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Sample records for patients organ transplantation

  1. On Patients Who Purchase Organ Transplants Abroad.

    PubMed

    Ambagtsheer, F; de Jong, J; Bramer, W M; Weimar, W

    2016-10-01

    The international transplant community portrays organ trade as a growing and serious crime involving large numbers of traveling patients who purchase organs. We present a systematic review about the published number of patients who purchased organs. With this information, we discuss whether the scientific literature reflects a substantial practice of organ purchase. Between 2000 and 2015, 86 studies were published. Seventy-six of these presented patients who traveled and 42 stated that the transplants were commercial. Only 11 studies reported that patients paid, and eight described to what or whom patients paid. In total, during a period of 42 years, 6002 patients have been reported to travel for transplantation. Of these, only 1238 were reported to have paid for their transplants. An additional unknown number of patients paid for their transplants in their native countries. We conclude that the scientific literature does not reflect a large number of patients buying organs. Organ purchases were more often assumed than determined. A reporting code for transplant professionals to report organ trafficking networks is a potential strategy to collect and quantify cases. © Copyright 2016 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  2. Ridge augmentation in an organ transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Dalla Torre, D; Burtscher, D

    2016-05-01

    With the continuing progress in medicine, the number of successful organ transplantations has continued to increase, a fact that also concerns dentists and implantologists. Implantology after organ transplantation remains controversial due to the patient's immunocompromised situation and the corresponding risk of infection. Only a few studies on this topic have been reported, with all of them showing the dental implant success rates in transplant patients to be similar to those in healthy subjects. However, immunosuppression has been identified as a contraindication to bone augmentation. Consequently, there is still a lack of knowledge regarding pre-implantology bone grafting procedures. The following case report describes the use of ridge augmentation and extended bilateral sinus lift procedures in a liver transplant patient. The patient was treated with an implant-supported fixed prosthesis in the upper jaw and was followed up for a total of 28 months after implant insertion. According to the findings presented, pre-implantology augmentation procedures may be performed successfully in immunosuppressed organ transplant patients. Stable peri-implant conditions were shown over a period of more than 2 years. Nevertheless, further investigations are needed to define a safe treatment protocol for these high-risk patients. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cutaneous viral infections in organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Piaserico, S; Sandini, E; Peserico, A; Alaibac, M

    2014-08-01

    Cutaneous infections might occur in up to 80% of organ transplant recipients (OTR) and viral infections are the most common them. The risk of different skin infection is among related to the intensity of immunosuppression. During the first post-transplant period, herpes viruses are most common. After some months following transplantation, human papilloma viruses represent the most significant infections among OTR. Reactivation of herpes simplex virus in OTR can become more invasive, takes longer to heal, and shows greater potential for dissemination to visceral organs compared to the general population. Specific immunosuppressive drugs (namely muromonab and mycophenolate mofetil) have been associated with an increased risk of herpes virus reactivation after transplantation. On the other hand, there is evidence that the mTOR inhibitors, such as everolimus, may be associated with a decreased incidence of herpesvirus infections in transplant recipients. The incidence of herpes zoster in OTR is 10 to 100 fold higher than the general population, ranging from 1% to 12%. The chronic immunosuppression performed in OTR may lead to persistent replication of herpesviruses, dissemination of the virus with multivisceral involvement (hepatitis, pneumonitis, myocarditis, encephalitis and disseminated intravascular coagulation) and eventually, the emergence of antiviral-drug resistance. Viral warts are the most common cutaneous infection occurring in OTR. The number of warts increases with the duration of immunosuppressive therapy. Since warts in organ recipients are frequently multiple and only rarely undergo spontaneous regression, the therapeutic management of warts in patients treated with immunosuppressive drugs might be challenging. Imiquimod, 1% cidofovir ointment, acitretin proved to be useful off-label strategies for recalcitrant cutaneous viral warts in OTR. Extensive and atypical presentation of molluscum contagiosum has been also reported in OTR, with a prevalence

  4. Patients with psychotic disorders in solid-organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Zimbrean, Paula; Emre, Sukru

    2015-12-01

    Psychotic disorders are considered a relative or absolute contraindication to organ transplant, but information about their impact on transplant is limited. To describe the clinical course of psychotic patients while they were on the waiting list and the outcomes of patients with psychotic disorders undergoing evaluation for organ transplant. Thirty-eight transplant candidates with a diagnosis of psychotic disorder were analyzed in this descriptive study. The following variables were collected before transplant: demographics, type of transplant, cause of organ failure, medical comorbid conditions, and psychiatric variables (diagnosis, hospitalizations, treatment, substance abuse, family history, suicide attempts). For transplant recipients, the following posttransplant variables were recorded: rejection, toxic effects of medication, nonadherence, psychotic episodes (number, time interval after transplant), and number of hospitalizations. Of the 38 transplant candidates, 34 had a history of psychotic disorder before transplant. Nineteen (56%) of the 34 were listed for transplant, and 10 (29%) underwent transplant. Median follow-up time was 1.9 (IQR, 0.16-17.9) years. Among organ recipients with a history of psychotic disorders, psychiatric hospitalizations were 0.42 per patient per year (PPY), psychotic episodes 0.68 PPY, rejection 0.21 PPY, and toxic effects of immunosuppressants 0.05 PPY. None of the recipients lost their graft. Patients with a history of psychotic disorder can do well after organ transplant. Further studies are needed with factor analyses including severity of psychosis, medication adherence, and associated comorbid conditions.

  5. [Management of older patients following solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Roller-Wirnsberger, Regina Elisabeth; Wirnsberger, Gerhard Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Due to a continuous expansion of transplantation registers, such as the old-for-old program in Europe, the number of older patients treated with transplantation is increasing. At the same time the perioperative survival rates show a clear increase even in this patient collective (older than 65 years); therefore, the probability that the care of older patients after organ transplantation will be undertaken in the routine practice increases. This article describes the medical characteristics of older patients following organ transplantation. Special emphasis is placed on the management of accompanying diseases as well as possible side effects and interactions of immunosuppressive therapy.

  6. [Organ transplants in HIV infected patients. Update and recommendations].

    PubMed

    Barcan, Laura; Gadano, Adrian; Casetti, Isabel; Villamil, Federico

    2011-01-01

    Until few years ago, HIV infection was an absolute contraindication to consider organ transplants. Since HAART introduction, patient survival increased dramatically, but high mortality due to liver and kidney diseases became evident. For these reasons, this group of patients is now reconsidered for organ transplantation. In 2008, the Argentine Society of Transplants (SAT) and the Argentine Infectious Diseases Society (SADI), encouraged by the increasing published experience on kidney and liver transplants in this population, decided to form a Working Group, to prepare an update on this issue and elaborate practical recommendations for the better management of these patients. The first meeting was held on December 4th 2008. The most important conclusion was that HIV infection did not contraindicate a solid organ transplant. Later on, taking into account the accumulated experience and the available literature, the current document was prepared. HIV infected patients must fulfill certain clinical, immunological, virological and psychosocial criteria to be considered for solid organ transplants. HIV infected recipients of kidney and liver transplants currently show similar short and middle term survival to non HIV infected patients. There is not yet enough data on intrathoracic transplants in these patients in order to include them on a waiting list for these organs-transplants. Interactions between immunosupressors and antiretroviral drugs (specially protease inhibitors) are very important, and require a strict monitoring of immunosupressor levels.

  7. [Special considerations in dental surgery procedures on organ transplantation patients].

    PubMed

    Schmelzeisen, R; Eckardt, A; Knoll, M; Girod, S

    1991-01-01

    In 150 patients 366 (95%) of 385 dental surgery procedures performed prior to organ transplantations were free of complications. In 6 patients circumscribed wound infections occurred, and 5 post-operative hemorrhages as well as 2 injection hematomas were observed. In the group of patients where dental surgery was performed after organ transplantation, all 123 procedures were free of complications. Treatment of transplantation patients in the dental office requires a profound understanding of the complex clinical problems these patients might present, a good coordination of the required measures and close cooperation between the transplantation center and the attending dentist. Special considerations of the treatment of organ transplantation patients and the indications for dental surgery are discussed.

  8. Solid organ transplants in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Harbell, Jack; Terrault, Norah A; Stock, Peter

    2013-09-01

    There is a growing need for kidney and liver transplants in persons living with HIV. Fortunately, with the significant advances in antiretroviral therapy and management of opportunistic infections, HIV infection is no longer an absolute contraindication for solid organ transplantation. Data from several large prospective multi-center cohort studies have shown that solid organ transplantation in carefully selected HIV-infected individuals is safe. However, significant challenges have been identified including prevention of acute rejection, management of drug-drug interactions and treatment of recurrent viral hepatitis. This article reviews the selection criteria, outcomes, and special management considerations for HIV-infected patients undergoing liver or kidney transplantation.

  9. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Strober, Samuel

    2016-03-24

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism. © 2016 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Use of hematopoietic cell transplants to achieve tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The goals of tolerance in patients with solid organ transplants are to eliminate the lifelong need for immunosuppressive (IS) drugs and to prevent graft loss due to rejection or drug toxicity. Tolerance with complete withdrawal of IS drugs has been achieved in recipients of HLA-matched and mismatched living donor kidney transplants in 3 medical centers using hematopoietic cell transplants to establish mixed or complete chimerism. PMID:26796362

  11. [Neurological complications in patients receiving solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Fernández-Ramos, J A; López-Laso, E; Ordóñez-Díaz, M D; Camino-León, R; Ibarra-de la Rosa, I; Frías-Pérez, M A; Gilbert-Pérez, J J; Pérez-Navero, J L

    2013-03-01

    Neurological complications (NC) are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in paediatric patients receiving solid organ transplants. Our aim was to describe the experience of our hospital with NC in paediatric patients receiving heart, lung and liver transplants. A retrospective study was conducted on 140 paediatric patients who received a solid organ transplant during the period 2000-2011. A total of 23 paediatric solid organ transplant recipients (16.4% of cases), with a median age of 6 years, had NC. The symptoms were, in order of frequency: acute symptomatic seizures (12 patients); acute encephalopathy (11 patients); neuromuscular weakness (4 children), tremor (4 children), headache (2 children), neuropathic pain (2 children), and visual disturbances (2 children). The aetiologies of NC were: the neurotoxicity of the immunosuppressive drugs (12 patients), post-hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy (6 patients), infections (2 cases), mechanical compression of peripheral nerve during surgery (2 cases), and a metabolic complication (1 case). The five patients who met the criteria of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome had a favourable outcome. Seven patients died, four of them due to hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy. NC are common in paediatric patients receiving heart, liver, lung, and renal transplants, with acute symptomatic seizures and acute encephalopathy being the most common clinical signs. No differences were found in the NC with the different types of transplants. Neurotoxicity of the immunosuppressive drugs and hypoxic-ischaemic encephalopathy were the main causes of NC, having different management and outcomes. The prognosis was favourable in most of the patients, except for those who had moderate or severe post-hypoxic-ischaemic damage. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  12. Alternative EBNA1 expression in organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Berggren, Malin A M; Isaksson, Asa; Larsson, Ulrica; Nilsson, Folke; Nyström, Ulla; Ekman, Tor; Löfvenmark, Jane; Ricksten, Anne

    2005-07-01

    In order to identify patients at risk for developing post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), a sensitive nested RT-PCR method for detection of EBNA1 gene expression in peripheral blood cells was used. EBNA1 expression in peripheral blood samples from 60 organ recipients was analyzed and compared with 24 healthy controls in a retrospective study. Overall, EBNA1-positive samples were detected at least once in 43% of the transplant patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease, in 18% of the other transplant patients and in none of the healthy controls. The odds ratio for EBNA1 expression in patients with post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease was 3.42 (95% CI=1.02-11.54) compared to other transplant recipients. Together with normal EBV Q promoter initiated EBNA1 transcripts, an alternatively spliced form was expressed in peripheral blood cells in the above-mentioned transplant patients. This transcript lacks the U leader exon in the 5'-untranslated region (UTR). We have previously identified and characterized a functional internal ribosome entry site, the EBNA IRES, in the untranslated U leader exon of EBNA1. Transfection experiments with EBNA1 coding plasmids followed by Western blot showed that the EBNA IRES promotes cap-independent translation and increases the EBNA1 protein level. The alternative EBNA1 transcript lacking this function is expressed in the majority of the investigated EBNA1-positive patient samples as well as in some EBV-positive B-cell lines. Alternative splicing in this form gives EBV potential to regulate the translation of EBNA1 by modifying the 5' UTR. These findings indicate a new mechanism for EBNA1 expression in vivo. Copyright (c) 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.203 Section 413.203 Public...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries...

  14. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other than Medicare beneficiaries. 413.203 Section 413.203 Public...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries...

  15. Preventable Errors in Organ Transplantation: An Emerging Patient Safety Issue?

    PubMed Central

    Ison, Michael G.; Holl, Jane L.; Ladner, Daniela

    2012-01-01

    Several widely publicized errors in transplantation including a death due ABO incompatibility, two HIV transmissions and two HCV transmissions have raised concerns about medical errors in organ transplantation. The root cause analysis of each of these events revealed preventable failures in the systems and processes of care as the underlying causes. In each event, no standardized system or redundant process was in place to mitigate the failures that led to the error. Additional system and process vulnerabilities such as poor clinician communication, erroneous data transcription and transmission were also identified. Organ transplantation, because it is highly complex, often stresses the systems and processes of care and, therefore, offers a unique opportunity to proactively identify vulnerabilities and potential failures. Initial steps have been taken to understand such issues through the OPTN/UNOS Operations and Safety Committee, the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee (DTAC), and the current A2ALL ancillary Safety Study. However, to effectively improve patient safety in organ transplantation, the development of a process for reporting of preventable errors that affords protection and the support of empiric research are critical. Further, the transplant community needs to embrace the implementation of evidence-based system and process improvements that will mitigate existing safety vulnerabilities. PMID:22703471

  16. Retinal changes in solid organ and bone marrow transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Malerbi, Fernando Korn; Teixeira, Sergio Henrique; Hirai, Luis Gustavo Gondo; Matsudo, Nilson Hideo; Carneiro, Adriano Biondi Monteiro

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate retinal changes in patients who underwent solid organ or bone marrow transplantation. A retrospective analysis of medical records of patients evaluated from February 2009 to December 2016. All patients included underwent funduscopy. Clinical and demographic data regarding transplantation and ophthalmological changes were collected. A total of 126 patients were analyzed; of these, 108 underwent transplantation and 18 were in the waiting list. Transplantation modalities were heart, lung, kidney, liver, pancreas, combined pancreas and kidney and bone marrow transplantation. The main pre-transplantation comorbidities were diabetes and arterial hypertension. Of the 108 transplanted patients, 82 (76%) had retinal changes. All patients who underwent pancreas or combined pancreas and kidney transplantation had diabetic retinopathy. The main retinal changes found were diabetic retinopathy, hypertensive retinopathy, retinal vascular occlusions, chorioretinal infections and central serous chorioretinopathy. Retinal changes were either related to preexisting conditions, mainly diabetic retinopathy, or developed postoperatively as a complication of the surgical procedure, or as an infection related to the immunosuppressive status, or due to drug toxicity. These patients may present with complex ophthalmological changes and should be carefully evaluated prior to surgery and further followed by an ophthalmologist skilled in the management of diabetic retinopathy and posterior pole infections. Analisar as alterações retinianas de pacientes submetidos a transplantes de órgãos sólidos ou de medula óssea. Análise de prontuário dos pacientes avaliados no período de fevereiro de 2009 a dezembro de 2016. Todos os pacientes incluídos foram submetidos à avaliação fundoscópica. Foram coletados dados demográficos e clínicos, referentes ao transplante e às alterações oftalmológicas encontradas. Foram avaliados 126 pacientes, sendo 108 submetidos a transplantes

  17. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  18. Food safety for the solid organ transplant patient: preventing foodborne illness while on chronic immunosuppressive drugs.

    PubMed

    Obayashi, Patricia A C

    2012-12-01

    Issues regarding food safety are seen increasingly in the news; outbreaks of foodborne illness have been associated with public health concerns ranging from mild illness to death. For the solid organ transplant patient, immunosuppressive and antibacterial drugs, which maintain transplant organ function, can expose the transplant patient to increased risk of foodborne illness from bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites. This review article describes the clinical consequences, sources of foodborne illness, and food safety practices needed to minimize risks to the solid organ transplant patient who must take lifelong immunosuppressive drugs. All members of the transplant team share responsibility for education of the solid organ transplant patient in preventing infections. The registered dietitian, as part of the transplant team, is the recognized expert in providing food safety education in the context of medical nutrition therapy to solid organ transplant patients, the patients' caregivers, and other healthcare providers.

  19. Ohio solid organ transplantation consortium criteria for liver transplantation in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    PubMed Central

    Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Humberson, Annette; Hanouneh, Mohamad A; Barnes, David S; Arora, Zubin; Zein, Nizar N; Eghtesad, Bijan; Kelly, Dympna; Hanouneh, Ibrahim A

    2016-01-01

    AIM To evaluate risk of recidivism on a case-by-case basis. METHODS From our center’s liver transplant program, we selected patients with alcoholic liver disease who were listed for transplant based on Ohio Solid Organ Transplantation Consortium (OSOTC) exception criteria. They were considered to have either a low or medium risk of recidivism, and had at least one or three or more months of abstinence, respectively. They were matched based on gender, age, and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score to controls with alcohol-induced cirrhosis from Organ Procurement and Transplant Network data. RESULTS Thirty six patients with alcoholic liver disease were approved for listing based on OSOTC exception criteria and were matched to 72 controls. Nineteen patients (53%) with a median [Inter-quartile range (IQR)] MELD score of 24 (13) received transplant and were followed for a median of 3.4 years. They were matched to 38 controls with a median (IQR) MELD score of 25 (9). At one and five years, cumulative survival rates (± standard error) were 90% ± 7% and 92% ± 5% and 73% ± 12% and 77% ± 8% in patients and controls, respectively (Log-rank test, P = 0.837). Four (21%) patients resumed drinking by last follow-up visit. CONCLUSION Compared to traditional criteria for assessment of risk of recidivism, a careful selection process with more flexibility to evaluate eligibility on a case-by-case basis can lead to similar survival rates after transplantation. PMID:27721920

  20. [Lung cancer surgery in solid organ transplanted patients].

    PubMed

    Arame, A; Rivera, C; Borik, W; Mangiameli, G; Abdennahder, M; Pricopi, C; Bagan, P; Badia, A; Le Pimpec Barthes, F; Riquet, M

    2014-12-01

    The incidence of lung cancer is reputed to be higher and prognosis worse in solid organ transplant recipients than in the general population. Our purpose was to review the results of surgery in this group of patients. We retrospectively reviewed 49 male and 6 female patients; mean aged 60.6 years (38-85). Transplanted organ was heart (n = 37), kidney (n=12), liver (n = 5) and both-lungs (n = 1); 48 patients had smoking habits and 42 heavy comorbidities (76.4%). Lung cancer was diagnosed during surveillance (78.2%, n = 43) or because of symptoms (21.8%, n = 12). We reviewed TNM and other main characteristics, among them histology (squamous-cell-carcinoma n = 23, adenocarcinomas n = 24, others n = 8). Surgery consisted of: exploratory thoracotomy (n = 2), wedge resections (n = 6), segmentectomy (n = 1), lobectomy (n = 42), pneumonectomy (n = 4). Postoperative mortality was 7.4% (n = 4) and complication rate 34.5% (n = 19). Five-year survival rate was 46.4% (65.4% for stage I patients, n = 25). Among the 35 dead patients during follow-up, 14 died of their lung cancer (40%). Two had been re-operated from another lung cancer: one after 3 and 8 years who survived 16 years, and the other after 2 years who survived 70 months. Surgery results are good and postoperative events acceptable despite theoretically increased risks. This also supports performing a close follow-up of transplanted patients and particularly those with smoking history in view of detecting lung cancer appearing at an early stage. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Organ transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    El Matri, Aziz; Ben Abdallah, Taieb

    2015-04-01

    Kidney transplants were first performed in Tunisia in 1986, and transplants soon extended to other organs including the heart, liver, and pancreas. Live-related donor and deceased-donor kidney transplants were both began in the summer of 1986. An organ procurement and transplant law was passed in March 1991, and the National Centre for Advancement of Organ Transplantation was created in 1995. The number of transplantation units has increased to 7 throughout the country, and the yearly transplant number has progressively increased to 139 in 2010, including 20% from deceased kidney donors. Despite these gains, the need continues to grow. Heart transplants began in January 1993, and Tunisia and Jordan are currently the only Arab countries where it is practiced. However, only 16 patients have received a heart transplant as of 2004, and the number of recipients has decreased in the past 10 years. Liver transplants are rare in other Arab countries, but began in Tunisia in January 1998. Over 10 years, 38 patients benefited from this procedure. After a few years of stagnation, the number of liver transplants is increasing. While all types of transplantation are needed, kidney transplantation is a priority in Tunisia. The target is to perform 400 transplants annually, which would require a long-term strategy to provide full financial coverage using the National Health Insurance Funds in both the public and private sectors.

  2. The cutting edge of skin cancer in transplant recipients: scientific retreat of international transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative and Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Patients Europe.

    PubMed

    Hanlon, A; Colegio, O R

    2014-05-01

    The International Transplant Skin Cancer Collaborative (ITSCC) is an organization of more than 300 physicians and scientists focused on the study of dermatologic changes following solid organ transplantation. Transplant patients have a 100-fold increased risk of developing skin cancer. In October 2012, ITSCC and its European counterpart Skin Cancer in Organ Transplant Patients Europe held a joint biennial retreat in Essex, MA to discuss novel findings in the pathogenesis and management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients. This meeting report is a summary of the novel findings discussed.

  3. DNA damage in kidney transplant patients. Role of organ origin.

    PubMed

    Corredor, Zuray; Rodríguez-Ribera, Lara; Coll, Elisabet; Silva, Irene; Díaz, Juan Manuel; Ballarín, José; Marcos, Ricard; Pastor, Susana

    2017-08-19

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are characterized by elevated levels of genomic damage. This damage increases when kidney function decreases being maximum in hemodialysis patients. As kidney transplantation improves renal function, and it is related with better survival, the aim of our study was to evaluate potential changes in DNA damage levels after kidney transplantation, and comparing living donor recipients with cadaveric donor recipients. The alkaline comet assay was used to determine DNA breaks and oxidative damaged DNA; and the micronucleus assay was used to determine chromosomal breakage and/or aneuploidy. Fifty CKD patients were followed up after 6 and 12 months of their kidney transplantation. All patients increased their genomic damage levels after 6 and 12 months of renal transplantation, compared with those observed before transplantation, despite of the improvement of their metabolic functions. Donor advanced age correlated positively with higher DNA damage. Genomic damage was lower in living donor transplants with respect to cadaveric donor transplants. Our conclusion is that DNA damage increased in kidney transplantation patients, whereas their renal function improved. Higher levels of DNA damage were found in cadaveric donor transplants when compared to living donor transplants. Environ. Mol. Mutagen., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Solid organ transplantation: referral, management, and outcomes in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Roland, Michelle E; Carlson, Laurie L; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2006-12-01

    Advances in HIV management make it difficult to deny solid organ transplantation to HIV-infected patients based on futility arguments. Preliminary studies suggest that both patient and graft survival are similar in HIV-negative and HIV-positive transplant recipients. While there has been no significant HIV disease progression, substantial interactions between immunosuppressants and antiretroviral drugs necessitate careful monitoring. The evaluation and management of HIV-infected transplant candidates and recipients require excellent communication among a multidisciplinary team, the primary HIV care provider, and the patient. Timely referral for transplant evaluation will prevent unnecessary mortality during the pre-transplant evaluation process.

  5. Photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis in organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Basset-Seguin, N; Baumann Conzett, K; Gerritsen, M J P; Gonzalez, H; Haedersdal, M; Hofbauer, G F L; Aguado, L; Kerob, D; Lear, J T; Piaserico, S; Ulrich, C

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of actinic keratoses (AK) and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in organ transplant recipients (OTRs) is significantly higher than in immunocompetent patients. Rates of progression and recurrence following treatment are higher too, in part due to the effects of the immunosuppressant drugs. Conventional therapies for AK, using curettage, cryotherapy, surgical excision, topical therapies and photodynamic therapy (PDT), are often less effective, and may be inappropriate, for treating the greater numbers and extent of lesions in OTRs. Moreover, there are no specific protocols for treating this patient population that take into account the need for more frequent treatment and the increased pain associated with treating larger areas. Recently, a pan-European group of dermatologists with expertise in this area met to share current best practice in PDT for the treatment of AK in OTRs. The group identified areas where PDT currently is not meeting the needs of these patients and discussed how these gaps might be addressed. This position article summarizes those discussions and makes recommendations concerning a standardized protocol for treating OTRs, for a large randomized controlled trial to provide robust data on safety, efficacy and optimal pain control, and to provide pharmaco-economics data that can be used to support extended reimbursement in this patient group. The authors also recommend a second clinical trial to further investigate induced immunosuppression with PDT in healthy volunteers. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  6. Cross sectional survey on the concerns and anxiety of patients waiting for organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Li, Philip Kam-Tao; Chu, Kwok Hong; Chow, Kai Ming; Lau, Miu Fong; Leung, Chi Bon; Kwan, Bonnie Ching Ha; Tong, Yuen Fan; Szeto, Cheuk Chun; Ng, Maggie Miu Man

    2012-07-01

      We aimed to gain an understanding of patient concerns while on a transplantation waiting list in areas with long transplant waiting time.   The study population comprised patients with organ failure on the transplant waiting list in Hong Kong. They were invited to complete a questionnaire survey. Demographic data and waiting time were collected. Respondents rated their chance of getting transplanted, their subjective concerns and feelings, level of happiness and support received.   A total of 442 patients on the waiting list for kidney, liver, lung and heart-lung transplants completed the questionnaire survey. The majority of patients (93.0%) were waiting for kidney transplantation. More than half of the respondents (63.3%) had been waiting for more than 3 years. Patients with longer transplant waiting times had lower self-estimated chance of receiving a transplant (P = 0.004). Self-estimated chance of getting transplanted was positively associated with the happiness score (P < 0.0001). Issues of most concerns to the patients waiting for organ transplants were: inconvenience of therapy (48.2%), disease progression (47.9%), burden to family (59.5%) and financial difficulties (52.3%). More female patients on the waiting list (50.0% vs 25.7% in male) reported concerns about suffering associated with the illnesses. 21.7% of patients considered the level of support received inadequate.   Our patients had long waiting time for transplantation, which is associated with a lower perceived chance of getting a transplant. Attention to more psychosocial support to these patients waiting for organ transplant is important. Promoting and improving organ donation would be the ultimate way to help these patients. © 2012 The Authors. Nephrology © 2012 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  7. [Surgical techniques of organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Froněk, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    The list of surgical procedures of solid organ transplantations appears very interesting and colorful, even with overlap among techniques. Liver transplantation is a life-saving procedure in a majority of cases, the liver can be transplanted as a full or partial graft. The liver graft can be split for two recipients; it can also be reduced for a small recipient if splitting is not indicated. Kidney transplantation is the most common solid organ transplant procedure, the majority of kidney grafts come from brain-dead donors whereas the number of live donor transplants is increasing, also thanks to paired donation and blood group incompatible transplantation methods. The small bowel and multivisceral transplantation are rare procedures; they serve selected patients with short bowel syndrome, some patients with retroperitoneal tumors or with extensive visceral thrombosis. Solid organ transplants are well established treatment methods with good and proven outcomes. A majority of patients can return to a normal life after their transplants.

  8. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  9. Organ Harvesting and Transplants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baskette, Kimberly G.; Ritz, John M.

    2010-01-01

    Humans and animals need healthy organs to live. Due to medical conditions and accidents, some organs fail to function properly. For these reasons, the medical community has experimented and can now perform successful organ transplants, allowing patients to continue to live their lives. Many countries have medical programs where individuals can…

  10. Trauma patients with a previous organ transplant: outcomes are better than expected-a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Scalea, Joseph R; Menaker, Jay; Meeks, Adam K; Kramer, Mary E; Kufera, Joseph A; Auman, Kimberly M; Cooper, Matthew; Bartlett, Stephen T; Scalea, Thomas M

    2013-06-01

    Few reports are available concerning outcomes following trauma in transplanted patients. Investigating outcomes for patients in this population may yield helpful information about both immunosuppression and inflammatory responses. This was a retrospective study. The trauma registry was used to identify all patients with a history of solid-organ transplant who were admitted to the trauma center between January 2007 and June 2011. Data were stratified by age, sex, Injury Severity Score (ISS), and length of stay (LOS). During the study period, 50 patients admitted for traumatic injury also had previous organ transplants. We found that white blood cell count was significantly lower for transplanted patients (p < 0.001) and remained significantly lower at each stratification criteria. In addition, LOS was either lower or no different for transplanted patients when data were stratified. Only one patient explicitly had an injured graft (a kidney) secondary to trauma at the time of admission. This resulted in acute renal failure and a doubling of the serum creatinine. Three patients had questionable graft injuries, but graft function remained normal. Seventeen percent of patients developed acute rejection following admission for trauma. Outcomes following injury in patients with previous organ transplant are not worse than outcomes for nontransplanted patients, and transplanted organs are infrequently injured. Prospective data are needed to understand better the balance of inflammatory and anti-inflammatory mediators following acute injury in this population. Therapeutic/care management, level III.

  11. [Infections after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kern, W V; Wagner, D; Hirsch, H H

    2005-06-01

    Early postoperative infections after transplantation vary according to the transplanted organ. During the subsequent course opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus reactivation, Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia, invasive pneumococcal infection and mould infections predominate. Reactivated tuberculous infection appears to become more prevalent. Some of the opportunistic infections are preventable by chemoprophylaxis; others can be managed very effectively by monitoring and early preemptive therapy. Physicians caring for patients after organ transplantation need to early consider in the differential diagnosis rare pathogens which are often overlooked with standard diagnostic procedures.

  12. Voriconazole-Induced Periostitis & Enthesopathy in Solid Organ Transplant Patients: Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Sircar, Monica; Kotton, Camille; Wojciechowski, David; Safa, Kassem; Gilligan, Hannah; Heher, Eliot; Williams, Winfred; Thadhani, Ravi; Tolkoff-Rubin, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Background Voriconazole is frequently used to treat fungal infections in solid organ transplant patients. Recently, there have been reports suggesting that prolonged voriconazole therapy may lead to periostitis. Aim Here we present two cases of voriconazole-induced periostitis in solid organ transplant patients. Case Presentation Voriconazole was given to two transplant patients-one with a liver transplant and the second with a heart transplant, to treat their fungal infections. Both developed voriconazole-induced toxicity. While undergoing voriconazole therapy, they had incapacitating bone pain. The liver transplant patient had to be taken off voriconazole, and the heart transplant patient succumbed to non-voriconazole related causes. Conclusions Voriconazole therapy in two solid organ transplant patients resulted in periostitis. We provide potential etiologies underlying voriconazole-induced periostitis, including fluoride toxicity, abnormalities in the pulmonary vascular bed leading to the production of downstream inflammatory mediators, and abnormal pharmacokinetics of hepatic drug metabolism. In addition to monitoring blood voriconazole trough levels, we suggest careful assessment for musculoskeletal pain in patients undergoing voriconazole treatment for two months or more, particularly if their daily dosages of voriconazole exceed 500 mg per day. Appropriate workup should include measurement of alkaline phosphatase, voriconazole trough and fluoride levels as well as a bone scan. Overall, early recognition of voriconazole-induced musculoskeletal toxicity is important for better morbidity outcomes. PMID:27990445

  13. Acute appendicitis in organ transplantation patients: a report of two cases and a literature review.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chang Kuo; Chang, Chun Min; Lee, Cheng Hung; Chen, Jian Han; Yin, Wen Yao

    2014-05-23

    Abdominal surgery on patients with previous organ transplantation, especially in the early postoperative period, is a challenging problem. Due to high risk of complications in transplant patients, we usually tend to treat such patients more conservatively rather compared to the more aggressive attitude in diagnosis and surgery of non-transplant patients. Delayed diagnosis, delayed surgery, and high morbidity and mortality are more common in transplant patients with GI disease. While appendicitis is one of the most common surgical diseases, with an estimated lifetime risk of 8.6% for males and 6.7% for females, there are relatively few reports of appendicitis in solid organ transplant recipients, and the condition has rarely been reported after liver transplantation. We have performed surgery on 2 cases of presumed acute appendicitis among 75 cases of kidney and liver transplantation in our series in the last 10 years. Laparoscopic technique was used for exploration of presumed acute appendicitis with atypical clinical and image presentation in a deceased donor liver transplantation (DDLT) and a deceased donor kidney transplantation (DDKT). Acute appendicitis in both patients was highly suspected preoperatively in computed tomography, and early exploration with laparoscopic technique prompted early diagnosis and treatment, with excellent surgical outcomes.

  14. Cytomegalovirus appendicitis in solid organ transplant patients, two cases and a review.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Todd P; Lee, Rachael A; Herfel, Barbara M; Pappas, Peter G

    2015-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is a common complication following solid organ transplantation with a variety of gastrointestinal (GI) tract manifestations. CMV appendicitis, however, is a rare complication in a solid organ transplant patient, having been reported only once previously. We have recently seen two cases in solid organ transplant recipients at our institution, one a liver recipient and the other a heart recipient. Both patients underwent surgical resection. Pathologic evaluation of both resected appendices as well as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification for CMV from the serum revealed the virus as the etiology. Both patients received induction intravenous ganciclovir followed by oral valganciclovir and have done well post-operatively. Tissue-invasive CMV disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis for solid organ transplant patients with symptoms suggesting acute or chronic appendicitis. Both PCR testing as well as pathologic review of tissue specimens should be considered to ensure accurate diagnosis and management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Attitude toward xenotransplantation of patients prior and after human organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stadlbauer, V; Stiegler, P; Müller, S; Schweiger, M; Sereingg, M; Tscheliessnigg, K H; Freidl, W

    2011-01-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential strategy to overcome the shortage of human donor organs. As this technique has a major medical and psychological impact on patients and their family and friends, the attitude of patients currently waiting for organ transplantation is important. Therefore, we conducted a survey on the attitude toward xenotransplantation of patients on the waiting list and already transplanted patients. Patients received detailed information before being asked to fill in the questionnaire. We found that 65% would accept xenotransplantation, irrespective of gender, education level or if the patients were on the waiting list or already transplanted. The most common concern was transmission of diseases or genetic material, followed by psychological concerns and ethical issues. More patients had a positive attitude toward accepting cell or tissue transplantation when compared to whole organs. Pig pancreas islet cell transplantation is generally well accepted, patients with diabetes mellitus show even higher acceptance rates than patients without diabetes. In conclusion, xenotransplantation seems to be well accepted in patients who are potential future candidates for organ transplantation. Informing patients about the current status of research tended to decrease acceptance rates slightly.

  16. Spontaneous decision of organ donation in patients signing informed consent for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Heits, N; Guenther, R; Kuechler, T; Becker, T; Braun, F

    2013-05-01

    The shortage of postmortem donor organs is a well-known problem in Germany. Willingness in the general population is 80%, but less than 14% have an organ donor card. We evaluated the free decision of liver transplant candidates who filled out a donor card before signing the informed consent for the transplant procedure. We analyzed 122 patients of mean age 55.9 years (range, 15.4-74.1) who signed an informed consent for liver transplantation between January 10, 2007, and January 24, 2012. The patients received the original text of the German organ donor card with tick boxes on the informed consent form for liver transplantation. All patients were informed that their decision had no impact on further management. Patients were able to choose between (1) becoming a donor, (2) refusal, (3) transfer of the decision to another person, or (4) no decision. All patients signed the informed consent to be listed for liver transplantation: 73.8% (n = 90) chose to become a donor; 5.7% (n = 7) refused; 5.7% (n = 7) transferred the decision to another person; and 14.8% (n = 18) did not come to a decision. Interestingly, not all candidates for liver transplantation were willing to become an organ donor in the time of expressed consent. However, willingness to sign the donor card was much higher among liver transplant candidates compared with the general population.

  17. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries... for all organs is reduced by the costs associated with procuring organs sent to foreign transplant...

  18. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries... for all organs is reduced by the costs associated with procuring organs sent to foreign transplant...

  19. 42 CFR 413.203 - Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries or transplanted in patients other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign...) Services and Organ Procurement Costs § 413.203 Transplant center costs for organs sent to foreign countries... for all organs is reduced by the costs associated with procuring organs sent to foreign transplant...

  20. Liver transplantation in patients with cystic fibrosis: analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing data.

    PubMed

    Mendizabal, Manuel; Reddy, K Rajender; Cassuto, James; Olthoff, Kim M; Faust, Thomas W; Makar, George A; Rand, Elizabeth B; Shaked, Abraham; Abt, Peter L

    2011-03-01

    The improved life expectancy of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) has led to a change in the impact of liver disease on the prognosis of this population. Liver transplantation has emerged as the procedure of choice for patients with CF and features of hepatic decompensation and for intractable variceal bleeding as a major manifestation. We retrospectively reviewed the United Network for Organ Sharing database to analyze the outcomes of 55 adults and 148 children with CF who underwent liver transplantation, and we compared them to patients who underwent transplantation for other etiologies. We additionally compared the benefits of liver transplantation among patients who underwent transplantation for cystic fibrosis-related liver disease (CFLD) and those who remained on the waiting list. The 5-year survival rates for children and adults undergoing liver transplantation were 85.8% and 72.7%, respectively (P = 0.016). A multivariate Cox regression analysis comparing pediatric and adult CF patients to patients who underwent transplantation for other etiologies noted lower 5-year survival rates (P < 0.0001). However, compared to those remaining on the waiting list, pediatric transplant recipients with CF (hazard ratio = 0.33, 95% confidence interval = 0.16-0.70, P = 0.004) and adult transplant recipients with CF (hazard ratio = 0.25, 95% confidence interval = 0.11-0.57, P = 0.001) gained a significant survival benefit. In conclusion, long-term outcomes in patients with CFLD are acceptable but are inferior in comparison with the outcomes of those undergoing transplantation for other etiologies. Despite such observations, a survival benefit was noted in transplant patients versus those who remained on the waiting list.

  1. Outcomes of Foot and Ankle Surgery in Diabetic Patients Who Have Undergone Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zou, Richard H; Wukich, Dane K

    2015-01-01

    Foot and ankle problems are highly prevalent in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Increased rates of surgical site infections and noninfectious complications, such as malunion, delayed union, nonunion, and hardware failure, have also been more commonly observed in diabetic patients who undergo foot and ankle surgery. DM is a substantial contributor of perioperative morbidity in patients with solid organ transplantation. To the best of our knowledge, postoperative foot and ankle complications have not been studied in a cohort of diabetic patients who previously underwent solid organ transplantation. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the outcomes of foot and ankle surgery in a cohort of diabetic transplant patients and to compare these outcomes with those of diabetic patients without a history of transplantation. We compared the rates of infectious and noninfectious complications after foot and ankle surgery in 28 diabetic transplant patients and 56 diabetic patients without previous transplantation and calculated the odds ratios (OR) for significant findings. The diabetic transplant patients who underwent foot and ankle surgery in the present cohort were not at an increased risk of overall complications (OR 0.83, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.33 to 2.08, p = .67), infectious complications (OR 0.54, 95% CI 0.09 to 3.09, p = .49), or noninfectious complications (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.41 to 3.15, p = .81). Four transplant patients (14.3%) died of non-orthopedic surgery-related events during the follow-up period; however, no deaths occurred in the control group. Diabetic patients with previous solid organ transplantation were not at an increased risk of developing postoperative complications after foot and ankle surgery, despite being immunocompromised. The transplant patients had a greater mortality rate, but their premature death was unrelated to their foot and ankle surgery. Surgeons treating transplant patients can recommend foot and ankle surgery when

  2. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation after Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Doney, Kristine C; Mielcarek, Marco; Stewart, F Marc; Appelbaum, Frederick R

    2015-12-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) followed by hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used to treat a single disease with multiorgan involvement or 2 separate diseases, the first requiring SOT and the second often a possible complication of SOT. Results of such serial transplants have been reported sporadically in the literature, usually as single case studies. Thirteen autologous and 27 allogeneic HCTs after SOT published previously are summarized. A more detailed review is provided for an additional 16 patients transplanted at a single institution, 8 of whom had autologous and 8 of whom had allogeneic HCT after SOT. Five of 8 autologous transplant recipients are alive a median of 4.6 years after HCT. Four of 8 allogeneic HCT recipients are alive a median of 8.7 years after HCT. In carefully selected patients, HCT after SOT is feasible and associated with a low incidence of either solid organ or hematopoietic cell rejection.

  3. Progress in abdominal organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kosieradzki, Maciej; Lisik, Wojciech; Rowiński, Wojciech; Małkowski, Piotr

    2011-01-01

    Summary The excellent results of vascularized organ transplantation have resulted in an increasing number of end-stage organ failure patients seeking such treatment. The results of organ transplantation depend on a number of factors – the quality of the donor (and an organ), living vs. deceased donation, magnitude of ischemic injury (and its prevention), and recipient-dependent factors. Ischemia/reperfusion injury in organ transplantation is a multifactorial process, which may lead to delayed graft function. In addition, surgical and preservation techniques, type of immunosuppressive regimens, complications after transplantation and post-transplant management may also have a significant impact on short- and long-term results of transplantation. In this paper we describe advances in transplantation in recent years, with particular emphasis on kidney, liver, intestines, whole pancreas and pancreatic islets. PMID:22129915

  4. Native kidney function after renal transplantation combined with other solid organs in preemptive patients.

    PubMed

    Mosconi, G; Panicali, L; Persici, E; Conte, D; Cappuccilli, M L; Cuna, V; Capelli, I; Todeschini, P; D'Arcangelo, G Liviano; Stefoni, S

    2010-05-01

    Kidney transplantations combined with other solid organs are progressively increasing in number. There are no guidelines regarding the nephrologic indications for combined transplantations, namely liver-kidney (LKT), or heart-kidney (HKT), in preemptive patients with chronic kidney failure who are not on regular dialysis therapy. The objective of this study was to assess the functional contribution of the native kidneys after preemptive kidney transplantation combined with other solid organs. From 2004, 9 patients (aged 50.3 +/- 8.5 years) with chronic kidney failure (creatinine 2.5 +/- 1.0 mg/dL) caused by polycystic kidney disease (n = 4), vascular nephropathy (n = 2), interstitial nephropathy (n = 1), glomerulonephritis (n = 1), or end-stage kidney disease (n = 1), underwent combined transplantations (8 LKT, 1 HKT). A scintigraphic functional study (Tc-99DMSA or Tc-99mMAG3), was performed at 4 +/- 3 months after transplantation to evaluate the functional contribution of both the native kidneys and the graft. All patients were given immunosuppressive drugs, including a calcineurin inhibitor (tacrolimus/or cyclosporine). At the time of scintigraphy, renal function in all patients was 1.3 +/- 0.3 mg/dL. The functional contribution of the transplanted kidneys was on average 77 +/- 18%. Only in 1 patient was the contribution of the graft <50%. At follow-up after 36 months, patient and kidney survivals were 100%. The study confirmed a high risk of loss of native kidney function in the presence of organic nephropathy. In light of our experience, a creatinine clearance <30 mL/min in an appropriate cutoff for a combined transplantation. Close clinical and instrumental assessment pretransplant is essential before proceeding with a combined transplant program to exclude functional forms and to optimize the use of organs.

  5. Immunizations in solid organ and hematopoeitic stem cell transplant patients: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    L'Huillier, Arnaud G; Kumar, Deepali

    2015-01-01

    The Solid Organ Transplantation (SOT) and Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) population is continuously increasing as a result of broader indications for transplant and improved survival. Infectious diseases, including vaccine-preventable diseases, are a significant threat for this population, primarily after but also prior to transplantation. As a consequence, clinicians must ensure that patients are optimally immunized before transplantation, to provide the best protection during the early post-transplantation period, when immunosuppression is the strongest and vaccine responses are poor. After 3–6 months, inactivated vaccines immunization can be resumed. By contrast, live-attenuated vaccines are lifelong contraindicated in SOT patients, but can be considered in HSCT patients at least 2 years after transplantation, if there is no immunosuppression or graft-versus-host-disease. However, because of the advantages of live-attenuated over inactivated vaccines - and also sometimes the absence of an inactivated alternative - an increasing number of prospective studies on live vaccine immunization after transplantation are performed and give new insights about safety and immunogenicity in this population. PMID:26291740

  6. Neurologic complications of bone marrow, stem cell, and organ transplantation in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Pruitt, Amy

    2006-06-01

    Bone marrow and peripheral blood stem cell transplantation are part of the standard of care for a variety of oncologic and non-oncologic disorders and are associated with a large spectrum of neurologic complications. These complications may arise at any time during and after the transplantation process, especially in subjects requiring chronic immunosuppression, and are most frequently related to infections, cerebrovascular or metabolic events, and toxicity from radiation or chemotherapy. Due to the unique circumstances and treatments surrounding each step in the transplantation process, there is a higher incidence of some neurologic complications during discrete time periods. Being aware of the temporal relationship of the neurologic disorder within the transplantation process can therefore facilitate diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy. Neurologic complications after solid organ transplantation are often due to similar mechanisms as in patients after bone marrow and stem cell transplantation although there are several complications unique to these patients such as transmission of infectious agents by the donated organ. For these patients, the clinician needs to have a high index of suspicion that the neurologic problem is related to the transplant.

  7. Solid organ transplant patients experience high rates of infection and other complications after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Brian A; Steele, G Daxton; Fedorka, Catherine J; Sánchez, Alvaro I; Chen, Antonia F; Crossett, Lawrence S

    2013-06-01

    Survival after solid organ transplants in the United States is increasing, and there is a need to understand the complications in knee arthroplasty patients who underwent organ transplantation. A retrospective study was conducted from 1993-2008 on 19 patients (23 knee arthroplasties) with previous successful solid organ transplants. Eleven knee arthroplasties were performed after renal transplantation, and 12 after nonrenal solid organ transplant (seven liver, four heart, one lung). Complications occurred in 9/23 patients (39.1%) and infections occurred in 4/23 patients (17.3%). Of the infected knees, two had MRSA, one had MSSA, and one Escherichia coli. Noninfectious complications (5/24, 21.7%) include aseptic loosening, quadriceps rupture, femoral fracture, hemarthrosis, and arthrofibrosis. All patients with complications were on immunosuppressant medications at the time of arthroplasty. There was a significantly higher rate of infection in the renal group compared to the non-renal group (P = 0.022). There was also a higher overall complication rate in the renal group however this did not reach significance.

  8. Noncutaneous head and neck cancer in solid organ transplant patients: single center experience.

    PubMed

    Nelissen, Charlotte; Lambrecht, Maarten; Nevens, Frederik; Van Raemdonck, Dirk; Vanhaecke, Johan; Kuypers, Dirk; Pirenne, Jacques; Nuyts, Sandra

    2014-04-01

    We investigated the incidence and survival of non-cutaneous head and neck cancer (HNC) after solid organ transplantation and identified prognostic factors impacting the outcome after treatment. A retrospective analysis of patients who underwent solid organ transplantation in our institution between 1987 and 2012. Of 5255 organ transplant patients, 48 recipients (0.9%) developed HNC in the posttransplant follow-up period. Liver transplant recipients showed the highest risk. Median follow-up of cancer patients was 46.7 months (range 2.9-256.2 months). Three-year overall survival and disease free survival (DFS) were 70% and 53%. Locoregional control was 67% and 48% at 3 and 5 years, respectively. Smoking and initial AJCC stage were two significant prognostic factors influencing DFS. Non-cutaneous HNC is rare in transplant recipients, but slightly more common after liver transplantation. Outcome after treatment is poor with locoregional recurrence being the main problem. Screening of high risk groups might be relevant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance does not affect outcomes in patients undergoing solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Heilman, Raymond L; Engel, Rodney A; Carey, Elizabeth J; Freeman, Ciara; Rakela, Jorge; Mulligan, David C; Fonseca, Rafael; Stewart, Alexander Keith

    2011-09-15

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is an asymptomatic plasma cell proliferative disorder with a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma or another plasma cell dyscrasia. Despite a high incidence in the general population and an increased relative risk for later malignancy, there are few reports about the clinical course of MGUS or risk profile in long-term immunosuppressed patients. We reviewed 1593 solid organ transplant patients and reported the frequency and outcomes of patients with MGUS identified pretransplant. Polyclonal gammopathy pretransplant is common with 17% of all patients and as many as 75% of liver transplant candidates having increased globulins.However, a monoclonal immunoglobulin was identified in only 3% of all solid organ transplant patients pretransplant (n=34). Importantly, in these 34 patients, no cases of progression to multiple myeloma, amyloid, or lymphoma were observed during immune suppression, and there was no association between posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders and pretransplant MGUS. Death in MGUS patients was not associated with progression of the monoclonal clone or development of posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders or other malignancy. In conclusion, routine testing for MGUS before transplantation is not prognostic nor a contraindication to transplant, and therefore, it is not recommended.

  10. Belatacept As an Alternative to Calcineurin Inhibitors in Patients with Solid Organ Transplants.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Dhiren; LeCorchick, Spencer; Gupta, Gaurav

    2017-01-01

    The goal of immunosuppression in transplantation has shifted to improving long-term outcomes, reducing drug-induced toxicities while preserving the already excellent short-term outcomes. Long-term gains in solid organ transplantation have been limited at least partly due to the nephrotoxicity and metabolic side effects of calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). The alloimmune response requires activation of the costimulatory pathway for T cell proliferation and amplification. Belatacept is a molecule that selectively blocks T cell costimulation. In June 2011, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved it for maintenance immunosuppression in kidney transplantation based on two open-label, randomized, phase III trials. Since its introduction, belatacept has shown promise in both short- and long-term renal transplant outcomes in several other trials. It exhibits a superior side effect profile compared to CNIs with a comparable efficacy. Across all solid organ transplants, the burden of chronic kidney disease, its associated cardiovascular morbidity, mortality, and inferior patient/allograft survival is a well-documented problem. In this review, we aim to discuss the evidence behind the use of belatacept in solid organ transplants as an effective alternative to CNIs for renal rescue in patients with acute and/or chronic kidney injury.

  11. Free tissue transfer for head and neck reconstruction in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Miller, Matthew W; Dean, Nichole R; Cannady, Steven B; Rosenthal, Eben L; Wax, Mark K

    2012-08-01

    Patients with head and neck malignancies who have had solid organ transplant and require free tissue transfer are a unique population. This study was performed to evaluate the effect of immunosuppression on the rate of perioperative complications and the success of free tissue transfer in the head and neck. Complications in solid organ transplant patients undergoing free tissue transfer for reconstruction of head and neck malignancies from 1998 to 2010 were evaluated. A total of 22 flaps in 17 patients were performed. Eight patients (11 of 22 flaps) had complications. The median hospital stay was 6 days (range, 4-26 days). The median length of follow-up was 13.5 months (range, 3.5-49.9 months). Solid organ transplant patients are at an increased risk of de novo malignancies due to chronic immunosuppression. This study demonstrates that free tissue transfer is a viable option in transplant patients with morbidity similar to nontransplant patients. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Organ Transplants in Kazakhstan.

    PubMed

    Baigenzhin, Abay; Doskaliyev, Zhaksylyk; Tuganbekova, Saltanat; Zharikov, Serik; Altynova, Sholpan; Gaipov, Abduzhappar

    2015-11-01

    The Republic of Kazakhstan is one of the fastest developing countries in the world and has a health care system that is unique in Central Asia. Its organ transplant services are also developing rapidly. We aimed to analyze and briefly report on the current status of organ transplant in the Republic of Kazakhstan. We analyzed organ transplant activities in that country for the period 2012 to 2014. All data were collected from the official database of the National Transplant Coordinating Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. At the end of 2014, the number of transplant centers had increased to 10, three of which could perform multiorgan transplants; during the same period, the number of deceased-donor organ-donating hospitals increased up to 37. By 2013, the transplant activity rate for all centers had reached 9.22 per million population. During the previous 3 years (2012-2014), there was a 3-fold increase in the number of living donors and an 18-fold increase in the number of kidney transplants. Between 2012 and 2014, the number of living-donor liver transplants increased from 17 to 25, and the number of deceased-donor transplants increased from 3 to 7. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), the number of heart transplants increased to 7 cases. During the last 3 years (2012-2014), Kazakhstan achieved a significant improvement in the organization of its transplant services, and a noticeable upward trend in the system continues.

  13. Treatment of HEV Infection in Patients with a Solid-Organ Transplant and Chronic Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Kamar, Nassim; Lhomme, Sébastien; Abravanel, Florence; Marion, Olivier; Peron, Jean-Marie; Alric, Laurent; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause hepatic and extra-hepatic manifestations. Treatment of HEV infection has been thoroughly studied in solid-organ-transplant patients who have developed a chronic HEV infection. In this review, we report on our current knowledge regarding treatment of HEV infection. PMID:27537905

  14. [Risk factors for skin cancer development in patients after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Imko-Walczuk, Beata; Piesiaków, Maria Luiza; Okuniewska, Aleksandra; Jaśkiewicz, Janusz; Lizakowski, Sławomir; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja; Rutkowski, Bolesław

    2012-11-13

    Cancer has become the second most common cause of death in patients after organ transplantation. Among all cancers arising de novo after transplantation skin cancers are the most common, accounting for 95% of all skin neoplasms. Due to the significantly higher morbidity, aggressive, rapid progression of cancer and unfavorable prognosis, the population requires a specific oncological approach. Therefore, special attention should be paid to factors predisposing to the development of cancer, including skin cancer, in patients after organ transplantation. Some of these factors are well understood, while the role of others is still ambiguous. Among the etiological factors mentioned are those that are associated with the recipient. These include genetic factors such as male sex, fair skin and inability to be tanned, and compatibility of the HLA system, and non genetic factors such as patient age, chronic skin ulcers and scars, the type of transplanted organ, immunosuppression, and particularly the type and cumulative doses of drugs. In addition, the pathogenesis of cancer is influenced by environmental factors such as exposure to sunlight and therefore latitude, ionizing radiation, chemical carcinogens and viral infections. Knowledge of etiological factors and mechanisms of etiopathogenesis allow for indication and observation of patients with increased risk of cancer as well as faster healing in these patients.  

  15. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, G.; Desousa, A.

    2011-01-01

    Surgical transplantation of human organs from deceased as well as living donors to sick and dying patients began after the Second World War. Over the past 50 years the transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells has become a worldwide practice which has extended, and greatly enhanced the quality of hundreds of thousands of lives. The field of transplantation medicine provides an important chance for liaison between psychiatric professionals and other transplant physicians and surgeons. The discrepancy between the ever-increasing demand for organs but the decreasing supply makes it important to evaluate and prioritize individuals who are in dire need of the organ. However, this also gives rise to certain ethical questions. The following paper discusses various psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation in general. PMID:25013589

  16. Organ transplantation in Egypt.

    PubMed

    Paris, Wayne; Nour, Bakr

    2010-09-01

    Concern has increasingly been expressed about the growing number of reports of medical personnel participating in the transplantation of human organs or tissues taken from the bodies of executed prisoners, handicapped patients, or poor persons who have agreed to part with their organs for commercial purposes. Such behavior has been universally considered as ethically and morally reprehensible, yet in some parts of the world the practice continues to flourish. The concept of justice demands that every person have an equal right to life, and to protect this right, society has an obligation to ensure that every person has equal access to medical care. Regrettably, the Egyptian system does not legally recognize brain death and continues to allow the buying and selling of organs. For more than 30 years in Egypt, the ability to pay has determined who receives an organ and economic need has determined who will be the donor. As transplant professionals, it is important that we advocate on behalf of all patients, potential recipients, and donors and for those who are left out and not likely to receive a donor organ in an economically based system. Current issues associated with this debate are reviewed and recommendations about how to address them in Egypt are discussed.

  17. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection.

    PubMed

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-09-24

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research.

  18. BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of patients with organ transplants: Clinical spectrum of BK infection

    PubMed Central

    Vigil, Darlene; Konstantinov, Nikifor K; Barry, Marc; Harford, Antonia M; Servilla, Karen S; Kim, Young Ho; Sun, Yijuan; Ganta, Kavitha; Tzamaloukas, Antonios H

    2016-01-01

    Nephropathy secondary to BK virus, a member of the Papoviridae family of viruses, has been recognized for some time as an important cause of allograft dysfunction in renal transplant recipients. In recent times, BK nephropathy (BKN) of the native kidneys has being increasingly recognized as a cause of chronic kidney disease in patients with solid organ transplants, bone marrow transplants and in patients with other clinical entities associated with immunosuppression. In such patients renal dysfunction is often attributed to other factors including nephrotoxicity of medications used to prevent rejection of the transplanted organs. Renal biopsy is required for the diagnosis of BKN. Quantitation of the BK viral load in blood and urine are surrogate diagnostic methods. The treatment of BKN is based on reduction of the immunosuppressive medications. Several compounds have shown antiviral activity, but have not consistently shown to have beneficial effects in BKN. In addition to BKN, BK viral infection can cause severe urinary bladder cystitis, ureteritis and urinary tract obstruction as well as manifestations in other organ systems including the central nervous system, the respiratory system, the gastrointestinal system and the hematopoietic system. BK viral infection has also been implicated in tumorigenesis. The spectrum of clinical manifestations from BK infection and infection from other members of the Papoviridae family is widening. Prevention and treatment of BK infection and infections from other Papovaviruses are subjects of intense research. PMID:27683628

  19. Attitudes toward organ donation among waitlisted transplant patients: results of a cross-sectional survey.

    PubMed

    Merola, Jonathan; Pei, Kevin Y; Rodriguez-Davalos, Manuel I; Gan, Geliang; Deng, Yanhong; Mulligan, David C; Davis, Kimberly A

    2016-11-01

    Organ shortage remains a major barrier to transplantation. While many efforts have focused on educating the general population regarding donation, few studies have examined knowledge regarding donation and donor registration rates among waitlisted candidates. We aimed to determine waitlisted patients' willingness to donate, elucidate attitudes surrounding organ allocation, and identify barriers to donation. A cross-sectional survey was distributed to assess demographics, knowledge regarding organ donation, and attitudes regarding the allocation process. Responses from 225 of 579 (39%) waitlisted patients were collected. Seventy-one respondents (32%) were registered donors, while 64 patients (28%) noted no interest in participating in donation. A total of 19% of respondents felt their medical treatment would change by being a donor, while 86 patients (38%) felt their condition precluded them from donation. Forty patients (18%) felt they should be prioritized on the waitlist if they agreed to donate. A minority of patients (28%) reported discussion of organ donation with their physician. Waitlisted candidates constitute a population of willing, although often unregistered, organ donors. Moreover, many endorse misconceptions regarding the allocation process and their donation eligibility. In a population for which transplantation is not always possible, education is needed regarding organ donation among waitlisted patients, as this may enhance donation rates.

  20. Integrity of the Oral Tissues in Patients with Solid-Organ Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Gonzalo; Bravo, Loreto; Cordero, Karina; Sepúlveda, Luis; Elgueta, Leticia; Díaz, Juan Carlos; Urzúa, Blanca; Morales, Irene

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between the use of immunosuppressants in solid-organ transplant patients and oral tissue abnormalities has been recognized. The objective of this study was to determine the state of oral tissue integrity in renal, heart, and liver transplant patients who are on continuous medical and dental control. Forty patients of both sexes were clinically evaluated at the Clinical Hospital of the University of Chile to identify pathologies of oral mucosa, gingival enlargement (GE), decayed, missing, filled teeth (DMFT) index, and salivary flow. The average age of the transplant subjects was 49.4 years, and the age range was 19 to 69 years. Most subjects maintained a good level of oral hygiene, and the rate mean of DMFT was 14.7. The degree of involvement of the oral mucosa and GE was low (10%). Unlike other studies, the frequency of oral mucosal diseases and GE was low despite the fact that these patients were immunosuppressed. Care and continuous monitoring seem to be of vital importance in maintaining the oral health of transplant patients. PMID:22363835

  1. Are We Late in the Diagnosis of Malignities Occurring in Solid Organ Transplant Patients? 11 Years' Experience.

    PubMed

    Turkeli, Mehmet; Simsek, Melih; Aldemir, Mehmet Naci; Yildirim, Nilgun; Cankaya, Erdem; Erdemci, Burak; Bilici, Mehmet; Tekin, Salim Basol; Arslan, Sukru; Korkut, Ercan

    2016-02-01

    Our aim is to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of cancer in the population of patients with solid organ transplant who are under immunosuppressive medication. In this study we aimed to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis of cancer in solid organ transplant recipients. An aging population began to receive solid organ transplantation and survival times prolonged. But this had a cost and new problems came forward. Especially de novo cancers because of immunosuppressive therapy took notice. Risk of malignancy increases after organ transplantation and cancer incidence was about 2.3-3.1% in these patients including skin cancer, lung cancer, malign lymphoma, cervix cancer, kaposi sarcoma, and hepatobiliary cancer. The files of 328 organ transplant recipients followed from January 2004 to April 2015 at Atatürk University Medical Faculty were retrospectively reviewed. Eight patients developed cancer (2.4%). There were six males and two females. Age at cancer diagnosis ranged from 42 to 79 years old with average of 55 years. The interval from solid organ transplantation to cancer diagnosis ranged from 6 months to 30 years. Among the patients, five were renal transplant recipients and two were liver transplant recipients. Four patients had stage IV disease, one patient stage IIIB, and three patients had stage I disease. For none of the patients a diagnosis with screening methods was used for cancer before any complaints of tumor emerged. To diagnose cancer at early stages in solid organ transplant recipients, earlier and detailed cancer screening is very important. The association between diagnosis of cancer at early stages and prolonged overall survival time is well known. Detailed and careful evaluation for occult malignancies in pre-transplantation period is also important.

