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Sample records for patients phase iii

  1. Two-phase treatment of patients with crossbite and tendency toward skeletal Class III malocclusion*

    PubMed Central

    Bayerl, Maria de Lourdes Machado

    2014-01-01

    Angle Class III malocclusion is characterized by an inadequate anteroposterior dental relationship which may or may not be accompanied by skeletal changes. In general, patients are distressed by a significantly compromised facial aspect which, when associated with a deficient middle third, encourages patients to seek treatment. This article reports a two-phase treatment carried out in a female patient aged six years and six months with a tendency towards a Class III skeletal pattern. This case was presented to the Brazilian Board of Orthodontics and Facial Orthopedics (BBO). It is representative of the Discrepancy Index (DI) category, and fulfills part of the requirements for obtaining BBO Diploma. PMID:25279531

  2. [Phase III clinical trial using autologous mesenchymal stem cells for stroke patients].

    PubMed

    Honmou, Osamu

    2016-04-01

    We conduct a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial (Phase III: confirmatory trial) of intravenous infusion of autologous mesenchymal stem cells for cerebral infarction patients. The objectives of this study were to examine feasibility, safety, and efficacy of cell therapy using auto serum-expanded autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow in the stroke patients. Inclusion criteria is (1) Cerebral infarction onset within 40 days, (2) Supra-tentorial cerebral infarction(NINDS-III 1990) diagnosed by MRI(or CT), MRA (3D-CTA or DSA), ECG, chest X-ray etc., (3) Classified under grade 4 or 5 of mRS (modified Rankin scale), (4) Age between 20 to 80, (5) The written informed consent from subjects and legal representative is provided.

  3. Phage idiotype vaccination: first phase I/II clinical trial in patients with multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Multiple myeloma is characterized by clonal expansion of B cells producing monoclonal immunoglobulins or fragments thereof, which can be detected in the serum and/or urine and are ideal target antigens for patient-specific immunotherapies. Methods Using phage particles as immunological carriers, we employed a novel chemically linked idiotype vaccine in a clinical phase I/II trial including 15 patients with advanced multiple myeloma. Vaccines composed of purified paraproteins linked to phage were manufactured successfully for each patient. Patients received six intradermal immunizations with phage idiotype vaccines in three different dose groups. Results Phage idiotype was well tolerated by all study participants. A subset of patients (80% in the middle dose group) displayed a clinical response indicated by decrease or stabilization of paraprotein levels. Patients exhibiting a clinical response to phage vaccines also raised idiotype-specific immunoglobulins. Induction of a cellular immune response was demonstrated by a cytotoxicity assay and delayed type hypersensitivity tests. Conclusion We present a simple, time- and cost-efficient phage idiotype vaccination strategy, which represents a safe and feasible patient-specific therapy for patients with advanced multiple myeloma and produced promising anti-tumor activity in a subset of patients. PMID:24885819

  4. Effect of phase III cardiac rehabilitation and relaxation on the quality of life in patients with cardiac syndrome X.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Aram; Ghaderi, Chiman; Dehghani, Mohammad R; Khalkhali, Hamid R; Sheikhi, Siamak

    2012-11-01

    Cardiac syndrome X is a relatively common disorder, and still not much is known about the causative factors or its pathophysiology, which makes it difficult to cure. Due to its chronic nature and debilitating symptoms, many patients have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL).The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and relaxation on the QOL of patients. This research is a randomized clinical trial study. Forty eligible and consenting women (age 30-65 years) were randomly assigned to four groups. In the first group (n = 11), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR); in the second group (n = 11), phase III CR; and in the third group (n = 11), PMR along with phase III CR were performed for 8 weeks at home. The fourth group (n = 7) was used as the control group. Short form of QOL questionnaire (SF-36) was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using χ(2), Kruskal-Wallis, and rank sum difference tests. After phase III CR, relaxation, and combination of CR and relaxation, patients demonstrated improved QOL (P < 0.001). The results of post-test multiple comparisons showed that there were statistically significant differences between control and all intervention groups (P < 0.05). There was also statistically significant difference between relaxation and combination of phase III CR and relaxation groups (P < 0.5). An 8-week phase III CR program together with relaxation improved QOL of patients with cardiac syndrome X. We suggest phase III CR program together with relaxation as an effective treatment in these patients.

  5. Effect of phase III cardiac rehabilitation and relaxation on the quality of life in patients with cardiac syndrome X

    PubMed Central

    Feizi, Aram; Ghaderi, Chiman; Dehghani, Mohammad R.; Khalkhali, Hamid R.; Sheikhi, Siamak

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cardiac syndrome X is a relatively common disorder, and still not much is known about the causative factors or its pathophysiology, which makes it difficult to cure. Due to its chronic nature and debilitating symptoms, many patients have significantly reduced quality of life (QOL).The purpose of this study was to assess the impact of phase III cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and relaxation on the QOL of patients. Materials and Methods: This research is a randomized clinical trial study. Forty eligible and consenting women (age 30-65 years) were randomly assigned to four groups. In the first group (n = 11), progressive muscle relaxation (PMR); in the second group (n = 11), phase III CR; and in the third group (n = 11), PMR along with phase III CR were performed for 8 weeks at home. The fourth group (n = 7) was used as the control group. Short form of QOL questionnaire (SF-36) was used for data gathering. Data analysis was performed using χ2, Kruskal-Wallis, and rank sum difference tests. Results: After phase III CR, relaxation, and combination of CR and relaxation, patients demonstrated improved QOL (P < 0.001). The results of post-test multiple comparisons showed that there were statistically significant differences between control and all intervention groups (P < 0.05). There was also statistically significant difference between relaxation and combination of phase III CR and relaxation groups (P < 0.5). Conclusions: An 8-week phase III CR program together with relaxation improved QOL of patients with cardiac syndrome X. We suggest phase III CR program together with relaxation as an effective treatment in these patients. PMID:23922604

  6. Phase III randomized trial of toremifene versus tamoxifen for Japanese postmenopausal patients with early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Morihiko; Tominaga, Takeshi; Kimijima, Izo; Takatsuka, Yuichi; Takashima, Shigemitsu; Nomura, Yasuo; Kasumi, Fujio; Yamaguchi, Akihiro; Masuda, Norikazu; Noguchi, Shinzaburo; Eshima, Nobuoki

    2014-05-01

    Toremifene, a selective estrogen receptor modulator, is used as adjuvant therapy for postmenopausal patients with breast cancer in Japan. For Japanese patients, however, only limited data are available on the efficacy and safety profile of toremifene. To establish the long term efficacy and safety of toremifene for Japanese patients, we conducted a prospective, multicenter, randomized phase III trial comparing toremifene and tamoxifen. The subjects were postmenopausal Japanese patients who had undergone surgery for node-negative breast cancer. Toremifene or tamoxifen was administered for 2 years. The primary endpoint was demonstration of the non-inferiority of toremifene compared with tamoxifen in respect of 5-year survival. Secondary endpoints were cumulative overall survival, cumulative disease-free survival, effects on lipid profiles, and adverse events. A total of 253 patients were enrolled. The baseline characteristics of the two treatment groups were well-balanced. Median follow-up was 66.5 months. Five-year survival was similar for toremifene and tamoxifen (97.0 vs. 96.9 %; 90 % confidence interval -3.9 to 4.1), indicating that toremifene is not inferior to tamoxifen for postmenopausal Japanese patients with early breast cancer. Cumulative overall survival and cumulative disease-free survival were also very similar for toremifene and tamoxifen (97.5 vs. 97.3 %, log-rank test P = 0.9458; 88.4 vs. 90.6 %, log-rank test P = 0.3359, respectively). Adverse events in both groups were similar and mostly mild or moderate. Thus, both are equally effective and well tolerated. Our results suggest that the efficacy and safety of toremifene and tamoxifen are equivalent for postmenopausal Japanese patients with early breast cancer.

  7. Contribution of capecitabine for therapy of patients with gastroesophageal cancer: an update of recent phase III results

    PubMed Central

    Cen, Putao; Tetzlaff, Eric D; Ajani, Jaffer A

    2008-01-01

    Background Capecitabine, an orally administered fluoropyrimidines, is widely used in the treatment of multiple malignancies. It has been extensively evaluated in patients with gastroesophageal carcinoma. Since recent reviews have discussed phase I/II trials (Cancer 107:221–231, 2006; Drugs 67:601–610, 2007), we focus on the impact of the results of the most current phase III trials using capectiabine in the treatment of advanced gastroesophageal cancers, primarily in the first-line setting. Methods To find published phase III trials, Medline was searched for English-language clinical trials published from 1996 through June 2007 along with relevant abstracts presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology, and meetings of the European Cancer Conference and European Society of Medical Oncology. Only representative trials were chosen for this manuscript. Results The most frequently investigated combinations are capecitabine with taxanes, platinols, and camptothecins. Recent results of a large phase III trial (REAL-2) in untreated patients with gastroesophageal cancer suggest that capecitabine is a non-inferior substitute for intravenous 5-fluorouracil. These results of REAL-2 trial are substantiated by a smaller phase III trial. Previous analysis of multiple trials had suggested that capecitabine, when combined in doses lower than 1250 mg/m2 twice daily, consistently resulted in lower frequency of Grade 3 or 4 toxic effects. Conclusions Capecitabine provides much needed convenience to patients with gastroesophageal cancer. The recent data derived from two phase III trials confirm that capecitabine is a suitable substitute for intravenous 5-fluorouracil in patients whose swallowing is not greatly affected. Capecitabine remains a subject of further investigations in this group of patients with interest. PMID:18728703

  8. International phase III trial of liprotamase efficacy and safety in pancreatic-insufficient cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Borowitz, Drucy; Stevens, Christopher; Brettman, Lee R; Campion, Marilyn; Chatfield, Barbara; Cipolli, Marco

    2011-12-01

    Most cystic fibrosis (CF) patients have exocrine pancreatic insufficiency (EPI) and need supplementation with pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy (PERT). Liprotamase, a novel non-porcine PERT containing highly purified biotechnology-derived lipase, protease, and amylase, has successfully undergone initial efficacy and safety testing. In this international phase III parallel-group, randomized-withdrawal, double-blind placebo-controlled trial, CF patients with EPI 7 years and older, including nutritionally and functionally compromised individuals, underwent baseline testing for coefficients of fat and nitrogen absorption (CFA and CNA) and stool weight and frequency while off PERT. After an open-label treatment period with liprotamase, subjects were randomized 1:1 to one liprotamase or placebo capsule taken with 3 meals and 2 snacks per day. The dose was fixed and increases were not allowed. The same measurements were obtained again after treatment with double-blind study drug or placebo. 138 subjects were randomized. The adjusted least squares mean (LSM) difference between the treatment and placebo groups for change in CFA was 15.1% (p=0.001) for the subgroup with baseline CFA <40%, 8.6% (p=0.006) for subjects with baseline CFA ≥40%, and 10.6% (p<0.001) for the overall intent-to-treat population. Similar results were seen for change in CNA. Stool weight was significantly decreased although not stool frequency. Liprotamase was well tolerated with no safety concerns identified. In a CF patient population reflective of that encountered in clinical practice, this trial demonstrated that liprotamase at a fixed dose of one capsule per meal or snack (5 capsules per day) was well tolerated and significantly increased fat absorption as measured by improvement in CFA, significantly increased protein absorption as measured by improvement in CNA, and significantly decreased stool weight. Copyright © 2011 European Cystic Fibrosis Society. Published by Elsevier B.V. All

  9. Viking Phase III

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    VIKING PHASE III - With the incredible success of the Viking missions on Mars, mission operations have progressed though a series of phases - each being funded as mission success dictated its potential. The Viking Primary Mission phase was concluded in November, 1976, when the reins were passed on to the second phase - the Viking Extended Mission. The Extended Mission successfully carried spacecraft operations through the desired period of time needed to provided a profile of a full Martian year, but would have fallen a little short of connecting and overlapping a full Martian year of Viking operations which scientists desired as a means of determining the degree of duplicity in the red planet's seasons - at least for the summer period. Without this continuation of spacecraft data acquisitions to and beyond the seasonal points when the spacecraft actually began their Mars observations, there would be no way of knowing whether the changing environmental values - such as temperatures and winds atmospheric dynamics and water vapor, surface thermal dynamics, etc. - would match up with those acquired as the spacecraft began investigations during the summer and fall of 1976. This same broad interest can be specifically pursued at the surface - where hundreds of rocks, soil drifts and other features have become extremely familiar during long-term analysis. This picture was acquired on the 690th Martian day of Lander 1 operations - 4009th picture sequence commanded of the two Viking Landers. As such, it became the first picture acquired as the third phase of Viking operations got under way - the Viking Continuation Mission. Between the start of the Continuation Mission in April, 1978, until spacecraft operations are concluded in November, the landers will acquire an additional 200 pictures. These will be used to monitor the two landscaped for the surface changes. All four cameras, two on Lander 1 and two on Lander 2, continue to operate perfectly. Both landers will also

  10. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-07-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3-62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2-4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427.

  11. Velaglucerase alfa (VPRIV) enzyme replacement therapy in patients with Gaucher disease: Long-term data from phase III clinical trials

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Derralynn A; Gonzalez, Derlis E; Lukina, Elena A; Mehta, Atul; Kabra, Madhulika; Elstein, Deborah; Kisinovsky, Isaac; Giraldo, Pilar; Bavdekar, Ashish; Hangartner, Thomas N; Wang, Nan; Crombez, Eric; Zimran, Ari

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 Gaucher disease is an inherited lysosomal enzyme deficiency with variable age of symptom onset. Common presenting signs include thrombocytopenia, anemia, hepatosplenomegaly, bone abnormalities, and, additionally in children, growth failure. Fifty-seven patients aged 3–62 years at the baseline of two phase III trials for velaglucerase alfa treatment were enrolled in the single extension study. In the extension, they received every-other-week velaglucerase alfa intravenous infusions for 1.2–4.8 years at 60 U/kg, although 10 patients experienced dose reduction. No patient experienced a drug-related serious adverse event or withdrew due to an adverse event. One patient died following a convulsion that was reported as unrelated to the study drug. Only one patient tested positive for anti-velaglucerase alfa antibodies. Combining the experience of the initial phase III trials and the extension study, significant improvements were observed in the first 24 months from baseline in hematology variables, organ volumes, plasma biomarkers, and, in adults, the lumbar spine bone mineral density Z-score. Improvements were maintained over longer-term treatment. Velaglucerase alfa had a good long-term safety and tolerability profile, and patients continued to respond clinically, which is consistent with the results of the extension study to the phase I/II trial of velaglucerase alfa. EudraCT number 2008-001965-27; http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00635427. Am. J. Hematol. 90:584–591, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25801797

  12. Effects of Combined Phase III and Phase II Cardiac Exercise Therapy for Middle-aged Male Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih-Wei; Wang, Ji-Hung; Hsieh, Jen-Che; Hsieh, Tsung-Cheng; Huang, Chien-Hui

    2013-11-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effects of cardiac exercise therapy (CET) on exercise capacity and coronary risk factors (CRFs) of patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). [Methods] Patients who participated in an 8-week supervised, hospital-based phase II and 6-month home-based phase III CET with monthly telephone and/or home visits were defined as the exercise group (EG) (n=20), while those who did not receive phase II or phase III CET were defined as the no-exercise group (NEG) (n=10). CRFs were evaluated pre- and post-phase II and eight months after discharge. One and two-way repeated measures ANOVA were used to perform intra- and inter-group comparisons. [Results] Thirty men with AMI aged 49.3 ± 8.3 years were studied. EG increased their exercise capacity (METs) (6.8 ± 1.6 vs.10.0 ± 1.9) after phase II CET and was able to maintain it at 8-month follow-up. Both groups had significantly fewer persons who kept on smoking compared to the first examination. High density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) increased from 38.1 ± 11.0 to 43.7 ± 8.7 mg/dl at follow-up in EG while no significant difference was noted in NEG. [Conclusion] After phase III CET subjects had maintained the therapeutic effects of smoking cessation, and increasing exercise capacity obtained in phase II CET. HDL-C in EG continued to improve during phase III CET.

  13. Failures in Phase III: Causes and Consequences.

    PubMed

    Seruga, Bostjan; Ocana, Alberto; Amir, Eitan; Tannock, Ian F

    2015-10-15

    Phase III randomized controlled trials (RCT) in oncology fail to lead to registration of new therapies more often than RCTs in other medical disciplines. Most RCTs are sponsored by the pharmaceutical industry, which reflects industry's increasing responsibility in cancer drug development. Many preclinical models are unreliable for evaluation of new anticancer agents, and stronger evidence of biologic effect should be required before a new agent enters the clinical development pathway. Whenever possible, early-phase clinical trials should include pharmacodynamic studies to demonstrate that new agents inhibit their molecular targets and demonstrate substantial antitumor activity at tolerated doses in an enriched population of patients. Here, we review recent RCTs and found that these conditions were not met for most of the targeted anticancer agents, which failed in recent RCTs. Many recent phase III RCTs were initiated without sufficient evidence of activity from early-phase clinical trials. Because patients treated within such trials can be harmed, they should not be undertaken. The bar should also be raised when making decisions to proceed from phase II to III and from phase III to marketing approval. Many approved agents showed only better progression-free survival than standard treatment in phase III trials and were not shown to improve survival or its quality. Introduction of value-based pricing of new anticancer agents would dissuade the continued development of agents with borderline activity in early-phase clinical trials. When collaborating with industry, oncologists should be more critical and better advocates for cancer patients.

  14. Pasireotide treatment significantly improves clinical signs and symptoms in patients with Cushing's disease: results from a Phase III study.

    PubMed

    Pivonello, Rosario; Petersenn, Stephan; Newell-Price, John; Findling, James W; Gu, Feng; Maldonado, Mario; Trovato, Andrew; Hughes, Gareth; Salgado, Luiz R; Lacroix, André; Schopohl, Jochen; Biller, Beverly M K

    2014-09-01

    Signs and symptoms of Cushing's disease are associated with high burden of illness. In this analysis, we evaluated the effect of pasireotide treatment on signs and symptoms in patients with Cushing's disease. Phase III study with double-blind randomization of two pasireotide doses. Patients (n = 162) with persistent/recurrent or de novo Cushing's disease and urinary free cortisol (UFC) levels ≥1·5× upper limit of normal (ULN) were randomized to receive subcutaneous pasireotide (600/900 μg bid). At month 3, patients with UFC ≤2 × ULN and not exceeding the baseline value continued their randomized dose; all others received 300 μg bid uptitration. At month 6, patients could enter an open-label phase until month 12 with a maximal dose of 1200 μg bid. Changes in signs and symptoms of hypercortisolism over 12 months' treatment in patients still enroled in the study and with evaluable measurements were assessed in relation to degree of UFC control. Reductions in blood pressure were observed even without full UFC control and were greatest in patients who did not receive antihypertensive medications during the study. Significant reductions in total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol were observed in patients who achieved UFC control. Reductions in BMI, weight and waist circumference occurred during the study even without full UFC control. Adverse effects were typical of somatostatin analogues except for hyperglycaemia-related events, which were experienced by 72·8% of patients. In the largest Phase III study of medical therapy in Cushing's disease, significant improvements in signs and symptoms were seen during 12 months of pasireotide treatment, as UFC levels decreased. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. The EORTC module for quality of life in patients with thyroid cancer: phase III.

    PubMed

    Singer, Susanne; Jordan, Susan; Locati, Laura D; Pinto, Monica; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Araújo, Cláudia; Hammerlid, Eva; Vidhubala, E; Husson, Olga; Kiyota, Naomi; Brannan, Christine; Salem, Dina; Gamper, Eva M; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Ioannidis, Georgios; Andry, Guy; Inhestern, Johanna; Grégoire, Vincent; Licitra, Lisa

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to pilot-test a questionnaire measuring health-related quality of life (QoL) in thyroid cancer patients to be used with the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. A provisional questionnaire with 47 items was administered to patients treated for thyroid cancer within the last 2 years. Patients were interviewed about time and help needed to complete the questionnaire, and whether they found the items understandable, confusing or annoying. Items were kept in the questionnaire if they fulfilled pre-defined criteria: relevant to the patients, easy to understand, not confusing, few missing values, neither floor nor ceiling effects, and high variance. A total of 182 thyroid cancer patients in 15 countries participated (n = 115 with papillary, n = 31 with follicular, n = 22 with medullary, n = 6 with anaplastic, and n = 8 with other types of thyroid cancer). Sixty-six percent of the patients needed 15 min or less to complete the questionnaire. Of the 47 items, 31 fulfilled the predefined criteria and were kept unchanged, 14 were removed, and 2 were changed. Shoulder dysfunction was mentioned by 5 patients as missing and an item covering this issue was added. To conclude, the EORTC quality of life module for thyroid cancer (EORTC QLQ-THY34) is ready for the final validation phase IV. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  16. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Stages I to III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard-dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose of radiation therapy in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I to III non-small-cell lung cancer. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, and carboplatin, AUC of 2, given weekly. The radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size, starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results: The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial 8 patients were accrued to cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002, due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) were reported at the time: a case of grade 5 and grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the radiation therapy dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity, with 6/8 (75%) patients eventually developing grade >=3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5 patients) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2 patients). Conclusions: The maximum tolerated dose was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin therapy. This dose level in the Phase II portion has been well tolerated, with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities.

  17. A phase 0 trial of riluzole in patients with resectable stage III and IV melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yip, Dana; Le, Maithao N; Chan, Joseph L-K; Lee, Jonathan H; Mehnert, Janice A; Yudd, Anthony; Kempf, Jeffery; Shih, Weichung J; Chen, Suzie; Goydos, James S

    2009-06-01

    Ectopic expression of GRM1 in murine melanocytes results in transformation into a form of melanoma, and more than 60% of human melanoma samples tested ectopically express GRM1. Stimulation of this receptor in vitro results in up-regulation of activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, a xenograft model of melanoma treated with riluzole, an oral GRM1 blocking agent, showed decreased tumor growth compared with the untreated controls. We have now completed a phase 0 trial of riluzole in patients with melanoma. Patients enrolled on this trial underwent a pretreatment biopsy, took 200 mg of oral riluzole per day for 14 days, and then underwent resection of their remaining tumor. We compared the levels of pERK and pAKT in the pretreatment and post-treatment samples and assessed the metabolic activity of pretreatment and post-treatment tumors using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning. We accrued 12 patients and all expressed GRM1. We found a significant decrease in pAKT and/or pERK in post-treatment tumor samples as compared with pretreatment samples in 4 (34%) patients. These four patients had a significant decrease in FDG-PET intensity post-treatment as well. Two other patients had a clinical response with no corresponding metabolic response; five patients had similar pretreatment and post-treatment FDG-PET scan findings; and one patient had progressive disease. Our data show that glutamate blockade with riluzole can inhibit signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways and suppress the metabolic activity of melanoma. The ectopic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors may be important in the pathogenesis of human melanoma, and targeting this pathway may be an effective therapy.