  2. Are We Late in the Diagnosis of Malignities Occurring in Solid Organ Transplant Patients? 11 Years’ Experience

    PubMed Central

    Turkeli, Mehmet; Simsek, Melih; Aldemir, Mehmet Naci; Yildirim, Nilgun; Cankaya, Erdem; Erdemci, Burak; Bilici, Mehmet; Tekin, Salim Basol; Arslan, Sukru; Korkut, Ercan

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Our aim is to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of cancer in the population of patients with solid organ transplant who are under immunosuppressive medication. In this study we aimed to emphasize the importance of early diagnosis of cancer in solid organ transplant recipients. An aging population began to receive solid organ transplantation and survival times prolonged. But this had a cost and new problems came forward. Especially de novo cancers because of immunosuppressive therapy took notice. Risk of malignancy increases after organ transplantation and cancer incidence was about 2.3–3.1% in these patients including skin cancer, lung cancer, malign lymphoma, cervix cancer, kaposi sarcoma, and hepatobiliary cancer. Materials and Methods: The files of 328 organ transplant recipients followed from January 2004 to April 2015 at Atatürk University Medical Faculty were retrospectively reviewed. Results: Eight patients developed cancer (2.4%). There were six males and two females. Age at cancer diagnosis ranged from 42 to 79 years old with average of 55 years. The interval from solid organ transplantation to cancer diagnosis ranged from 6 months to 30 years. Among the patients, five were renal transplant recipients and two were liver transplant recipients. Four patients had stage IV disease, one patient stage IIIB, and three patients had stage I disease. For none of the patients a diagnosis with screening methods was used for cancer before any complaints of tumor emerged. Conclusion: To diagnose cancer at early stages in solid organ transplant recipients, earlier and detailed cancer screening is very important. The association between diagnosis of cancer at early stages and prolonged overall survival time is well known. Detailed and careful evaluation for occult malignancies in pre-transplantation period is also important. PMID:27026762

  3. Bioethics of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    As the ability to transplant organs and tissues has grown, the demand for these procedures has increased as well--to the point at which it far exceeds the available supply creating the core ethical challenge for transplantation--rationing. The gap between supply and demand, although large, is worse than it appears to be. There are two key steps to gaining access to a transplant. First, one must gain access to a transplant center. Then, those waiting need to be selected for a transplant. Many potential recipients do not get admitted to a program. They are deemed too old, not of the right nationality, not appropriate for transplant as a result of severe mental impairment, criminal history, drug abuse, or simply because they do not have access to a competent primary care physician who can refer them to a transplant program. There are also financial obstacles to access to transplant waiting lists in the United States and other nations. In many poor nations, those needing transplants simply die because there is no capacity or a very limited capacity to perform transplants. Although the demand for organs now exceeds the supply, resulting in rationing, the size of waiting lists would quickly expand were there to suddenly be an equally large expansion in the number of organs available for transplantation. Still, even with the reality of unavoidable rationing, saving more lives by increasing organ supply is a moral good. Current public policies for obtaining organs from cadavers are not adequate in that they do not produce the number of organs that public polls of persons in the United States indicate people are willing to donate.

  4. Sarcopenia in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carey, Elizabeth J

    2014-04-01

    Sarcopenia is a relatively new concept in the medical literature, initially intended to describe the loss of lean body mass that occurs with aging. More recently, sarcopenia has been described in various forms of chronic disease, including patients with end-stage organ disease awaiting transplantation. The presence of sarcopenia is an important marker in transplant patients, since it has been linked to poorer pre- and posttransplant outcomes compared with patients with preserved muscle mass. The mechanisms and natural history of sarcopenia in transplant patients are incompletely understood, and there are currently no therapies proven to mitigate or reverse the process. This article reviews the current understanding of the prevalence and clinical significance of sarcopenia in transplant patients and highlights important areas of future research.

  5. Complicated Outcomes After Emergent Lower Extremity Surgery in Patients With Solid Organ Transplants.

    PubMed

    Reid, Alexander T; Perdue, Aaron; Goulet, James A; Robbins, Christopher B; Pour, Aidin Eslam

    2016-11-01

    The complications of emergent or urgent surgery in solid organ transplant recipients are unclear. The goal of this nonrandomized retrospective case study, conducted at a large public university teaching hospital, was to determine the following: (1) 90-day postsurgical complications in solid organ transplant recipients who undergo fracture surgery of the lower extremities; (2) 90-day and 1-year mortality rates for this cohort; (3) correlation of particular postsurgical complications with the 90-day or 1-year mortality rate; and (4) correlation of body mass index with the 90-day or 1-year mortality rate. Subjects included 36 solid organ transplant recipients who underwent surgical treatment for 37 emergent or urgent lower extremity fractures within 72 hours of presentation to the emergency department. Patients were followed for all medical and surgical complications for 90 days and for all-cause mortality for 1 year. Within 90 days of surgery, patients had complications that included acute renal failure (15, 40.5%), deep venous thrombosis (3, 8.1%), pulmonary embolus (2, 5.4%), pneumonia (7, 18.9%), superficial surgical site infection (3, 8.1%), and nonorthopedic sepsis (4, 10.8%). In addition, 3 (8.1%) and 5 (13.9%) patients died within 90 days and 1 year, respectively. Hospital readmission correlated with a higher 1-year mortality rate (odds ratio, 14.000; P=.016). Higher body mass index correlated with higher 90-day (odds ratio, 1.425; P=.035) and 1-year (odds ratio, 1.334; P=.033) mortality rates. Solid organ transplant recipients with lower extremity fracture have high 90-day and 1-year mortality rates and may have multiple complications within 90 days of treatment. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(6):e1063-e1069.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  6. Transplantation of female genital organs.

    PubMed

    Brännström, Mats; Díaz-García, César

    2011-04-01

    Transplantation of gynecological organs is a medical field where considerable advancements have been made in research during the last 25 years and with some procedures already introduced as clinical treatments. These types of transplantations aim at curing permanent infertility. Uterus transplantation has been proven to be a feasible procedure in different experimentation animal models with proof of concept concerning surgery, control of rejection and fertility. There has already been one human transplantation attempt, which, however, was unsuccessful. Based on the progress in this area, we predict that the first successful uterus transplantation attempt will come within 2-3 years. Orthotopic ovarian cortex transplantation has overcome the status of an experimental procedure since more than 20 pregnancies have been reported. Its main field of application is fertility preservation in oncologic patients undergoing high gonadotoxic risk therapies. The role of heterotopic ovarian cortex transplantation still remains at the research level, although co-transplantation with an orthotopic cortex might facilitate a more accurate endocrine environment. The major drawback of ovarian cortex transplantation remains the long ischemic interval between re-implantation and the establishment of neovascularization. Whole ovary cryopreservation followed by transplantation through vascular anastomosis may emerge as an important procedure in this field, because the warm ischemic time would be reduced from several days to less than 1 h, which will most likely improve follicle survival. In summary, transplantation surgery is also entering the field of gynecology and in the future several types of transplantations of organs/tissues of the female reproductive tract may become established clinical procedures.

  7. Organ transplantation and magical thinking.

    PubMed

    Vamos, Marina

    2010-10-01

    Organ transplantation can provide important treatment benefits in a variety of situations. While a number of live donor procedures are now possible, procurement of organs from dead donors remains the mainstay of transplant programmes. However, cadaveric donation rates remain much lower than anticipated, and some patients who receive organs struggle to adapt to their new body. The reasons for this are not entirely explained by rational or logical means. This paper uses concepts drawn from magical thinking to try to explain some of the less apparent issues at play within the process of cadaveric organ transplantation, including both the donation and receiving of organs. Three themes are explored as potentially relevant: superstitions and rituals around death and the dead body, incorporation and the meanings attached to the transplanted organ, and survivor guilt. All three are shown to be relevant for some part of the transplantation process in at least a minority of cases. It is therefore suggested that focusing not only on the logical and scientific, but also on the ambiguous and magical may enhance the organ donation process and thus increase donation rates and the psychological adjustment of transplant recipients.

  8. Organ transplantation and replacement

    SciTech Connect

    Cerilli, G.J.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 49 chapters. Some of the titles are: Molecular, Genetic, and Clinical Aspects of the HLA System; The Normal Immune Response; Significance of the ABO Antigen System; The Role of Dialysis in the Management of End-Stage Renal Disease; Access for Dialysis; Patient Selection for Renal Transplantation; The Living Donor in Kidney Transplantation; and Kidney Preservation by Cold Storage.

  9. Pilot test of a patient decision aid about liver transplant organ quality.

    PubMed

    Volk, Michael L; Roney, Meghan; Fagerlin, Angela

    2014-07-01

    Prior studies have shown that patients are reluctant to accept donor-specific risks, and transplant professionals lack an effective and time-efficient means of obtaining informed consent. We designed and pilot-tested a Web-based patient decision aid (DA) on organ quality. The DA was administered to 53 liver transplant candidates (median Model for End-Stage Liver Disease score = 14, range = 7-26), and they took a mean of 15 minutes to complete it. Questions about knowledge and attitudes were asked before and after the DA. Subjects' knowledge improved, with 53% and 60% correctly answering questions about hepatitis B virus and human immunodeficiency virus transmission before the DA and 94% and 100%, respectively, correctly answering them afterward (P < 0.001). The accuracy of mortality prediction also improved from a mean 3-month mortality estimate of 22% before the DA to 12% afterward (P < 0.001). After the DA, subjects felt that it was more likely that they might be offered a less-than-perfect liver (P = 0.001), and they were more likely to consider accepting such a liver (P < 0.001). In conclusion, implementing a Web-based patient DA is feasible and improves knowledge among liver transplant candidates. The use of this tool may decrease candidates' reluctance to accept extended criteria organs.

  10. Organ transplant group formed.

    PubMed

    Gunby, Phil

    1983-10-28

    In response to a call from Surgeon General C. Everett Koop, the American Council on Transplantation (ACT)--a federation of organizations, health professionals, and others interested in human organ donation--has been organized and expects to hold its first formal meeting in January 1984. ACT's goals include ensuring equitable access to available organs, promoting effective use of multiple organ donations, improving donor identification and referral, and motivating the public to donate organs.

  11. Organ allocation in lung transplant.

    PubMed

    Davis, Steven Q; Garrity, Edward R

    2007-11-01

    Since the first successful single-lung transplant in 1983 and double-lung transplant in 1986, thousands of patients have benefited from the procedures. Until 1995, allocation of donor lungs was based purely on time on the waiting list. In 1995, a 90-day credit was given to patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, while still maintaining allocation based on waiting list time. In 2005, the lung allocation score (LAS) was implemented, dramatically changing the way lungs are allocated. This article will explore the reasons for the creation of the LAS, the design of the score, early experience with transplant results under the new system, and further changes that may be made to the system of lung allocation. As surgical techniques and medical management evolve, so to will the management of potential donors and the allocation of their organs, with the aim of benefiting patients needing lung transplantation in the United States.

  12. Early liver transplantation for patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis: public views and the effects on organ donation.

    PubMed

    Stroh, G; Rosell, T; Dong, F; Forster, J

    2015-06-01

    Patients with severe acute alcoholic hepatitis may not survive to fulfill the standard 6 months of abstinence and counseling prior to transplantation. A prospective study demonstrated that early liver transplantation in such patients improved 2 year survival from 23% to 71% and only 3 of 26 patients returned to drinking after 1140 days; graft function was unaffected. Nonetheless, this treatment protocol may raise public concerns and affect organ donation rates. A total of 503 participants took a survey made available at an online crowdsourcing marketplace. The survey measured attitudes on liver transplantation generally and early transplantation for this patient population, in addition to measuring responses to nine vignettes describing fictional candidates. The majority of respondents (81.5%, n = 410) was at least neutral toward early transplantation for these patients; only a minority (26.3%) indicated that transplantation in any vignette would make them hesitant to donate their organs. Middle-aged patients with good social support and financial stability were viewed most favorably (p < 0.001). Age was considered the most important selection factor and financial stability the least important factor (each p < 0.001). Results indicate early transplantation for carefully selected patients with acute alcoholic hepatitis may not be as controversial to the public as previously thought.

  13. Immunosuppressive therapy after solid-organ transplantation: does the INTERMED identify patients at risk of poor adherence?

    PubMed Central

    Michaud, Laurent; Ludwig, Gundula; Berney, Sylvie; Rodrigues, Stéphanie; Niquille, Anne; Santschi, Valérie; Favre, Anne-Sophie; Lange, Anne-Catherine; Michels, Annemieke A.; Vrijens, Bernard; Bugnon, Olivier; Pilon, Nathalie; Pascual, Manuel; Venetz, Jean-Pierre; Stiefel, Friedrich; Schneider, Marie-Paule

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lack of adherence to medication is a trigger of graft rejection in solid-organ transplant (SOT) recipients. Objective: This exploratory study aimed to assess whether a biopsychosocial evaluation using the INTERMED instrument before transplantation could identify SOT recipients at risk of suboptimal post-transplantation adherence to immunosuppressant drugs. We hypothesized that complex patients (INTERMED>20) might have lower medication adherence than noncomplex patients (INTERMED≤20). Methods: Each patient eligible for transplantation at the University Hospital of Lausanne, Switzerland, has to undergo a pre-transplantation psychiatric evaluation. In this context the patient was asked to participate in our study. The INTERMED was completed pre-transplantation, and adherence to immunosuppressive medication was monitored post-transplantation by electronic monitors for 12 months. The main outcome measure was the implementation and persistence to two calcineurin inhibitors, cyclosporine and tacrolimus, according to the dichotomized INTERMED score (>20 or ≤20). Results: Among the 50 SOT recipients who completed the INTERMED, 32 entered the study. The complex (N=11) and noncomplex patients (N=21) were similar in terms of age, sex and transplanted organ. Implementation was 94.2% in noncomplex patients versus 87.8% in complex patients (non-significant p-value). Five patients were lost to follow-up: one was non-persistent, and four refused electronic monitoring. Of the four patients who refused monitoring, two were complex and withdrew early, and two were noncomplex and withdrew later in the study. Conclusion: Patients identified as complex pre-transplant by the INTERMED tended to deviate from their immunosuppressant regimen, but the findings were not statistically significant. Larger studies are needed to evaluate this association further, as well as the appropriateness of using a nonspecific biopsychosocial instrument such as INTERMED in highly morbid

  14. Donor-derived tuberculosis after solid organ transplantation in two patients and a staff member.

    PubMed

    Bucher, J N; Schoenberg, M B; Freytag, I; Lange, U; Hofmann-Thiel, S; Guba, M O; Werner, J; Eder, A; Schelling, G; Stangl, M

    2016-06-01

    Because of global mobility and migration resulting in a growing diversity of the donor pool, the risk for donor-derived tuberculosis in solid organ transplant recipients becomes more and more relevant, even in countries with a low overall tuberculosis incidence. Here, we describe a case series of donor-derived tuberculosis in 2 of 3 solid organ transplant recipients and one medical staff member in Germany resulting in the death of one recipient. This case series highlights the relevance of this topic to clinicians. It advocates for a better communication between organ procurement organizations and transplant centers regarding donor information and transplant recipient outcome. Furthermore, it underpins the necessity for a standardized critical incident reporting system in the german transplant system to improve short- and long-term recipient's safety, health and survival.

  15. Helminths in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Andrew J R; Dholakia, Shamik; Holland, Celia V; Friend, Peter J

    2017-06-01

    With transplantation becoming an increasingly routine form of treatment for diverse populations, and with international travel becoming ever more accessible and affordable, the danger of transplantation-mediated helminth infections, exacerbated by coincident immunosuppression, must be considered. In this Review, we attempt to catalogue all clinically-relevant helminthiases that have been reported to coincide with transplantation, whether by transplantation-mediated transmission, reactivation of latent infections in an immunosuppressed context, or possible de-novo infection during the immunosuppressed peritransplant period. Helminthiasis has been reported in cases of kidney, liver, bowel, pancreas, heart, lung, and stem-cell transplant, and blood transfusion. For each helminthiasis, known risk factors, symptoms, and suggested options for screening and treatment are given. We conclude that helminths are a small but important and potentially severe source of disease after transplantation, and, with options for diagnosis and treatment, these pathogens warrant greater consideration during organ implantation. The achievement of immunological tolerance using helminth-derived products is also an exciting future prospect. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... January - March 2017 as of 04/13/2017 Organ donation and transplantation can save lives Every ten minutes, ... in medicine and technology, and increased awareness of organ donation and transplantation, there continues to be a gap ...

  17. Challenges in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beyar, Rafael

    2011-04-01

    Organ transplantation has progressed tremendously with improvements in surgical methods, organ preservation, and pharmaco-immunologic therapies and has become a critical pathway in the management of severe organ failure worldwide. The major sources of organs are deceased donors after brain death; however, a substantial number of organs come from live donations, and a significant number can also be obtained from non-heart-beating donors. Yet, despite progress in medical, pharmacologic, and surgical techniques, the shortage of organs is a worldwide problem that needs to be addressed internationally at the highest possible levels. This particular field involves medical ethics, religion, and society behavior and beliefs. Some of the critical ethical issues that require aggressive interference are organ trafficking, payments for organs, and the delicate balance in live donations between the benefit to the recipient and the possible harm to the donor and others. A major issue in organ transplantation is the definition of death and particularly brain death. Another major critical factor is the internal tendency of a specific society to donate organs. In the review below, we will discuss the various challenges that face organ donation worldwide, and particularly in Israel, and some proposed mechanisms to overcome this difficulty.

  18. Peri-Implant Response and Microflora in Organ Transplant Patients 1 Year after Prosthetic Loading: A Prospective Controlled Study.

    PubMed

    Montebugnoli, Lucio; Venturi, Mattia; Cervellati, Fabio; Servidio, Dora; Vocale, Caterina; Pagan, Flavia; Landini, Maria Paola; Magnani, Gaia; Sambri, Vittorio

    2015-10-01

    A recent study conducted in humans demonstrated for the first time that bone loss in the immediate period after implant insertion before loading did not significantly differ in organ transplant recipients with respect to normal subjects. The purpose of this study is to evaluate bone and periodontal response and peri-implant microflora in a group of organ-transplanted patients 1 year after prosthetic loading. The study population included 13 consecutive organ-transplanted (11 hearts, two livers) patients and 13 normal (healthy) control subjects who received 29 and 28 submerged dental implants, respectively. Crestal bone level, peri-implant probing depth (PIPD), and bleeding on probing were evaluated at prosthetic loading and after 1 year. Samples for microbiological testing were taken from the subgingival microbiota of each implant 1 year after loading and analyzed with polymerase chain reaction. All samples were examined for the presence of five microorganisms: Treponema denticola, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannarella forsythensis, and Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans. A mean bone loss of 0.17 ± 0.10 and 0.20 ± 0.10 mm at 1 year was observed in the group of transplant recipients and in controls, respectively (N.S.). Similar results were obtained considering PIPD changes at 1 year (respectively 0.06 ± 0.71 mm in transplants vs 0.11 ± 0.74 mm in controls). Detection frequencies of pathogens were not statistically different between normal and transplanted patients. The present pilot study seems to indicate that bone and periodontal response and microbiological status around submerged dental implants in immunocompromised organ-transplanted patients do not differ 1 year after loading from those observed in control patients and that this particular population of patients may be successfully rehabilitated with dental implants. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Once-Daily Tacrolimus in Solid-Organ Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Staatz, Christine E; Tett, Susan E

    2015-10-01

    Tacrolimus is a pivotal immunosuppressant agent used in solid-organ transplantation. It was originally formulated for oral administration as Prograf(®), a twice-daily immediate-release capsule. In an attempt to improve patient adherence, retain manufacturer market share and/or reduce health care costs, newer once-daily prolonged-release formulations of tacrolimus (Advagraf(®) and Envarsus(®) XR) and various generic versions of Prograf(®) are becoming available. Tacrolimus has a narrow therapeutic index. Small variations in drug exposure due to formulation differences can have a significant impact on patient outcomes. The aim of this review is to critically analyse the published data on the clinical pharmacokinetics of once-daily tacrolimus in solid-organ transplant patients. Forty-three traditional (non-compartmental) and five population pharmacokinetic studies were identified and evaluated. On the basis of the stricter criteria for narrow-therapeutic-index drugs, Prograf(®), Advagraf(®) and Envarsus(®) XR are not bioequivalent [in terms of the area under the concentration-time curve from 0 to 24 h (AUC0-24) or the minimum concentration (C min)]. Patients may require a daily dosage increase if converted from Prograf(®) to Advagraf(®), while a daily dosage reduction appears necessary for conversion from Prograf(®) to Envarsus(®) XR. Prograf(®) itself, or generic immediate-release tacrolimus, can be administered in a once-daily regimen with a lower than double daily dose being reported to give 24-h exposure equivalent to that of a twice-daily regimen. Intense clinical and concentration monitoring is prudent in the first few months after any conversion to once-daily tacrolimus dosing; however, there is no guarantee that therapeutic drug monitoring strategies applicable to one formulation (or twice-daily dosing) will be equally applicable to another. The correlation between the tacrolimus AUC0-24 and C min is variable and not strong for all three

  20. Neurologic aspects of multiple organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zivković, Saša A

    2014-01-01

    Complex multiorgan failure may require simultaneous transplantation of several organs, including heart-lung, kidney-pancreas, or multivisceral transplantation. Solid organ transplantation can also be combined with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to modulate immunologic response to a solid organ allograft. Combined multiorgan transplantation may offer a lower rate of allograft rejection and lower immunosuppression needs. In recent years, intestinal and multivisceral transplantations became viable as a rescue treatment for patients with irreversible intestinal failure who can no longer tolerate total parenteral nutrition with 70% survival after 5 years which is comparable to other types of solid organ allografts. Post-transplant neurologic complications were reported in up to 86% of allograft recipients and greatly overlap in intestinal and multivisceral allograft recipients, without a significant effect on the outcome of transplantation. Other common organ combinations in multiorgan transplantation include kidney-pancreas, which is mostly used for patients with renal failure and uncontrolled diabetes, and heart-lung for patients with congenital heart disease and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Kidney-pancreas transplantation frequently results in an improvement of diabetic complications, including diabetic neuropathy. Heart-lung allograft recipients have very similar clinical course and spectrum of neurologic complications to lung transplant recipients. At this time there are no reports of an increased risk of graft-versus-host disease with combined transplantation of solid organ allograft and hematopoietic stem cells. Chronic immunosuppression and complex toxic-metabolic disturbances after multiorgan transplantation create a permissive environment for development of a wide spectrum of neurologic complications which largely resemble complications after transplantations of individual components of complex multiorgan allografts.

  1. Spine after solid organ transplantation in childhood: a clinical, radiographic, and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of 40 patients.

    PubMed

    Helenius, Ilkka; Remes, Ville; Tervahartiala, Pekka; Salminen, Sari; Sairanen, Heikki; Holmberg, Christer; Palmu, Petri; Helenius, Miia; Peltonen, Jari; Jalanko, Hannu

    2006-08-15

    A cross-sectional study of the spine in 40 young adults after solid organ transplantation in childhood. To evaluate the impact of organ transplantation and long-term immunosuppressive treatment on growing spine using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). A review of the current literature reveals no systematic evaluation of the spine after transplantation in childhood. A total of 40 adult patients (mean age 22.1 years, range, 16.0-27.0), who received either kidney, liver, or heart transplant as children, were evaluated. Mean follow-up after transplantation was 11.2 years (range 3.0-18.0). All patients filled in a questionnaire, underwent an interview and physical examination, as well as had MRI of the spine. Standing spinal radiographs were taken from patients with a rib hump > or = 6 degrees. There were 8 (20%) patients who had a history of vertebral fracture. Eleven (28%) patients reported frequent back pain at rest. There were 15 (38%) patients who had scoliosis > 10 degrees (range 10 degrees -69 degrees ). On MRI, narrowed disc spaces were noted in 32 (80%) patients, and irregular endplates were noted in 24 (60%). There were 14 (35%) patients who had at least 1 compressed or wedged vertebra (> 20%). Patients treated for acute rejection had wedged vertebrae, speckled or black disc spaces, and irregular endplates more often than patients without rejections. Males had wedged vertebrae more often than females (P = 0.0067). Back pain, scoliosis, wedged vertebrae, and narrowed, degenerated disc spaces are common after solid organ transplantation in childhood.

  2. Neoplastic and non-neoplastic complications of solid organ transplantation in patients with preexisting monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Teresa E; Schiltz, Nicholas K; Woodside, Kenneth J; Pillai, Aiswarya Chandran; Caimi, Paolo F; Lazarus, Hillard M; Koroukian, Siran M; Campagnaro, Erica L

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) occurs in 3-7% of the elderly population, with higher prevalence in renal failure patients, and is associated with a 25-fold increased lifetime risk for plasma cell myeloma (PCM), also known as multiple myeloma. Using the California State Inpatient, Emergency Department, and Ambulatory Surgery Databases components of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP), we sought to determine whether patients with MGUS who undergo solid organ allograft (n = 22,062) are at increased adjusted relative risk (aRR) for hematologic malignancy and other complications. Among solid organ transplant patients, patients with preexisting MGUS had higher aRR of PCM (aRR 19.46; 95% CI 7.05, 53.73; p < 0.001), venous thromboembolic events (aRR 1.66; 95% CI 1.15, 2.41; p = 0.007), and infection (aRR 1.24; 95% CI 1.06, 1.45; p = 0.007). However, when comparing MGUS patients with and without solid organ transplant, there was decreased aRR for PCM with transplant (aRR 0.34; 95% CI 0.13, 0.88; p = 0.027), and increased venous thromboembolic events (aRR 2.33; 95% CI 1.58, 3.44; p < 0.001) and infectious risks (aRR 1.44; 95% CI 1.23, 1.70; p < 0.001). While MGUS increased the risk of PCM overall following solid organ transplantation, there was lower risk of PCM development compared to MGUS patients who did not receive a transplant. MGUS should not preclude solid organ transplant.

  3. [Carcinogenic viruses in etiopathogenesis of skin cancers in patients after organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Piesiaków, Maria Luiza; Imko-Walczuk, Beata; Osiecka, Karolina; Kiełbowicz, Marta; Dębska-Ślizień, Alicja

    2016-02-14

    The latest literature report specifies multifactoral etiology of skin cancer in population of patients after organs transplats. Carcirogenic viruses are one of etiopathogenesis components. Viruses of a vital meaning for skin oncogenesis are called Human papillomavirus - HPV, Human herpesvirus 8 - HHV8 i Merkel cell polyomavirus - MCV. Report on connections exisisting between viruses HPV and skin cancers in the population of patients after organs transplants confirms clinical connection between viruses papillas and cancers centres occuring in similar locations and more frequent appearance of attributes characteristic for HPV infection within the limits of changes in the type of Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). What's more, coexisting of viruses papillas and SCC is more often noticed in the population of organ recipients than in the population of healthy people. It is not confirmed yet that any specific correlation between subtypes of HPV and greater frequency of morbidity in skin cancers really exist. However, in the population of organ recipients infections of different types of HPV are found within the limits of cancers centres in the case of SCC (63%) as well as in basal cell carcinoma-BCC (55%). DNA of HPV was also fund in healthy parts of organ recipients skin (92-94%). HHV8 is also an oncogenic viruse that influences the development of lymphoma. Infection of that virus may cause ocuuring of Kaposi's sarkoma, which is one of the most frequent types of cancer appearing in population of patients treating by long-term immunosuppression in particular geographical zones. MCV, which belongs to the group called Polyomaviriade, owes a particular meaning in etiopathogenesis of Merkel cell carcinoma - MCC. It is a rare cancer derived from neuroendocrine cells of the basic layers of epidermie. For over 30 years it was supposed that correlation between viruses and skin cancers in population of organ recipient exist. Knowledge of the total viruses influence on skin cancers

  4. Ethical issues in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Abouna, George M

    2003-01-01

    Clinical organ transplantation has been recognized as one of the most gripping medical advances of the century as it provides a way of giving the gift of life to patients with terminal failure of vital organs, which requires the participation of other fellow human beings and of society by donating organs from deceased or living individuals. The increasing incidence of vital organ failure and the inadequate supply of organs, especially from cadavers, has created a wide gap between organ supply and organ demand, which has resulted in very long waiting times to receive an organ as well as an increasing number of deaths while waiting. These events have raised many ethical, moral and societal issues regarding supply, the methods of organ allocation, the use of living donors as volunteers including minors. It has also led to the practice of organ sale by entrepreneurs for financial gains in some parts the world through exploitation of the poor, for the benefit of the wealthy. The current advances in immunology and tissue engineering and the use of animal organs, xenotransplantation, while offering very promising solutions to many of these problems, also raise additional ethical and medical issues which must be considered by the medical profession as well as society. This review deals with the ethical and moral issues generated by the current advances in organ transplantation, the problem of organ supply versus organ demand and the appropriate allocation of available organs. It deals with the risks and benefits of organ donation from living donors, the appropriate and acceptable methods to increase organ donation from the deceased through the adoption of the principle of 'presumed consent', the right methods of providing acceptable appreciation and compensation for the family of the deceased as well as volunteer and altruistic donors, and the duties and responsibilities of the medical profession and society to help fellow humans. The review also deals with the appropriate

  5. [Relationship between Stress and Resources in Patients Waiting for Organ Transplantation: Comparison of Patients with Renal and Liver Insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Wick, Katharina; Bauer, Stephanie; Malessa, Christina; Settmacher, Utz; Strauß, Bernhard

    2015-08-01

    Patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation are exposed to different stress factors and use individual resources for coping. The present study examines these factors in the context of health-related quality of life in different patient groups (patients with renal vs. liver insufficiency) and attachment pattern. The following variables were measured by questionnaire in a clinical sample of 103 patients waiting for a liver or kidney transplant in Thuringia: Physical complaints (GBB), Depression and Anxiety (HADS-D), Coping (EFK), Self-efficacy expectations (SWE), Resilience (RS-13), Social support (F-SozU-K-14), Health-related quality of life (SF-8) and Attachment style (BFPE). Patients with liver insufficiency have a higher level of anxiety and show more often an insecure attachment style as renal failure patients. Differences between secure and insecure attached patients waiting for a kidney transplant are found in physical complaints, depression, depressive coping and self-efficacy, resilience, social support, active coping and mental health, in favor of secure attachment. Insecure attachment in patients with liver insufficiency leads to a less frequent usage of active coping strategies. Furthermore, the variables anxiety, depression, resilience, social support and dysfunctional coping mediate the relationship between attachment and mental health completely. RESULTS suggest that psychological interventions should specifically consider the variables anxiety, depression, resilience, self-efficacy, social support, coping and attachment. The gained insights of this study make it possible to derive implications for interventions to reduce risk factors for the development of co-morbid mental disorders and to strengthen protective factors and thus improve the well-being and quality of life of patients. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  6. Hyperglycemia and Diabetes Mellitus Following Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Rodolfo J; Wallia, Amisha

    2016-02-01

    Hyperglycemia is common following organ transplantation, regardless of the pre-transplant diabetes status. Transient post-transplant hyperglycemia and/or new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) are common and are associated with increased morbidity and mortality. NODAT and type 2 diabetes share similar characteristics, but the pathophysiology may differ. Immunosuppressive agents and steroids play a key role in the development of NODAT. Glycemic control is challenging in this population due to fluctuating renal/end-organ function, immunosuppressive dosing, nutritional status, and drug-drug interactions. A proactive and multidisciplinary approach is essential, along with flexible protocols to adjust to patient status, type of organ transplanted, and corticosteroid regimens. Insulin is the preferred agent for hospitalized patients and during the early post-transplant period; optimal glycemic control (BG < 180 mg/dl with minimal hypoglycemia [<70 mg/dl]) is desired.

  7. Clinical Lessons to Be Learned from Patients Developing Chronic Myeloid Leukemia While on Immunosuppressive Therapy after Solid Organ Transplantation: Yet Another Case after Orthotopic Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oberender, Christian; Kleeberg, Lorenz; Nienhues, Nicola; Dörken, Bernd; Riess, Hanno

    2014-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia developing after transplantation of solid organs and concomitant immunosuppression is a rare but still significant clinical phenomenon. We here describe an additional case of a 62-year-old male patient developing CML after orthotopic heart transplantation and medication with cyclosporine A, mofetil-mycophenolate, and steroids. Initial antileukemic therapy was imatinib at a standard dose and within 15 months of therapy a complete cytogenetic response was noted. In this report we discuss the clinical implications of these rare but biologically important cases. PMID:25478254

  8. Seizure Treatment in Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, Paul W.

    2013-01-01

    Opinion statement Solid organ transplantation is frequently complicated by a spectrum of seizure types, including single partial-onset or generalized tonic-clonic seizures, acute repetitive seizures or status epilepticus, and sometimes the evolution of symptomatic epilepsy. There is currently no specific evidence involving the transplant patient population to guide the selection, administration, or duration of antiepileptic drug (AED) therapy, so familiarity with clinical AED pharmacology and application of sound judgment are necessary for successful patient outcomes. An initial detailed search for symptomatic seizure etiologies, including metabolic, infectious, cerebrovascular, and calcineurin inhibitor treatment-related neuro-toxic complications such as posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), is imperative, as underlying central nervous system disorders may impose additional serious risks to cerebral or general health if not promptly detected and appropriately treated. The mainstay for post-transplant seizure management is AED therapy directed toward the suspected seizure type. Unfavorable drug interactions could place the transplanted organ at risk, so choosing an AED with limited interaction potential is also crucial. When the transplanted organ is dysfunctional or vulnerable to rejection, AEDs without substantial hepatic metabolism are favored in post-liver transplant patients, whereas after renal transplantation, AEDs with predominantly renal elimination may require dosage adjustment to prevent adverse effects. Levetiracetam, gabapentin, pregabalin, and lacosamide are drugs of choice for treatment of partial-onset seizures in post-transplant patients given their efficacy spectrum, generally excellent tolerability, and lack of drug interaction potential. Levetiracetam is the drug of choice for primary generalized seizures in post-transplant patients. When intravenous drugs are necessary for acute seizure management, benzodiazepines and

  9. Bioengineering in organ transplantation: targeting the liver.

    PubMed

    Fukumitsu, K; Yagi, H; Soto-Gutierrez, A

    2011-01-01

    About 27,000 deaths are registered annually in the United States due to liver disease. At this time, the only definitive treatment of hepatic failure is orthotopic transplantation. However, there is a critical shortage of organs with the total waiting list for all organs currently at 100,000 requests. The number is increasing by 5% every year. Given that only organs in pristine condition are transplantable and that the hidden demand for organs as an anti-aging solution will be many times the current figures, orthotopic transplantation will always remain a limited pool. The increasing donor organ shortage requires consideration of alternative emerging technologies. Regenerative medicine may offer novel strategies to treat patients with end-stage organ failure. The ultimate aim of cell transplantation, tissue engineering, and stem cells is to regenerate tissues and organs. With the development of whole organ decellularization methods, the equation of organ shortage may dramatically change in the near future. Decellularized organs provide the ideal transplantable scaffold with all the necessary microstructure and extracellular cues for cell attachment, differentiation, vascularization, and function. New techniques to re-engineer organs may have major implications for the fields of drug discovery, regeneration biology, and ultimately organ transplantation. In this review we have provided an overview of complementary approaches to study and enhance the success of organ repopulation strategies creating new grafts/organs for transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Ethics and practice in organ transplantation in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Ricci-Murphy, J A; Ress, B; Axt, C

    2000-04-01

    In sum, much more needs to be known about the issue of transplantation in HIV-infected patients before the current state of extremely limited access to transplantation for these patients can be medically and ethically justified. Approaches to remedy this situation may include well-designed outcome studies; revision of existing local, regional, and national policies to better reflect the current state of knowledge; and education of clinicians, patients, and the public about this topic. Nurses can effect change in this area as informed clinicians, patients' advocates, researchers, and policy makers.

  11. Organ Transplantation in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Shaheen, Faissal A M

    2016-07-01

    Organ transplantation started in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA) in 1979 with a kidney transplanted from a live donor. The Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation has been established in 1985 as a governmental agency that supervises all national transplant activities in the KSA. Organ transplantation in the KSA has made great strides since 1985. Saudi Center for Organ Transplantation is playing a central role in all aspects of transplantation including education on all levels, allocation, coordination and procurement. A new initiative has started an ambitious program in 2014 to improve the identification and reporting of organ donors aiming at an annual rate of 15 donors per million populations within 3 years in the KSA.

  12. Factors associated with chronic hepatitis in patients with hepatitis E virus infection who have received solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Kamar, Nassim; Garrouste, Cyril; Haagsma, Elizabeth B; Garrigue, Valérie; Pischke, Sven; Chauvet, Cécile; Dumortier, Jérome; Cannesson, Amélie; Cassuto-Viguier, Elisabeth; Thervet, Eric; Conti, Filomena; Lebray, Pascal; Dalton, Harry R; Santella, Robert; Kanaan, Nada; Essig, Marie; Mousson, Christiane; Radenne, Sylvie; Roque-Afonso, Anne Marie; Izopet, Jacques; Rostaing, Lionel

    2011-05-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection can cause chronic hepatitis in recipients of solid organ transplants. However, the factors that contribute to chronic infection and the outcomes of these patients are incompletely understood. We performed a retrospective analysis of data from 17 centers from Europe and the United States that described the progression, outcomes, and factors associated with development of chronic HEV infection in recipients of transplanted solid organs. We studied data from 85 recipients of solid organ transplants who were infected with HEV. Chronic HEV infection was defined by the persistent increases in levels of liver enzymes and polymerase chain reaction evidence of HEV in the serum and/or stool for at least 6 months. Fifty-six patients (65.9%) developed chronic hepatitis. Univariate analysis associated liver transplant, shorter times since transplant, lower levels of liver enzymes and serum creatinine, lower platelet counts, and tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy (rather than cyclosporin A) with chronic hepatitis. On multivariate analysis, the independent predictive factors associated with chronic HEV infection were the use of tacrolimus rather than cyclosporin A (odds ratio [OR], 1.87; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.49-1.97; P = .004) and a low platelet count at the time of diagnosis with HEV infection (OR, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.001-1.1; P = .04). Of patients with chronic hepatitis, 18 (32.1%) achieved viral clearance after the dose of immunosuppressive therapy was reduced. No HEV reactivation was observed after HEV clearance. HEV infection causes chronic hepatitis in more than 60% of recipients of solid organ transplants. Tacrolimus therapy is the main predictive factor for chronic hepatitis. Dose reductions of immunosuppressive therapy resulted in viral clearance in more than 30% of patients. Copyright © 2011 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Histoplasmosis after solid organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Assi, Maha; Martin, Stanley; Wheat, L Joseph; Hage, Chadi; Freifeld, Alison; Avery, Robin; Baddley, John W; Vergidis, Paschalis; Miller, Rachel; Andes, David; Young, Jo-Anne H; Hammoud, Kassem; Huprikar, Shirish; McKinsey, David; Myint, Thein; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Esguerra, Eden; Kwak, E J; Morris, Michele; Mullane, Kathleen M; Prakash, Vidhya; Burdette, Steven D; Sandid, Mohammad; Dickter, Jana; Ostrander, Darin; Antoun, Smyrna Abou; Kaul, Daniel R

    2013-12-01

    To improve our understanding of risk factors, management, diagnosis, and outcomes associated with histoplasmosis after solid organ transplant (SOT), we report a large series of histoplasmosis occurring after SOT. All cases of histoplasmosis in SOT recipients diagnosed between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2010 at 24 institutions were identified. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. One hundred fifty-two cases were identified: kidney (51%), liver (16%), kidney/pancreas (14%), heart (9%), lung (5%), pancreas (2%), and other (2%). The median time from transplant to diagnosis was 27 months, but 34% were diagnosed in the first year after transplant. Twenty-eight percent of patients had severe disease (requiring intensive care unit admission); 81% had disseminated disease. Urine Histoplasma antigen detection was the most sensitive diagnostic method, positive in 132 of 142 patients (93%). An amphotericin formulation was administered initially to 73% of patients for a median duration of 2 weeks; step-down therapy with an azole was continued for a median duration of 12 months. Ten percent of patients died due to histoplasmosis with 72% of deaths occurring in the first month after diagnosis; older age and severe disease were risk factors for death from histoplasmosis. Relapse occurred in 6% of patients. Although late cases occur, the first year after SOT is the period of highest risk for histoplasmosis. In patients who survive the first month after diagnosis, treatment with an amphotericin formulation followed by an azole for 12 months is usually successful, with only rare relapse.

  14. Varicella zoster virus (VZV) and herpes simplex virus (HSV) in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Zuckerman, R A; Limaye, A P

    2013-02-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) and the two herpes simplex viruses (HSV) are human α-herpesviruses that establish life-long latency in neural ganglia after initial primary infection. In the solid organ transplant (SOT) population, manifestations of VZV or HSV may be seen in up to 70% of recipients if no prophylaxis is used, some of them life and organ threatening. While there are effective vaccines to prevent VZV primary infection and reactivation in immunocompetent adults, these vaccines are contraindicated after SOT because they are live-virus vaccines. For HSV, prevention has focused primarily on antiviral strategies because the immunologic correlates of protection and control are different from VZV, making vaccine development more challenging. Current antiviral therapy remains effective for the majority of clinical VZV and HSV infections. © Copyright 2013 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  15. The effect of music therapy on relaxation, anxiety, pain perception, and nausea in adult solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Madson, Amy T; Silverman, Michael J

    2010-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients characteristically experience low levels of relaxation and high levels of anxiety, pain, and nausea. Although music therapy has demonstrated effectiveness in ameliorating these types of conditions with patients in other areas of medical hospitals, no studies have evaluated the effects of music therapy on solid organ transplant patients. The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of music therapy on anxiety, relaxation, pain, and nausea levels in recovering patients on the adult transplant unit of the hospital utilizing a pre-posttest design. Participants (N = 58) received an individual 15-35 minute music therapy session consisting of live patient-preferred music and therapeutic social interaction. To remain consistent with the hospital's evaluative instruments during this pilot study, participants' self-reported levels of anxiety, relaxation, pain, and nausea, were based on separate 10-point Likert-type scales. The principal investigator observed affect and verbalizations at pre and posttest. Results indicated there were significant improvements in self-reported levels of relaxation, anxiety (both p < .001), pain (p < .01), and nausea (p < .05). Although there was no reliability measure, there were significant increases in positive verbalizations and positive affect (p < .001). All participants reported that they would desire music therapy again during a future long-term hospital stay. From the results of this exploratory study, it seems that music therapy can be a viable psychosocial intervention for hospitalized postoperative solid transplant patients. Implications for clinical practice and suggestions for future research are provided.

  16. Fungal infections in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Fernanda P; Husain, Shahid

    2007-06-01

    Fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients continue to be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality. Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. account for most invasive fungal infections. The incidence of fungal infection varies with type of solid organ transplant. Liver transplant recipients have highest reported incidence of candida infections while lung transplant recipients have highest rate of Aspergillus infections. Recent epidemiological studies suggest the emergence of resistant strains of candida as well as mycelial fungi other than Aspergillus in these patients. The current review incorporates the recent changes in the epidemiology of fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients and highlights the newer data on the diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment of fungal infections in these patients.

  17. Oral manifestations in transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Nappalli, Deepika; Lingappa, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation is a widely undertaken procedure and has become an important alternative for the treatment of different end-stage organ diseases that previously had a poor prognosis. The field of organ transplant and hematopoietic stem cell transplant is developing rapidly. The increase in the number of transplant recipients also has an impact on oral and dental services. Most of the oral problems develop as a direct consequence of drug-induced immunosuppression or the procedure itself. These patients may present with oral complaints due to infections or mucosal lesions. Such lesions should be identified, diagnosed, and treated. New treatment strategies permit continuous adaptation of oral care regimens to the changing scope of oral complications. The aim of this review is to analyze those oral manifestations and to discuss the related literature. PMID:26005458

  18. Invasive Trichophyton rubrum mimicking blastomycosis in a patient with solid organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Talebi-Liasi, Faezeh; Shinohara, Michi M

    2017-09-01

    We present a case of tissue invasive Trichophyton rubrum (T. rubrum) histologically mimicking blastomycosis in a patient with kidney transplant on chronic immunosuppression. Invasive dermatophyte infections are rare, and present a diagnostic challenge to the dermatopathologist due to atypical clinical and histopathological presentations. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Kidney transplantation in obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Tran, Minh-Ha; Foster, Clarence E; Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar; Ichii, Hirohito

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization estimated that in 2014, over 600 million people met criteria for obesity. In 2011, over 30% of individuals undergoing kidney transplant had a body mass index (BMI) 35 kg/m2 or greater. A number of recent studies have confirmed the relationship between overweight/obesity and important comorbidities in kidney transplant patients. As with non-transplant surgeries, the rate of wound and soft tissue complications are increased following transplant as is the incidence of delayed graft function. These two issues appear to contribute to longer length of stay compared to normal BMI. New onset diabetes after transplant and cardiac outcomes also appear to be increased in the obese population. The impact of obesity on patient survival after kidney transplantation remains controversial, but appears to mirror the impact of extremes of BMI in non-transplant populations. Early experience with (open and laparoscopic) Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy support excellent weight loss (in the range of 50%-60% excess weight lost at 1 year), but experts have recommended the need for further studies. Long term nutrient deficiencies remain a concern but in general, these procedures do not appear to adversely impact absorption of immunosuppressive medications. In this study, we review the literature to arrive at a better understanding of the risks related to renal transplantation among individuals with obesity. PMID:27011911

  20. Growth following solid organ transplantation in childhood.

    PubMed

    Laster, M L; Fine, R N

    2014-03-01

    One of the ultimate goals of successful transplantation in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients is the attainment of optimal final adult height. This manuscript will discuss the attainment of height following solid organ transplantation in pediatric recipients of kidney, liver, heart, lung, and small bowel transplantation. Age is a primary factor with younger recipients exhibiting the greatest immediate catch up growth. Graft function is a significant contributory factor with a reduction in glomerular filtration rate correlating with poor growth in kidney recipients and the need for re-transplantation with impaired growth in liver recipients. The known adverse impact of steroids on growth has led to modification of steroid dosage and even to steroid withdrawal and steroid avoidance. In kidney and liver recipients, this has been associated with the development on occasion of acute rejection episodes. In infant heart transplantation, avoidance of maintenance corticosteroid immunosuppression is associated with normal growth velocity in the majority of patients. With marked improvement in patient and graft survival rates in pediatric organ graft recipients, it is timely that the quality of life issues, such as normal adult height, receive paramount attention. In general, normal growth post-transplantation should be an achievable goal that results in normal adult height for many solid organ transplantation recipients.

  1. Mycoses in the transplanted patient.

    PubMed

    Dictar, M O; Maiolo, E; Alexander, B; Jacob, N; Verón, M T

    2000-01-01

    The incidence of invasive fungal infection (IFI) has increased considerably over the past 20 years, and transplant recipients are at especially high risk for fungal infections owing to their overall immunosuppressed condition. Organ transplantation procedures were incorporated as a therapeutic option for many patients who lacked the normal functions of organs such as the heart, liver, kidney, lung, pancreas and small bowel. The prevalence of IFI in solid organ transplant (SOTR) patients ranges from 5 to 50% in kidney and liver transplants, respectively. In bone marrow transplant (BMT) patients, IFI are major causes of morbidity and mortality due to the protracted neutropenic period and graft-versus-host disease. Candida spp. and Aspergillus spp. account for >80% of fungal episodes in both SOTR and BMT. The development of new immunosuppressive agents, new prophylaxis strategies (as pre-emptive therapy) and the improvement in surgical techniques led to increase survival of transplant recipients. In this session, a clear and concise update of the recent advances in the laboratory diagnosis of candidiasis and aspergillosis in this kind of patients was presented. However, we still need to establish more rapid, sensitive and specific methods for IFI diagnosis. Representatives of the 'Subcomision de Infecciones en el Paciente Neutropenico y Transplantado (SIPNYT)' de la Sociedad Argentina de Infectologia (SADI), presented the results of an unusual multicenter study both retrospective and descriptive studies of IFI in SOTR and BMT patients in Argentina. In addition, a study of IFI in 1,861 SOTR patients from four centers and the analysis of IFI in 2,066 BMT patients from all 12 BMT centers from Argentina was presented. From these studies it can be concluded that 'all transplant recipients are not the same' and that they should be stratified according to their different risk degrees in order to determine the best prophylaxis and treatment strategies.

  2. Tuberculosis of the central nervous system in immunocompromised patients: HIV infection and solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Christina A; Zunt, Joseph R

    2011-11-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating infection with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide and may manifest as meningitis, tuberculoma, abscess, or other forms of disease. Immunosuppression, due to either human immunodeficiency virus infection or solid organ transplantation, increases susceptibility for acquiring or reactivating TB and complicates the management of underlying immunosuppression and CNS TB infection. This article reviews how immunosuppression alters the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of TB infections of the CNS.

  3. Tuberculosis of the Central Nervous System in Immunocompromised Patients: HIV Infection and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) tuberculosis (TB) is a devastating infection with high rates of morbidity and mortality worldwide and may manifest as meningitis, tuberculoma, abscess, or other forms of disease. Immunosuppression, due to either human immunodeficiency virus infection or solid organ transplantation, increases susceptibility for acquiring or reactivating TB and complicates the management of underlying immunosuppression and CNS TB infection. This article reviews how immunosuppression alters the clinical presentation, diagnosis, treatment, and outcome of TB infections of the CNS. PMID:21960714

  4. [Modern immunosuppression after solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Beimler, J; Morath, C; Zeier, M

    2014-02-01

    The one common factor in solid organ transplantation is the need for lifelong maintenance immunosuppression. Drug regimens after organ transplantation typically comprise a combination of different immunosuppressive drugs. In most cases a triple drug regimen with different mechanisms of action is used. The aim is to improve both patient and graft survival while minimizing potential side effects of immunosuppressive medication. The basis of most immunosuppressive regimens is calcineurin inhibitors in combination with mycophenolic acid. There are various stages of immunosuppression after solid organ transplantation involving induction therapy, initial and long-term maintenance therapy. In each phase an individual combination of immunosuppressants is set up depending on the risk profile of the individual patient to prevent transplant rejection and organ loss. Based on these considerations, concepts of calcineurin inhibitor or steroid reduction have been established in transplant medicine in recent years. The key role in terms of development of new immunosuppressive strategies is taken by kidney transplantation, the most common solid organ transplantation performed.

  5. Solid Organ Transplantation in Patients with Inflammatory Bowel Diseases (IBD): Analysis of Transplantation Outcome and IBD Activity in a Large Single Center Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Schnitzler, Fabian; Friedrich, Matthias; Stallhofer, Johannes; Schönermarck, Ulf; Fischereder, Michael; Habicht, Antje; Karbalai, Nazanin; Wolf, Christiane; Angelberger, Marianne; Olszak, Torsten; Beigel, Florian; Tillack, Cornelia; Göke, Burkhard; Zachoval, Reinhart; Denk, Gerald; Guba, Markus; Rust, Christian; Grüner, Norbert; Brand, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Background Currently, limited data of the outcome of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in patients after solid organ transplantation (SOT) are available. We aimed to analyze effects of SOT on the IBD course in a large IBD patient cohort. Methods Clinical data from 1537 IBD patients were analyzed for patients who underwent SOT (n = 31) between July 2002 and May 2014. Sub-analyses included SOT outcome parameters, IBD activity before and after SOT, and efficacy of IBD treatment. Results 4.74% of patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) and 0.84% of patients with Crohn’s disease (CD) underwent SOT (p = 2.69 x 10−6, UC vs. CD). 77.4% of patients with SOT underwent liver transplantation (LTx) with tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive therapy after SOT. All LTx were due to primary sclerosing cholangitis (PSC) or PSC overlap syndromes. Six patients (19.4%) required renal transplantation and one patient (3.2%) heart transplantation. A survival rate of 83.9% after a median follow-up period of 103 months was observed. Before SOT, 65.0% of patients were in clinical remission and 5 patients received immunosuppressive therapy (16.1%). After SOT, 61.0% of patients were in remission (p = 1.00 vs. before SOT) and 29.0% required IBD-specific immunosuppressive or anti-TNF therapy (p = 0.54 vs. before SOT). 42.9% of patients with worsening of IBD after SOT were at higher risk of needing steroid therapy for increased IBD activity (p = 0.03; relative risk (RR): 10.29; 95% CI 1.26–84.06). Four patients (13.0%) needed anti-TNF therapy after SOT (response rate 75%). Conclusions SOT was more common in UC patients due to the higher prevalence of PSC-related liver cirrhosis in UC. Despite mainly tacrolimus-based immunosuppressive regimens, outcome of SOT and IBD was excellent in this cohort. In this SOT cohort, concomitant immunosuppressive therapy due to IBD was well tolerated. PMID:26288187

  6. Histoplasmosis After Solid Organ Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Assi, Maha; Martin, Stanley; Wheat, L. Joseph; Hage, Chadi; Freifeld, Alison; Avery, Robin; Baddley, John W.; Vergidis, Paschalis; Miller, Rachel; Andes, David; Young, Jo-Anne H.; Hammoud, Kassem; Huprikar, Shirish; McKinsey, David; Myint, Thein; Garcia-Diaz, Julia; Esguerra, Eden; Kwak, E. J.; Morris, Michele; Mullane, Kathleen M.; Prakash, Vidhya; Burdette, Steven D.; Sandid, Mohammad; Dickter, Jana; Ostrander, Darin; Antoun, Smyrna Abou; Kaul, Daniel R.

    2013-01-01

    Background. To improve our understanding of risk factors, management, diagnosis, and outcomes associated with histoplasmosis after solid organ transplant (SOT), we report a large series of histoplasmosis occurring after SOT. Methods. All cases of histoplasmosis in SOT recipients diagnosed between 1 January 2003 and 31 December 2010 at 24 institutions were identified. Demographic, clinical, and laboratory data were collected. Results. One hundred fifty-two cases were identified: kidney (51%), liver (16%), kidney/pancreas (14%), heart (9%), lung (5%), pancreas (2%), and other (2%). The median time from transplant to diagnosis was 27 months, but 34% were diagnosed in the first year after transplant. Twenty-eight percent of patients had severe disease (requiring intensive care unit admission); 81% had disseminated disease. Urine Histoplasma antigen detection was the most sensitive diagnostic method, positive in 132 of 142 patients (93%). An amphotericin formulation was administered initially to 73% of patients for a median duration of 2 weeks; step-down therapy with an azole was continued for a median duration of 12 months. Ten percent of patients died due to histoplasmosis with 72% of deaths occurring in the first month after diagnosis; older age and severe disease were risk factors for death from histoplasmosis. Relapse occurred in 6% of patients. Conclusions. Although late cases occur, the first year after SOT is the period of highest risk for histoplasmosis. In patients who survive the first month after diagnosis, treatment with an amphotericin formulation followed by an azole for 12 months is usually successful, with only rare relapse. PMID:24046304

  7. Results from a horizon scan on risks associated with transplantation of human organs, tissues and cells: from donor to patient.

    PubMed

    Herberts, C A; Park, M V D Z; Pot, J W G A; de Vries, C G J C A

    2015-03-01

    The successful transplantation of human materials such as organs, tissues and cells into patients does not only depend on the benefits, but also on the mitigation of risks. To gain insight into recent publications on risks associated with the process of transferring human materials from donor to recipient we performed a horizon scan by reviewing scientific literature and news websites of 2011 on this subject. We found there is ample information on how extended donor criteria, such as donor age, affect the survival rates of organs or patients. Interestingly, gender mismatch does not appear to be a major risk factor in organ rejection. Data on risks of donor tumor transmission was very scarce; however, risk categories for various tumor types have been suggested. In order to avoid rejection, a lot of research is directed towards engineering tissues from a patient's own tissues and cells. Some but not all of these developments have reached the clinic. Developments in the field of stem cell therapy are rapid. However, many hurdles are yet to be overcome before these cells can be applied on a large scale in the clinic. The processes leading to genetic abnormalities in cells differentiated from stem cells need to be identified in order to avoid transplantation of aberrant cells. New insights have been obtained on storage and preservation of human materials, a critical step for success of their clinical use. Likewise, quality management systems have been shown to improve the quality and safety of human materials used for transplantation.

  8. Cutaneous malignancies in immunosuppressed organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Seda, Ivette M Sosa; Zubair, Adeel; Brewer, Jerry D

    2014-01-01

    During the past century, organ transplantation has delivered the miracle of life to more than 500,000 patients in need. Secondary malignancies have developed as an unforeseen consequence of intense immunosuppressive regimens. Cutaneous malignancies have been recognized as the most frequent cancer that arises post-transplantation. Among organ transplant recipients (OTRs), skin cancer is a substantial cause of morbidity and potential mortality. The authors discuss epidemiology and clinical presentation of cutaneous malignancies; associated risk factors; recommendation for the care of immunosuppressed OTRs, and emerging therapies on the horizon.

  9. Future of liver transplantation: non-human primates for patient-specific organs from induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2011-08-28

    Strategies to fill the huge gap in supply versus demand of human organs include bioartificial organs, growing humanized organs in animals, cell therapy, and implantable bioengineered constructs. Reproducing the complex relations between different cell types, generation of adequate vasculature, and immunological complications are road blocks in generation of bioengineered organs, while immunological complications limit the use of humanized organs produced in animals. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) biology offer a possibility of generating human, patient-specific organs in non-human primates (NHP) using patient-derived iPSC and NHP-derived iPSC lacking the critical developmental genes for the organ of interest complementing a NHP tetraploid embryo. The organ derived in this way will have the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile as the patient. This approach can be curative in genetic disorders as this offers the possibility of gene manipulation and correction of the patient's genome at the iPSC stage before tetraploid complementation. The process of generation of patient-specific organs such as the liver in this way has the great advantage of making use of the natural signaling cascades in the natural milieu probably resulting in organs of great quality for transplantation. However, the inexorable scientific developments in this direction involve several social issues and hence we need to educate and prepare society in advance to accept the revolutionary consequences, good, bad and ugly.

  10. The dilemma of "to be or not to be": developing electronically e-health & cloud computing documents for overseas transplant patients from Taiwan organ transplant health professionals' perspective.

    PubMed

    Shih, F-J; Fan, Y-W; Chiu, C-M; Shih, F-Ji; Wang, S-S

    2012-05-01

    The development of mutually accessible e-health documents (ehD) and cloud computing (CC) for overseas organ transplant health professionals (OTHP) in two medical parties (domestic and overseas) would ensure better quality of care. This project attempted to compare pro and con arguments from the perspective of Taiwan's OTHP. A sample was obtained from three leading medical centers in Taiwan. Eighty subjects including transplant surgeons (n = 20), registered nurses (RN; n = 30), coordinating nurses (OTCN; n = 15), and e-health information and communication technologies experts (ehICTs; n = 15) participated in this research. The pros of developing ehD were: (1) better and continuous care through communication and cooperation in two parties (78%); (2) better collaborative efforts between health professionals, information technology experts in two medical parties is (74%); (3) easier retrieval and communication of personal health documents with the trustworthy OTHP in the different countries (71%); and (4) CC may help develop transplant patients medical cloud based on the collaboration between medical systems in political parties of Taiwan and mainland China (69%). The cons of developing ehD and CC included: (1) inadequate knowledge of benefits and manuals of developing ehD and CC (75%); (2) no reliable communication avenues in developing ehD and CC (73%); (3) increased workload in direct care and documentation in developing new ehD and CC (70%); (4) lack of coaching and accreditation systems in medical, electronic, and law aspects to settle discrepancies in medical diagnosis and treatment protocols between two parties (68%); and (5) lacking systematic ehD and CC plans developed by interdisciplinary teams in two parties (60%). In this initial phase, the establishment of an interdisciplinary team including transplant leaders, transplant surgeon, RN, OTCN, ehICTs, and law experts from two parties might be helpful in working out developing plans with careful monitoring

  11. Neurological Complications of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pruitt, Amy A.; Graus, Francesc; Rosenfeld, Myrna R.

    2013-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is the preferred treatment for an expanding range of conditions whose successful therapy has produced a growing population of chronically immunosuppressed patients with potential neurological problems. While the spectrum of neurological complications varies with the type of organ transplanted, the indication for the procedure, and the intensity of long-term required immunosuppression, major neurological complications occur with all SOT types. The second part of this 2-part article on transplantation neurology reviews central and peripheral nervous system problems associated with SOT with clinical and neuroimaging examples from the authors’ institutional experience. Particular emphasis is given to conditions acquired from the donated organ or tissue, problems specific to types of organs transplanted and drug therapy-related complications likely to be encountered by hospitalists. Neurologically important syndromes such as immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS), posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome (PRES), and posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) are readdressed in the context of SOT. PMID:24167649

  12. Future of liver transplantation: Non-human primates for patient-specific organs from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanal, Madhusudana Girija

    2011-01-01

    Strategies to fill the huge gap in supply versus demand of human organs include bioartificial organs, growing humanized organs in animals, cell therapy, and implantable bioengineered constructs. Reproducing the complex relations between different cell types, generation of adequate vasculature, and immunological complications are road blocks in generation of bioengineered organs, while immunological complications limit the use of humanized organs produced in animals. Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) biology offer a possibility of generating human, patient-specific organs in non-human primates (NHP) using patient-derived iPSC and NHP-derived iPSC lacking the critical developmental genes for the organ of interest complementing a NHP tetraploid embryo. The organ derived in this way will have the same human leukocyte antigen (HLA) profile as the patient. This approach can be curative in genetic disorders as this offers the possibility of gene manipulation and correction of the patient’s genome at the iPSC stage before tetraploid complementation. The process of generation of patient-specific organs such as the liver in this way has the great advantage of making use of the natural signaling cascades in the natural milieu probably resulting in organs of great quality for transplantation. However, the inexorable scientific developments in this direction involve several social issues and hence we need to educate and prepare society in advance to accept the revolutionary consequences, good, bad and ugly. PMID:21990949

  13. Advances in organ preservation for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Ahmer M; Hawthorne, Wayne J; Pleass, Henry C

    2016-08-04

    Organ transplantation provides the best available therapy for a myriad of medical conditions, including end-stage renal disease, hepatic failure and type I diabetes mellitus. The current clinical reality is, however, that there is a significant shortage of organs available for transplantation with respect to the number of patients on organ waiting lists. As such, methods to increase organ supply have been instituted, including improved donor management, organ procurement and preservation strategies, living organ donation, transplantation education and the increased utilization of donation after circulatory death and expanded criteria donors. In particular, especially over the last decade, we have witnessed a significant change in the way donor organs are preserved, away from static cold storage methods to more dynamic techniques centred on machine perfusion (MP). This review highlights the current state and future of organ preservation for transplantation, focusing on both abdominal and thoracic organs. In particular, we focus on MP preservation of renal, hepatic, pancreatic, cardiac and lung allografts, also noting relevant advances in Australasia. MP of organs after procurement holds considerable promise, and has the potential to significantly improve graft viability and function post-transplantation, especially in donors in whom acceptance criteria have been expanded.

  14. Psychiatric Aspects of Organ Transplantation and Donation

    PubMed Central

    Faeder, Sarah; Moschenross, Darcy; Rosenberger, Emily; Dew, Mary Amanda; DiMartini, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of the review Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals typically assist with evaluating and treating psychiatric and behavioral issues in transplant candidates, recipients and living organ donors. In this review recent findings on specific psychiatric issues in adult solid organ transplant candidates and recipients, as well as living donors are discussed as well as their relevance to clinical practice. Recent findings Patients with complex mental health and addiction histories can have outcomes similar to patients without these disorders but may require specialized pre-transplant preparation or post-transplant interventions to optimize their outcomes. Specific attention to the preparation and wellbeing of living donors is needed. Summary As transplant programs increasingly consider patients with complex mental health histories, psychiatrists and mental health professionals evaluating and treating these patients need to consider plans for early identification and treatment. Psychiatric care provided across the pre- to post-operative periods will best address the longitudinal care needs of patients with mental health disorders. Abstinence from substances and complete adherence to medical directives provides the best chance for optimal outcomes. Treatment of depression may improve transplant outcomes. Research is needed to identify effective interventions and the best strategies to engage patients to improve adherence. PMID:26186069

  15. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  16. CRTC2 polymorphism as a risk factor for the incidence of metabolic syndrome in patients with solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Quteineh, L; Bochud, P-Y; Golshayan, D; Crettol, S; Venetz, J-P; Manuel, O; Kutalik, Z; Treyer, A; Lehmann, R; Mueller, N J; Binet, I; van Delden, C; Steiger, J; Mohacsi, P; Dufour, J-F; Soccal, P M; Pascual, M; Eap, C B

    2017-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome after transplantation is a major concern following solid organ transplantation (SOT). The CREB-regulated transcription co-activator 2 (CRTC2) regulates glucose metabolism. The effect of CRTC2 polymorphisms on new-onset diabetes after transplantation (NODAT) was investigated in a discovery sample of SOT recipients (n1=197). Positive results were tested for replication in two samples from the Swiss Transplant Cohort Study (STCS, n2=1294 and n3=759). Obesity and other metabolic traits were also tested. Associations with metabolic traits in population-based samples (n4=46'186, n5=123'865, n6>100,000) were finally analyzed. In the discovery sample, CRTC2 rs8450-AA genotype was associated with NODAT, fasting blood glucose and body mass index (Pcorrected<0.05). CRTC2 rs8450-AA genotype was associated with NODAT in the second STCS replication sample (odd ratio (OR)=2.01, P=0.04). In the combined STCS replication samples, the effect of rs8450-AA genotype on NODAT was observed in patients having received SOT from a deceased donor and treated with tacrolimus (n=395, OR=2.08, P=0.02) and in non-kidney transplant recipients (OR=2.09, P=0.02). Moreover, rs8450-AA genotype was associated with overweight or obesity (n=1215, OR=1.56, P=0.02), new-onset hyperlipidemia (n=1007, OR=1.76, P=0.007), and lower high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (n=1214, β=-0.08, P=0.001). In the population-based samples, a proxy of rs8450G>A was significantly associated with several metabolic abnormalities. CRTC2 rs8450G>A appears to have an important role in the high prevalence of metabolic traits observed in patients with SOT. A weak association with metabolic traits was also observed in the population-based samples.

  17. Canadian Forum on Combined Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantarovich, Marcelo; Blydt-Hansen, Tom D; Gill, John; Tinckam, Kathryn; Schiff, Jeffrey; Alwayn, Ian; Bain, Vince; Dipchand, Anne I; Isaac, Debra; Kim, S Joseph; Lien, Dale; Zaltzman, Jeffrey; Young, Kimberly; Nickerson, Peter

    2016-06-01

    The Canadian Society of Transplantation and Canadian Blood Services conducted a consensus forum on combined renal/nonrenal transplants, as they are not part of Canadian organ-specific allocation models at present. The purpose of this initiative was to make recommendations, develop eligibility criteria, and a decision-making model on listing and allocation. Forty-two participants with expertise in combined transplantation participated in the consensus forum. The United States and Canadian data were reviewed. The consensus forum made recommendations regarding the following: (1) investigation of etiology, severity, duration, and level of renal dysfunction; (2) documentation of degree of nonreversible kidney injury; (3) eligibility for combined (either simultaneous or staged) transplantation; (4) research. Key recommendations were: (1) patients with end-stage nonrenal disease with estimated glomerular filtration rate less than 30 mL/min per 1.73 m for longer than 1 month or on dialysis less than 3 months, who fulfill criteria for nonreversibility of renal dysfunction (by level and duration of renal dysfunction, imaging, and pathology findings), would be eligible for combined renal/nonrenal transplantation; (2) patients on dialysis longer than 3 months would be eligible for combined renal/nonrenal transplantation; (3) staged renal after nonrenal transplantation with subsequent prioritized allocation of renal transplant was endorsed in selected cases. The validation and impact of these recommendations on allocation will require further studies.

  18. Outcomes in pediatric solid-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, Christopher; Baluarte, H Jorge; Meyers, Kevin E C

    2011-03-01

    LaR Pediatric solid-organ transplantation is an increasingly successful treatment for organ failure. Five- and 10-yr patient survival rates have dramatically improved over the last couple of decades, and currently, over 80% of pediatric patients survive into adolescence and young adulthood. Waiting list mortality has been a concern for liver, heart, and intestinal transplantation, illustrating the importance of transplant as a life-saving therapy. Unfortunately, the success of pediatric transplantation comes at the cost of long-term or late complications that arise as a result of allograft rejection or injury, immunosuppression-related morbidity, or both. As transplant recipients enter adolescence treatment, non-adherence becomes a significant issue, and the medical and psychosocial impacts transition to adulthood not only with regard to healthcare but also in terms of functional outcomes, economic potential, and overall QoL. This review addresses the clinical and psychosocial challenges encountered by pediatric transplant recipients in the current era. A better understanding of pediatric transplant outcomes and adult morbidity and mortality requires further ongoing assessment.

  19. Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection in Seronegative Kidney Transplant Patients Is Associated with Protracted Cold Ischemic Time of Seropositive Donor Organs.

    PubMed

    Schlott, Fabian; Steubl, Dominik; Hoffmann, Dieter; Matevossian, Edouard; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Hösel, Volker; Busch, Dirk H; Renders, Lutz; Neuenhahn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) can lead to primary infection or reactivation in CMV-seronegative or -seropositive kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Complications comprise severe end-organ diseases and acute or chronic transplant rejection. Risk for CMV manifestation is stratified according to the CMV-IgG-serostatus, with donor+/recipient- (D+/R-) patients carrying the highest risk for CMV-replication. However, risk factors predisposing for primary infection in CMV-seronegative recipients are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we monitored D+/R- high-risk patients undergoing kidney transplantation in combination with antiviral prophylaxis for the incidence of CMV-viremia for a median follow-up time of 784 days (156-1155 days). In this period, we analyzed the functional CMV-specific T cell response by intracellular cytokine staining and CMV-serology by ELISA. Only four of eight D+/R- patients developed clinically relevant CMV-viremia followed by seroconversion. Viremia triggered expansion of functional CMV-specific T cells correlating with protection against secondary CMV-reactivations. In contrast, all other patients remained permanently aviremic and showed no immunological correlate of infection after discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis for up to three years. Comparing cold ischemic times (CIT) of viremic (median = 1020 min; 720-1080 min) and aviremic patients (median = 335 min; 120-660 min) revealed significantly (p = 0.0286) protracted CIT in patients with primary CMV-infection. Taken together, primary CMV-infection affects only a subgroup of D+/R- patients correlating with length of CIT. Therefore, patients with extended CIT should be thoroughly monitored for CMV-replication well beyond discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis. In contrast, patients with short CIT remained permanently uninfected and might benefit from shorter prophylactic treatment.

  20. Primary Cytomegalovirus Infection in Seronegative Kidney Transplant Patients Is Associated with Protracted Cold Ischemic Time of Seropositive Donor Organs

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Dieter; Matevossian, Edouard; Lutz, Jens; Heemann, Uwe; Hösel, Volker; Busch, Dirk H.; Renders, Lutz; Neuenhahn, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Human Cytomegalovirus (CMV) can lead to primary infection or reactivation in CMV-seronegative or -seropositive kidney transplant recipients, respectively. Complications comprise severe end-organ diseases and acute or chronic transplant rejection. Risk for CMV manifestation is stratified according to the CMV-IgG-serostatus, with donor+/recipient- (D+/R-) patients carrying the highest risk for CMV-replication. However, risk factors predisposing for primary infection in CMV-seronegative recipients are still not fully elucidated. Therefore, we monitored D+/R- high-risk patients undergoing kidney transplantation in combination with antiviral prophylaxis for the incidence of CMV-viremia for a median follow-up time of 784 days (156–1155 days). In this period, we analyzed the functional CMV-specific T cell response by intracellular cytokine staining and CMV-serology by ELISA. Only four of eight D+/R- patients developed clinically relevant CMV-viremia followed by seroconversion. Viremia triggered expansion of functional CMV-specific T cells correlating with protection against secondary CMV-reactivations. In contrast, all other patients remained permanently aviremic and showed no immunological correlate of infection after discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis for up to three years. Comparing cold ischemic times (CIT) of viremic (median = 1020 min; 720–1080 min) and aviremic patients (median = 335 min; 120–660 min) revealed significantly (p = 0.0286) protracted CIT in patients with primary CMV-infection. Taken together, primary CMV-infection affects only a subgroup of D+/R- patients correlating with length of CIT. Therefore, patients with extended CIT should be thoroughly monitored for CMV-replication well beyond discontinuation of antiviral prophylaxis. In contrast, patients with short CIT remained permanently uninfected and might benefit from shorter prophylactic treatment. PMID:28129395

  1. [Christian religions and organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Kinnaert, P

    2008-01-01

    The present paper describes the position of catholic, protestant and orthodox Churches concerning the various aspects of organ retrieval and transplantation. The official position of the catholic Church, defined by the pope favors these activities if they respond to strict rules. The absence of magisterium in the protestant and orthodox Churches causes sometimes divergent opinions among the members of the clergy. However, there are convergences between the three religions. Theologians who are in favour of organ transplantation promote organ donation but consider that it is not mandatory. They do not admit the principle of presumed consent and organ commerce is expressly forbidden.

  2. Liver transplantation using organs from deceased organ donors: a single organ transplant center experience.

    PubMed

    Han, Ming; Guo, Zhi-Yong; Zhao, Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Ping; Yuan, Xiao-Peng; Jiao, Xing-Yuan; Yang, Chun-Hua; Wang, Dong-Ping; Ju, Wei-Qiang; Wu, Lin-Wei; Hu, An-Bin; Tai, Qiang; Ma, Yi; Zhu, Xiao-Feng; He, Xiao-Shun

    2014-08-01

    In 2011, a pilot program for deceased organ donation was initiated in China. We describe the first successful series of liver transplants in the pilot program. From July 2011 to August 2012, our center performed 26 liver transplants from a pool of 29 deceased donors. All organ donation and allograft procurement were conducted according to the national protocol. The clinical data of donors and recipients were collected and summarized retrospectively. Among the 29 donors, 24 were China Category II donors (organ donation after cardiac death), and five were China Category III donors (organ donation after brain death followed by cardiac death). The recipients were mainly the patients with hepatocellular carcinoma. The one-year patient survival rate was 80.8% with a median follow-up of 422 (2-696) days. Among the five mortalities during the follow-up, three died of tumor recurrence. In terms of post-transplant complications, 9 recipients (34.6%) experienced early allograft dysfunction, 1 (3.8%) had non-anastomotic biliary stricture, and 1 (3.8%) was complicated with hepatic arterial thrombosis. None of these complications resulted in patient death. Notably, primary non-function was not observed in any of the grafts. With careful donor selection, liver transplant from deceased donors can be performed safely and plays a critical role in overcoming the extreme organ shortage in China.

  3. Noteworthy Literature Published in 2016 for Abdominal Organ Transplant Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Zerillo, Jeron; Kim, Sang; Hill, Bryan; DeMaria, Samuel; Sakai, Tetsuro

    2017-03-01

    More than 400 peer-reviewed publications on the topic of pancreas transplantation, more than 400 on intestine transplantation, and more than 3000 on renal transplantation were published in 2016. This review will highlight the most pertinent literature for anesthesiologists caring for patients undergoing non-liver abdominal organ transplantation. This review is the second part in an annual series to review relevant contributions in the field of abdominal organ transplantation focusing on pancreas, intestine, and renal transplantation. We explore a myriad of topics, including outcomes determined by center size, novel assessment of intestine graft function, the effect of Zika virus on the transplant population, appropriate fluid management for renal transplantation, cardiovascular risk assessment in the transplant population, and several topics pertinent to optimizing patient and graft survival.

  4. Growth following solid organ transplantation in childhood.

    PubMed

    Fine, Richard N

    2014-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals of successful solid organ transplantation in pediatric recipients is attaining an optimal final adult height. This manuscript will discuss growth following transplantation in pediatric recipients of kidney, liver, heart, lung or small bowel transplants. Remarkably similar factors impact growth in all of these recipients. Age is a primary factor, with younger recipients exhibiting the greatest immediate catch-up growth. Graft function is a significant contributing factor, with a reduced glomerular filtration rate correlating with poor growth in kidney recipients and the need for re-transplantation with impaired growth in liver recipients. The known adverse impact of steroids on growth has led to modification of the steroid dose and even steroid withdrawal and avoidance. In kidney and liver recipients, this strategy has been associated with the development of acute rejection. In infant heart transplantation, avoiding maintenance corticosteroid immunosuppression is associated with normal growth velocity in the majority of patients. With marked improvements in patient and graft survival rates in pediatric organ recipients, quality of life issues, such as normal adult height, should now receive paramount attention. In general, normal growth following solid organ transplantation should be an achievable goal that results in normal adult height.

  5. Transitional care in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kerkar, Nanda; Annunziato, Rachel

    2015-04-01

    Pediatric solid organ transplantation has become an accepted modality of treatment in the last few decades. The number of childhood recipients of solid organ transplantation surviving to adulthood is correspondingly rising. This review examines the epidemiology of pediatric solid organ transplant recipients, and the challenges faced during transition to adult services, with suggestions for improvement in collaborative and coordinated care. Transition to adulthood has been established as a vulnerable period for recipients of a solid organ transplant. Assessment of readiness for transfer, allowing sufficient time for preparation before the actual transfer, involvement of all stakeholders, and inclusion of a transition coordinator are some of the components that can facilitate successful transition to the adult transplant program. This programmatic approach improves both quality of life and long-term graft and patient survival. Moreover, the economic benefits associated with avoiding frequent hospitalizations for graft dysfunction and preventing re-transplantation more than compensate for the costs related to establishing and maintaining a robust transition program.

  6. Synthetic Biology in Cell and Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Sean

    2017-02-01

    The transplantation of cells and organs has an extensive history, with blood transfusion and skin grafts described as some of the earliest medical interventions. The speed and efficiency of the human immune system evolved to rapidly recognize and remove pathogens; the human immune system also serves as a barrier against the transplant of cells and organs from even highly related donors. Although this shows the remarkable effectiveness of the immune system, the engineering of cells and organs that will survive in a host patient over the long term remains a steep challenge. Progress in the understanding of host immune responses to donor cells and organs, combined with the rapid advancement in synthetic biology applications, allows the rational engineering of more effective solutions for transplantation. Copyright © 2017 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Transplant tourism among kidney transplant patients in Eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okafor, U H

    2017-07-05

    Transplant tourism entails movement of recipient, donor or both to a transplant centre outside their country of residence. This has been reported in many countries; and has variously been associated with organ trade. The objective of this study is to determine the frequency and pattern of transplant tourism among transplant patients in Eastern Nigeria. This is a non randomized cross sectional study. All kidney transplant patients who presented at Enugu State University Teaching Hospital Parklane Enugu and Hilton Clinics Port Harcourt in Nigeria were recruited. The clinical parameters including the transplant details of all the patients were documented. The data obtained was analysed using SPSS package. A total of one hundred and twenty six patients were studied, 76.2% were males with M:F ratio of 3.2:1 and mean age of 46.9 ± 13.3 years. Fifty four and 58.7% of the patients were managed in a tertiary hospital and by a nephrologist respectively before referral for kidney transplant. Only 15.8% of the patients had their kidney transplant without delay: finance, lack of donor, logistics including delay in obtaining travelling documents were the common causes of the delay. Ninety percent of the patients had their transplant in India with majority of them using commercial donors. India was also the country with cheapest cost ($18,000.00). 69.8% were unrelated donors, 68.2% were commercial donors and 1.6% of the donors were spouse. All the commercial donors received financial incentives and each commercial donor received mean of 7580 ± 1280 dollars. Also 30.2% of the related donors demanded financial incentive. Transplant tourism is prevalent in eastern Nigeria.

  8. New Organ Allocation System for Combined Liver-Kidney Transplants and the Availability of Kidneys for Transplant to Patients with Stage 4-5 CKD.

    PubMed

    Asch, William S; Bia, Margaret J

    2016-12-27

    A new proposal has been created for establishing medical criteria for organ allocation in recipients receiving simultaneous liver-kidney transplants. In this article, we describe the new policy, elaborate on the points of greatest controversy, and offer a perspective on the policy going forward. Although we applaud the fact that simultaneous liver-kidney transplant activity will now be monitored and appreciate the creation of medical criteria for allocation in simultaneous liver-kidney transplants, we argue that some of the criteria proposed, especially those for allocating a kidney to a liver recipient with AKI, are too liberal. We call on the nephrology community to follow the consequences of this new policy and push for a re-examination of the longstanding policy of allocating kidneys to multiorgan transplant recipients before all other candidates. The charge to protect our system of equitable organ allocation is very challenging, but it is a challenge that we must embrace.

  9. Generic tacrolimus in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Taube, D; Jones, G; O'Beirne, J; Wennberg, L; Connor, A; Rasmussen, A; Backman, L

    2014-05-01

    The availability of a wide range of immunosuppressive therapies has revolutionized the management of patients who have undergone solid organ transplantation (SOT). However, the cost of immunosuppressive drugs remains high. This situation has led to the development of generic equivalents, which are similar in quality, safety, and efficacy to their approved innovator drugs. There are data available for three generic brands, tacrolimus (Intas), tacrolimus (PharOS), and tacrolimus (Sandoz). Bioequivalence has been demonstrated for generic tacrolimus (Sandoz) within a narrow therapeutic range to its innovator tacrolimus drug (Prograf) in both healthy volunteers and kidney transplant patients. Clinical experience with this generic tacrolimus formulation has also been established in both de novo and conversion patients who have undergone kidney and liver transplantation, as well as in conversion of other SOT patients, including lung and heart recipients.

  10. HLA Population Genetics in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kransdorf, Evan P; Pando, Marcelo J; Gragert, Loren; Kaplan, Bruce

    2017-09-01

    HLAs are fundamental to the adaptive immune response and play critical roles in the cellular and humoral response in solid organ transplantation. The genes encoding HLA proteins are the most polymorphic within the human genome, with thousands of different allelic variants known within the population. Application of the principles of population genetics to the HLA genes has resulted in the development of a numeric metric, the calculated panel-reactive antibody (CPRA) that predicts the likelihood of a positive crossmatch as a function of a transplant candidate's unacceptable HLA antigens. The CPRA is an indispensible measure of access to transplantation for sensitized candidates and is used as the official measure of sensitization for allocation of points in the US Kidney Allocation System and Eurotransplant. Here, we review HLA population genetics and detail the mathematical basis of the CPRA. An understanding of these principles by transplant clinicians will lay the foundation for continued innovation in the care of sensitized patients.

  11. Solid organ transplants following hematopoietic stem cell transplant in children.

    PubMed

    Bunin, Nancy; Guzikowski, Virginia; Rand, Elizabeth R; Goldfarb, Samuel; Baluarte, Jorge; Meyers, Kevin; Olthoff, Kim M

    2010-12-01

    SOT may be indicated for a select group of pediatric patients who experience permanent organ failure following HSCT. However, there is limited information available about outcomes. We identified eight children at our center who received an SOT following an HSCT. Patients were six months to 18 yr at HSCT. Diseases for which children underwent HSCT included thalassemia, Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome, Shwachman-Diamond/bone marrow failure, sickle cell disease (SCD), erythropoietic porphyria (EP), ALL, chronic granulomatous disease, and neuroblastoma. Time from HSCT to SOT was 13 days to seven yr (median, 27 months. Lung SOT was performed for two patients with BO, kidney transplants for three patients, and liver transplants for three patients (VOD, chronic GVHD). Seven patients are alive with functioning allografts 6-180 months from SOT. Advances in organ procurement, operative technique, immunosuppressant therapy, and infection control may allow SOT for a select group of patients post-HSCT. However, scarcity of donor organs available in a timely fashion continues to be a limiting factor. Children who have undergone HSCT and develop single organ failure should be considered for an SOT if there is a high likelihood of cure of the primary disease. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  12. Contraception and Fertility Awareness Among Women With Solid Organ Transplants

    PubMed Central

    French, Valerie A.; Davis, John S.; Sayles, Harlan S.; Wu, Serena S.

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the contraception and fertility counseling provided to women with solid organ transplants. METHODS A telephone survey of 309 women aged 19–49 years who had received a solid organ transplant at the University of Nebraska Medical Center was performed. Of the 309 eligible women, 183 responded. Patients were asked 19 questions regarding pretransplant and posttransplant fertility awareness and contraception counseling. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. RESULTS Patients had undergone a variety of solid organ transplantations: 40% kidney (n=73); 32% liver (n=59); 6% pancreas (n=11); 5% heart (n=9); 3% intestine (n=5); and 14% multiple organs (n=26). Before their transplantations, 79 women (44%) reported they were not aware that a woman could become pregnant after transplantation. Only 66 women aged 13 and older at the time of transplantation reported that a health care provider discussed contraception before transplantation. Approximately half of women surveyed were using a method of contraception. Oral contraceptive pills were the most commonly recommended method. Twenty-two of the 31 pregnancies after organ transplantation were planned, which is higher than that of the general population. CONCLUSION Few women with transplants are educated regarding the effect of organ transplantation on fertility and are not routinely counseled about contraception or the potential for posttransplant pregnancy. Health care providers should incorporate contraceptive and fertility counseling as part of routine care for women with solid organ transplants. PMID:24084538

  13. Contraception and fertility awareness among women with solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    French, Valerie A; Davis, John S; Sayles, Harlan S; Wu, Serena S

    2013-10-01

    To assess the contraception and fertility counseling provided to women with solid organ transplants. A telephone survey of 309 women aged 19-49 years who had received a solid organ transplant at the University of Nebraska Medical Center was performed. Of the 309 eligible women, 183 responded. Patients were asked 19 questions regarding pretransplant and posttransplant fertility awareness and contraception counseling. Data were summarized using descriptive statistics. Patients had undergone a variety of solid organ transplantations: 40% kidney (n=73); 32% liver (n=59); 6% pancreas (n=11); 5% heart (n=9); 3% intestine (n=5); and 14% multiple organs (n=26). Before their transplantations, 79 women (44%) reported they were not aware that a woman could become pregnant after transplantation. Only 66 women aged 13 and older at the time of transplantation reported that a health care provider discussed contraception before transplantation. Approximately half of women surveyed were using a method of contraception. Oral contraceptive pills were the most commonly recommended method. Twenty-two of the 31 pregnancies after organ transplantation were planned, which is higher than that of the general population. Few women with transplants are educated regarding the effect of organ transplantation on fertility and are not routinely counseled about contraception or the potential for posttransplant pregnancy. Health care providers should incorporate contraceptive and fertility counseling as part of routine care for women with solid organ transplants. : II.

  14. Aspergillus Infections in Transplant and Non-Transplant Surgical Patients

    PubMed Central

    Guidry, Christopher; Politano, Amani; Rosenberger, Laura; McLeod, Matthew; Hranjec, Tjasa; Sawyer, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Background: Aspergillus infections are associated commonly with immunocompromised states, such as transplantation and hematologic malignant disease. Although Aspergillus infections among patients having surgery occur primarily in transplant recipients, they are found in non-recipients of transplants, and have a mortality rate similar to that seen among transplant recipients. Methods: We conducted a retrospective analysis of a prospective data base collected from 1996 to 2010, in which we identified patients with Aspergillus infections. We compared demographic data, co-morbidities, and outcomes in non-transplant patients with those in abdominal transplant recipients. Continuous data were evaluated with the Student t-test, and categorical data were evaluated through χ2 analysis. Results: Twenty-three patients (11 transplant patients and 12 non-transplant patients) were identified as having had Aspergillus infections. The two groups were similar with regard to their demographics and co-morbidities, with the exceptions of their scores on the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II), of 23.6±8.1 points for transplant patients vs. 16.8±6.1 points for non-transplant patients (p=0.03); Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) of 16.6±8.3 points vs. 9.2±4.1 points, respectively (p=0.02); steroid use 91.0% vs. 25.0%, respectively (p=0.003); and percentage of infections acquired in the intensive care unit (ICU) 27.3% vs. 83.3%, respectively (p=0.01). The most common site of infection in both patient groups was the lung. The two groups showed no significant difference in the number of days from admission to treatment, hospital length of stay following treatment, or mortality. Conclusions: Although Aspergillus infections among surgical patients have been associated historically with solid-organ transplantation, our data suggest that other patients may also be susceptible to such infections, especially those in an ICU who are deemed to be critically ill

  15. The impact of RSV, adenovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza infection in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplant, solid organ transplant, or cancer chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Mindy S; Lee, Grace M; Gunawardane, Nilanthi; Burchett, Sandra K; Lachenauer, Catherine S; Lehmann, Leslie E

    2013-03-01

    RVIs are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised children. We analyzed the characteristics and outcomes of infection by four respiratory viruses (RSV, adenovirus, influenza, and parainfluenza) treated at a pediatric tertiary care hospital in a retrospective cohort of patients who had received cancer chemotherapy, hematopoietic stem cell, or SOT. A total of 208 infections were studied among 166 unique patients over a time period of 1993-2006 for transplant recipients, and 2000-2005 for patients with cancer. RSV was the most common respiratory virus identified. There were 17 (10% of all patients) deaths overall, of which 12 were at least partly attributed to the presence of a RVI. In multivariate models, LRT symptoms in the absence of upper respiratory symptoms on presentation (OR 10.2 [2.3, 45.7], p = 0.002) and adenoviral infection (OR 3.7 [1.1, 12.6], p = 0.034) were significantly associated with poor outcome, defined as death or disability related to RVI. All of the deaths occurred in patients who had received either solid organ or HSCT. There were no infections resulting in death or disability in the cancer chemotherapy group.

  16. The start of the transplant journey: referral for pediatric solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Shellmer, Diana; Brosig, Cheryl; Wray, Jo

    2014-03-01

    The focus of the majority of the psychosocial transplant literature is on post-transplant outcomes, but the transplant journey starts much earlier than this, at the point when transplantation is first considered and a referral for transplant evaluation is made. In this review, we cover information regarding the meaning of the referral process for solid organ transplantation. We discuss various factors of the referral for transplantation including the impact of referral on the pediatric patient and the family, potential expectations and misconceptions held by pediatric patients and parents, the role of health literacy, decision-making factors, and the informational needs of pediatric patients and parents. We elucidate steps that providers can take to enhance transplant referral and provide suggestions for much needed research within this area.

  17. The start of the transplant journey: Referral for pediatric solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shellmer, Diana; Brosig, Cheryl; Wray, Jo

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the majority of the psychosocial transplant literature is on post-transplant outcomes but the transplant journey starts much earlier than this, at the point when transplantation is first considered and a referral for transplant evaluation is made. In this review we cover information regarding the meaning of the referral process for solid organ transplantation. We discuss various factors of the referral for transplantation including the impact of referral on the pediatric patient and the family, potential expectations and misconceptions held by pediatric patients and parents, the role of health literacy, decision making factors, and the informational needs of pediatric patients and parents. We elucidate steps that providers can take to enhance transplant referral and provide suggestions for much needed research within this area. PMID:24438194

  18. The Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Organ commercialism, which targets vulnerable populations (such as illiterate and impoverished persons, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, and political or economic refugees) in resource-poor countries, has been condemned by international bodies such as the World Health Organization for decades. Yet in recent years, as a consequence of the increasing ease of Internet communication and the willingness of patients in rich countries to travel and purchase organs, organ trafficking and transplant tourism have grown into global problems. For example, as of 2006, foreigners received two-thirds of the 2000 kidney transplants performed annually in Pakistan. The Istanbul Declaration proclaims that the poor who sell their organs are being exploited, whether by richer people within their own countries or by transplant tourists from abroad. Moreover, transplant tourists risk physical harm by unregulated and illegal transplantation. Participants in the Istanbul Summit concluded that transplant commercialism, which targets the vulnerable, transplant tourism, and organ trafficking should be prohibited. And they also urged their fellow transplant professionals, individually and through their organizations, to put an end to these unethical activities and foster safe, accountable practices that meet the needs of transplant recipients while protecting donors. Countries from which transplant tourists originate, as well as those to which they travel to obtain transplants, are just beginning to address their respective responsibilities to protect their people from exploitation and to develop national self-sufficiency in organ donation. The Declaration should reinforce the resolve of governments and international organizations to develop laws and guidelines to bring an end to wrongful practices. “The legacy of transplantation is threatened by organ trafficking and transplant tourism. The Declaration of Istanbul aims to combat these activities and to preserve the nobility of organ

  19. The Declaration of Istanbul on Organ Trafficking and Transplant Tourism.

    PubMed

    2008-09-01

    Organ commercialism, which targets vulnerable populations (such as illiterate and impoverished persons, undocumented immigrants, prisoners, and political or economic refugees) in resource-poor countries, has been condemned by international bodies such as the World Health Organization for decades. Yet in recent years, as a consequence of the increasing ease of Internet communication and the willingness of patients in rich countries to travel and purchase organs, organ trafficking and transplant tourism have grown into global problems. For example, as of 2006, foreigners received two-thirds of the 2000 kidney transplants performed annually in Pakistan. The Istanbul Declaration proclaims that the poor who sell their organs are being exploited, whether by richer people within their own countries or by transplant tourists from abroad. Moreover, transplant tourists risk physical harm by unregulated and illegal transplantation. Participants in the Istanbul Summit concluded that transplant commercialism, which targets the vulnerable, transplant tourism, and organ trafficking should be prohibited. And they also urged their fellow transplant professionals, individually and through their organizations, to put an end to these unethical activities and foster safe, accountable practices that meet the needs of transplant recipients while protecting donors. Countries from which transplant tourists originate, as well as those to which they travel to obtain transplants, are just beginning to address their respective responsibilities to protect their people from exploitation and to develop national self-sufficiency in organ donation. The Declaration should reinforce the resolve of governments and international organizations to develop laws and guidelines to bring an end to wrongful practices. "The legacy of transplantation is threatened by organ trafficking and transplant tourism. The Declaration of Istanbul aims to combat these activities and to preserve the nobility of organ

  20. Organ transplant & the psychiatrist: An overview.

    PubMed

    Anil Kumar, B N; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar

    2015-04-01

    Organ transplantation has emerged as the saving grace for those who are suffering from end organ disease. Advent of modern surgical procedures and immunosuppressants further decrease morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses have shown that post-organ transplantation quality of life improves for social, physical and daily activity functioning, but not consistently for psychological health. Psychiatrists can play a useful role not only in selecting the best suitable candidate for the procedure by psychosocial screening but also to tackle post-operation psychological issues that trouble patients as well as caretakers and decrease their quality of life. Issues like selection of patients with psychiatric disorders and substance abuse for transplantation process and their treatment both pre- and post- operation, risky health behaviours, treatment adherence for immunosuppressants and psychological support for caretakers can be better addressed by a psychiatrist who is sensitive towards these issues. Prescribing various psychotropics and immunosuppressants in the background of impaired organ function and drug-drug interaction is further challenging. Thus, psychiatrists need to be knowledgeable about these issues and should be an integral part of organ transplantation team for overall better outcome.

  1. Organ transplant & the psychiatrist: An overview

    PubMed Central

    Anil Kumar, B.N.; Mattoo, Surendra Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation has emerged as the saving grace for those who are suffering from end organ disease. Advent of modern surgical procedures and immunosuppressants further decrease morbidity and mortality. Meta-analyses have shown that post-organ transplantation quality of life improves for social, physical and daily activity functioning, but not consistently for psychological health. Psychiatrists can play a useful role not only in selecting the best suitable candidate for the procedure by psychosocial screening but also to tackle post-operation psychological issues that trouble patients as well as caretakers and decrease their quality of life. Issues like selection of patients with psychiatric disorders and substance abuse for transplantation process and their treatment both pre- and post- operation, risky health behaviours, treatment adherence for immunosuppressants and psychological support for caretakers can be better addressed by a psychiatrist who is sensitive towards these issues. Prescribing various psychotropics and immunosuppressants in the background of impaired organ function and drug-drug interaction is further challenging. Thus, psychiatrists need to be knowledgeable about these issues and should be an integral part of organ transplantation team for overall better outcome. PMID:26112841

  2. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation. PMID:24860856

  3. Long-term outcomes of children after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jon Jin; Marks, Stephen D

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation has transformed the lives of many children and adults by providing treatment for patients with organ failure who would have otherwise succumbed to their disease. The first successful transplant in 1954 was a kidney transplant between identical twins, which circumvented the problem of rejection from MHC incompatibility. Further progress in solid organ transplantation was enabled by the discovery of immunosuppressive agents such as corticosteroids and azathioprine in the 1950s and ciclosporin in 1970. Today, solid organ transplantation is a conventional treatment with improved patient and allograft survival rates. However, the challenge that lies ahead is to extend allograft survival time while simultaneously reducing the side effects of immunosuppression. This is particularly important for children who have irreversible organ failure and may require multiple transplants. Pediatric transplant teams also need to improve patient quality of life at a time of physical, emotional and psychosocial development. This review will elaborate on the long-term outcomes of children after kidney, liver, heart, lung and intestinal transplantation. As mortality rates after transplantation have declined, there has emerged an increased focus on reducing longer-term morbidity with improved outcomes in optimizing cardiovascular risk, renal impairment, growth and quality of life. Data were obtained from a review of the literature and particularly from national registries and databases such as the North American Pediatric Renal Trials and Collaborative Studies for the kidney, SPLIT for liver, International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation and UNOS for intestinal transplantation.

  4. Psychiatric aspects of organ transplantation and donation.

    PubMed

    Faeder, Sarah; Moschenross, Darcy; Rosenberger, Emily; Dew, Mary Amanda; DiMartini, Andrea

    2015-09-01

    Psychiatrists and other mental health professionals typically assist with evaluating and treating psychiatric and behavioral issues in transplant candidates, recipients, and living organ donors. In this review recent findings on specific psychiatric issues in adult solid organ transplant candidates and recipients, as well as living donors are discussed as well as their relevance to clinical practice. Patients with complex mental health and addiction histories can have outcomes similar to patients without these disorders but may require specialized pretransplant preparation or posttransplant interventions to optimize their outcomes. Specific attention to the preparation and wellbeing of living donors is needed. As transplant programmes increasingly consider patients with complex mental health histories, psychiatrists, and mental health professionals evaluating and treating these patients need to consider plans for early identification and treatment. Psychiatric care provided across the preoperative to postoperative periods will best address the longitudinal care needs of patients with mental health disorders. Abstinence from substances and complete adherence to medical directives provides the best chance for optimal outcomes. Treatment of depression may improve transplant outcomes. Research is needed to identify effective interventions and the best strategies to engage patients to improve adherence. http://links.lww.com/YCO/A30.

  5. Hepatitis E virus quasispecies and the outcome of acute hepatitis E in solid-organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Lhomme, Sebastien; Abravanel, Florence; Dubois, Martine; Sandres-Saune, Karine; Rostaing, Lionel; Kamar, Nassim; Izopet, Jacques

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) infections are responsible for chronic hepatitis in immunocompromised patients, and this can evolve to cirrhosis. Like all RNA viruses, HEV exists as a mixture of heterogeneous viruses defining quasispecies. The relationship between the genetic heterogeneity described as a quasispecies, cytokine secretion, and the outcome of acute hepatitis in immunocompromised patients remains to be elucidated. We cloned and sequenced the region encoding the M and P capsid domains of HEV from eight solid-organ transplant (SOT) patients with acute HEV infection who subsequently cleared the virus and from eight SOT patients whose infection became chronic. We analyzed the cytokines and chemokines in the sera of these SOT patients by multianalyte profiling. The nucleotide sequence entropy and genetic distances were greater in patients whose infections became chronic. A lower K(a)/K(s) ratio was associated with the persistence of HEV. The patients who developed chronic infection had lower serum concentrations of interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor antagonist and soluble IL-2 receptor. Increased concentrations of the chemokines implicated in leukocyte recruitment to the liver were associated with persistent infection. Those patients with chronic HEV infection and progressing liver fibrosis had less quasispecies diversification during the first year than patients without liver fibrosis progression. Great quasispecies heterogeneity, a weak inflammatory response, and high serum concentrations of the chemokines involved in leukocyte recruitment to the liver in the acute phase were associated with persistent HEV infection. Slow quasispecies diversification during the first year was associated with rapidly developing liver fibrosis.

  6. Outcomes of third heart transplants in pediatric and young adult patients: analysis of the United Network for Organ Sharing database.

    PubMed

    Friedland-Little, Joshua M; Gajarski, Robert J; Yu, Sunkyung; Donohue, Janet E; Zamberlan, Mary C; Schumacher, Kurt R

    2014-09-01

    Repeat heart transplantation (re-HTx) is standard practice in many pediatric centers. There are limited data available on outcomes of third HTx after failure of a second graft. We sought to compare outcomes of third HTx in pediatric and young adult patients with outcomes of second HTx in comparable recipients. All recipients of a third HTx in whom the primary HTx occurred before 21 years of age were identified in the United Network for Organ Sharing database (1985 to 2011) and matched 1:3 with a control group of second HTx patients by age, era and re-HTx indication. Outcomes including survival, rejection and cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV) were compared between groups. There was no difference between third HTx patients (n = 27) and control second HTx patients (n = 79) with respect to survival (76% vs 80% at 1 year, 62% vs 58% at 5 years and 53% vs 34% at 10 years, p = 0.75), early (<1 year from HTx) rejection (33.3% vs 44.3%, p = 0.32) or CAV (14.8% vs 30.4%, p = 0.11). Factors associated with non-survival in third HTx patients included mechanical ventilation at listing or HTx, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation support at listing or HTx, and elevated serum bilirubin at HTx. Outcomes among recipients of a third HTx are similar to those with a second HTx in matched patients, with no difference in short- or long-term survival and comparable rates of early rejection and CAV. Although the occurrence of a third HTx remains relatively rare in the USA, consideration of a third HTx appears reasonable in appropriately selected patients. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increasing referral for renal transplant evaluation in recipients of nonrenal solid-organ transplants: a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Chandrakantan, Arun; de Mattos, Angelo M; Naftel, David; Crosswy, Apryl; Kirklin, James; Curtis, John J

    2006-07-01

    The use of cyclosporine and tacrolimus therapy in nonrenal (heart, heart/lung, lung, and liver) transplantation has resulted in improved patient and graft survival. Nephrotoxicity is one of the major side effects of tacrolimus and cyclosporine therapy and may lead to ESRD. The trend of referral of nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients for kidney transplant evaluation at a large multiorgan transplant center was examined. Records of all patients who were referred for renal transplantation at the University of Alabama between January 1, 1993, and June 30, 2004, were reviewed. Eighty (0.96%) of 8318 individuals had previously undergone a nonrenal solid-organ transplant and were included in the study. The majority (72%) of patients had their nonrenal transplants performed at the University of Alabama. Twenty-two patients had their nonrenal transplant performed elsewhere and had fewer data available for analysis. From the period 1993-1996 to 2001-2004, an 11-fold increase in the absolute number of referrals of patients with nonrenal transplants was noted. Of patients who were referred for transplant evaluation, 25 became recipients of kidney transplants with a predominance of living-donor transplants. Referral for kidney transplant evaluation among nonrenal solid-organ transplant recipients is increasing and will exacerbate the existing shortage of deceased-donor kidneys that are available for transplantation. There was a trend for liver transplant recipients compared with other solid-organ recipients to develop ESRD at a greater rate.

  8. Antiphospholipid syndrome, antiphospholipid antibodies and solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    González-Moreno, J; Callejas-Rubio, J L; Ríos-Fernández, R; Ortego-Centeno, N

    2015-11-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome is considered a high risk factor for any kind of surgery. Considering that all solid organ transplants are critically dependent on the patency of vascular anastomosis, there is much concern about the consequences this pro-thrombotic condition may have on transplantation. Relatively little information is available in the literature assessing the real risk that antiphospholipid syndrome or the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies represent in solid organ transplantation. The aim of this article is to review the literature related to transplantation of solid organs in patients diagnosed with antiphospholipid syndrome or patients with positive antiphospholipid antibodies.

  9. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for the...

  10. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for the...

  11. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in connection with organ transplant procedures only if the State plan includes written standards for the...

  12. An Asian perspective on organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tai, Michael Cheng-tek

    2009-01-01

    The organ transplantation seems to have become a route practice of modern medical treatment when a patient's organ fails providing that she/he can afford the cost and a suitable organ is found. This practice, however, was not without scepticism and reservation at least to some Asians, for instance, Japan has been reluctant to launch a brave search for organs to save any patient whose organs fail. The western world including Vatican has seen donating one's organ for transplantation to save others as an act of love. Compassion is one of the main teachings in Asian tradition too, therefore culturally, Asians should be in favour of this modern medical treatment. But the ancient teachings of Asia also call for respecting parents by carefully safeguarding the gift of body that they gave and abiding in Tao to follow the flow of nature. What will the Asian ancient sages say to this new modern medical technology? This article will examine the teachings of Confucianism, Taoism and Buddhism to find out how they respond to the procedures of organ transplantation.

  13. Changing Patterns of Foreigner Transplants in Korea and Overseas Organ Transplants among Koreans.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Hyung Joon; Kim, Hwi Won; Han, Miyeun; Jeon, Hee Jung; Kwon, Oh Jung; Ahn, Curie

    2017-08-31

    This study aimed to estimate the numbers of foreign patients seeking organ transplantation (OT) in Korea, and to examine the relationship between the trend of deceased donors in Korea and number of Korean patients seeking OT overseas since 2000. Data on foreigners who received a transplant in Korea were obtained from the Korean Network for Organ Sharing. Data on overseas transplants were obtained from 42 transplant centers surveyed through transplant coordinators. A total of 336 foreigners underwent OT (kidney transplantation [KT]: 174; liver transplantation [LT]: 162) in Korea between 2006 and 2016. The Mongolians were the most common foreigners who undergo KTs (32%), followed by the Chinese (18%), Americans (9%), and Emiratis (7%). Among foreigners undergoing LTs, the most common country of origin was Mongolia (39%), followed by United Arab Emirates (23%), China (13%), and the United States (6%). A total of 2206 Korean patients underwent overseas OT (KT: 977; LT: 1229) between 2000 and 2016. In 97% of overseas KT cases (n=942) and 98% (n=1205) of overseas LT cases, the transplantations were performed in China. The relationship between the number of deceased donors in Korea and the number of overseas transplants after 2006 indicates a highly negative correlation. (ρ= -0.988, p<0.001). This analysis of trends in Korean patients seeking OT overseas demonstrates the importance of multilateral approaches to address organ trafficking. National effort to achieve self-sufficiency by increasing activities for organ donations is 1 of the fundamental solutions to transplant tourism.

  14. Nonmelanoma Skin Cancer in Nonwhite Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Pritchett, Ellen N; Doyle, Alden; Shaver, Christine M; Miller, Brett; Abdelmalek, Mark; Cusack, Carrie Ann; Malat, Gregory E; Chung, Christina Lee

    2016-12-01

    Organ transplant recipients have a higher incidence of skin cancer. This risk is magnified over time and with continued exposure to immunosuppression. Skin cancer in nonwhite patients is associated with greater morbidity and mortality owing to diagnosis at a more advanced stage, which suggests that nonwhite organ transplant recipients are at even higher risk. To describe demographic and clinical factors and the incidence of skin cancer in nonwhite organ transplant recipients. We performed a retrospective medical record review of patients who were organ transplant recipients (154 were white and 259 nonwhite [black, Asian, Hispanic, Pacific Islander]) seen from November 1, 2011, to April 18, 2016 at an academic referral center. Variables were analyzed and compared between racial groups, including sex, age, race/ethnicity, Fitzpatrick type, type and location of skin cancer, type of organ transplanted, time to diagnosis of skin cancer after transplantation, and history of condyloma acuminata and/or verruca vulgaris. Most of the 413 patients (62.7%) evaluated were nonwhite organ transplant recipients; 264 were men, and 149 were women. Their mean (SD) age was 60.09 (13.59) years. Nineteen skin cancers were identified in 15 patients (5.8%) representing 3 racial/ethnic groups: black (6 patients), Asian (5), and Hispanic (4). All squamous cell carcinomas in blacks were diagnosed in the in situ stage, located on sun-protected sites, and occurred in patients whose lesions tested positive for human papilloma virus (HPV) and/or who endorsed a history of condyloma acuminata or verruca vulgaris. Most skin cancers in Asians were located on sun-exposed areas and occurred in individuals who emigrated from equatorial locations. Nonwhite organ transplant recipients are at risk for developing skin cancer posttransplantation. Follow-up in a specialized transplant dermatology center and baseline total-body skin examination should be part of posttransplantation care in all organ

  15. Toxoplasmosis in organ transplant recipients: Evaluation, implication, and prevention

    PubMed Central

    Khurana, Sumeeta; Batra, Nitya

    2016-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis in organ transplant patients can be a result of donor-transmitted infection, or reactivation of latent infection, or de novo infection. Solid organ transplants including heart, liver, kidney, pancreas and small bowel, and hematogenous stem cell transplants have been implicated in the risk of acquiring infection. In contrast to a benign course in immunocompetent individuals, the spectrum of illness is severe in transplant recipients. Clinical manifestations usually occur within the first 3 months of transplant and may present as encephalitis, pneumonitis, chorioretinitis, meningitis, and disseminated toxoplasmosis with multi-organ involvement. The diagnosis of toxoplasmosis in organ transplant patients is often difficult and is an integration of clinical, radiological, and microbiological workup. Preventive measures include pretransplant evaluation and chemoprophylaxis in view of rapidly progressing and fatal outcome of toxoplasmosis in immunocompromised individuals. PMID:27722100

  16. [Ethical problems in organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Valenta, J; Treska, V; Hasman, D

    1999-02-01

    Organ transplantation is an accepted therapeutic method with good results, but it is connected with many not only medical but also ethical problems. One of the most important problems is the donor programme. In cadaverous donors the main ethical and legal question is the decision who can issue the consent with organ retrieval; in living donors it is the problem of motivation and financial compensation. Allocation of organs with low compatibility or from non-ideal donors, and the recipient's consent in these cases may involve difficult decisions.

  17. Lung Cancer Prognosis in Elderly Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sigel, Keith; Veluswamy, Rajwanth; Krauskopf, Katherine; Mehrotra, Anita; Mhango, Grace; Sigel, Carlie; Wisnivesky, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Background Treatment-related immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients has been linked to increased incidence and risk of progression for several malignancies. Using a population-based cancer cohort, we evaluated whether organ transplantation was associated with worse prognosis in elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results registry linked to Medicare claims we identified 597 patients age ≥65 with NSCLC who had received organ transplants (kidney, liver, heart or lung) prior to cancer diagnosis. These cases were compared to 114,410 untransplanted NSCLC patients. We compared overall survival (OS) by transplant status using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression. To account for an increased risk of non-lung cancer death (competing risks) in transplant recipients, we used conditional probability function (CPF) analyses. Multiple CPF regression was used to evaluate lung cancer prognosis in organ transplant recipients while adjusting for confounders. Results Transplant recipients presented with earlier stage lung cancer (p=0.002) and were more likely to have squamous cell carcinoma (p=0.02). Cox regression analyses showed that having received a non-lung organ transplant was associated with poorer OS (p<0.05) while lung transplantation was associated with no difference in prognosis. After accounting for competing risks of death using CPF regression, no differences in cancer-specific survival were noted between non-lung transplant recipients and non-transplant patients. Conclusions Non-lung solid organ transplant recipients who developed NSCLC had worse OS than non-transplant recipients due to competing risks of death. Lung cancer-specific survival analyses suggest that NSCLC tumor behavior may be similar in these two groups. PMID:25839704

  18. Noteworthy Literature Published in 2016 for Thoracic Organ Transplantation Anesthesiologists.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Kathirvel; Nazarnia, Soheyla

    2017-03-01

    This article is first in the series to review the published literature on perioperative issues in patients undergoing thoracic solid organ transplantations. We present recent literature from 2016 on preoperative considerations, organ preservation, intraoperative anesthesia management, surgical techniques, postoperative complications, and the impact of perioperative management on short- and long-term outcomes that are pertinent to thoracic transplantation anesthesiologists.

  19. Predictive factors of brain death in severe stroke patients identified by organ procurement and transplant coordination in Lorrain, France.

    PubMed

    Humbertjean, Lisa; Mione, Gioia; Fay, Renaud; Durin, Laurent; Planel, Sophie; Lacour, Jean-Christophe; Enea, Ana-Maria; Richard, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    There are no established predictive factors to identify patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a high probability of presenting brain death (BD). We retrospectively collected clinical and paraclinical data of consecutive patients at the acute phase of severe stroke with a potential progression to BD through the hospital organ procurement and transplant coordination system in five centres in Lorrain (France) between 1 January 2012 and 31 December 2013. Final endpoint was adjudicated BD. Of 400 included patients, 91 (23%) presented adjudicated BD. Initial Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤6 (P = 0.008), herniation (P = 0.009), hydrocephalus (P = 0.019), initial systolic blood pressure >150 mmHg (P = 0.002), past history of alcohol abuse (P = 0.019) and stroke volume >65 ml (P = 0.040) were significantly associated with BD progression. Two prognostic scores for stroke with unquantifiable or quantifiable volume were built according to the number of risk factors presented. Following internal validation, the respective bias-corrected predictive performance (c-index) of the two scores was 72% (95% confidence interval: 67-78%) and 77% (95% confidence interval: 72-82%). These scores could form the basis of a simple tool of six criteria to help physicians make the difficult decision of intensive care unit management to preserve organs in potential donors.

  20. Bioengineering for Organ Transplantation: Progress and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Welman, Ted; Michel, Sebastian; Segaren, Nicholas; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran

    2015-01-01

    Organ transplantation can offer a curative option for patients with end stage organ failure. Unfortunately the treatment is severely limited by the availability of donor organs. Organ bioengineering could provide a solution to the worldwide critical organ shortage. The majority of protocols to date have employed the use of decellularization-recellularization technology of naturally occurring tissues and organs with promising results in heart, lung, liver, pancreas, intestine and kidney engineering. Successful decellularization has provided researchers with suitable scaffolds to attempt cell reseeding. Future work will need to focus on the optimization of organ specific recellularization techniques before organ bioengineering can become clinically translatable. This review will examine the current progress in organ bioengineering and highlight future challenges in the field.

  1. Solid organ transplantation: technical progress meets human dignity: a review of the literature considering elderly patients' health related quality of life following transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kniepeiss, Daniela; Wagner, Doris; Pienaar, Simon; Thaler, Heinrich W; Porubsky, Christian; Tscheliessnigg, Karl-Heinz; Roller, Regina E

    2012-01-01

    Many transplant studies in elderly patients focus on survival and mortality rates. It was the aim of this review to evaluate publications dealing with individual patient performance and independence. The literature search included all articles retrievable for the hit "transplantation in elderly recipients" between 1960 and 2010. For quality search the inclusion criteria were as follows: older than 60 years and transplanted kidney, liver, heart, lung or pancreas from a deceased or living donor. We focussed on parameters concerning quality of life, frailty, nutritional status/weight loss, drugs/interactions/polypharmacy, gait/osteoporosis/fracture, delirium/dementia and geriatric assessment to address physical and psychosocial functionality of elderly recipients. The initial hit list contained 1427 citations from electronic databases. 249 abstracts thereof were selected for full review. A total of 60 articles met final inclusion criteria. Finally, only five studies met the qualitative inclusion criteria as listed above. The number of elderly patients placed on waiting lists has increased dramatically and will further grow. Interdisciplinary collaboration and distinct patient selection is recommended in most of the studies. However, data concerning quality of life and related parameters in elderly transplant recipients are rare. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. [Comparative study of needs of transplanted patients or those waiting for an organ transplantation and the nurses' attitudes of these needs].

    PubMed

    Baert, C; Cocula, N; Delran, J; Faubel, E; Foucaud, C; Martins, V

    2000-12-01

    Literature has shown that information, education and support had a beneficial effect on how the patients and their family lived through the transplant process. In our daily practice, we are permanently confronted with requests for information and psychological adjustments from our patients. Do the needs of this population meet the representations of the care-takers? Our theoretical framework is based on the theories of Maslow and Callista Roy, on the concept of social representations according to Moscovici and on the steps of the transplant process. To carry out this survey, we used a questionnaire which we gave to the patients at the different phases of the graft and to the nurses of the services involved in the transplant. There was a similarity of the results between the two populations, despite some differences for certain items. The development of a programme for information and for education will enable an improvement of the care quality thanks to the adaptation of knowledge to the needs of the transplanted patients.

  3. Hepatitis E Virus Infection in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients, France

    PubMed Central

    Lhomme, Sebastien; Bardiaux, Laurent; Abravanel, Florence; Gallian, Pierre; Kamar, Nassim

    2017-01-01

    The rate of transfusion-transmitted hepatitis E virus (HEV) in transplant recipients is unknown. We identified 60 HEV-positive solid organ transplant patients and retrospectively assessed their blood transfusions for HEV. Seven of 60 patients received transfusions; 3 received HEV-positive blood products. Transfusion is not the major route of infection in this population. PMID:28098552

  4. A review of abdominal organ transplantation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Brandy R; Esquivel, Carlos O

    2010-12-01

    With advances in medical treatments, patients with CF are having improved quality of life and living longer. Although pulmonary disease is still the leading cause of morbidity and mortality, this longevity has allowed for the development of other organ dysfunction, mainly liver and pancreas. This review discusses the abdominal organ complications and the role of abdominal organ transplantation in CF. Liver failure and portal hypertension complications are the most common indicators for liver transplantation in CF, and five-yr survival for isolated liver transplantation is >80%. Deficiency of pancreatic enzymes is almost universal and up to 40% of patients with CF can develop insulin-dependent diabetes, although the role of pancreas transplantation is less clear and needs further research. Finally, the need for lung transplantation should always be assessed and considered in combination with liver transplantation on a case-by-case basis.

  5. [Altered gut bacterial flora and organic acids in feces of patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based antibacterial prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Shotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Asahara, Takashi; Nomoto, Koji; Morotomi, Masami; Ishizuka, Naoki; Miwa, Akiyoshi; O Yoshida, Takato

    2010-06-01

    Gastrointestinal toxicity and various infections are serious problems associated with high-dose chemotherapy. Antibacterial chemoprophylaxis reduces the incidence of gram-negative bacterial infection; however, it may affect the normal intestinal flora and induce drug resistance in organisms. We evaluated the chronological changes in fecal bacteria and organic acids in 6 patients undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolone-based chemoprophylaxis. All patients developed grade 2-3 diarrhea. Four patients developed grade 3 febrile neutropenia. The total count of obligatory anaerobic bacteria was significantly decreased on Day 7, but total facultative anaerobic bacterial count did not change throughout transplantation. However, Enterobacteriaceae and Lactobacillus were decreased on Day 7 and Staphylococcus was increased after transplantation. Total organic acid concentration and short-chain fatty acids were decreased on Day 7. The bacterial flora and organic acids in the gut were significantly altered in patients who underwent autologous stem cell transplantation with quinolonebased chemoprophylaxis. These changes may contribute to gastrointestinal toxicity and infections.

  6. The Effect of Bridging Locoregional Therapy and Sociodemographics on Survival in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation: A United Network for Organ Sharing Population Study.

    PubMed

    Magnetta, Michael J; Xing, Minzhi; Zhang, Di; Kim, Hyun S

    2016-12-01

    To investigate socioeconomic and demographic factors associated with transplantation outcomes in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with bridging locoregional therapy (LRT) before orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT). The United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) database was used to identify all patients in the United States with HCC who were listed for OLT between 2002 and 2013. Mean overall survival (OS) after OLT was stratified based on age, sex, ethnicity, transplant year, region, and insurance status. Kaplan-Meier estimation was used for survival analysis with log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards model to assess independent prognostic factors for OS. Of the 17,291 listed patients with HCC, 14,511 underwent OLT. Mean age was 57.4 years (76.8% male). Favorable sociodemographic factors were associated with increased rates of bridging LRT before OLT and longer wait time on the transplant list and were shown to be independent prognostic factors for prolonged OS after OLT using multivariate analysis. Favorable demographic factors included patient age < 60 years, donor age < 45 years, year of diagnosis between 2008 and 2013, UNOS regions 4 and 5, Asian ethnicity, high functional status, postgraduate education, private payer insurance, and employment at the time of OLT. Patients with favorable sociodemographics had higher rates of LRT before OLT performed for HCC cure. These patients had longer transplant wait times and longer OS after OLT. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Organ donation and pre-emptive kidney transplantation: ethical issues.