  18. A Phase 0 Trial of Riluzole in Patients with Resectable Stage III and IV Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Dana; Le, Maithao N.; Chan, Joseph L.-K.; Lee, Jonathan H.; Mehnert, Janice A.; Yudd, Anthony; Kempf, Jeffery; Shih, Weichung J.; Chen, Suzie; Goydos, James S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Ectopic expression of GRM1 in murine melanocytes results in transformation into a form of melanoma, and more than 60% of human melanoma samples tested ectopically express GRM1. Stimulation of this receptor in vitro results in up-regulation of activated extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK). Furthermore, a xenograft model of melanoma treated with riluzole, an oral GRM1 blocking agent, showed decreased tumor growth compared with the untreated controls. We have now completed a phase 0 trial of riluzole in patients with melanoma. Experimental Design Patients enrolled on this trial underwent a pretreatment biopsy, took 200 mg of oral riluzole per day for 14 days, and then underwent resection of their remaining tumor. We compared the levels of pERK and pAKT in the pretreatment and post-treatment samples and assessed the metabolic activity of pretreatment and post-treatment tumors using fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) scanning. Results We accrued 12 patients and all expressed GRM1. We found a significant decrease in pAKT and/or pERK in post-treatment tumor samples as compared with pretreatment samples in 4 (34%) patients. These four patients had a significant decrease in FDG-PET intensity post-treatment as well. Two other patients had a clinical response with no corresponding metabolic response; five patients had similar pretreatment and post-treatment FDG-PET scan findings; and one patient had progressive disease. Conclusions Our data show that glutamate blockade with riluzole can inhibit signaling through the mitogen-activated protein kinase and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/AKT pathways and suppress the metabolic activity of melanoma. The ectopic expression of metabotropic glutamate receptors may be important in the pathogenesis of human melanoma, and targeting this pathway may be an effective therapy. PMID:19458050

  19. A phase I-II trial of fludarabine, bendamustine and rituximab (FBR) in previously treated patients with CLL.

    PubMed

    Jain, Nitin; Balakrishnan, Kumudha; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; O'Brien, Susan M; Burger, Jan A; Kadia, Tapan M; Cortes, Jorge E; Ayres, Mary L; Tambaro, Francesco Paolo; Keating, Michael J; Gandhi, Varsha; Wierda, William G

    2016-09-15

    Chemoimmunotherapy regimens have been the standard first-line therapy for patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). For young, fit patients the standard of care is combination of fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, and rituximab (FCR). Based on the preclinical work demonstrating that bendamustine combined with fludarabine resulted in increased DNA damage, we designed a phase I-II clinical trial with fludarabine, bendamustine, and rituximab (FBR) for patients with relapsed/refractory CLL. Treatment consisted of fludarabine 20 mg/m2 daily x 3 days and rituximab 375-500 mg/m2 x 1 day. Phase I included bendamustine at increasing doses of 20, 30, 40, or 50 mg/m2 daily x 3 days; phase II was with FR, and B at the selected dose. DNA damage response (H2AX phosphorylation) was evaluated in a subset of patients. Fifty-one patients were enrolled. The median age was 62 years; median number of prior therapies was 2; 40% had del(11q); and 41 patients had received prior FCR-based therapies. Hematologic toxicity was more common in ≥40 mg/m2 dose cohorts. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not identified. Bendamustine-elicited H2AX phosphorylation was not dose-dependent, but markedly increased after fludarabine. We identified bendamustine 30 mg/m2 as the safe dose for phase II. The overall response rate (ORR) was 67% with 36% complete response (CR) / CR with incomplete count recovery (CRi). Younger patients (<65 years) had significantly higher ORR (81% vs. 50%; p=0.038). The median progression-free survival was 19 months, and the median overall survival was 52.5 months. FBR is an effective and tolerable CIT regimen for patients with relapsed CLL.

  20. Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Tremelimumab With Standard-of-Care Chemotherapy in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ribas, Antoni; Kefford, Richard; Marshall, Margaret A.; Punt, Cornelis J.A.; Haanen, John B.; Marmol, Maribel; Garbe, Claus; Gogas, Helen; Schachter, Jacob; Linette, Gerald; Lorigan, Paul; Kendra, Kari L.; Maio, Michele; Trefzer, Uwe; Smylie, Michael; McArthur, Grant A.; Dreno, Brigitte; Nathan, Paul D.; Mackiewicz, Jacek; Kirkwood, John M.; Gomez-Navarro, Jesus; Huang, Bo; Pavlov, Dmitri; Hauschild, Axel

    2013-01-01

    Purpose In phase I/II trials, the cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen-4–blocking monoclonal antibody tremelimumab induced durable responses in a subset of patients with advanced melanoma. This phase III study evaluated overall survival (OS) and other safety and efficacy end points in patients with advanced melanoma treated with tremelimumab or standard-of-care chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Patients with treatment-naive, unresectable stage IIIc or IV melanoma were randomly assigned at a ratio of one to one to tremelimumab (15 mg/kg once every 90 days) or physician's choice of standard-of-care chemotherapy (temozolomide or dacarbazine). Results In all, 655 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned. The test statistic crossed the prespecified futility boundary at second interim analysis after 340 deaths, but survival follow-up continued. At final analysis with 534 events, median OS by intent to treat was 12.6 months (95% CI, 10.8 to 14.3) for tremelimumab and 10.7 months (95% CI, 9.36 to 11.96) for chemotherapy (hazard ratio, 0.88; P = .127). Objective response rates were similar in the two arms: 10.7% in the tremelimumab arm and 9.8% in the chemotherapy arm. However, response duration (measured from date of random assignment) was significantly longer after tremelimumab (35.8 v 13.7 months; P = .0011). Diarrhea, pruritus, and rash were the most common treatment-related adverse events in the tremelimumab arm; 7.4% had endocrine toxicities. Seven deaths in the tremelimumab arm and one in the chemotherapy arm were considered treatment related by either investigators or sponsor. Conclusion This study failed to demonstrate a statistically significant survival advantage of treatment with tremelimumab over standard-of-care chemotherapy in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma. PMID:23295794

  1. Phase I/II Study of Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Nivolumab Who Had Progressed after Ipilimumab.

    PubMed

    Weber, Jeffrey; Gibney, Geoffrey; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Yu, Bin; Cheng, Pingyan; Martinez, Alberto J; Kroeger, Jodie; Richards, Allison; McCormick, Lori; Moberg, Valerie; Cronin, Heather; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-04-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is active in patients with metastatic melanoma who have failed ipilimumab. In this phase I/II study, we assessed nivolumab's safety in 92 ipilimumab-refractory patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, including those who experienced grade 3-4 drug-related toxicity to ipilimumab. We report long-term survival, response duration, and biomarkers in these patients after nivolumab treatment (3 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 24 weeks, then every 12 weeks for up to 2 years, with or without a multipeptide vaccine. The response rate for ipilimumab-refractory patients was 30% (95% CI, 21%-41%). The median duration of response was 14.6 months, median progression-free survival was 5.3 months, and median overall survival was 20.6 months, when patients were followed up for a median of 16 months. One- and 2-year survival rates were 68.4% and 31.2%, respectively. Ipilimumab-naïve and ipilimumab-refractory patients showed no significant difference in survival. The 21 patients with prior grade 3-4 toxicity to ipilimumab that was managed with steroids tolerated nivolumab well, with 62% (95% CI, 38%-82%) having complete or partial responses or stabilized disease at 24 weeks. High numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were associated with poor survival. Thus, survival and long-term safety were excellent in ipilimumab-refractory patients treated with nivolumab. Prior grade 3-4 immune-related adverse effects from ipilimumab were not indicative of nivolumab toxicities, and patients had a high overall rate of remission or stability at 24 weeks. Prospectively evaluating MDSC numbers before treatment could help assess the expected benefit of nivolumab.

  2. A Phase I/II Radiation Dose Escalation Study with Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients with Inoperable Stages I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: The Phase I Results of RTOG 0117

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Moughan, Jennifer; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2009-01-01

    Background In preparation for a Phase III comparison of high-dose versus standard dose radiation therapy, this Phase I/II study was initiated to establish the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation therapy, in the setting of concurrent chemotherapy, using 3DCRT for NSCLC. Methods Eligibility included patients with histologically proven, unresectable Stages I-III NSCLC. Concurrent chemotherapy consisted of paclitaxel 50 mg/m2 and carboplatin AUC=2 given weekly. Radiation dose was to be sequentially intensified by increasing the daily fraction size starting from 75.25 Gy/35 fractions. Results The Phase I portion of this study accrued 17 patients from 10 institutions and was closed in January 2004. After the initial eight patients were accrued to Cohort 1, the trial closed temporarily on September 26, 2002 due to reported toxicity. Two acute treatment-related DLTs were reported at the time: a grade 5 and a grade 3 radiation pneumonitis. The protocol, therefore, was revised to de-escalate the RT dose (74 Gy/37 fractions). Patients in Cohort 1 continued to develop toxicity with 6/8 (75%) eventually developing ≥ grade 3 events. Cohort 2 accrued 9 patients. There was one DLT, a grade 3 esophagitis, in Cohort 2 in the first 5 patients (1/5) and no DLTs for the next 2 patients (0/2). Conclusions The MTD was determined to be 74 Gy/37 fractions (2.0 Gy per fraction) using 3DCRT with concurrent paclitaxel and carboplatin. This dose level, in the Phase II portion, has been well tolerated with low rates of acute and late lung toxicities. PMID:20457350

  3. Phase I/II study of metastatic melanoma patients treated with nivolumab who had progressed after ipilimumab

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jeffrey; Gibney, Geoffrey; Kudchadkar, Ragini; Yu, Bin; Cheng, PingYan; Martinez, Alberto J.; Kroeger, Jodie; Richards, Allison; McCormick, Lori; Moberg, Valerie; Cronin, Heather; Zhao, Xiuhua; Schell, Michael; Chen, Yian Ann

    2016-01-01

    The checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab is active in metastatic melanoma patients who have failed ipilimumab. In this phase I/II study, we assessed nivolumab's safety in 92 ipilimumab refractory patients with unresectable stage III or IV melanoma, including those who experienced grade 3-4 drug related toxicity to ipilimumab. We report long-term survival, response duration, and biomarkers in these patients after nivolumab treatment (3 mg/kg) every 2 weeks for 24 weeks, then every 12 weeks for up to 2 years, with or without a multipeptide vaccine. Response rate for ipilimumab-refractory patients was 30% (95%CI: 21% - 41%). Median duration of response was 14.6 months, median progression-free survival was 5.3 months, and median overall survival was 20.6 months, when followed up a median of 16 months. One and two year survivals were 68.4% and 31.2%, respectively. Ipilimumab-naïve and -refractory patients showed no significant difference in survival. The 21 patients with prior grade 3–4 toxicity to ipilimumab that was managed with steroids, tolerated nivolumab well, with 62% (95%CI: 38% - 82%) having complete or partial remissions or stabilized disease at 24 weeks. High numbers of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) were associated with poor survival. Thus, survival and long-term safety were excellent in ipilimumab-refractory patients treated with nivolumab. Prior grade 3-4 immune-related adverse effects from ipilimumab were not indicative of nivolumab toxicities, and patients had a high overall rate of remission or stability at 24 weeks. Prospectively evaluating MDSC numbers before treatment could help assess the expected benefit of nivolumab. PMID:26873574

  4. A phase I/II trial of TAC-101, an oral synthetic retinoid, in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Kimberly B; Lozano, Richard; Brown, Thomas; Patt, Yehuda Z; Arima, Takashi; Abbruzzese, James L; Thomas, Melanie B

    2008-12-01

    Preclinical models showed TAC-101 (4-[3,5-bis(trimethylsilyl) benzamide] benzoic acid), an oral synthetic retinoid, has anti-tumor activity in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A phase I/II study was performed in advanced HCC patients (pts). Thirty-three patients were enrolled. During Phase I, pts received 40 mg daily for 14 days q3 weeks; 2 of 5 patients developed DLT so dose was reduced to 20 mg/day. Twenty-eight patients received 20 mg/day. No pt had a CR or PR, but 12 of 21 (57%) had SD. Two pts (9.5%) had late PR after discontinuing TAC-101. Median survival (MS) for all 28 pts treated with 20 mg/day was 12.7 months (95% CI 8.8-22.7); MS for 21 evaluable pts was 19.2 months (95% CI 10.4-27.6). 20 mg of TAC- was well tolerated. Significant disease stabilization (12/21 pts, 57%), 2 late PRs, and prolonged MS (19.2 months) suggest that TAC-101 provides meaningful patient benefit.

  5. Liposomal cisplatin combined with gemcitabine in pretreated advanced pancreatic cancer patients: a phase I-II study.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Boulikas, Teni; Vougiouka, Maria; Rigatos, Sotirios K; Stathopoulos, John G

    2006-05-01

    The present trial is a phase I-II study based on a new liposomal cisplatin (lipoplatin). Previous preclinical and clinical data (phase I pharmacokinetics) led to the investigation of a combined treatment modality involving lipoplatin and gemcitabine. The gemcitabine dose was kept standard at 1000 mg/m2 and the lipoplatin dose was escalated from 25 mg/m2 to 125 mg/m2. The treatment was administered to advanced pretreated pancreatic cancer patients who were refractory to previous chemotherapy which included gemcitabine. Lipoplatin at 125 mg/m2 was defined as dose limiting toxicity (DLT) and 100 mg/m2 as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in combination with 1000 mg/m2 of gemcitabine. Preliminary objective response rate data showed a partial response in 2/24 patients (8.3%), disease stability in 14 patients (58.3%) for a median duration of 3 months (range 2-7 months) and clinical benefit in 8 patients (33.3%). Liposomal cisplatin is a non-toxic alternative agent to bare cisplatin. In combination with gemcitabine, it has an MTD of 100 mg/m2 and shows promising efficacy in refractory pancreatic cancer.

  6. A Phase I/II Trial of Gefitinib Given Concurrently With Radiotherapy in Patients With Nonmetastatic Prostate Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Joensuu, Greetta; Joensuu, Timo; Nokisalmi, Petri

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: To estimate the safety and tolerability of daily administration of 250 mg of gefitinib given concurrently with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy for patients with nonmetastatic prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 patients with T2-T3N0M0 tumors were treated in a nonrandomized single-center study. A prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level of <20 and a good performance status (WHO, 0-1) were required. Adjuvant or neoadjuvant hormone treatments were not allowed. A daily regimen of 250 mg of gefitinib was started 1 week before radiation therapy began and lasted for the duration of radiation therapy. A dose of 50.4 Gy (1.8 Gy/day) was administered to the tumor, prostate, and seminal vesicles, followed by a 22-Gy booster (2 Gy/day) for a total dose of 72.4 Gy. Correlative studies included analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), EGFRvIII, and phosphorylated EGFR in tumors and tumor necrosis factor, interleukin-1{alpha} (IL-1{alpha}), and IL-6 in serum. Results: Maximum tolerated dose was not reached in phase I (12 patients), and 30 additional patients were treated in phase II. Thirty (71.4%) patients completed trial medication. Dose-limiting toxicities were recorded for 16 (38.1%) patients, the most common of which was a grade 3 to 4 increase in transaminase (6 patients). After a median follow-up of 38 months, there were no deaths due to prostate cancer. The estimated PSA relapse-free survival rate at 4 years (Kaplan-Meier) was 97%, the salvage therapy-free survival rate was 91%, and the overall survival rate was 87%. These figures compared favorably with those of matched patients treated with radiation only at higher doses. Conclusions: The combination of gefitinib and radiation is reasonably well tolerated and has promising activity against nonmetastatic prostate cancer.

  7. Phase I-II trial of ONYX-015 in combination with MAP chemotherapy in patients with advanced sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Galanis, E; Okuno, S H; Nascimento, A G; Lewis, B D; Lee, R A; Oliveira, A M; Sloan, J A; Atherton, P; Edmonson, J H; Erlichman, C; Randlev, B; Wang, Q; Freeman, S; Rubin, J

    2005-03-01

    ONYX-015 is a provisionally replication competent adenovirus with oncolytic activity in cells with malfunctioning p53. Sarcomas represent a rational target for this approach given the high frequency of p53 mutations (40-75%) and MDM-2 amplification (10-30%). We, therefore, undertook a phase I/II study of ONYX-015, days 1-5 every month administered intratumorally under radiographic guidance, in combination with MAP (mitomycin-C, doxorubicin, cisplatin) chemotherapy in patients with advanced sarcoma. Six patients were treated. Injected lesions included liver metastases in four patients and chest wall metastases in two patients. Sarcoma histologies were gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST, two patients), leiomyosarcoma (two patients), liposarcoma (one patient), and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (1 patient). Dose escalation was performed from 10(9) plaque forming units (PFU)/dose (total dose of 5 x 10(9) PFU/cycle) to 10(10) PFU/dose (total dose of 5 x 10(10) PFU/cycle) without dose-limiting toxicity being encountered. Immunohistochemistry of the metastatic lesions prior to treatment showed that five out of six patients were positive for p53, while two patients also had mdm-2 overexpression. Adenoviral replication was detected in two out of six patient biopsies on day 5 of the first cycle, by in situ hybridization (ISH). Both patients were treated at the highest dose level. ONYX-015 viral DNA was detected by quantitative PCR in the plasma of 5/6 patients on day 5 of the first cycle, and up to day 12 (7 days after the last viral dose) in one patient who had extended sampling for viral kinetics performed, suggesting viral replication in sarcoma tissue. One patient with p53 mutation and MDM-2 amplification achieved a partial response to treatment that lasted 11 months. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of ONYX-015 in combination with MAP chemotherapy is well tolerated with no significant toxicity due to ONYX-015 being encountered. Detection of viral

  8. Randomized phase II/III clinical trial of elpamotide for patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: PEGASUS-PC Study.

    PubMed

    Yamaue, Hiroki; Tsunoda, Takuya; Tani, Masaji; Miyazawa, Motoki; Yamao, Kenji; Mizuno, Nobumasa; Okusaka, Takuji; Ueno, Hideki; Boku, Narikazu; Fukutomi, Akira; Ishii, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Shinichi; Furukawa, Masayuki; Maguchi, Hiroyuki; Ikeda, Masafumi; Togashi, Yosuke; Nishio, Kazuto; Ohashi, Yasuo

    2015-07-01

    Gemcitabine is a key drug for the treatment of pancreatic cancer; however, with its limitation in clinical benefits, the development of another potent therapeutic is necessary. Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 is an essential target for tumor angiogenesis, and we have conducted a phase I clinical trial using gemcitabine and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2 peptide (elpamotide). Based on the promising results of this phase I trial, a multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind phase II/III clinical trial has been carried out for pancreatic cancer. The eligibility criteria included locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer. Patients were assigned to either the Active group (elpamotide + gemcitabine) or Placebo group (placebo + gemcitabine) in a 2:1 ratio by the dynamic allocation method. The primary endpoint was overall survival. The Harrington-Fleming test was applied to the statistical analysis in this study to evaluate the time-lagged effect of immunotherapy appropriately. A total of 153 patients (Active group, n = 100; Placebo group, n = 53) were included in the analysis. No statistically significant differences were found between the two groups in the prolongation of overall survival (Harrington-Fleming P-value, 0.918; log-rank P-value, 0.897; hazard ratio, 0.87, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.486-1.557). Median survival time was 8.36 months (95% CI, 7.46-10.18) for the Active group and 8.54 months (95% CI, 7.33-10.84) for the Placebo group. The toxicity observed in both groups was manageable. Combination therapy of elpamotide with gemcitabine was well tolerated. Despite the lack of benefit in overall survival, subgroup analysis suggested that the patients who experienced severe injection site reaction, such as ulceration and erosion, might have better survival.

  9. Subcutaneous Progesterone Is Effective and Safe for Luteal Phase Support in IVF: An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis of the Phase III Trials

    PubMed Central

    Doblinger, Jakob; Cometti, Barbara; Trevisan, Silvia; Griesinger, Georg

    2016-01-01

    Objective To summarize efficacy and safety data on a new progesterone compound which is available for subcutaneous administration as compared to vaginally administered progesterone for luteal phase support in patients undergoing IVF treatment. Design Data from two randomized phase III trials (07EU/Prg06 and 07USA/Prg05) performed according to GCP standards with a total sample size of 1435 per-protocol patients were meta-analyzed on an individual patient data level. Setting University affiliated reproductive medicine unit. Patients Subcutaneous progesterone was administered to a total of 714 subjects and vaginal progesterone was administered to a total of 721 subjects who underwent fresh embryo transfer after ovarian stimulation followed by IVF or ICSI. The subjects were between 18 and 42 years old and had a BMI <30kg/m2. Interventions Subcutaneous progesterone 25 mg daily vs. either progesterone vaginal gel 90 mg daily (07EU/Prg06) or 100 mg intravaginal twice a day (07USA/Prg05) for luteal phase support in IVF patients. Main outcome measures Ongoing pregnancy rate beyond 10 gestational weeks, live birth rate and OHSS risk. Results The administration of subcutaneous progesterone versus intra-vaginal progesterone had no impact on ongoing pregnancy likelihood (OR = 0.865, 95% CI 0.694 to 1.077; P = n.s.), live birth likelihood (OR = 0.889, 95% CI 0.714 to 1.106; P = n.s.) or OHSS risk (OR = 0.995, 95% CI 0.565 to 1.754; P = n.s.) in regression analyses accounting for clustering of patients within trials, while adjusting for important confounders. Only female age and number of oocytes retrieved were significant predictors of live birth likelihood and OHSS risk. Conclusion No statistical significant or clinical significant differences exist between subcutaneous and vaginal progesterone for luteal phase support. PMID:26991890

  10. Long-term safety of sorafenib in advanced renal cell carcinoma: follow-up of patients from phase III TARGET.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Thomas E; Bellmunt, Joaquim; Porta, Camillo; Szczylik, Cezary; Staehler, Michael; Nadel, Andrea; Anderson, Sibyl; Bukowski, Ronald; Eisen, Tim; Escudier, Bernard

    2010-09-01

    The phase III Treatment Approaches in Renal cancer Global Evaluation Trial (TARGET) indicated that sorafenib is effective and well tolerated in advanced renal cell carcinoma patients. However, few data have been published on the safety of long-term sorafenib treatment. A retrospective subgroup analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients in TARGET who received treatment for >1 year. The present subgroup analysis (based on the September 2006 database with updated safety analysis) evaluated the efficacy and safety of sorafenib in all patients in the sorafenib arm of TARGET who were treated for >1 year. The assessments included the overall survival, progression-free survival (PFS), disease control rate (DCR), and safety. The patients remained on therapy post-progression at the discretion of the investigator. In TARGET, 169 patients received treatment with sorafenib for >1 year. The median PFS of patients in this subpopulation was 10.9 months from the date of randomisation, with a DCR of 92%. The most commonly reported treatment-related adverse events of any grade were diarrhoea (74%), rash/desquamation (51%), hand-foot skin reaction (49%), alopecia (39%), and fatigue (38%). Adverse events were mild to moderate, and presented early in the course of the treatment; there were no unexpected toxicities associated with the long-term administration of sorafenib. Results of this subgroup analysis of patients enrolled in TARGET who received treatment for >1 year indicate that long-term treatment with sorafenib is associated with continued efficacy and a well-tolerated safety profile. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Eligibility of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer for phase III chemotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Evidence that chemotherapy improves survival and quality of life in patients with stage IIIB & IV non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is based on large randomized controlled trials. The purpose of this study was to determine eligibility of patients with advanced NSCLC for major chemotherapy trials. Methods Physicians treating stage IIIB/IV NSCLC at Sydney Cancer Centre assessed patient eligibility for the E1594, SWOG9509 and TAX326 trials for patients presenting from October 2001 to December 2002. A review of the centre's registry was used to obtain missing data. Results 199 patients with advanced NSCLC were registered during the 14-month period. Characteristics of 100 patients were defined prospectively, 85 retrospectively: 77% males, median age 68 (range 32–88), 64% stage IV disease. Only 35% met trial eligibility for E1594 and 28% for SWOG9509 and TAX326. Common reasons for ineligibility were: co-morbidities 75(40%); ECOG Performance Status ≥2 72(39%); symptomatic brain metastasis 15(8%); and previous cancers 21(11%). Many patients were ineligible by more than one criterion. Conclusion The majority of patients with advanced NSCLC were ineligible for the large chemotherapy trials. The applicability of trial results to advanced lung cancer populations may be limited. Future trials should be conducted in a more representative population. PMID:19402889

  12. Randomized Phase III and Extension Studies of Naldemedine in Patients With Opioid-Induced Constipation and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Katakami, Nobuyuki; Harada, Toshiyuki; Murata, Toru; Shinozaki, Katsunori; Tsutsumi, Masakazu; Yokota, Takaaki; Arai, Masatsugu; Tada, Yukio; Narabayashi, Masaru; Boku, Narikazu

    2017-10-02

    Purpose Opioid-induced constipation (OIC) is a frequent and debilitating adverse effect (AE) of opioids-common analgesics for cancer pain. We investigated the efficacy and safety of a peripherally acting μ-opioid receptor antagonist, naldemedine (S-297995), for OIC, specifically in patients with cancer. Patients and Methods This phase III trial consisted of a 2-week, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (COMPOSE-4) and an open-label, 12-week extension study (COMPOSE-5). In COMPOSE-4, eligible adults with OIC and cancer were randomly assigned on a 1:1 basis to receive once-daily oral naldemedine 0.2 mg or placebo. The primary end point was the proportion of spontaneous bowel movement (SBM) responders (≥ 3 SBMs/week and an increase of ≥ 1 SBM/week from baseline). The primary end point of COMPOSE-5 was safety. Results In COMPOSE-4, 193 eligible patients were randomly assigned to naldemedine (n = 97) or placebo (n = 96). The proportion of SBM responders in COMPOSE-4 was significantly greater with naldemedine than with placebo (71.1% [69 of 97 patients] v 34.4% [33 of 96 patients]; P < .0001). A greater change from baseline was observed with naldemedine than with placebo in the frequency of SBMs/week (5.16 v 1.54; P < .0001), SBMs with complete bowel evacuation/week (2.76 v 0.71; P < .0001), and SBMs without straining/week (3.85 v 1.17; P = .0005). In COMPOSE-4, more patients treated with naldemedine than with placebo reported treatment-emergent AEs (TEAEs) (44.3% [43 of 97 patients] v 26.0% [25 of 96 patients]; P = .01); in COMPOSE-5, 105 (80.2%) of 131 of patients reported TEAEs. Diarrhea was the most frequently reported TEAE in COMPOSE-4 (19.6% [19 of 97 patients] v 7.3% [seven of 96 patients] with naldemedine v placebo) and COMPOSE-5 (18.3% [24 of 131 patients] with naldemedine). Naldemedine was not associated with signs or symptoms of opioid withdrawal and had no notable impact on opioid-mediated analgesia. Conclusion Once-daily oral naldemedine

  13. Bendamustine compared with chlorambucil in previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukaemia: updated results of a randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Wolfgang U; Lissitchkov, Toshko; Aldaoud, Ali; Liberati, Anna M; Loscertales, Javier; Herbrecht, Raoul; Juliusson, Gunnar; Postner, Gerhard; Gercheva, Liana; Goranov, Stefan; Becker, Martin; Fricke, Hans-Joerg; Huguet, Francoise; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Klein, Peter; Merkle, Karlheinz; Montillo, Marco

    2012-10-01

    The efficacy of bendamustine versus chlorambucil in a phase III trial of previously untreated patients with Binet stage B/C chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) was re-evaluated after a median observation time of 54 months in May 2010. Overall survival (OS) was analysed for the first time. At follow-up, investigator-assessed complete response (CR) rate (21·0% vs 10·8%), median progression-free survival (21·2 vs 8·8 months; P < 0·0001; hazard ratio 2·83) and time to next treatment (31·7 vs 10·1 months; P < 0·0001) were improved for bendamustine over chlorambucil. OS was not different between groups for all patients or those ≤65 years, >65 years, responders and non-responders. However, patients with objective response or a CR experienced a significantly longer OS than non-responders or those without a CR. Significantly more patients on chlorambucil progressed to second/further lines of treatment compared with those on bendamustine (78·3% vs 63·6%; P = 0·004). The benefits of bendamustine over chlorambucil were achieved without reducing quality of life. In conclusion, bendamustine is significantly more effective than chlorambucil in previously untreated CLL patients, with the achievement of a CR or objective response appearing to prolong OS. Bendamustine should be considered as a preferred first-line option over chlorambucil for CLL patients ineligible for fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and rituximab. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  14. [A phase III study of the efficacy and safety of meropenem in patients with febrile neutropenia].