    PubMed

    Petrini, C

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that pre-emptive transplants have several clinical advantages. However, pre-emptive transplants raise a number of ethical issues. Pre-emptive transplants from living donors offer distinctly greater benefits than those from deceased donors and some pre-emptive transplantation programmes actively encourage living organ donations. Moreover, the offer of a pre-emptive transplant to a patient who is not yet on dialysis unquestionably penalises patients already on dialysis who may have been on the waiting list for a long time. Therefore preemptive transplants give rise to conflicts between justice and utility. Several factors should be considered: health conditions, clinical urgency, probability of imminent worsening of a patient's clinical condition, the future chances of finding a matching organ, and others. From the various values at stake, ethical issues are analysed in search of an acceptable synthesis.

  8. Anesthetic Considerations for the Parturient After Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Moaveni, Daria M; Cohn, Jennifer H; Hoctor, Katherine G; Longman, Ryan E; Ranasinghe, J Sudharma

    2016-08-01

    Over the past 40 years, the success of organ transplantation has increased such that female solid organ transplant recipients are able to conceive and carry pregnancies successfully to term. Anesthesiologists are faced with the challenge of providing anesthesia care to these high-risk obstetric patients in the peripartum period. Anesthetic considerations include the effects of the physiologic changes of pregnancy on the transplanted organ, graft function in the peripartum period, and the maternal side effects and drug interactions of immunosuppressive agents. These women are at an increased risk of comorbidities and obstetric complications. Anesthetic management should consider the important task of protecting graft function. Optimal care of a woman with a transplanted solid organ involves management by a multidisciplinary team. In this focused review article, we review the anesthetic management of pregnant patients with solid organ transplants of the kidney, liver, heart, or lung.

  9. Neuropathologic findings after organ transplantation. An autopsy study.

    PubMed

    Schwechheimer, K; Hashemian, A

    1995-05-01

    Since 1972 organ transplantations of kidney, bone marrow, liver, heart and lung have been performed at the University Hospital of Essen, Germany. Out of 2535 transplantations until September 1993, autopsies were performed in 157 patients In 25 patients (15.9%) neuropathologic findings (n = 26) were found. In 97 autopsies after bone marrow transplantation, 9 patients (9.3%) exhibited a severe neuropathologic alteration. In six patients (6/9; 66.6%), necrotisizing toxoplasmose encephalitis was found. Other cases showed a septic-metastatic mycotic encephalitis with crypto-coccus neoformans and candida albicans (n = 2) and leucemia infiltrates (n = 1). Massive cerebral hemorrhage was the most frequent neuropathologic finding after liver (4/8) and kidney transplantation (3/6). In addition liver-transplanted patients exhibited septic-metastatic encephalitis (3/8) and embolic brain infarct (1/8) as well as cerebral metastases (2/6) and primary malignant cerebral lymphoma in kidney transplantation (1/6). CNS findings in five autopsies after heart-lung-transplantation were diverse. They comprised intracerebral hemorrhage, intravasal lymphoma and septic-metastatic encephalitis, respectively. In summary, neuropathologic autopsy findings after organ transplantation are diverse and preferentially comprise infections, cerebral hemorrhages, and malignant lymphomas. After bone marrow transplantation, the most frequent neuropathologic autopsy finding was toxoplasmose encephalitis and massive cerebral hemorrhages after liver and kidney transplantations.

  10. Probable Rabies Virus Transmission through Organ Transplantation, China, 2015

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Zhu, Wuyang; Zeng, Jun; He, Jianfeng; Liu, Kai; Li, Yu; Zhou, Shuwu; Mu, Di; Zhang, Kechun; Yu, Pengcheng; Li, Zhijian; Zhang, Meng; Chen, Xueqiong; Guo, Chun

    2016-01-01

    During July 2015, physicians at a hospital in Beijing, China, diagnosed rabies in 2 patients who had each received a kidney from a common organ donor who had died from acute progressive encephalitis of unknown cause. The patients had rabies incubation periods of 42 and 48 days. Altered mental status developed in both patients and progressively worsened to deep coma within 80 days after transplantation; both patients died. Two other transplant recipients received corneas but remained well after receiving timely rabies prophylaxis. An effective regulatory system for testing donors should be implemented to decrease the occurrence of donor-derived infectious diseases. In addition, health education should be improved to enhance public awareness of transplant-associated infectious diseases. Transplant recipients and other persons with exposure to organs or tissues from donors with rabies must be provided consistent health monitoring and follow-up, including rabies postexposure prophylaxis; any remaining organs and tissues must be quarantined and not transplanted. PMID:27331337

  11. Genitourinary Malignancies in Transplant or Dialysis Patients: The Frequency of Two Newly Described 2016 World Health Organization Histopathologic Types.

    PubMed

    Billis, A; Freitas, L L L; Costa, L B E; Barreto, I S; Asato, M A; Araujo, K S; Losada, D M; Herculiani, A P; Tabosa, G V B S; Zaidan, B C; Oliveira, G L P; Bastos, L Q A; Rocha, R M

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to revise the histopathologic types of neoplasias in the genitourinary tract and determine the frequency of 2 new entities included in the 2016 book of World Health Organization classification of renal tumors. It is not established so far whether these 2 recently described tumors are the most frequent in association with end-stage kidney disease. In a retrospective analysis, we revised the histopathologic type of 37 genitourinary tumors from 21 patients in dialysis and/or submitted to renal transplantation from 2003 to 2016 aiming to find the frequency of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma and clear cell papillary (tubulopapillary) renal cell carcinoma. From the total of 37 tumors, 34 were from native end-stage kidneys, 1 from the pelvis of the transplant kidney, and 2 from the urinary bladder. The frequencies from native kidneys were: papillary carcinoma, 13/34 (38.2%); papillary adenoma, 9/34 (26.5%); acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma, 4/34 (11.8%); oncocytoma, 3/34 (8.8%); conventional clear cell renal cell carcinoma, 3/34 (8.8%); and clear cell papillary (tubulopapillary) renal cell carcinoma, 2/34 (5.34%). The pelvis and urinary bladder tumors were high-grade urothelial carcinomas. The patients with urinary bladder tumors had been treated for polyomavirus infection. The frequencies of acquired cystic disease-associated renal cell carcinoma and clear cell papillary renal cell carcinoma were 11.8% and 5.9%, respectively. However, the spectrum of adenoma/carcinoma papillary tumors composed the majority, 64.7%, of tumors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Religious aspects of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bruzzone, P

    2008-05-01

    No religion formally forbid donation or receipt of organs or is against transplantation from living or deceased donors. Only some orthodox jews may have religious objections to "opting in." However, transplantation from deceased donors may be discouraged by Native Americans, Roma Gypsies, Confucians, Shintoists, and some Orthodox rabbis. Some South Asia Muslim ulemas (scholars) and muftis (jurists) oppose donation from human living and deceased donors because the human body is an "amanat" (trusteeship) from God and must not be desecrated following death, but they encourage xenotransplantation research. No religion formally obliges one to donate or refuse organs. No religion formally obliges one to consider cadaveric organs "a societal resource" or considers organ donation "a religious duty" (except some rabbis and isolated Muslim and Christian scholars) No religion has a formal position on "bonus points," which is priority on the waiting list. Living organ donation is strongly encouraged only between jesus christians (15 of 28 jesus christians worldwide have donated a kidney). No religion forbid this practice. Directed organ donation to people of the same religion has been proposed only by some Orthodox Jews and some Islamic Ulemas/Muftis. Only some Muslim Ulemas/Muftis and some Asian religions may prefer living donation over cadaveric donation. No religion prefers cadaveric over living donation. No religion formally forbid non-heart-beating donors (nhbd) cadaveric donation or cross-over donation. Due to the sacrad of human life, the Catholic Church is against donation from anencephalic donors or after active euthanasia. No religion formally forbid xenotransplantation. Addressing the participants of the First International Congress of the Society for Organ Sharing in 1991, Pope John Paul II said "There are many questions of an ethical, legal and social nature which need to be more deeply investigated. There are even shameful abuses which call for determined action

  13. [Transplant coordinator: organ donation process].

    PubMed

    Gironés-Guillem, Purificación; Camaño-Puig, Ramón; Lillo-Crespo, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Spain is a leader in organ donations although it seems that this number does not increase in the same proportion that the waiting list and it is necessary to decrease the refusal situations, which are ~16%. Analytic study. We review the reports prepared by the coordinators of transplants archived at the hospital La Fe during the period between May 1, 2004 and December 31, 2007, resulting in conceptualization and categorization. Sixty-nine topics were obtained from the point of view of the family and 11 from the point of view of the interviewer. After its conceptualization, codification and classification, we proceeded to create an appropriate text. Certain guidelines may be offered that allow us to standardize the action of transplant coordinators during the interview and to be more effective.

  14. Immunobiological determinants in organ transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Marks, C.

    1983-01-01

    The most important development in determining successful organ transplantation has been the improved understanding of the immune response and the interactions between antigens, antibody, immune complexes, complement component, lymphocytes and macrophages. The initiation and termination of an immune response, whether cellular or humoral depends upon cellular interaction between subsets of the lymphocyte cell series and macrophages. An equilibrium between helper and suppressor T cells determines protection of the host from non-self tissue invasion, infection and neoplasia. The role of mediators, immunosuppressants, hybridomas and recombitant DNA technology are briefly considered. The relative importance of tissue typing and blood transfusion in preventing allograft rejection is considered and the role of immunological monitoring in allograft transplantation is reviewed. PMID:6344730

  15. [Solid organ transplantation in the Czech Republic].

    PubMed

    Kuman, Milan

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation (heart, lung, liver, kidney, pancreas, small interesting and their combinations) are standard therapy of terminal organ failure. Czech Republic belongs to the states with developed transplantation program. The results correspond with current knowledge and results of leading centers in the world, as demostrated in this article. Organ donor shortage is major factor limiting development of organ transplantations as elsewhere in the Europe or in the world.

  16. What Kind of Information About Marginal Donors Is Available Through Sources Other Than Health Care Professionals for Patients on the Waiting List for Organ Transplantation?

    PubMed

    Kamran, Sara; Calmus, Yvon; Pomey, Marie Pascale; Vidal-Trécan, Gwenaëlle

    2015-07-14

    The current organ shortage has necessitated expanding the criteria for potential donations to marginal donors (older or sick donors whose organs would have been considered unsuitable before). In France, physicians are not required to provide information to recipients about marginal donors except for hepatitis C or hepatitis B infection and non-heart-beating donations. We hypothesized that patients can be informed about these risks by other information sources than health care professionals, such as websites and patient associations. The objectives of the study were to identify the main health information sources of transplant patients other than health professionals and to evaluate the information provided by websites and associations to patients about the risks of transplantation from marginal donors. In this study, the information sources for kidney, liver, heart, and lung patients that had already received transplants or registered on waiting lists were identified by a survey in four transplant centers. Further, the information proposed by French and English language websites and patient associations were evaluated, respectively, by a systematic review of websites and a survey among the presidents of kidney, liver, heart, and lung patient associations. For the first survey, (367/402) 91.3% responses were registered. Apart from health professionals identified as the principal information source (363/367) 98.9%, 19 liver and 28 heart patients searched for information on the websites, while 37 kidney and 42 lung patients were more informed by patients' associations. Our two last surveys showed that information about marginal donors is accessible by websites and (10/34) 30% of associations. All of the 60 Internet documents evaluated on French language and English language websites proposed information about marginal donors. Otherwise, (52/65) 80% of these documents were dedicated to health professionals and contained specialized information, difficult to understand

  17. Epidemiology of Cryptococcosis and Cryptococcal Meningitis in a Large Retrospective Cohort of Patients After Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Carlos A. Q.; Olsen, Margaret A.; Powderly, William G.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background. Cryptococcosis is the third most common invasive fungal infection in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients. There are no nationally representative data describing the incidence, risk factors, and outcomes of cryptococcosis after SOT. Methods. We assembled a large cohort of adult SOT recipients using Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification billing data from Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project State Inpatient Databases of Florida (2006–2012), New York (2006–2011), and California (2004–2010). Demographics, comorbidities, death, and cryptococcal infections coded during hospitalization were identified. Results. A total of 42634 adults with SOT were identified during the study period. Cryptococcal disease was identified in 0.37% (n = 158), 44% of which had meningitis (n = 69). Median time to diagnosis of cryptococcosis was 464 days (range, 4–2393). The median time to onset of cryptococcosis was earlier for lung (191 days; range, 7.5–1816), heart (195 days; range, 4–1061), and liver (200 days; range, 4–1581) compared with kidney transplant recipients (616 days; range, 12–2393; P < .001, log rank test). Very early-onset disease (<30 days after transplantation) more frequently occurred in liver and lung transplant recipients. Lung transplant recipients had the highest risk of cryptococcosis (hazard ratio [HR], 2.10; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21–3.60). Cryptococcosis was associated with death (HR, 2.29; 95% CI, 1.68–3.11), after adjusting for age, type of SOT, and other comorbidities. Conclusions. Cryptococcosis is rare after SOT, but it is associated with significantly increased risk of death. Lung transplant recipients are at highest risk for cryptococcosis among SOTs. Nonkidney transplants have earlier onset of cryptococcosis and higher risk of death compared with kidney transplant recipients. PMID:28480277

  18. [Prophylaxis against Toxoplasma gondii disease in pediatric and adult patients undergoing solid organ and hematopoietic stem cells transplantation].

    PubMed

    Payá, Ernesto; Noemí, Isabel; Tassara, Renzo; Catalán, Paula; Avilés, Carmen L

    2012-09-01

    Toxoplasmosis is a widely distributed zoonosis produced by the parasite T. gondii. In Chile the seroprevalence has been estimated between 20-37% in general population. Defined risk groups acquire or reactivate the infection by T. gondii in patients undergoing SOT and HSCT are: heart transplant or heart-lung with D (+) and R (-), allogeneic HSCT with R (+), HSCT with cord cells, GVHD, history of previous clinical toxoplasmosis and use of corticosteroids for prolonged periods or in high doses. Hand washing, hygiene in food handling and weekly post-transplant surveillance since day 15 post transplant for six months, are universally recommended. All patients with SOT and HSCT, regardless of risk, should receive prophylaxis with cotrimoxazole and require no another specific prophylaxis against T. gondii (A2). It is particularly important in high-risk patients who cannot receive cotrimoxazole prophylaxis establish specific alternative against T. gondii (B3).

  19. Histoplasmosis in Patients With Cell-Mediated Immunodeficiency: Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection, Organ Transplantation, and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Luckett, Keith; Dummer, J Stephen; Miller, Geraldine; Hester, Sydney; Thomas, Lora

    2015-01-01

    Background.  Histoplasmosis causes severe disease in patients with defects of cell-mediated immunity. It is not known whether outcomes vary related to the type of immunodeficiency or class of antifungal treatment. Methods.  We reviewed cases of active histoplasmosis that occurred at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from July 1999 to June 2012 in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, a history of transplantation, or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α inhibitor use. These groups were compared for differences in clinical presentation and outcomes. In addition, outcomes were related to the initial choice of treatment. Results.  Ninety cases were identified (56 HIV, 23 transplant, 11 TNF-α inhibitor). Tumor necrosis factor-α patients had milder disease, shorter courses of therapy, and fewer relapses than HIV patients. Histoplasma antigenuria was highly prevalent in all groups (HIV 88%, transplant 95%, TNF-α 91%). Organ transplant recipients received amphotericin B formulation as initial therapy less often than other groups (22% vs 57% HIV vs 55% TNF-α; P = .006). Treatment failures only occurred in patients with severe disease. The failure rate was similar whether patients received initial amphotericin or triazole therapy. Ninety-day histoplasmosis-related mortality was 9% for all groups and did not vary significantly with choice of initial treatment. Conclusions.  Histoplasmosis caused milder disease in patients receiving TNF-α inhibitors than patients with HIV or solid organ transplantation. Treatment failures and mortality only occurred in patients with severe disease and did not vary based on type of immunosuppression or choice of initial therapy.

  20. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  1. Lung Cancer Prognosis in Elderly Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Sigel, Keith; Veluswamy, Rajwanth; Krauskopf, Katherine; Mehrotra, Anita; Mhango, Grace; Sigel, Carlie; Wisnivesky, Juan

    2015-10-01

    Treatment-related immunosuppression in organ transplant recipients has been linked to increased incidence and risk of progression for several malignancies. Using a population-based cancer cohort, we evaluated whether organ transplantation was associated with worse prognosis in elderly patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Using the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry linked to Medicare claims, we identified 597 patients aged 65 years or older with NSCLC who had received organ transplants (kidney, liver, heart, or lung) before cancer diagnosis. These cases were compared to 114,410 untransplanted NSCLC patients. We compared overall survival (OS) by transplant status using Kaplan-Meier methods and Cox regression. To account for an increased risk of non-lung cancer death (competing risks) in transplant recipients, we used conditional probability function (CPF) analyses. Multiple CPF regression was used to evaluate lung cancer prognosis in organ transplant recipients while adjusting for confounders. Transplant recipients presented with earlier stage lung cancer (P = 0.002) and were more likely to have squamous cell carcinoma (P = 0.02). Cox regression analyses showed that having received a non-lung organ transplant was associated with poorer OS (P < 0.05), whereas lung transplantation was associated with no difference in prognosis. After accounting for competing risks of death using CPF regression, no differences in cancer-specific survival were noted between non-lung transplant recipients and nontransplant patients. Non-lung solid organ transplant recipients who developed NSCLC had worse OS than nontransplant recipients due to competing risks of death. Lung cancer-specific survival analyses suggest that NSCLC tumor behavior may be similar in these 2 groups.

  2. The mechanisms of rejection in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Emanuele; Colpo, Anna; De Silvestro, Giustina

    2017-08-01

    Organ transplantation represents the preferred treatment option for many patients in terminal organ failure. The half-life of transplanted organs, however, is still far from being satisfactory with the vast majority of the organs failing within the first two decades following transplantation. At this stage, it has become apparent that rejection (prevalently mediated by humoral events) remains the primary cause of graft loss after the first year. In this light, studies are underway to better comprehend the immune events underlying graft rejection and novel immunosuppressive strategies are being explored. In this context, therapeutic apheresis techniques, that include therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE), immunoadsorption (IA) and extracorporeal photochemotherapy (ECP), represent an important adjunct in the current immunosuppressive armamentarium. This article briefly reviews our current understanding of the immune process underlying rejection of a solid organ transplant and describes the principal areas of application of therapeutic apheresis techniques in transplantation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Bridging to Heart Transplantation from the Biventricular Pulsatile Berlin Heart EXCOR Assist Device Support in a Patient with Advanced End-Organ Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tuba Demirozu, Zumrut; Suha Kucukaksu, Deniz

    2015-01-01

    Long-term mechanical circulatory support is a life-saving technology while briding to heart transplantation. It increases the quality of life and preserves end-organ function for patients with advanced heart failure. The number of patients with advanced heart failure scheduled for heart transplantation before comorbidities escalate is on the rise. However, the device function is complicated by the bleeding-thrombosis and infection paradigm, hence the interest in understanding device thrombosis and infection. We describe a 27-year-old man with idiopathic cardiomyopathy, advanced end-organ failure, and severe infection, who was bridged to heart transplantation after 8 months on the Berlin Heart EXCOR (Berlin Heart AG, Berlin, Germany) biventricular support. The patient was discharged from the hospital in the third postoperative week after the recovery of his end-organ functions. At 29 months’ post-transplantation follow-up, his last cardiac biopsy was grade 0, his ejection fraction was 60%, and he was enjoying a good quality of life. PMID:26985209

  4. Prevention of non-melanoma skin cancer in organ transplant patients by regular use of a sunscreen: a 24 months, prospective, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, C; Jürgensen, J S; Degen, A; Hackethal, M; Ulrich, M; Patel, M J; Eberle, J; Terhorst, D; Sterry, W; Stockfleth, E

    2009-11-01

    Skin cancers represent a major challenge within the ever growing group of long time surviving organ transplant recipients (OTR) world wide. Especially UV-induced non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) like invasive squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and actinic keratoses (AK), and basal cell carcinoma (BCC), outnumber every other form of cancer in organ transplant recipients. Despite encouraging reports of protective effects of broad-spectrum sunscreens in immunocompetent patients, evidence for the prevention of NMSC in immunocompromised patients is still missing. To assess preventive effects of regular sun-screen use on AK, SCC and BCC in chronically immunocompromised organ transplant recipients. Hundred and twenty matched (age, sex, skin type, graft, transplant duration, previous post-transplant skin malignancies) organ transplant recipients (40 heart, 40 kidney, 40 liver grafted) were recruited for this prospective, single-center study. Both groups received equally written and oral information on sun protection measures. Sixty patients were provided with a free broad spectrum study-sunscreen (SPF>50, high-UVA absorption) for daily application of 2 mg cm(-2) to the head, neck, forearms, and hands. All 120 patients completed the 24 months study. Within this 24 month study interval 42 of the 120 patients developed 82 new AK (-102 sunscreen group vs. +82 control; P<0.01), 8 new invasive SCC (0 vs. 8; P<0.01) and 11 BCC (2 vs. 9; ns). In spite of equal numbers of AK at baseline, a marked difference in favor of the intent-to-treat sunscreen group was recorded after 24 months (89 vs. 273; P<0.01, mean difference 3.07 [1.76-4.36]) and the lesion count was significantly lower as compared to the initial visit (89 vs. 191; P<0.01, mean difference 1.7 [0.68-2.72]). With an average of 5.6 applications per week throughout the 24 months the study sunscreen was generally well tolerated. Serum 25-hydroxy vitamin D levels as marker for vitamin D status were decreased in all patients

  5. Drug-drug interactions between antiretroviral and immunosuppressive agents in HIV-infected patients after solid organ transplantation: a review.

    PubMed

    van Maarseveen, Erik M; Rogers, Christin C; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; van Zuilen, Arjan D; Mudrikova, Tania

    2012-10-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) resulting in the prolonged survival of HIV-infected patients, HIV infection is no longer considered to be a contraindication for solid organ transplantation (SOT). The combined management of antiretroviral and immunosuppressive therapy proved to be extremely challenging, as witnessed by high rates of allograft rejection and drug toxicity, but the profound drug-drug interactions between immunosuppressants and cART, especially protease inhibitors (PIs) also play an important role. Caution and frequent drug level monitoring of calcineurin inhibitors, such as tacrolimus are necessary when PIs are (re)introduced or withdrawn in HIV-infected recipients. Furthermore, the pharmacokinetics of glucocorticoids and mTOR inhibitors are seriously affected by PIs. With the introduction of integrase inhibitors, CCR5-antagonists and fusion inhibitors which cause significantly less pharmacokinetic interactions, have minor overlapping toxicity, and offer the advantage of pharmacodynamic synergy, it is time to revaluate what may be considered the optimal antiretroviral regimen in SOT recipients. In this review we provide a brief overview of the recent success of SOT in the HIV population, and an update on the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic interactions between currently available cART and immunosuppressants in HIV-infected patients, who underwent SOT.

  6. Outcomes of Pediatric Kidney Transplantation in Recipients of a Previous Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplant.

    PubMed

    Hamdani, G; Zhang, B; Liu, C; Goebel, J; Zhang, Y; Nehus, E

    2017-03-07

    Children who receive a non-renal solid organ transplant may develop secondary renal failure requiring kidney transplantation. We investigated outcomes of 165 pediatric kidney transplant recipients who previously received a heart, lung, or liver transplant using data from 1988 to 2012 reported to the United Network for Organ Sharing. Patient and allograft survival were compared with 330 matched primary kidney transplant (PKT) recipients. Kidney transplantation after solid organ transplant (KASOT) recipients experienced similar allograft survival: 5- and 10-year graft survival was 78% and 60% in KASOT recipients, compared to 80% and 61% in PKT recipients (p = 0.69). However, KASOT recipients demonstrated worse 10-year patient survival (75% KASOT vs. 97% PKT, p < 0.001). Competing risks analysis indicated that KASOT recipients more often experienced graft loss due to patient death (p < 0.001), whereas allograft failure per se was more common in PKT recipients (p = 0.01). To study more recent outcomes, kidney transplants performed from 2006 to 2012 were separately investigated. Since 2006, KASOT and PKT recipients had similar 5-year graft survival (82% KASOT vs. 83% PKT, p = 0.48), although 5-year patient survival of KASOT recipients remained inferior (90% KASOT vs. 98% PKT, p < 0.001). We conclude that despite decreased patient survival, kidney allograft outcomes in pediatric KASOT recipients are comparable to those of PKT recipients.

  7. Organic tomato transplant production and supplemental fertilizers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Producing healthy transplants for organic production systems is an essential step in the process of maximizing crop yields. All components entering into the organic crop production system must be approved for organic use, including the seed, soil media, and fertilizer used in transplant production....

  8. Travel to High Altitude Following Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Luks, Andrew M

    2016-09-01

    Luks, Andrew M. Clinician's corner: travel to high altitude following solid organ transplantation. High Alt Med Biol. 17:147-156, 2016.-As they regain active lifestyles following successful organ transplantation, transplant recipients may travel to high altitude for a variety of activities, including skiing, climbing, and trekking. This review is intended to provide information for medical providers who may encounter transplant patients seeking advice before planned high altitude travel or care for medical issues that develop during the actual sojourn. There is currently limited information in the literature about outcomes during high-altitude travel following solid organ transplantation, but the available evidence suggests that the physiologic responses to hypobaric hypoxia are comparable to those seen in nontransplanted individuals and well-selected transplant recipients with no evidence of organ rejection can tolerate ascents as high as 6200 m. All transplant recipients planning high-altitude travel should undergo pretravel assessment and counseling with an emphasis on the recognition, prevention, and treatment of altitude illness, as well as the importance of preventing infection and limiting sun exposure. Transplant recipients can use the standard medications for altitude illness prophylaxis and treatment, but the choice and dose of medication should take into account the patient's preexisting medication regimen and current renal function. With careful attention to these and other details, the healthy transplant recipient can safely experience the rewards of traveling in the mountains.

  9. Immunosuppression in Solid-Organ Transplantation: Essentials and Practical Tips.

    PubMed

    Jasiak, Natalia M; Park, Jeong M

    2016-01-01

    A multidisciplinary team approach is essential for successful management of patients with solid-organ transplant. Transplant nursing encompasses care and support of transplant recipients as well as caregivers and organ donors through all phases of transplantation, from pretransplant evaluation to posttransplant recovery and maintenance. The field of solid-organ transplantation has advanced rapidly, and new treatments continue to emerge. Nurses who are responsible for the care of transplant recipients should have a knowledge base in transplant immunology and pharmacology. This review discusses mechanism of action, indication, side effects, and drug interactions of commonly used immunosuppressive medications in solid-organ transplantation. Nonoral routes of drug administration, therapeutic drug monitoring, and patient monitoring strategies are also included as practical tips for bedside nurses who are responsible for delivery of direct patient care and education of patients and their caregivers. This review focuses on the following medications: antithymocyte globulins, basiliximab, alemtuzumab, corticosteroids, tacrolimus, cyclosporine, azathioprine, mycophenolate mofetil/mycophenolate sodium, sirolimus, everolimus, belatacept, intravenous immunoglobulin, and rituximab.

  10. Organ transplantation: a Sunni Islamic perspective.

    PubMed

    Albar, Mohammed

    2012-07-01

    This paper reviews the standpoints of Muslim jurists within the Sunni tradition on organ transplantation. Muslim jurists allowed different forms of bone grafts (autograft, allograft and xenograft) for widely broken bones. Ibn Sina in 1037 discussed this subject in Al-Kanoon 1000 years ago. In 1959, the Muftis of Egypt and Tunisia allowed, under specific conditions, corneal transplants from dead persons. Thereafter, many fatwas (jurisprudence) on organ trans-plantation have been issued from different parts of the Muslim world. In Amman, Jordan, the International Islamic Jurist Council recognized brain-death as a recognized sign of death in Islam in October 1986. This paved the way for organ transplantation from brain-dead persons, which started immediately in Saudi Arabia. In 1990 and 2003, the International Islamic Fiqh Academy (IIFA) and the Islamic Fiqh Academy (IFA) issued important fatwas on organ transplantation. By the end of 2008, more than 3600 organs were transplanted from brain-dead persons in Saudi Arabia.

  11. Solid organ transplantation following end-organ failure in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Kiran; Fine, Richard N

    2014-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an accepted treatment modality for various malignant and non-malignant disorders of the lympho-hematopoietic system. Patient survival rate has increased significantly with the use of this procedure. However, with the increase in disease-free patient survival rates, complications including various organ toxicities are also common. Kidney, liver, lung, heart, and skin are among those solid organs that are commonly affected and frequently lead to organ dysfunction and eventually end-organ disease. Conservative measures may or may not be successful in managing the organ failure in these patients. Solid organ transplantation has been shown to be promising in those patients who fail conservative management. This review will summarize the causes of solid organ (kidney, liver, and lung) dysfunction and the available data on transplantation of these solid organs in post-HSCT recipients.

  12. Quality of life in organ transplant recipients participating in an online transplant community.

    PubMed

    Wicks, Paul; Sulham, Katherine A; Gnanasakthy, Ari

    2014-01-01

    The PatientsLikeMe Organ Transplants online community allows patients to share detailed health information for research. The objectives of our study were to describe and contrast data collected through an online community with the broader organ transplant population. Quantitative data were examined with respect to basic demographic characteristics and quantitative data including treatment, symptoms, side effects, and the PatientsLikeMe Quality of Life (PLMQOL) scale. Qualitative data including forum discussion posts and treatment evaluations were examined to support future development of standardized questions that could be added to the platform. Online data were compared with US national registry data from the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). Within 30 days of account creation, 1,924 single-organ transplant patients provided spontaneous, patient-reported data in the form of 915 reported symptoms, 938 treatment episodes, and 1,215 PLMQOL assessments. Relative to patients in the UNOS registry, online participants were more likely to be female, younger, and white. Lung transplant patients had worse quality-of-life scores than other organs. Average organ transplant quality-of-life scores were most similar to those of HIV patients, faring better than patients with epilepsy, fibromyalgia, mood disorders, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, or ALS. Site users generated 2,169 posts to 346 unique topic threads in the transplants forum. Organ transplant patients are willing to report detailed health data through online communities across key domains-symptoms, treatment effects, and generic quality of life-that constitute the essential core of patient-reported outcomes. Patient-reported outcomes captured online have the potential to accelerate learning about patient experiences but suffer methodological challenges that must be overcome to maximize their utility.

  13. Sodium, potassium and glucose management in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Mark T; Wright, David R

    2010-06-01

    To present current knowledge about the metabolic management of patients undergoing solid organ transplantation, and potential organ donors. Appropriate management of electrolytes and glucose improves outcome after transplantation, although conflicting evidence exists. Patients with cirrhosis-induced hyponatremia can be successfully transplanted but are at increased risk of postoperative complications. A new class of drugs, the vaptans, that antagonizes arginine vasopressin may be an effective treatment for hyponatremia in transplant candidates. Recent literature has documented the implications, predictors and potential therapies for perioperative hyperkalemia in the transplant population. The debate over appropriate targets for serum glucose in perioperative and critically ill patients has been lively. The documented risk of hypoglycemia associated with 'intensive insulin therapy' has led to the adoption of more conservative glycemic targets. Studies of glycemic control in transplant recipients are limited. In patients undergoing solid organ transplants, sodium management should aim to minimize an acute change in sodium concentration. Vaptans may be of future use in optimizing patients with cirrhosis prior to transplantation. Pending further studies, a perioperative 'middle ground' target glucose of between 140 and 180 mg/dl seems reasonable at this time.

  14. Donor to recipient sizing in thoracic organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eberlein, Michael; Reed, Robert M

    2016-03-24

    Donor-to-recipient organ size matching is a critical aspect of thoracic transplantation. In the United States potential recipients for lung transplant and heart transplant are listed with limitations on donor height and weight ranges, respectively. Height is used as a surrogate for lung size and weight is used as a surrogate for heart size. While these measures are important predictors of organ size, they are crude surrogates that fail to incorporate the influence of sex on organ size. Independent of other measures, a man's thoracic organs are approximately 20% larger than a woman's. Lung size can be better estimated using the predicted total lung capacity, which is derived from regression equations correcting for height, sex and age. Similarly, heart size can be better estimated using the predicted heart mass, which adjusts for sex, age, height, and weight. These refined organ sizing measures perform better than current sizing practice for the prediction of outcomes after transplantation, and largely explain the outcome differences observed after sex-mismatch transplantation. An undersized allograft is associated with worse outcomes. In this review we examine current data pertaining to size-matching in thoracic transplantation. We advocate for a change in the thoracic allocation mechanism from a height-or-weight-based strategy to a size-matching process that utilizes refined estimates of organ size. We believe that a size-matching approach based on refined estimates of organ size would optimize outcomes in thoracic transplantation without restricting or precluding patients from thoracic transplantation.

  15. Patient with a total artificial heart maintained on outpatient dialysis while listed for combined organ transplant, a single center experience.

    PubMed

    Hanna, Ramy M; Hasnain, Huma; Kamgar, Mohammad; Hanna, Mina; Minasian, Raffi; Wilson, James

    2017-08-11

    Advanced mechanical circulatory support is increasingly being used with more sophisticated devices that can deliver pulsatile rather than continuous flow. These devices are more portable as well, allowing patients to await cardiac transplantation in an outpatient setting. It is known that patients with renal failure are at increased risk for developing worsening acute kidney injury during implantation of a ventricular assist device (VAD) or more advanced modalities like a total artificial heart (TAH). Dealing with patients who have an implanted TAH who develop renal failure has been a challenge with the majority of such patients having to await a combined cardiac and renal transplant prior to transition to outpatient care. Protocols do exist for VAD implanted patients to be transitioned to outpatient dialysis care, but there are no reported cases of TAH patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) being successfully transitioned to outpatient dialysis care. In this report, we identify a patient with a TAH and ESRD transitioned successfully to outpatient hemodialysis and maintained for more than 2 years, though he did not survive to transplant. It is hoped that this report will raise awareness of this possibility, and assist in the development of protocols for similar patients to be successfully transitioned to outpatient dialysis care. © 2017 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  16. A brief history of cross-species organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation) offers the prospect of an unlimited supply of organs and cells for clinical transplantation, thus resolving the critical shortage of human tissues that currently prohibits a majority of patients on the waiting list from receiving transplants. Between the 17th and 20th centuries, blood was transfused from various animal species into patients with a variety of pathological conditions. Skin grafts were carried out in the 19th century from a variety of animals, with frogs being the most popular. In the 1920s, Voronoff advocated the transplantation of slices of chimpanzee testis into aged men whose “zest for life” was deteriorating, believing that the hormones produced by the testis would rejuvenate his patients. Following the pioneering surgical work of Carrel, who developed the technique of blood vessel anastomosis, numerous attempts at nonhuman primate organ transplantation in patients were carried out in the 20th century. In 1963–1964, when human organs were not available and chronic dialysis was not yet in use, Reemtsma transplanted chimpanzee kidneys into 13 patients, one of whom returned to work for almost 9 months before suddenly dying from what was believed to be an electrolyte disturbance. The first heart transplant in a human ever performed was by Hardy in 1964, using a chimpanzee heart, but the patient died within 2 hours. Starzl carried out the first chimpanzee-to-human liver transplantation in 1966; in 1992, he obtained patient survival for 70 days following a baboon liver transplant. With the advent of genetic engineering and cloning technologies, pigs are currently available with a number of different manipulations that protect their tissues from the human immune response, resulting in increasing pig graft survival in nonhuman primate models. Genetically modified pigs offer hope of a limitless supply of organs and cells for those in need of a transplant. PMID:22275786

  17. Coping-Infused Dialogue through Patient-Preferred Live Music: A Medical Music Therapy Protocol and Randomized Pilot Study for Hospitalized Organ Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Tyler James; Silverman, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplant patients often experience a variety of psychosocial stressors that can lead to distress and may hinder successful recovery. Using coping-infused dialogue (CID) through patient- preferred live music (PPLM) music therapy sessions may improve mood and decrease pain while also imparting psychoeducational knowledge concerning the identification of local and global problems and coping skills. The purpose of this pilot study was to develop a coping-based medical music therapy protocol that combines coping-infused dialogue (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM) and measure the effects of the resulting CID-PPLM protocol on mood (positive and negative affect) and pain in hospitalized transplant patients. Our study used a pre-/posttest single-session wait-list control design. Participants (N=25) were randomly assigned to experimental (CID-PPLM) or control (usual care) conditions. Participants in the CID-PPLM condition received a single 30-minute session that integrated stressor identification and knowledge of coping skills (CID) with patient-preferred live music (PPLM). Results indicated no between-group differences at pretest and significant correlations between pre- and posttest measures. Concerning posttest ANCOVA analyses, there were significant between-group differences in positive affect, negative affect, and pain, with experimental participants having more favorable posttest scores than control participants. Effect sizes were in the medium-to-large range for positive affect (η2=.198), negative affect (η2=.422), and pain (η2=.303). CID through receptive PPLM may be an effective protocol for improving mood and decreasing pain in organ transplant recipients. MT interventions can be an important tool to develop rapport and enhance outcomes with patients. As greater engagement during interventions may have stronger treatment effects, we recommend future research examining patient engagement as a potential mediator of intervention effects

  18. Differences in the peritumoural inflammatory skin infiltrate between squamous cell carcinomas in organ transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients.

    PubMed

    Krynitz, Britta; Lundh Rozell, Barbro; Lindelöf, Bernt

    2010-07-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTR) have a greatly increased risk (up to 100 times) of developing squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) in the skin. This is attributed specifically to chronic immunosuppression, causing dysfunctional viral defence and tumour protection. To investigate the possible link between increasing risk of SCCs and type of inflammation in these tumour-prone patients, we analysed the peritumoural infiltrates with regard to cell types and densities. Seven SCCs from immunosuppressed OTR and 14 SCCs from immunocompetent patients were immun-histochemically stained for CD3, CD4, CD8, CD56, CD20, CD138, CD14, CD68, CD1a. Cell counts were performed with the aid of computer-based image analysis of > 100,000 cells. When comparing the percentage distributions, significant differences were detected (outlined as median values (min-max)): T cells (CD3+): OTR 57% (35-78), controls 68% (48-80), p = 0.036; plasma cells (CD138+): OTR 2% (0.7-7), controls 0.2% (0-1.2), p = 0.001; mono-cytes (CD14+): OTR 3.2% (1.1-5.6), controls 9.3% (2.2-17.2), p = 0.014. Surprisingly, no differences in cell densities, i.e. cells/mm2 tumour section area, were detected between the 2 groups. In conclusion, we found that the peritumoural infiltrates in immunosuppressed compared with immunocompetent patients differ in cellular composition, inferring a more tumour-submissive environment in OTR. However, cellular densities were equal, suggesting deviating cellular functionality in OTR.

  19. Cryptosporidial infections after solid organ transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Gerber, D A; Green, M; Jaffe, R; Greenberg, D; Mazariegos, G; Reyes, J

    2000-02-01

    The diagnosis and treatment of moderate-to-severe diarrhea in solid organ transplant recipients is often a challenge because of the variety of infectious and non-infectious causes. The morbidity associated with this clinical condition is of particular significance in the pediatric population where malnutrition may lead to poor growth and development. Rarely, Cryptosporidium has been identified as the cause of clinically significant diarrhea in pediatric solid organ transplant patients. A retrospective review identified cases of cryptosporidiosis among the 1160 non-renal, abdominal organ transplant recipients cared for at the Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh between 1981 and June 1998. Four cases of clinically significant diarrhea were identified in three liver transplant recipients and one small bowel transplant recipient. Endoscopy and biopsy with histologic confirmation diagnosed three cases; ova and parasitic examination of stool specimens identified the fourth case. Therapy varied among the patients depending on when they had been diagnosed as, over the years, different and newer agents have been indicated for the treatment of cryptosporidiosis. All four patients resolved their infections. Hence, endoscopy and biopsy is recommended for pediatric transplant patients who present with chronic diarrhea of unknown etiology. The patients who may be at a higher risk for cryptosporidial infections include those with an increased immunosuppressive state (i.e. pre-existing immunodeficiency, malignancy, re-transplantation, and those receiving higher doses of immunosuppressive therapy). While cryptosporidiosis is a non-lethal complication, it allows the clinician to gain further insight into the degree of immunosuppression of their patient.

  20. The emerging role of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Cabrera, Fernando J.; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O.; Thekkedath, Usha R.; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ghobrial, Rafik M.; Li, Xian C.; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-01-01

    Transplantation is often the only choice many patients have when suffering from end stage organ failure. Although the quality of life improves after transplantation, challenges such as organ shortages, necessary immunosuppression with associated complications and chronic graft rejection limits its wide clinical application. Nanotechnology has emerged in the past two decades as a field with the potential to satisfy clinical needs in the area of targeted and sustained drug delivery, non-invasive imaging, and tissue engineering. In this paper, we provide an overview of popular nanotechnologies and a summary of the current and potential uses of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation. PMID:27257995

  1. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in...

  2. 42 CFR 441.35 - Organ transplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Organ transplants. 441.35 Section 441.35 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Provisions § 441.35 Organ transplants. (a) FFP is available in expenditures for services furnished in...

  3. Global initiatives to tackle organ trafficking and transplant tourism.

    PubMed

    Bagheri, Alireza; Delmonico, Francis L

    2013-11-01

    The increasing gap between organ supply and demand has opened the door for illegal organ sale, trafficking of human organs, tissues and cells, as well as transplant tourism. Currently, underprivileged and vulnerable populations in resource-poor countries are a major source of organs for rich patient-tourists who can afford to purchase organs at home or abroad. This paper presents a summary of international initiatives, such as World Health Organization's Principle Guidelines, The Declaration of Istanbul, Asian Task Force Recommendations, as well as UNESCO's and the United Nation's initiatives against trafficking of human organs, tissues, cells, and transplant tourism. Beyond the summary, it calls for more practical measures to be taken to implement the existing guidelines and recommendations, in order to prevent exploitation of the poor as organ providers. The paper suggests that an international legally binding agreement in criminalizing organ trafficking would be a step forward to bring a change in the global picture of organ trafficking and transplant tourism.

  4. [Liver transplantation: how to manage organ shortage?].

    PubMed

    Pruvot, François-René; Boleslawski, Emmanuel

    2009-03-20

    Organ shortage remains a major problem in liver transplantation for which the number of patients on the waiting list is superior to the number of liver grafts harvested each year. In 2007, 1061 liver transplantations have covered 78.7% of the needs for 1348 new candidates. Improvement of the results (5 year-survival 74.9% and 63% at 10 years) do not influence the number of major indications (hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis C virus, alcohol), despite a slight decrease in the rate of activity of 1 to 2% per year. Introduction of the national score for each patient to be registered on the waiting list, the use of split grafts or grafts from marginal criteria donors may enlarge the donor pool. Liver grafts from cardiac deceased donors or from living donors are less frequent and are controversial from a technical and psychological point of view. The most efficient solution in order to overcome organ shortage is the increase in the pool of brain dead donors by accompanying people acceptance of organ donation and the use of parts of human body after death. Such education of the population could be made by the valorisation of organ donation, through public campaigns suggesting reflexion rather than coercition.

  5. Renal transplantation in a HIV positive patient

    PubMed Central

    Mann, A.; Soundararajan, P.; Shroff, S.

    2009-01-01

    Historically HIV positive patients were considered a contraindication for renal transplant. After the year 1996, with the introduction of HAART the retropositive patients live longer and therefore end stage organ disease is now an increasingly important cause of mortality and morbidity in these patients. Here we report our experience for the first time in India. A forty nine year old hypertensive female from Africa who was diagnosed chronic kidney disease and retropositive status, progressed to end stage renal disease and underwent live related renal transplant at our centre. PMID:20436733

  6. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate.

    PubMed

    Röck, Tobias; Bramkamp, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly (P=0.0181 and P=0.0006). We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families.

  7. Organ transplantation scandal influencing corneal donation rate

    PubMed Central

    Röck, Tobias; Bramkamp, Matthias; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl Ulrich; Röck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    In the majority of countries, there is a shortage of donor corneas for corneal transplantations. This study investigated the impact of organ transplantation scandals on corneal donation rate at the University Hospital Tübingen. Each deceased patient was considered as a potential corneal donor. An ophthalmic resident handled with stable methods of procedures the corneal donor procurement from 2009 to 2015. The rates of corneal donation were examined and analyzed. Among the 5712 hospital deaths, consent for corneal donation was obtained in 711 cases. The mean annual corneal donation rate was 12.4%. Since 2009, the donation rate per year could be increased with exception of 2013 and 2015. In the end of 2012 and 2014 two huge organ donation scandals were known in Germany. In the following years 2013 and 2015 corneal donation rate decreased significantly (P=0.0181 and P=0.0006). We concluded that transplantation scandals have a significant impact on corneal donation rate. Improving professional's performance through full transparency and honesty is very important to earn trust of potential donors and their families. PMID:28730094

  8. FAQ: Blood Donation and Organ Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Surveillance Software Health Education Public Service Videos Blood Donation & Organ Transplant Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On ... to weeks (not month or years) before their donation. Currently, most organs are not screened for West Nile virus. This ...

  9. Under Utilization of Pancreas Transplants in Cystic Fibrosis Recipients in the United Network Organ Sharing (UNOS) Data 1987-2014.

    PubMed

    Usatin, D J; Perito, E R; Posselt, A M; Rosenthal, P

    2016-05-01

    Despite a high prevalence of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), pancreas transplantation is rarely reported. United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data were used to examine utilization of pancreas transplant and posttransplant outcomes in CF patients. Between 1987-2014, CF patients (N = 4600) underwent 17 liver-pancreas, three lung-pancreas, one liver-lung pancreas, four kidney-pancreas, and three pancreas-only transplants. Of the 303 CF patients who received liver transplantation, 20% had CF-related diabetes (CFRD) before transplantation, and nine of those received a liver-pancreas transplant. Of 4241 CF patients who underwent lung transplantation, 33% had CFRD before transplantation, and three of those received a pancreas transplant. Of 49 CF patients who received a liver-lung transplant, 57% had CFRD before transplantation and one received a pancreas transplant. Posttransplantation diabetes developed in 7% of CF pancreas transplant recipients versus 24% of CF liver and 29% of CF lung recipients. UNOS has no data on pancreas exocrine insufficiency. Two-year posttransplantation survival was 88% after liver-pancreas transplant, 33% after lung-pancreas transplant, and 100% after pancreas-kidney and pancreas-only transplants. Diabetes is common pretransplantation and posttransplantation in CF solid organ transplant recipients, but pancreas transplantation remains rare. Further consideration of pancreas transplant in CF patients undergoing other solid organ transplant may be warranted. © Copyright 2015 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  10. The Impact of Repeated Mismatches in Kidney Transplantations Performed After Non-Renal Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Côté, J M; Zhang, X; Dahhou, M; Sapir-Picchadze, R; Foster, B; Cardinal, H

    2017-09-11

    The aim of this study was to determine whether kidney transplantations performed after previous non-renal solid organ transplants are associated with worse graft survival when there are repeated HLA mismatches (RMM) with the previous donor(s). We performed a retrospective cohort study using data from the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients. Our cohort comprised 6, 624 kidney transplantations performed between January 1(st) 1990 and January 1(st) , 2015. All patients had previously received one or more non-renal solid organ transplants. RMM were observed in 35.3% of kidney transplantations and 3, 012 grafts were lost over a median follow-up of 5.4 years. In multivariate Cox regression analyses, we found no association between overall graft survival and either RMM in class 1 (hazard ratio (HR): 0.97, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.89-1.07) or class 2 (HR: 0.95, 95% CI 0.85- 1.06). Results were similar for the associations between RMM, death-censored graft survival and patient survival. Our results suggest that the presence of RMM with previous donor(s) does not have an important impact on allograft survival in kidney transplant recipients who have previously received a non-renal solid organ transplant. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Organ shortage: the greatest challenge facing transplant medicine.

    PubMed

    Shafran, David; Kodish, Eric; Tzakis, Andreas

    2014-07-01

    The success of organ transplantation as a treatment for end-stage organ disease has yielded a series of ethical quandaries originating from the issue of organ shortage. Scarcity of organs for transplantation necessitates formulation of just and fair allocation policies as well as ethically viable solutions to bridging the vast gap between organ supply and demand. The concept of "triage" provides a useful paradigm in which to contextualize the organ shortage issue. This entails subjugating the welfare of the individual patient for the benefit of the wider community as an ethically justified response to the challenge of scarcity.

  12. Organ Transplantation: Legal, Ethical and Islamic Perspective in Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Bakari, Abubakar A; Abbo Jimeta, Umar S; Abubakar, Mohammed A; Alhassan, Sani U; Nwankwo, Emeka A

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation dates back to the ancient times and since then it has become one of the important developments in modern medicine; saving the lives, as well as improving the quality of life of many patients. As the demand for organ transplantation far exceeds the organ availability, the transplant program is often saddled with complex legal and ethical issues. This review article highlights the legal and ethical issues that might arise regarding organ transplantation and appraises the existing legal frame work governing organ transplantation in Nigeria. Information on legal, cultural, religious and medical ethical issues regarding organ transplantation in Nigeria was obtained by searching the PubMed and Google Scholar, conference proceedings, seminar paper presentations, law library and other related publications were collated and analyzed. In decision making for organ transplantation, the bioethical principles like autonomy, beneficence and justice must be employed. It was believed by Catholic theologians that to mutilate one living person to benefit another violates the principle of Totality. Among Muslim scholars and researchers, there are those who throw legal support as to its permissibility while the other group sees it as illegal. Organ/tissues transplantation is considered a medical intervention that touches on the fundamental rights of the donor or the recipient. Where there is an unlawful infringement of the right of such persons in any way may be regarded as against Section 34 of the 1999 Nigerian Constitution dealing with right to dignity of the human person. Worldwide, the researchers and government bodies have agreed on informed consent for organ/tissue donation and for recipient should be obtained without coercion before embarking on such medical treatment Worldwide organ transplantation has become the best medical treatment for patients with end stage organ failure. However, there is no law/legislation backing organ/tissues transplantation in

  13. Food allergies developing after solid organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Needham, J M; Nicholas, S K; Davis, C M

    2015-12-01

    The development of food allergy is an increasingly recognized form of morbidity after solid organ transplant. It occurs more commonly in liver transplant recipients, although it has also been reported in heart, lung, kidney, and intestinal transplants. Pediatric transplant recipients are more likely to develop symptoms compared to adults, and reports of frequency vary widely from 5% to 38% in pediatric liver transplant recipients. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed in the literature, although no single mechanism can yet account for all reported observations. As food allergy can have at worst potentially fatal consequences, and at best require lifestyle adjustment through food avoidance, it is important for recipients to be aware of the donor's food allergies and particularly in pediatrics, the possibility of completely de novo allergies. This review explores the recent reports surrounding food allergy after solid organ transplant, including epidemiology, proposed mechanisms, and implications for practice.

  14. Cytomegalovirus pneumonia in transplant patients: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Eun-Young Kang; Patz, E.F. Jr.; Mueller, N.L.

    1996-03-01

    Our goal was to assess the CT findings of cytomegalovirus (CMV) pneumonia in transplant patients. The study included 10 transplant patients who had chest CT scan and pathologically proven isolated pulmonary CMV infection. Five patients had bone marrow transplant and five had solid organ transplant. The CT scans were retrospectively reviewed for pattern and distribution of disease and the CT findings compared with the findings on open lung biopsy (n = 9) and autopsy (n = 1). Nine of 10 patients had parenchymal abnormalities apparent at CT and I had normal CT scans. The findings in the nine patients included small nodules (n = 6), consolidation (n = 4), ground-glass attenuation (n = 4), and irregular lines (n = 1). The nodules had a bilateral and symmetric distribution and involved all lung zones. The consolidation was most marked in the lower lung zones. The CT findings of CMV pneumonia in transplant patients are heterogeneous. The most common patterns include small nodules and areas of consolidation. 13 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  15. Loss of Vancomycin-Resistant Enterococcus Fecal Dominance in an Organ Transplant Patient With Clostridium difficile Colitis After Fecal Microbiota Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Stripling, Joshua; Kumar, Ranjit; Baddley, John W.; Nellore, Anoma; Dixon, Paula; Howard, Donna; Ptacek, Travis; Lefkowitz, Elliot J.; Tallaj, Jose A.; Benjamin, William H.; Morrow, Casey D.; Rodriguez, J. Martin

    2015-01-01

    We report the use of fecal microbiota transplantation in a single heart-kidney transplant recipient with recurrent Clostridium difficile, vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus (VRE) fecal dominance, and recurrent VRE infections. Fecal microbiota transplantation resulted in the reconstruction of a diverse microbiota with (1) reduced relative abundance of C difficile and VRE and (2) positive clinical outcome. PMID:26180828

  16. Organ procurement and transplantation network. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-07-03

    : HHS is issuing this final rule (herein referred to as ``this rule'') to add vascularized composite allografts (VCAs) as specified herein to the definition of organs covered by the rules governing the operation of the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) (herein referred to as the OPTN final rule). When it enacted the National Organ Transplant Act in 1984, Congress included a definition of the term organ and authorized the Secretary to expand this definition by regulation. The Secretary has previously exercised this authority and expanded the statutory definition of organ. Prior to this rule, the OPTN final rule defined covered organs as ``a human kidney, liver, heart, lung, or pancreas, or intestine (including the esophagus, stomach, small and/or large intestine, or any portion of the gastrointestinal tract). Blood vessels recovered from an organ donor during the recovery of such organ(s) are considered part of an organ with which they are procured for purposes of this part if the vessels are intended for use in organ transplantation and labeled `For use in organ transplantation only.' '' This rule also includes a corresponding change to the definition of human organs covered by section 301 of the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, as amended (NOTA).

  17. Under Utilization of Pancreas Transplants in Cystic Fibrosis Recipients in the United Network Organ Sharing (UNOS) Data 1987–2014

    PubMed Central

    Usatin, D. J.; Perito, E. R.; Posselt, A. M.; Rosenthal, P.

    2017-01-01

    Despite a high prevalence of pancreatic endocrine and exocrine insufficiency in cystic fibrosis (CF), pancreas transplantation is rarely reported. United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data were used to examine utilization of pancreas transplant and posttransplant outcomes in CF patients. Between 1987–2014, CF patients (N = 4600) underwent 17 liver–pancreas, three lung–pancreas, one liver–lung pancreas, four kidney–pancreas, and three pancreas-only transplants. Of the 303 CF patients who received liver transplantation, 20% had CF-related diabetes (CFRD) before transplantation, and nine of those received a liver–pancreas transplant. Of 4241 CF patients who underwent lung transplantation, 33% had CFRD before transplantation, and three of those received a pancreas transplant. Of 49 CF patients who received a liver–lung transplant, 57% had CFRD before transplantation and one received a pancreas transplant. Posttransplantation diabetes developed in 7% of CF pancreas transplant recipients versus 24% of CF liver and 29% of CF lung recipients. UNOS has no data on pancreas exocrine insufficiency. Two-year post-transplantation survival was 88% after liver–pancreas transplant, 33% after lung–pancreas transplant, and 100% after pancreas–kidney and pancreas-only transplants. Diabetes is common pretransplantation and posttransplantation in CF solid organ transplant recipients, but pancreas transplantation remains rare. Further consideration of pancreas transplant in CF patients undergoing other solid organ transplant may be warranted. PMID:26603034

  18. Period analysis for more up-to-date graft and patient survival estimates in transplantation: an evaluation using united network for organ sharing data.

    PubMed

    Gondos, Adam; Brenner, Hermann

    2010-03-15

    Traditional, cohort-based survival analysis approaches may provide outdated graft and patient survival estimates in times when clinical progress is rapid. Period analysis, a survival analysis method that uses left truncation and was shown to provide more up-to-date survival estimates than traditional, cohort-based methods in other medical fields, may improve the timeliness of survival monitoring in transplantation. Using United Network for Organ Sharing/Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network data, we evaluated, through a series of comparisons, how well most up-to-date 5-year survival estimates potentially derivable by two commonly used cohort-based methods and the period method would have been able to predict the later observed survival of corresponding most recent transplants in the dataset between 1992 to 1994 and 2001 to 2003. In the analysis of overall survival, period analysis provided a best prediction for 93 of the 100 evaluated point estimates, whereas among 350 evaluated point estimates of age-specific survival, period analysis provided a best estimate on 254 occasions (72.6%), compared with 49 (14.0%) and 82 (23.4%) occasions for the cohort-based approaches. Mean average absolute differences between period estimates and the later observed survival were meaningfully lower than those obtained by traditional methods, indicating that period estimates may provide much better survival predictions for recently transplanted grafts and patients than estimates derivable at the same time by traditional survival analysis approaches. The timeliness of survival monitoring can be meaningfully improved by the application of period analysis. The use of period analysis for providing more up-to-date survival estimates in transplantation may be encouraged.

  19. Deceased organ donation for transplantation: Challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Girlanda, Raffaele

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation saves thousands of lives every year but the shortage of donors is a major limiting factor to increase transplantation rates. To allow more patients to be transplanted before they die on the wait-list an increase in the number of donors is necessary. Patients with devastating irreversible brain injury, if medically suitable, are potential deceased donors and strategies are needed to successfully convert them into actual donors. Multiple steps in the process of deceased organ donation can be targeted to increase the number of organs suitable for transplant. In this review, after describing this process, we discuss current challenges and potential strategies to expand the pool of deceased donors. PMID:27683626

  20. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-01-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. PMID:24517434

  1. Desensitization for solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zachary, Andrea A; Leffell, Mary S

    2014-03-01

    Desensitization protocols are being used worldwide to enable kidney transplantation across immunologic barriers, i.e. antibody to donor HLA or ABO antigens, which were once thought to be absolute contraindications to transplantation. Desensitization protocols are also being applied to permit transplantation of HLA mismatched hematopoietic stem cells to patients with antibody to donor HLA, to enhance the opportunity for transplantation of non-renal organs, and to treat antibody-mediated rejection. Although desensitization for organ transplantation carries an increased risk of antibody-mediated rejection, ultimately these transplants extend and enhance the quality of life for solid organ recipients, and desensitization that permits transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells is life saving for patients with limited donor options. Complex patient factors and variability in treatment protocols have made it difficult to identify, precisely, the mechanisms underlying the downregulation of donor-specific antibodies. The mechanisms underlying desensitization may differ among the various protocols in use, although there are likely to be some common features. However, it is likely that desensitization achieves a sort of immune detente by first reducing the immunologic barrier and then by creating an environment in which an autoregulatory process restricts the immune response to the allograft. © 2014 The Authors. Immunological Reviews Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Hepatitis B in renal transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Marinaki, Smaragdi; Kolovou, Kyriaki; Sakellariou, Stratigoula; Boletis, John N; Delladetsima, Ioanna K

    2017-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) poses a significant challenge for both dialysis patients and kidney transplant recipients despite its decreasing rates, especially in developed countries. The best preventive method is vaccination. Patients with chronic renal disease should ideally be vaccinated prior to dialysis, otherwise, reinforced vaccination practices and close antibody titer monitoring should be applied while on dialysis. HBV infected dialysis patients who are renal transplant candidates must be thoroughly examined by HBV-DNA, and liver enzyme testing and by liver biopsy. When needed, one must consider treating patients with tenofovir or entecavir rather than lamivudine. Depending on the cirrhosis stage, dialysis patients are eligible transplant recipients for either a combined kidney-liver procedure in the case of decompensated cirrhosis or a lone kidney transplantation since even compensated cirrhosis after sustained viral responders is no longer considered an absolute contraindication. Nucleoside analogues have led to improved transplantation outcomes with both long-term patient and graft survival rates nearing those of HBsAg(-) recipients. Moreover, in the cases of immunized HBsAg(-) potential recipients with concurrent prophylaxis, we are enabled today to safely use renal grafts from both HBsAg(+) and HBsAg(-)/anti-HBc(+) donors. In so doing, we avoid unnecessary organ discarding. Universal prophylaxis with entecavir is recommended in HBV kidney recipients and should start perioperatively. One of the most important issues in HBV(+) kidney transplantation is the duration of antiviral prophylaxis. In the absence of robust data, it seems that prophylactic treatment may be discontinued in selected stable, low-risk recipients during maintenance immunosuppression and should be reintroduced when the immune status is altered. All immunosuppressive agents in kidney transplantation can be used in HBV(+) recipients. Immunosuppression is intimately associated with increased

  3. Supporting organ transplantation in non-resident aliens within limits.

    PubMed

    Bramstedt, Katrina A

    2006-01-01

    It is common knowledge that the supply of cadaveric organs does not meet demand. This shortage is often used as ethical argument against transplantation in Non-Resident Aliens; however, this fact in isolation does not present a comprehensive picture of organ allocation in USA. Even though approximately 153 cadaveric livers, kidneys, and hearts are transplanted into Non-Resident Aliens each year, roughly another 85 livers, kidneys and hearts are recovered as usable for transplantation but are not transplanted due to inability to find a recipient. These organs are also unable to be exported due to logistics or lack of patient matching. Because usable, recovered allografts are discarded on a yearly basis, there is no justification to use "allograft scarcity" as argument against transplantation in Non-Resident Aliens. Further, consistent with other countries, a system of two waiting lists which allocates organs to US Residents with the first right of refusal (with Non-Resident Aliens having to access organs refused by or not matched to US Residents) is ethically appropriate. Justification for this two-list system lies in deconstructing "who" is the transplant community, and who are "guests" of the transplant community.

  4. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  5. [Securing transplantation medicine. Duties of the German Foundation for Organ Transplantation (DSO)].

    PubMed

    Hess, R

    2014-09-01

    Due to a lack of confidence, the organ transplantation system in Germany is currently in a crisis. This was triggered by waiting list manipulations at four transplant centers in 2012, which led to a public debate that continues to this day and a dramatic decline in the number of post-mortem organ donations. This problem affects the 11,000 critically ill patients on the waiting list who are in urgent need of a post-mortem organ donation for their own survival. Also affected are transplantation medicine physicians and facilities whose work in organ donations is severely influenced by the resurgent discussion of brain death diagnosis and the medical and ethical criteria for the allocation of organs. Despite extensive documentation of donor/organ data, receiver data, and functional data, the necessary transparency to assess and represent the quality of transplantation medicine in Germany is not available due to systematic segregation of the information by the databases. Therefore, the joint efforts of all stakeholders are required to restore confidence in a transparent high-quality organ donation and transplantation process based on a transplant registry.

  6. Kidney Transplant Outcomes After Primary, Repeat and Kidney After Nonrenal Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sood, Puneet; Gao, Xiaotian; Mehta, Rajil; Landsittel, Douglas; Wu, Christine; Nusrat, Rabeeya; Puttarajappa, Chethan; Tevar, Amit D.; Hariharan, Sundaram

    2016-01-01

    Background Improvements in renal allograft outcomes have permitted kidney transplantation after prior kidney allograft failure as well as after nonrenal solid organ transplantation. This study compares renal allograft outcomes in the 3 groups, that is, primary, repeat, and kidney after nonrenal solid organ transplantation, where transplant group was coded as a time-dependent variable. Methods We retrospectively reviewed registry data for kidney transplant recipients at University of Pittsburgh Medical Center from January 2000 to December 2011. We compared overall graft survival between the 3 groups using Cox regression modeling. We calculated 1-, 3-, and 5-year graft survival and half-lives for each group where feasible. Results The study cohort (N = 2014) consisted of group A (primary kidney transplant, n = 1578, with 7923.2 years of follow-up time), group B (repeat kidney transplant, n = 314, with 1566.7 years of follow-up time) and group C (kidney post-nonrenal solid organ transplant, n = 176, with 844.8 years of follow-up time). Of the 1578 patients in the primary kidney transplant group, 74 later received a repeat transplant and thus also have follow-up counted in the repeat kidney transplant group. The median follow-up was 56, 53, and 55 months, respectively. The 5-year actuarial and death-censored graft survival was 68.69%, 68.79%, and 66.48% and 65.53%, 67.68%, and 62.92%, respectively (P = 0.70). There was no difference in overall graft survival in the Cox-adjusted analysis (group B: odds ratio, 1.02; 95% confidence interval, 0.84-1.26; P = 0.79; group C: odds ratio, 0.96; 95% confidence interval, 0.75-1.23; P = 0.76). Conclusions The adjusted kidney graft survivals in the 3 groups were similar. PMID:27500265

  7. Hepatitis C virus and nonliver solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carbone, Marco; Mutimer, David; Neuberger, James

    2013-03-27

    : Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is common in solid organ allograft recipients and is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after transplantation, so effective management will improve outcomes. In this review, we discuss the extent of the problem associated with HCV infection in donors and kidney, heart, and lung transplant candidates and recipients and recommend follow-up and treatment.Patients with end-stage kidney disease without cirrhosis and selected patients with early-stage cirrhosis can be considered for kidney transplant alone. In HCV-infected kidney allograft recipients, the progression of fibrosis should be evaluated serially by Fibroscan or serologic measures of fibrosis. Transplantation of kidneys from HCV-positive donors should be restricted to HCV-positive recipients as it is associated with a reduced time waiting for a graft and does not affect posttransplant outcomes. Hepatitis C virus antiviral therapy should be considered for all HCV-RNA-positive kidney transplant candidates, irrespective of the baseline liver histopathology. Protease inhibitors have yet to be fully evaluated in patients with renal dysfunction and in the transplant population. As these agents may cause anemia in patients with normal renal function, tolerability may be a problem in patients with end-stage kidney disease.The impact of HCV infection on survival in heart and lung transplantation is unclear. Because of the shortage of organs, few HCV-infected patients are accepted for transplantation.Universal use of nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for the screening of potential organ donors should be reserved to high-risk donors. Assays that quantify HCV core antigen may become more cost-effective than NAT for the screening of potential organ donors.

  8. Hepatitis E virus infection in patients on dialysis and in solid organ transplant recipients in Argentina: exploring associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Pisano, María Belén; Balderramo, Domingo; Wassaf, Maribel Martínez; Lotto, Martín; Carlino, Yanina; Ré, Viviana Elizabeth; Debes, José D

    2017-03-01

    Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) leads to acute hepatitis infection in immunocompetent hosts. HEV genotype 3 can present with high frequency and lead to chronic infection in individuals with a compromised immune system. The risk factors related to increased seroprevalence or chronicity in this population are not entirely understood. Moreover, most studies addressing risk factors for HEV in non-endemic areas come from developed areas such as North America and Europe. In this study we evaluated seroprevalence, chronicity and risk factors for HEV in 120 transplant recipients and 88 patients on dialysis in Argentina. We found a significantly higher seroprevalence of HEV IgG in those undergoing dialysis compared with healthy controls (10.2% and 4.3% respectively, p = 0.03). No difference in HEV seroprevalence was observed between healthy controls and transplant recipients (5.8%). We found no association between previously identified risk factors for HEV, such as pork consumption or use of tacrolimus, and HEV seroprevalence. In univariate and multivariate analyses, consumption of fish was associated with higher seroprevalence of HEV (OR = 9.33; 95% CI: 2.07-42.2; p = 0.04). None of the samples showed HEV RNA amplification, indicating that chronicity does not seem to be an issue in these cohorts. Our results show increased seroprevalence of HEV in individuals undergoing dialysis but not in transplant recipients. We also found that fish consumption can be a potential risk factor for acquiring HEV.

  9. Cancer Risk After Pediatric Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yanik, Elizabeth L; Smith, Jodi M; Shiels, Meredith S; Clarke, Christina A; Lynch, Charles F; Kahn, Amy R; Koch, Lori; Pawlish, Karen S; Engels, Eric A

    2017-05-01

    The effects of pediatric solid organ transplantation on cancer risk may differ from those observed in adult recipients. We described cancers in pediatric recipients and compared incidence to the general population. The US transplant registry was linked to 16 cancer registries to identify cancer diagnoses among recipients <18 years old at transplant. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were estimated by dividing observed cancer counts among recipients by expected counts based on the general population rates. Cox regression was used to estimate the associations between recipient characteristics and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) risk. Among 17 958 pediatric recipients, 392 cancers were diagnosed, of which 279 (71%) were NHL. Compared with the general population, incidence was significantly increased for NHL (SIR = 212, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 188-238), Hodgkin's lymphoma (SIR = 19, 95% CI = 13-26), leukemia (SIR = 4, 95% CI = 2-7), myeloma (SIR = 229, 95% CI = 47-671), and cancers of the liver, soft tissue, ovary, vulva, testis, bladder, kidney, and thyroid. NHL risk was highest during the first year after transplantation among recipients <5 years old at transplant (SIR = 313), among recipients seronegative for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) at transplant (SIR = 446), and among intestine transplant recipients (SIR = 1280). In multivariable analyses, seronegative EBV status, the first year after transplantation, intestine transplantation, and induction immunosuppression were independently associated with higher NHL incidence. Pediatric recipients have a markedly increased risk for many cancers. NHL constitutes the majority of diagnosed cancers, with the highest risk occurring in the first year after transplantation. NHL risk was high in recipients susceptible to primary EBV infection after transplant and in intestine transplant recipients, perhaps due to EBV transmission in the donor organ. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  10. The high cost of organ transplant commercialism.

    PubMed

    Danovitch, Gabriel M

    2014-02-01

    The Declaration of Istanbul defines organ transplant commercialism as '…a policy or practice in which an organ is treated as a commodity, including by being bought or sold or used for material gain.' It is this treatment of the organ that inevitably leads to its financial value being placed before the welfare of either its donor or its recipient or others in need of organ transplantation. International experience over the past two decades has proven this point and outcomes of commercial donation for both organ donors and their recipients have been poor. Commercial organ donation also comes at the expense of, not in addition to, unpaid, 'altruistic' donation. Other consequences of commercial donation are discussed in addition to a review of measures taken by the international community to put an end to the exploitation of vulnerable organ donors and the provision of ethically acceptable options for those in need of organ transplantation.

  11. Organ procurement: Spanish transplant procurement management.

    PubMed

    Manyalich, Martí; Mestres, Carlos A; Ballesté, Chloë; Páez, Gloria; Valero, Ricard; Gómez, María Paula

    2011-06-01

    Transplantation is an accepted therapeutic option to save or improve the quality of life when organ failure occurs or tissue replacements are needed. However, the lack of organs is the major limitation. The deceased organ procurement organization and professionals provide the solution to this international problem. In this review, we identify the elements involved in the organ procurement management process to analyze the possibility of implementation of deceased organ procurement for a transplantation program. While the donation rates are subject to several negative factors including religious, economic, cultural, and legal issues, the existence of well-trained professionals may considerably increase them. Professional training in organ donation along with the establishment of a solid organizational system has been identified as the crucial factor in developing efficient organ donation and transplantation programs.

  12. Invasive candidiasis serological diagnosis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Magdalena; Gołaś, Marlena; Dąbkowska, Maria; Pączek, Leszek; Swoboda-Kopeć, Ewa

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients are at high risk of fungal infections, because of ongoing immunosuppressive treatment. There are three post organ transplant phases: early, intermediate, and late, all of them at risk of Candida infections. Since conventional tests are insufficient, specific secondary diagnostic tests are still being explored. Serological tests are currently the most common choice. The present study was to determine the usefulness of mannan antigen and anti-mannan antibody detection in diagnosing invasive candidiasis in liver or kidney transplant recipients. The levels of mannan and anti-mannan antibodies were assessed with Platelia Candida Ag Plus, and Platelia Candida Ab Plus (Biorad, Marne-la-Coquette, France) commercial tests, according to manufacturer's guidelines. Sixty six serum samples were obtained from 25 patients (9 liver transplant recipients, 7 kidney transplant recipients, and 9 patients prepared for a kidney transplant), 29 serum samples from 15 patients tested positive for mannan antigen. Serum samples were obtained from 14 patients tested positive for anti- mannan antibodies. Fungal antigen detection in blood serum in patients under immunosuppression, especially with neutropenia, suggests that antifungal treatment should be administered. Serological tests, especially mannan and anti-mannan ones, are very useful for confirmation or exclusion of invasive candidiasis in high-risk patients. PMID:26155122

  13. Transplant recipients' conceptions of three key phenomena in transplantation: the organ donation, the organ donor, and the organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Sanner, Margareta A

    2003-08-01

    Thirty-five heart and kidney transplant patients were interviewed on five separate occasions during the first 2 yr after transplantation. The aim was to explore their experiences of phenomena that distinguish the transplantation from other kinds of medical treatment. The selection of informants was designed to permit comparisons between recipients with heart and kidney transplants and with living and necro-transplants. The qualitative analysis of the informants' reactions was focused on three themes; nine categories emerged. The first theme concerned general aspects of the donation and the donor and was differentiated in four categories: joy and sorrow, gratefulness and indebtedness, guilt, and inequity. The second theme related to the donor as a unique individual and included three categories: recognition and identification with the donor, influences of the donor, and relationship to the living donor. The third theme pertained to incorporation of the transplant and included two categories related to the naturalness of having a transplant, and the benevolent transplant. The informants' reactions were discussed in terms of primary and secondary processes. All informants were in an emotionally charged situation after transplantation and warded off anxiety-provoking impulses, most intensively during the first 6 months. Avoidance, suppression, and denial were the most common defence mechanisms, all of which seemed to be supported by the medical context. Other, more constructive strategies are suggested. The recipients' own interpretations of causes to possible personality changes are discussed. There were few differences between heart and necro-kidney patients concerning the reactions to the donation, the donor, and the transplant; the dividing line was more prominent between recipients with living and necro-transplants.

  14. Haematuria in postrenal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team.

  15. Haematuria in Postrenal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ziting; Vathsala, Anantharaman; Tiong, Ho Yee

    2015-01-01

    Haematuria has a prevalence of 12% in the postrenal transplant patient population. It heralds potentially dangerous causes which could threaten graft loss. It is important to consider causes in light of the unique, urological, and immunological standpoints of these patients. We review the literature on common causes of haematuria in postrenal transplant patients and suggest the salient approach to the evaluation of this condition. A major cause of haematuria is urinary tract infections. There should be a higher index of suspicion for mycobacterial, fungal, and viral infection in this group of immunosuppressed patients. Measures recommended in the prevention of urinary tract infections include early removal of foreign bodies as well as prophylactic antibiotics during the early transplant phase. Another common cause of haematuria is that of malignancies, in particular, renal cell carcinomas. When surgically managing cancer in the setting of a renal transplant, one has to be mindful of the limited retropubic space and the need to protect the anastomoses. Other causes include graft rejections, recurrences of primary disease, and calculus formation. It is important to perform a comprehensive evaluation with the aid of an experienced multidisciplinary transplant team. PMID:25918706

  16. Prophylaxis of hepatitis B infection in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Karin L.; Kotton, Camille N.; Hertl, Martin; Markmann, James F.; Cosimi, A. Benedict; Chung, Raymond T.

    2013-01-01

    Rates of transmission of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection from organ donors with HBV markers to recipients along with reactivation of HBV during immunosuppression following transplantation have fallen significantly with the advent of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIg) and effective antiviral therapy. Although the availability of potent antiviral agents and HBIg has highly impacted the survival rate of HBV-infected patients after transplantation, the high cost associated with this practice represents a major financial burden. The availability of potent antivirals with high genetic barrier to resistance and minimal side effects have made it possible to recommend an HBIg-free prophylactic regimen in selected patients with low viral burden prior to transplant. Significant developments over the last two decades in the understanding and treatment of HBV infection necessitate a re-appraisal of the guidelines for prophylaxis of HBV infection in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:23814610

  17. Management of the patient awaiting cardiac transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mills, R M

    1992-09-01

    The spectacular clinical success of heart transplantation (HTTX) in the cyclosporine era has engendered challenging new clinical problems that include long-term management of patients with severely compromised systolic function, preparation of potential HTTX recipients for major surgery followed by immunosuppression, and ethical and rational distribution of limited numbers of donated organs. The magnitude of these challenges may seem overwhelming. Fortunately, clinicians have the luxury of dealing with the issues involved one patient, and one step, at a time. The continued efforts of clinical investigators have clarified important management principles. There is a growing appreciation of the pivotal importance of mitral valve function in determining the response to medical therapy and long-term prognosis in this patient population. Enthusiasm for pharmacologic control of asymptomatic ventricular ectopy has waned; instead, the restoration and maintenance of normal atrial function has clearly taken precedence. In preparation for surgery, new endoscopic techniques offer great advantages. The use of high-technology support devices as "bridges to transplantation" has been re-examined in view of the relatively poorer short- and long-term prognosis of patients managed with these devices. Increasingly, the optimal scenario for HTTX entails transplantation of a severely compromised but medically stable patient. As specific therapy, HTTX today has relatively limited application to the vast majority of patients with heart failure (HF). Seventeen hundred heart transplants will do little to directly affect the 400,000 patients in the United States who each year develop symptomatic HF.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Organ Transplantation: Frequently Asked Questions

    MedlinePlus

    ... org www.marrow.org American Association of Blood Banks (301) 907-6977 aabb@aabb.org www.aabb. ... or appeals. Every transplant program has a social worker or financial coordinator who can work with you ...

  19. Rotavirus in organ transplantation: drug-virus-host interactions.

    PubMed

    Yin, Y; Metselaar, H J; Sprengers, D; Peppelenbosch, M P; Pan, Q

    2015-03-01

    Although rotavirus is usually recognized as the most common etiology of diarrhea in young children, it can in fact cause severe diseases in organ transplantation recipients irrespective of pediatric or adult patients. This comprehensive literature analysis revealed 200 cases of rotavirus infection with 8 related deaths in the setting of organ transplantation been recorded. Based on published cohort studies, an average incidence of 3% (187 infections out of 6176 organ recipients) was estimated. Rotavirus infection often causes severe gastroenteritis complications and occasionally contributes to acute cellular rejection in these patients. Immunosuppressive agents, universally used after organ transplantation to prevent organ rejection, conceivably play an important role in such a severe pathogenesis. Interestingly, rotavirus can in turn affect the absorption and metabolism of particular immunosuppressive medications via several distinct mechanisms. Even though rotaviral enteritis is self-limiting in general, infected transplantation patients are usually treated with intensive care, rehydration and replacement of nutrition, as well as applying preventive strategies. This article aims to properly assess the clinical impact of rotavirus infection in the setting of organ transplantation and to disseminate the interactions among the virus, host and immunosuppressive medications.

  20. Solid organ transplant training objectives for residents.

    PubMed

    Masclans, J R; Vicente, R; Ballesteros, M A; Sabater, J; Roca, O; Rello, J

    2012-11-01

    With the aim of analyzing the current state of the educational objectives in the training of medical residents in solid organ transplantation (SOT), we conducted a review of the status of the official programs of the specialities involved in SOT, focusing particularly on lung transplantation. A survey of medical residents was also conducted to allow reflexion about the topic. We obtained 44 surveys from 4 University Hospitals with active programs in SOT, mainly from intensive care medicine and anesthesiology residents. We detected an important number of courses oriented to organ donation but very limited in terms of basic training in the management of the immediate postoperative period, principles of immunosuppression and updates on immunosuppressive therapy and complications (particularly rejection and infection). We also identified that these educational aspects should be directed not only to medical residents from specialities with a close retation to SOT, but also to all who may at some time have a relation to such patients. The use of information and communication techniques (ICTs), on-line courses and also simulations should be instruments to take into account in the biomedical training of medical residents. We conclude that we need a specific training program in complications of SOT, as well as fundamental principles in immunology and immunosuppressor pharmacology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. Skin cancer in organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Werner; Mertz, Kirsten D; Hofbauer, Günther F L; Tinguely, Marianne

    2013-01-01

    Organ transplant recipients (OTR) are at a significantly increased risk for developing a wide variety of skin cancers, particularly epithelial skin cancer, Merkel cell carcinoma and Kaposi's sarcoma. Melanoma, skin adnexal neoplasm and cutaneous lymphomas are also more common in OTR and may differ in their clinicopathologic presentation from tumors in immunocompetent patients. The accuracy of clinical diagnosis of suspected premalignant and malignant skin lesions in OTR is modest. Therefore, histopathological diagnosis is an essential element for the diagnostic workup of skin cancers and, in addition, provides important information on prognosis. Squamous cell carcinoma and intraepithelial neoplasias (actinic keratosis, squamous cell carcinoma in situ or Bowen's disease) are the most common forms of skin cancer in OTR. The risk of Merkel cell carcinoma and Kaposi's sarcoma is dramatically increased in OTR. Merkel cell carcinoma shows a highly aggressive course. Kaposi's sarcoma tends to spread to extracutaneous sites. Primary cutaneous lymphomas developing after organ transplantation are rare. The spectrum of cutaneous B cell lymphomas in OTR, in particular, differs significantly from that of the general population, with a predominance of Epstein-Barr virus-driven posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder. This review discusses the clinical and histopathological aspects of skin cancers in OTR, the impact of dermatopathological analysis on prognosis and the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms.

  2. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Wong, Christopher J; Pagalilauan, Genevieve

    2015-09-01

    Solid organ transplantation (SOT) is one of the major advances in medicine. Care of the SOT recipient is complex and continued partnership with the transplant specialist is essential to manage and treat complications and maintain health. The increased longevity of SOT recipients will lead to their being an evolving part of primary care practice, with ever more opportunities for care, education, and research of this rewarding patient population. This review discusses the overall primary care management of adult SOT recipients.

  3. Harvesting organs for paediatric transplantation: medical features.

    PubMed

    Nivet, H

    1989-01-01

    The progress in organ transplantation has led to a rise in the demand for organs. Paediatric intensive care units are the main source for obtaining organs. Every "brain dead" patient should be regarded as a potential donor. General contraindications to organ donation are: systemic viral or bacterial infections and extra-cerebral malignancy. They are also organ-specific contraindications. The criteria for the diagnosis of "brain death" have been widely studied and defined. Care of brain dead donors consists of maintenance of cardiac, pulmonary and renal function. Monitoring requires control of central venous and arterial blood pressure, core temperature, urine flow, heart rate and biological data on both urine and blood. A 5% dextrose infusion is maintained with added potassium and sodium chloride according to the urine flow, detectable water loss, and blood and urine composition. Hypotension due to hypovolaemia requires immediate treatment with blood, colloid or albumin infusion. Persistent hypotension with cardiac pump failure is treated with inotropic agents: dopamine and/or dobutamine. Raised urine flow due to diabetes insipidus requires desmopressin (dDAVP). Progress in organ collection requires the consent of the parents and highly motivated medical teams.

  4. The history of organ donation and transplantation in Iran.

    PubMed

    Ghods, Ahad J

    2014-03-01

    The first kidney transplant in Iran was performed in 1967, and this was the first organ transplant in countries that are current members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation. In 1988, in response to the long waiting list at the Iranian Ministry of Health for kidney transplant, a state-regulated living-unrelated donor kidney transplant program was adopted. By 1999, the kidney transplant waiting list in Iran was eliminated. In 1989, a fatwa (religious approval) from the Supreme Religious Leader was obtained that recognized brain death and allowed deceased-donor organ transplant. Subsequently, transplant centers began performing deceased-donor kidney, liver, and heart transplants. In 2000, the Brain Death and Organ Transplantation Act was passed by the Iranian parliament, legalizing deceased-donor organ transplant. The transplant team at Shiraz began performing more deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants and became a successful deceased-donor organ transplant model in the country. By the end of 2012, there were 34166 kidney (including 4436 deceased-donor) and 2021 liver (including 1788 deceased-donor), 482 heart, 147 pancreas, 63 lung, and several intestine and multiorgan transplants performed in Iran. In 2011, there were 2771 solid-organ transplants performed in Iran (37 transplants per million population), and Iran ranked as number 33 among the 50 most active countries worldwide. In 2011 and 2012, Iran was ahead of all country members of the Middle East Society for Organ Transplantation in performing deceased-donor kidney and liver transplants.

  5. Risk of myeloid neoplasms after solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Gibson, Todd M.; Clarke, Christina A.; Lynch, Charles F.; Anderson, Lesley A.; Pfeiffer, Ruth; Landgren, Ola; Weisenburger, Dennis D.; Engels, Eric A.

    2014-01-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have elevated cancer risks, due in part to pharmacologic immunosuppression. However, little is known about risks for hematologic malignancies of myeloid origin. We linked the US Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients with 15 population-based cancer registries to ascertain cancer occurrence among 207,859 solid organ transplants (1987–2009). Solid organ transplant recipients had significantly elevated risk for myeloid neoplasms, with standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of 4.6 (95% confidence interval 3.8–5.6; N=101) for myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), 2.7 (2.2–3.2; N=125) for acute myeloid leukemia (AML), 2.3 (1.6–3.2; N=36) for chronic myeloid leukemia, and 7.2 (5.4–9.3; N=57) for polycythemia vera. SIRs were highest among younger individuals and varied by time since transplantation and organ type (Poisson regression P<0.05 for all comparisons). Azathioprine for initial maintenance immunosuppression increased risk for MDS (P=0.0002) and AML (2–5 years after transplantation, P=0.0163). Overall survival following AML/MDS among transplant recipients was inferior to that of similar patients reported to US cancer registries (log-rank P<0.0001). Our novel finding of increased risks for specific myeloid neoplasms after solid organ transplantation supports a role for immune dysfunction in myeloid neoplasm etiology. The increased risks and inferior survival should heighten clinician awareness of myeloid neoplasms during follow-up of transplant recipients. PMID:24727673

  6. Risk for transmission of Naegleria fowleri from solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Roy, S L; Metzger, R; Chen, J G; Laham, F R; Martin, M; Kipper, S W; Smith, L E; Lyon, G M; Haffner, J; Ross, J E; Rye, A K; Johnson, W; Bodager, D; Friedman, M; Walsh, D J; Collins, C; Inman, B; Davis, B J; Robinson, T; Paddock, C; Zaki, S R; Kuehnert, M; DaSilva, A; Qvarnstrom, Y; Sriram, R; Visvesvara, G S

    2014-01-01

    Primary amebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) caused by the free-living ameba (FLA) Naegleria fowleri is a rare but rapidly fatal disease of the central nervous system (CNS) affecting predominantly young, previously healthy persons. No effective chemotherapeutic prophylaxis or treatment has been identified. Recently, three transplant-associated clusters of encephalitis caused by another FLA, Balamuthia mandrillaris, have occurred, prompting questions regarding the suitability of extra-CNS solid organ transplantation from donors with PAM. During 1995-2012, 21 transplant recipients of solid organs donated by five patients with fatal cases of PAM were reported in the United States. None of the recipients developed PAM, and several recipients tested negative for N. fowleri by serology. However, historical PAM case reports and animal experiments with N. fowleri, combined with new postmortem findings from four patients with PAM, suggest that extra-CNS dissemination of N. fowleri can occur and might pose a risk for disease transmission via transplantation. The risks of transplantation with an organ possibly harboring N. fowleri should be carefully weighed for each individual recipient against the potentially greater risk of delaying transplantation while waiting for another suitable organ. In this article, we present a case series and review existing data to inform such risk assessments.

  7. The American Society of Transplantation Consensus Conference on the Use of Hepatitis C Viremic Donors in Solid Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Levitsky, J; Formica, R N; Bloom, R D; Charlton, M; Curry, M; Friedewald, J; Friedman, J; Goldberg, D; Hall, S; Ison, M; Kaiser, T; Klassen, D; Klintmalm, G; Kobashigawa, J; Liapakis, A; O'Conner, K; Reese, P; Stewart, D; Terrault, N; Theodoropoulos, N; Trotter, J; Verna, E; Volk, M

    2017-05-29

    The availability of direct-acting antiviral agents for the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has resulted in a profound shift in the approach to the management of this infection. These changes have affected the practice of solid organ transplantation by altering the framework by which patients with end-stage organ disease are managed and receive organ transplants. The high level of safety and efficacy of these medications in patients with chronic HCV infection provides the opportunity to explore their use in the setting of transplanting organs from HCV-viremic patients into non-HCV-viremic recipients. Because these organs are frequently discarded and typically come from younger donors, this approach has the potential to save lives on the solid organ transplant waitlist. Therefore, an urgent need exists for prospective research protocols that study the risk versus benefit of using organs for hepatitis C-infected donors. In response to this rapidly changing practice and the need for scientific study and consensus, the American Society of Transplantation convened a meeting of experts to review current data and develop the framework for the study of using HCV viremic organs in solid organ transplantation. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  8. A Rationale for Age-Adapted Immunosuppression in Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krenzien, Felix; ElKhal, Abdallah; Quante, Markus; Rodriguez Cetina Biefer, Hector; Hirofumi, Uehara; Gabardi, Steven; Tullius, Stefan G

    2015-11-01

    Demographic changes are associated with a steady increase of older patients with end-stage organ failure in need for transplantation. As a result, the majority of transplant recipients are currently older than 50 years, and organs from elderly donors are more frequently used. Nevertheless, the benefit of transplantation in older patients is well recognized, whereas the most frequent causes of death among older recipients are potentially linked to side effects of their immunosuppressants.Immunosenescence is a physiological part of aging linked to higher rates of diabetes, bacterial infections, and malignancies representing the major causes of death in older patients. These age-related changes impact older transplant candidates and may have significant implications for an age-adapted immunosuppression. For instance, immunosenescence is linked to lower rates of acute rejections in older recipients, whereas the engraftment of older organs has been associated with higher rejection rates. Moreover, new-onset diabetes mellitus after transplantation is more frequent in the elderly, potentially related to corticosteroids, calcineurin inhibitors, and mechanistic target of rapamycin inhibitors.This review presents current knowledge for an age-adapted immunosuppression based on both, experimental and clinical studies in and beyond transplantation. Recommendations of maintenance and induction therapy may help to improve graft function and to design future clinical trials in the elderly.

  9. Red cell antibodies arising from solid organ transplants.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, G

    1991-01-01

    RBC antibodies arising from transplanted organs and directed against recipient RBCs represent a well-established immunohematologic complication of solid organ transplantation. In ABO-unmatched organs, the frequency and severity of graft antibodies and hemolysis generally increase with the size (lymphoid content) of the organ, from kidney to liver to heart-lung transplants. In the cases reviewed here, the frequency of hemolysis increased in cyclosporine-treated kidney transplant recipients and O-to-A liver transplant recipients and decreased in group AB liver transplant recipients and kidney transplant recipients receiving azathioprine or low-dose postoperative graft irradiation. Available data cannot otherwise distinguish which cyclosporine-treated recipients of ABO-unmatched kidneys and livers (30-40% of total) will develop graft antibody. There has been no conclusive effect to date of the age, race, or gender of the donor or the recipient, of cadaver versus living kidney donors, or of patients' A2 or secretor status. In a few cases of living-donor kidney grafts, the donor was the patient's mother or wife who had been exposed to the recipient's RBC antigens via pregnancy. The ABO antibodies are typically IgG, appear 7 to 10 days after transplantation, and last for about a month. If immediate-spin crossmatching is done routinely, DATs are recommended in compatibility testing after ABO-unmatched transplants. Changes in the immunosuppressive regimen, such as a change from cyclosporine therapy, have not affected the duration of these antibodies. Most patients require only transfusions for this self-limited process, but six cases of hemolysis-induced acute renal failure have been reported, and one death was attributed to complications of hemolysis. RBC or plasma exchange has been performed in a few fulminant cases. RBCs of the donor's blood type are given when antibody appears. Some workers recommend such transfusion as prophylaxis at the time of surgery, although in

  10. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  11. Mobile decision support for transplantation patient data.

    PubMed

    Krause, Andreas; Hartl, Dominik; Theis, Fabian; Stangl, Manfred; Gerauer, Klaus E; Mehlhorn, Alexander T

    2004-06-15

    In high-critical medical fields instant information delivery is essential. Task-flow analyses within the transplantation unit of the Technische Universität München revealed that valuable time could be saved in pre-transplantation management being able to retrieve data of organ receivers ubiquitously. Inspired by this clinical scenario, a mobile application was designed and implemented providing surgeons with decision-relevant information on potential organ receivers. It assists them in considering the prospects of forthcoming organ transplantations and facilitates decision making and documentation with regard to high security demands. The described system services three organ receiver lists and is used by the surgeons in every transplantation procedure. After a 6-month period of clinical usage, the system has been evaluated in terms of handling, clinical benefit and total time savings. Intuitive, ubiquitous access to decision-relevant patient data and authenticated documentation were the major improvements with average total time savings of 50 min in comparison to the old system.

  12. Comparison of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients and nonimmunocompromised patients with pandemic H1N1 infection: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Minnema, Brian J; Patel, Mehul; Rotstein, Coleman; Mazzulli, Tony; Hota, Susy; Cole, Edward H; Renner, Eberhard L; Ross, Heather J; Singer, Lianne G; Husain, Shahid

    2011-07-27

    Pandemic H1N1 influenza has been associated with a worldwide outbreak of febrile respiratory illness. Although impaired cell mediated immunity, such as that caused by transplant immunosuppression, has been identified as a risk factor for severe infection with this virus, the course of this infection has not been adequately characterized in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients in comparison with nontransplanted controls. We report our experience with severe pH1N1 infection in transplant recipients and compare this group with nonimmunosuppressed patients. Data were retrospectively collected on all patients admitted to our institution with proven pH1N1 infection. Clinical characteristics, treatments, and outcomes were compared between SOT recipients and nonimmunocompromised controls. Seventeen SOT recipients and 49 controls were identified. The control group had higher baseline rates of asthma (P = 0.02) and smoking (P = 0.05) at baseline. No difference in clinical features of H1N1 infection was detected except for a greater prevalence of wheeze in the non-SOT group (P = 0.02). No statistical differences in outcomes could be detected between the groups. Several markers of severity, including use of high frequency oscillatory ventilation, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, and death were slightly more frequent in the control group. SOT recipients admitted to hospital with pH1N1 infection did not have significantly more severe outcomes of their infection compared with their nonimmunocompromised counterparts, despite their immune suppressed status.

  13. Attitude and Impact Factors Toward Organ Transplantation and Donation Among Transplantation Nurses in China.

    PubMed

    Xie, J-F; Wang, C-Y; He, G-P; Ming, Y-Z; Wan, Q-Q; Liu, J; Gong, L-N; Liu, L-F

    Health workers' awareness and knowledge of transplantation medicine can improve people's sensitivity and reduce their degree of opposition to donations. The medical literature contains numerous examples of attitudes toward organ transplantation and donation aimed at university students or medical staff members, but rarely for transplantation nurses. The purposes of the study were to investigate the attitudes toward organ transplantation and donation among transplantation nurses and to explore the impact factors. The study was conducted in 37 transplantation surgery wards in 22 hospitals using cross-sectional approach. SPSS (International Business Machines Corporation, Armonk, New York, USA) 7.0 software was used to analysis descriptive and inferential statistics for data. Five hundred thirty-six effective questionnaires were received and the effective rate was 89.33%. Nurses' mean age was 28.40 years with a mean service length of 6.54 years. Among these nurses, 66.6% and 78.0% were willing to accept organ transplantation surgery for themselves and their relatives, respectively. Of these nurses, 33.4% would donate their organs after death; whereas 39.9% were uncertain. Only 38.2% were willing to register in the national organ donation system. Of these nurses, 28.2% were willing to sign the organ donation consent forms when their relatives became potential organ donors, and 45.7% were uncertain. Eight independent variables that affected nurses' attitudes toward donating their organs from most to least significant were: ratio of nurse to bed, title, employment form, age, length of service, position, monthly income, and the highest educational degree earned. Pearson correlation analysis showed a significant correlation among nurses' attitudes toward organ transplantation, organ donation, and online registration. The attitude toward donation and transplantation in the hospitals was not too optimistic, and an improvement in the training regarding transplantation and

  14. Organ transplantation: the Latin American legislative response.

    PubMed

    Fuenzalida-Puelma, H L

    1990-01-01

    As medical barriers to human organ transplants have fallen, serious legal and ethical obstacles have emerged. This article provides an overview of those obstacles, taking into account the relevant legislation in force in 16 Latin American countries in 1989. The author proceeds by considering postmortem and inter-vivos organ donations separately and examining the principal ethical and legal issues relating to each kind. In the case of postmortem donation these deal mainly with donor consent, recipient selection, funding of transplant costs, and possible conflict of interest. In the case of inter-vivos donation they relate again to donor consent and funding as well as to certain other matters-notably donor compensation, commerce in organs, and international sharing of organs. On the whole it is concluded that the countries of Latin America, together with the nations of the world in general, urgently need to develop more comprehensive legislation on organ procurement and transplantation.

  15. [Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection following organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Haas, Charles; Le Jeunne, Claire

    2006-11-01

    In transplant recipients, immunosuppressive treatment affects cell-mediated immunity and increases the risk of tuberculosis. Tuberculosis may be transmitted by the donor organ or occur de novo, but such cases are rare. The vast majority of cases of active tuberculosis in transplant recipients result from reactivation of latent Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. The incidence varies from one region of the globe to another, from 0.5-1.0% in North America, to 0.36-5.5% in Europe and 7.0-11.8% in India. The incidence of tuberculosis among transplant recipients is much higher than in the general population. Diabetes mellitus, renal impairment, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic liver disease and AIDS all increase the risk of post-transplant tuberculosis. Extrapulmonary and disseminated forms are frequent in this setting. The diagnosis of tuberculosis in transplant recipients is often difficult, and treatment is frequently delayed. Tuberculosis can be life-threatening in such cases. Treatment is difficult because rifampicin is a cytochrome P450 inducer (leading to reduced levels of cyclosporine), and because the hepatotoxicity of isoniazid, rifampin and pyrazinamide is frequently increased in transplant recipients. Treatment of latent tuberculosis before transplantation markedly reduces the risk of developing active tuberculosis after transplantation.

  16. Primate Models in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas J.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2013-01-01

    Large animal models have long served as the proving grounds for advances in transplantation, bridging the gap between inbred mouse experimentation and human clinical trials. Although a variety of species have been and continue to be used, the emergence of highly targeted biologic- and antibody-based therapies has required models to have a high degree of homology with humans. Thus, the nonhuman primate has become the model of choice in many settings. This article will provide an overview of nonhuman primate models of transplantation. Issues of primate genetics and care will be introduced, and a brief overview of technical aspects for various transplant models will be discussed. Finally, several prominent immunosuppressive and tolerance strategies used in primates will be reviewed. PMID:24003248

  17. Overview: fungal infections in the transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Fishman, J A

    2002-01-01

    Fungal infection remains a major hurdle in solid organ transplantation. A variety of new antifungal agents have become available and new diagnostic tools are in development. This conference was convened to review current approaches to the prevention and treatment of fungal infection in transplantation. Among the keys to successful management of fungal infection are identification of patients at risk for infection (stratification), eradication or control of established infection in advance of transplantation, the demonstration of cure by radiologic and histopathologic means, and the use of surgical debridement, reduction in immune suppression, and fungicidal therapies whenever possible. The absence of sensitive diagnostic tools and standardization of antifungal susceptibility testing for the filamentous fungi are identified as major impediments to care in this area.

  18. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease in liver transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Christina; Schuchmann, Marcus; Zimmermann, Tim

    2011-02-01

    Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) are a life-threatening complication following solid organ transplantation. Many posttransplant lymphomas develop from the uncontrolled proliferation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-infected B-cells, whereas EBV-negative PTLDs were increasingly recognized within the past decade. Major risk factors for the development of PTLDs after liver transplantation are immunosuppressive therapy and the type of underlying disease: viral hepatitis, autoimmune liver disease, or alcoholic liver cirrhosis contribute to an increased risk for PTLD. Therapeutic regimens include reduction of immunosuppression, the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab, and chemotherapy, as well as new approaches using interferon-α and anti-interleukin-6 antibodies. Despite the different therapeutic regimens, mortality from PTLD remains high. Therefore, it is of major importance to identify patients at risk at an early stage of the disease. In this review, risk factors for PTLD development after liver transplantation, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapy are discussed.

  19. Fecal microbiota transplantation for refractory Clostridium difficile colitis in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Friedman-Moraco, R J; Mehta, A K; Lyon, G M; Kraft, C S

    2014-02-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) has been shown to be safe and efficacious in individuals with refractory Clostridium difficile. It has not been widely studied in individuals with immunosuppression due to concerns about infectious complications. We describe two solid organ transplant recipients, one lung and one renal, in this case report that both had resolution of their diarrhea caused by C. difficile after FMT. Both recipients required two FMTs to achieve resolution of their symptoms and neither had infectious complications. Immunosuppressed individuals are at high risk for acquisition of C. difficile and close monitoring for infectious complications after FMT is necessary, but should not preclude its use in patients with refractory disease due to C. difficile. Sequential FMT may be used to achieve cure in these patients with damaged microbiota from antibiotic use and immunosuppression. © Copyright 2014 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  20. Revisiting multi-organ transplantation in the setting of scarcity.

    PubMed

    Reese, P P; Veatch, R M; Abt, P L; Amaral, S

    2014-01-01

    In the setting of organ scarcity, the ethics of multi-organ transplantation (MOT) deserve new examination. MOT offers substantial benefits to certain recipients, including avoiding serial surgeries. However, MOT candidates in the United States commonly receive priority for their nonprimary organ over many individuals who need that organ, which may undermine equity. The absence of standard criteria for MOT eligibility also enables large and unfair regional variation in MOT, such as simultaneous liver-kidney transplantation. Unfortunately, MOT may also undermine utility (optimal patient and graft survival) in circumstances where providing multiple organs to one person fails to achieve the greater collective benefit attained by providing transplants to multiple people. Policy reforms should include the adoption of minimal clinical criteria for MOT candidacy with the attendant goal of decreasing regional variation in MOT. In the future, these minimal criteria can be revised to accommodate new research about which patients derive the most benefit from MOT. Incentives to perform MOT should also be reduced, such as by including MOT outcomes in center-specific reports. These reforms run the risk that the transplant community could be perceived as abandoning MOT candidates, but offer an opportunity to align transplant practice and ethical principles.

  1. Insurance Type and Solid Organ Transplantation Outcomes: A Historical Perspective on How Medicaid Expansion Might Impact Transplantation Outcomes.

    PubMed

    DuBay, Derek A; MacLennan, Paul A; Reed, Rhiannon D; Shelton, Brittany A; Redden, David T; Fouad, Mona; Martin, Michelle Y; Gray, Stephen H; White, Jared A; Eckhoff, Devin E; Locke, Jayme E

    2016-10-01

    The number of Medicaid beneficiaries has increased under the Affordable Care Act, improving access to solid organ transplantation in this disadvantaged patient cohort. It is unclear what impact Medicaid expansion will have on transplantation outcomes. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis to measure the frequency and variation in Medicaid transplantation and post-transplantation survival in Medicaid patients. Adult heart, lung, liver, and renal transplant recipients between 2002 and 2011 (n = 169,194) reported to the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients were identified. Transplant recipients were classified based on insurance status (private, Medicare or Medicaid). Outcomes measures included 5-year post-transplantation survival, summarized using Kaplan-Meier curves and compared with log-rank tests. Organ-specific Cox proportional hazards models were used to adjust for donor and recipient factors. Medicaid patients comprised 8.6% of all organ transplant recipients. Fewer transplantations were performed than expected among Medicaid beneficiaries for all organs except liver (liver: observed to expected ratio = 1.21; 95% CI, 0.68-1.90; heart: observed to expected ratio = 0.89; 95% CI, 0.44-1.49; lung: observed to expected ratio = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.22-1.06; renal: observed to expected ratio = 0.32; 95% CI, 0.08-0.72). Medicaid transplant recipients were listed with more severe organ failure and experienced shorter transplant wait times. Post-transplantation survival was lower in Medicaid patients compared with private insurance for all organs. Post-transplantation survival in Medicaid patients was similar to Medicare patients for heart, liver, and renal but lower in lung. Medicaid organ transplant beneficiaries had significantly lower survival compared with privately insured beneficiaries. The more severe organ failure among Medicaid beneficiaries at the time of listing, suggested a pattern of late referral, which might account for worse outcomes

  2. Government's role in organ transplantation policy.

    PubMed

    Blumstein, J F

    1989-01-01

    This paper initially considers ways of thinking about organ transplantation: Should it be treated as a catastrophic disease or as an ordinary and accepted medical procedure? The analysis then shifts to the role the government has played in influencing organ transplantation policy. The federal government's involvement initially stemmed from its role as payer for end-stage renal disease services. In recent years, the rationale for intervention has changed, and the mechanism for implementing regulatory oversight has shifted to a private network run for the government by the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS). The government has delegated much policymaking authority to UNOS, although the author demonstrates that this is not required by the applicable legislation. The article raises questions about the relationship between UNOS and the federal government, about potential conflicts between UNOS guidelines and state laws under the Uniform Anatomical Gift Act, and about the ideological stance undergirding much of current federal policy in the organ transplantation arena.

  3. Palliative and end of life care in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wentlandt, Kirsten; Weiss, Andrea; O'Connor, Erin; Kaya, Ebru

    2017-10-04

    Palliative care is an interprofessional approach that focuses on quality of life of patients facing life-threatening illness. Palliative care is consistently associated with improvements in advance care planning, patient and caregiver satisfaction, quality of life, symptom burden, and lower health care utilization. Most transplant patients suffer from advanced chronic disease, significant symptom burden, and mortality awaiting transplant. Transplantation introduces new risks including perioperative death, organ rejection, infection, renal insufficiency, and malignancy. Numerous publications over the last decade identify that palliative care is well-suited to support these patients and their caregivers, yet access to palliative care and research within this population is lacking. This review describes palliative care and summarizes existing research supporting palliative intervention in advanced organ failure, and transplant populations. A proposed model to provide palliative care in parallel with disease directed therapy in a transplant program has potential to improve symptom burden, quality of life, and health care utilization. Further studies are needed to elucidate specific benefits of palliative care for this population. In addition, there is tremendous need for education, specifically for clinicians, patients, and families, to improve understanding of palliative care and its benefits for patients with advanced disease. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. Qualification of biomarkers for drug development in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Burckart, Gilbert J; Amur, Shashi; Goodsaid, Federico M; Lesko, Lawrence J; Frueh, Felix W; Huang, Shiew-Mei; Cavaille-Coll, Marc W

    2008-02-01

    The drug development process is dependent upon having established end points for measuring drug efficacy and adverse effects. New drug development in organ transplantation suffers from having end points which are either outdated or which do not serve the purpose of addressing the current critical drug therapy problems. Numerous biomarkers have been examined in organ transplantation, but almost all would be classified as exploratory for drug development purposes. Some of the possible pathways out of this dilemma include investigator- or consortium-initiated research that would qualify the biomarkers as either probable or known valid biomarkers, help in identification of new end points in transplantation and their associated biomarkers, co-development of a new biomarker and drug for transplantation and the use of new clinical trial design methods which facilitate enriched or stratified transplant patient populations. With new biomarkers and new study design methodologies for drug development, improvement in the drug development process for transplantation is a real possibility that the transplant clinical and research community can help to bring about.

  5. Organ transplantation and drug eluting stents: Perioperative challenges

    PubMed Central

    Dalal, Aparna

    2016-01-01

    Patients listed for organ transplant frequently have severe coronary artery disease (CAD), which may be treated with drug eluting stents (DES). Everolimus and zotarolimus eluting stents are commonly used. Newer generation biolimus and novolimus eluting biodegradable stents are becoming increasingly popular. Patients undergoing transplant surgery soon after the placement of DES are at increased risk of stent thrombosis (ST) in the perioperative period. Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT) with aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor such as clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor is instated post stenting to decrease the incident of ST. Cangrelor has recently been approved by Food and Drug Administration and can be used as a bridging antiplatelet drug. The risk of ischemia vs bleeding must be considered when discontinuing or continuing DAPT for surgery. Though living donor transplant surgery is an elective procedure and can be optimally timed, cadaveric organ availability is unpredictable, therefore, discontinuation of antiplatelet medication cannot be optimally timed. The type of stent and timing of transplant surgery can be of utmost importance. Many platelet function point of care tests such as Light Transmittance Aggregrometry, Thromboelastography Platelet Mapping, VerifyNow, Multiple Electrode Aggregrometry are used to assess bleeding risk and guide perioperative platelet transfusion. Response to allogenic platelet transfusion to control severe intraoperative bleeding may differ with the antiplatelet drug. In stent thrombosis is an emergency where management with either a drug eluting balloon or a DES has shown superior outcomes. Post-transplant complications often involved stenosis of an important vessel that may need revascularization. DES are now used for endovascular interventions for transplant orthotropic heart CAD, hepatic artery stenosis post liver transplantation, transplant renal artery stenosis following kidney transplantation, etc. Several antiproliferative drugs

  6. State of the Art: Bridging to lung transplantation using artificial organ support technologies.

    PubMed

    Rajagopal, Keshava; Hoeper, Marius M

    2016-12-01

    Lung transplantation increasingly is being performed in recipients of higher risk and acuity. A subset of these patients has severely abnormal gas exchange and/or right ventricular dysfunction, such that artificial organ support strategies are required to bridge patients to lung transplantation. We review the rationales and currently used and potential strategies for bridging to lung transplantation and characterize bridging outcomes. Based on physiologic reasoning and a study of the existing literature, we provide a working strategy for bridging to lung transplantation.

  7. Comparison of cytomegalovirus viral load measure by real-time PCR with pp65 antigenemia for the diagnosis of cytomegalovirus disease in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Hernando, S; Folgueira, L; Lumbreras, C; San Juan, R; Maldonado, S; Prieto, C; Babiano, M J; Delgado, J; Andres, A; Moreno, E; Aguado, J M; Otero, J R

    2005-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is the most frequent complication in solid organ transplant recipients. Currently, the antigenemia assay is widely used to detect this infection, although its success is being questioned to a great extent nowadays. The aim of our study is to compare a quantitative real time PCR to measure CMV DNA to the antigenemia assay, for the diagnosis to CMV disease. For our research, we prospectively processed 1198 samples (plasma and peripheral blood leukocytes [PBMC]), which belonged to 158 transplant recipients. In every sample the detection of the pp65 antigen in PBMC was carried out, as well as the quantification of CMV DNA by PCR (Light Cycler, LC-PCR). For this process, FRET probes, which detect a 254-bp fragment from the CMV gB gene, were used. The dynamic range of the LC-PCR was 500 to 5.10(7) copies/mL plasma and from 62 to 6.10(6) copies/10(6) PBMC. Twenty-three episodes of cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease occurred in 22 out of 158 patients and PCR displayed levels of sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 67%, respectively. The antigenemia assay obtained values of 91% and 57%. We established a cutoff value of 10(3) copies/mL plasma and 315 copies/10(6) cells. According to these cutoff values, PCR showed levels of sensitivity, specificity, VPN and VPP of 95.6%, 81.6%, 99%, and 53% respectively. Moreover, the LC-PCR assay anticipated the antigenemia assay in 10 patients out of 22 who developed CMV disease and the appearance of any clinical symptoms in 12 out of 22 patients. In conclusion, we believe that the quantification of CMV DNA by LC-PCR is a superior assay to pp65 antigenemia test regarding the early diagnosis of CMV disease in solid organ transplant recipients.

  8. Willingness of human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients to donate their organs for transplantation in Taiwan: a cross-sectional questionnaire survey.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yi-Chieh; Hung, Chien-Ching; Cheng, Aristine; Liu, Wen-Chun; Wu, Pei-Ying; Yang, Shang-Ping; Zhang, Jun-Yu; Luo, Yu-Zhen; Chang, Hsi-Yen; Sun, Hsin-Yun; Chang, Shan-Chwen

    2016-12-01

    With the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) that has significantly improved survival, human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients may be potential organ donors to HIV-positive recipients in a few countries. Organ shortage remains a challenge for organ transplantation in Taiwan, where organ donation by HIV-positive patients remains prohibited by law. We assessed the willingness of organ donation (should they be pronounced brain dead, and the ban on HIV-positive organ donation be lifted) among HIV-positive patients who received regular HIV care at a university hospital in a cross-sectional survey between May and August 2015 with the use of an anonymous, self-administered questionnaire interview. Of the 1010 participants, 93.7% were receiving cART with the latest mean CD4 count and plasma HIV RNA load of 587 cells/mm(3) and 2.73 log10 copies/mL, respectively. Overall, 71.9% were willing to donate organs. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with willingness to donate organs included college or graduate school diploma (odds ratio [OR] 1.571, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.166-2.191), registered willingness to donate in the National Health Insurance system (OR 9.430, 95% CI 1.269-70.051), and knowledge of the information on HIV-positive deceased donors (HIVDD) (OR 1.673, 95% CI 1.073-2.608). We concluded that a significant proportion (71.9%) of HIV-positive Taiwanese patients were willing to donate their organs. The willingness was associated with a higher education level, prior registered willingness to donate organs, and awareness of HIVDD. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mental health disorders and solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Parker, Richard; Webb, Kerry; Neuberger, James M

    2013-10-15

    Depression affects up to 60% of solid-organ recipients and is independently associated with both mortality (hazard ratio for death of ~2) and de novo malignancy after transplantation, although the mechanism is not clear. Both pretransplantation psychosis and depression occurring more than 2 years after transplantation are associated with increased noncompliance and graft loss. It remains to be shown that effective treatment of depression is associated with improved outcomes and quality of life. Immunosuppressive drugs (especially corticosteroids and calcineurin inhibitors) and physiologic challenges can precipitate deterioration in mental health. All potential transplant candidates should be assessed for mental health problems and preexisting medical conditions that can mimic mental health problems, such as uremic, hepatic, or hypoxic encephalopathy, should be identified and treated appropriately. Expert mental health review of those with identified risk factors (such as previous suicide attempts, history of mental illness or noncompliance with medications) is advisable early in the transplant assessment process to mitigate risk and support the patient. Patients with mental health disorders, when adequately controlled and socially supported, have outcomes similar to the general transplant population. Therefore, exclusion from transplantation based on the diagnosis alone is neither ethically nor medically justified. However, it is ethically and clinically justifiable to deny access to transplantation to those who, despite full support, would have a quality of life that is unacceptable to the candidate or are likely to be noncompliant with treatment or follow-up, which would lead to graft loss.

  10. Smoking behaviour of patients before and after renal transplantation.

    PubMed

    Banas, Miriam C; Banas, Bernhard; Wolf, Johanna; Hoffmann, Ute; Krüger, Bernd; Böger, Carsten A; Orth, Stephan R; Krämer, Bernhard K

    2008-04-01

    Smoking is the most important remediable cardiovascular risk factor, and an independent risk factor for the progression of renal diseases. To date, only limited information about changes in cigarette-smoking habits before and after renal transplantation is available. In a comprehensive cross-sectional single centre study, we analysed smoking habits of patients registered on the waiting list for renal transplantation and patients that had received an allograft. Of 230 patients (76.1%), 175 on the waiting list and of 264 allograft recipients (87.5%), 231 were non-smokers at the time of investigation (P <0.01). Among the non-smoking waiting list patients, only 71 (30.9%) had never smoked, whereas 108 (40.9%) patients of the allograft recipients were never-smokers. Of former smoking patients, 27.6% (n = 34) had stopped smoking after transplantation. Patients <55 years of age and females were more likely to stop smoking than patients >55 years of age or males. A data analysis revealed that smokers had a significantly lower probability to attain renal transplantation. We conclude that renal transplantation is a strong incentive for patients to stop smoking. Reasons for changes in smoking behaviour after renal transplantation may be an intense contact of the patients with their physicians, the fear of a premature loss of the transplanted organ with continued smoking and the psychological support during post-transplantation patient care.

  11. Stem-cell-activated organ following ultrasound exposure: better transplant option for organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Sen; Li, Yu; Ji, Ying-Chang; Lin, Chang-Min; Man, Cheng; Zheng, Xiao-Xuan

    2010-01-01

    Although doctors try their best to protect transplants during surgery, there remain great challenges for the higher survival rate and less rejection of transplants after organ transplantation. Growing evidence indicates that the stem cells could function after injury rather than aging, implying that suitable injury may activate the stem cells of damaged organs. Furthermore, it has been revealed that stem cells can be used to induce tolerance in transplantation and the ultrasound has great biological effects on organs. Basing on these facts, we hypothesize that the stem cells within the transplants can be activated by ultrasound with high-frequency and medium-intensity. Therefore, the stem-cell-activated organs (SCAO) can be derived, and the SCAO will be better transplant option for organ transplantation. We postulate the ultrasound can change the molecular activity and/or quantity of the stem cells, the membrane permeability, the cell-cell junctions, and their surrounding microenvironments. As a result, the stem cells are activated, and the SCAO will acquire more regenerative capacity and less rejection. In the paper, we also discuss the process, methods and models for verifying the theory, and the consequences. We believe the theory may provide a practical method for the clinical application of the ultrasound and stem cells in organ transplantation.

  12. Disseminated Ochroconis gallopava infection in a heart transplant patient.

    PubMed

    Cardeau-Desangles, I; Fabre, A; Cointault, O; Guitard, J; Esposito, L; Iriart, X; Berry, A; Valentin, A; Cassaing, S; Kamar, N

    2013-06-01

    Ochroconis gallopava is an emerging cause of mycosis in solid organ transplant recipients. Herein, we report a rare case of disseminated O. gallopava infection that involved lung, subcutaneous area, brain and peritoneum in a heart transplant recipient. Despite voriconazole therapy, the patient died 2 months after diagnosis.

  13. [Visceral leishmaniasis and pregnancy in renal transplanted patient: case report].

    PubMed

    Silva, Jaqueline de Almeida; Araújo, Ivan de Melo; Pavanetti, Luiz Carlos; Okamoto, Liene Shigaki; Dias, Mônica

    2015-01-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is a severe and potentially fatal disease caused by different Leishmania species, Leishmania chagasi prevailing in Brazil. Main symptoms include fever, malaise, anorexia, weight loss and abdominal enlargement with typically occurring hepatosplenomegaly Currently, VL is considered an opportunistic infection in immunocompromised hosts, including solid organ transplanted patients. The present study reports a case of VL associated to pregnancy after renal transplantation.

  14. Classical Hodgkin lymphoma-type PTLD after solid organ transplantation in children: a report on 17 patients treated according to subsequent GPOH-HD treatment schedules.

    PubMed

    Kampers, Johanna; Orjuela-Grimm, Manuela; Schober, Tilmann; Schulz, Thomas F; Stiefel, Martina; Klein, Christoph; Körholz, Dieter; Mauz-Körholz, Christine; Kreipe, Hans; Beier, Rita; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta

    2017-03-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a severe complication after solid organ transplantation (SOT). Classical Hodgkin lymphoma-type (HL-) PTLD is a rare subtype, and systematic data on treatment and prognosis are lacking. We report on 17 pediatric patients with classical HL-PTLD. HL-PTLD developed late at a median of 8.1 years after SOT. It was commonly EBV-positive (16/17) and expressed both CD30 (all tumors) and CD20 (8/17 tumors). Patients were treated with chemotherapy +/- involved field radiotherapy (IF-RT) according to the respective GPOH-HD protocol tailored by stage and LDH. Overall survival at 2 and 5 years was 86% with 81% of patients surviving event-free. Six patients had additional rituximab treatment; in two it was given as upfront monotherapy and in four was given concurrently with their chemotherapy. Rituximab monotherapy did not lead to long-term remission. In conclusion, treatment of HL-PTLD with classical HL chemotherapy is effective and tolerable. New treatment modalities such as CD30-targeted or EBV-specific agents may diminish toxicity.

  15. [Vaccinations for immunocompromised hosts – focussing on patients after a hematological stem cell or organ transplantation, with HIV or with functional or anatomical asplenia].