    PubMed

    Imajo, Kenji; Ueda, Yasunori; Kawano, Fumio; Sao, Hiroshi; Kamimura, Tomohiko; Ito, Yoshikazu; Mugitani, Atuko; Suzuki, Kenshi; Uike, Naokuni; Miyamura, Koichi; Uski, Kensuke; Morimatsu, Yoshitaka; Akiyama, Nobu; Nagai, Hirokazu; Ohara, Akira; Tanimoto, Mitsune; Takaki, Kazutaka; Chayama, Kosuke; Urabe, Masao; Nagatoshi, Yoshihisa; Tamura, Kazuo

    2012-08-01

    Efficacy, safety and pharmacokinetics of meropenem (MEPM) were assessed when 1 g (40 mg/kg for some of the pediatric patients) t.i.d. was administered every 8hours to 101 adult and 6 pediatric patients with febrile neutropenia (FN) as diagnosed based on the Japanese guideline for FN treatment. The efficacy rate evaluated as antifebrile effect up to Day 4 of treatment was 40.0% (40/100) in adult and 66.7% (4/6) in pediatric patients. The antifebrile effect in adult patients was analyzed after stratifying them according to their neutrophil counts up to Day 4. Treatment with MEPM produced an antifebrile effect not only in patients with higher neutrophil counts (> or = 500/mm3) but also in those with lower counts (< 100/mm3), and the efficacy rate was comparable between the two groups: 38.2% in the < 100/mm3 group and 29.4 to 55.6% in the > or = 500/mm3 group. The bacteriological efficacy of MEPM evaluated as disappearance rate on Days 3 to 5 and Day 7 was both 100% (8/8 and 4/4, respectively). The time above minimal inhibitory concentration (% T > MIC) in the treatment interval was greater than 90% in 9 out of 10 patients for whom likely causative organism was isolated and identified after MEPM treatment or for whom causative organism emerging after treatment was isolated and identified. The incidence of adverse events was 93.1% in adult and 83.3% in pediatric patients. There were three deaths and one serious adverse event reported among the adult patients; however, all these cases were assessed as not related to the study medication. The incidence of adverse drug reactions was 45.5% and 66.7%, respectively. All the observed adverse drug reactions were mild or moderate in severity and none of them was severe. Adverse drug reactions which were unknown from the previous MEPM clinical studies and investigation of the results of clinical experience include 'chest discomfort', 'blood uric acid decreased', 'lymphocyte deformation', 'blood uric acid increased', 'abnormal

  15. Laparoscopic Radiofrequency Fibroid Ablation: Phase II and Phase III Results

    PubMed Central

    Pemueller, Rodolfo Robles; Garza Leal, José Gerardo; Abbott, Karen R.; Falls, Janice L.; Macer, James

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objectives: To review phase II and phase III treatments of symptomatic uterine fibroids (myomas) using laparoscopic radiofrequency volumetric thermal ablation (RFVTA). Methods: We performed a retrospective, multicenter clinical analysis of 206 consecutive cases of ultrasound-guided laparoscopic RFVTA of symptomatic myomas conducted on an outpatient basis under two phase II studies at 2 sites (n = 69) and one phase III study at 11 sites (n = 137). Descriptive and exploratory, general trend, and matched-pair analyses were applied. Results: From baseline to 12 months in the phase II study, the mean transformed symptom severity scores improved from 53.9 to 8.8 (P < .001) (n = 57), health-related quality-of-life scores improved from 48.5 to 92.0 (P < .001) (n = 57), and mean uterine volume decreased from 204.4 cm3 to 151.4 cm3 (P = .008) (n = 58). Patients missed a median of 4 days of work (range, 2–10 days). The rate of possible device-related adverse events was 1.4% (1 of 69). In the phase III study, approximately 98% of patients were assessed at 12 months, and their transformed symptom severity scores, health-related quality-of-life scores, mean decrease in uterine volume, and mean menstrual bleeding reduction were also significant. Patients in phase III missed a median of 5 days of work (range, 1–29 days). The rate of periprocedural device-related adverse events was 3.5% (5 of 137). Despite the enrollment requirement for patients in both phases to have completed childbearing, 4 pregnancies occurred within the first year after treatment. Conclusions: RFVTA does not require any uterine incisions and provides a uterine-sparing procedure with rapid recovery, significant reduction in uterine size, significant reduction or elimination of myoma symptoms, and significant improvement in quality of life. PMID:24960480

  16. Tivozanib Versus Sorafenib As Initial Targeted Therapy for Patients With Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma: Results From a Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Motzer, Robert J.; Nosov, Dmitry; Eisen, Timothy; Bondarenko, Igor; Lesovoy, Vladimir; Lipatov, Oleg; Tomczak, Piotr; Lyulko, Oleksiy; Alyasova, Anna; Harza, Mihai; Kogan, Mikhail; Alekseev, Boris Y.; Sternberg, Cora N.; Szczylik, Cezary; Cella, David; Ivanescu, Cristina; Krivoshik, Andrew; Strahs, Andrew; Esteves, Brooke; Berkenblit, Anna; Hutson, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Tivozanib is a potent and selective tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (VEGFR1), -2, and -3. This phase III trial compared tivozanib with sorafenib as initial targeted therapy in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Patients and Methods Patients with metastatic RCC, with a clear cell component, prior nephrectomy, measurable disease, and 0 or 1 prior therapies for metastatic RCC were randomly assigned to tivozanib or sorafenib. Prior VEGF-targeted therapy and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor were not permitted. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) by independent review. Results A total of 517 patients were randomly assigned to tivozanib (n = 260) or sorafenib (n = 257). PFS was longer with tivozanib than with sorafenib in the overall population (median, 11.9 v 9.1 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.797; 95% CI, 0.639 to 0.993; P = .042). One hundred fifty-six patients (61%) who progressed on sorafenib crossed over to receive tivozanib. The final overall survival (OS) analysis showed a trend toward longer survival on the sorafenib arm than on the tivozanib arm (median, 29.3 v 28.8 months; HR, 1.245; 95% CI, 0.954 to 1.624; P = .105). Adverse events (AEs) more common with tivozanib than with sorafenib were hypertension (44% v 34%) and dysphonia (21% v 5%). AEs more common with sorafenib than with tivozanib were hand-foot skin reaction (54% v 14%) and diarrhea (33% v 23%). Conclusion Tivozanib demonstrated improved PFS, but not OS, and a differentiated safety profile, compared with sorafenib, as initial targeted therapy for metastatic RCC. PMID:24019545

  17. Phase III randomized trial of sunitinib versus capecitabine in patients with previously treated HER2-negative advanced breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mei-Ching; Lee, Soo Chin; Vanlemmens, Laurence; Ferrero, Jean-Marc; Tabei, Toshio; Pivot, Xavier; Iwata, Hiroji; Aogi, Kenjiro; Lugo-Quintana, Roberto; Harbeck, Nadia; Brickman, Marla J.; Zhang, Ke; Kern, Kenneth A.; Martin, Miguel

    2010-01-01

    This multicenter, randomized, open-label phase III trial (planned enrollment: 700 patients) was conducted to test the hypothesis that single-agent sunitinib improves progression-free survival (PFS) compared with capecitabine as treatment for advanced breast cancer (ABC). Patients with HER2-negative ABC that recurred after anthracycline and taxane therapy were randomized (1:1) to sunitinib 37.5 mg/day or capecitabine 1,250 mg/m2 (1,000 mg/m2 in patients >65 years) BID on days 1–14 q3w. The independent data-monitoring committee (DMC) determined during the first interim analysis (238 patients randomized to sunitinib, 244 to capecitabine) that the trial be terminated due to futility in reaching the primary endpoint. No statistical evidence supported the hypothesis that sunitinib improved PFS compared with capecitabine (one-sided P = 0.999). The data indicated that PFS was shorter with sunitinib than capecitabine (median 2.8 vs. 4.2 months, respectively; HR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.16–1.87; two-sided P = 0.002). Median overall survival (15.3 vs. 24.6 months; HR, 1.17; two-sided P = 0.350) and objective response rates (11 vs. 16%; odds ratio, 0.65; P = 0.109) were numerically inferior with sunitinib versus capecitabine. While no new or unexpected safety findings were reported, sunitinib treatment was associated with higher frequencies and greater severities of many common adverse events (AEs) compared with capecitabine, resulting in more temporary discontinuations due to AEs with sunitinib (66 vs. 51%). The relative dose intensity was lower with sunitinib than capecitabine (73 vs. 95%). Based on these efficacy and safety results, sunitinib should not be used as monotherapy for patients with ABC. PMID:20339913

  18. Objectives and methodology of BIOBADASER phase iii.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Piedra, Carlos; Hernández Miguel, M Victoria; Manero, Javier; Roselló, Rosa; Sánchez-Costa, Jesús Tomás; Rodríguez-Lozano, Carlos; Campos, Cristina; Cuende, Eduardo; Fernández-Lopez, Jesús Carlos; Bustabad, Sagrario; Martín Domenech, Raquel; Pérez-Pampín, Eva; Del Pino-Montes, Javier; Millan-Arcineas, Ana Milena; Díaz-González, Federico; Gómez-Reino, Juan Jesús

    2017-09-18

    Describe the objectives, methods and results of the first year of the new version of the Spanish registry of adverse events involving biological therapies and synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatic diseases (BIOBADASER III). Multicenter prospective registry of patients with rheumatic inflammatory diseases being treated with biological drugs or synthetic drugs with an identifiable target in rheumatology departments in Spain. The main objective of BIOBADASER Phase III is the registry and analysis of adverse events; moreover, a secondary objective was added consisting of assessing the effectiveness by means of the registry of activity indexes. Patients in the registry are evaluated at least once every year and whenever they experience an adverse event or a change in treatment. The collection of data for phase iii began on 17 December 2015. During the first year, 35 centers participated. The number of patients included in this new phase in December 2016 was 2,664. The mean age was 53.7 years and the median duration of treatment was 8.1 years. In all, 40.4% of the patients were diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis. The most frequent adverse events were infections and infestations. BIOBADASER Phase III has been launched to adapt to a changing pharmacological environment, with the introduction of biosimilars and small molecules in the treatment of rheumatic diseases. This new stage is adapted to the changes in the reporting of adverse events and now includes information related to activity scores. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Reumatología y Colegio Mexicano de Reumatología. All rights reserved.

  19. What makes a compliant Phase III and pre-launch patient advocacy strategy?

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Nick; Allan, Keith; Thalheim, Christoph; Woods, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background A key task for the pharmaceutical industry is to understand the compliance implications of engaging with a patient advocacy group (PAG). This presents challenges for the industry to negotiate the ethical and reputational issues that can arise when working with a PAG. Objective To gain the views of pharmaceutical industry executives on future compliance challenges when working with PAGs. Study design We conducted two surveys among two sets of industry executives: one group focussed on market access roles and the other focussed on non-market access roles. Results Transparency was identified as the biggest challenge, followed by project rationale and then by project ownership. Conclusion We explore how this can be overcome and make recommendations on how best to work compliantly with PAGs. PMID:28003867

  20. Blueberry Improves the Therapeutic Effect of Etanercept on Patients with Juvenile Idiopathic Arthritis: Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Yingjie; Wang, Ye; Guo, Jun; Chu, Haifeng; Gao, Yong; Pang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is the most common arthritis in the adolescents under the age of 16. Etanercept, an inhibitor of tumor necrosis factor, is often used to treat JIA despite its significant side effects. Homeopathic remedies, such as blueberries, have anti-inflammatory properties with fewer unwanted effects and should be considered as a primary treatment. We aimed to explore the efficacy and safety of combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept for JIA. Two hundred and one JIA patients were selected, and randomly and evenly assigned to three groups: ETA (50 mg of etanercept twice weekly), ETABJ (matched etanercept and 50 ml blueberry juice daily) and ETAPJ (matched etanercept and placebo juice). The severity of JIA was measured using American College of Rheumatology scales (ACR) 20, 50 and 70. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, interleukin-1 (IL1) alpha and IL1 beta, and interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL1RA) were measured by qRT-PCR and ELISA. After a 6-month follow-up, the ACR20, ACR50 and ACR70 in an ETABJ group were higher than those in other two groups (P < 0.05), suggesting clinically meaningful improvement in JIA. Meanwhile, the symptoms and side effects were reduced significantly or absent in an ETABJ group, including mental diseases, retrobulbar optic neuritis, gaining weight, infection, cutaneous vasculitis, diarrhea, uveitis and pancytopenia. Blueberries reduced the levels of IL1 alpha and beta, and increased the level of IL1RA. Thus, a combination therapy of blueberry and etanercept can reduce the severity of JIA and should be developed as a new method for JIA therapy.

  1. A phase III trial of pemetrexed plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine in patients with unresectable or metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Oettle, H; Richards, D; Ramanathan, R K; van Laethem, J L; Peeters, M; Fuchs, M; Zimmermann, A; John, W; Von Hoff, D; Arning, M; Kindler, H L

    2005-10-01

    This randomized phase III study compared the overall survival (OS) of pemetrexed plus gemcitabine (PG) versus standard gemcitabine (G) in patients with advanced pancreatic cancer. Patients with unresectable locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer and no prior systemic therapy (including 5-fluorouracil as a radiosensitizer) were randomized to receive either 1,250 mg/m(2) gemcitabine on days 1 and 8 plus pemetrexed 500 mg/m(2) after gemcitabine on day 8 (PG arm) of each 21-day cycle, or gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) on days 1, 8 and 15 of each 28-day cycle (G arm). Five hundred and sixty-five patients with well-balanced baseline characteristics were randomly assigned (283 PG, 282 G). OS was not improved on the PG arm (6.2 months) compared with the G arm (6.3 months) (P=0.8477). Progression-free survival (3.9 versus 3.3 months; P=0.1109) and time to treatment failure (3 versus 2.2 months; P=0.2680) results were similar. Tumor response rate (14.8% versus 7.1%; P=0.004) was significantly better on the PG arm. Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia (45.1% versus 12.8%), thrombocytopenia (17.9% versus 6.2%), anemia (13.9% versus 2.9%), febrile neutropenia (9.9% versus 0.4%; all P <0.001) and fatigue (15% versus 6.6%; P=0.002) were significantly more common on the PG arm. Four treatment-related deaths occurred on the PG arm and none in the G arm. Pemetrexed plus gemcitabine therapy did not improve OS. Single-agent gemcitabine remains the standard of care for advanced pancreatic cancer.

  2. Hospital resource use of patients receiving isavuconazole vs voriconazole for invasive mold infections in the phase III SECURE trial.

    PubMed

    Horn, David; Goff, Debra; Khandelwal, Nikhil; Spalding, James; Azie, Nkechi; Shi, Fei; Franks, Billy; Shorr, Andrew F

    2016-07-01

    In the phase III SECURE trial, isavuconazole was non-inferior to voriconazole for all-cause mortality for the primary treatment of invasive mold disease (IMD) caused by Aspergillus spp. and other filamentous fungi. This analysis assessed whether hospital resource utilization was different between patients treated with isavuconazole vs voriconazole in SECURE. The analysis population comprised adults with proven/probable/possible IMD enrolled in SECURE. The primary endpoint was hospital length of stay (LOS) in the overall trial population. Patients were also stratified by estimated glomerular filtration rate-modification of diet in renal disease category (< 60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [moderate-to-severe impairment] and ≥60 mL/min/1.73 m(2) [mild or no impairment]), body mass index (BMI; <25, ≥25-<30, and ≥30 kg/m(2)), and age (≤45, >45-≤65, and >65 years). Data from 516 patients (258 per arm) were evaluated. Overall, median LOS was not statistically significantly different between the isavuconazole (15.0 days) and voriconazole (16.0 days; p = 0.607) arms. Median LOS was statistically significantly shorter in patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment treated with isavuconazole (9.0 days) vs voriconazole (19.0 days; hazard ratio [HR]: 3.44; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.51-7.83). Median LOS was shorter, but not significantly, in patients with a BMI ≥30 kg/m(2) (isavuconazole 13.5 days vs voriconazole 22 days; HR = 1.57; 95% CI = 0.70-3.52) or aged >65 years (isavuconazole 15.0 days vs voriconazole 20.0 days; HR = 1.37; 95% CI = 0.87-2.16). As the patient subgroups analyzed were small, sub-group findings should be interpreted with caution in light of the lack of statistical significance for each sub-group-by-treatment interaction. Isavuconazole may reduce hospital LOS in certain subgroups of patients with IMD, especially those with moderate-to-severe renal impairment.

  3. Tofacitinib versus methotrexate in rheumatoid arthritis: patient-reported outcomes from the randomised phase III ORAL Start trial

    PubMed Central

    Strand, Vibeke; Lee, Eun Bong; Fleischmann, Roy; Koncz, Tamas; Zwillich, Samuel H; Gruben, David; Wilkinson, Bethanie; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Wallenstein, Gene

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To compare patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in methotrexate (MTX)-naive patients (defined as no prior treatment or ≤3 doses) receiving tofacitinib versus MTX. Methods In the 24-month, phase III, randomised, controlled, ORAL Start trial (NCT01039688), patients were randomised 2:2:1 to receive tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day (n=373), tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day (n=397) or MTX (n=186). PROs assessed included Patient Global Assessment of disease (PtGA), pain, Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F) and health-related quality of life (Short Form-36 [SF-36]). Results PROs improved following tofacitinib and MTX treatment: benefits were sustained over 24 months. Patients receiving tofacitinib reported earlier responses which were significantly different between each tofacitinib dose and MTX at month 3 through month 24. At month 6 (primary end point), significant improvements versus MTX were observed in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 Physical Component Summary (PCS), 5/8 domain scores and FACIT-F with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day; all PROs, except SF-36 Mental Component Summary Score and Medical Outcomes Survey-Sleep, with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day. At month 6, the proportion of patients reporting improvements ≥minimum clinically important difference were significant versus MTX with tofacitinib 5 mg two times per day in PtGA and 3/8 SF-36 domains; and with tofacitinib 10 mg two times per day in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, SF-36 PCS, 4/8 domains and FACIT-F. Conclusions Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg two times per day monotherapy versus MTX reported statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in multiple PROs over 24 months; onset of benefit with tofacitinib treatment occurred earlier. Trial registration number NCT01039688. PMID:27752357

  4. Randomized Phase III Clinical Trial of Five Different Arms of Treatment in 332 Patients with Cancer Cachexia

    PubMed Central

    Macciò, Antonio; Madeddu, Clelia; Serpe, Roberto; Massa, Elena; Dessì, Mariele; Panzone, Filomena; Contu, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. A phase III, randomized study was carried out to establish the most effective and safest treatment to improve the primary endpoints of cancer cachexia—lean body mass (LBM), resting energy expenditure (REE), and fatigue—and relevant secondary endpoints: appetite, quality of life, grip strength, Glasgow Prognostic Score (GPS) and proinflammatory cytokines. Patients and Methods. Three hundred thirty-two assessable patients with cancer-related anorexia/cachexia syndrome were randomly assigned to one of five treatment arms: arm 1, medroxyprogesterone (500 mg/day) or megestrol acetate (320 mg/day); arm 2, oral supplementation with eicosapentaenoic acid; arm 3, L-carnitine (4 g/day); arm 4, thalidomide (200 mg/day); and arm 5, a combination of the above. Treatment duration was 4 months. Results. Analysis of variance showed a significant difference between treatment arms. A post hoc analysis showed the superiority of arm 5 over the others for all primary endpoints. An analysis of changes from baseline showed that LBM (by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and by L3 computed tomography) significantly increased in arm 5. REE decreased significantly and fatigue improved significantly in arm 5. Appetite increased significantly in arm 5; interleukin (IL)-6 decreased significantly in arm 5 and arm 4; GPS and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (ECOG PS) score decreased significantly in arm 5, arm 4, and arm 3. Toxicity was quite negligible, and was comparable between arms. Conclusion. The most effective treatment in terms of all three primary efficacy endpoints and the secondary endpoints appetite, IL-6, GPS, and ECOG PS score was the combination regimen that included all selected agents. PMID:20156909

  5. A Phase III Study of Balugrastim Versus Pegfilgrastim in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy With Doxorubicin and Docetaxel.