    PubMed

    Staehelin, Cornelia; Hirzel, Cédric; Hauser, Christoph; Furrer, Hansjakob

    2016-01-01

    Patients with an acquired immune deficiency, for example due to HIV-infection, after a solid organ or haematological stem cell transplantation or due to functional or anatomical asplenia, have a greater risk to experience severe complications or a chronic course of infection compared to healthy individuals. Vaccinations would pose an ideal primary preventive method. However, their efficacy is reduced if applied during the immunosuppressed period. Therefore, whenever possible, vaccinations should be administered before the period of immunosuppression starts – or caught up later during the period of minimal possible immunosuppression. Nevertheless, the benefit conveyed through vaccines is undisputed, particularly if indications regarding dosing of vaccines (amount and frequency of doses) are optimized according to the given state of immunosuppression. Live attenuated vaccines are contraindicated during severe immunosuppression. Serologies should still be analysed and documented however, since these vulnerable patients require passive immunization through specific or standard intravenous immunoglobulins in case of relevant exposure to the respective antigens. For all patients therefore, careful documentation and communication of previous vaccinations and serologies (protective or not) among the various medical specialties is required to optimize patient management. For all immunosuppressed patients the efficacy of polysaccharide vaccines (such as the pneumococcal and meningococcal vaccines PSV-23 and MPV-ACWY) is strongly reduced compared to the conjugated ones (PCV13 and MCV-ACWY). Therefore, contrary to most other national guidelines, the Swiss guidelines recommend to use only the conjugated versions in primary vaccination series as well as in boosters – this applies strongly for immunosuppressed patients, but is recommended also for the general population in Switzerland. Another common management recommendation specific for transplant patients is the indication

  16. Perioperative Monitoring in Liver Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shweta; Nasa, Vaibhav; Tandon, Manish

    2012-01-01

    Liver transplant (LT) is a major surgical undertaking involving major fluid shifts, hemodynamic instability and metabolic derangements in a patient with preexisting liver failure and multisystemic derangements. Monitoring and organ support initiated in the preoperative phase is continued intraoperatively and into the postoperative phase to ensure an optimal outcome. As cardiovascular events are the leading cause of non-graft related death among LT recipients, major emphasis is placed on cardiovascular monitoring. The other essential monitoring are the continuous assessment of coagulapathy, extent of metabolic derangements, dyselectrolytemis and intracranial pressure monitoring in patients with fulminant hepatic failure. The type and extent of monitoring differs with need according to preexisting child status of the patient and the extent of systemic derangements. It also varies among transplant centers and is mainly determined by individual or institutional practices. PMID:25755443

  17. Tobacco smoking and solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corbett, Chris; Armstrong, Matthew J; Neuberger, James

    2012-11-27

    Smoking, both by donors and by recipients, has a major impact on outcomes after organ transplantation. Recipients of smokers' organs are at greater risk of death (lungs hazard ratio [HR], 1.36; heart HR, 1.8; and liver HR, 1.25), extended intensive care stays, and greater need for ventilation. Kidney function is significantly worse at 1 year after transplantation in recipients of grafts from smokers compared with nonsmokers. Clinicians must balance the use of such higher-risk organs with the consequences on waiting list mortality if the donor pool is reduced further by exclusion of such donors. Smoking by kidney transplant recipients significantly increases the risk of cardiovascular events (29.2% vs. 15.4%), renal fibrosis, rejection, and malignancy (HR, 2.56). Furthermore, liver recipients who smoke have higher rates of hepatic artery thrombosis, biliary complications, and malignancy (13% vs. 2%). Heart recipients with a smoking history have increased risk of developing coronary atherosclerosis (21.2% vs. 12.3%), graft dysfunction, and loss after transplantation. Self-reporting of smoking is commonplace but unreliable, which limits its use as a tool for selection of transplant candidates. Despite effective counseling and pharmacotherapy, recidivism rates after transplantation remain high (10-40%). Transplant services need to be more proactive in educating and implementing effective smoking cessation strategies to reduce rates of recidivism and the posttransplantation complications associated with smoking. The adverse impact of smoking by the recipient supports the requirement for a 6-month period of abstinence in lung recipients and cessation before other solid organs.

  18. Organ transplant tissue rejection: detection and staging by fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Whitehead, Peter D.; McManus, Bruce; Zeng, Haishan; Wilson-McManus, Janet; MacKinnon, Nick; Morgan, David C.; Dong, Chunming; Gerla, Paul; Kenyon, Jennifer

    1998-07-01

    Patients receiving heart or other organ transplants usually require some level of anti-rejection drug therapy, most commonly cyclosporine. The rejection status of the organ must be monitored to determine the optimal anti-rejection drug therapy. The current method for monitoring post-transplant rejection status of heart transplant patients consists of taking biopsies from the right ventricle. In this work we have developed a system employing optical and signal-processing techniques that will allow a cardiologist to measure spectral changes associated with tissue rejection using an optical catheter probe. The system employs time gated illumination and detection systems to deal with the dynamic signal acquisition problems associated with in vivo measurements of a beating heart. Spectral data processing software evaluates and processes the data to produce a simple numerical score. Results of measurements made on 100 excised transplanted isograft and allograft rat hearts have demonstrated the ability of the system to detect the presence of rejection and to accurately correlate the spectroscopic results with the ISHLT (International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation) stage of rejection determined by histopathology. In vivo measurements using a pig transplant model are now in process.

  19. [Invasive yeast diseases in solid organ transplant recipients].

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Patricia; Aguado, José María

    2016-01-01

    Invasive yeast diseases are uncommon nowadays in solid organ transplant recipients. Invasive candidiasis (2%) usually presents during the first month after transplantation in patients with risk factors. Both common and transplant-specific risk factors have been identified, allowing very efficacious targeted prophylaxis strategies. The most common clinical presentations are fungaemia and local infections near the transplantation area. Cryptococcosis is usually a late infection. Its incidence remains stable and the specific risk factors have not been identified. When cryptococcosis is detected very early, transmission with the allograft should be considered. The most common clinical presentations include meningitis, pneumonia, and disseminated infection. Intracranial hypertension and immune reconstitution syndrome have to be considered. No therapeutic clinical trials have been conducted in solid organ transplant recipients, thus treatment recommendations are derived from data obtained from the general population. It is particularly important to consider the possibility of drug-drug interactions, mainly between azoles and calcineurin inhibitors. Both invasive candidiasis and cryptococcosis increase the mortality significantly in solid organ transplant recipients.

  20. Optimized donor management and organ preservation before kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mundt, Heiko M; Yard, Benito A; Krämer, Bernhard K; Benck, Urs; Schnülle, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Kidney transplantation is a major medical improvement for patients with end-stage renal disease, but organ shortage limits its widespread use. As a consequence, the proportion of grafts procured from extended criteria donors (ECD) has increased considerably, but this comes along with increased rates of delayed graft function (DGF) and a higher incidence of immune-mediated rejection that limits organ and patient survival. Furthermore, most grafts are derived from brain dead organ donors, but the unphysiological state of brain death is associated with significant metabolic, hemodynamic, and pro-inflammatory changes, which further compromise patient and graft survival. Thus, donor interventions to preserve graft quality are fundamental to improve long-term transplantation outcome, but interventions must not harm other potentially transplantable grafts. Several donor pretreatment strategies have provided encouraging results in animal models, but evidence from human studies is sparse, as most clinical evidence is derived from single-center or nonrandomized trials. Furthermore, ethical matters have to be considered especially concerning consent from donors, donor families, and transplant recipients to research in the field of donor treatment. This review provides an overview of clinically proven and promising preclinical strategies of donor treatment to optimize long-term results after kidney transplantation. © 2015 Steunstichting ESOT.

  1. Pre-transplant thymic function is associated with the risk of cytomegalovirus disease after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Gracia-Ahufinger, I; Ferrando-Martínez, S; Montejo, M; Muñoz-Villanueva, M C; Cantisán, S; Rivero, A; Solana, R; Leal, M; Torre-Cisneros, J

    2015-05-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease is an important complication in solid organ transplant recipients. Thymic function in adults is associated with specific T-cell immunity. Pre-transplant thymic function was analysed in 75 solid organ transplant patients by the use of nested PCR. The primary outcome was the incidence of CMV disease 12 months after transplantation. Using multivariable logistic regression, we studied whether pre-transplant thymic function is an independent risk factor for CMV disease after transplantation. Thymic function was related to the risk of CMV disease in CMV-seropositive recipients. In these recipients, pre-transplant thymic function of <9.5 (OR 11.27, 95% CI 1.11-114.43, p 0.040) and the use of thymoglobulin (OR 8.21, 95% CI 1.09-61.84, p 0.041) were independent risk factors for CMV disease at 12 months after transplantation. Patients with pre-transplant thymic function values of <9.5 had a higher subsequent incidence of CMV disease (24%) than patients with values of ≥ 9.5 (3%) (log-rank test: 5.727; p 0.017). The positive and negative predictive values of these pre-transplant thymic function cut-offs were 0.24 (95% CI 0.10-0.45) and 0.97 (95% CI 0.82-1.00), respectively. Pre-transplant thymic function in CMV-seropositive candidates could be useful in determining the risk of post-transplant CMV disease in solid organ transplant patients, selecting a group of low-risk candidates.

  2. Emerging fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Shoham, Shmuel

    2013-06-01

    The most important emerging and rare fungal pathogens in solid organ transplant recipients are the Zygomycetes, Scedosporium, Fusarium, and the dark molds. Factors affecting the emergence of these fungi include the combination of intensive immunosuppressive regimens with increasingly widespread use of long-term azole antifungal therapy; employment of aggressive diagnostic approaches (eg, sampling of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid); and changes in patients' interactions with the environment. This article reviews the epidemiology, microbiology, and clinical impact of emerging fungal infections in solid organ transplant recipients, and provides up-to-date recommendations on their treatment.

  3. Skin changes following organ transplantation: an interdisciplinary challenge.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Claas; Arnold, Renate; Frei, Ulrich; Hetzer, Roland; Neuhaus, Peter; Stockfleth, Eggert

    2014-03-14

    The immunosuppressants used in transplantation medicine significantly elevate the incidence of neoplasia, particularly in the skin. The cumulative incidence of non-melanocytic skin cancer (NMSC) in renal transplant recipients was 20.5% in a study carried out in German centers. Data on more than 35 000 renal transplant recipients in the USA document a cumulative NMSC incidence of over 7% after 3 years of immunosuppression. The authors selectively review publications obtained by a PubMed search to discuss the incidence of, and major risk factors for, skin tumors and infectious diseases of the skin in immunosuppressed patients. The main risk factors for skin tumors are age at the time of transplantation, light skin color, previous and present exposure to sunlight, and the type and duration of immunosuppressive treatment. Squamous-cell carcinoma (SCC) is the most common kind of skin tumor in immunosuppressed patients. Human herpesvirus 8 and Merkel-cell polyoma virus also cause neoplasia more often in immunosuppressed patients than in the general population. Surgical excision is the treatment of choice. Actinic keratosis markedly elevates the risk that SCC will arise in the same skin area (odds ratio 18.36, 95% confidence interval 3.03-111). Patients with multiple actinic keratoses can be treated with photodynamic therapy or with acitretin. To lower the skin cancer risk, organ transplant recipients should apply medical screening agents with a sun protection factor of at least 50 to exposed skin areas every day. 55% to 97% of organ transplant recipients have skin infections; these are treated according to their respective types. Squamous-cell carcinoma of the skin adds to the morbidity and mortality of transplant recipients and is therefore among the major oncological challenges in this patient group. Structured concepts for interdisciplinary care enable risk-adapted treatment.

  4. Periocular Skin Cancer in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients.

    PubMed

    Perry, Julian D; Polito, Sara C; Chundury, Rao V; Singh, Arun D; Fritz, Michael A; Vidimos, Allison T; Gastman, Brian R; Koyfman, Shlomo A

    2016-01-01

    To determine the proportion of solid organ transplant recipients developing periocular nonmelanoma skin cancer and to describe the morbidity of these cancers in transplant recipients. Cohort study. Consecutive patients undergoing solid organ transplantation at the Cleveland Clinic between 1990 and 2008. The charts of all patients receiving a solid organ transplant from 1990-2008 evaluated in the dermatology department for a subsequent biopsy-proven head and neck malignancy through April 2015 were reviewed. Patients with a periocular region nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC) or a nonperiocular NMSC causing a complication requiring eyelid surgery were included. Charts were reviewed for demographic data; transplant date, type, and source; immunosuppressive agents received at diagnosis; and type of NMSC, number of nonperiocular NMSCs, ophthalmologic findings, and periocular sequelae after the repair. Primary outcome measures included the type, location, final defect size, tumor-node-metastasis classification, presence of perineural invasion, and reconstruction technique(s) used for each periocular NMSC. Secondary outcome measures included the type and treatment of ocular sequelae due to nonperiocular facial NMSC. A total of 3489 patients underwent solid organ transplantation between 1990 and 2008. Of these, 420 patients were evaluated in the dermatology clinic for biopsy-proven NMSC of the head and neck during the study period, and 11 patients (15 malignancies) met inclusion criteria. Nine patients developed 12 periocular malignancies and 3 patients required eyelid surgery for facial malignancies outside the periocular zone. All 11 patients developed a squamous cell carcinoma (14 malignancies), and 1 patient (1 malignancy) also developed a periocular basal cell carcinoma. There was orbital invasion in 4 cases and paranasal and/or cavernous sinus invasion in 3 cases. Two patients underwent exenteration. Seven cases required reconstruction with a free flap or graft

  5. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  6. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  7. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  8. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12... RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on Organ... Committee on Organ Transplantation. The Secretary may seek the comments of the Advisory Committee...

  9. Roles of toll-like receptors signaling in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Ting; Chen, Guodong; Zhang, Zheng

    2011-12-01

    Organ transplantation is the gold standard of treatment for patients with end-stage organ failure. However, transplant recipients must take immunosuppressive drugs lifelong to fight against rejection, which is inevitably caused by the recipient's immune system in response to transplanted foreign tissues. Despite advances in the prevention of acute rejection, it is still a significant and potentially devastating complication of solid organ transplantation. Moreover, chronic allograft dysfunction as a result of acute and chronic alloimmune-mediated injury still develops in a majority of transplant recipients regardless of continuous immunosuppression. While host adaptive immune responses elicited by T lymphocytes are primarily responsible for allotransplant rejection, emerging evidence supports an important role of the innate immune system in the development of organ rejection. Innate immune recognition is initiated by a set of diverse receptors that belong to different protein families including the family of toll-like receptors (TLRs). TLR signaling is a highly specialized system that can identify a variety of microbial and endogenous mediators, and activate the innate immune system in response to danger. The discovery of TLRs over the past 10 years has started a new era in understanding the molecular events that initiate and regulate the inflammatory response following organ transplantation. They influence the adaptive immune reactions and contribute to ischemic reperfusion injury, acute and chronic allograft rejection, and tolerance induction. Their role as potential targets for therapeutic intervention has just begun to be appreciated. In this article, we summarize the structural and functional characteristics of TLRs and their ligands. We focus on the studies to define the roles of TLRs in ischemic reperfusion injury, allotransplant rejection, and immune regulation in both animal models and clinical transplantation.

  10. Outcome of Kidney Transplant in Primary, Repeat and Kidney after Nonrenal Solid Organ Transplantation: 15-year Analysis of Recent UNOS Database.

    PubMed

    El-Husseini, A; Aghil, A; Ramirez, J; Sawaya, B; Rajagopalan, N; Baz, M; Mei, X; Davenport, D L; Gedaly, R

    2017-09-07

    The number of nonrenal solid organ transplants increased substantially in the last few decades. Many of these patients develop renal failure and receive kidney transplantation. The aim of this study is to evaluate patient and kidney allograft survival in primary, repeat, and kidney after nonrenal organ transplantation using national data reported to United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) from January 2000 through December 2014. Survival time for each patient was stratified into the following: Group A (comparison group) - recipients of primary kidney transplant (178,947 patients), Group B - recipients of repeat kidney transplant (17,819 patients), and Group C - recipients of kidney transplant performed after either a liver, heart, or lung transplant (2,365 patients). We compared survivals using log-rank test. Compared to primary or repeat kidney transplant, patient and renal allograft survival was significantly lower in those with previous nonrenal organ transplant. Renal allograft and patient survival after liver, heart, or lung transplants are comparable. Death was the main cause of graft loss in patients who had prior nonrenal organ transplant. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  11. Challenges of organ shortage for transplantation: solutions and opportunities.

    PubMed

    Saidi, R F; Hejazii Kenari, S K

    2014-01-01

    Organ shortage is the greatest challenge facing the field of organ transplantation today. A variety of approaches have been implemented to expand the organ donor pool including live donation, a national effort to expand deceased donor donation, split organ donation, paired donor exchange, national sharing models and greater utilization of expanded criteria donors. Increased public awareness, improved efficiency of the donation process, greater expectations for transplantation, expansion of the living donor pool and the development of standardized donor management protocols have led to unprecedented rates of organ procurement and transplantation. Although live donors and donation after brain death account for the majority of organ donors, in the recent years there has been a growing interest in donors who have severe and irreversible brain injuries but do not meet the criteria for brain death. If the physician and family agree that the patient has no chance of recovery to a meaningful life, life support can be discontinued and the patient can be allowed to progress to circulatory arrest and then still donate organs (donation after circulatory death). Increasing utilization of marginal organs has been advocated to address the organ shortage.

  12. Infections in solid-organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, R; Paya, C V

    1997-01-01

    Solid-organ transplantation is a therapeutic option for many human diseases. Infections are a major complication of solid-organ transplantation. All candidates should undergo a thorough infectious-disease screening prior to transplantation. There are three time frames, influenced by surgical factors, the level of immunosuppression, and environmental exposures, during which infections of specific types most frequently occur posttransplantation. Most infections during the first month are related to surgical complications. Opportunistic infections typically occur from the second to the sixth month. During the late posttransplant period (beyond 6 months), transplantation recipients suffer from the same infections seen in the general community. Opportunistic bacterial infections seen in transplant recipients include those caused by Legionella spp., Nocardia spp., Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Cytomegalovirus is the most common cause of viral infections. Herpes simplex virus, varicella-zoster virus, Epstein-Barr virus and others are also significant pathogens. Fungal infections, caused by both yeasts and mycelial fungi, are associated with the highest mortality rates. Mycobacterial, pneumocystis, and parasitic diseases may also occur. PMID:8993860

  13. Innate immune receptors in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Georgel, Philippe

    2016-11-01

    The discovery of Pattern Recognition Receptors (PRRs) followed by that of their role in the early detection of pathogens and the ignition of the innate immune response has been a formidable progress for immunological research in the past 15years. This has massively fueled investigations aiming at developing better strategies to fight off infectious diseases and/or to prevent their occurrence. However, infected individuals are for most part outliers in a given population and therefore, the primary function of these receptors should be considered in pathogen-free conditions. Our current understanding indicates that an important physiological function of PRRs resides in their capacity to maintain epithelial homeostasis in response to colonizing commensals. In addition, endogenous host-derived ligands, expressed under stressed, albeit sterile, conditions (called DAMPs for Danger-Associated Molecular Patterns) are also able to trigger PRR signaling. Solid organ transplantation represents a unique situation where both contributions of PRRs signaling can be studied. Indeed, dysbiosis (either caused by antibiotherapy preceding organ transplantation or simply due to the microbiota differences between the transplanted organ and the recipient host) is a characteristic feature of this situation, which is also marked by a massive synthesis and liberation of DAMPs as a result of hypoxia/reperfusion injury. Therefore, in the transplanted organ, at least two compartments (epithelial and that composed of immune cells) participate in graft rejection/acceptance depending on the activation status of expressed PRRs.

  14. Cognitive Development and Learning in the Pediatric Organ Transplant Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Steven A.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating neurocognitive changes following organ transplantation in pediatric end-stage renal and liver disease. Findings suggest possible neurocognitive benefits associated with organ transplantation. Recommendations are made for methodological improvements in future research. (DB)

  15. Organ Transplants: What Every Kid Needs to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... For more information about UNOS, living donation, and organ transplantation, please call 1-888-894-6361 or visit ... their families feel more at ease with the organ transplantation process by providing general information in an understandable ...

  16. Cognitive Development and Learning in the Pediatric Organ Transplant Recipient.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hobbs, Steven A.; Sexson, Sandra B.

    1993-01-01

    This article reviews studies evaluating neurocognitive changes following organ transplantation in pediatric end-stage renal and liver disease. Findings suggest possible neurocognitive benefits associated with organ transplantation. Recommendations are made for methodological improvements in future research. (DB)

  17. TRANSPLANTATION EN MASSE DES ORGANES ABDOMINAUX

    PubMed Central

    STARZL, T.

    2010-01-01

    Les transplantations multi-organes, comprenant les blocs foie-duodénum-pancréas, foie-estomac-duodénum-pancréas, et foie-intestin sont réalisées avec un succés croissant Ces techniques et leurs combinaisons variées de transplantation monobloc ne sont pas de pratique courante. Les techniques de prélévement, de conservation et de soins post-opératoires sont décrites pour la transplantation multi-organes compléte ainsi que pour les variantes incomplétes. Le probléme particulier à ce type de transplantation est celui de la transplantation intestinale, c’est-à-dire la transplantation d’un organe à composante lymphoréticulaire complexe ce qui peut provoquer un syndrome greffon contre hôte. Par erreur de conception, et un peu par esprit de systéme, les efforts par le passé étaient dirigés sur la modification et la destruction des systémes lymphoréticulaires grâce au traitement préalable du donneur ou des organes transplantés, par médicaments, radiation ou autres moyens. Actuellement, I’idée directrice est de garder intacte les systémes lymphoréticulaires qui deviennent alors le site d’une circulation à double sens aprés transplantation. Avec la puissante immunodépression que fournit le FK 506, les cellules lymphoréticulaires du donneur peuvent circuler chez le receveur sans créer de syndrome du greffon contre hôte clinique et les cellules de la greffe s’assimilent à celles du receveur (chimérisme local) sans provoquer de rejet. Même si I’on évite le rejet ou le syndrome greffon contre hôte, il existe, à côté de ces entités, des relations métaboliques entre les organes greffés ainsi qu’entre les organes greffés et les viscéres du receveur laissés en place, qui peuvent influencer I’avenir soit des organes greffés, soit des organes laissés en place. Parmi les échanges métaboliques les mieux connus actuellement, il y a les facteurs splanchniques hépatotrophes endogénes, dont I’insuline est la mieux

  18. Pneumonia in renal transplant patients.

    PubMed Central

    Bowie, D. M.; Marrie, T. J.; Janigan, D. T.; MacKeen, A. D.; Belitsky, P.; MacDonald, A. S.; Lannon, S. G.; Cohen, A. D.

    1983-01-01

    Between January 1976 and March 1982, 28 episodes of pneumonia occurred in 26 renal transplant patients. The overall mortality rate was 46%. Of the 16 patients with nosocomial pneumonia 9 (56%) died, whereas of the 12 patients with community-acquired pneumonia 4 (33%) died. In all 9 cases of unknown cause the response to empiric treatment was prompt, whereas in 4 of the 10 cases of monomicrobial pneumonia and 8 of the 9 cases of polymicrobial pneumonia the patient died. Cytomegalovirus was the sole cause of the pneumonia in two patients and a contributing cause, along with aerobic gram-negative bacteria, in another five, four of whom also had a fungal infection. Two patients, both of whom survived, had nosocomial Legionnaires' disease. PMID:6342741

  19. Solid-organ transplantation in childhood: transitioning to adult health care.

    PubMed

    LaRosa, Christopher; Glah, Caryle; Baluarte, H Jorge; Meyers, Kevin E C

    2011-04-01

    Pediatric solid-organ transplantation is an increasingly successful treatment for solid-organ failure. With dramatic improvements in patient survival rates over the last several decades, there has been a corresponding emergence of complications attributable to pretransplant factors, transplantation itself, and the management of transplantation with effective immunosuppression. The predominant solid-organ transplantation sequelae are medical and psychosocial. These sequelae have a substantial effect on transition to adult care; as such, hurdles to successful transition of care arise from the patients, their families, and pediatric and adult health care providers. Crucial to successful transitioning is the ongoing development of a sense of autonomy and responsibility for one's own care. In this article we address the barriers to transitioning that occur with long-term survival in pediatric solid-organ transplantation. Although a particular transitioning model is not promoted, practical tools and strategies that contribute to successful transitioning of pediatric patients who have received a transplant are suggested.

  20. [Organ transplantation in Germany: Critical examination in times of scarce resources].

    PubMed

    Haverich, A; Haller, H

    2016-01-01

    Organ transplantation over the last 40 years has developed into a standardized successful procedure for the replacement of heart, kidney liver, lung, and pancreas. During this time, treatment strategies have greatly improved and novel procedures such as living related organ donation have been introduced. Despite these improvements, the number of organ transplants has stalled in recent years. In the face of increasing numbers of patients on the waiting list for organ transplantation, this situation is unacceptable and ways to improve the situation of organ transplantation have to be found.The reasons for the stagnant situation in organ transplantation are manifold and include lack of awareness in the general population, insufficient organ procurement in hospitals as well as problems in organ allocation. The criteria for organ allocation have been unfairly reported to EUROTRANSPLANT by some of the presently 44 centers in order of more rapidly receive an organ for their patients on the waiting list. The evolving discussions around this so-called transplantation scandal has further eroded support for organ transplantation in Germany. A critical assessment and a well-defined plan are necessary to improve the situation, increase the number of transplanted organs, and reduce the unacceptably long waiting time for patients in Germany.

  1. Retrospective analysis of varicella zoster virus (VZV) copy DNA numbers in plasma of immunocompetent patients with herpes zoster, of immunocompromised patients with disseminated VZV disease, and of asymptomatic solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Kronenberg, A; Bossart, W; Wuthrich, R P; Cao, C; Lautenschlager, S; Wiegand, N D; Mullhaupt, B; Noll, G; Mueller, N J; Speck, R F

    2005-01-01

    Varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes significant morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised patients. Subclinical reactivation has been described in solid organ recipients and has been associated with graft versus host disease in bone marrow transplantation. Newer studies assessing the prevalence and impact of subclinical VZV reactivation in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients are lacking. In a first step we developed a highly sensitive quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay for VZV DNA with a detection limit of < or = 20 copies/mL. Using this assay, we retrospectively analyzed plasma samples of different patient groups for VZV DNA. VZV DNA was found in 10/10 plasma samples of immunocompetent patients with herpes zoster (VZV copy numbers/mL: mean+/-SEM 1710+/-1018), in 1/1 sample of a human immunodeficiency virus-infected patient with primary VZV disease (15,192 copies/mL) and in 4/4 plasma samples of immunocompromised patients with visceral VZV disease (mean of first value 214,214+/-178,572). All 108 plasma samples of asymptomatic SOT recipients off any antiviral therapy, randomly sampled over 1 year, were negative for VZV DNA. Our qPCR assay proved to be highly sensitive (100%) in symptomatic VZV disease. We did not detect subclinical reactivation in asymptomatic SOT recipients during the first post-transplant year. Thus, subclinical VZV reactivation is either a rare event or does not exist. These data need to be confirmed in larger prospective trials.

  2. Clinical effects of direct hemoperfusion using a polymyxin-B immobilized column in solid organ transplanted patients with signs of severe sepsis and septic shock. A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Ruberto, F; Pugliese, F; D'Alio, A; Martelli, S; Bruno, K; Marcellino, V; Summonti, D; Celli, P; Perrella, S; Cappannoli, A; Pietropaoli, C; Tosi, A; Diana, B; Novelli, G; Rossi, M; Ginanni-Corradini, S; Ferretti, G; Berloco, P B; Pietropaoli, P

    2007-10-01

    Polymyxin B (PMX-B) is a polycationic antibiotic, known to bind the lipid A portion of endotoxin, a cell wall component found exclusively in gram negative bacteria (GNB). An extracorporeal hemoperfusion device (TORAYMYXIN) has been developed: PMX is covalently bound on the surface of an insoluble carrier material so that the endotoxin can be inactivated in the blood without exerting its toxicity on the brain and kidney. The aim of this study was to clarify the efficacy, safety and clinical effects of direct hemoperfusion with an immobilized polymyxin-B fiber column (DHP-PMX) in solid organ transplanted patients with severe sepsis or septic shock. From June 2004 to May 2005, 15 patients (10 men and 5 women), mean age 55 years old (46-65 range), underwent kidney or liver transplantation and developed severe sepsis or septic shock, as defined by the Consensus Conference of American College Physicians/Society of Critical Care Medicine (ACCP/SCCM) criteria. GNB were detected in all the patients receiving conventional treatments including antibiotic therapy, vasopressive or inotropic agents, and ventilation support. The DHP-PMX treatment was performed three times in each patient. Hemodynamic and respiratory parameters, dosage of vasopressor/inotropic drugs were assessed at baseline and after each treatment. No adverse events occurred. From baseline to 3rd treatment, mean arterial pressure (MAP) was increased (from 63+/-5 to 83+/-4 mmHg), while the dosage of dobutamine (from 7.5+/-3 to 3+/-2 mcg/kg/min) and noradrenaline (from 1.3+/-0.45 to 0.05+/-0.02 mcg/kg/min) were reduced. The PaO2/FiO2 ratio increased (from 234+/-38.47 to 290+/-107.48 mmHg). The use of DHP-PMX in association with conventional therapy may be an important aid in patients with sepsis.

  3. Liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Tan-Tam, Clara C; Frassetto, Lynda A; Stock, Peter G

    2009-01-01

    HIV infection has evolved into a chronic condition as a result of improvements in therapeutic options. Chronic exposure with HIV and associated co-pathogens as well as toxicities from prolonged therapy with antiviral medications has resulted in increased morbidity and mortality rates from end-stage liver and kidney disease in the HIV-infected population. Since the definitive treatment for end-stage organ failure is transplantation, demand has increased among HIV-infected patients. Although the transplant community has been slow to recognize HIV as a chronic condition, many transplant centers have eliminated HIV infection as a contraindication to transplantation as a result of better patient management and demand. This review examines the current clinical strategies and issues surrounding liver and kidney transplantation in HIV-infected patients.

  4. Ethical and scientific issues surrounding solid organ transplantation in HIV-positive patients: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence.

    PubMed

    Christie, Timothy; Jiwani, Bashir; Asrat, Getnet; Montessori, Valentina; Mathias, Richard; Montaner, Julio

    2006-01-01

    End-stage liver disease is emerging as a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients. Historically, an HIV diagnosis was a contraindication for a liver transplant; however, because of the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-positive patients have one-year, two-year, and three-year post-transplantation survival rates similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Based on this evidence, HIV-positive patients are now considered eligible for transplantation. However, newly emerging guidelines include the stipulation that HIV-positive patients must be on HAART to be placed on a waiting list for transplantation. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the scientific and ethical probity of requiring HIV-positive patients to be on HAART as a condition for being on a liver transplant waiting list. It is argued that the emphasis should be placed on the probability of post-transplantation HAART tolerance, and that concerns about pretransplantation HAART tolerance are of secondary importance.

  5. Ethical and scientific issues surrounding solid organ transplantation in HIV-positive patients: Absence of evidence is not evidence of absence

    PubMed Central

    Christie, Timothy; Jiwani, Bashir; Asrat, Getnet; Montessori, Valentina; Mathias, Richard; Montaner, Julio

    2006-01-01

    End-stage liver disease is emerging as a leading cause of death among HIV-positive patients. Historically, an HIV diagnosis was a contraindication for a liver transplant; however, because of the efficacy of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), HIV-positive patients have one-year, two-year, and three-year post-transplantation survival rates similar to that of HIV-negative patients. Based on this evidence, HIV-positive patients are now considered eligible for transplantation. However, newly emerging guidelines include the stipulation that HIV-positive patients must be on HAART to be placed on a waiting list for transplantation. The purpose of the present paper is to evaluate the scientific and ethical probity of requiring HIV-positive patients to be on HAART as a condition for being on a liver transplant waiting list. It is argued that the emphasis should be placed on the probability of post-transplantation HAART tolerance, and that concerns about pretransplantation HAART tolerance are of secondary importance. PMID:18418478

  6. [History of organ transplantation in the field of pediatric surgery in Japan].

    PubMed

    Inomata, Yukihiro

    2014-11-01

    In Japan, liver transplantation was first attempted 50 years ago, around the same time as the development of pediatric surgery. In 1989, clinical liver transplantation in Japan started with a living related-donor transplantation in a boy with biliary atresia. In the early years, the majority of recipients were children worldwide, which is why pediatric surgeons played a major role in the establishment of liver transplantation in Japan. From 1998, most of the indications for pediatric patients needing liver transplantation have been covered by governmental health insurance. Since that year, the annual number of pediatric liver transplantations, mainly living-donor transplantations, has remained stable at around 130. Biliary atresia is still the most common indication, but others like metabolic disease and hepatoblastoma have been increasing. Deceased-donor liver transplantation started in 1999 in Japan, but pediatric donors are very rare. Intestinal transplantation in Japan also started in a pediatric patient with short bowel syndrome in 1996. Deceased-donor intestinal transplantation is also performed, but the number of those on the waiting list for bowel transplantations in Japan has been very limited, probably due to financial constraints and relatively poor long-term results. With the change in the Organ Transplant Law in 2010, organ donations in Japan have increased slightly. Cadaveric split-liver transplantation has the potential to expand the benefit to pediatric recipients. A universal system for the long-term follow-up of pediatric recipients should be established to manage their transition to adulthood.

  7. Patient selection for liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Carrion, Andres F; Aye, Lydia; Martin, Paul

    2013-08-01

    Improved outcomes in liver transplant recipients reflect advances in surgical technique, post-operative care, immunosuppression as well as better selection of potential candidates. The pre-transplant evaluation is a multidisciplinary process intended to recognize and treat important comorbid conditions that may impair outcomes during the peri- and post-transplant periods. Important psychosocial issues should also be ascertained and tackled early during the pre-transplant evaluation with an overarching intention to improve the success of liver transplantation.

  8. Organ engineering--combining stem cells, biomaterials, and bioreactors to produce bioengineered organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean Vincent; Atala, Anthony

    2013-03-01

    Often the only treatment available for patients suffering from diseased and injured organs is whole organ transplant. However, there is a severe shortage of donor organs for transplantation. The goal of organ engineering is to construct biological substitutes that will restore and maintain normal function in diseased and injured tissues. Recent progress in stem cell biology, biomaterials, and processes such as organ decellularization and electrospinning has resulted in the generation of bioengineered blood vessels, heart valves, livers, kidneys, bladders, and airways. Future advances that may have a significant impact for the field include safe methods to reprogram a patient's own cells to directly differentiate into functional replacement cell types. The subsequent combination of these cells with natural, synthetic and/or decellularized organ materials to generate functional tissue substitutes is a real possibility. This essay reviews the current progress, developments, and challenges facing researchers in their goal to create replacement tissues and organs for patients.

  9. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords "regenerative medicine," "tissue-engineering," "bio-engineered organs," "decellularized scaffold" and "three-dimensional printing." This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update.

  10. When thoracic organ recipients become abdominal organ donors: sharing the risks and benefits of transplantation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chua, S; Swaminathan, R; Irish, A

    2015-01-01

    The increasing demand for organ donation has resulted in the use of expanded-criteria donors. Solid organ transplant recipients and potential recipients represent a unique pool of selected organ donors that may help to meet this demand. We present 2 cases, a lung transplant recipient and a patient on the lung transplant waiting list, who became kidney donors to 4 recipients. These donations illustrate the interrelated risks and benefits for transplant recipients who themselves can become unintended, but effective donors. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Simultaneous pancreas kidney transplant versus other kidney transplant options in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Alexander C; Gralla, Jane

    2012-04-01

    Current organ allocation policy prioritizes placement of kidneys (with pancreas) to patients listed for simultaneous pancreas-kidney transplantation (SPK). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) may undergo SPK, but it is unknown whether these patients enjoy a survival advantage with SPK versus deceased-donor kidney transplantation alone (DDKA) or living-donor kidney transplantation alone (LDKA). Using the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients database, patients with T2DM, age 18-59 years, body mass index 18-30 kg/m(2), who underwent SPK, DDKA, or LDKA from 2000 through 2008 were identified. Five-year patient and kidney graft survival rates were compared, and multivariable analysis was performed to determine donor, recipient, and transplant factors influencing these outcomes. Of 6416 patients identified, 4005, 1987, and 424 underwent DDKA, LDKA, and SPK, respectively. On unadjusted analysis, patient and kidney graft survival rates were superior for LDKA versus SPK, whereas patient but not graft survival was higher for SPK versus DDKA. On multivariable analysis, survival advantage for SPK versus DDKA was related not to pancreas transplantation but younger donor and recipient ages in the SPK cohort. Good outcomes can occur with SPK in selected patients with T2DM, but no patient or graft survival advantage is provided by added pancreas transplantation compared with DDKA; outcomes were superior with LDKA. These results support cautious use of SPK in T2DM when LDKA is not an option, with close oversight of the effect of kidney (with pancreas) allocation priority over other transplant candidates.

  12. A Descriptive Analysis of 1251 Solid Organ Transplant Visits to the Emergency Department

    PubMed Central

    Unterman, Sarah; Zimmerman, Michael; Tyo, Carissa; Sterk, Ethan; Gehm, Lisa; Edison, Marcia; Benedetti, Enrico; Orsay, Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Background As solid organ transplants become more common, recipients present more frequently to the emergency department (ED) for care. Methods We performed a retrospective medical record review of ED visits of all patients who received an organ transplant at our medical center from 2000–2004, and included all visits following the patients’ transplant surgery through December 2005 or until failed graft, lost to follow up, or death. Clinically relevant demographic variables, confounding and outcome variables were recorded. Kidney, liver and combined kidney with other organ transplant recipients were included. Results Five hundred ninety-three patients received kidney (395), liver (161), or combined renal (37) organ transplants during the study period, resulting in 1,251 ED visits. This represents 3.15 ED visits/patient followed over a mean of 30.8 months. Abdominal pain/gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms (31.3%) and infectious complaints (16.7%) were the most common presentations. The most common ED discharge diagnoses were fever/infection (36%), GI/Genitourinary (GU) pathology (20.4%) and dehydration (15%). Renal transplant recipients were diagnosed with infectious processes most often, despite time elapsed from transplant. Liver transplant patients had diagnoses of fever/infection most often in their first 30 days post transplant. Thereafter they were more likely to develop GI/GU pathology. After the first year of transplantation, cardiopulmonary and musculoskeletal pathology become more common in all transplant organ groups. Of the 1,251 ED visits, 762 (60.9%) resulted in hospitalization. Chief complaints of abdominal pain/GI symptoms, infectious complaints, cardiovascular and neurologic symptoms, and abnormal laboratory studies were significantly likely to result in hospitalization. Conclusions This study demonstrates a significant utilization of the ED by transplant recipients, presenting with a wide variety of symptoms and diagnoses, and with a high

  13. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs.

    PubMed

    Scozzi, D; Ibrahim, M; Menna, C; Krupnick, A S; Kreisel, D; Gelman, A E

    2017-02-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as nonspecialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and has illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. In this article, we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance.

  14. The Role of Neutrophils in Transplanted Organs

    PubMed Central

    Menna, Cecilia; Krupnick, Alexander S.; Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Neutrophils are often viewed as non-specialized effector cells whose presence is a simple indicator of tissue inflammation. There is new evidence that neutrophils exist in subsets and have specialized effector functions that include extracellular trap generation and the stimulation of angiogenesis. The application of intravital imaging to transplanted organs has revealed novel requirements for neutrophil trafficking into graft tissue and illuminated direct interactions between neutrophils and other leukocytes that promote alloimmunity. Paradoxically, retaining some neutrophilia may be important to induce or maintain tolerance. Neutrophils can stimulate anti-inflammatory signals in other phagocytes and release molecules that inhibit T cell activation. Here we will review the available evidence of how neutrophils regulate acute and chronic inflammation in transplanted organs and discuss the possibility of targeting these cells to promote tolerance. PMID:27344051

  15. Generic maintenance immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Ensor, Christopher R; Trofe-Clark, Jennifer; Gabardi, Steven; McDevitt-Potter, Lisa M; Shullo, Michael A

    2011-11-01

    Survival after solid organ transplantation has increased in the era of tacrolimus and mycophenolate. This increased survival could be due in part to the broad clinical use of these potent and specific agents for maintenance immunosuppression. These drugs have enhanced specificity and potency for T and B lymphocytes compared with their predecessors, cyclosporine and azathioprine. Between 2008 and 2010, the United States Food and Drug Administration approved several generic formulations of both tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. Deciding whether generic products can be safely substituted for the innovator product is a clinical dilemma similar to that which occurred when generic formulations of cyclosporine became available. We describe the concerns regarding generic immunosuppression use, summarize expert opinion and consensus statements in transplantation, analyze the potential impact of generic substitution, and provide estimates of populations affected based on generic drug market penetration. Formulary considerations such as cost, availability, and potential drug ordering and drug selection errors are described, and transplant coordinator and patient perspectives are reviewed. Finally, general recommendations about the use of generic maintenance immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients are provided. Although more research is needed to confirm clinical and therapeutic equivalence and pharmacoeconomic benefit, generic immunosuppressants can be safely substituted for innovator products as long as patients consistently receive the same product, patients and clinicians are aware of when substitutions occur, and enhanced therapeutic drug monitoring is provided during the transition.

  16. Research priority setting in organ transplantation: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Sautenet, Benedicte; Chapman, Jeremy R; Harper, Claudia; MacDonald, Peter; Shackel, Nicholas; Crowe, Sally; Hanson, Camilla; Hill, Sophie; Synnot, Anneliese; Craig, Jonathan C

    2017-04-01

    Barriers to access and long-term complications remain a challenge in transplantation. Further advancements may be achieved through research priority setting with patient engagement to strengthen its relevance. We evaluated research priority setting in solid organ transplantation and described stakeholder priorities. Databases were searched to October 2016. We synthesized the findings descriptively. The 28 studies (n = 2071 participants) addressed kidney [9 (32%)], heart [7 (25%)], liver [3 (11%)], lung [1 (4%)], pancreas [1 (4%)], and nonspecified organ transplantation [7 (25%)] using consensus conferences, expert panel meetings, workshops, surveys, focus groups, interviews, and the Delphi technique. Nine (32%) reported patient involvement. The 336 research priorities addressed the following: organ donation [43 priorities (14 studies)]; waitlisting and allocation [43 (10 studies)]; histocompatibility and immunology [31 (8 studies)]; immunosuppression [21 (10 studies)]; graft-related complications [38 (13 studies)]; recipient (non-graft-related) complications [86 (14 studies)]; reproduction [14 (1 study)], psychosocial and lifestyle [49 (7 studies)]; and disparities in access and outcomes [10 (4 studies)]. The priorities identified were broad but only one-third of initiatives engaged patients/caregivers, and details of the process were lacking. Setting research priorities in an explicit manner with patient involvement can guide investment toward the shared priorities of patients and health professionals.

  17. Long-Term Outcome and Evaluation of Organ Function in Pediatric Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and Matched Related Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, Mari H.; Triplett, Brandon; Shook, David R.; Hartford, Christine; Srinivasan, Ashok; Laver, Joseph; Ware, Russell; Leung, Wing

    2013-01-01

    HLA-matched related donor (MRD) hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well-established therapy for patients with sickle cell disease (SCD); however, experience using alternative donors, including haploidentical donors, in HSCT for SCD is limited. We report the long-term outcomes of 22 pediatric patients who underwent related donor HSCT for SCD at St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, either a myeloablative sibling MRD HSCT (n = 14) or reduced-intensity parental haploidentical donor HSCT (n = 8). The median patient age was 11.0 ± 3.9 years in the MRD graft recipients and 9.0 ± 5.0 years in the haploidentical donor graft recipients. The median follow-up was 9.0 ± 2.3 years, with an overall survival (OS) of 93% and a recurrence/graft failure rate of 0%, for the MRD cohort and 7.4 ± 2.4 years, with an OS of 75%, disease-free survival of 38%, and disease recurrence of 38%, for the haploidentical donor cohort. We report the long-term hematologic response and organ function in patients undergoing MRD or haploidentical donor HSCT for severe SCD. Our data demonstrate long-term hematologic improvements after HSCT with sustained engraftment, and confirm that HSCT offers long-term protection from common complications of SCD, including stroke, pulmonary hypertension, acute chest, and nephropathy, regardless of donor source. PMID:23416852

  18. Systematic review of melanoma incidence and prognosis in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Dahlke, Erin; Murray, Christian Alexander; Kitchen, Jessica; Chan, An-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma carries the potential for substantial morbidity and mortality in the solid organ transplant population. We systematically reviewed the literature published from January 1995 to January 2012 to determine the overall relative risk and prognosis of melanoma in transplant recipients. Our search identified 7,512 citations. Twelve unique non-overlapping studies reported the population-based incidence of melanoma in an inception cohort of solid organ transplant recipients. Compared to the general population, there is a 2.4-fold (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 2.9) increased incidence of melanoma after transplantation. No population-based outcome data were identified for melanoma arising post-transplant. Data from non-population based cohort studies suggest a worse prognosis for late-stage melanoma developing after transplantation compared with the general population. For patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma, one population-based study reported a local recurrence rate of 11% (2/19) after transplantation, although staging and survival information was lacking. There is a need for population-based data on the prognosis of melanoma arising pre- and post-transplantation. Increased incidence and potentially worse melanoma outcomes in this high-risk population have implications for clinical care in terms of prevention, screening and reduction of immunosuppression after melanoma development post-transplant, as well as transplantation decisions in patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma.

  19. Systematic review of melanoma incidence and prognosis in solid organ transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Cutaneous melanoma carries the potential for substantial morbidity and mortality in the solid organ transplant population. We systematically reviewed the literature published from January 1995 to January 2012 to determine the overall relative risk and prognosis of melanoma in transplant recipients. Our search identified 7,512 citations. Twelve unique non-overlapping studies reported the population-based incidence of melanoma in an inception cohort of solid organ transplant recipients. Compared to the general population, there is a 2.4-fold (95% confidence interval, 2.0 to 2.9) increased incidence of melanoma after transplantation. No population-based outcome data were identified for melanoma arising post-transplant. Data from non-population based cohort studies suggest a worse prognosis for late-stage melanoma developing after transplantation compared with the general population. For patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma, one population-based study reported a local recurrence rate of 11% (2/19) after transplantation, although staging and survival information was lacking. There is a need for population-based data on the prognosis of melanoma arising pre- and post-transplantation. Increased incidence and potentially worse melanoma outcomes in this high-risk population have implications for clinical care in terms of prevention, screening and reduction of immunosuppression after melanoma development post-transplant, as well as transplantation decisions in patients with a history of pre-transplant melanoma. PMID:24834346

  20. Organ transplantation in Malaysia: a social-legal study.

    PubMed

    Ngah, Anisah Che

    2005-09-01

    Kidney and corneal transplants have been undertaken since the seventies although other forms of organ transplantation were lesser known. To date more than 1000 kidney transplants, the majority from living related donors have been performed. Nevertheless heart, lung and liver transplant only had an impact in the nineties. The main reason being, the lack of cadaveric donors, which has hampered the development of organ transplantation in Malaysia. It is instructive to note that the Malaysian society has been rather conservative when it comes to organ transplantation. This is compounded by the Asean culture and value system, which are directly derived from our historical background and religious convictions. However attempts had been made by various organisations such as The Malaysian Society of Transplantation, which was set up in 1994 to create greater awareness on organ donation & transplantation amongst both the healthcare professionals and the public.

  1. [Patients with solid organ transplantation and skin cancer: determination of risk factors with emphasis in photoexposure and immunosuppressive regimen. Experience in a third level hospital].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Acosta, Elva Dalia; Calva-Mercado, Juan José; Alberú-Gómez, Josefina; Vilatoba-Chapa, Mario; Domínguez-Cherit, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most common malignancy in transplant patients. The incidence of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is 10 times greater than in the general population, while squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is 100 times greater. The relationship between the BCC and SCC reverses and increases according to the degree of immunosuppression and sun exposure. One way to predict the risk of NMSC should be based on factors such as: total sun burden factor (TSB). To determine the influence of various risk factors in the development of NMSC and its relation to the type and duration of immunosuppressive treatment, type of transplant, and TSB. We worked with a fledgling historical cohort in which patients with kidney or liver transplant were identified and recorded if they developed some form of skin cancer. To study the factors associated with NMSC, we resorted to the strategy of a case-control study. Dermatological examination was performed and a questionnaire of risk factors made in both groups. Of the 140 patients enrolled, 51 were women and 89 men, 120 were renal transplant recipients and 20 liver transplants. Of patients who developed NMSC, 100% were renal transplant recipients. The median age was 48.5 years. Most cancer patients worked outdoors. A total of 78 lesions were found in 40 NMSC patients, 59 (76%) of them were SCC, and 19 (24%) BCC; 45% of all skin cancer patients had more than one injury. The worst affected areas were those photoexposed: 60% head and neck, trunk and upper extremities 18% 50%. In 30% of patients (12/40) 22 new tumors were identified (SCC 18 and BCC 4). No lesions were identified for melanoma. In multivariate logistic regression analysis, statistically significant features were: type-based immunosuppressive regimen of cyclosporine A, azathioprine and prednisone (OR: 59.7; 95% CI: 10.2-348), TSB > 10 (OR: 19; 95% CI: 3-120) and duration of use of immunosuppressive therapy (OR: 1.06; 95% CI: 0.9-1.1). The mean time from transplantation

  2. Impact of cytomegalovirus on early immunosenescence of CD8+ T lymphocytes after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cantisán, Sara; Torre-Cisneros, Julián; Lara, Rosario; Zarraga, Sofía; Montejo, Miguel; Solana, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    The increasing number of elderly people eligible for solid organ transplants has made it necessary to reevaluate how the decline in immune function associated to ageing (immunosenescence) affects solid organ transplants. Some immunosenescence biomarkers, such as the expansion of CD28(-)CD8+ T lymphocytes, have been associated to cytomegalovirus infection and are related to a form of accelerated immune senescence in transplant recipients. However, the impact of cytomegalovirus replication on downregulation of CD28 on total CD8+ T cells is independent of patients' age, whereas downregulation on cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells depends on patients' age, inducing early immunosenescence of cytomegalovirus-specific CD8+ T cells in young but not elderly solid organ transplants recipients. Although immunosenescence in transplant recipients should be considered a two-edged sword as it is a risk factor for the development of tumors after transplantation, it has a beneficial effect in attenuating acute allograft rejection and correlates with better clinical outcomes.

  3. Safety of live vaccinations on immunosuppressive therapy in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases, solid organ transplantation or after bone-marrow transplantation - A systematic review of randomized trials, observational studies and case reports.

    PubMed

    Croce, Evelina; Hatz, Christoph; Jonker, Emile F; Visser, L G; Jaeger, Veronika K; Bühler, Silja

    2017-03-01

    Live vaccines are generally contraindicated on immunosuppressive therapy due to safety concerns. However, data are limited to corroborate this practice. To estimate the safety of live vaccinations in patients with immune-mediated inflammatory diseases (IMID) or solid organ transplantation (SOT) on immunosuppressive treatment and in patients after bone-marrow transplantation (BMT). A search was conducted in electronic databases (Cochrane, Pubmed, Embase) and additional literature was identified by targeted searches. Randomized trials, observational studies and case reports. Patients with IMID or SOT on immunosuppressive treatment and BMT patients <2years after transplantation. Live vaccinations: mumps, measles, rubella (MMR), yellow fever (YF), varicella vaccine (VV), herpes zoster (HZ), oral typhoid, oral polio, rotavirus, Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG), smallpox. One author performed the data extraction using predefined data fields. It was cross-checked by two other authors. 7305 articles were identified and 64 articles were included: 40 on IMID, 16 on SOT and 8 on BMT patients. In most studies, the administration of live vaccines was safe. However, some serious vaccine-related adverse events occurred. 32 participants developed an infection with the vaccine strain; in most cases the infection was mild. However, in two patients fatal infections were reported: a patient with RA/SLE overlap who started MTX/dexamethasone treatment four days after the YFV developed a yellow fever vaccine-associated viscerotropic disease (YEL-AVD) and died. The particular vaccine lot was found to be associated with a more than 20 times risk of YEL-AVD. One infant whose mother was under infliximab treatment during pregnancy received the BCG vaccine at the age of three months and developed disseminated BCG infection and died. An immunogenicity assessment was performed in 43 studies. In most cases the patients developed satisfactory seroprotection rates. In the IMID group, YFV and VV

  4. Colon Biopsy Findings of Renal Transplant Patients.

    PubMed

    Taştepe, Firdevs Zeynep; Özgün, Gonca; Özdemir, Binnaz Handan; Tepeoğlu, Merih; Haberal, Mehmet

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate colonic pathologies in renal transplant recipients. Patients with colon biopsies were selected from 1816 renal transplant recipients from January 1990 to December 2012 at Baskent University Hospital (Ankara, Turkey). Demographic and clinical findings with colon biopsies were examined. There were 84 patients who had colon biopsies after renal transplant. There were 57 male and 27 female patients (median age at renal transplant was 33 y). Chronic diarrhea was the most common clinical finding at the time of colon biopsy. The median interval from renal transplant to first colon biopsy was 48.1 ± 47.5 months. On microscopic evaluation, there were no pathologic changes in 17 patients. The remaining 67 patients had colitis (38 patients), polyps (17 patients), cytomegalovirus colitis (8 patients), and amyloidosis (4 patients). The mean interval between transplant and the diagnosis of colitis was 49.08 ± 42.6 months, amyloidosis was 47.5 ± 79.28 months, cytomegalovirus colitis was 5 ± 3.5 months, and polyps was 77.65 ± 58.8 months. There was a statistically significant difference between biopsy diagnosis and the time interval between transplant and colon biopsy (P < .01). Among 84 renal transplant recipients with colonic biopsies, 40 patients never had acute rejection episodes and 44 patients had at least 1 acute rejection episode. Seven of 8 patients with cytomegalovirus colitis, 19 of 38 with colitis, 3 of 4 with amyloidosis, and 5 of 17 with polyps had acute rejection episodes. In our report on colonic manifestations in renal transplant recipients, the most common colonic lesion was noninfectious colitis. Cytomegalovirus colitis is an important infection that affects immunosuppressed individuals, such as transplant recipients. Cytomegalovirus must be kept in mind, and thorough sectioning and immunohistochemical sta ining should be used if necessary in the presence of any clinical or histologic suspicion for infective colitis.

  5. Generic immunosuppression in solid organ transplantation: a Canadian perspective.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Jennifer J; Schiff, Jeffrey R; Coursol, Christian J; Daley, Christopher J A; Dipchand, Anne I; Heywood, Norine M; Keough-Ryan, Tammy M; Keown, Paul A; Levy, Gary A; Lien, Dale C; Wichart, Jenny R; Cantarovich, Marcelo

    2012-04-15

    The introduction of generic immunosuppressant medications may present an opportunity for cost savings in solid organ transplantation if equivalent clinical outcomes to the branded counterparts can be achieved. An interprofessional working group of the Canadian Society of Transplantation was established to develop recommendations on the use of generic immunosuppression in solid organ transplant recipients (SOTR) based on a review of the available data. Under current Health Canada licensing requirements, a demonstration of bioequivalence with the branded formulation in healthy volunteers allows for bridging of clinical data. Cyclosporine, tacrolimus, and sirolimus are designated as "critical dose drugs" and are held to stricter criteria. However, whether this provides sufficient guarantee of therapeutic equivalence in SOTR remains controversial, and failure to maintain an appropriate balance of immunosuppression may have serious consequences, including rejection, graft loss, and death. Published evidence supporting therapeutic equivalence of generic formulations in SOTR is lacking. Moreover, in the setting of multiple generic formulations the potential for uncontrolled product switching is a major concern, since generic preparations are not required to demonstrate bioequivalence with each other. Although close monitoring is recommended with any change in formulation, drug product switches are likely to occur without prescriber knowledge and may pose a significant patient safety risk. The advent of generic immunosuppression will require new practices including more frequent therapeutic drug and clinical monitoring, and increased patient education. The additional workload placed on transplant centers without additional funding will create challenges and could ultimately jeopardize patient outcomes. Until more robust clinical data are available and adequate regulatory safeguards are instituted, caution in the use of generic immunosuppressive drugs in solid organ

  6. [Usage of marginal organs for liver transplantation: a way around the critical organ shortage?].

    PubMed

    Pratschke, S; Loehe, F; Graeb, C; Jauch, K W; Angele, M K

    2009-04-01

    The transplantation of marginal organs or those meeting the so-called extended donor criteria (EDC) is today a significant option to alleviate the low availability or organs and to increase the number of transplantation which in turn is -accompanied by a lower mortality among wait-ing-list patients. However such an extension of the spender pool carries the risks of an increased incidence of organ dysfuntions and a higher recipient mortality. This situation presents an ethical problem when marginal organs are accepted for transplantation because the anticipated mortality for the individual recipient cannot be determined. The transplantation of marginal organs from -donors with a high MELD score seems to be linked to a higher mortality. In particular, the combina-tions of high donor age and long ischaemic time or advanced donor age and hepatitis C infection in the recipient are definitively associated with a significantly poorer organ survival rate. In view of the serious lack of organs, efforts should be made, for example, by shortening of the is-chae-mic time and the development of therapeutic strategies, to improve the function and increase the number of usable marginal organs and thus to increase pool of donor organs. The refusal of marginal organs on the basis of individual EDC without consideration of the status of recipient does not seem to be adequate.

  7. Cancer of the head and neck region in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Rabinovics, Naomi; Mizrachi, Aviram; Hadar, Tuvia; Ad-El, Dean; Feinmesser, Raphael; Guttman, Dan; Shpitzer, Thomas; Bachar, Gideon

    2014-02-01

    Solid organ recipients are at an increased risk of developing various malignancies. We investigated the incidence, clinical features, and outcome of patients diagnosed with head and neck cancer after organ transplantation. A retrospective analysis was undertaken of patients who underwent solid organ transplantation (kidney, liver, lung, heart) treated at our institution from 1992 to 2010. Of 2817 organ recipients, 175 patients (6.1%) developed 391 head and neck malignancies. Cutaneous malignancies were the most common (93%): squamous cell carcinoma (SCC; 51%) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC; 42%). The average interval from transplantation to diagnosis of head and neck malignancy was 7.3 years, with liver recipients diagnosed earlier. Eighteen percent of patients presented with an aggressive pattern of head and neck cancer, including 24% of patients with cutaneous SCC. Organ transplantation recipients are at a higher risk to develop head and neck cancer with an aggressive behavior characterized by multiple recurrences and decreased survival. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Antibody Subclass Repertoire and Graft Outcome Following Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Nicole M.; Hickey, Michelle J.; Reed, Elaine F.

    2016-01-01

    Long-term outcomes in solid organ transplantation are constrained by the development of donor-specific alloantibodies (DSA) against human leukocyte antigen (HLA) and other targets, which elicit antibody-mediated rejection (ABMR). However, antibody-mediated graft injury represents a broad continuum, from extensive complement activation and tissue damage compromising the function of the transplanted organ, to histological manifestations of endothelial cell injury and mononuclear cell infiltration but without concurrent allograft dysfunction. In addition, while transplant recipients with DSA as a whole fare worse than those without, a substantial minority of patients with DSA do not experience poorer graft outcome. Taken together, these observations suggest that not all DSA are equally pathogenic. Antibody effector functions are controlled by a number of factors, including antibody concentration, antigen availability, and antibody isotype/subclass. Antibody isotype is specified by many integrated signals, including the antigen itself as well as from antigen-presenting cells or helper T cells. To date, a number of studies have described the repertoire of IgG subclasses directed against HLA in pretransplant patients and evaluated the clinical impact of different DSA IgG subclasses on allograft outcome. This review will summarize what is known about the repertoire of antibodies to HLA and non-HLA targets in transplantation, focusing on the distribution of IgG subclasses, as well as the general biology, etiology, and mechanisms of injury of different humoral factors. PMID:27822209

  9. Long-Term Follow-Up of Fecal Microbiota Transplantation for Treatment of Recurrent Clostridium difficile Infection in a Dual Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Bilal, Mohammad; Khehra, Raman; Strahotin, Cristina; Mitre, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection is one of the most frequent causes of healthcare-associated infections, and its rates are also increasing in the community. Mounting evidence suggests that fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) may be effective; however, as there is paucity of data regarding the use of FMT in patients with solid organ transplants, we present a case of successful FMT in a patient with dual solid organ transplant.

  10. Clinical pharmacogenetics of immunosuppressive drugs in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, Thomas; Haushofer, Alexander

    2005-03-01

    Organ transplantation has become an important additional option for patients with organ failure. Immunosuppressive drugs showing a very narrow therapeutic window have to be administered. Different transporters and metabolic pathways are responsible for absorption and metabolism of these drugs; for instance, the P-glycoprotein (P-gp) pump regulates the absorption of a drug, and its metabolism is catalyzed by cytochrome P450s (CYPs). As the phenotypes of P-gp or the CYPs are predetermined by their genotypes, genetic testing prior to drug therapy may help to predict the drug doses required. This review describes polymorphisms of the genes coding for P-gp and CYPs, and focuses on the compounds cyclosporin and tacrolimus. It is hoped that this information might help to judge the value of pharmacogenetic testing prior to immunosuppressive therapy in solid organ transplantation.

  11. [Organ transplant network in Japan: current status and its role].

    PubMed

    Teraoka, S; Kurokawa, K; Mito, M; Yoshinaga, K; Igata, A; Sonoda, T; Orita, K; Fujimi, S; Ishikawa, K; Nomoto, K

    1998-11-01

    The Role of Organ Transplant Network are the encouragement of the organ transplantation and fair organ sharing. Its principled are united, neutral open and nonprofit organization, so as to secure the fair and quick organ sharing based on the uniform allocation policy. Japan Kidney Transplant Network was established in 1995 nad reorganized into multi-organ sharing network, Japan Organ Transplant Network in 1997, when Japan Organ transplant Act was enacted. It consists of transplant coordinators, physicians, transplant surgeons, kidney banks, local administration, academic standings, other organization/associations and others. There are several committee, in which special subjects on organ transplantation and related matters are consulted, and review system in which each case is assessed and judged. And principal and essential items are decided by the board of members and then by the general assembly. The new computer system was introduced and registrants data are renewed every year, and recipient selection is done based on the latest registrants data. Standardized HLA examination tray was introduced and class II antigen was examined by means of DNA typing since 1997, which enabled more precise and accurate search. Hereafter, the education and encouragement of transplant coordinators to raise themselves and the more effective and extended distribution of donor cards are indispensable to promote organ donation/transplantation.

  12. The effect of the Syrian crisis on organ transplantation in Syria.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Bassam

    2015-04-01

    The war in Syria that started in March 2011 has destroyed much of the country's infrastructure including many hospitals. The total number of kidney transplants performed in Syria in 2010 was 385 transplants before the number gradually declined to 154 transplants in 2013, a decrease of 60%. In addition, the number of operational kidney transplant centers has decreased from 8 to 4 centers. Unrelated-donor kidney transplant decreased from 70% during the years that preceded the crisis to 47% in 2013. More than 50% of physicians and surgeons involved in kidney transplant are not practicing transplant currently in their centers. Difficulties in the provision of immunosuppressive drugs for all patients in all provinces constitute a major challenge for the health authorities and transplant patients, especially patients who cannot arrange an alternate source. The project to initiate liver transplant came to a halt because foreign trainers could not visit Syria. The autologous bone marrow transplant program continued to function, but in a smaller and irregular manner. The commitment of transplant teams despite the large challenges was, and still is, extraordinary. In conclusion, all aspects of organ transplant have been affected, paralyzing new projects and negatively affecting existing programs.

  13. Pediatric liver transplantation for urea cycle disorders and organic acidemias: United Network for Organ Sharing data for 2002-2012.

    PubMed

    Perito, Emily R; Rhee, Sue; Roberts, John Paul; Rosenthal, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Decision making concerning liver transplantation is unique for children with urea cycle disorders (UCDs) and organic acidemias (OAs) because of their immediate high priority on the waiting list, which is not related to the severity of their disease. There are limited national outcome data on which recommendations about liver transplantation for UCDs or OAs can be based. This study was a retrospective analysis of United Network for Organ Sharing data for liver recipients who underwent transplantation at an age < 18 years in 2002-2012. Repeat transplants were excluded. Among the pediatric liver transplants, 5.4% were liver-only for UCDs/OAs. The proportion of transplants for UCDs/OAs increased from 4.3% in 2002-2005 to 7.4% in 2010-2012 (P < 0.001). Ninety-six percent were deceased donor transplants, and 59% of these patients underwent transplantation at <2 years of age. Graft survival improved as the age at transplant increased (P = 0.04). Within 5 years after transplantation, the graft survival rate was 78% for children < 2 years old at transplant and 88% for children ≥ 2 years old at transplant (P = 0.06). Vascular thrombosis caused 44% of the graft losses, and 65% of these losses occurred in children < 2 years old. Patient survival also improved as the age at transplant increased: the 5-year patient survival rate was 88% for children with UCDs/OAs who were <2 years old at transplant and 99% for children who were ≥2 years old at transplant (P = 0.006). At the last-follow-up (54 ± 34.4 months), children who underwent transplantation for UCDs/OAs were more likely to have cognitive and motor delays than children who underwent transplantation for other indications. Cognitive and motor delays for children with UCDs/OAs were associated with metabolic disorders, but they were not predicted by age or weight at transplant, sex, ethnicity, liver graft type (split versus whole), or hospitalization at transplant in univariate and

  14. Renal transplantation in patients with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Frassetto, Lynda A.; Tan-Tam, Clara; Stock, Peter G.

    2010-01-01

    HIV infection has been a major global health problem for almost three decades. With the introduction of highly active anti-retroviral therapy in 1996, and the advent of effective prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections, AIDS mortality has decreased markedly. In developed countries, this once fatal infection is now being treated as a chronic condition. As a result, rate of morbidity and mortality from other medical conditions leading to end-stage liver, kidney and heart disease is steadily increasing in individuals with HIV. Presence of HIV infection used to be viewed as a contraindication to transplantation for multiple reasons:,concerns for exacerbation of an already immunocompromised state by administration of additional immunosuppressants; the use of a limited supply of donor organs with unknown long-term outcomes; and, the risk of viral transmission to the surgical and medical staff. This Review examines open questions on kidney transplantation in patients infected with HIV-1 and clinical strategies that have resulted in good outcomes. It also describes the clinical concerns associated with the treatment of renal transplant recipients with HIV. PMID:19776780

  15. Renal transplantation in patients with HIV.

    PubMed

    Frassetto, Lynda A; Tan-Tam, Clara; Stock, Peter G

    2009-10-01

    HIV infection has been a major global health problem for almost three decades. With the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 1996, and the advent of effective prophylaxis and management of opportunistic infections, AIDS mortality has decreased markedly. In developed countries, this once fatal infection is now being treated as a chronic condition. As a result, rates of morbidity and mortality from other medical conditions leading to end-stage liver, kidney and heart disease are steadily increasing in individuals with HIV. Presence of HIV infection used to be viewed as a contraindication to transplantation for multiple reasons: concerns for exacerbation of an already immunocompromised state by administration of additional immunosuppressants; the use of a limited supply of donor organs with unknown long-term outcomes; and, the risk of viral transmission to the surgical and medical staff. This Review examines open questions on kidney transplantation in patients infected with HIV-1 and clinical strategies that have resulted in good outcomes. It also describes the clinical concerns associated with the treatment of renal transplant recipients with HIV.

  16. Relative EBV antibody concentrations and cost of standard IVIG and CMV-IVIG for PTLD prophylaxis in solid organ transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Avila, L; Garner, O B; Cherry, J D

    2014-09-01

    Some centers prefer CMV-IVIG over IVIG for the prophylaxis of EBV-related PTLD in solid organ transplant patients. Our objective was to compare the relative dose-related EBV ELISA antibody concentrations and cost of standard IVIG and CMV-IVIG. The concentration of EBV IgG to VCA was analyzed via ELISA in four lots of IVIG and four lots of CMV-IVIG. Relative EBV ELISA antibody concentrations and cost were compared assuming an IVIG dose of 0.5 gm/kg and CMV-IVIG dose of 0.15 gm/kg in a 50-kg patient. The price of IVIG was $70/gm and CMV-IVIG $430/gm. IVIG contains the same EBV antibody concentrations (20 790 ELISA antibody units/mL) than CMV-IVIG (17 430 ELISA antibody units/mL, p > 0.2) in the four lots of each product sampled. When factoring in the dosing scheme for a 50-kg patient, IVIG contains two times more EBV antibody than CMV-IVIG. Yet, CMV-IVIG is 1.8 times more expensive than IVIG ($3225 vs. $1750). In the four lots of each product sampled, IVIG contains more EBV antibodies and costs less than CMV-IVIG when factoring in the dosing scheme. Studies are needed to determine whether there is clinical efficacy of immunoglobulin products for EBV-related PTLD prophylaxis.

  17. [Evaluation of viral hepatitis in solid organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Mikolašević, Ivana; Sladoje-Martinović, Branka; Orlić, Lidija; Milić, Sandra; Lukenda, Vesna; Župan, Željko; Štimac, Davor; Rački, Sanjin

    2014-04-01

    Renal transplantation has significantly improved survival of patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Transplantation is the best treatment in this population of patients. Despite the introduction of various preventive measures, viral hepatitis, i.e. hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections, are still a major problem because they are common in patients on renal replacement therapy as well as in allograft recipients. They are a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in this patient population. In recent years, hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection has been added as an emergent cause of chronic hepatitis in solid organ transplantation, mainly in renal and liver allograft recipients. Most studies show higher mortality in renal transplant recipients (RTRs) infected with HBV, compared with RTRs without HBV infection, although this topic is still under debate. Furthermore, HCV infection in RTRs is associated with a significant reduction in patient and graft survival due to liver disease and septic complications related to cirrhosis and immunosuppressive therapy. The immunosuppressive therapy prescribed after transplantation modifies the natural history of chronic HCV infection. Given the high prevalence of HCV and HBV infections in RTRs, a growing incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma and the possible contribution of immunosuppression might be expected in these patients. Therefore, after renal transplantation, early screening with abdominal ultrasound (every 3 months in cirrhotic patients and every 6-12 months in non-cirrhotic RTRs) is necessary when the risk factors such as HBV and HCV are present. The European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL) recommends that all HbsAg-positive patients who are candidates for solid organ transplantation should be treated with nucleoside analogs. The KDIGO guidelines recommend that all HbsAg-positive RTRs receive prophylaxis with tenofovir, entecavir or lamivudine; however, tenofovir and

  18. Vitamin D status of human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with advanced liver disease enrolled in the solid organ transplantation in HIV: multi-site study.

    PubMed

    Branch, Andrea D; Barin, Burc; Rahman, Adeeb; Stock, Peter; Schiano, Thomas D

    2014-02-01

    An optimal vitamin D status may benefit liver transplantation (LT) patients. Higher levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] mitigate steroid-induced bone loss after LT, correlate with better hepatitis C virus treatment responses, and increase graft survival. This study investigated 25(OH)D levels and assessed strategies for vitamin D deficiency prevention in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients with advanced liver disease who were enrolled in the Solid Organ Transplantation in HIV: Multi-Site Study. 25(OH)D was measured in banked specimens from 154 LT candidates/recipients with the DiaSorin assay; deficiency was defined as a 25(OH)D level < 20 ng/mL. Information about vitamin D supplement use after LT was obtained from medication logs and via surveys. Logistic regression, Cox regression, and linear repeated measures analyses were performed with SAS software. We found that none of the 17 academic medical centers in the United States routinely recommended vitamin D supplements before LT, and only a minority (4/17) recommended vitamin D supplements to all patients after LT. Seventy-one percent of the 139 patients with pre-LT values had vitamin D deficiency, which was significantly associated with cirrhosis (P = 0.01) but no other variable. The vitamin D status improved modestly after LT; however, the status was deficient for 40% of the patients 1 year after LT. In a multivariate linear repeated measures model, a higher pre-LT 25(OH)D level (P < 0.001), specimen collection in the summer (P < 0.001), a routine vitamin D supplementation strategy after LT (P < 0.001), and the time elapsing since LT (P = 0.01) were significantly associated with increases in the post-LT 25(OH)D level; black race was associated with a decreased level (P = 0.02). In conclusion, the majority of patients awaiting LT were vitamin D deficient, and approximately half were vitamin D deficient after LT. More extensive use of vitamin D supplements, more sun

  19. [Brain death, bioethics and organ transplantation].

    PubMed

    Flores, Juan Carlos; Pérez, Manuel; Thambo, Sergio; Valdivieso, Andrés

    2004-01-01

    The concept of death has evolved medically, legally and culturally since the introduction of life support technologies in the middle of the 20th century. The traditional cardiopulmonary and the new neurologically based brain death criterions of death are examined. We conclude that brain death, defined as total and irreversible loss of function of the whole brain, fulfills better "the permanent cessation of functioning of the organism as a whole" definition of death. Brain death diagnosis, based on standard neurologic clinical examination performed accurately, is unequivocal. Transplantation medicine, mostly based on organ donation of brain dead people, has become a routine and universally accepted therapeutic intervention nowadays, which benefits many people. Ethics foundations of organ transplantation are reviewed. Even though brain death and organ donation are widely accepted in medical, legal, religious and public opinion today, the whole society and medical community need to be further educated about these matters, so that unavoidable changes of traditional concepts might be better understood. Permanent education should be the best way to dissipate social fears and distrust towards organ donation and brain death.

  20. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder after pancreas transplantation: a United Network for Organ Sharing database analysis.

    PubMed

    Jackson, K; Ruppert, K; Shapiro, R

    2013-01-01

    There are not a great deal of data on post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) following pancreas transplantation. We analyzed the United Network for Organ Sharing national database of pancreas transplants to identify predictors of PTLD development. A univariate Cox model was generated for each potential predictor, and those at least marginally associated (p < 0.15) with PTLD were entered into a multivariable Cox model. PTLD developed in 43 patients (1.0%) of 4205 pancreas transplants. Mean follow-up time was 4.9 ± 2.2 yr. In the multivariable Cox model, recipient EBV seronegativity (HR 5.52, 95% CI: 2.99-10.19, p < 0.001), not having tacrolimus in the immunosuppressive regimen (HR 6.02, 95% CI: 2.74-13.19, p < 0.001), recipient age (HR 0.96, 95% CI: 0.92-0.99, p = 0.02), non-white ethnicity (HR 0.11, 95% CI: 0.02-0.84, p = 0.03), and HLA mismatching (HR 0.80, 95% CI: 0.67-0.97, p = 0.02) were significantly associated with the development of PTLD. Patient survival was significantly decreased in patients with PTLD, with a one-, three-, and five-yr survival of 91%, 76%, and 70%, compared with 97%, 93%, and 88% in patients without PTLD (p < 0.001). PTLD is an uncommon but potentially lethal complication following pancreas transplantation. Patients with the risk factors identified should be monitored closely for the development of PTLD.

  1. The logistics management and coordination in procurement phase of organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Genç, Ruhet

    2008-12-01

    The number of organ transplantation surgeries has increased particularly in the last decade due to technological and scientific advances in medicine. Despite this increase, many patients, however, remain in waiting lists for transplantation surgery. Main reasons for these waiting lists are that there are limited number of organ donations and specifically problems in the management of organ transplantation activities. An efficient management of the allocation and transportation of organs (in other words, logistics management of organ transplantation) are thus extremely important. The aim of the paper is to review current practices of logistics management in the procurement phase of organ transplantation. It initially reviews the organizational structures of the international and national coordination centres, which are founded to coordinate organ transplantation activities and to enhance collaboration among physicians and medical staff. The paper, then, focuses on the possible managerial problems encountered during the procurement phase of organ transplantation. With this respect, common transportation difficulties from global and local perspective are also analyzed. This paper tries to take attention to a systematic regard of the organ transplantation from logistics point of view, thus providing applicable solutions to managerial problems in terms of allocation and transportation of organs.

  2. Spontaneous bacterial peritonitis prevalence in pre-transplant patients and its effect on survival and graft loss post-transplant

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Neeral L; Intagliata, Nicolas M; Henry, Zachary H; Argo, Curtis K; Northup, Patrick G

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the incidence of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) in pre-transplant patients and its effect on post transplant mortality and graft failure. METHODS We conducted a retrospective cohort study of patient records from the organ procurement and transplant network data set. Patients were identified by the presence of SBP pre-transplant. Univariate post-transplant survival models were constructed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and multivariate models were constructed using the Cox proportional hazards model. Variables that affected post-transplant graft survival were identified in the SBP population. RESULTS Forty-seven thousand eight hundred and eighty patient records were included in the analysis for both groups, and 1966 (4.11%) patients were identified in the data set as having pre-transplant SBP. Patients that had pre-transplant SBP had higher rates of graft loss from recurrent hepatitis C virus (HCV) (3.6% vs 2.0%, P < 0.0001), infections leading to graft loss (1.9% vs 1.3%, P = 0.02), primary non-function (4.3% vs 3.0%, P < 0.0001) and chronic rejection (1.1% vs 0.7%, P = 0.04). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a statistically significant difference in all-cause survival in patients with a history of SBP vs those without (P < 0.0001). Pre-transplant history of SBP was independently predictive of mortality due to recurrent HCV (HR = 1.11, 95%CI: 1.02-1.21, P < 0.017) after liver transplantation. CONCLUSION HCV patients prior to the advent of directing acting anti-viral agents had a higher incidence of pre-transplant SBP than other patients on the liver transplant wait list. SBP history pre-transplant resulted in a higher rate of graft loss due to recurrent HCV infection and chronic rejection. PMID:28083084

  3. Liver transplantation in children using organs from young paediatric donors.

    PubMed

    Herden, Uta; Ganschow, Rainer; Briem-Richter, Andrea; Helmke, Knut; Nashan, Bjoern; Fischer, Lutz

    2011-06-01

    Nowadays, most paediatric liver transplant recipients receive a split or other technical variant graft from adult deceased or live donors, because of a lack of available age- and size matched paediatric donors. Few data are available, especially for liver grafts obtained from very young children (<6 years). We analysed all paediatric liver transplantations between 1989 and 2009. Recipients were divided into five groups (1-5) depending on donor age (<1, ≥1 to <6, ≥6 to <16, ≥16 to <45, ≥45 years). Overall, 413 paediatric liver transplantations from deceased donors were performed; 1- and 5-year graft survival rates were 75%, 80%, 78%, 81%, 74% and 75%, 64%, 70%, 67%, 46%, and 1- and 5-year patient survival rates were 88%, 91%, 90%, 89%, 78% and 88%, 84%, 84%, 83%, 63% for groups 1-5, respectively, without significant difference. Eight children received organs from donors younger than 1 year and 45 children received organs from donors between 1 and 6 years of age. Overall, vascular complications occurred in 13.2% of patients receiving organs from donors younger than 6 years. Analysis of our data revealed that the usage of liver grafts from donors younger than 6 years is a safe procedure. The outcome was comparable with grafts from older donors with excellent graft and patient survival, even for donors younger than 1 year.

  4. Organ trafficking and transplant tourism: a commentary on the global realities.

    PubMed

    Budiani-Saberi, D A; Delmonico, F L

    2008-05-01

    The extent of organ sales from commercial living donors (CLDs) or vendors has now become evident. At the Second Global Consultation on Human Transplantation of the World Health Organization's (WHO) in March 2007, it was estimated that organ trafficking accounts for 5-10% of the kidney transplants performed annually throughout the world. Patients with sufficient resources in need of organs may travel from one country to another to purchase a kidney (or liver) mainly from a poor person. Transplant centers in 'destination' countries have been well known to encourage the sale of organs to 'tourist' recipients from the 'client' countries.

  5. Effect of pulmonary hypertension on survival in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis after lung transplantation: an analysis of the United Network of Organ Sharing registry.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Don; Higgins, Robert S; Black, Sylvester M; Wehr, Allison M; Lehman, Amy M; Kirkby, Stephen; Whitson, Bryan A

    2015-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a comorbidity associated with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). There is limited research regarding the effect on survival after lung transplantation (LTx). To assess the effect of PH on survival in patients with IPF who received LTx, the United Network for Organ Sharing was queried for eligible patients with recorded mean (PAmean) and systolic (PAsystolic) pulmonary artery pressure. The analysis was restricted to the post-lung allocation scoring system starting May 1, 2005, to provide a cohort receiving present-day therapies and management. The last update of the data set was July 6, 2012, so a cutoff date of July 6, 2011, was chosen to allow for the possibility of at least 1 year of follow-up. Thresholds of ≥25 and ≥35 mm Hg were chosen for PAmean and PAsystolic, respectively, as indicators of PH. Of 23,951 LTxs in the UNOS data set, 2,542 met inclusion criteria, 1,234 (49%) with PAmean ≥ 25 mm Hg and 1,680 (66%) with PAsystolic ≥ 35 mm Hg. PAmean and PAsystolic were highly correlated, with an estimated correlation coefficient ρ = 0.93 (p < 0.001). Patients with PH (PAmean ≥ 25 mm Hg or PAsystolic ≥ 35 mm Hg) tended to have higher ischemic times, lung allocation score values, forced vital capacity percentage predicted at LTx, and supplemental oxygen requirement at rest values. In addition, a larger proportion of patients with PH was African American, male, had diabetes, and received bilateral LTx compared with single LTx. Comparing PAmean < 25 vs ≥ 25 mm Hg and PAsystolic < 35 vs ≥ 35 mm Hg, median survival in months was 60.4 (95% confidence interval [CI], 55.2-80.4) vs 61.4 (95% CI, 56.9-66.9; log-rank p = 0.876) and 57.6 (95% CI, 50.9-68.0) vs 64.3 (95% CI, 57.5-71.3; log-rank p = 0. 247), respectively. Hazard ratios for both definitions of PH from univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazard models were close to 1 and none were statistically significant. On the basis of our models and despite PH being

  6. Public and professional attitudes to transplanting alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Neuberger, James

    2007-11-01

    The discrepancy between the number of people who might benefit from liver transplantation continues to exceed the availability of donor livers available, so rationing of grafts must occur. Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) is an excellent indication for liver transplantation, with outcomes at least as good as for other indications.ALD remains a controversial indication for liver transplantation. There is no robust evidence that public disquiet over distribution of donor livers to those with ALD (even if they return to alcohol) greatly affects organ donation, although this does not mean there is no consequence of such disquiet. Numerous surveys of the general public, patients, and health care professionals indicate the these patients are thought to have lower priority for access to available liver grafts. Public education is required to demonstrate that patients with ALD are carefully selected for liver transplantation and available grafts are used with attention to equity, justice, and utility.

  7. Pleural effusions in non-transplanted cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Belanger, Adam R; Nguyen, Kimtuyen; Osman, Umar; Gilbert, Christopher R; Allen, Katie; Al Rais, Ahmad Farid; Yarmus, Lonny; Akulian, Jason A

    2017-07-01

    Pleural effusions are considered rare in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. There is a paucity of available information in the literature concerning the nature and significance of pleural effusions in non-transplanted CF patients. We conducted a multicenter retrospective evaluation of non-transplanted adult CF patients. Given the small sample size, only descriptive statistics were performed. A total of 17 CF patients with pleural effusion were identified, of whom 9 patients underwent thoracentesis. The crude incidence of pleural effusion was 43 per 10,000 person-years in hospitalized CF patients at large CF centers. All sampled effusions were inflammatory in nature. All samples submitted for culture grew at least one organism. Pleural effusions are rare in adult non-transplanted CF patients. These fluid collections appear to be quite inflammatory with a higher rate of empyema than in the general population. Copyright © 2016 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Fifty years of organ transplants: the successes and the failures.

    PubMed

    Kaserman, David L

    2007-01-01

    More than fifty years have now passed since the first successful human organ transplant. During that time, substantial progress has been made in both surgical techniques and immunosuppressive drug therapy. As a result, transplant success rates have improved dramatically, and thousands of recipients of kidneys, hearts, livers, and lungs have been granted both longer and healthier lives. At the same time, however, many more thousands of patients have died while waiting in vain for a cadaveric donor organ to become available due to a severe and persistent shortage of such organs. That shortage, in turn, is directly attributable to the National Organ Transplant Act of 1984, which proscribes payment to potential organ donors, even if that would increase supply. This atavistic policy and the shortage and deaths it has spawned provides a stirring example of the tendency for public policy to lag behind technological advancement, particularly in the medical field. But the tide of medical opinion may be turning on this issue, and some form of donor payments may soon emerge.

  9. Regulatory T cells: first steps of clinical application in solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    van der Net, Jeroen B; Bushell, Andrew; Wood, Kathryn J; Harden, Paul N

    2016-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is the treatment of choice for patients with end-stage organ failure. To prevent rejection of the transplanted organ continuous treatment with immunosuppressive medication is needed. Immunosuppression may be harmful to the transplant recipient, increasing the risk of cancer, infections and cardiovascular disease. To improve transplant and patient survival, there is a need for an immune-modulatory regimen that is not only potent in preventing rejection of the transplanted organ, but has less side effects compared to current immunosuppressive regimens. Increasingly, transplantation research focusses on regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy to achieve this aim, in which Treg are used as a strategy to allow reduction of immunosuppression. Currently, the first clinical trials are underway investigating the safety and feasibility of Treg therapy in renal transplantation. This review gives an overview of the rationale of using Treg therapy in transplantation, previous experience with Treg therapy in humans, and the expected safety, potential efficacy and cost-effectiveness of Treg therapy in solid organ transplantation.

  10. Early renal failure after domino liver transplantation using organs from donors with primary hyperoxaluria type 1.

    PubMed

    Saner, Fuat H; Treckmann, Juergen; Pratschke, Johann; Arbogast, Helmut; Rahmel, Axel; Vester, Udo; Paul, Andreas

    2010-10-15

    Organ shortage is responsible for high mortality rates of patients awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Domino transplantation has had reported success in patients with metabolic disorders. Primary hyperoxaluria type 1 (PH1) is a rare metabolic disorder. There are a few case reports that suggest that PH1 livers originating from donors that have undergone combined liver-kidney transplantation can be successfully used for domino transplantation. In the last decade, five patients received a domino liver transplant from patients with PH1 in the EUROTRANSPLANT region. In this study, we report the clinical course and outcome of these five patients who were received a domino graft transplant. All patients, with the exception of one, suffered from multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma and underwent domino LT from patients undergoing combined liver-kidney transplantation for PH1. Within the first 4 weeks, all the domino recipients developed dialysis-dependent kidney failure despite good liver function. Four of the five patients died. The only survivor underwent retransplantation due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Twenty months after transplantation, this patient is doing well and has had no recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma. Domino LT using donors with PH1 results in early renal failure and cannot be recommended for transplantation unless preventive strategies have been identified.

  11. Pharmacokinetic strategies for cyclosporin therapy in organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kahan, B D; Welsh, M; Knight, R; Katz, S; Lewis, R; Grevel, J; Van Buren, C T

    1992-04-01

    Marked interindividual variations in cyclosporin (CsA) produce disparate clinical results in organ transplant recipients. In an attempt to eliminate marked deviations of insufficient or excessive CsA concentrations consequent to the administration of uniform drug doses, test dose pharmacokinetics were performed on each potential organ transplant candidate. An intravenous 3 mg/kg test dose delivered over 3 h proved to be readily performed, namely 53% perfect studies, and relatively reliable, namely 73% of observed concentrations within 10% of the predicted values. Furthermore, the use of CsA doses predicted by pretransplant studies reduces the incidence of delayed graft function, early rejection episodes and transplant loss. The oral test dose study predicted a suitable amount of CsA to achieve sufficient gastrointestinal absorption but was less accurate than the iv prediction method: namely, 40% of observed post-transplant concentrations were within 10% of the predicted target value. Furthermore, patients who received oral doses predicted by the test dose strategy showed no improvement in the incidence of acute rejection episodes between 7 and 60 days, and only modestly improved serum creatinine values. The lower accuracy of predictions from oral test dose studies may reflect the impact of non-linear oral (as opposed to iv) drug pharmacokinetics, of variable diet, and/or of altered postoperative gastrointestinal function.

  12. Antibody-mediated rejection across solid organ transplants: manifestations, mechanisms, and therapies.

    PubMed

    Valenzuela, Nicole M; Reed, Elaine F

    2017-06-30

    Solid organ transplantation is a curative therapy for hundreds of thousands of patients with end-stage organ failure. However, long-term outcomes have not improved, and nearly half of transplant recipients will lose their allografts by 10 years after transplant. One of the major challenges facing clinical transplantation is antibody-mediated rejection (AMR) caused by anti-donor HLA antibodies. AMR is highly associated with graft loss, but unfortunately there are few efficacious therapies to prevent and reverse AMR. This Review describes the clinical and histological manifestations of AMR, and discusses the immunopathological mechanisms contributing to antibody-mediated allograft injury as well as current and emerging therapies.

  13. Hepatitis B in Solid-Organ Transplant Procedures Other Than Liver.

    PubMed

    Halegoua-De Marzio, Dina; Fenkel, Jonathan M; Doria, Cataldo

    2017-04-01

    Transplant is often the best treatment available for patients with end-stage organ failure. Hepatitis B virus infection in transplant procedures other than liver is a major concern because it can be a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after transplant. Due to the increased risk of hepatic complications, such as fibrosing cholestatic hepatitis or histologic deterioration after transplant, systematic use of nucleoside or nucleotide analogues shortly before or at the time of transplant is recommended (tenofovir or entecavir are preferable to lamivudine) in all patients, whatever the baseline histologic evaluation. Sustained viral suppression may result in regression of fibrosis, which in turn may lead to decreased disease-related morbidity and improved survival. Finally, due to the high mortality after nonliver transplant procedures, decompensated cirrhosis from chronic hepatitis B should be considered as a contraindication to nonliver transplant but an indication to combined organ transplant (ie, liver-kidney transplant). Because of the high prevalence of hepatitis B virus exposure in allograft donors and recipients, hepatitis B virus status must be considered during organ allocation. Prevention of hepatitis B virus-related complications in transplant recipients starts with vaccination and donor-recipient matching.

  14. Kidney transplantation in patients with Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Cybulla, Markus; Walter, Kerstin Nanette; Schwarting, Andreas; Divito, Raffaelle; Feriozzi, Sandro; Sunder-Plassmann, Gere

    2009-04-01

    Little is known about the effects of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) in kidney transplant recipients with Fabry disease. Clinical characteristics of transplant recipients in the Fabry Outcome Survey (FOS) were therefore examined in patients with Fabry disease with or without ERT. Of the 837 European patients in FOS (March 2006), 34 male patients and two female patients had received kidney transplants. Mean age at transplantation was 37.6 +/- 10.9 years, mean time since transplantation was 7.7 +/- 6.4 years, median estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was 44.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2), and median proteinuria was 296 mg/24 h. Of 27 patients with baseline data, 59% had hypertension, 74% had left ventricular hypertrophy, 22% had cardiac valve disease, 30% had arrhythmia, and 22% had transient ischaemic attacks and 15% stroke. Twenty patients (74%; two female patients, 18 male patients) were receiving ERT with agalsidase alfa. At enrollment or at the start of ERT, median eGFRs were 59 and 35 ml/min/1.73 m(2) (P = 0.05) and median proteinuria levels were 240 and 420 mg/24 h (not significant) in treated and untreated patients respectively. Renal function remained stable in patients receiving ERT. In conclusion, agalsidase alfa is well tolerated in patients with Fabry disease who have undergone renal transplantation.

  15. Kidney Transplantation in the Diabetic Patient

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Sáez, María José; Pascual, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the most important causes of chronic kidney disease (CKD). In patients with advanced diabetic kidney disease, kidney transplantation (KT) with or without a pancreas transplant is the treatment of choice. We aimed to review current data regarding kidney and pancreas transplant options in patients with both type 1 and 2 diabetes and the outcomes of different treatment modalities. In general, pancreas transplantation is associated with long-term survival advantages despite an increased short-term morbidity and mortality risk. This applies to simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation or pancreas after KT compared to KT alone (either living donor or deceased). Other factors as living donor availability, comorbidities, and expected waiting time have to be considered whens electing one transplant modality, rather than a clear benefit in survival of one strategy vs. others. In selected type 2 diabetic patients, data support cautious utilization of simultaneous pancreas kidney transplantation when a living kidney donor is not an option. Pancreas and kidney transplantation seems to be the treatment of choice for most type 1 diabetic and selected type 2 diabetic patients. PMID:26239558

  16. Policy statement--pediatric organ donation and transplantation.

    PubMed

    2010-04-01

    Pediatric organ donation and organ transplantation can have a significant life-extending benefit to the young recipients of these organs and a high emotional impact on donor and recipient families. Pediatricians, pediatric medical specialists, and pediatric transplant surgeons need to be better acquainted with evolving national strategies that involve organ procurement and organ transplantation to help acquaint families with the benefits and risks of organ donation and transplantation. Efforts of pediatric professionals are needed to shape public policies to provide a system in which procurement, distribution, and cost are fair and equitable to children and adults. Major issues of concern are availability of and access to donor organs; oversight and control of the process; pediatric medical and surgical consultation and continued care throughout the organ-donation and transplantation process; ethical, social, financial, and follow-up issues; insurance-coverage issues; and public awareness of the need for organ donors of all ages.

  17. Central nervous system syndromes in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Wright, Alissa J; Fishman, Jay A

    2014-10-01

    Solid organ transplant recipients have a high incidence of central nervous system (CNS) complications, including both focal and diffuse neurologic deficits. In the immunocompromised host, the initial clinical evaluation must focus on both life-threatening CNS infections and vascular or anatomic lesions. The clinical signs and symptoms of CNS processes are modified by the immunosuppression required to prevent graft rejection. In this population, these etiologies often coexist with drug toxicities and metabolic abnormalities that complicate the development of a specific approach to clinical management. This review assesses the multiple risk factors for CNS processes in solid organ transplant recipients and establishes a timeline to assist in the evaluation and management of these complex patients.

  18. [The ethics of organ donation for transplantation].

    PubMed

    Fernandes, F V

    1994-01-01

    The new law 12/93, which regulates organ donation for transplantation in Portugal, is reviewed. The author emphasizes the importance of some legal improvements to allow a better fulfillment of the first principles of ethics that will rule the conflicts of interest between living and dead donors and recipients. Criticism is made of the interference that the Ministry of Health will have in the decision of doctors' and Medical Centres' competence. The importance given to economic reasons which stimulate political promotion and minimise ethical and professional reasons would become future factors of obstruction and backwardness.

  19. B Cell Immunity in Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karahan, Gonca E.; Claas, Frans H. J.; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2017-01-01

    The contribution of B cells to alloimmune responses is gradually being understood in more detail. We now know that B cells can perpetuate alloimmune responses in multiple ways: (i) differentiation into antibody-producing plasma cells; (ii) sustaining long-term humoral immune memory; (iii) serving as antigen-presenting cells; (iv) organizing the formation of tertiary lymphoid organs; and (v) secreting pro- as well as anti-inflammatory cytokines. The cross-talk between B cells and T cells in the course of immune responses forms the basis of these diverse functions. In the setting of organ transplantation, focus has gradually shifted from T cells to B cells, with an increased notion that B cells are more than mere precursors of antibody-producing plasma cells. In this review, we discuss the various roles of B cells in the generation of alloimmune responses beyond antibody production, as well as possibilities to specifically interfere with B cell activation. PMID:28119695

  20. [Organ transplantation and human dignity. Editorial].

    PubMed

    Bardenheuer, H J; Kupatt, C; Anselm, R

    1994-08-01

    Modern medicine has succeeded in achieving enormous technical developments. One recent highlight has been the introduction of postmortem organ transplantation. At the same time, serious objections have been raised concerning the radical changes in the cultural conception of the inviolable body. One major objection arises from the conflict of considering a brain-dead person as dead. The presence of brain death is a prerequisite for post-mortem organ donation, because only during this phase of dying does the individual quality as dead while the organs, other than the brain, remain viable. The objection implies scepticism as to the physician's ability to distinguish a dead from a living person. On the other hand, even the critics must rely on the physician's ability to discriminate, e.g., when to discontinue resuscitation. The medical community has not found reasons to restrict the definition of irreversible coma 25 years after its first formulation. It must be clearly recognised that reasons other than medical ones can be decisive for refusing organ donation. One ethical problem is the therapeutic benefit of organ transplantation. The beneficiary of the treatment is not the donor, but another person, the recipient. The concept of human dignity does not allow the use of a person for purposes other than the ones he/she consents to, as Immanual Kant stated. Although the human corpse is not a person in the full sense, even if it is protected by the thought of respect for the former person, the life-interest of the organ recipient had to be considered legitimate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  1. Neurocognitive functions in pediatric renal transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Gulleroglu, K; Baskin, E; Bayrakci, U S; Aydogan, M; Alehan, F; Kantar, A; Karakayali, F; Moray, G; Haberal, M

    2013-01-01

    Neurocognitive dysfunction is one of the major complications of chronic renal failure (CRF). Uremic state during CRF encompasses a wide spectrum of neurobehavioral and neurological disturbances. Recent studies showed that the pathophysiology of neurocognitive dysfunction in CRF is related to plasma levels of uremic solutes. Successful renal transplantation improves renal, metabolic, and endocrine functions and the quality of life. The aim of our study was to determine the state of neurocognitive function in pediatric renal transplant recipients. We prospectively performed a neurological examination and neuropsychological test battery (Bender-Gestalt Test, Cancellation Test, and Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test) in 20 pediatric renal transplant recipients between 6 and 16 years of age. Twenty healthy children and 20 children with CRF were included in the study as the control groups. Mean age of the renal transplant recipients was 13.50 ± 3.40 years old. Mean evaluation time after transplantation was 2.0 ± 0.5 years. Bender-Gestalt Test result was abnormal in 40% of patients. The results of the Cancellation Test and the Visual and Auditory Number Assay Test showed significant decline in pediatric renal transplant patients when compared with the control. We found that neurocognitive dysfunction was frequent in pediatric renal transplantation patients. Awareness of this potential problem may be helpful for early recognition and treatment. Our findings suggest that periodic neurocognitive assessments may be indicated in transplant recipients.

  2. Outcomes of Adult Patients With Congenital Heart Disease After Heart Transplantation: Impact of Disease Type, Previous Thoracic Surgeries, and Bystander Organ Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Matthew; Ginns, Jonathon; Schulze, Christian; Lippel, Matt; Chai, Paul; Bacha, Emile; Mancini, Donna; Rosenbaum, Marlon; Farr, Maryjane

    2016-07-01

    Adults with congenital heart disease (CHD) are at increased risk for adverse outcomes after heart transplantation (HT). However, small cohorts have constrained the identification of factors associated with poor prognosis. We hypothesized that number of sternotomies and bystander organ dysfunction would be associated with an increased risk for early death after HT. We performed a retrospective observational study of all adult CHD patients who underwent HT at our institution from January 1997 to January 2014. Forty-eight adult CHD patients were followed for a mean of 5 years. Diagnoses included tetralogy of Fallot/pulmonary atresia/double-outlet right ventricle in 15 (31%), D-transposition of the great arteries (TGA) in 10 (21%), tricuspid atresia/double-inlet left ventricle in 9 (19%), ventricular or atrial septal defect in 4 (8%), heterotaxy in 3 (6%), congenitally corrected TGA in 2 (4%), and other diagnoses in 5 (10%). Survival at both 1 and 5 years was 77%. According to multivariate analysis, ≥3 sternotomies (hazard ratio [HR] 8.5; P = .02) and Model for End-Stage Liver Disease Excluding International Normalized Ratio (MELD-XI) score >18 (HR 6.2; P = .01) were significant predictors of mortality. Failed Fontan surgery was not a significant predictor of death (P = .19). In our cohort of adult CHD patients undergoing HT, ≥3 sternotomies and MELD-XI score >18 were significantly associated with death. These findings may be important in patient selection and decision regarding tolerable number of CHD surgeries before considering HT. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Catheter ablation of organized atrial arrhythmias in orthotopic heart transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mouhoub, Yamina; Laredo, Mikael; Varnous, Shaida; Leprince, Pascal; Waintraub, Xavier; Gandjbakhch, Estelle; Hébert, Jean-Louis; Frank, Robert; Maupain, Carole; Pavie, Alain; Hidden-Lucet, Françoise; Duthoit, Guillaume

    2017-07-21

    Organized atrial arrhythmias (OAAs) are common after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). Some controversies remain about their clinical presentation, relationship with atrial anastomosis and electrophysiologic features. The objectives of this retrospective study were to determine the mechanisms of OAAs after OHT and describe the outcomes of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA). Thirty consecutive transplanted patients (mean age 48 ± 17 years, 86.6% male) underwent 3-dimensional electroanatomic mapping and RFCA of their OAA from 2004 to 2012 at our center. Twenty-two patients had biatrial anastomosis and 8 had bicaval anastomosis. Macro-reentry was the arrhythmia mechanism for 96% of patients. The electrophysiologic diagnoses were: cavotricuspid isthmus (CTI)-dependent atrial flutter (AFL) in 93% of patients (n = 28); perimitral AFL in 3% (n = 1); and focal atrial tachycardia (FAT) in 3% (n = 1). In 5 patients with biatrial anastomosis, a right FAT was inducible. Primary RFCA success was obtained in 93% of patients. Mean follow-up time was 39 ± 26.8 months. Electrical repermeation between recipient and donor atria, present in 20% of patients (n = 6), did not account for any of the OAAs observed. Survival without OAA relapse at 12, 24 and 60 months was 93%, 89% and 79%, respectively. CTI-dependent AFL accounted for most instances of OAA after OHT, regardless of anastomosis type. Time from transplantation to OAA was shorter with bicaval than with biatrial anastomosis. RFCA was safe and provided good long-term results. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Risk factors of post renal transplant anaemia among Sudanese patients, a study in three renal transplant centres

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background There is a relative lack of recent information about late post kidney transplantation anaemia (PTA), especially in the developing countries; data are scarce about the prevalence and risk factors of PTA. Sudan was a leading country in Africa and Arab world in kidney transplantation. The first kidney transplantation in Sudan was in 1973. Methods This is a cross-sectional hospital analytic study enrolling all kidney transplanted recipients following in the transplant referral clinics at Ahmed Gassim, Selma and Ibn Sina Hospitals, Khartoum/Sudan, in the period from 1/8/2010 to 1/9/2010, clinical and laboratory data were obtained from 114 patients, anaemia was defined as Hb levels of < 13 g/dl for male patients and < 12 g/dl for female patients, exclusion criteria were pregnancy, below 18 years old patients, multiple organ transplantation, and patients with less than one year from the transplantation. Results The study showed that 39.5% of the patients were anaemic. Univariate analysis showed that late PTA is significantly associated with not using Erythropoietin (EPO) in the pre-transplant period (p = < 0.001), history of rejection (p = 0.003), longer time from transplantation (p = 0.015), and eGFR (p < 0.0001). Multivariate analysis showed that eGFR (p = < 0.001) and not use of EPO in the pre transplant period (p < 0.001) are strong predictors of PTA. The use of Angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/Angiotensin receptors blockers (ACEI/ARB), immunosuppressive treatments, presence or absence of co-morbidities, donor type and donor age are not significantly associated with late PTA. Conclusion The study concluded that late PTA is common and under recognized. Risk factors for late PTA include renal dysfunction, history of rejection, longer duration of transplantation and not using EPO in the pre-transplant period. Renal dysfunction and not using EPO in the pre-transplant period are major predictors of late PTA. PMID:21827693

  5. PTX3 Polymorphisms and Invasive Mold Infections After Solid Organ Transplant.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Agnieszka; Lecompte, T Doco; Bibert, Stephanie; Manuel, Oriol; Rüeger, Sina; Berger, Christoph; Boggian, Katia; Cusini, Alexia; Garzoni, Christian; Hirsch, Hans; Khanna, Nina; Mueller, Nicolas J; Meylan, Pascal R; Pascual, Manuel; van Delden, Christian; Bochud, Pierre-Yves

    2015-08-15

    Donor PTX3 polymorphisms were shown to influence the risk of invasive aspergillosis among hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Here, we show that PTX3 polymorphisms are independent risk factors for invasive mold infections among 1101 solid organ transplant recipients, thereby strengthening their role in mold infection pathogenesis and patients' risk stratification.

  6. Nutrition assessment in patients undergoing liver transplant

    PubMed Central

    Bakshi, Neha; Singh, Kalyani

    2014-01-01

    Liver transplantation (LT) is a major surgery performed on patients with end stage liver disease. Nutrition is an integral part of patient care, and protein-energy malnutrition is almost universally present in patients suffering from liver disease undergoing LT. Nutrition assessment of preliver transplant phase helps to make a good nutrition care plan for the patients. Nutrition status has been associated with various factors which are related to the success of liver transplant such as morbidity, mortality, and length of hospital stay. To assess the nutritional status of preliver transplant patients, combinations of nutrition assessment methods should be used like subjective global assessment, Anthropometry mid arm-muscle circumference, Bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) and handgrip strength. PMID:25316978

  7. Invasive Mold Infections in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Crabol, Yoann; Lortholary, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Invasive mold infections represent an increasing source of morbidity and mortality in solid organ transplant recipients. Whereas there is a large literature regarding invasive molds infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplants, data in solid organ transplants are scarcer. In this comprehensive review, we focused on invasive mold infection in the specific population of solid organ transplant. We highlighted epidemiology and specific risk factors for these infections and we assessed the main clinical and imaging findings by fungi and by type of solid organ transplant. Finally, we attempted to summarize the diagnostic strategy for detection of these fungi and tried to give an overview of the current prophylaxis treatments and outcomes of these infections in solid organ transplant recipients. PMID:25525551

  8. Applications of regenerative medicine in organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Aditya; Bansal, Ramta

    2015-01-01

    A worldwide shortage of organs for clinical implantation establishes the need to bring forward and test new technologies that will help in solving the problem. The concepts of regenerative medicine hold the potential for augmenting organ function or repairing damaged organ or allowing regeneration of deteriorated organs and tissue. Researchers are exploring possible regenerative medicine applications in organ transplantation so that coming together of the two fields can benefit each other. The present review discusses the strategies that are being implemented to regenerate or bio-engineer human organs for clinical purposes. It also highlights the limitations of the regenerative medicine that needs to be addressed to explore full potential of the field. A web-based research on MEDLINE was done using keywords “regenerative medicine,” “tissue-engineering,” “bio-engineered organs,” “decellularized scaffold” and “three-dimensional printing.” This review screened about 170 articles to get the desired knowledge update. PMID:26229352

  9. Cohort profile: the skin cancer after organ transplant study.

    PubMed

    Madeleine, Margaret M; Johnson, Lisa G; Daling, Janet R; Schwartz, Stephen M; Carter, Joseph J; Berg, Daniel; Nelson, Karen; Davis, Connie L; Galloway, Denise A

    2013-12-01

    The Skin Cancer after Organ Transplant (SCOT) study was designed to investigate the link between genus beta human papillomavirus (HPV) and squamous cell skin cancer (SCSC). We focused on a population receiving immunosuppressive therapy for extended periods, transplant patients, as they are at extremely high risk for developing SCSC. Two complementary projects were conducted in the Seattle area: (i) a retrospective cohort with interview data from 2004 recipients of renal or cardiac transplants between 1995 and 2010 and (ii) a prospective cohort with interview data from 328 people on the transplant waiting lists between 2009 and 2011. Within the retrospective cohort, we developed a nested case-control study (172 cases and 337 control subjects) to assess risk of SCSC associated with markers of HPV in SCSC tumour tissue and eyebrow hair bulb DNA (HPV genotypes) and blood (HPV antibodies). In the prospective cohort, 135 participants had a 1-year post-transplant visit and 71 completed a 2-year post-transplant visit. In both arms of the cohort, we collected samples to assess markers of HPV infection such as acquisition of new types, proportion positive for each type, persistence of types at consecutive visits and number of HPV types detected. In the prospective cohort, we will also examine these HPV markers in relation to levels of cell-mediated immunity. The goal of the SCOT study is to use the data we collected to gain a more complete understanding of the role of immune suppression in HPV kinetics and of genus beta HPV types in SCSC. For more information, please contact the principal investigator through the study website: http://www.fhcrc.org/science/phs/cerc/The_SCOT_Study.html.

  10. Skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients: advances in therapy and management: part II. Management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Zwald, Fiona O'Reilly; Brown, Marc

    2011-08-01

    The management of skin cancer in solid organ transplant recipients is a challenge to both the dermatologist and transplant physician. Part II of this continuing medical education review offers an approach to the management of this increasing problem. The importance of specialty dermatology clinics providing access to transplant patients, frequent skin cancer screening, patient education, and multidisciplinary care is discussed. The management of low risk squamous cell carcinoma with topical therapies, photodynamic therapy, systemic retinoids, and capecitabine is reviewed. Revision of immunosuppression in the management of high-risk patients is discussed in association with the potential role of sentinel lymph node biopsy for aggressive disease. Finally, management of in-transit and metastatic squamous cell carcinoma is reviewed, with a discussion of the role of more recent innovative therapies, including epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors in advanced squamous cell carcinoma in solid organ transplant recipients.

  11. Successful lung transplant from donor after cardiac death: a potential solution to shortage of thoracic organs.

    PubMed

    McKellar, Stephen H; Durham, Lucian A; Scott, John P; Cassivi, Stephen D

    2010-02-01

    Lung transplant is an effective treatment for patients with end-stage lung disease but is limited because of the shortage of acceptable donor organs. Organ donation after cardiac death is one possible solution to the organ shortage because it could expand the pool of potential donors beyond brain-dead and living donors. We report the preliminary experience of Mayo Clinic with donation after cardiac death, lung procurement, and transplant.

  12. Parents' quality of life and family functioning in pediatric organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Ryota; Kamibeppu, Kiyoko

    2015-01-01

    Solid organ transplantation is an important treatment option for pediatric patients in end-stage organ failure. The impact of pediatric organ transplantation on parents' quality of life and family functioning has been found to be substantial, but findings on this topic have not previously been consolidated. Thirty-one studies were selected for analysis after a database search on this topic. We present future research questions and suggestions to improve clinical practice based on the integration of this knowledge.

  13. Transplantation of organs from deceased donors with meningitis and encephalitis: a UK registry analysis.

    PubMed

    Trotter, Patrick B; Robb, Matthew; Hulme, William; Summers, Dominic M; Watson, Christopher J E; Bradley, J Andrew; Neuberger, James

    2016-12-01

    Deceased organ donors, where the cause of death is meningitis or encephalitis, are a potential concern because of the risks of transmission of a potentially fatal infection to recipients. Using the UK Transplant Registry, a retrospective cohort analysis of deceased organ donors in the UK was undertaken to better understand the extent to which organs from deceased donors with meningitis and/or encephalitis (M/E) (of both known and unknown cause) have been used for transplantation, and to determine the associated recipient outcomes. Between 2003 and 2015, 258 deceased donors with M/E were identified and the causative agent was known in 188 (72.9%). These donors provided 899 solid organs for transplantation (455 kidneys and 444 other organs). The only recorded case of disease transmission was from a donor with encephalitis of unknown cause at time of transplantation who transmitted a fatal nematode infection to 2 kidney transplant recipients. A further 3 patients (2 liver and 1 heart recipient) died within 30 days of transplantation from a neurological cause (cerebrovascular accident) with no suggestion of disease transmission. Overall, patient and graft survival in recipients of organs from donors with M/E were similar to those for all other types of deceased organ donor. Donors dying with M/E represent a valuable source of organs for transplantation. The risk of disease transmission is low but, where the causative agent is unknown, caution is required. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Rationing scarce organs for transplantation: healthcare provider perspectives on wait-listing and organ allocation.

    PubMed

    Tong, Allison; Jan, Stephen; Wong, Germaine; Craig, Jonathan C; Irving, Michelle; Chadban, Steven; Cass, Alan; Howard, Kirsten

    2013-01-01

    Ongoing debate about how to maximize the benefit of scarce organs while maintaining equity of access to transplantation exists. This study aims to synthesize healthcare provider perspectives on wait-listing and organ allocation. MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO were searched till February 21, 2011. Quantitative data were extracted, and a qualitative synthesis of the studies was conducted. Twenty studies involving 4254 respondents were included. We identified two goals underpinning healthcare provider preferences for organ allocation: (i) maximize clinical benefit (quality of life gains, patient survival, treatment adherence, and graft survival) and social outcomes (social support, productivity, and valuation); (ii) achieve equity (waiting time, patient preferences, access to live donation, and medical urgency). Maximizing clinical or social outcomes meant organs would be preferentially given to patients expected to achieve good transplant outcomes or wider social gain. Achieving equity meant all patients should have an equal chance of transplant, or patients deemed more urgent receive higher priority. A tension between equity and efficiency is apparent. Balanced against dimensions of efficiency were considerations to instill a degree of perceived fairness in organ allocation. Ongoing engagement with stakeholders is needed to enhance transparency, a reasonable balance between efficiency and equity, and avoid discrimination against specific populations.

  15. Current Antioxidant Treatments in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Shaojun; Xue, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is one of the key mechanisms affecting the outcome throughout the course of organ transplantation. It is widely believed that the redox balance is dysregulated during ischemia and reperfusion (I/R) and causes subsequent oxidative injury, resulting from the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Moreover, in order to alleviate organ shortage, increasing number of grafts is retrieved from fatty, older, and even non-heart-beating donors that are particularly vulnerable to the accumulation of ROS. To improve the viability of grafts and reduce the risk of posttransplant dysfunction, a large number of studies have been done focusing on the antioxidant treatments for the purpose of maintaining the redox balance and thereby protecting the grafts. This review provides an overview of these emerging antioxidant treatments, targeting donor, graft preservation, and recipient as well. PMID:27403232

  16. Angiography of Liver Transplantation Patients 1

    PubMed Central

    Zajko, Albert B.; Bron, Klaus M.; Starzl, Thomas E.; Van Thiel, David H.; Gartner, J. Carlton; Iwatsuki, Shunzaburo; Shaw, Byers W.; Zitelli, Basil J.; Malatack, J. Jeffrey; Urbach, Andrew H.

    2010-01-01

    Over 45 months, 119 angiographic examinations were performed in 95 patients prior to liver transplantation, and 53 examinations in 44 patients after transplantation. Transplantation feasibility was influenced by patency of the portal vein and inferior vena cava. Selective arterial portography, wedged hepatic venography, and transhepatic portography were used to assess the portal vein if sonography or computed tomography was inconclusive. Major indications for angiography after transplantation included early liver failure, sepsis, unexplained elevation of liver enzyme levels, and delayed bile leakage, all of which may be due to hepatic artery thrombosis. Other indications included gastrointestinal tract bleeding, hemobilia, and evaluation of portal vein patency in patients with chronic rejection who were being considered for retransplantation. Normal radiographic features of hepatic artery and portal vein reconstruction are demonstrated. Complications diagnosed using results of angiography included hepatic artery or portal vein stenoses and thromboses and pancreaticoduodenal aneurysms. Intrahepatic arterial narrowing, attenuation, slow flow, and poor filling were seen in five patients with rejection PMID:3901102

  17. Clinical Outcome of Patients Transplanted with Marginal Donor Lungs via Ex Vivo Lung Perfusion Compared to Standard Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fildes, James E; Archer, Louise D; Blaikley, John; Ball, Alexandra L; Stone, John P; Sjöberg, Trygve; Steen, Stig; Yonan, Nizar

    2015-05-01

    Lung transplantation is limited by a scarcity of suitable donors resulting in high waiting list mortality. Ex vivo lung perfusion (EVLP) allows the evaluation and reconditioning of marginal donor lungs for use in transplantation. This study aimed to compare clinical outcome of patients transplanted with marginal organs by means of EVLP with a standard lung transplant cohort through a multicenter open trial. Group 1 (n = 9) included patients transplanted using EVLP reconditioned marginal lungs. Group 2 (n = 46) consisted of date-matched patients transplanted using standard transplantation of acceptable lungs. The primary composite endpoint included acute rejection and infection at 12 months after transplantation. There was no significant difference in the overall incidence of acute rejection (P = 0.754) and the number of treated infection episodes (proven/probable pneumonia; P = 0.857/0.368 and proven/probable tracheobronchitis; P = 0.226/0.529) up to 12 months after transplantation, between group 1 and group 2. Additionally, there was no significant difference in early clinical outcome, including intensive care unit stay, hospital stay, and 1 year mortality between the two groups (P = 0.338, P = 0.112 and P = 0.372, respectively). This multicenter study demonstrates that EVLP is associated with no adverse effect on clinical outcome, including the incidence of acute rejection and infection after lung transplantation.

  18. What's new and hot in clinical organ transplantation: report from American Transplant Congress 2012.

    PubMed

    Humar, A

    2013-02-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2012. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered with important advancements in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, organ preservation, optimal allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody mediated rejection and the regulatory environment. This review will highlight some of the most interesting and innovative clinical presentations from the meeting.

  19. Transition from Hospital to Home Following Pediatric Solid Organ Transplant: Qualitative Findings of Parent Experience

    PubMed Central

    Lerret, Stacee M.; Weiss, Marianne E; Stendahl, Gail; Chapman, Shelley; Neighbors, Katie; Amsden, Katie; Lokar, Joan; Voit, Ashley; Menendez, Jerome; Alonso, Estella M

    2014-01-01

    Transplant providers are challenged to determine appropriate interventions for patients and families due to limited published research regarding the context of the post-discharge experience from the perspective of parents of transplanted children. The purpose of this study is to describe the parent perspective of the transition from hospital to home following their child’s solid organ transplant. Within a mixed-methods design, 37 parents of pediatric heart, kidney and liver transplant recipients from three pediatric hospitals responded to qualitative interview questions on the day of hospital discharge and three weeks following hospital discharge. Insight to the discharge preparation process revealed necessary education components. Post-discharge themes were identified for coping, knowledge and adherence. The parents’ responses provide awareness as to specific stressors and concerns parents are faced with when their child is discharged from the hospital after solid organ transplant and opportunities for ways the transplant team can provide support. PMID:24814154

  20. Gastrointestinal complications in heart transplant patients: MITOS study.

    PubMed

    Díaz, B; González Vilchez, F; Almenar, L; Delgado, J F; Manito, N; Paniagua, M J; Crespo, M G; Kaplinsky, E; Pascual, D A; Fernández-Yáñez, J; Mirabet, S; Palomo, J

    2007-09-01

    The most frequent immunosuppressive treatment complications in solid organ transplant recipients are gastrointestinal (GI) disorders. An observational, cross-sectional study to evaluate the prevalence and management of GI complications in transplanted patients was conducted via a written questionnaire given to doctors at their practice. This study included 1788 patients; 181 corresponded to heart transplant recipients. The mean age for the heart transplant patients was 58.7 +/- 11.8 years. The mean time from the transplantation was 5.2 +/- 4.4 years. GI complications were seen in 38.7% of cases. Regarding the clinical management, in 72.9% of cases patients with GI complications received pharmacologic treatment, 86.3% with gastric protectors, 32.8% reduced the dose of some drug, 8.1% interrupted the drug temporarily, and 10.9% discontinued the drug permanently. The drug that was always discontinued was mycophenolate mofetil (MMF), and in 85.7% of cases in which the dose of an immunosuppressive drug was reduced, the reduced drug was also MMF. Almost 40% of heart transplant recipients suffered GI complications which affected daily activities in most cases. The most used strategy to manage these complications was based on a treatment with gastric protectors together with dose reduction and/or partial or definitive MMF discontinuation.

  1. Everolimus and Malignancy after Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Update.

    PubMed

    Holdaas, Hallvard; De Simone, Paolo; Zuckermann, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Malignancy after solid organ transplantation remains a major cause of posttransplant mortality. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor class of immunosuppressants exerts various antioncogenic effects, and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is licensed for the treatment of several solid cancers. In kidney transplantation, evidence from registry studies indicates a lower rate of de novo malignancy under mTOR inhibition, with some potentially supportive data from randomized trials of everolimus. Case reports and small single-center series have suggested that switch to everolimus may be beneficial following diagnosis of posttransplant malignancy, particularly for Kaposi's sarcoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer, but prospective studies are lacking. A systematic review has shown mTOR inhibition to be associated with a significantly lower rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence versus standard calcineurin inhibitor therapy. One meta-analysis has concluded that patients with nontransplant HCC experience a low but significant survival benefit under everolimus monotherapy, so far unconfirmed in a transplant population. Data are limited in heart transplantation, although observational data and case reports have indicated that introduction of everolimus is helpful in reducing the recurrence of skin cancers. Overall, it can be concluded that, in certain settings, everolimus appears a promising option to lessen the toll of posttransplant malignancy.