    PubMed

    Gladkov, Oleg; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Bondarenko, Igor N; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Barash, Steve; Adar, Liat; Avisar, Noa

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of once-per-cycle balugrastim versus pegfilgrastim for neutrophil support in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Breast cancer patients (n = 256) were randomized to 40 or 50 mg of subcutaneous balugrastim or 6 mg of pegfilgrastim ≈24 hours after chemotherapy (60 mg/m(2) doxorubicin and 75 mg/m(2) docetaxel, every 21 days for up to 4 cycles). The primary efficacy parameter was the duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) in cycle 1. Secondary parameters included DSN (cycles 2-4), absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir, febrile neutropenia rates, and time to ANC recovery (cycles 1-4). Safety, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity were assessed. Mean cycle 1 DSN was 1.0 day with 40 mg of balugrastim, 1.3 with 50 mg of balugrastim, and 1.2 with pegfilgrastim (upper limit of 95% confidence intervals for between-group DSN differences was <1.0 day for both balugrastim doses versus pegfilgrastim). Between-group efficacy parameters were comparable except for time to ANC recovery in cycle 1 (40 mg of balugrastim, 2.0 days; 50 mg of balugrastim, 2.1; pegfilgrastim, 2.6). Median terminal elimination half-life was ≈37 hours for 40 mg of balugrastim, ≈36 for 50 mg of balugrastim, and ≈45 for pegfilgrastim. Antibody response to balugrastim was low and transient, with no neutralizing effect. Once-per-cycle balugrastim is not inferior to pegfilgrastim in reducing cycle 1 DSN in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy; both drugs have comparable safety profiles. This paper provides efficacy and safety data for a new, once-per-cycle granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, balugrastim, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with breast cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. In this phase III trial, balugrastim was shown to be not inferior to pegfilgrastim in the duration of severe neutropenia in cycle 1 of doxorubicin/docetaxel chemotherapy, and the safety

  6. A Phase III Study of Balugrastim Versus Pegfilgrastim in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Chemotherapy With Doxorubicin and Docetaxel

    PubMed Central

    Gladkov, Oleg; Moiseyenko, Vladimir; Bondarenko, Igor N.; Shparyk, Yaroslav; Barash, Steve; Adar, Liat

    2016-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of once-per-cycle balugrastim versus pegfilgrastim for neutrophil support in breast cancer patients receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. Methods. Breast cancer patients (n = 256) were randomized to 40 or 50 mg of subcutaneous balugrastim or 6 mg of pegfilgrastim ≈24 hours after chemotherapy (60 mg/m2 doxorubicin and 75 mg/m2 docetaxel, every 21 days for up to 4 cycles). The primary efficacy parameter was the duration of severe neutropenia (DSN) in cycle 1. Secondary parameters included DSN (cycles 2–4), absolute neutrophil count (ANC) nadir, febrile neutropenia rates, and time to ANC recovery (cycles 1–4). Safety, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity were assessed. Results. Mean cycle 1 DSN was 1.0 day with 40 mg of balugrastim, 1.3 with 50 mg of balugrastim, and 1.2 with pegfilgrastim (upper limit of 95% confidence intervals for between-group DSN differences was <1.0 day for both balugrastim doses versus pegfilgrastim). Between-group efficacy parameters were comparable except for time to ANC recovery in cycle 1 (40 mg of balugrastim, 2.0 days; 50 mg of balugrastim, 2.1; pegfilgrastim, 2.6). Median terminal elimination half-life was ≈37 hours for 40 mg of balugrastim, ≈36 for 50 mg of balugrastim, and ≈45 for pegfilgrastim. Antibody response to balugrastim was low and transient, with no neutralizing effect. Conclusion. Once-per-cycle balugrastim is not inferior to pegfilgrastim in reducing cycle 1 DSN in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy; both drugs have comparable safety profiles. Implications for Practice: This paper provides efficacy and safety data for a new, once-per-cycle granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, balugrastim, for the prevention of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in patients with breast cancer receiving myelosuppressive chemotherapy. In this phase III trial, balugrastim was shown to be not inferior to pegfilgrastim in the duration of severe neutropenia

  7. Phase III Study of the Efficacy and Safety of Subcutaneous Versus Intravenous Tocilizumab Monotherapy in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Atsushi; Tanimura, Kazuhide; Sugimoto, Toyohiko; Inoue, Hiroshi; Urata, Yukitomo; Matsubara, Tsukasa; Kondo, Masakazu; Ueki, Yukitaka; Iwahashi, Mitsuhiro; Tohma, Shigeto; Ohta, Shuji; Saeki, Yukihiko; Tanaka, Toshio

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacious noninferiority of subcutaneous tocilizumab injection (TCZ-SC) monotherapy to intravenous TCZ infusion (TCZ-IV) monotherapy in Japanese patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) with an inadequate response to synthetic and/or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Methods This study had a double-blind, parallel-group, double-dummy, comparative phase III design. Patients were randomized to receive TCZ-SC 162 mg every 2 weeks or TCZ-IV 8 mg/kg every 4 weeks; no DMARDs were allowed during the study. The primary end point was to evaluate the noninferiority of TCZ-SC to TCZ-IV regarding the American College of Rheumatology criteria for 20% improvement in disease activity (ACR20) response rates at week 24 using an 18% noninferiority margin. Additional efficacy, safety, pharmacokinetic, and immunogenicity parameters were assessed. Results At week 24, ACR20 response was achieved in 79.2% (95% confidence interval [95% CI] 72.9, 85.5) of the TCZ-SC group and in 88.5% (95% CI 83.4, 93.5) of the TCZ-IV group; the weighted difference was −9.4% (95% CI −17.6, −1.2), confirming the noninferiority of TCZ-SC to TCZ-IV. Remission rates of the Disease Activity Score in 28 joints using the erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the Clinical Disease Activity Index at week 24 were 49.7% and 16.4% in the TCZ-SC group and 62.2% and 23.1% in the TCZ-IV group, respectively. Serum trough TCZ concentrations were similar between the groups over time. Incidences of all adverse events and serious adverse events were 89.0% and 7.5% in the TCZ-SC group and 90.8% and 5.8% in the TCZ-IV group, respectively. Anti-TCZ antibodies were detected in 3.5% of the TCZ-SC group; no serious hypersensitivity was reported in these patients. Conclusion TCZ-SC monotherapy demonstrated comparable efficacy and safety to TCZ-IV monotherapy. TCZ-SC could provide additional treatment options for patients with RA. PMID:23983039

  8. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial of duloxetine in Japanese fibromyalgia patients.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Masato; Osada, Kenichi; Mizuno, Hiromichi; Ochiai, Toshimitsu; Alev, Levent; Nishioka, Kusuki

    2015-08-22

    Fibromyalgia is characterized by widespread pain and is often accompanied by accessory symptoms. There are limited treatment options for this condition in Japan. Therefore, we conducted a phase III study to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine in Japanese patients with fibromyalgia. This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial was conducted in Japan. Outpatients who met the American College of Rheumatology 1990 criteria for fibromyalgia and whose Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score was ≥4 were randomized to duloxetine 60 mg or placebo once daily for 14 weeks. The primary efficacy measure was the change in the BPI average pain score from baseline. Secondary efficacy, quality of life (QoL), and safety outcomes were also evaluated. Mixed-effects model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis and last observation carried forward (LOCF) analysis of covariance were used to evaluate the primary efficacy measure. Overall, 393 patients were randomized to receive either duloxetine (n = 196) or placebo (n = 197). The MMRM analysis revealed no significant difference between duloxetine and placebo regarding the change in BPI average pain scores at week 14. Based on LOCF analysis, a statistically significant improvement in the change in BPI average pain scores at week 14 was observed for patients treated with duloxetine compared with placebo. Duloxetine treatment was associated with improved outcomes in nearly all secondary and post hoc analyses. The treatment was generally well tolerated. Somnolence, nausea, and constipation were the most common treatment-emergent adverse events in the duloxetine group. The discontinuation rates due to treatment-emergent adverse events were similar in both groups. Although the MMRM analysis did not demonstrate superiority of duloxetine over placebo, duloxetine treatment was associated with improved outcomes in secondary and post hoc analyses of the mean change in the BPI average pain score and

  9. SCORE2 Report 1: Techniques to Optimize Recruitment in Phase III Clinical Trials of Patients With Central Retinal Vein Occlusion.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ingrid U; VanVeldhuisen, Paul C; Ip, Michael S; Blodi, Barbara A; Oden, Neal L; Figueroa, Maria

    2016-10-01

    To investigate recruitment rates of patients with central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) into phase III clinical trials evaluating intravitreal pharmacotherapy for treatment of macular edema in the United States, describe recruitment techniques in the Study of COmparative Treatments for REtinal Vein Occlusion 2 (SCORE2), and assess which SCORE2 recruitment techniques were most useful to principal investigators and clinical coordinators. Retrospective survey within a randomized clinical trial. Recruitment rates of the Standard Care versus COrticosteroid for REtinal Vein Occlusion (SCORE)-CRVO trial, CRUISE Study, and SCORE2 were calculated. Techniques employed to facilitate recruitment in SCORE2 are described, and a survey was sent to the principal investigator and primary clinical coordinator of each SCORE2 site to assess the usefulness of recruitment techniques. In SCORE2, the recruitment rate of 0.39 participants/month/site was higher than in SCORE-CRVO (0.10 participants/month/site) and CRUISE (0.23 participants/month/site). For study design factors in SCORE2, investigators and coordinators rated provision of standard-of-care treatments to all study participants as having a major positive impact on recruitment. A monthly e-newsletter to site staff and communication by physician members of the SCORE2 Executive Committee to sites upon each randomization were perceived as effective means to help site staff focus on recruitment. The SCORE2 recruitment rate compares favorably to previous clinical trials investigating intravitreal pharmacotherapy for treatment of CRVO-associated macular edema. Study design factors, methods of communication with sites, and recruitment techniques implemented in SCORE2 were well received by investigators and coordinators and may be helpful in future clinical trials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Correct usage, ease of use, and preference of two dry powder inhalers in patients with COPD: analysis of five phase III, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Riley, John H; Tabberer, Maggie; Richard, Nathalie; Donald, Alison; Church, Alison; Harris, Stephanie S

    2016-01-01

    Background Handheld inhalers are used to deliver treatment for COPD. Incorrect usage leads to suboptimal disease control. Complex treatment regimens and use of multiple inhalers may reduce patient compliance. The Anoro Ellipta™ dry powder inhaler (DPI) simultaneously delivers umeclidinium bromide (UMEC) and vilanterol (VI) without coformulation being required. Aim To assess the correct usage and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI administering UMEC/VI and to compare patient preference for Ellipta™ with the HandiHaler® through exploratory analyses of patient and observer questionnaires in five Phase III studies. Methods Two Phase III, 3-month double-blind, placebo-controlled studies assessed the correct usage of the Ellipta™ DPI at Day 1 and after 6 weeks, and ease of use of the Ellipta™ DPI using a nonvalidated patient questionnaire after 6 weeks or early withdrawal. In three 6-month, blinded double-dummy, active comparator studies (two Phase IIIa and one Phase IIIb), patients completed a COPD device preference questionnaire between the Ellipta™ DPI and the Handi-Haler® at Day 168 (Week 24) or early withdrawal. Results In the 3-month placebo-controlled studies, ≥98% of patients used the Ellipta™ DPI correctly and 99% of patients found the inhaler easy/very easy-to-use and the dose counter easy/very easy to read. Across the two Phase IIIa active comparator studies, patients consistently stated a preference for the Ellipta™ DPI over HandiHaler® regarding the number of steps to use (59% vs 17%), time taken to use (62% vs 14%), and ease of use (63% vs 15%) regardless of which inhaler contained active drug. Results were consistent in the Phase IIIb active comparator study. Conclusion Delivery of UMEC/VI via the Ellipta™ DPI was considered easy-to-use, and patients with COPD demonstrated clear preference for this inhaler compared with HandiHaler®. PMID:27578968

  11. Exploratory analysis of a phase III trial of pirfenidone identifies a subpopulation of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis as benefiting from treatment.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Arata; Taguchi, Yoshio; Ogura, Takashi; Ebina, Masahito; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Kondoh, Yasuhiro; Suga, Moritaka; Takahashi, Hiroki; Nakata, Koichiro; Sato, Atsuhiko; Kudoh, Shoji; Nukiwa, Toshihiro

    2011-10-28

    A phase III trial in Japan showed that pirfenidone is effective for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). To find out which patients specifically benefit from pirfenidone, we analyzed in an exploratory manner the data from the phase III trial. The patients in the phase III trial were stratified by baseline percentage predicted vital capacity (%VC), arterial oxygen partial pressure (PaO(2)), and the lowest oxygen saturation by pulse oximetry (SpO(2)) during the 6-minute steady-state exercise test (6MET). In the subpopulations, changes in VC and subjective symptoms (cough and dyspnea on the Fletcher, Hugh-Jones [F, H-J] Classification scale) were evaluated in patients treated with high-dose (1800 mg/day) pirfenidone, low-dose (1200 mg/day) pirfenidone, and placebo at week 52. Significant efficacy of pirfenidone in reducing the decline in VC could be seen in a subpopulation having %VC ≥ 70% and SpO(2) < 90% at baseline. This favorable effect was accompanied by categorical change in VC and progression-free survival time. In the subpopulation, pirfenidone significantly suppressed cough and dyspnea. IPF patients having %VC ≥ 70% and SpO(2) < 90% at baseline will most likely benefit from pirfenidone when evaluated using changes in VC (and %VC), and cough and dyspnea symptoms. This subpopulation could expect to benefit most from pirfenidone treatment. This clinical trial was registered with the Japan Pharmaceutical Information Center (JAPIC) on September 13th, 2005 (REGISTRATION NUMBER: JAPICCTI-050121).

  12. Comprehensive School Transformation, Phase III. Program Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prine, Donald; Wilkinson, David

    The Iowa Educational Excellence Act and its amendments provide for four types of Phase III programs: performance-based pay, supplemental pay, a combination of both, or comprehensive school transformation. In 1993, the Des Moines Phase III program, which originated as a combination of performance-based pay and supplemental pay, changed to a…

  13. Phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) progressing after docetaxel and abiraterone

    PubMed Central

    Mateo, J.; Loriot, Y.; Pezaro, C.; Albiges, L.; Mehra, N.; Varga, A.; Bianchini, D.; Ryan, C. J.; Petrylak, D. P.; Attard, G.; Shen, L.; Fizazi, K.; de Bono, J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Abiraterone and cabazitaxel improve survival in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). We conducted an open-label phase I/II trial of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone to assess the antitumor activity and tolerability in patients with progressive mCRPC after docetaxel (phase I), and after docetaxel and abiraterone (phase II) (NCT01511536). Patients and methods The primary objectives were to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) of cabazitaxel plus abiraterone (phase I), and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) response defined as a ≥ 50% decrease confirmed ≥3 weeks later with this combination (phase II). Results Ten patients were enrolled in the phase I component; nine were evaluable. No DLTs were identified. The MTD was established as the approved doses for both drugs (cabazitaxel 25 mg/m2 every 3 weeks and abiraterone 1000 mg once daily). Daily abiraterone treatment did not impact on cabazitaxel clearance. Twenty-seven patients received cabazitaxel plus abiraterone plus prednisone (5 mg twice daily) in phase II. The median number of cycles administered (cabazitaxel) was seven (range: 1–28). Grade 3–4 treatment-emergent adverse events included asthenia (in 5 patients; 14%), neutropenia (in 5 patients; 14%) and diarrhea (in 3 patients; 8%). Nine patients (24%) required dose reductions of cabazitaxel. Of 26 evaluable patients, 12 achieved a PSA response [46%; 95% confidence interval (CI): 26.6–66.6%]. Median PSA-progression-free survival was 6.9 months (95% CI: 4.1–10.3 months). Of 14 patients with measurable disease at baseline, 3 (21%) achieved a partial response per response evaluation criteria in solid tumors. Conclusions The combination of cabazitaxel and abiraterone has a manageable safety profile and shows antitumor activity in patients previously treated with docetaxel and abiraterone. PMID:28039155

  14. Adjuvant regional chemotherapy and systemic chemotherapy versus systemic chemotherapy alone in patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer: a multicentre randomised controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Nordlinger, Bernard; Rougier, Philippe; Arnaud, Jean-Pierre; Debois, Muriel; Wils, Jaques; Ollier, Jean-Claude; Grobost, Olivier; Lasser, Philippe; Wals, Jacob; Lacourt, Jerome; Seitz, Jean-François; Guimares dos Santos, Jose; Bleiberg, Harry; Mackiewickz, Rémy; Conroy, Thierry; Bouché, Olivier; Morin, Thierry; Baila, Liliana; van Cutsem, Eric; Bedenne, Laurent

    2005-07-01

    Systemic adjuvant chemotherapy can improve overall survival and reduce the incidence of distant metastases for patients with advanced colon cancer. This study aimed to investigate whether regional chemotherapy (given by intraperitoneal or intraportal methods) combined with systemic chemotherapy was more effective than was systemic chemotherapy alone in terms of survival and recurrence for patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer. The study also compared systemic chemotherapy with fluorouracil and folinic acid with that of fluorouracil and levamisole. During surgery, 753 patients with stage II-III colorectal cancer were randomly assigned to systemic chemotherapy alone (379 with fluorouracil and folinic acid, and 374 with fluorouracil and levamisole), and 748 to postoperative regional chemotherapy with fluorouracil followed by systemic chemotherapy with fluorouracil and folinic acid (n=368) or with fluorouracil and levamisole (n=380). Regional chemotherapy was given intraperitoneally (n=415) or intraportally (n=235) according to institution. The primary endpoint was 5-year overall survival. Secondary endpoints were 5-year disease-free survival and toxic effects. Analyses were by intention to treat. Median follow-up was 6.8 years (range 0.0-10.1). 5-year overall survival was 72.3% (95% CI 69.0-75.6) for patients assigned regional and systemic chemotherapy, compared with 72.0% (68.7-75.3) for those assigned systemic chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio [HR] 0.97 [0.81-1.15], p=0.69). 5-year overall survival for all patients assigned fluorouracil and levamisole was 72.0% (68.7-75.2) compared with 72.3% (69.0-75.6) for all those assigned fluorouracil and folinic acid (HR 0.98 [0.82-1.17], p=0.81). The hazard ratios for 5-year disease-free survival were 0.94 (0.80-1.10) for regional versus non-regional treatment, and 0.92 (0.79-1.08) for all fluorouracil and levamisole versus fluorouracil and folinic acid. Grade 3-4 toxic effects were low in all groups. Fluorouracil

  15. The PACOVAR-trial: A phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. Methods/design This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). Discussion The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic

  16. The PACOVAR-trial: a phase I/II study of pazopanib (GW786034) and cyclophosphamide in patients with platinum-resistant recurrent, pre-treated ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Eichbaum, Michael; Mayer, Christine; Eickhoff, Regina; Bischofs, Esther; Gebauer, Gerhard; Fehm, Tanja; Lenz, Florian; Fricke, Hans-Christian; Solomayer, Erich; Fersis, Nikos; Schmidt, Marcus; Wallwiener, Markus; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof

    2011-10-20

    The prognosis of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is poor. There is no standard treatment available. Emerging evidence suggests a major role for antiangiogenic treatment modalities in EOC, in particular in combination with the metronomic application of low dose chemotherapy. The novel, investigational oral antiangiogenic agent pazopanib targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) and c-kit is currently being studied in different tumour types and is already used as first line therapy in recurrent renal cell carcinoma. A combined therapy consisting of pazopanib and metronomic oral cyclophosphamide may offer a well-tolerable treatment option to patients with recurrent, pretreated EOC. This study is designed as a multicenter phase I/II trial evaluating the optimal dose for pazopanib (phase I) as well as activity and tolerability of a combination regimen consisting of pazopanib and metronomic cyclophosphamide in the palliative treatment of patients with recurrent, platinum-resistant, pre-treated ovarian cancer (phase II). The patient population includes patients with histologically or cytologically confirmed diagnosis of EOC, cancer of the fallopian tube or peritoneal cancer which is platinumresistant or -refractory. Patients must have measurable disease according to RECIST criteria and must have failed available standard chemotherapy. Primary objectives are determination of the optimal doses for pazopanib (phase I) and the overall response rate according to RECIST criteria (phase II). Secondary objectives are time to progression, overall survival, safety and tolerability. The treatment duration is until disease progression or intolerability of study drug regimen (with a maximum of 13 cycles up to 52 weeks per subject). The current phase I/II trial shall clarify the potential of the multitargeting antiangiogenic tyrosinkinaseinhibitor GW 786034 (pazopanib) in

  17. Tofacitinib in Combination With Conventional Disease-Modifying Antirheumatic Drugs in Patients With Active Rheumatoid Arthritis: Patient-Reported Outcomes From a Phase III Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Strand, Vibeke; Kremer, Joel M; Gruben, David; Krishnaswami, Sriram; Zwillich, Samuel H; Wallenstein, Gene V

    2017-04-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (RA). We compared patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with RA treated with tofacitinib or placebo in combination with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). In a 12-month, phase III randomized controlled trial (ORAL Sync), patients (n = 795) with active RA and previous inadequate response to therapy with ≥1 conventional or biologic DMARD were randomized 4:4:1:1 to tofacitinib 5 mg twice daily (BID), tofacitinib 10 mg BID, placebo advanced to 5 mg BID, or placebo to 10 mg BID, in combination with stable background DMARD therapy. PROs included patient global assessment of arthritis (PtGA), patient assessment of arthritis pain (Pain), physical function (Health Assessment Questionnaire disability index [HAQ DI]), health-related quality of life (Short Form 36 health survey [SF-36]), fatigue (Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue [FACIT-F]), and sleep (Medical Outcomes Study Sleep [MOS Sleep]). At month 3, statistically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo were reported in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, all 8 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 10 mg BID, and in PtGA, Pain, HAQ DI, 7 SF-36 domains, FACIT-F, and MOS Sleep with tofacitinib 5 mg BID. Improvements were sustained to month 12. Significantly more tofacitinib-treated patients reported improvements of greater than or equal to the minimum clinically important differences at month 3 versus placebo in all PROs, except the SF-36 role-emotional domain (significant for tofacitinib 10 mg BID). Patients with active RA treated with tofacitinib combined with background conventional DMARD therapy reported sustained, significant, and clinically meaningful improvements in PROs versus placebo. © 2016, The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American College of Rheumatology.

  18. PICASSO III: A Phase III, Placebo-Controlled Study of Doxorubicin With or Without Palifosfamide in Patients With Metastatic Soft Tissue Sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Christopher W; Merimsky, Ofer; Agulnik, Mark; Blay, Jean-Yves; Schuetze, Scott M; Van Tine, Brian A; Jones, Robin L; Elias, Anthony D; Choy, Edwin; Alcindor, Thierry; Keedy, Vicki L; Reed, Damon R; Taub, Robert N; Italiano, Antoine; Garcia Del Muro, Xavier; Judson, Ian R; Buck, Jill Y; Lebel, Francois; Lewis, Jonathan J; Maki, Robert G; Schöffski, Patrick

    2016-09-12

    Palifosfamide is the active metabolite of ifosfamide and does not require prodrug activation, thereby avoiding the generation of toxic metabolites. The PICASSO III trial compared doxorubicin plus palifosfamide with doxorubicin plus placebo in patients who had received no prior systemic therapy for metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. Patients were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive doxorubicin 75 mg/m(2) intravenously day 1 plus palifosfamide 150 mg/m(2)/d intravenously days 1 to 3 or doxorubicin plus placebo once every 21 days for up to six cycles. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS) by independent radiologic review. In all, 447 patients were randomly assigned to receive doxorubicin plus palifosfamide (n = 226) or doxorubicin plus placebo (n = 221). Median PFS was 6.0 months for doxorubicin plus palifosfamide and 5.2 months for doxorubicin plus placebo (hazard ratio, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.68 to 1.08; P = .19). Median overall survival was 15.9 months for doxorubicin plus palifosfamide and 16.9 months for doxorubicin plus placebo (hazard ratio, 1.05; 95% CI, 0.79 to 1.39; P = .74). There was a higher incidence of grade 3 to 4 adverse events in the doxorubicin plus palifosfamide arm (63.6% v 50.9%) including a higher rate of febrile neutropenia (21.4% v 12.6%). No significant difference in PFS was observed in patients receiving doxorubicin plus palifosfamide compared with those receiving doxorubicin plus placebo. The observed median PFS and overall survival in this large, international study can serve as a benchmark for future studies of doxorubicin in metastatic soft tissue sarcoma. © 2016 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Patient-reported outcomes from a phase III study of baricitinib in patients with conventional synthetic DMARD-refractory rheumatoid arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Blanco, Ricardo; Maldonado Cocco, Jose; Chen, Ying-Chou; Gaich, Carol L; DeLozier, Amy M; de Bono, Stephanie; Liu, Jiajun; Rooney, Terence; Chang, Cecile Hsiao-Chun; Dougados, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To evaluate the effect of baricitinib on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response or intolerance to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. Methods In this phase III study, patients were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo (N=228), baricitinib 2 mg once daily (QD, N=229) or baricitinib 4 mg QD (N=227). PROs included the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Patient's Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), patient's assessment of pain, measures from patient electronic daily diaries (duration and severity of morning joint stiffness (MJS), Worst Tiredness, Worst Joint Pain), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), SF-36, EuroQol 5-D index scores and visual analogue scales (VAS) and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-RA. The primary time point for the study was week 12. Treatment comparisons were assessed with logistic regression for categorical measures and analysis of covariance for continuous variables. Results Statistically significant improvements were observed for both baricitinib groups versus placebo in HAQ-DI, PtGA, pain, daily diary measures, EuroQoL index scores and SF-36 physical component score at week 12 and for those measures when assessed at week 24. Baricitinib 2 mg and baricitinib 4 mg were statistically significantly improved versus placebo for the EuroQoL VAS and FACIT-F, respectively, at week 24. Conclusions Baricitinib 2 or 4 mg provided significant improvement versus placebo in PROs across different domains of RA, including physical function, MJS, fatigue, pain and quality of life. Trial registration number NCT01721057; Results. PMID:28405473

  20. Patient-reported outcomes from a phase III study of baricitinib in patients with conventional synthetic DMARD-refractory rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul; Blanco, Ricardo; Maldonado Cocco, Jose; Chen, Ying-Chou; Gaich, Carol L; DeLozier, Amy M; de Bono, Stephanie; Liu, Jiajun; Rooney, Terence; Chang, Cecile Hsiao-Chun; Dougados, Maxime

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of baricitinib on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and an inadequate response or intolerance to conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs. In this phase III study, patients were randomised 1:1:1 to placebo (N=228), baricitinib 2 mg once daily (QD, N=229) or baricitinib 4 mg QD (N=227). PROs included the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Patient's Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), patient's assessment of pain, measures from patient electronic daily diaries (duration and severity of morning joint stiffness (MJS), Worst Tiredness, Worst Joint Pain), Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), SF-36, EuroQol 5-D index scores and visual analogue scales (VAS) and the Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-RA. The primary time point for the study was week 12. Treatment comparisons were assessed with logistic regression for categorical measures and analysis of covariance for continuous variables. Statistically significant improvements were observed for both baricitinib groups versus placebo in HAQ-DI, PtGA, pain, daily diary measures, EuroQoL index scores and SF-36 physical component score at week 12 and for those measures when assessed at week 24. Baricitinib 2 mg and baricitinib 4 mg were statistically significantly improved versus placebo for the EuroQoL VAS and FACIT-F, respectively, at week 24. Baricitinib 2 or 4 mg provided significant improvement versus placebo in PROs across different domains of RA, including physical function, MJS, fatigue, pain and quality of life. NCT01721057; Results.

  1. Alopecia as surrogate marker for chemotherapy response in patients with primary epithelial ovarian cancer: a metaanalysis of four prospective randomised phase III trials with 5114 patients.

    PubMed

    Sehouli, Jalid; Fotopoulou, Christina; Erol, Edibe; Richter, Rolf; Reuss, Alexander; Mahner, Sven; Lauraine, Eric Pujade; Kristensen, Gunnar; Herrstedt, Jörn; du Bois, Andreas; Pfisterer, Jacobus

    2015-05-01

    Alopecia is a common side-effect of chemotherapy and affects quality of life of cancer patients. Some patients and physicians believe that alopecia could be a surrogate marker for response to chemotherapy and impact on prognosis. However, this was never been tested in a sufficiently large cohort of ovarian cancer patients. We analysed retrospectively the meta-databank of four prospective randomised phase-III-trials with platinum- and taxane-based 1st-line-chemotherapy in patients with advanced epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) regarding the impact of alopecia overall outcome. For 4705 (92.0%) of a total of 5114 EOC-patients alopecia was documented. They had received on median six cycle platinum-taxane chemotherapy (range 0-11) with 4186 (89.0%) having completed ⩾ 6 cycles. Worst alopecia grade was 0 in 2.4%, 1 in 2.9% and 2 in 94.7% of the patients. In a univariate analysis, including all patients, grade-0/1 alopecia was associated with significantly lower progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to grade-2 alopecia. However when assessing only those patients who completed ⩾ 6 chemotherapy-cycles and hence eliminating the bias of lower total dose of treatment, alopecia failed to retain any significant impact on survival in the multivariate analysis. Merely the time point of alopecia onset was an independent prognostic factor of survival: patients who developed grade-2 alopecia up to cycle 3 had a significantly longer OS compared to patients who experienced alopecia later during therapy (hazard ratio (HR): 1.25; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.04-1.50). Within a large EOC-patient cohort with 1st-line platinum- and taxane-based chemotherapy early onset alopecia appears to be significantly associated with a more favourable outcome in those patients who completed ⩾ 6 chemotherapy cycles. It remains to be elucidated if early onset alopecia is just a surrogate marker for higher sensitivity to chemotherapy or if other biological effects are

  2. Patient-reported outcomes from a randomised phase III study of baricitinib in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and an inadequate response to biological agents (RA-BEACON).

    PubMed

    Smolen, Josef S; Kremer, Joel M; Gaich, Carol L; DeLozier, Amy M; Schlichting, Douglas E; Xie, Li; Stoykov, Ivaylo; Rooney, Terence; Bird, Paul; Sánchez Bursón, Juan Miguel; Genovese, Mark C; Combe, Bernard

    2017-04-01

    To assess baricitinib on patient-reported outcomes (PROs) in patients with moderately to severely active rheumatoid arthritis, who had insufficient response or intolerance to ≥1 tumour necrosis factor inhibitors (TNFis) or other biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (bDMARDs). In this double-blind phase III study, patients were randomised to once-daily placebo or baricitinib 2 or 4 mg for 24 weeks. PROs included the Short Form-36, EuroQol 5-D, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), Patient's Global Assessment of Disease Activity (PtGA), patient's assessment of pain, duration of morning joint stiffness (MJS) and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment Questionnaire-Rheumatoid Arthritis. Treatment comparisons were performed with logistic regression for categorical measures or analysis of covariance for continuous variables. 527 patients were randomised (placebo, 176; baricitinib 2 mg, 174; baricitinib 4 mg, 177). Both baricitinib-treated groups showed statistically significant improvements versus placebo in most PROs. Improvements were generally more rapid and of greater magnitude for patients receiving baricitinib 4 mg than 2 mg and were maintained to week 24. At week 24, more baricitinib-treated patients versus placebo-treated patients reported normal physical functioning (HAQ-DI <0.5; p≤0.001), reductions in fatigue (FACIT-F ≥3.56; p≤0.05), improvements in PtGA (p≤0.001) and pain (p≤0.001) and reductions in duration of MJS (p<0.01). Baricitinib improved most PROs through 24 weeks compared with placebo in this study of treatment-refractory patients with previously inadequate responses to bDMARDs, including at least one TNFi. PRO results aligned with clinical efficacy data for baricitinib. NCT01721044; Results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Phase I/II study of S-1 combined with paclitaxel in patients with unresectable and/or recurrent advanced gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mochiki, E; Ohno, T; Kamiyama, Y; Aihara, R; Haga, N; Ojima, H; Nakamura, J; Ohsawa, H; Nakabayashi, T; Takeuchi, K; Asao, T; Kuwano, H

    2006-01-01

    Both paclitaxel and S-1 are effective against gastric cancer, but the optimal regimen for combined chemotherapy with these drugs remains unclear. This phase I/II study was designed to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), recommended dose (RD), dose-limiting toxicity (DLT), and objective response rate of paclitaxel in combination with S-1. S-1 was administered orally at a fixed dose of 80 mg m−2 day−1 from days 1 to 14 of a 28-day cycle. Paclitaxel was given intravenously on days 1, 8, and 15, starting with a dose of 40 mg m−2 day−1. The dose was increased in a stepwise manner to 70 mg m−2. Treatment was repeated every 4 weeks unless disease progression was confirmed. In the phase I portion, 17 patients were enrolled. The MTD of paclitaxel was estimated to be 70 mg m−2 because 40% of the patients given this dose level (two of five) had DLT. The RD was determined to be 60 mg m−2. In the phase II portion, 24 patients, including five with assessable disease who received the RD in the phase I portion, were evaluated. The median number of treatment courses was six (range: 1–17). The incidence of the worst-grade toxicity in patients given the RD was 28 and 8%, respectively. All toxic effects were manageable. The response rate was 54.1%, and the median survival time was 15.5 months. Our phase I/II trial showed that S-1 combined with paclitaxel is effective and well tolerated in patients with advanced gastric cancer. PMID:17133268

  4. Design of Training Systems Phase III Report

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-09-01

    as the reader is aware of this approach and relies on the T&E Report for a more detailed analysis , this summary should highlight the key T&E concerns... ANALYSIS AND EVALUATION GROUP LIBRARY TECHNICAL REPORT SECTION NAVAL POSTGRADUATE S^ MONTEREY CALliChMA TAEG REPORT NO. 28 DESIGN...EVALUATION SUMMARY I II-l IV PHASE III PRODUCTS CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS IV-1 PHASE III DOCUMENTATION IV-7 11 TAE6 REPORT NO. 28

  5. SHARE: a French multicenter phase III trial comparing accelerated partial irradiation versus standard or hypofractionated whole breast irradiation in breast cancer patients at low risk of local recurrence.

    PubMed

    Belkacemi, Yazid; Bourgier, Céline; Kramar, Andrew; Auzac, Guillaume; Dumas, Isabelle; Lacornerie, Thomas; Mége, Jean-Pierre; Mijonnet, Sylvie; Lemonnier, Jerôme; Lartigau, Eric

    2013-02-01

    The standard treatment for breast cancer patients at low risk of recurrence is based on conservative surgery followed by radiation therapy delivered to the whole breast. The accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) concept, developed more than 15 years ago, could be an option in selected patients. However, the ideal patient profile for APBI is still not clearly identified. Recent reports from the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) and the Groupe Européen de Curiethérapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology (GEC-ESTRO) have suggested selection criteria for "suitable patients" who could receive APBI outside of clinical trials. Currently, there are 6 ongoing phase III trials. All are characterized by a significant heterogeneity regarding inclusion criteria and stratification factors. The French UNICANCER trial (SHARE; ClinicalTrials.gov identifier NCT01247233) will randomize 2,800 patients in 3 arms: APBI (1 week) using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal radiotherapy, standard radiotherapy (6.5 weeks), and hypofractionated radiotherapy (3 weeks). In this article, we review the reported retrospective studies as well as older randomized trials. We will also describe the differences between the 6 ongoing phase III trials and the particularities of the French SHARE trial.

  6. The addition of cyclophosphamide to lenalidomide and dexamethasone in multiply relapsed/refractory myeloma patients; a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Schey, Stephen A; Morgan, Gareth J; Ramasamy, Karthik; Hazel, Beth; Ladon, Dariusz; Corderoy, Sophie; Jenner, Matthew; Phekoo, Karen; Boyd, Kevin; Davies, Faith E

    2010-08-01

    We report the results of a Phase I/II dose escalation study to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of cyclophosphamide when combined with lenalidomide and dexamethasone in relapsed/refractory myeloma. Thirty-one patients were enrolled in cohorts of 3, at five dose levels of cyclophosphamide to a maximum of 700 mg on days 1 and 8 of a 28-d cycle. Patients received lenalidomide 25 mg days 1-21 and dexamethasone 20 mg orally days 1-4 and 8-11. The MTD was 600 mg cyclophosphamide, days 1 and 8. Grade 3/4 haematological complications occurred in 26% of patients, grade 3/4 infection in 3% (both at 700 mg cyclophosphamide), with thromboembolic complications in 6% of patients. Overall complete response (CR) rate was 29%, very good partial response rate 7% and partial response rate 45% giving an overall response rate of 81%. After 21 months median follow-up, projected 2-year progression-free survival was 56%, with 80% overall survival at 30 months. Ten further patients were treated at MTD with a 40% CR rate. No dose reductions for any study drugs or deaths occurred during cycles 1-9. Lenalidomide, cyclophosphamide and dexamethasone is a safe, effective combination in relapsed myeloma inducing a high response rate, warranting further investigation in phase III trials.

  7. Results of a phase I-II study of fenretinide and rituximab for patients with indolent B-cell lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cowan, Andrew J; Stevenson, Phillip A; Gooley, Ted A; Frayo, Shani L; Oliveira, George R; Smith, Stephen D; Green, Damian J; Roden, Jennifer E; Pagel, John M; Wood, Brent L; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2017-02-01

    Fenretinide, a synthetic retinoid, induces apoptotic cell death in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) and acts synergistically with rituximab in preclinical models. We report results from a phase I-II study of fenretinide with rituximab for B-NHLs. Eligible diagnoses included indolent B-NHL or mantle cell lymphoma. The phase I design de-escalated from fenretinide at 900 mg/m(2) PO BID for days 1-5 of a 7-day cycle. The phase II portion added 375 mg/m(2) IV rituximab weekly on weeks 5-9 then every 3 months. Fenretinide was continued until progression or intolerance. Thirty-two patients were treated: 7 in phase I, and 25 in phase II of the trial. No dose-limiting toxicities were observed. The phase II component utilized fenretinide 900 mg/m(2) twice daily with rituximab. The most common treatment-related adverse events of grade 3 or higher were rash (n = 3) and neutropenia (n = 3). Responses were seen in 6 (24%) patients on the phase II study, with a median duration of response of 47 months (95% confidence interval, 2-56). The combination of fenretinide and rituximab was well tolerated, yielded a modest overall response rate, but with prolonged remission durations. Further study should focus on identifying the responsive subset of B-NHL. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Effect of Teduglutide, a Glucagon-like Peptide 2 Analog, on Citrulline Levels in Patients With Short Bowel Syndrome in Two Phase III Randomized Trials

    PubMed Central

    Seidner, Douglas L; Joly, Francisca; Youssef, Nader N

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: In clinical trials, treatment with the glucagon-like peptide 2 analog teduglutide was associated with improved fluid and nutrient absorption and increased intestinal villus height and crypt depth in patients with short bowel syndrome (SBS). Plasma citrulline, an amino acid produced by enterocytes, is considered a measure of enterocyte mass. This analysis assessed changes in plasma citrulline levels in patients with SBS in 2 phase III clinical studies of teduglutide. Methods: Both teduglutide studies (0.05 or 0.10 mg/kg/day in CL0600-004 and 0.05 mg/kg/day in CL0600-020) were phase III, 24-week, double-blind, and placebo controlled. Plasma citrulline levels were analyzed and validated by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Results: In both the CL0600-004 and CL0600-020 studies, change in mean plasma citrulline concentrations at Week 24 vs. baseline was significantly greater with teduglutide compared with placebo (10.9 (0.05-mg/kg/day dose) and 15.7 (0.10-mg/kg/day dose) vs. 2.0 μmol/L and 20.6 vs. 0.7 μmol/L, respectively, for each study (P≤0.0001 for each comparison with placebo)). Teduglutide treatment was associated with reductions from baseline in PS (parenteral support) volume requirements; however, a significant correlation between PS reduction and increase in plasma citrulline at Week 24 was observed in only one out of the three teduglutide treatment groups. Conclusions: In 2 phase III studies, patients receiving teduglutide had significant increases in plasma citrulline at Week 24 compared with patients receiving placebo. Increases in plasma citrulline concentrations likely reflect enterocyte mass expansion, but no clear correlation was detected between change in plasma citrulline and change in weekly PS volume. PMID:26111125

  9. Primary Analysis of the Phase II Component of a Phase I/II Dose Intensification Study Using Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiation Therapy and Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Inoperable Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: RTOG 0117

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Graham, Mary V.; Byhardt, Roger; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Fowler, Jack; Purdy, James A.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gore, Elizabeth; Choy, Hak

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Phase I of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0117 determined that 74 Gy was the maximum-tolerated dose with concurrent weekly carboplatin/paclitaxel chemotherapy for inoperable non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Phase II results are reported here. Patients and Methods Patients with unresectable stages I-III NSCLC were eligible. Chemotherapy consisted of weekly paclitaxel at 50 mg/m2 and carboplatin at area under the curve 2 mg/m2. The radiation dose was 74 Gy given in 37 fractions. Radiation therapy volumes included those of the gross tumor and involved nodes. The volume of lung at or exceeding 20 Gy (V20) was mandated to be ≤ 30%. Results Of the combined phase I/II enrollment, a total of 55 patients received 74 Gy, of whom 53 were evaluable. The median follow-up was 19.3 months (range, 0.9 to 57.9 months) for all patients and 25.4 months (range, 13.1 to 57.9 months) for those still alive. The median survival for all patients was 25.9 months. The percentage surviving at least 12 months was 75.5% (95% CI, 65.7% to 85.2%). The median overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) times for stage III patients (n = 44) were 21.6 months and 10.8 months, respectively. OS and PFS rates at 12 months were 72.7% and 50.0%, respectively. Twelve patients experienced grade ≥ 3 lung toxicity (two patients had grade 5 lung toxicity). Conclusion The median survival time and OS rate at 12 months for this regimen are encouraging. These results serve as projection expectations for the high-dose radiation arms of the current RTOG 0617 phase III intergroup trial. PMID:20368547

  10. Zoledronic Acid for Prevention of Bone Loss in Patients Receiving Primary Therapy for Lymphomas: A Prospective, Randomized Controlled Phase III Trial

    PubMed Central

    Westin, Jason R.; Thompson, Michael A.; Cataldo, Vince D.; Fayad, Luis E.; Fowler, Nathan; Fanale, Michelle A.; Neelapu, Saatva; Samaniego, Felipe; Romaguera, Jorge; Shah, Jatin; McLaughlin, Peter; Pro, Barbara; Kwak, Larry W.; Sanjorjo, Perpetua; Murphy, William A.; Jimenez, Camillo; Toth, Bela; Dong, Wenli; Hagemeister, Fredrick B.

    2013-01-01

    In patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma, low bone mineral density (BMD) is common at diagnosis and worsens with therapy. Our randomized phase III trial demonstrates that 2 doses of zoledronic acid (ZA) and supplementation with calcium and vitamin D effectively prevent further bone loss. Background Patients with lymphoma are at risk of development of bone mineral density (BMD) loss from therapy with high-dose corticosteroids and alkylating agents. Zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate, may prevent this complication of therapy. We evaluated the effect of ZA on the change in BMD and surrogate biomarkers in patients with lymphoma receiving initial chemotherapy. Patients and Methods Our phase III trial randomized 74 patients with newly diagnosed lymphoma and a baseline BMD of ≥ −2.0 to receive oral calcium and vitamin D daily with or without ZA at enrollment and at 6 months after enrollment. BMD was evaluated at baseline and 1 year after enrollment. Secondary biomarker endpoints were collected at baseline and at 3, 6, 9, and 12 months after enrollment. Results Forty-three percent of patients had baseline osteopenia. Fifty-three patients were evaluable for response: 24 received ZA and had stable BMD during the observation period, whereas 29 patients in the control group had decreased BMD (P < .05 at lumbar spine and bilateral femoral neck). Twenty-one randomized patients were not evaluable for response because of lymphoma progression or death, withdrawn consent/incomplete testing, or ineligibility. Bone biomarkers were higher in the control group at all intervals after treatment (P < .001). No fractures or intervention-related toxicities were observed during this trial. Conclusions Newly diagnosed patients with lymphoma are at risk of low BMD, which may worsen with therapy. Treatment with ZA effectively stabilizes BMD and prevents bone loss. Our data suggest that BMD testing and prophylaxis should be considered as an early intervention for a preventable problem

  11. Phase I/II study of the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Berdeja, Jesus G; Hart, Lowell L; Mace, Joseph R; Arrowsmith, Edward R; Essell, James H; Owera, Rami S; Hainsworth, John D; Flinn, Ian W

    2015-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the safety and efficacy of the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. Patients with multiple myeloma who had relapsed after at least one prior treatment were eligible to participate. In the dose escalation part of the study a standard 3+3 design was used to determine the maximum tolerated dose of four planned dose levels of the combination of carfilzomib and panobinostat. Panobinostat was administered on days 1, 3, 5, 15, 17, and 19. Carfilzomib was administered on days 1, 2, 8, 9, 15, and 16 of each 28-day cycle. Treatment was continued until progression or intolerable toxicity. Forty-four patients were accrued into the trial, 13 in the phase I part and 31 in the phase II part of the study. The median age of the patients was 66 years and the median number of prior therapies was five. The expansion dose was established as 30 mg panobinostat, 20/45 mg/m(2) carfilzomib. The overall response rate was 67% for all patients, 67% for patients refractory to prior proteasome inhibitor treatment and 75% for patients refractory to prior immune modulating drug treatment. At a median follow up of 17 months, median progression-free survival was 7.7 months, median time to progression was 7.7 months, and median overall survival had not been reached. The regimen was well tolerated, although there were several panobinostat dose reductions. In conclusion, the combination of panobinostat and carfilzomib is feasible and effective in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. (Trial registered at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01496118).

  12. Phase I/II study of biweekly vinorelbine and oxaliplatin as first-line treatment in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Antonio; Servitja, Sonia; Rodríguez-Lescure, Alvaro; Calvo, Lourdes; del Barco, Sonia; Quintanar, María Teresa; Juárez, José Ignacio; Gayo, Javier; Llombart, Antonio; Tusquets, Ignasi

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this phase I/II study was to establish the recommended dose of biweekly vinorelbine and oxaliplatin in patients with metastatic breast cancer and to evaluate the efficacy and safety profile of this schedule as first-line treatment. Four different dose levels of vinorelbine and oxaliplatin were selected for the phase I study: (i) 25 and 80 mg/m²; (ii) 25 and 90 mg/m²; (iii) 25 and 100 mg/m²; and (iv) 30 and 90 mg/m²; respectively. At least three patients were treated at each dose level. Overall, 12 patients were included in the phase I trial. No dose-limiting toxicities occurred at any dose level. Therefore, the fourth dose level (30 mg/m² of vinorelbine and 90 mg/m² of oxaliplatin) every 2 weeks was selected for the phase II trial. In this part, 44 patients were included and 61% completed the eight 2-week cycles of study treatment. On an intention-to-treat basis, overall response rate was 59%, and median progression-free survival and overall survival were 9.2 months (95% confidence interval: 7.6-10.9) and 18.6 months (95% confidence interval: 14.4-22.9), respectively. The main severe toxicities were neutropenia (46%) and fatigue (14%). We conclude that the biweekly combination of vinorelbine and oxaliplatin at doses of 30 mg/m² and 90 mg/m², respectively, is highly active and well tolerated as first-line treatment for patients with metastatic breast cancer.

  13. Phase I/II Study of the Antibody-Drug Conjugate Glembatumumab Vedotin in Patients With Advanced Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Ott, Patrick A.; Hamid, Omid; Pavlick, Anna C.; Kluger, Harriet; Kim, Kevin B.; Boasberg, Peter D.; Simantov, Ronit; Crowley, Elizabeth; Green, Jennifer A.; Hawthorne, Thomas; Davis, Thomas A.; Sznol, Mario; Hwu, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The antibody-drug conjugate glembatumumab vedotin links a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody against the melanoma-related glycoprotein NMB (gpNMB) to the potent cytotoxin monomethyl auristatin E. This study evaluated the safety and activity of glembatumumab vedotin in patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients received glembatumumab vedotin every 3 weeks (schedule 1) in a dose escalation and phase II expansion at the maximum-tolerated dose (MTD). Dosing during 2 of 3 weeks (schedule 2) and weekly (schedule 3) was also assessed. The primary end points were safety and pharmacokinetics. The secondary end points included antitumor activity, gpNMB expression, and immunogenicity. Results One hundred seventeen patients were treated using schedule 1 (n = 79), schedule 2 (n = 15), or schedule 3 (n = 23). The MTDs were 1.88, 1.5, and 1.0 mg/kg for schedules 1, 2, and 3, respectively. Grade 3/4 treatment-related toxicities that occurred in two or more patients included rash, neutropenia, fatigue, neuropathy, arthralgia, myalgia, and diarrhea. Three treatment-related deaths (resulting from pneumococcal sepsis, toxic epidermal necrolysis, and renal failure) occurred at doses exceeding the MTDs. In the schedule 1 phase II expansion cohort (n = 34), five patients (15%) had a partial response and eight patients (24%) had stable disease for ≥ 6 months. The objective response rate (ORR) was 2 of 6 (33%) for the schedule 2 MTD and 3 of 12 (25%) for the schedule 3 MTD. Rash was correlated with a greater ORR and improved progression-free survival. Conclusion Glembatumumab vedotin is active in advanced melanoma. The schedule 1 MTD (1.88 mg/kg once every 3 weeks) was associated with a promising ORR and was generally well tolerated. More frequent dosing was potentially associated with a greater ORR but increased toxicity. PMID:25267741

  14. Dosing considerations for rufinamide in patients with Lennox-Gastaut syndrome: Phase III trial results and real-world clinical data.