  2. Everolimus and Malignancy after Solid Organ Transplantation: A Clinical Update

    PubMed Central

    De Simone, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Malignancy after solid organ transplantation remains a major cause of posttransplant mortality. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitor class of immunosuppressants exerts various antioncogenic effects, and the mTOR inhibitor everolimus is licensed for the treatment of several solid cancers. In kidney transplantation, evidence from registry studies indicates a lower rate of de novo malignancy under mTOR inhibition, with some potentially supportive data from randomized trials of everolimus. Case reports and small single-center series have suggested that switch to everolimus may be beneficial following diagnosis of posttransplant malignancy, particularly for Kaposi's sarcoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer, but prospective studies are lacking. A systematic review has shown mTOR inhibition to be associated with a significantly lower rate of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence versus standard calcineurin inhibitor therapy. One meta-analysis has concluded that patients with nontransplant HCC experience a low but significant survival benefit under everolimus monotherapy, so far unconfirmed in a transplant population. Data are limited in heart transplantation, although observational data and case reports have indicated that introduction of everolimus is helpful in reducing the recurrence of skin cancers. Overall, it can be concluded that, in certain settings, everolimus appears a promising option to lessen the toll of posttransplant malignancy. PMID:27807479

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in Organ Transplant Recipients: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Davydow, Dimitry S.; Lease, Erika D.; Reyes, Jorge D.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To summarize and critically review the existing literature on the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) following organ transplantation, risk factors for post-transplantation PTSD and the relationship of post-transplant PTSD to other clinical outcomes including health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and mortality. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review using PubMed, CINAHL Plus, the Cochrane Library, PsycInfo and a search of the online contents of 18 journals. Results Twenty-three studies were included. Post-transplant, the point prevalence of clinician-ascertained PTSD ranged from 1% to 16% (n = 738), the point prevalence of questionnaire-assessed substantial PTSD symptoms ranged from 0% to 46% (n = 1,024), and the cumulative incidence of clinician-ascertained transplant-specific PTSD ranged from 10% to 17% (n = 482). Consistent predictors of post-transplant PTSD included history of psychiatric illness prior to transplantation and poor social support post-transplantation. Post-transplant PTSD was consistently associated with worse mental HRQOL and potentially associated with worse physical HRQOL. Conclusions PTSD may impact a substantial proportion of organ transplant recipients. Future studies should focus on transplant-specific PTSD, and clarify potential risk factors for, and adverse outcomes related to, post-transplant PTSD. PMID:26073159

  4. Liver transplantation in patients with situs inversus

    PubMed Central

    Todo, Satoru; Hall, Roberta; Tzakis, Andreas; Starzl, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Two patients with situs inversus and biliary atresia were treated with hepatic transplantation, one with an auxiliary liver and the other with an orthotopic graft which was placed using a piggy-back technique. Both transplants functioned well initially. The auxiliary liver was rejected after 1 ½ months, and the patient died after an attempt at retransplantation many months later. The recipient of the orthotopic liver has perfect liver function 10 months postoperatively. PMID:10147625

  5. Long-term dietary habits and interventions in solid-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Zeltzer, Stuart M; Taylor, David O; Tang, W H Wilson

    2015-11-01

    Diet and nutrition are moving to the forefront of modern primary and preventive care to help address the rising burden of chronic diseases among the general population. Such a movement has yet to occur formally across the field of transplantation. We therefore looked to establish the current base of knowledge regarding diet, nutrition and solid-organ transplantation. A limited number of focused studies looking into the dietary habits of solid-organ transplant patients have been performed and many of the available studies have detailed the nutritional status in the peri-operative period. Frequently described, however, is the heavy incidence of metabolic abnormalities, such as obesity, dyslipidemia and diabetes, occurring after solid-organ transplantation. Optimistically, several studies have noted improvement in several metabolic abnormalities with the use of dietary interventions in the post-transplant period. Despite these positive results, few consensus guidelines for post-transplant diet have been established and nutritional support among transplant programs remains limited. Although there are many hurdles to implementation of detailed dietary recommendations and nutritional support for transplant patients, creating such programs and guidelines could dramatically impact long-term outcomes and burden of chronic metabolic disease for transplant recipients.

  6. Are informed consent forms for organ transplantation and donation too difficult to read?

    PubMed

    Gordon, Elisa J; Bergeron, Ashley; McNatt, Gwen; Friedewald, John; Abecassis, Michael M; Wolf, Michael S

    2012-01-01

    Informed consent for organ transplantation and donation is an ethical obligation, legally required, and considered as part of the Patient's Rights Condition of Medicare Participation for hospitals. National policy-makers recommend that informed consent forms and patient education materials be written at a low reading level (5th-8th grade level) to facilitate patient comprehension. We assessed reading levels of informed consent forms (CFs) for adult organ transplant recipients and living organ donors across US transplant centers. CFs were analyzed using three measures of reading level: Lexile Measure, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level, and the Gunning Fog Index. Of active transplant centers contacted (N=209), 75 (36%) sent a total of 332 CFs. CFs were written, on average, at the college level, which is a considerably higher reading level than the standards set by policy-makers. CF reading levels were negatively correlated with transplant center volume (r=-0.119; p<0.03). CFs for intestine transplantation and for evaluation/listing were the easiest to read, while consent forms for liver transplantation/donation and pre-transplant agreements were the most difficult to read. Reducing CFs' reading level may help to increase patient comprehension for adequate informed consent. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Role of patient-support groups in the Thailand transplant program.

    PubMed

    Luvira, U; Supaporn, T

    2004-09-01

    Thailand started kidney transplantation in 1972 when vascular and nonvascular transplant programs were first established. Presently, we have 27 kidney, 6 liver, and 6 intrathoracic private or governmental transplantation centers, all approved and members of the Organ Donation Centres Thai Red Cross Society (ODC). They also provide organ procurement teams to the ODC. The Thai Medical Council has issued and supervised the criterion of brain death and ethical rules of transplantation to all practicing physicians since 1989. All recipients must register at these selected transplantation centers and at the ODC. When the potential donor arrives from any hospital in Thailand, the donor hospital notifies the ODC and organ procurement teams are sent out to harvest organs and transfer them to the recipient transplantation centers. The ODC computerizes and shares organs according to ABO, HLA typing, and crossmatching results. After transplantation all patients register with the Thai Transplantation Society (TTS) and the ODC. The TTS, the Thai Transplant Coordinator Society, and the ODC are responsible for the education of surgeons, physicians, nurses, patients, the public, and mass media to improve our transplant program. Bone marrow transplantation has separate regulations. Pooled, nonrelated bone marrow donors are registered at the blood-bank of the Thai Red Cross Society to provide donors for bone marrow transplantation. Financially, government support recipients only if they are state enterprise workers or civil servants. Public fund support through the ODC for organ procurement and the Kidney Foundation of Thailand is available for kidney transplantation. The ODC and the transplantation centers are the main patient-support groups for transplant programs in Thailand.

  8. Ethical perspectives on living donor organ transplantation in Asia.

    PubMed

    Concejero, Allan M; Chen, Chao-Long

    2009-12-01

    Live donors are a continuing source of organ grafts for solid organ transplantation in Asia. Ethical issues surrounding the development of living donor organ transplantation in Eastern countries are different from those in Western countries. Donor safety is still the paramount concern in any donor operation. Issues on organ trafficking remain societal concerns in low-income nations. Religion, cultural background, economic prerogatives, and timely legislation contribute to the social acceptance and maturation of organ donation.

  9. Retrieval of the pancreas allograft for whole-organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fridell, Jonathan A; Powelson, John A; Kubal, Chandrashekhar A; Burke, George W; Sageshima, Junichiro; Rogers, Jeffrey; Stratta, Robert J

    2014-12-01

    Proper pancreas retrieval during multi-organ recovery is one of the cornerstones of technically successful whole-organ pancreas transplantation. With evolving surgical approaches for organ retrieval and implantation, it has become standard to procure the pancreas in conjunction with other abdominal organs without compromising either vasculature, graft quality, or transplant outcomes. This review summarizes the major steps required for proper whole-organ retrieval of the pancreas allograft with suggestions and tips whenever alternative approaches are available.

  10. Lung transplant or bust: patients' recommendations for ideal lung transplant education.

    PubMed

    Davis, LaShara A; Ryszkiewicz, Eric; Schenk, Emily; Peipert, John; LaSee, Claire; Miller, Carol; Richardson, Greg; Ridolfi, Gene; Trulock, Elbert P; Patterson, G Alexander; Waterman, Amy

    2014-06-01

    Effective lung transplant education helps ensure informed decision making by patients and better transplant outcomes. To understand the educational needs and experiences of lung transplant patients. Mixed-method study employing focus groups and patient surveys. Barnes-Jewish Hospital in St Louis, Missouri. 50 adult lung transplant patients: 23 pretransplant and 27 posttransplant. Patients' interest in receiving specific transplant information, the stage in the transplant process during which they wanted to receive the education, and the preferred format for presenting the information. Patients most wanted information about how to sustain their transplant (72%), when to contact their coordinator immediately (56%), transplant benefits (56%), immunosuppressants (54%), and possible out-of-pocket expenses (52%). Patients also wanted comprehensive information early in the transplant process and a review of a subset of topics immediately before transplant (time between getting the call that a potential donor has been found and getting the transplant). Patients reported that they would use Internet resources (74%) and converse with transplant professionals (68%) and recipients (62%) most often. Lung transplant patients are focused on learning how to get a transplant and ensuring its success afterwards. A comprehensive overview of the evaluation, surgery, and recovery process at evaluation onset with a review of content about medications, pain management, and transplant recovery repeated immediately before surgery is ideal.

  11. Realization of the sixth modification of guidelines for organ placement in renal transplantation-a single-center experience.

    PubMed

    Dreihaupt, M; Ott, U; Wolf, G; Schubert, J; Steiner, T

    2006-04-01

    Because of the recommendation of the standing commission on organ transplantation, the Board of Bundesärztekammer agreed to a modification of the guidelines for organ transplantation under section 16 of the transplantation law regarding organs from extended donors who have grave diseases. In our case all patients on our waiting list were contacted to be informed about the guideline changes. Only 6 of 322 patients (1.9%) on our waiting list who were transplantable agreed to allow organ placement from a donor with extended criteria.

  12. Cryptococcosis in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Henao-Martínez, Andrés F; Beckham, John David

    2015-08-01

    Cryptococcosis among solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients is a source of significant morbidity. Its pathogenesis, the etiology of immune reconstitution syndrome, and the optimal therapy in this setting are still not well defined. Herein, we review the epidemiology, the latest findings on pathogenesis, unique clinical manifestations, and the treatment of Cryptococcosis in this specific vulnerable population. Cryptococcosis is a common fungal complication among SOT recipients. It follows in frequency only to aspergillosis and candidiasis. Cryptococcal infection carries a high mortality, up to 27% during the first year posttransplantation. Host factors, environmental factors, medications, and the type of transplant all play a role in the clinical presentation and severity of infection. Clinical manifestations can be atypical among SOT recipients, and therefore, clinical suspicion and diagnostic evaluation must consider cryptococcal central nervous system disease. During meningitis treatment, measurement of Flucytosine levels is recommended to increase safety and optimize the therapeutic effect. Cryptococcosis among SOT recipients is an evolving field. Increased recognition and understanding of the disease pathogenesis, its uncommon clinical manifestations, complications and particular therapeutic strategies are the cornerstone for the optimal outcome of this often fatal condition.

  13. Management strategies for cytomegalovirus infection and disease in solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Razonable, Raymund R

    2013-06-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most common viral pathogen that affects solid organ transplant recipients. It directly causes fever, myelosuppression, and tissue-invasive disease, and indirectly, it negatively impacts allograft and patient survival. Nucleic acid amplification testing is the preferred method to confirm the diagnosis of CMV infection. Prevention of CMV disease using antiviral prophylaxis or preemptive therapy is critical in the management of transplant patients. Intravenous ganciclovir and oral valganciclovir are the first line drugs for antiviral treatment. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current epidemiology, diagnosis, prevention and treatment of CMV infection in solid organ transplant recipients.

  14. Treatment with sirolimus ameliorates tacrolimus-induced autoimmune cytopenias after solid organ transplant.

    PubMed

    Teachey, David T; Jubelirer, Tracey; Baluarte, H Jorge; Wade, Amanda; Manno, Catherine S

    2009-12-01

    The development of autoimmune blood cell cytopenias is a potentially life-threatening complication of solid organ transplantation, resulting from T-cell dysregulation from immunosuppressive medications. Conventional treatment with corticosteroids and IVIgG is often unsuccessful as these therapies are unlikely to overcome the T-cell dysregulation. We describe two patients who developed severe autoimmune cytopenias after solid organ transplantation. They had limited response to conventional medications, but had complete resolution of autoimmunity upon transition of immunosuppression from tacrolimus to sirolimus. Altering the immunosuppressive regimen to modify T-cell dysregulation may be beneficial for patients who develop post-transplant autoimmune disease and allow continued preservation of allograft.

  15. Prevention of infection in adult travelers after solid organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kotton, Camille Nelson; Ryan, Edward T; Fishman, Jay A

    2005-01-01

    Increasing numbers of solid organ transplant recipients are traveling to the developing world. Many of these individuals either do not seek or do not receive optimal medical care prior to travel. This review considers risks of international travel to adult solid organ transplant recipients and the use of vaccines and prophylactic agents in this population.

  16. 42 CFR 121.12 - Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Advisory Committee on Organ Transplantation. 121.12 Section 121.12 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES HEALTH RESOURCES DEVELOPMENT ORGAN PROCUREMENT AND TRANSPLANTATION NETWORK § 121.12 Advisory Committee on...

  17. Opportunities and challenges of expanded criteria organs in liver and kidney transplantation as a response to organ shortage.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Harvey

    2011-01-01

    In 1989, there were 19,000 patients on the UNOS (United Network of Organ Sharing) wait list for organs compared to 110,000 today. Without an equivalent increase in donors, the patients awaiting these organs for transplant face increasing severity of illness and risk of dying without receiving a transplant. This disparity in supply and demand has led to acceptance of organs with lower than expected success rates compared to previous standard donors variously defined as extended criteria donors in order to increase transplantation. The reluctance to wider use of these types of organs is based on the less than expected transplant center graft and patient survival results associated with their use, as well as the increased resources required to care for the patients who receive these organs. The benefits need to be compared to the survival of not receiving a transplant and remaining on the waiting list rather than on outcomes of receiving a standard donor. A lack of a systematic risk outcomes adjustment is one of the most important factors preventing more extensive utilization as transplant centers are held to patient and graft survival statistics as a performance measure by multiple regulatory organizations and insurers. Newer classification systems of such donors may allow a more systematic approach to analyzing the specific risks to individualized patients. Due to changes in donor policies across the country, there has been an increase in Extended Criteria Donors (ECD) organs procured by organ procurement organizations (OPO) but their uneven acceptance by the transplant centers has contributed to an increase in discards and organs not being used. This is one of the reasons that wider sharing of organs is currently receiving much attention. Transplanting ECD organs presents unique challenges and innovative approaches to achieve satisfactory results. Improved logistics and information technology combined strategies for improving donor quality with may prevent discards

  18. Cost of organ procurement and transplantation network data collection for a large transplant center.

    PubMed

    Roberts, John P; Nikolai, Bev; Tomlanovich, Steve

    2003-10-01

    Collection of data on transplant candidates and recipients for the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network (OPTN) and the Scientific Registry of Transplant Recipients (SRTR) is a burden that falls primarily on the transplant centers. We examined the cost of data collection at one large transplant center. The average number of forms per year submitted more than 3 years was 5245. For the 3 years, 2.46 full time equivalents (FTEs) were committed to this data collection. Annual salaries in addition to benefits (calculated at 22% of salary) for these FTEs were US dollars 143026.22. The calculated annual cost per form submitted amounted to US dollars 27.27. Collection of data on transplant candidates and recipients is expensive and the cost of data collection should be understood before the institution of new data collection requirements for the transplant centers.

  19. Prospects of using organs and cells from pigs for transplantation into humans.

    PubMed

    Groth, Carl G

    2007-02-01

    Once pig organs can be transplanted into humans, transplantation will move into a new era. There will be unlimited access to undamaged organs, and cells for transplantation and, eventually, donation from deceased or live human beings will become obsolete. Furthermore, it will be possible to alleviate graft rejection, at least in part, by genetic modification of the source animal. Currently, there are three major obstacles to performing transplantations from pig to man: a powerful immune barrier, a potential risk of transmitting microorganisms, particularly endogenous retrovirus, and ethical issues related to the future recipients and to society at large. This article will first discuss the ongoing work with regards to overcoming the current obstacles. Also, the many potential advantages of using pig organs will be discussed in some detail. Furthermore, lessons learned from attempts at transplanting porcine cells to patients will be reviewed.

  20. Pregnancy in Women With Solid-Organ Transplants: A Review.

    PubMed

    Durst, Jennifer K; Rampersad, Roxane M

    2015-06-01

    Advances in solid-organ transplantation have allowed many women to reach reproductive potential, and pregnancy is no longer a rarity for these women. To identify (1) potential complications to allograft function posed by pregnancy, (2) expected perinatal outcomes in women with solid-organ transplants, (3) risks of potential immunosuppressant regimens, (4) safety of lactation, and (5) contraceptive options for women with solid-organ transplants. Single-center, registry data, and previous systematic reviews were evaluated in women with solid-organ transplants to identify the objectives of this review. In addition, recommendations from public health organizations were examined in regard to safety of medications and contraceptive methods. Women with solid-organ transplants are at risk for premature birth, low birth weight, cesarean delivery, and hypertensive disorders of pregnancy. Most immunosuppressant regimens are safe; however, mycophenolate mofetil should be avoided. Lactation with tacrolimus, cyclosporine, azathioprine, and prednisone appears safe. Long-acting reversible contraceptive methods are safe and effective for transplant recipients. Many successful pregnancies have been achieved in women following transplantation; however, optimal perinatal outcomes require stable allograft function. As more women are becoming pregnant after organ transplantation, a review of obstetric recommendations and perinatal outcome is warranted.

  1. [Patients' knowledge of the risk of skin cancer following kidney transplantation].

    PubMed

    Cramer, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Knud; Jemec, Gregor B E

    2009-11-09

    Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) increases the rate of morbidity and mortality in kidney transplant patients. Studies have shown that kidney transplanted patients have at least a 3-4-fold increased risk of cancers. Organ-transplanted (OT) patients therefore constitute a known and growing risk population. Careful information of the patient and prophylactic measures are thus strongly indicated. A questionnaire was sent to 110 kidney-transplanted patients in Region Sjaelland, Denmark. Patients were identified through Nephrology Departments. A total of 75 patients responded. The object of the questionnaire was to describe the level of information among the patients and the scope and frequency of any skin examination they underwent following transplantation. Responders did not differ from non-responders regarding gender and age. Among the responders, 22 (29%) had received oral information prior to transplantation and 38 (51%) after transplantation. A total of nine (12%) patients had received written information prior to transplantation and 18 (24%) after. In all, 39 (53%) were well-informed on their increased risk of NMSC. Only four patients (5%) had their skin and lymph nodes examined at follow-up visits by the physician responsible for the proper functioning of the transplant. This study shows that kidney transplanted patients do not receive adequate information about increased risk of skin cancer and the necessity of photoprotection. Furthermore, the rate of examination by a dermatologist is very low. Both parameters could be improved by a structured plan for patient information and follow-up visits.

  2. The roles of a bioethicist on an organ transplantation service.

    PubMed

    Wright, Linda; Ross, Kelley; Daar, Abdallah S

    2005-04-01

    Organ transplantation centers have expanded and increased in the last 20 years as transplant recipient outcomes have improved steadily and transplantation has moved from experimentation to treatment of choice for several indications. Transplantation presents difficult ethical and legal challenges for the transplant community and society. These include declarations of death, consent to donation and allocation of a scarce societal resource, i.e. transplantable organs. Policy and practice reflect the law, societal beliefs and prevailing values. A bioethicist contributes to a transplant team by clarifying values held by various stakeholders or embodied in decisions and policies, conducting clinical consultations, developing and interpreting policy and researching the ethics of innovations for rationing and increasing available supply of organs for transplantation. The bioethicist's interdisciplinary education, preparation, experience and familiarity with ethics, law, sociology and philosophy and skills of mediation, communication and ethical analysis contribute to addressing and resolving many issues in transplantation. This paper outlines the various roles of a bioethicist on a transplantation service, using case examples to illustrate some of the ethical issues.

  3. [Chronic rejection: Differences and similarities in various solid organ transplants].

    PubMed

    Suhling, H; Gottlieb, J; Bara, C; Taubert, R; Jäckel, E; Schiffer, M; Bräsen, J H

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, chronic rejections after transplantation of the lungs, heart, liver, and kidney are described. Chronic allograft dysfunction (CAD) plays an important role in all of these transplantations and has a significant influence on patient survival. The pathophysiological reasons for CAD varies greatly in the various organs.Chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD) is the most important determinant of survival and quality of life after lung transplantation. Diagnosis is based on lung function, especially forced expiratory flow in 1 s (FEV1) decline. Prevention, early detection, and rapid treatment are extremely important. Azithromycin and extracorporeal photopheresis are commonly used for treatment because they usually positively influence the progression of lung remodeling.The expression for chronic rejection of the heart is cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV). Immunological and nonimmunological factors are important for its development. Due to limited therapeutic options, prevention is of utmost importance (administration of mTOR inhibitors and minimizing cardiovascular risk factors).The mid- and long-term survival rates after liver transplantation have hardly changed in recent decades, which is an indication of the difficulty in diagnosing chronic graft dysfunction. Chronic ductopenic rejection accounts for a small proportion of late graft dysfunction. Idiopathic posttransplant hepatitis and de novo autoimmune hepatitis are important in addition to recurrence of the underlying disease that led to transplantation.Chronic allograft nephropathy is the result of severe rejection which cumulates in increasing fibrosis with remodeling. The earliest possible diagnosis and therapy is currently the only option. Diagnosis is based on evidence of donor-specific antibodies and histological findings.

  4. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in solid organ transplant recipients: a retrospective, multicenter study of the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Labopin, M; Schoemans, H; Ljungman, P; Kobbe, G; Beguin, Y; Lang, P; Koenecke, C; Sykora, K W; Te Boome, L; van Biezen, A; van der Werf, S; Mohty, M; de Witte, T; Marsh, J; Dreger, P; Kröger, N; Duarte, R; Ruutu, T

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a questionnaire survey of the 565 European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers to analyze the outcome of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) in recipients of solid organ transplantation (SOT). We investigated 28 patients with malignant (N = 22) or nonmalignant diseases (N = 6), who underwent 31 alloSCT procedures: 12 after kidney, 13 after liver and 3 after heart transplantation. The incidence of solid organ graft failure at 60 months after first alloSCT was 33% (95% confidence interval [CI], 16-51%) for all patients, 15% (95% CI, 2-40%) for liver recipients and 50% (95% CI, 19-75%) for kidney recipients (p = 0.06). The relapse rate after alloSCT (22%) was low following transplantation for malignant disorders, despite advanced stages of malignancy. Overall survival at 60 months after first alloSCT was 40% (95% CI, 19-60%) for all patients, 51% (95% CI, 16-86%) for liver recipients and 42% (95% CI, 14-70%) for kidney recipients (p = 0.39). In summary, we show that selected SOT recipients suffering from hematologic disorders may benefit from alloSCT and experience enhanced long-term survival without loss of organ function.

  5. Respiratory infections in patients with cystic fibrosis undergoing lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lobo, Leonard J; Noone, Peadar G

    2014-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis is an inherited disease characterised by chronic respiratory infections associated with bronchiectasis. Lung transplantation has helped to extend the lives of patients with cystic fibrosis who have advanced lung disease. However, persistent, recurrent, and newly acquired infections can be problematic. Classic cystic fibrosis-associated organisms, such as Staphylococcus aureus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, are generally manageable post-transplantation, and are associated with favourable outcomes. Burkholderia cenocepacia poses particular challenges, although other Burkholderia species are less problematic. Despite concerns about non-tuberculous mycobacteria, especially Mycobacterium abscessus, post-transplantation survival has not been definitively shown to be less than average in patients with these infections. Fungal species can be prevalent before and after transplantation and are associated with high morbidity, so should be treated aggressively. Appropriate viral screening and antiviral prophylaxis are necessary to prevent infection with and reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus and cytomegalovirus and their associated complications. Awareness of drug pharmacokinetics and interactions in cystic fibrosis is crucial to prevent toxic effects and subtherapeutic or supratherapeutic drug dosing. With the large range of potential infectious organisms in patients with cystic fibrosis, infection control in hospital and outpatient settings is important. Despite its complexity, lung transplantation in the cystic fibrosis population is safe, with good outcomes if the clinician is aware of all the potential pathogens and remains vigilant by means of surveillance and proactive treatment.

  6. Hepatitis C in non-hepatic solid organ transplant candidates and recipients: A new horizon

    PubMed Central

    Belga, Sara; Doucette, Karen Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is estimated to affect 130-150 million people globally which corresponds to 2%-3% of the total world population. It remains the leading indication for liver transplant worldwide and has been demonstrated to negatively impact both patient and graft survival following non-hepatic organ transplantation. In the era of interferon-based therapy, although treatment and cure of HCV prior to non-hepatic transplant improved survival, tolerability and low cure rates substantially limited therapy. Interferon (IFN)-based therapy following non-hepatic solid organ transplant, due to the risk of allograft rejection, is generally contraindicated. Rapid advances in IFN-free therapy with direct acting antivirals (DAAs) in the last few years have completely changed the paradigm of hepatitis C therapy. Compared to IFN-based regimens, DAAs have less frequent and less severe adverse effects, shorter durations of therapy, and higher cure rates that are minimally impacted by historically negative predictors of response such as cirrhosis, ethnicity, and post-transplant state. Recent studies have shown that liver transplant (LT) recipients can be safely and effectively treated with DAA combination therapies; although data are limited, many of the principles of therapy in LT may be extrapolated to non-hepatic solid organ transplant recipients. Here we review the data on DAA combination therapies in transplantation, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of pre- vs post-transplant HCV therapy and future directions. PMID:26819530

  7. A Case Series of Gastrointestinal Tuberculosis in Renal Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Cristina; Silva, Hugo; Aguiar, Pedro; Farrajota, Pedro; Almeida, Manuela; Pedroso, Sofia; Martins, La Salete; Dias, Leonídio; Vizcaíno, José Ramón; Castro Henriques, António; Cabrita, António

    2013-01-01

    Tuberculosis is a disease relatively frequent in renal transplant patients, presenting a wide variety of clinical manifestations, often involving various organs and potentially fatal. Gastrointestinal tuberculosis, although rare in the general population, is about 50 times more frequent in renal transplant patients. Intestinal tuberculosis has a very difficult investigational approach, requiring a high clinical suspicion for its diagnosis. Therapeutic options may be a problem in the context of an immunosuppressed patient, requiring adjustment of maintenance therapy. The authors report two cases of isolated gastro-intestinal tuberculosis in renal transplant recipients that illustrates the difficulty of making this diagnosis and a brief review of the literature on its clinical presentation, diagnosis, and therapeutic approach. PMID:24558621

  8. Organ donation and transplantation-the Chennai experience in India.

    PubMed

    Shroff, S; Rao, S; Kurian, G; Suresh, S

    2007-04-01

    Tamil Nadu has been at the forefront of medical care in the country. It was the first state in the country that started a living kidney transplant program. It is also the first state to successfully start the cadaver programme after the passing of the "Transplantation of Human Organ Act" of 1994 and in the last 5 years has formed a network between hospitals for organ sharing. From the year 2000 to 2006 an organ sharing network was started in Tamil Nadu and the facilitator of this programme has been a non-government organization called MOHAN (acronym for Multi Organ Harvesting Aid Network) Foundation. The organs shared during the period number over 460 organs in two regions (both Tamil Nadu and Hyderabad). In Tamil Nadu the shared organs have included 166 Kidneys, 24 livers, 6 hearts, and 180 eyes. In 2003 sharing network was initiated by MOHAN in Hyderabad and to some extent the Tamil Nadu model was duplicated. with some success and 96 cadaver organs have been transplanted in the last 3 years. There are many advantages of organ sharing including the cost economics. At present there is a large pool of brain dead patients who could become potential organ donors in the major cities in India. Their organs are not being utilized for various support logistics. A multi-pronged strategy is required for the long term success of this program. These years in Tamil Nadu have been the years of learning, un-learning and relearning and the program today has matured slowly into what can perhaps be evolved as an Indian model. In all these years there have been various difficulties in its implementation and some of the key elements for the success of the program is the need to educate our own medical fraternity and seek their cooperation. The program requires trained counselors to be able to work in the intensive cares. The government's support is pivotal if this program to provide benefit to the common man. MOHAN Foundation has accumulated considerable experience to be able to

  9. [Ethics in organ transplantation: continous search for defining what is acceptable].

    PubMed

    Reyes-Acevedo, Rafael

    2005-01-01

    In the past 50 years, Transplant Medicine has been adopted worldwide as a growing option for treatment of many organic diseases. Ethical Issues in organ replacement therapy have emerged since the beginning. Significant advancements in the care of critically ill patients, as well as the increasing need of cadaveric organs for transplantation, definitively influenced a complex discussion about new criteria for definition of death, one of the most complex ethic debates in last century. Criteria for organ assignment are also cause of profound debate, especially when the number of patients waiting for an organ is extremely high compared with organ availability. Living donor represents a very complex figure in modern medicine, security issues as well as the need to offer them absolute respect to their capacity to decide must be considered in every patient. Ethics in transplantation represent a continuous search for defining what is acceptable.

  10. Organ transplantation in Greece: the need for mediation.

    PubMed

    Zanni, A

    2014-11-01

    Organ transplants are not regarded as an exclusively medical process, because they involve financial, religious, philosophic, and bioethical parameters. It becomes clear that if they are to achieve their purpose, which we believe extends well beyond the medical dimension, the creation of a comprehensive framework of communication between the involved parties is of paramount importance. The aim of this paper is to present an outline and a number of considerations regarding the communicational, bioethical, and legal issues that arise from a rather dramatic state of affairs in Greece today: In 2012 the rate of organ transplants stood at only 7 per 1 million of the population. The outdated legal framework and the lack of trust on the part of patients and the public have led to a highly inefficient system that is lagging behind in many respects. The proposition made in this paper is that there is a need for a new system of communication between doctors, patients, relatives of patients, and hospitals: bioethical mediation. This is a system that has played a vital role and has produced astounding results in other countries. There is also every indication that the introduction of such a system is crucial for Greece, especially as the symptoms of the acute financial crisis are become fully visible and tangible. Mediation aims to identify solutions that are oriented toward the interests and wishes of patients, are acknowledged and accepted by all parties involved, and are in tune with the values and the principles of medical practice.

  11. Renal scans in pregnant transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, H.A.; Ziessman, H.A.; Fahey, F.H.; Collea, J.V.; Alijani, M.R.; Helfrich, G.B.

    1988-08-01

    This study demonstrates the normal technetium-99m diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid ((/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA) renal scan in pregnant patients with transplanted kidneys. Five pregnant renal transplant patients had seven (/sup 99m/Tc)DTPA renal studies to assess allograft perfusion and function. All scans showed the uteroplacental complex. The bladder was always compressed and distorted. The transplanted kidney was frequently rotated to a more vertical position. In all patients allograft flow and function were maintained. There was calyceal retention on all studies and ureteral retention activity in three of five patients. Using the MIRD formalism, the total radiation absorbed dose to the fetus was calculated to be 271 mrad. This radiation exposure is well within NRCP limits for the fetus of radiation workers and an acceptable low risk in the management of these high risk obstetric patients.

  12. Cryptosporidium infection in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Florescu, Diana F; Sandkovsky, Uriel

    2016-01-01

    Diarrhea is a common complication in solid organ transplant (SOT) recipients and may be attributed to immunosuppressive drugs or infectious organisms such as bacteria, viruses or parasites. Cryptosporidium usually causes self-limited diarrhea in immunocompetent hosts. Although it is estimated that cryptosporidium is involved in about 12% of cases of infectious diarrhea in developing countries and causes approximately 748000 cases each year in the United States, it is still an under recognized and important cause of infectious diarrhea in SOT recipients. It may run a protracted course with severe diarrhea, fluid and electrolyte depletion and potential for organ failure. Although diagnostic methodologies have improved significantly, allowing for fast and accurate identification of the parasite, treatment of the disease is difficult because antiparasitic drugs have modest activity at best. Current management includes fluid and electrolyte replacement, reduction of immunosuppression and single therapy with Nitazoxanide or combination therapy with Nitazoxanide and other drugs. Future drug and vaccine development may add to the currently poor armamentarium to manage the disease. The current review highlights key epidemiological, diagnostic and management issues in the SOT population. PMID:27683627

  13. Heart and heart-liver transplantation in patients with hemochromatosis.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Monique R; Al-Kindi, Sadeer G; Oliveira, Guilherme H

    2017-10-01

    Hemochromatosis predisposes to dilated or restrictive cardiomyopathy which can progress to end-stage heart failure, requiring the use of advanced heart therapies including heart (HT) and heart liver (HLT) transplantation. Little is known about the characteristics and outcomes of these patients. We queried the United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) registry for all patients listed for HT or HLT for a diagnosis of 'hemochromatosis' between 1987 and 2014. Waitlist and post-transplantation outcomes were compared between patients with hemochromatosis (HT vs HLT) and other etiologies. Of the 81,356 adults listed for heart transplantation, 23 patients with hemochromatosis were identified (16 listed for HLT; and 7 listed for HT). Compared with other etiologies, HC patients were younger (39 vs 51years, p<0.0001), and more likely to need inotropes (56.5% vs 25.6%, p=0.003) and mechanical ventilation (13% vs 3.4%, p=0.041). Cumulative hazards of waitlist mortality or delisting were higher in hemochromatosis patients than for other etiologies of heart failure (p<0.001). There were 4 HT and 4 HLT during the study period. Post-transplantation, patients with HC had a 1- and 2-year cumulative survival of 88% and 75%, respectively. Both HT and HLT are viable options for patients with hemochromatosis. Patients with hemochromatosis are younger with increased wait-list mortality compared with other etiologies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. What's hot, what's new in clinical organ transplantation: report from the American Transplant Congress 2015.

    PubMed

    Sung, R S

    2015-11-01

    Innovative and exciting advances in the clinical sciences in organ transplantation were presented at the American Transplant Congress 2015. The full spectrum of transplantation was covered, with important developments in many topics. Key areas covered by presentations included living donor outcomes, optimal utilization and allocation of deceased donors, new immunosuppression regimens, antibody-mediated rejection and tolerance induction. This review highlights some of the most interesting and noteworthy clinical presentations from the meeting.

  15. Primary Care of the Solid Organ Transplant Recipient.

    PubMed

    Cimino, Francesca M; Snyder, Katherine A M

    2016-02-01

    The advancing science of transplantation has led to more transplants and longer survival. As a result, primary care physicians are more involved in the care of transplant recipients. Immunosuppressive therapy has significantly decreased rates of transplant rejection but accounts for more than 50% of transplant-related deaths, often due to infections and other risks related to long-term use. Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of non-transplant-related mortality. Aggressive risk factor management is recommended for transplant recipients, including a blood pressure goal of less than 130/80 mm Hg and statin therapy in kidney, liver, and heart recipients. Fertility typically increases posttransplant, and female transplant recipients should avoid pregnancy for one year after surgery. The best contraceptive choice is usually an intrauterine device. Because of the increased risk of infection, patients should be tested for graft dysfunction or infection if suspicion arises. Testing should be coordinated with the transplant center. Malignancies are a common cause of death in transplant recipients, requiring careful attention to screening recommendations and informed discussions with patients. Family physicians should maintain an ongoing relationship with the transplant team to discuss medication changes and the risk of infection or graft rejection.

  16. Pre-transplant risk factors for cryptogenic organizing pneumonia/bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nakasone, H; Onizuka, M; Suzuki, N; Fujii, N; Taniguchi, S; Kakihana, K; Ogawa, H; Miyamura, K; Eto, T; Sakamaki, H; Yabe, H; Morishima, Y; Kato, K; Suzuki, R; Fukuda, T

    2013-10-01

    Cryptogenic organizing pneumonia (COP), previously known as bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP), is a significant complication after allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (HCT). However, the pathogenesis of this complication has not yet been elucidated. Therefore, we identified the pre-transplant risk factors for the development of COP/BOOP using the Japan transplant registry database between 2005 and 2009. Among 9550 eligible recipients, 193 experienced COP/BOOP (2%). HLA disparity (odds ratio (OR) 1.51, P=0.05), female-to-male HCT (OR 1.53, P=0.023), and PBSC transplant (OR 1.84, P=0.0076) were significantly associated with an increased risk of COP/BOOP. On the other hand, BU-based myeloablative conditioning (OR 0.52, P=0.033), or fludarabine-based reduced-intensity conditioning (OR 0.50, P=0.0011) in comparison with a TBI-based regimen and in vivo T-cell depletion (OR 0.46, P=0.055) were associated with a lower risk. Of the 193 patients with COP/BOOP, 77 died, including non-relapse death in 46 (59%). Pulmonary failure and fatal infection accounted for 41% (n=19) and 26% (n=12) of the non-relapse death. Allogeneic immunity and conditioning toxicity could be associated with COP/BOOP. Prospective studies are required to elucidate the true risk factors for COP/BOOP and to develop a prophylactic approach.

  17. Donation after cardiac death in abdominal organ transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reich, David J; Guy, Stephen R

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the field of donation after cardiac death, focusing on the history, ethicolegal issues, clinical outcomes, best practices, operative techniques, and emerging strategies to optimize utilization of this resource. Donation after cardiac death is one effective way to decrease the organ shortage and has contributed the largest recent increase in abdominal organ allografts. Currently, donation after cardiac death organs confer an increased risk of ischemic cholangiopathy after liver transplant and of delayed graft function after kidney transplant. As this field matures, risk factors for donation after cardiac death organ transplant will be further identified and clinical outcomes will improve as a result of protocol standardization and ongoing research.

  18. The utilization of solid organs for transplantation in the setting of infection with multidrug-resistant organisms: an expert opinion.

    PubMed

    Bishara, Jihad; Goldberg, Elad; Lev, Shaul; Singer, Pierre; Ashkenazi, Tamar; Cohen, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Organ transplantation remains the optimal treatment for many patients suffering from end-stage organ disease. Increasing numbers of patients admitted to intensive care units, among them potential heart-beating, brain-dead organ donors, are exposed to infections with multidrug-resistant organisms, in particular carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae (CR-KP). An extensive literature search failed to reveal any information regarding the eligibility for transplantation of organs from such donors. For this reason, in 2009, the Israel Transplant Center, together with the Israeli Society for Infectious Diseases, established a working group with the intention of developing a national-specific approach to the use of these organs. In this viewpoint article, we present an algorithm based on expert opinion and our clinical experience with a donor who was found to be an asymptomatic carrier of CR-KP.

  19. Recommendations for use of marginal donors in heart transplantation: Brazilian Association of Organs Transplantation guideline.

    PubMed

    Fiorelli, A I; Stolf, N A G; Pego-Fernandes, P M; Oliveira Junior, J L; Santos, R H B; Contreras, C A M; Filho, D D L; Dinkhuysen, J J; Moreira, M C V; Mejia, J A C; Castro, M C R

    2011-01-01

    The high prevalence of heart failure has increased the candidate list for heart transplantation; however, there is a shortage of viable donated organs, which is responsible for the high mortality of patients awaiting a transplantation. Because the marginal donor presents additional risk factors, it is not considered to be an ideal donor. The use of a marginal donor is only justified in situations when the risk of patient death due to heart disease is greater than that offered by the donor. These recommendations sought to expand the supply of donors, consequently increasing the transplant rate. We selected articles based on robust evidence to provide a substratum to develop recommendations for donors who exceed the traditional acceptance criteria. Recipient survival in the immediate postoperative period is intimately linked to allograft quality. Primary allograft failure is responsible for 38% to 40% of immediate deaths after heart transplantation: therefore; marginal donor selection must be more rigorous to not increase the surgical risk. The main donor risk factors with the respective evidence levels are: cancer in the donor (B), female donor (B), donor death due to hemorrhagic stroke (B), donor age above 50 years (relative risk [RR] = 1.5) (B), weight mismatch between donor and recipient < 0.8 (RR = 1.3) (B), ischemia > 240 minutes (RR = 1.2) (B), left ventricular dysfunction with ejection fraction below 45% (B), and use of high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine > 15 mg/kg·min) (B). Factors that impact recipient mortality are: age over 50 years (RR = 1.5); allograft harvest at a distance; adult recipient weighing more than 20% of the donor; high doses of vasoactive drugs (dopamine greater than 15 mg/kg·min) and ischemic time >4 hours. The use of a marginal donor is only justified when it is able to increase life expectancy compared with clinical treatment, albeit the outcomes are interior to those using an ideal donor.

  20. Subclinical cardiovascular changes in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Nasser, Yasser; Moura, Marta C; Mertens, Luc; McCrindle, Brian W; Parekh, Rulan S; Ng, Vicky L; Church, Peter C; Mouzaki, Marialena

    2016-06-01

    CV disease is a major cause of morbidity and mortality following solid organ transplantation in adults. While the prevalence of multiple cardiometabolic risk factors is increased in pediatric solid organ transplant recipients, it is not clear whether they have subclinical CV changes. cIMT, central pWV, and CAC are indicative of subclinical CV disease, and, in adults, predict future CV events. The objective of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to investigate the prevalence of subclinical CV changes, as measured by cIMT, pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients. We searched MEDLINE(®) and EMBASE and conducted meta-analysis for studies that evaluated cIMT, central pWV, and CAC among pediatric solid organ transplant recipients (kidney, lung, intestine and liver). The search identified nine eligible studies that included a total of 259 patients and 685 healthy controls. Eight studies reported on kidney transplant recipients and one study on a combined cohort of kidney and liver transplant recipients. The mean cIMT of transplant recipients was significantly higher than that of healthy controls (mean difference = 0.05 mm, 95% CI 0.02-0.07; p < 0.0001) with an estimated pooled prevalence of elevated cIMT of 56.0% (95% CI 17.0-95.0). The one study that assessed pWV showed increased vascular stiffness in transplant recipients compared to healthy controls. No studies assessing for CAC were found. There were limited data regarding subclinical CV disease following pediatric solid organ transplantation. In conclusion, kidney transplantation in childhood is associated with a higher prevalence of subclinical CV changes compared to healthy children. Longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether children have increased CV morbidity and mortality after transplantation.

  1. Challenges for Production of Human Transplantable Organ Grafts

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Eiji

    2017-01-01

    The described research methods explain how you could generate a three-dimensional kidney, based on recent research results. The first method is to fabricate human organs in a pig body. The second is to transplant the so-called “organ bud” into a patient’s body for further development. The third method is to regenerate organs by filling cells into the cytoskeleton as a scaffold. Research for the in vitro fabrication of organ buds has been elaborately accelerated. The organ bud transplantation has been confronted with issues of continuity with the original organs, so the development of technology for achieving continuity between a transplanted organ bud and the existing organs is progressing well. The “organ fabrication” methodology, whereby cells are placed into completely decellularized organs, is supported by recent research results using pig organs taking the size of humans into consideration. PMID:28174670

  2. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with mis-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  3. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with miss-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  4. Should we allow organ donation euthanasia? Alternatives for maximizing the number and quality of organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Dominic; Savulescu, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste. In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways to improve the number and quality of organs available from this group of patients. Changes to consent arrangements (for example conscription of organs after death) or changes to organ donation practice could dramatically increase the numbers of organs available, though they would conflict with currently accepted norms governing transplantation. We argue that one alternative, Organ Donation Euthanasia, would be a rational improvement over current practice regarding withdrawal of life support. It would give individuals the greatest chance of being able to help others with their organs after death. It would increase patient autonomy. It would reduce the chance of suffering during the dying process. We argue that patients should be given the choice of whether and how they would like to donate their organs in the event of withdrawal of life support in intensive care. Continuing current transplantation practice comes at the cost of death and prolonged organ failure. We should seriously consider all of the alternatives.

  5. SHOULD WE ALLOW ORGAN DONATION EUTHANASIA? ALTERNATIVES FOR MAXIMIZING THE NUMBER AND QUALITY OF ORGANS FOR TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Wilkinson, Dominic; Savulescu, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are not enough solid organs available to meet the needs of patients with organ failure. Thousands of patients every year die on the waiting lists for transplantation. Yet there is one currently available, underutilized, potential source of organs. Many patients die in intensive care following withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment whose organs could be used to save the lives of others. At present the majority of these organs go to waste. In this paper we consider and evaluate a range of ways to improve the number and quality of organs available from this group of patients. Changes to consent arrangements (for example conscription of organs after death) or changes to organ donation practice could dramatically increase the numbers of organs available, though they would conflict with currently accepted norms governing transplantation. We argue that one alternative, Organ Donation Euthanasia, would be a rational improvement over current practice regarding withdrawal of life support. It would give individuals the greatest chance of being able to help others with their organs after death. It would increase patient autonomy. It would reduce the chance of suffering during the dying process. We argue that patients should be given the choice of whether and how they would like to donate their organs in the event of withdrawal of life support in intensive care. Continuing current transplantation practice comes at the cost of death and prolonged organ failure. We should seriously consider all of the alternatives. PMID:20459428

  6. Diagnostic yields in solid organ transplant recipients admitted with diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Echenique, Ignacio A; Penugonda, Sudhir; Stosor, Valentina; Ison, Michael G; Angarone, Michael P

    2015-03-01

    Although diarrhea is a frequent complaint among solid organ transplant recipients, the contribution of infectious etiologies remains incompletely defined. We sought to define the etiologies of diarrhea and the yields of testing at our institution. We performed a retrospective analysis over an 18-month period of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients. We stratified diarrhea by community onset vs hospital onset of diarrhea. We identified 422 admissions (representing 314 unique patients) with community-onset diarrhea, and 112 admissions (representing 102 unique patients) with hospital-onset diarrhea. The majority of community- and hospital-onset diarrheal episodes had no identified etiology (60.9% and 75.9%, respectively; P = .03), yet were also self-limited (91% and 91%, respectively; P = .894). Thereafter, the most frequently encountered infectious etiologies were Clostridium difficile infection (13.3% and 11.8%, respectively), norovirus enteritis (8.2% and 3%), cytomegalovirus disease or colitis (6.3% and 2.7%), and bacterial enterocolitis (0.9% and 0%) (P = .03). In aggregate, these entities represented 93.7% and 90.5% of the identified infectious etiologies, respectively. Protozoan causes were rarely seen. Coinfection, or the simultaneous detection of ≥2 pathogens, occurred in 8 (1.9%) and 2 (1.8%) community- and hospital-onset diarrheal admissions, respectively (P = .99). In solid organ transplant recipients who presented at our institution with diarrhea, approximately one-third had infectious etiologies identified, consisting predominantly of C. difficile, norovirus, cytomegalovirus, and bacterial enterocolitis. Other infectious etiologies were rare. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Diagnostic Yields in Solid Organ Transplant Recipients Admitted With Diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Echenique, Ignacio A.; Penugonda, Sudhir; Stosor, Valentina; Ison, Michael G.; Angarone, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Although diarrhea is a frequent complaint among solid organ transplant recipients, the contribution of infectious etiologies remains incompletely defined. We sought to define the etiologies of diarrhea and the yields of testing at our institution. Methods. We performed a retrospective analysis over an 18-month period of hospitalized solid organ transplant recipients. We stratified diarrhea by community onset vs hospital onset of diarrhea. Results. We identified 422 admissions (representing 314 unique patients) with community-onset diarrhea, and 112 admissions (representing 102 unique patients) with hospital-onset diarrhea. The majority of community- and hospital-onset diarrheal episodes had no identified etiology (60.9% and 75.9%, respectively; P = .03), yet were also self-limited (91% and 91%, respectively; P = .894). Thereafter, the most frequently encountered infectious etiologies were Clostridium difficile infection (13.3% and 11.8%, respectively), norovirus enteritis (8.2% and 3%), cytomegalovirus disease or colitis (6.3% and 2.7%), and bacterial enterocolitis (0.9% and 0%) (P = .03). In aggregate, these entities represented 93.7% and 90.5% of the identified infectious etiologies, respectively. Protozoan causes were rarely seen. Coinfection, or the simultaneous detection of ≥2 pathogens, occurred in 8 (1.9%) and 2 (1.8%) community- and hospital-onset diarrheal admissions, respectively (P = .99). Conclusions. In solid organ transplant recipients who presented at our institution with diarrhea, approximately one-third had infectious etiologies identified, consisting predominantly of C. difficile, norovirus, cytomegalovirus, and bacterial enterocolitis. Other infectious etiologies were rare. PMID:25371488

  8. A review of nationwide population study of organ transplantation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsin-I; Yu, Huang-Ping

    2016-06-01

    Solid organ transplantation has become the therapy of choice for patients with end-stage organ disease. The frequently transplanted organs in Taiwan include liver, kidney, heart, and lung, and the success rate has improved significantly worldwide for the past decades. However, organ recipients are known to be at a higher risk of post-transplant infections and de novo cancer due to immunosuppression and oncogenic viral infections. Organ recipients are known to be at a two- to fourfold increased risk of cancer and the risks are particularly high for malignancies caused by viral infections, including post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders via Epstein-Barr virus, Kaposi sarcoma via Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus, anogenital cancers via human papillomavirus, and hepatocellular carcinoma via hepatitis B and C virus. Population-based cohort studies may help better understand the pattern of infection and cancer risk in transplant recipients and clarify the role of the immune system, infection, and risk factors in the development of malignancy. Improvement of surgical techniques, advancement of immunosuppressant therapy in addition to early detection and prevention of infection, and regular surveillance of de novo cancer after transplantation have become the mainstay of successful organ transplantation.

  9. Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorders in lung transplant patients: the Cleveland Clinic experience.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, P; Rybicki, L; Smith, M D; Abrahams, N A; Tubbs, R R; Pettay, J; Farver, C F; Hsi, E D

    2002-06-01

    PTLD is a well-recognized complication of organ transplantation. Large series of heart, renal, and liver transplants have been examined for the incidence and behavior of PTLD. However, reports of the incidence and characteristics of PTLDs in lung transplant (LTx) patients are few. We report our experience with PTLDs in a large series of LTx recipients at a single institution and compare them to other solid organ transplant recipient PTLDs seen at our institution. Twenty-eight patients were found to have PTLD, of whom 8 were lung transplant recipients. We evaluated nine PTLD specimens from these 8 patients for their histology, immunophenotype (CD20, CD3, EBV-LMP1), EBER status by in situ hybridization, and clinical features. The incidence of PTLD was 3.3% (8/244 patients). The time to development of PTLD, after transplant, was short (median time, 7 mo). All were of B-cell lineage. Overall, EBV was demonstrated in 77.7% (7 of 9 specimens) of PTLDs. All specimens tested for clonality were found to be monoclonal. Five patients died, with a median time to death of only 4.6 months. PTLDs in LTx patients are EBV-associated B-cell, predominantly monoclonal lymphoid lesions similar to other solid organ transplant PTLDs. Compared with other solid organ transplant recipients with PTLD at our institution, PTLDs in LTx patients have a propensity to involve the transplanted organ (P =.001, Fisher's exact test), occur earlier after transplant (P =.003, Wilcoxon test), and have a shorter survival (P =.002, log rank test). Reasons for this may include the relatively higher level of immunosuppression required in these patients and limited options in decreasing it. Although the incidence is low, careful early monitoring of lung transplantation patients is warranted because of the poor prognosis of patients developing this complication.

  10. Are Transplant Recipients Human Subjects When Research Is Conducted on Organ Donors?

    PubMed

    Heffernan, Kate Gallin; Glazier, Alexandra K

    2017-09-01

    Interventional research on deceased organ donors and donor organs prior to transplant holds the promise of reducing the number of patients who die waiting for an organ by expanding the pool of transplantable organs and improving transplant outcomes. However, one of the key challenges researchers face is an assumption that someone who receives an organ that was part of an interventional research protocol is always a human subject of that same study. The consequences of this assumption include the need for oversight by an institutional review board and for research-level informed consent from transplant recipients, all within the complex practical realities of the organ donation and transplantation process in the United States. The current national focus on this issue provides an opportunity to think critically about the policy goals of the human subjects regulations and their application to the nascent field of deceased organ donor intervention research. We propose that for donor research where the transplant recipient does not fall under the definition of human subject, the clinical consent model-rather than the consent model used for human research subjects-best facilitates the policy objectives of balancing clinical innovation, transparency, and protection of patients in an ethically responsible and legally compliant manner. © 2017 The Hastings Center.

  11. Liver transplantation for chronic liver disease: advances and controversies in an era of organ shortages

    PubMed Central

    Prince, M; Hudson, M

    2002-01-01

    Since liver transplantation was first performed in 1968 by Starzl et al, advances in case selection, liver surgery, anaesthetics, and immunotherapy have significantly increased the indications for and success of this operation. Liver transplantation is now a standard therapy for many end stage liver disorders as well as acute liver failure. However, while demand for cadaveric organ grafts has increased, in recent years the supply of organs has fallen. This review addresses current controversies resulting from this mismatch. In particular, methods for increasing graft availability and difficulties arising from transplantation in the context of alcohol related cirrhosis, primary liver tumours, and hepatitis C are reviewed. Together these three indications accounted for 42% of liver transplants performed for chronic liver disease in the UK in 2000. Ethical frameworks for making decisions on patients' suitability for liver transplantation have been developed in both the USA and the UK and these are also reviewed. PMID:11884694

  12. Fusarium Infection in Lung Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Carneiro, Herman A.; Coleman, Jeffrey J.; Restrepo, Alejandro; Mylonakis, Eleftherios

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium is a fungal pathogen of immunosuppressed lung transplant patients associated with a high mortality in those with severe and persistent neutropenia. The principle portal of entry for Fusarium species is the airways, and lung involvement almost always occurs among lung transplant patients with disseminated infection. In these patients, the immunoprotective mechanisms of the transplanted lungs are impaired, and they are, therefore, more vulnerable to Fusarium infection. As a result, fusariosis occurs in up to 32% of lung transplant patients. We studied fusariosis in 6 patients following lung transplantation who were treated at Massachusetts General Hospital during an 8-year period and reviewed 3 published cases in the literature. Cases were identified by the microbiology laboratory and through discharge summaries. Patients presented with dyspnea, fever, nonproductive cough, hemoptysis, and headache. Blood tests showed elevated white blood cell counts with granulocytosis and elevated inflammatory markers. Cultures of Fusarium were isolated from bronchoalveolar lavage, blood, and sputum specimens. Treatments included amphotericin B, liposomal amphotericin B, caspofungin, voriconazole, and posaconazole, either alone or in combination. Lung involvement occurred in all patients with disseminated disease and it was associated with a poor outcome. The mortality rate in this group of patients was high (67%), and of those who survived, 1 patient was treated with a combination of amphotericin B and voriconazole, 1 patient with amphotericin B, and 1 patient with posaconazole. Recommended empirical treatment includes voriconazole, amphotericin B or liposomal amphotericin B first-line, and posaconazole for refractory disease. High-dose amphotericin B is recommended for treatment of most cases of fusariosis. The echinocandins (for example, caspofungin, micafungin, anidulafungin) are generally avoided because Fusarium species have intrinsic resistance to them. Treatment

  13. Mobile Health in Solid Organ Transplant: The Time Is Now.

    PubMed

    Fleming, J N; Taber, D J; McElligott, J; McGillicuddy, J W; Treiber, F

    2017-09-01

    Despite being in existence for >40 years, the application of telemedicine has lagged significantly in comparison to its generated interest. Detractors include the immobile design of most historic telemedicine interventions and the relative lack of smartphones among the general populace. Recently, the exponential increase in smartphone ownership and familiarity have provided the potential for the development of mobile health (mHealth) interventions that can be mirrored realistically in clinical applications. Existing studies have demonstrated some potential clinical benefits of mHealth in the various phases of solid organ transplantation (SOT). Furthermore, studies in nontransplant chronic diseases may be used to guide future studies in SOT. Nevertheless, substantially more must be accomplished before mHealth becomes mainstream. Further evidence of clinical benefits and a critical need for cost-effectiveness analysis must prove its utility to patients, clinicians, hospitals, insurers, and the federal government. The SOT population is an ideal one in which to demonstrate the benefits of mHealth. In this review, the current evidence and status of mHealth in SOT is discussed, and a general path forward is presented that will allow buy-in from the health care community, insurers, and the federal government to move mHealth from research to standard care. © 2017 The American Society of Transplantation and the American Society of Transplant Surgeons.

  14. [De novo cancer after solid organ transplantation: Epidemiology, prognosis and management].

    PubMed

    Guillemin, Aude; Rousseau, Benoît; Neuzillet, Cindy; Joly, Charlotte; Boussion, Helene; Grimbert, Philippe; Compagnon, Philippe; Duvoux, Christophe; Tournigand, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The risk of cancer after solid organ transplantation is increased by 2.6 compared to overall population. Cancer is currently the third leading cause of death in solid organ transplanted patients, making screening and early management of de novo cancers a major challenge. This increased risk of cancer in this population results from the combination of known environmental risk factors of cancer, comorbidities of transplanted patients, and exposure to chronic immunosuppression. The prognosis of cancer in these patients seems poorer as compared to other cancer patients owing to their comorbidities, the immunosuppression and patient's poorer tolerance to oncologic treatment. Moreover, interactions between immunosuppressive agents and antitumor therapies must be taken into account in the therapeutic strategy. Better knowledge of the specificities of solid organ transplanted patients with de novo cancer is required to improve cancer care in this patient population. This article aims to review the current data available on de novo cancers in solid organ transplanted patients, with a focus on epidemiology, risks factors of de novo cancers, impact of immunosuppressive drugs and oncologic prognosis.

  15. Effects of anonymous information about potential organ transplant recipients on attitudes toward organ transplantation and the willingness to donate organs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Michelle; Katz, Roger C; Beauchamp, Kenneth; Hannon, Roseann

    2002-10-01

    Two approaches for educating college students about the need for organ donors were compared. The experimental group (N = 162) watched a video-taped dramatization of an organ procurement coordinator asking the family members of a recently deceased loved one if they would donate their loved one's organs. Contained in this videotape was demographic information about three adults who needed an organ transplant. The control group (N = 169) saw the same videotape minus the demographic information. Extrapolating from research on altruism, we hypothesized that information about potential organ recipients would increase the viewer's willingness to donate a next-of-kin's organs and their own willingness to become an organ donor. Results supported this hypothesis. Compared to the control group, the experimental group was more willing to donate a next-of-kin's organs and take action to become an organ donor. We tentatively conclude that providing information about potential organ recipients increases the willingness of college students to become organ donors.

  16. Entry Inhibitors: A Perspective for Prevention of Hepatitis C Virus Infection in Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Colpitts, Che C; Chung, Raymond T; Baumert, Thomas F

    2017-09-08

    Entry inhibitors are emerging as an attractive class of therapeutics for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Entry inhibitors target either virion-associated factors or cellular factors necessary for infection. By blocking entry into cells, entry inhibitors prevent both the establishment of persistent reservoirs and the emergence of resistant variants during viral replication. Furthermore, entry inhibitors protect naïve cells from virus-induced alterations. Combining entry inhibitors with direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) may therefore improve treatment outcomes, particularly in the context of organ transplantation. The role of DAAs in transplantation, while still under clinical investigation, carries the risk of recipient infection and HCV-induced disease, since DAAs act only after infection is established. Thus, entry inhibitors provide a perspective to improve patient outcomes during organ transplantation. Applying this approach for transplant of organs from HCV-positive donors to HCV-negative recipients may also contribute to alleviate the medical burden of organ shortage.

  17. Head and neck cancer in renal transplant patients in Finland.

    PubMed

    Mäkitie, Antti A; Lundberg, Marie; Salmela, Kaija; Kyllönen, Lauri; Pukkala, Eero

    2008-11-01

    This study found a 0.8% incidence of non-cutaneous head and neck cancer during a mean follow-up of 10 years. The benefits of successful renal transplantation clearly outweigh the observed risk of malignancy. Increased cancer incidence after organ transplantation is well documented but few studies have reported on the rate of head and neck malignancies among these patients. This study aimed to determine the incidence and specific sites of head and neck cancer in a nationwide series of renal transplant patients in Finland. Data from the National Kidney Transplant Registry and the Finnish Cancer Registry were used. A total of 2884 kidney transplant patients from the period 1964 to 1997 were followed for cancer incidence during the period from 1967 to 2003. There were 113 non-lymphomatous head and neck malignancies. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR), as compared with the general population, was 13.6, with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 11.2-16.2. The SIR was significantly elevated for cancers of the skin (47.3, 95% CI 36.3-60.7), lip (31.8, 95% CI 20.8-46.6), oral cavity (6.5, 95% CI 2.4-14.0) and thyroid (5.8, 95% CI 3.0-10.2).

  18. Changing strategies for organ transplantation in atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome: a tertiary case series.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Thomas A; Bradbury, Mark G; Goodship, Tim H J; McKiernan, Patrick J; Milford, David V

    2013-05-01

    We present three cases of organ transplantation for atypical haemolytic uraemic syndrome secondary to complement factor H mutation: one isolated renal transplant; one previously reported isolated liver transplant; and one combined liver and kidney transplant. All three patients were treated prior to the licensing of eculizumab for this condition, and all have had favourable outcomes with maintenance of graft function for years following transplantation. We discuss the evolution of transplantation therapy for aHUS over the last two decades. Transplantation decision-making in aHUS has evolved over this time with expanding knowledge of pathophysiology and genetics, alongside refined plasma exchange and anticoagulation protocols and improved centre experience. Our cases demonstrate how individual patient factors within this heterogeneous condition also underlie transplantation decisions and outcomes. Whilst our cases demonstrate that transplantation in aHUS can be a successful long-term treatment providing good quality of life, worldwide experience has proven that most curative treatment for aHUS strategies represents significant risks. Whether new pharmacotherapies such as eculizumab will alter this risk is yet to be determined.

  19. Health-Related Quality of Life After Different Types of Solid Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pinson, C. Wright; Feurer, Irene D.; Payne, Jerita L.; Wise, Paul E.; Shockley, Shannon; Speroff, Theodore

    2000-01-01

    Objective To describe functional health and health-related quality of life (QOL) before and after transplantation; to compare and contrast outcomes among liver, heart, lung, and kidney