    PubMed

    Kothare, Sanjeev; Kluger, Gerhard; Sachdeo, Rajesh; Williams, Betsy; Olhaye, Omar; Perdomo, Carlos; Bibbiani, Francesco

    2017-04-01

    Lennox-Gastaut syndrome (LGS), a rare, severe form of childhood-onset epilepsy, is difficult to control. Rufinamide is indicated for adjunctive treatment of seizures associated with LGS in adults and pediatric patients aged ≥1 year. In clinical practice, rufinamide dosing and titration may differ from the trial setting. Here, rufinamide clinical trial data are compared with real-world experience to provide insight into optimal dosing and titration strategies. Rufinamide Phase III and open-label extension (OLE) studies were reviewed; effect of titration and dose on adverse events (AEs) and concomitant AED use were analyzed. Real-world studies of rufinamide in LGS were identified via PubMed search. Clinical data were extracted and compared. Results demonstrated that a rapid titration schedule (7 or 14 days) of rufinamide was tolerable for most patients and resulted in highly significant reductions in total and tonic-atonic seizures, with efficacy and tolerability sustained over 3 years. The most common AEs during the Phase III study - somnolence, vomiting, and pyrexia - occurred during the first 3 weeks of treatment, and a small subset of patients were unable to reach target dose in that time. Use of concomitant AEDs had no clinically significant effect on plasma concentrations of rufinamide. Data from real-world clinical studies are consistent with the Phase III and OLE study results. However, relative to those used in clinical trials, lower doses and slower titration schedules were commonly employed in real-world settings. A lower dose and slower titration schedule ("low and slow") may reduce incidence of AEs without compromising efficacy of rufinamide in LGS. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Using phase II data for the analysis of phase III studies: An application in rare diseases.

    PubMed

    Wandel, Simon; Neuenschwander, Beat; Röver, Christian; Friede, Tim

    2017-06-01

    Clinical research and drug development in orphan diseases are challenging, since large-scale randomized studies are difficult to conduct. Formally synthesizing the evidence is therefore of great value, yet this is rarely done in the drug-approval process. Phase III designs that make better use of phase II data can facilitate drug development in orphan diseases. A Bayesian meta-analytic approach is used to inform the phase III study with phase II data. It is particularly attractive, since uncertainty of between-trial heterogeneity can be dealt with probabilistically, which is critical if the number of studies is small. Furthermore, it allows quantifying and discounting the phase II data through the predictive distribution relevant for phase III. A phase III design is proposed which uses the phase II data and considers approval based on a phase III interim analysis. The design is illustrated with a non-inferiority case study from a Food and Drug Administration approval in herpetic keratitis (an orphan disease). Design operating characteristics are compared to those of a traditional design, which ignores the phase II data. An analysis of the phase II data reveals good but insufficient evidence for non-inferiority, highlighting the need for a phase III study. For the phase III study supported by phase II data, the interim analysis is based on half of the patients. For this design, the meta-analytic interim results are conclusive and would justify approval. In contrast, based on the phase III data only, interim results are inconclusive and require further evidence. To accelerate drug development for orphan diseases, innovative study designs and appropriate methodology are needed. Taking advantage of randomized phase II data when analyzing phase III studies looks promising because the evidence from phase II supports informed decision-making. The implementation of the Bayesian design is straightforward with public software such as R.

  16. Phase I/II trial of capecitabine and oxaliplatin in combination with bevacizumab and imatinib in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: AIO KRK 0205

    PubMed Central

    Hoehler, T; von Wichert, G; Schimanski, C; Kanzler, S; Moehler, M H; Hinke, A; Seufferlein, T; Siebler, J; Hochhaus, A; Arnold, D; Hallek, M; Hofheinz, R; Hacker, U T

    2013-01-01

    Background: Combined inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor receptor beta signalling and vascular endothelial growth factor promotes vascular normalisation in preclinical models and may lead to increased delivery of chemotherapy to tumour tissue. This phase I/II trial assessed the safety and efficacy of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) plus bevacizumab and imatinib in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer. Methods: Two dose levels (I/II) were defined: capecitabine 850/1000 mg m−2 twice daily on days 1–14; oxaliplatin 100/130 mg m−2 on day 1; bevacizumab 7.5 mg kg−1 on day 1; imatinib 300 mg day−1 on days 1–21 every 21 days. The primary study endpoint was safety. The phase II secondary endpoint was 6-month progression-free survival (PFS). Results: Dose level I was chosen for phase II testing because, even though further dose escalation was permitted by the protocol, gastrointestinal toxicities were considered to be clinically significant. A total of 49 patients were evaluated. The 6-month PFS rate was 76%, median PFS was 10.6 months and median overall survival was 23.2 months. Haematological toxicities were generally mild. Sensory neuropathy and diarrhoea were the most common grade 3 toxicities. Conclusion: The combination of XELOX with bevacizumab and imatinib is tolerable and has promising efficacy. PMID:23963139

  17. Project 8 Phase III Design Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashtari Esfahani, A.; Böser, S.; Claessens, C.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Doeleman, S.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Guigue, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Jones, A. M.; Kazkaz, K.; LaRoque, B. H.; Machado, E.; Monreal, B.; Nikkel, J. A.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Saldaña, L.; Slocum, P. L.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thümmler, T.; VanDevender, B. A.; Wachtendonk, M.; Weintroub, J.; Young, A.; Zayas, E.

    2017-09-01

    We present a working concept for Phase III of the Project 8 experiment, aiming to achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of 2 eV (90 % C.L.) using a large volume of molecular tritium and a phased antenna array. The detection system is discussed in detail.

  18. Effect of Secukinumab on Patient-Reported Outcomes in Patients With Active Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Phase III Randomized Trial (MEASURE 1).

    PubMed

    Deodhar, Atul A; Dougados, Maxime; Baeten, Dominique L; Cheng-Chung Wei, James; Geusens, Piet; Readie, Aimee; Richards, Hanno B; Martin, Ruvie; Porter, Brian

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of secukinumab (interleukin-17A inhibitor) on patient-reported outcomes in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). In this phase III study, 371 patients were randomized (1:1:1) to receive intravenous (IV) secukinumab 10 mg/kg at baseline and weeks 2 and 4 followed by subcutaneous (SC) secukinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks (IV→150 mg group), or SC secukinumab 75 mg every 4 weeks (IV→75 mg group), or placebo. Patient-reported outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), BASDAI criteria for 50% improvement (BASDAI 50), Short Form 36 (SF-36) physical component summary (PCS) score and mental component summary (MCS) score, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), EuroQol 5-domain (EQ-5D) questionnaire, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Fatigue (FACIT-F), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment-General Health questionnaire (WPAI-GH). At week 16, secukinumab IV→150 mg or IV→75 mg was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo in the BASDAI (-2.3 for both regimens versus -0.6; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively), SF-36 PCS (5.6 for both regimens versus 1.0; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively), and ASQoL (-3.6 for both regimens versus -1.0; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Clinically significant improvements in the SF-36 MCS, BASFI, EQ-5D, and BASDAI 50 were observed with both secukinumab groups versus placebo at week 16; improvements were also observed in the FACIT-F and WPAI-GH. All improvements were sustained through week 52. Our findings indicate that secukinumab provides significant and sustained improvements in patient-reported disease activity and health-related quality of life, and reduces functional impairment, fatigue, and impact of disease on work productivity in patients with active AS. © 2016 The

  19. Effects of phase III cardiac rehabilitation programs on health-related quality of life in elderly patients with coronary artery disease: Juntendo Cardiac Rehabilitation Program (J-CARP).

    PubMed

    Seki, Eriko; Watanabe, Yoshiro; Sunayama, Satoshi; Iwama, Yoshitaka; Shimada, Kazunori; Kawakami, Kazunobu; Sato, Mizue; Sato, Hiroyuki; Mokuno, Hiroshi; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized controlled trial was to assess the impact of phase III comprehensive cardiac rehabilitation (CR) on health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Thirty-eight elderly males (mean age, 70 years) with CAD were stratified as the intervention group (n=20) and the control group (n=18). In the intervention group, patients participated in CR for 6 months, whereas in the control group, they received standard care. Validated questionnaires were obtained to evaluate HRQOL using the Medical Outcome Study Short-Form 36 Health Status Survey (SF-36), State-trait anxiety inventory questionnaire (STAI) and Self-rating Depression Scale (SDS) at baseline and after 6 months. At baseline, scores of SF-36 except for general health, STAI and SDS were not different in either group. After 6 months, in the intervention group, scores of bodily pain, general health, vitality and mental health of SF-36 improved significantly compared with baseline. State anxiety scores also improved significantly (p<0.01), but SDS depression scores were not improved. In the control group, none of the parameters significantly changed. These results indicate that elderly patients with CAD should be vigorously encouraged to pursue CR even in chronic phase III.

  20. Phase I/II Study of Erlotinib Combined With Cisplatin and Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    SciTech Connect

    Herchenhorn, Daniel; Dias, Fernando L.; Viegas, Celia M.P.; Federico, Miriam H.; Araujo, Carlos Manoel M.; Small, Isabelle; Bezerra, Marcos; Fontao, Karina M.D.; Knust, Renata E.; Ferreira, Carlos G.; Martins, Renato G.

    2010-11-01

    Purpose: Erlotinib, an oral tyrosine kinase inhibitor, is active against head-and-neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) and possibly has a synergistic interaction with chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We investigated the safety and efficacy of erlotinib added to cisplatin and radiotherapy in locally advanced HNSCC. Methods and Materials: In this Phase I/II trial 100 mg/m{sup 2} of cisplatin was administered on Days 8, 29, and 50, and radiotherapy at 70 Gy was started on Day 8. During Phase I, the erlotinib dose was escalated (50 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg) in consecutive cohorts of 3 patients, starting on Day 1 and continuing during radiotherapy. Dose-limiting toxicity was defined as any Grade 4 event requiring radiotherapy interruptions. Phase II was initiated 8 weeks after the last Phase I enrollment. Results: The study accrued 9 patients in Phase I and 28 in Phase II; all were evaluable for efficacy and safety. No dose-limiting toxicity occurred in Phase I, and the recommended Phase II dose was 150 mg. The most frequent nonhematologic toxicities were nausea/vomiting, dysphagia, stomatitis, xerostomia and in-field dermatitis, acneiform rash, and diarrhea. Of the 31 patients receiving a 150-mg daily dose of erlotinib, 23 (74%; 95% confidence interval, 56.8%-86.3%) had a complete response, 3 were disease free after salvage surgery, 4 had inoperable residual disease, and 1 died of sepsis during treatment. With a median 37 months' follow-up, the 3-year progression-free and overall survival rates were 61% and 72%, respectively. Conclusions: This combination appears safe, has encouraging activity, and deserves further studies in locally advanced HNSCC.

  1. Phase III placebo-controlled, double-blind, randomized trial of pegfilgrastim to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel/cyclophosphamide chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Kosaka, Yoshimasa; Rai, Yoshiaki; Masuda, Norikazu; Takano, Toshimi; Saeki, Toshiaki; Nakamura, Seigo; Shimazaki, Ryutaro; Ito, Yoshinori; Tokuda, Yutaka; Tamura, Kazuo

    2015-04-01

    Pegfilgrastim is a pegylated form of filgrastim, a recombinant protein of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, that is used to reduce the risk of febrile neutropenia (FN). Here, we report the results of a phase III trial of pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients receiving docetaxel and cyclophosphamide (TC) chemotherapy. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized trial to determine the efficacy of pegfilgrastim in reducing the risk of FN in early-stage breast cancer patients. A total of 351 women (177 in the pegfilgrastim group and 174 in the placebo group) between 20 and 69 years of age with stage I-III invasive breast carcinoma who were to receive TC chemotherapy (docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) and cyclophosphamide 600 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks) as either neoadjuvant or adjuvant therapy were enrolled; 346 of these patients were treated with either pegfilgrastim (n = 173) or placebo (n = 173). The incidence of FN was significantly lower in the pegfilgrastim group than in the placebo group (1.2 vs. 68.8 %, respectively; P < 0.001). In addition, patients in the pegfilgrastim group required less hospitalization and antibiotics for FN. Most adverse events were consistent with those expected for breast cancer subjects receiving TC chemotherapy. Pegfilgrastim is safe and significantly reduces the incidence of FN in breast cancer patients.

  2. Phase I/II study of GM-CSF DNA as an adjuvant for a multipeptide cancer vaccine in patients with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Perales, Miguel-Angel; Yuan, Jianda; Powel, Sarah; Gallardo, Humilidad F.; Rasalan, Teresa S.; Gonzalez, Christina; Manukian, Gregor; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Chapman, Paul B.; Krown, Susan E.; Livingston, Philip O.; Ejadi, Samuel; Panageas, Katherine S.; Engelhorn, Manuel E.; Terzulli, Stephanie L.; Houghton, Alan N.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2014-01-01

    Granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) enhances immune responses by inducing dendritic cell proliferation, maturation, and migration and B and T lymphocyte expansion and differentiation. The potency of DNA vaccines can be enhanced by the addition of DNA encoding cytokines, acting as molecular adjuvants. We conducted a phase I/II trial of human GM-CSF DNA in conjunction with a multipeptide vaccine (gp100 and tyrosinase) in stage III/IV melanoma patients. Nineteen human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A*0201(+) patients were treated. Three dose levels were studied: 100, 400, and 800 mcg DNA/injection, administered subcutaneously (SQ) every month with 500 mcg of each peptide. In the dose-ranging study, 3 patients were treated at each dose level. The remaining patients were then treated at the highest dose. Most toxicities were grade 1 injection site reactions. Eight patients (42%) developed CD8+ T-cell responses, defined by a ≥3 SD increase in baseline reactivity to tyrosinase or gp100 peptide in tetramer or intracellular cytokine staining assays. There was no relationship between dose and T-cell response. Responding T cells had an effector memory cell phenotype. Polyfunctional T cells were also demonstrated. At a median of 31 months follow-up, median survival has not been reached. Human GM-CSF DNA was found to be a safe adjuvant. PMID:18797450

  3. Chemotherapy-associated treatment burden in breast cancer patients receiving lipegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim: secondary efficacy data from a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Gladkov, Oleg A; Buchner, Anton; Bias, Peter; Müller, Udo; Elsässer, Reiner

    2016-01-01

    Lipegfilgrastim is a once-per-cycle glycoPEGylated granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Noninferiority of lipegfilgrastim versus pegfilgrastim was demonstrated in a phase III trial in chemotherapy (CTx)-naïve breast cancer patients. Secondary outcomes relating to treatment burden are reported here. Patients with high-risk stage II, III, or IV breast cancer were randomized to receive lipegfilgrastim 6 mg (n = 101) or pegfilgrastim 6 mg (n = 101) subcutaneously on day 2 of each CTx cycle. Doxorubicin 60 mg/m(2) plus docetaxel 75 mg/m(2) commenced on day 1, for up to four cycles. Secondary end points included days in the hospital or intensive care unit (ICU), use of intravenous antibiotics for febrile neutropenia (FN) or related infections, and measures of CTx delivery (dose delays, reductions, and omissions). One lipegfilgrastim recipient and two pegfilgrastim recipients were hospitalized in cycle 1 because of FN or associated infection. The lipegfilgrastim-treated patient spent 1 day in the ICU for FN, and the two pegfilgrastim-treated patients were hospitalized for FN for 5 and 6 days, respectively. All hospitalized patients received antibiotics. An additional pegfilgrastim-treated patient received antibiotics but was not hospitalized. Most patients received CTx as scheduled; over 98% received their planned doxorubicin and docetaxel doses in all cycles. In the lipegfilgrastim group, no patients had a CTx dose reduced or omitted; eight patients in the pegfilgrastim group had a CTx dose reduced or omitted during cycles 2-4. The burden of treatment associated with myelosuppressive CTx was similar in breast cancer patients treated with lipegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim.

  4. EORTC QLQ-COMU26: a questionnaire for the assessment of communication between patients and professionals. Phase III of the module development in ten countries.

    PubMed

    Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Wintner, Lisa M; Sztankay, Monika; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Hofmeister, Dirk; Costantini, Anna; Bredart, Anne; Young, Teresa; Kuljanic, Karin; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Kontogianni, Meropi; Chie, Wei-Chu; Kulis, Dagmara; Greimel, Eva

    2017-05-01

    Communication between patients and professionals is one major aspect of the support offered to cancer patients. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Group (QLG) has developed a cancer-specific instrument for the measurement of different issues related to the communication between cancer patients and their health care professionals. Questionnaire development followed the EORTC QLG Module Development Guidelines. A provisional questionnaire was pre-tested (phase III) in a multicenter study within ten countries from five cultural areas (Northern and South Europe, UK, Poland and Taiwan). Patients from seven subgroups (before, during and after treatment, for localized and advanced disease each, plus palliative patients) were recruited. Structured interviews were conducted. Qualitative and quantitative analyses have been performed. One hundred forty patients were interviewed. Nine items were deleted and one shortened. Patients' comments had a key role in item selection. No item was deleted due to just quantitative criteria. Consistency was observed in patients' answers across cultural areas. The revised version of the module EORTC QLQ-COMU26 has 26 items, organized in 6 scales and 4 individual items. The EORTC COMU26 questionnaire can be used in daily clinical practice and research, in various patient groups from different cultures. The next step will be an international field test with a large heterogeneous group of cancer patients.

  5. Gefitinib in Combination With Irradiation With or Without Cisplatin in Patients With Inoperable Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Phase I Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Rothschild, Sacha; Bucher, Stephan E.; Bernier, Jacques; Aebersold, Daniel M.; Zouhair, Aberrahim; Ries, Gerhard; Lombrieser, Norbert; Lippuner, Thomas; Luetolf, Urs M.; Glanzmann, Christoph; Ciernik, I. Frank

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: To establish the feasibility and tolerability of gefitinib (ZD1839, Iressa) with radiation (RT) or concurrent chemoradiation (CRT) with cisplatin (CDDP) in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods: In this multicenter Phase I study, 5 patients with unresectable NSCLC received 250 mg gefitinib daily starting 1 week before RT at a dose of 63 Gy (Step 1). After a first safety analysis, 9 patients were treated daily with 250 mg gefitinib plus CRT in the form of RT and weekly CDDP 35 mg/m{sup 2} (Step 2). Gefitinib was maintained for up to 2 years until disease progression or toxicity. Results: Fourteen patients were assessed in the two steps. In Step 1 (five patients were administered only gefitinib and RT), no lung toxicities were seen, and there was no dose-limiting toxicity (DLT). Adverse events were skin and subcutaneous tissue reactions, limited to Grade 1-2. In Step 2, two of nine patients (22.2%) had DLT. One patient suffered from dyspnea and dehydration associated with neutropenic pneumonia, and another showed elevated liver enzymes. In both steps combined, 5 of 14 patients (35.7%) experienced one or more treatment interruptions. Conclusions: Gefitinib (250 mg daily) in combination with RT and CDDP in patients with Stage III NSCLC is feasible, but CDDP likely enhances toxicity. The impact of gefitinib on survival and disease control as a first-line treatment in combination with RT remains to be determined.

  6. A Novel Bayesian Seamless Phase I/II Design

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zuoren; Wang, Ling; Li, Chanjuan; Xia, Jielai

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a novel bayesian phase I/II design featuring using a hybrid mTPI method in phase I for targeting the MTD level and a randomization allocation schema for adaptively assigning patients to desirable doses in phase II. The mechanism of simultaneously escalating dose in phase I and expanding promising doses to phase II is inherited from a design proposed in literature. Extensive simulation studies indicate that our proposed design can vastly save sample size and efficiently assign more patients to optimal dose when compared to two competing designs. PMID:24023809

  7. The pharmacological costs of complete liver resections in unselected advanced colorectal cancer patients: a review of published Phase II and III trials.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Mercanti, Anna; Muraro, Silvia; Trolese, Anna Rita; Durante, Emilia; Greco, Filippo; Piacentini, Paolo; Tognetto, Michele; Bonetti, Andrea

    2015-02-01

    The pharmacological costs of regimens used as front-line therapy in advanced colorectal cancer patients and their impact on the liver resection rates have not been considered. In this paper, we made a review of published randomized Phase II and III trials that reported the liver resection rates following upfront chemotherapy and linked this outcome to the pharmacological costs of drugs used. The costs are calculated based on the price at Pharmacy of our Hospital in Legnago (Italy), and as a measure of activity, we used the number of patients needed to treat to get one complete liver resection. Number needed to treat is highly variable among the different trials according to patient's characteristics, tumor biology and the efficacy of chemotherapy administered. The range of activity is greatly amplified when the costs are compared.

  8. Safety and tolerability of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir with and without ribavirin in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus genotype 1 infection: Analysis of phase III ION trials.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Saleh A; Afdhal, Nezam; Zeuzem, Stefan; Gordon, Stuart C; Mangia, Alessandra; Kwo, Paul; Fried, Michael; Yang, Jenny C; Ding, Xiao; Pang, Phillip S; McHutchison, John G; Pound, David; Reddy, K Rajender; Marcellin, Patrick; Kowdley, Kris V; Sulkowski, Mark

    2015-07-01

    In phase III studies, treatment with the once-daily fixed-dose combination tablet of ledipasvir/sofosbuvir (LDV/SOF) with and without ribavirin (RBV) resulted in high rates of sustained virological response (SVR) in patients chronically infected with genotype 1 hepatitis C virus, including those with compensated cirrhosis. We conducted an analysis of data from these trials to compare the safety and tolerability profile of LDV-SOF with and without RBV. We analyzed treatment-emergent adverse events (AEs) and laboratory abnormalities in patients who were randomized to 8, 12, and 24 weeks of LDV/SOF with or without RBV. In total, data from 1,952 patients (of whom 872 received LDV/SOF with RBV and 1,080 received LDV/SOF alone) were analyzed. Overall, 308 patients (16%) were African American, 224 (11%) had compensated cirrhosis, 501 (26%) had a body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2) , and 440 (23%) were treatment experienced. Treatment-related AEs occurred in 71% and 45% of patients treated with and without RBV, respectively, including fatigue, insomnia, irritability, and rash/pruritus. Patients receiving RBV with LDV/SOF were more likely to require dose modification, interruptions of treatment resulting from AEs, or require the use of concomitant medications than those receiving LDV/SOF alone. Rates of treatment-related serious AEs and discontinuations resulting from AEs were similarly low (<1%) in both groups. The rate of SVR in those receiving RBV and those not receiving RBV was the same (97%). LDV/SOF plus RBV was associated with a greater incidence of AEs as well as concomitant medication use than LDV/SOF alone. Use of RBV did not impact the efficacy of LDV/SOF regimens in the ION phase III studies. © 2015 by the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  9. Effect of prophylactic transluminal balloon angioplasty on cerebral vasospasm and outcome in patients with Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage: results of a phase II multicenter, randomized, clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Zwienenberg-Lee, Marike; Hartman, Jonathan; Rudisill, Nancy; Madden, Lori Kennedy; Smith, Karen; Eskridge, Joseph; Newell, David; Verweij, Bon; Bullock, M Ross; Baker, Andrew; Coplin, William; Mericle, Robert; Dai, Jian; Rocke, David; Muizelaar, J Paul

    2008-06-01

    Cerebral vasospasm continues to be a major cause of poor outcome in patients with ruptured aneurysms. Prophylactic Transluminal Balloon Angioplasty (pTBA) appeared to prevent delayed ischemic neurological deficit in a pilot study. A phase II multicenter randomized clinical trial was subsequently designed. One hundred and seventy patients with Fisher Grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage were enrolled in the study. Of these, 85 patients were randomized to the treatment group and underwent pTBA within 96 hours after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Main end points of the study included the 3-month dichotomized Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS), development of delayed ischemic neurological deficit (DIND), occurrence of Transcranial Doppler (TCD) vasospasm, and length of stay in the ICU and hospital. The incidence of DIND was lower in the pTBA group (P=0.30) and fewer patients required therapeutic angioplasty to treat DIND (P=0.03). Overall pTBA resulted in an absolute risk reduction of 5.9% and a relative risk reduction of 10.4% unfavorable outcome (P=0.54). Good grade patients had absolute and relative risk reductions of respectively 9.5 and 29.4% (P=0.73). Length of stay in ICU and hospital was similar in both groups. Four patients had a procedure-related vessel perforation, of which three patients died. While the trial is unsuccessful as defined by the primary end point (GOS), proof of concept is confirmed by these results. Fewer patients tend to develop vasospasm after treatment with pTBA and there is a statistically significantly decreased need for therapeutic angioplasty. pTBA does not improve the poor outcome of patients with Fisher grade III subarachnoid hemorrhage.

  10. Low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac : a review of safety across two Phase III studies in patients with acute and osteoarthritis pain.

    PubMed

    Gibofsky, Allan; Altman, Roy; Daniels, Stephen; Imasogie, Olaolu; Young, Clarence

    2015-08-01

    Similar to other NSAIDs, diclofenac is associated with serious dose-related cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, and renal adverse events. Low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac , containing submicron particles of diclofenac, was developed to provide effective analgesia at lower drug doses compared with currently available NSAIDs. The efficacy and safety of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac was evaluated in two randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III studies: a study in patients with acute pain following bunionectomy surgery and a study in patients with osteoarthritis pain of the hip or knee. In this review article, we summarize safety data from these studies. The safety results from the Phase III studies indicate that all dosing regimens of low-dose SoluMatrix diclofenac up to 12 weeks are generally well tolerated. Few serious gastrointestinal, cardiovascular, renal, or hepatic adverse events commonly associated with NSAID use were reported in these studies. Although not directly compared, the safety of SoluMatrix diclofenac was similar to findings for other diclofenac drug products. The potential for safe and effective management of acute and chronic pain at reduced NSAID doses is attractive; definitive characterization of SoluMatrix diclofenac safety requires confirmation by long-term studies.

  11. Phase I/II study of oncolytic herpes simplex virus NV1020 in patients with extensively pretreated refractory colorectal cancer metastatic to the liver.

    PubMed

    Geevarghese, Sunil K; Geller, David A; de Haan, Hans A; Hörer, Markus; Knoll, Anette E; Mescheder, Axel; Nemunaitis, John; Reid, Tony R; Sze, Daniel Y; Tanabe, Kenneth K; Tawfik, Hoda

    2010-09-01

    This multicenter phase I/II study evaluated the safety, pharmacokinetics, and antitumor effects of repeated doses of NV1020, a genetically engineered oncolytic herpes simplex virus, in patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients with liver-dominant mCRC received four fixed NV1020 doses via weekly hepatic artery infusion, followed by two or more cycles of conventional chemotherapy. Phase I included cohorts receiving 3 × 10(6), 1 × 10(7), 3 × 10(7), and 1 × 10(8) plaque-forming units (PFU)/dose to determine the optimal biological dose (OBD) for phase II. Blind independent computed tomography scan review was based on RECIST (response evaluation criteria in solid tumors) to assess hepatic tumor response. Phase I and II enrolled 13 and 19 patients, respectively. Patients experienced transient mild-moderate febrile reactions after each NV1020 infusion. Grade 3/4 virus-related toxicity was limited to transient lymphopenia in two patients. NV1020 shedding was not detected. Simultaneous cytokine and grade 1 coagulation perturbations were dose-limiting at 1 × 10(8) PFU/dose, considered the OBD. All 22 OBD patients had previously received 5-fluorouracil; most had received oxaliplatin or irinotecan (50% had both), many with at least one targeted agent. After NV1020 administration, 50% showed stable disease. The best overall tumor control rate after chemotherapy was 68% (1 partial response, 14 stable disease); this did not correlate with baseline variables or chemotherapy. Median time to progression was 6.4 months (95% confidence interval: 2, 8.9); median overall survival was 11.8 months (95% confidence interval: 8.3, 20.7). One-year survival was 47.2%. We conclude that NV1020 stabilizes liver metastases with minimal toxicity in mCRC. It may resensitize metastases to salvage chemotherapy and extend overall survival. A randomized phase II/III trial now appears justified.

  12. Pharmacokinetics of tiotropium administered by Respimat(®) in asthma patients: Analysis of pooled data from Phase II and III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashish; Kerstjens, Huib A M; Aalbers, René; Moroni-Zentgraf, Petra; Weber, Benjamin; Dahl, Ronald

    2017-02-01

    Tiotropium is a long-acting inhaled antimuscarinic bronchodilator that has recently received marketing authorization for the indication of asthma with dose delivery via the Respimat(®) inhaler, in addition to its widely established role in the management of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This report presents a combined analysis of tiotropium plasma and urine pharmacokinetics at steady state from 8 Phase II/III clinical trials in asthma and delineates the effects of patient characteristics on systemic exposure based on the parameters fe0-24,ss (fraction of dose excreted unchanged in urine over 24 h post-dose at steady-state) and dose-normalized AUCtau,ss and Cmax,ss. Pharmacokinetics were also compared between asthma and COPD, incorporating data from 3 COPD Phase II/III clinical trials. Tiotropium pharmacokinetics in asthma were dose-proportional up to 5 μg dosed once daily. The following factors showed no statistically significant effects on tiotropium systemic exposure in asthma based on analysis of geometric mean ratios and 90% confidence intervals: age, asthma severity, lung function, reversibility testing, allergy status, smoking history, geographical region, and posology (5 μg once daily or 2.5 μg twice daily via Respimat(®)). Asian patients showed a moderately but significantly higher systemic exposure compared to White or Black patients. However, no differences in safety by race were observed. Total systemic exposure (AUCtau,ss) was similar between asthma and COPD, but Cmax,ss was 52% lower in asthma patients compared to COPD. It is concluded that in asthma, patient characteristics have no relevant effect on tiotropium systemic exposure. Since systemic exposure to inhaled drugs is an indicator of safety, the lower Cmax,ss compared to COPD is not considered a concern for tiotropium therapy of asthma.

  13. Lanreotide autogel every 6 weeks compared with Lanreotide microparticles every 3 weeks in patients with well differentiated neuroendocrine tumors: a Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Bajetta, Emilio; Procopio, Giuseppe; Catena, Laura; Martinetti, Antonia; De Dosso, Sara; Ricci, Sergio; Lecchi, Alberto S; Boscani, Paolo F; Iacobelli, Stefano; Carteni, Giacomo; De Braud, Filippo; Loli, Paola; Tartaglia, Andreas; Bajetta, Roberto; Ferrari, Leonardo

    2006-11-15

    The noninferiority of a 6-week dosing schedule of lanreotide Autogel (Lan ATG) at a dose of 120 mg compared with a 3-week dosing schedule of lanreotide microparticles (Lan MP) at a dose of 60 mg was investigated in patients with neuroendocrine tumors (NET). Patients who had sporadic, well differentiated NET with a low grade of malignancy were recruited for this open-label, Phase III, multicenter trial. Patients were randomized to receive either 3 deep subcutaneous injections of Lan ATG (120 mg, every 6 weeks) or 6 intramuscular injections of Lan MP (60 mg, every 3 weeks). Tumor markers, tumor size, and symptoms were assessed between baseline and Week 18. Success was classified as a response that ranged from disappearance to an increase <25% in tumor marker, tumor size, or symptom frequency. Sixty patients were randomized, and 46 patients completed the study. Both for tumor markers and for tumor size, Lan ATG was not inferior to Lan MP (55% and 59% of patients responded on tumor markers, respectively; 68% and 66% of patients responded on tumor size, respectively). There were too few symptomatic patients to compare carcinoid symptoms. Both treatments were tolerated well, and no safety concerns were identified. Lan ATG at a dose of 120 mg every 6 weeks was as effective for controlling NET as Lan MP at a dose of 60 mg every 3 weeks.

  14. Does Concurrent Radiochemotherapy Affect Cosmetic Results in the Adjuvant Setting After Breast-Conserving Surgery? Results of the ARCOSEIN Multicenter, Phase III Study: Patients' and Doctors' Views

    SciTech Connect

    Toledano, Alain H. . E-mail: alain.toledano@gmail.com; Bollet, Marc A.; Fourquet, Alain; Azria, David; Gligorov, Joseph; Garaud, Pascal; Serin, Daniel; Bosset, Jean-Francois; Miny-Buffet, Joelle; Favre, Anne; Le Foch, Olivier; Calais, Gilles

    2007-05-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the cosmetic results of sequential vs. concurrent adjuvant chemotherapy with radiotherapy after breast-conserving surgery for breast cancer, and to compare ratings by patients and physicians. Methods and Materials: From 1996 to 2000, 716 patients with Stage I-II breast cancers were included in a multicenter, Phase III trial (the ARCOSEIN study) comparing, after breast-conserving surgery with axillary dissection, sequential treatment with chemotherapy first followed by radiotherapy vs. chemotherapy administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Cosmetic results with regard to both the overall aspect of the breast and specific changes (color, scar) were evaluated in a total of 214 patients (107 in each arm) by means of questionnaires to both the patient and a physician whose rating was blinded to treatment allocation. Results: Patients' overall satisfaction with cosmesis was not statistically different between the two arms, with approximately 92% with at least satisfactory results (p = 0.72), although differences between the treated and untreated breasts were greater after the concurrent regimen (29% vs. 14% with more than moderate differences; p 0.0015). Physician assessment of overall cosmesis was less favorable, with lower rates of at least satisfactory results in the concurrent arm (60% vs. 85%; p = 0.001). Consequently, the concordance for overall satisfaction with cosmesis between patients and doctors was only fair ({kappa} = 0.62). Conclusion: After breast-conserving surgery, the concurrent use of chemotherapy with radiotherapy is significantly associated with greater differences between the breasts. These differences do not translate into patients' lessened satisfaction with cosmesis.

  15. Phase I/II Trial of 5-Fluorouracil and a Noncytotoxic Dose Level of Suramin in Patients with Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    George, Saby; Dreicer, Robert; Au, Jessie J. L.; Shen, Tong; Rini, Brian I.; Roman, Susan; Cooney, Matthew M.; Mekhail, Tarek; Elson, Paul; Wientjes, Guillaume M.; Ganapathi, Ram; Bukowski, Ronald M.

    2010-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is recognized as a neoplasm resistant to chemotherapy. In vitro experiments demonstrated that suramin, at noncytotoxic doses, enhanced the activity of chemotherapy including 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) in xenograft models. Patients and Methods A phase I/II trial of noncytotoxic suramin in combination with weekly 5-FU in patients with metastatic RCC was conducted. The treatment consisted of intravenous (I.V.) suramin followed by a 500 mg/m2 I.V. bolus of 5-FU given 4.5 hours after starting suramin. In the phase I portion, a cohort of 6 patients received a suramin dose calculated to achieve a plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L. Therapy was administered once weekly for 6 doses, followed by 2 weeks off. This was followed by a phase II portion in which the primary goal was to determine the objective response rate. Results Twenty-three patients were enrolled in the study: 6 in the phase I portion and 17 in phase II. Seventy-eight percent of patients were men, the mean age was 58.8 years, 96% had previous nephrectomy, and 70% had received previous systemic therapy. Histologic subtype was clear cell in 91%. Dose-limiting toxicity was observed in 1 of 6 patients (grade 3 hypersensitivity related to suramin infusion). The suramin dosing nomogram used in phase I and II portions of the trial yielded the desired plasma level of 10–50 μmol/L from 4.5 hours to 48 hours after infusion in 94 of 115 treatments. No objective responses were noted, and the median time to treatment failure was 2.5 months. The major toxicities (all grades) were fatigue (83%), nausea/vomiting (78%), diarrhea (61%), and chills (61%). Conclusion Suramin levels expected to reverse fibroblast growth factor–induced resistance can be achieved with the dosing regimen used in this study. The toxicity observed with suramin and 5-FU was acceptable. The combination does not have clinical activity in patients with metastatic RCC. PMID:18824429

  16. Oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin with or without cetuximab in patients with resected stage III colon cancer (PETACC-8): an open-label, randomised phase 3 trial.

    PubMed

    Taieb, Julien; Tabernero, Josep; Mini, Enrico; Subtil, Fabien; Folprecht, Gunnar; Van Laethem, Jean-Luc; Thaler, Josef; Bridgewater, John; Petersen, Lone Nørgård; Blons, Hélène; Collette, Laurence; Van Cutsem, Eric; Rougier, Philippe; Salazar, Ramon; Bedenne, Laurent; Emile, Jean-François; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Lepage, Come

    2014-07-01

    Since the 1990s, fluorouracil-based adjuvant chemotherapy has significantly reduced the risk of tumour recurrence in patients with stage III colon cancer. We aimed to assess whether the addition of cetuximab to standard adjuvant oxaliplatin, fluorouracil, and leucovorin chemotherapy (FOLFOX4) in patients with stage III colon cancer improved disease-free survival (DFS). For this open-label, randomised phase 3 study done in nine European countries, we enrolled patients through an interactive voice response system to the central randomisation centre, with a central stratified permuted block randomisation procedure. We randomly assigned patients with resected (R0) stage III disease (1:1) to receive 12 cycles of FOLFOX4 twice a week with or without cetuximab. Patients were stratified by N-status (N1 vs N2), T-status (T1-3 vs T4), and obstruction or perforation status (no obstruction and no perforation vs obstruction or perforation or both). A protocol amendment (applied in June, 2008, after 2096 patients had been randomly assigned to treatment-restricted enrolment to patients with tumours wild-type at codons 12 and 13 in exon 2 of the KRAS gene (KRAS exon 2 wild-type). The primary endpoint was DFS. Analysis was intention to treat in all patients with KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumours. The study is registered at EudraCT, number 2005-003463-23. Between Dec 22, 2005, and Nov 5, 2009, 2559 patients from 340 sites in Europe were randomly assigned. Of these patients, 1602 had KRAS exon 2 wild-type tumours (intention-to-treat population), 791 in the FOLFOX4 plus cetuximab group and 811 in the FOLFOX4 group. Median follow-up was 3·3 years (IQR 3·2-3·4). In the experimental and control groups, DFS was similar in the intention-to-treat population (hazard ratio [HR] 1·05; 95% CI 0·85-1·29; p=0·66), and in patients with KRAS exon 2/BRAF wild-type (n=984, HR 0·99; 95% CI 0·76-1·28) or KRAS exon 2-mutated tumours (n=742, HR 1·06; 95% CI 0·82-1·37). We noted heterogeneous

  17. Impact of Young Age on Treatment Efficacy and Safety in Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of Patients From Nine First-Line Phase III Chemotherapy Trials

    PubMed Central

    Blanke, Charles D.; Bot, Brian M.; Thomas, David M.; Bleyer, Archie; Kohne, Claus-Henning; Seymour, Matthew T.; de Gramont, Aimery; Goldberg, Richard M.; Sargent, Daniel J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Colorectal cancer predominantly occurs in the elderly, but approximately 5% of patients are 50 years old or younger. We sought to determine whether young age is prognostic, or whether it influences efficacy/toxicity of chemotherapy, in patients with advanced disease. Methods We analyzed individual data on 6,284 patients from nine phase III trials of advanced colorectal cancer (aCRC) that used fluorouracil-based single-agent and combination chemotherapy. End points included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), response rate (RR), and grade 3 or worse adverse events. Stratified Cox and adjusted logistic-regression models were used to test for age effects and age-treatment interactions. Results A total of 793 patients (13%) were younger than 50 years old; 188 of these patients (3% of total patients) were younger than 40 years old. Grade 3 or worse nausea (10% v 7%; P = .01) was more common, and severe diarrhea (11% v 14%; P = .001) and neutropenia (23% v 26%; P < .001) were less common in young (younger than 50 years) than in older (older than 50 years) patients. Age was prognostic for PFS, with poorer outcomes occurring in those younger than 50 years (median, 6.0 v 7.5 months; hazard ratio, 1.10; P = .02), but it did not affect RR or OS. In the subset of monotherapy versus combination chemotherapy trials, the relative benefits of multiagent chemotherapy were similar for young and older patients. Results were comparable when utilizing an age cut point of 40 years. Conclusion Young age is modestly associated with poorer PFS but not OS or RR in treated patients with aCRC, and young patients have more nausea but less diarrhea and neutropenia with chemotherapy in general. Young versus older patients derive the same benefits from combination chemotherapy. Absent results of a clinical trial, standard combination chemotherapy approaches are appropriate for young patients with aCRC. PMID:21646604

  18. Antiemetic Corticosteroid Rotation from Dexamethasone to Methylprednisolone to Prevent Dexamethasone-Induced Hiccup in Cancer Patients Treated with Chemotherapy: A Randomized, Single-Blind, Crossover Phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Go, Se-Il; Koo, Dong-Hoe; Kim, Seung Tae; Song, Haa-Na; Kim, Rock Bum; Jang, Joung-Soon; Oh, Sung Yong; Lee, Kyung Hee; Lee, Soon Il; Kim, Seong-Geun; Park, Lee Chun; Lee, Sang-Cheol; Park, Byeong-Bae; Ji, Jun Ho; Yi, Seong Yoon; Lee, Yun-Gyoo; Yun, Jina; Bruera, Eduardo; Hwang, In Gyu; Kang, Jung Hun

    2017-07-07

    To assess whether the rotation of dexamethasone to methylprednisolone decreases the intensity of dexamethasone-induced hiccup (DIH) in cancer patients treated with chemotherapy. Adult patients who experienced DIH within 3 days after the administration of dexamethasone as an antiemetic were screened. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive dexamethasone (n = 33) or methylprednisolone (n = 32) as an antiemetic (randomization phase). In the next cycle of chemotherapy, the dexamethasone group received methylprednisolone and vice versa in the methylprednisolone group (crossover phase). The primary endpoint was the difference in hiccup intensity as measured using the numeric rating scale (NRS) between two groups. No female patients were enrolled, although the study did not exclude them. At the randomization phase, hiccup frequency was 28/33 (84.8%) in the dexamethasone group versus 20/32 (62.5%) in the methylprednisolone group (p = .04). Intensity of hiccup was significantly higher in the dexamethasone group than that in the methylprednisolone group (mean NRS, 3.5 vs. 1.4, p < .001). At the crossover phase, hiccup intensity was further decreased after the rotation of dexamethasone to methylprednisolone in the dexamethasone group (mean NRS, 3.5 to 0.9, p < .001), while it was increased by rotating methylprednisolone to dexamethasone in the methylprednisolone group (mean NRS, 1.4 to 3.3, p = .025). There were no differences in emesis intensity between the two groups at either the randomization or crossover phases. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT01974024. Dexamethasone-induced hiccup is a male-predominant phenomenon that can be ameliorated by rotating dexamethasone to methylprednisolone without compromising the antiemetic efficacy. In this randomized, multicenter, phase III trial, hiccup intensity was significantly lower when the antiemetic corticosteroid was rotated from dexamethasone to methylprednisolone without a change in emesis

  19. LM1500 Engine Marinization Contract. Phase III. Materials and Processes Development for Phase III Engine Components.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    The purpose of this report is to briefly document the principal difficulties encountered and the solutions which were effected in the course of manufacturing the modified Phase III test engine hardware. (Author)

  20. A phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of misoprostol rectal suppositories to prevent acute radiation proctitis in patients with prostate cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Hille, Andrea . E-mail: ahille@med.uni-goettingen.de; Schmidberger, Heinz; Hermann, Robert M.; Christiansen, Hans; Saile, Bernhard; Pradier, Olivier; Hess, Clemens F.

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Acute radiation proctitis is the most relevant complication of pelvic radiation and is still mainly treated supportively. Considering the negative impact of acute proctitis symptoms on patients' daily activities and the potential relationship between the severity of acute radiation injury and late damage, misoprostol was tested in the prevention of acute radiation-induced proctitis. Methods and Materials: A total of 100 patients who underwent radiotherapy for prostate cancer were entered into this phase III randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind study with misoprostol or placebo suppositories. Radiation-induced toxicity was evaluated weekly during radiotherapy using the Common Toxicity Criteria. Results: Between the placebo and the misoprostol groups, no significant differences in proctitis symptoms occurred: 76% of patients in each group had Grade 1 toxicity, and 26% in the placebo group and 36% in the misoprostol group had Grade 2 toxicity. No differences were found in onset or symptom duration. Comparing the peak incidence of patients' toxicity symptoms, significantly more patients experienced rectal bleeding in the misoprostol group (p = 0.03). Conclusion: Misoprostol given as a once-daily suppository did not decrease the incidence and severity of radiation-induced acute proctitis and may increase the incidence of acute bleeding.

  1. Proposed biosimilar pegfilgrastim (LA-EP2006) compared with reference pegfilgrastim in Asian patients with breast cancer: an exploratory comparison from two Phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Harbeck, Nadia; Gascon, Pere; Jones, Clyde M; Nixon, Allen; Krendyukov, Andriy; Nakov, Roumen; Li, Yuhan; Blackwell, Kimberly

    2017-07-01

    This is a pooled subgroup analysis of Asian patients enrolled in two Phase III confirmatory studies comparing proposed biosimilar LA-EP2006 with reference pegfilgrastim in women receiving chemotherapy for breast cancer. Women were randomized to LA-EP2006 (n = 90) or reference (n = 84) pegfilgrastim (Neulasta(®), Amgen, Inc., CA, USA) for ≤6 cycles of TAC chemotherapy. Primary end point was duration of severe neutropenia during Cycle 1 (number of consecutive days with absolute neutrophil count <0.5 × 10(9)/l) with equivalence confirmed if 95% CIs were within a ±1-day margin. Mean duration of severe neutropenia (days) in Cycle 1 was 1.36 ± 0.98 (LA-EP2006) versus 1.35 ± 1.06 (reference) (difference 0.01 days; 95% CI: -0.30-0.32, indicating equivalence). LA-EP2006 showed similar clinical efficacy and safety compared with reference pegfilgrastim.

  2. Safety Analyses of Pemetrexed-cisplatin and Pemetrexed Maintenance Therapies in Patients With Advanced Non-squamous NSCLC: Retrospective Analyses From 2 Phase III Studies.

    PubMed

    Langer, Corey J; Paz-Ares, Luis G; Wozniak, Antoinette J; Gridelli, Cesare; de Marinis, Filippo; Pujol, Jean-Louis; San Antonio, Belen; Chen, Jian; Liu, Jingyi; Oton, Ana B; Visseren-Grul, Carla; Scagliotti, Giorgio V

    2017-09-01

    In a phase III study, maintenance pemetrexed showed superior survival over placebo (PARAMOUNT) for patients with advanced non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who completed 4 cycles of pemetrexed plus cisplatin (PC) induction therapy, with low incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) generally associated with pemetrexed. Prior analyses did not account for toxicities carried over from induction; thus, the current analysis was developed to understand toxicities that may be attributed to pemetrexed maintenance versus PC induction, and how treatment duration affects toxicity. Selected clinically relevant TEAEs were explored in 2 analyses: assessing induction versus maintenance treatment in PARAMOUNT, and comparing PC from PARAMOUNT with toxicity data from a previous phase III study that established the role of PC in front-line therapy of non-squamous NSCLC (JMDB trial). In PARAMOUNT, the incidence of most drug-related TEAEs was higher during induction than maintenance, for both the pemetrexed and placebo randomized populations. The majority of TEAEs during maintenance, except renal events, were carried over from induction with no change in severity from the end of induction; the incidence of TEAEs associated with pemetrexed maintenance was low. The cross-trial analysis showed that 6 cycles of PC in JMDB compared with 4 cycles in PARAMOUNT increased grade 1/2 fatigue (34.1% vs. 25.0%), anemia (24.0% vs. 13.5%), and renal events (11.8% vs. 3.6%). Safety data presented here support the favorable risk benefit of 4 cycles of PC followed by maintenance pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-squamous NSCLC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Randomized, Double-Blind, Phase III Trial of Ipilimumab Versus Placebo in Asymptomatic or Minimally Symptomatic Patients With Metastatic Chemotherapy-Naive Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Beer, Tomasz M; Kwon, Eugene D; Drake, Charles G; Fizazi, Karim; Logothetis, Christopher; Gravis, Gwenaelle; Ganju, Vinod; Polikoff, Jonathan; Saad, Fred; Humanski, Piotr; Piulats, Josep M; Gonzalez Mella, Pablo; Ng, Siobhan S; Jaeger, Dirk; Parnis, Francis X; Franke, Fabio A; Puente, Javier; Carvajal, Roman; Sengeløv, Lisa; McHenry, M Brent; Varma, Arvind; van den Eertwegh, Alfonsus J; Gerritsen, Winald

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Ipilimumab increases antitumor T-cell responses by binding to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4. We evaluated treatment with ipilimumab in asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic patients with chemotherapy-naive metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer without visceral metastases. Patients and Methods In this multicenter, double-blind, phase III trial, patients were randomly assigned (2:1) to ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or placebo every 3 weeks for up to four doses. Ipilimumab 10 mg/kg or placebo maintenance therapy was administered to nonprogressing patients every 3 months. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Four hundred patients were randomly assigned to ipilimumab and 202 to placebo; 399 were treated with ipilimumab and 199 with placebo. Median OS was 28.7 months (95% CI, 24.5 to 32.5 months) in the ipilimumab arm versus 29.7 months (95% CI, 26.1 to 34.2 months) in the placebo arm (hazard ratio, 1.11; 95.87% CI, 0.88 to 1.39; P = .3667). Median progression-free survival was 5.6 months in the ipilimumab arm versus 3.8 with placebo arm (hazard ratio, 0.67; 95.87% CI, 0.55 to 0.81). Exploratory analyses showed a higher prostate-specific antigen response rate with ipilimumab (23%) than with placebo (8%). Diarrhea (15%) was the only grade 3 to 4 treatment-related adverse event (AE) reported in ≥ 10% of ipilimumab-treated patients. Nine (2%) deaths occurred in the ipilimumab arm due to treatment-related AEs; no deaths occurred in the placebo arm. Immune-related grade 3 to 4 AEs occurred in 31% and 2% of patients, respectively. Conclusion Ipilimumab did not improve OS in patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer. The observed increases in progression-free survival and prostate-specific antigen response rates suggest antitumor activity in a patient subset.

  4. Up to 15-year clinical follow-up of a pilot Phase III immunotherapy study in stage II breast cancer patients using oxidized mannan-MUC1.

    PubMed

    Vassilaros, Stamatis; Tsibanis, Anastasios; Tsikkinis, Annivas; Pietersz, Geoffrey A; McKenzie, Ian F C; Apostolopoulos, Vasso

    2013-11-01

    Targeting antigens to dendritic cell receptors has recently become a popular approach to inducing effective immune responses against cancer antigens. Almost 20 years ago, however, we demonstrated that targeting the mannose receptor on macrophages and dendritic cells leads to strong cellular immune responses. We conducted numerous human clinical trials demonstrating the effectiveness of oxidized mannan-MUC1 (M-FP) in MUC1(+) adenocarcinoma patients. In one trial, the 5-8-year follow-up of breast cancer patients vaccinated with M-FP was published previously; we now report here the 12-15-year follow-up. Details regarding the preparation of the vaccine, inclusion and exclusion criteria, immunotherapy and follow-up schedule, were published previously. The follow-up at 12-15 years showed that the recurrence rate in patients receiving placebo was 60% (nine of 15). In those receiving immunotherapy (M-FP), the rate was 12.5% (two of 16). The time of recurrence in the placebo group ranged from 7 to 180 months (mean: 65.8 months) and in the two patients of the vaccine group, the recurrence appeared at 95 and 141 months (mean: 118 months) after surgery. These findings are statistically significant (p = 0.02 for survival and p = 0.009 for percentage of patients cancer-free). All patients injected with M-FP showed no evidence of toxic effects or signs of autoimmunity during the 12-15-year follow-up. The preliminary evidence indicates that M-FP is beneficial in the overall survival of early-stage breast cancer patients. This long-term clinical follow-up of patients strongly supports the necessity for a large Phase III study of direct M-FP injection in early-stage breast cancer patients, to evaluate immunotherapy as an adjuvant treatment for breast cancer.

  5. A retrospective analysis of RET translocation, gene copy number gain and expression in NSCLC patients treated with vandetanib in four randomized Phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Platt, Adam; Morten, John; Ji, Qunsheng; Elvin, Paul; Womack, Chris; Su, Xinying; Donald, Emma; Gray, Neil; Read, Jessica; Bigley, Graham; Blockley, Laura; Cresswell, Carl; Dale, Angela; Davies, Amanda; Zhang, Tianwei; Fan, Shuqiong; Fu, Haihua; Gladwin, Amanda; Harrod, Grace; Stevens, James; Williams, Victoria; Ye, Qingqing; Zheng, Li; de Boer, Richard; Herbst, Roy S; Lee, Jin-Soo; Vasselli, James

    2015-03-23

    To determine the prevalence of RET rearrangement genes, RET copy number gains and expression in tumor samples from four Phase III non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) trials of vandetanib, a selective inhibitor of VEGFR, RET and EGFR signaling, and to determine any association with outcome to vandetanib treatment. Archival tumor samples from the ZODIAC ( NCT00312377 , vandetanib ± docetaxel), ZEAL ( NCT00418886 , vandetanib ± pemetrexed), ZEPHYR ( NCT00404924 , vandetanib vs placebo) and ZEST ( NCT00364351 , vandetanib vs erlotinib) studies were evaluated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 944 and 1102 patients. The prevalence of RET rearrangements by FISH was 0.7% (95% CI 0.3-1.5%) among patients with a known result. Seven tumor samples were positive for RET rearrangements (vandetanib, n = 3; comparator, n = 4). 2.8% (n = 26) of samples had RET amplification (innumerable RET clusters, or ≥7 copies in > 10% of tumor cells), 8.1% (n = 76) had low RET gene copy number gain (4-6 copies in ≥40% of tumor cells) and 8.3% (n = 92) were RET expression positive (signal intensity ++ or +++ in >10% of tumor cells). Of RET-rearrangement-positive patients, none had an objective response in the vandetanib arm and one patient responded in the comparator arm. Radiologic evidence of tumor shrinkage was observed in two patients treated with vandetanib and one treated with comparator drug. The objective response rate was similar in the vandetanib and comparator arms for patients positive for RET copy number gains or RET protein expression. We have identified prevalence for three RET biomarkers in a population predominated by non-Asians and smokers. RET rearrangement prevalence was lower than previously reported. We found no evidence of a differential benefit for efficacy by IHC and RET gene copy number gains. The low prevalence of RET rearrangements (0.7%) prevents firm conclusions regarding association of vandetanib treatment with

  6. Erlotinib and bevacizumab in patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck: a phase I/II study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ezra E W; Davis, Darren W; Karrison, Theodore G; Seiwert, Tanguy Y; Wong, Stuart J; Nattam, Sreenivasa; Kozloff, Mark F; Clark, Joseph I; Yan, Duen-Hwa; Liu, Wen; Pierce, Carolyn; Dancey, Janet E; Stenson, Kerstin; Blair, Elizabeth; Dekker, Allison; Vokes, Everett E

    2009-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a validated target in squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck, but in patients with recurrent or metastatic disease, EGFR targeting agents have displayed modest efficacy. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-mediated angiogenesis has been implicated as a mechanism of resistance to anti-EGFR therapy. In this multi-institutional phase I/II study we combined an EGFR inhibitor, erlotinib, with an anti-VEGF antibody, bevacizumab. Between April 15, 2003, and Jan 27, 2005, patients with recurrent or metastatic squamous-cell carcinoma of the head and neck were enrolled from seven centres in the USA and were given erlotinib (150 mg daily) and bevacizumab in escalating dose cohorts. The primary objectives in the phase I and II sections, respectively, were to establish the maximum tolerated dose and dose-limiting toxicity of bevacizumab when administered with erlotinib and to establish the proportion of objective responses and time to disease progression. Pretreatment serum and tissues were collected and analysed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and immunofluorescence quantitative laser analysis, respectively. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00055913. In the phase I section of the trial, ten patients were enrolled in three successive cohorts with no dose-limiting toxic effects noted. 46 patients were enrolled in the phase II section of the trial (including three patients from the phase I section) on the highest dose of bevacizumab (15 mg/kg every 3 weeks). Two additional patients were accrued beyond the protocol-stipulated 46, leaving a total of 48 patients for the phase II assessment. The most common toxic effects of any grade were rash and diarrhoea (41 and 16 of 48 patients, respectively). Three patients had serious bleeding events of grade 3 or higher. Seven patients had a response, with four showing a complete response allowing rejection of the null hypothesis. Median time of overall

  7. Famotidine for the prevention of peptic ulcers and oesophagitis in patients taking low-dose aspirin (FAMOUS): a phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Taha, Ali S; McCloskey, Caroline; Prasad, Rakesh; Bezlyak, Vladimir

    2009-07-11

    There are few therapeutic options for the prevention of gastrointestinal mucosal damage caused by low-dose aspirin. We therefore investigated the efficacy of famotidine, a well-tolerated histamine H(2)-receptor antagonist, in the prevention of peptic ulcers and erosive oesophagitis in patients receiving low-dose aspirin for vascular protection. Adult patients (aged >/=18 years) from the cardiovascular, cerebrovascular, and diabetes clinics at Crosshouse Hospital, Kilmarnock, UK, were eligible for enrolment in this phase III, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial if they were taking aspirin 75-325 mg per day with or without other cardioprotective drugs. Patients without ulcers or erosive oesophagitis on endoscopy at baseline were randomly assigned by computer-generated randomisation sequence to receive famotidine 20 mg twice daily (n=204) or placebo twice daily (n=200). Patients had a final endoscopic examination at 12 weeks. The primary endpoint was the development of new ulcers in the stomach or duodenum or erosive oesophagitis at 12 weeks after randomisation. Analysis was by intention to treat, including all randomised patients who received at least one dose of study drug (famotidine or placebo). This trial is registered as an International Standard Randomised Clinical Trial, number ISRCTN96975557. All randomised patients received at least one dose and were included in the ITT population. 82 patients (famotidine, n=33; placebo, n=49) did not have the final endoscopic examination and were assumed to have had normal findings; the main reason for participant withdrawal was refusal to continue. At 12 weeks, comparing patients assigned to famotidine with patients assigned to placebo, gastric ulcers had developed in seven (3.4%) of 204 patients compared with 30 (15.0%) of 200 patients (odds ratio [OR] 0.20, 95% CI 0.09-0.47; p=0.0002); duodenal ulcers had developed in one (0.5%) patient compared with 17 (8.5%; OR 0.05, 0.01-0.40; p=0.0045); and erosive

  8. Efficacy and Safety of Calcipotriene Plus Betamethasone Dipropionate Aerosol Foam in Patients With Psoriasis Vulgaris--a Randomized Phase III Study (PSO-FAST).

    PubMed

    Leonardi, Craig; Bagel, Jerry; Yamauchi, Paul; Pariser, David; Xu, Zhenyi; Olesen, Martin; Østerdal, Marie Louise; Stein Gold, Linda

    2015-12-01

    An innovative aerosol foam formulation of calcipotriene 0.005% (Cal) plus betamethasone dipropionate 0.064% (BD) designed to improve treatment outcomes. To compare the efficacy and safety of Cal/BD aerosol foam with aerosol foam vehicle in patients with psoriasis. Phase III, double-blind, randomized PSO-FAST (Cal/BD foam in PSOriasis vulgaris, a Four-week, vehicle-controlled, efficacy And Safety Trial) study recruited patients with ≥ mild severity psoriasis of the trunk and/or limbs from 27 US outpatient sites (NCT01866163). Patients were randomized (3:1) to Cal/BD foam or vehicle once-daily for 4 weeks. proportion of patients at week 4 who achieved treatment success according to physician's global assessment. modified (excluding head) psoriasis area and severity index (mPASI) and patient's assessment of itch (visual analog scale). Safety was monitored by adverse events/calcium homeostasis. 426 patients enrolled between June and October 2013 (Cal/BD foam, n=323; vehicle, n=103). At week 4, significantly more patients using Cal/BD foam achieved treatment success versus vehicle (53.3 versus 4.8%; OR 30.3, 95% CI 9.7,94.3; P < .001) and mean mPASI score was significantly lower for patients using Cal/BD foam than vehicle (2.0 versus 5.5; adjusted difference -3.3, P <.001). Significantly greater itch relief was observed for patients using Cal/BD foam than vehicle (P = .010 at day 3, P < .001 from day 5). Adverse drug reactions were reported in 10 Cal/BD foam patients (3.1%) and two vehicle patients (1.9%); events occurred in one patient each except application site pain (Cal/BD foam, two patients; vehicle, one patient). There were no clinically significant changes in calcium homeostasis. Cal/BD foam was efficacious, achieved rapid itch relief and was well tolerated in patients with body psoriasis. This innovative aerosol foam formulation is expected to become a valuable treatment option.

  9. Tn-MUC1 DC Vaccination of Rhesus Macaques and a Phase I/II Trial in Patients with Nonmetastatic Castrate-Resistant Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Scheid, Elizabeth; Major, Pierre; Bergeron, Alain; Finn, Olivera J; Salter, Russell D; Eady, Robin; Yassine-Diab, Bader; Favre, David; Peretz, Yoav; Landry, Claire; Hotte, Sebastien; Mukherjee, Som D; Dekaban, Gregory A; Fink, Corby; Foster, Paula J; Gaudet, Jeffery; Gariepy, Jean; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Lacombe, Louis; Fradet, Yves; Foley, Ronan

    2016-10-01

    MUC1 is a glycoprotein expressed on the apical surface of ductal epithelial cells. Malignant transformation results in loss of polarization and overexpression of hypoglycosylated MUC1 carrying truncated carbohydrates known as T or Tn tumor antigens. Tumor MUC1 bearing Tn carbohydrates (Tn-MUC1) represent a potential target for immunotherapy. We evaluated the Tn-MUC1 glycopeptide in a human phase I/II clinical trial for safety that followed a preclinical study of different glycosylation forms of MUC1 in rhesus macaques, whose MUC1 is highly homologous to human MUC1. Either unglycosylated rhesus macaque MUC1 peptide (rmMUC1) or Tn-rmMUC1 glycopeptide was mixed with an adjuvant or loaded on autologous dendritic cells (DC), and responses were compared. Unglycosylated rmMUC1 peptide induced negligible humoral or cellular responses compared with the Tn-rmMUC1 glycopeptide. Tn-rmMUC1 loaded on DCs induced the highest anti-rmMUC1 T-cell responses and no clinical toxicity. In the phase I/II clinical study, 17 patients with nonmetastatic castrate-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC) were tested with a Tn-MUC1 glycopeptide-DC vaccine. Patients were treated with multiple intradermal and intranodal doses of autologous DCs, which were loaded with the Tn-MUC1 glycopeptide (and KLH as a positive control for immune reactivity). PSA doubling time (PSADT) improved significantly in 11 of 16 evaluable patients (P = 0.037). Immune response analyses detected significant Tn-MUC1-specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T-cell intracellular cytokine responses in 5 out of 7 patients evaluated. In conclusion, vaccination with Tn-MUC1-loaded DCs in nmCRPC patients appears to be safe, able to induce significant T-cell responses, and have biological activity as measured by the increase in PSADT following vaccination. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(10); 881-92. ©2016 AACR.

  10. Intravenous C.E.R.A. maintains stable haemoglobin levels in patients on dialysis previously treated with darbepoetin alfa: results from STRIATA, a randomized phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Canaud, Bernard; Mingardi, Giulio; Braun, Johann; Aljama, Pedro; Kerr, Peter G.; Locatelli, Francesco; Villa, Giuseppe; Van Vlem, Bruno; McMahon, Alan W.; Kerloëguen, Cécile; Beyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Background. Extending the administration interval of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents (ESAs) represents an opportunity to improve the efficiency of anaemia management in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, effective haemoglobin (Hb) maintenance can be challenging with epoetin alfa and epoetin beta administered at extended intervals. C.E.R.A., a continuous erythropoietin receptor activator, has a unique pharmacologic profile and long half-life (∼130 h), allowing administration at extended intervals. Phase III results have demonstrated that C.E.R.A. administered once every 4 weeks effectively maintains stable Hb levels in patients with CKD on dialysis. Methods. STRIATA (Stabilizing haemoglobin TaRgets in dialysis following IV C.E.R.A. Treatment for Anaemia) was a multicentre, open-label randomized phase III study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intravenous C.E.R.A. administered once every 2 weeks (Q2W) for Hb maintenance following direct conversion from darbepoetin alfa (DA). Adult patients on dialysis receiving stable intravenous DA once weekly (QW) or Q2W were randomized (1:1) to continue their current DA regimen (n = 156) or receive intravenous C.E.R.A. Q2W (n = 157) for 52 weeks. Doses were adjusted to maintain Hb levels within ± 1.0 g/dl of baseline and between 10.0 and 13.5 g/dl. The primary endpoint was the mean Hb change between baseline and the evaluation period (weeks 29–36). Results. Most patients (>80%) received DA QW before randomization. The mean (95% CI) difference between C.E.R.A. and DA in the primary endpoint was 0.18 g/dl (−0.05, 0.41), within a pre-defined non-inferiority limit. C.E.R.A. was clinically non-inferior to DA (P < 0.0001) in maintaining Hb levels. Both treatments were well tolerated. Conclusions. Stable Hb levels were successfully maintained in patients on haemodialysis directly converted to Q2W intravenous C.E.R.A. from DA. PMID:18586762

  11. Prospective Phase I-II Trial of Helical Tomotherapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Postoperative Cervical Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Wahab, Sasa; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate, in a prospective trial, the acute and chronic toxicity of patients with cervical cancer treated with surgery and postoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy (RT) delivered using helical tomotherapy, with or without the administration of concurrent chemotherapy. Patients and Methods: A total of 24 evaluable patients entered the study between March 2006 and August 2009. The indications for postoperative RT were tumor size, lymphovascular space invasion, and the depth of cervical stromal invasion in 15 patients; 9 patients underwent postoperative RT because of surgically positive lymph nodes. All patients underwent pelvic RT delivered with helical tomotherapy and intracavitary high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Treatment consisted of concurrent weekly platinum in 17, sequential carboplatin/Taxol in 1, and RT alone in 6. The patients were monitored for acute and chronic toxicity using the Common Toxicity Criteria, version 3.0. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months (range, 4-49). At the last follow-up visit, 23 patients were alive and disease free. Of the 24 patients, 12 (50%) experienced acute Grade 3 gastrointestinal toxicity (anorexia in 5, diarrhea in 4, and nausea in 3). One patient developed acute Grade 4 genitourinary toxicity (vesicovaginal fistula). For patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 71% and 24%, respectively. For patients treated without concurrent chemotherapy, the incidence of acute Grade 3 and 4 hematologic toxicity was 29% and 14%, respectively. Two long-term toxicities occurred (vesicovaginal fistula at 25 months and small bowel obstruction at 30 months). The overall and progression-free survival rate at 3 years for all patients was 100% and 89%, respectively. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that postoperative external RT for cervical cancer delivered with helical tomotherapy and high-dose-rate brachytherapy and with or without

  12. Immunosuppressive therapy for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome: a prospective randomized multicenter phase III trial comparing antithymocyte globulin plus cyclosporine with best supportive care--SAKK 33/99.

    PubMed

    Passweg, Jakob R; Giagounidis, Aristoteles A N; Simcock, Mathew; Aul, Carlo; Dobbelstein, Christiane; Stadler, Michael; Ossenkoppele, Gert; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Schilling, Kristina; Tichelli, André; Ganser, Arnold

    2011-01-20

    Immunosuppressive treatment is reported to improve cytopenia in some patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Combined antithymocyte globulin (ATG) and cyclosporine (CSA) is most effective in patients with immune-mediated marrow failure. This trial was designed to assess the impact of immunosuppression on hematopoiesis, transfusion requirements, transformation, and survival in patients with MDS randomly assigned to 15 mg/kg of horse ATG for 5 days and oral CSA for 180 days (ATG+CSA) or best supportive care (BSC), stratified by treatment center and International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) risk score. Primary end point was best hematologic response at 6 months. Eligible patients had an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of ≤ 2 and transfusion dependency of less than 2 years in duration. Between 2000 and 2006, 45 patients received ATG+CSA (median age, 62 years; range, 23 to 75 years; 56% men) and 43 patients received BSC (median age, 65 years; range, 24 to 76 years; 81% men). IPSS score was low, intermediate-1, intermediate-2, high, and not evaluable in eight, 24, seven, one, and five patients on ATG+CSA, respectively, and eight, 25, five, zero, and five patients on BSC, respectively. Refractory anemia, refractory anemia with ringed sideroblasts, refractory anemia with excess of blasts (RAEB) -I, RAEB-II, and hypoplastic disease were present in 21, six, nine, zero, and nine patients on ATG+CSA, respectively, and 18, eight, 11, two, and four patients on BSC, respectively. By month 6, 13 of 45 patients on ATG+CSA had a hematologic response compared with four of 43 patients on BSC (P = .0156). Two-year transformation-free survival (TFS) rates were 46% (95% CI, 28% to 62%) and 55% (95% CI, 34% to 70%) for ATG+CSA and BSC patients, respectively (P = .730), whereas overall survival (OS) estimates were 49% (95% CI, 31% to 66%) and 63% (95% CI, 42% to 78%), respectively (P = .828). This open-label randomized phase III trial demonstrates that

  13. Analysis of overall survival from a phase III study of ixabepilone plus capecitabine versus capecitabine in patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes.

    PubMed

    Hortobagyi, Gabriel N; Gomez, Henry L; Li, Rubi K; Chung, Hyun-Cheol; Fein, Luis E; Chan, Valorie F; Jassem, Jacek; Lerzo, Guillermo L; Pivot, Xavier B; Hurtado de Mendoza, Fernando; Xu, Binghe; Vahdat, Linda T; Peck, Ronald A; Mukhopadhyay, Pralay; Roché, Henri H

    2010-07-01

    Limited proven treatment options exist for patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) resistant to anthracycline and taxane treatment. Ixabepilone, a novel semisynthetic analog of epothilone B, has demonstrated single-agent activity in MBC resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes. In combination with capecitabine in a phase III trial (CA163-046) in this setting, ixabepilone prolonged progression-free survival and increased objective response rate relative to capecitabine (Thomas et al. J Clin Oncol 25:5210-5217, 2007). Here, we report the results of overall survival (OS), a secondary efficacy endpoint from the CA163-046 trial. Seven hundred fifty-two patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes were randomized to ixabepilone (40 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 of a 21-day cycle) plus capecitabine (2,000 mg/m(2) orally on days 1 through 14 of a 21-day cycle) or capecitabine alone (2,500 mg/m(2) on the same schedule). Patients receiving ixabepilone plus capecitabine treatment had a median survival of 12.9 months compared to 11.1 months for patients receiving capecitabine alone (HR = 0.9; 95%CI: 077-1.05; P = 0.19). This observed increase in median OS favored the combination; however, the difference was not statistically significant. Predefined subset analyses showed a clinically meaningful increase in OS in KPS 70-80 patients receiving ixabepilone plus capecitabine (HR = 0.75; 95% CI: 0.58-0.98). Ixabepilone plus capecitabine did not show a significant improvement in survival compared to capecitabine alone in patients with MBC resistant to anthracyclines and taxanes. The observed differences in survival favored the combination arm. A clinical benefit was also seen in patients in the KPS 70-80 subgroup.

  14. Phase I/II study of pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) in patients with advanced melanoma.

    PubMed

    Ott, Patrick A; Carvajal, Richard D; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Jungbluth, Achim A; Hoffman, Eric W; Wu, Bor-Wen; Bomalaski, John S; Venhaus, Ralph; Pan, Linda; Old, Lloyd J; Pavlick, Anna C; Wolchok, Jedd D

    2013-04-01

    Background Arginine deiminase (ADI) is an enzyme that degrades arginine, an amino acid that is important for growth and development of normal and neoplastic cells. Melanoma cells are auxotrophic for arginine, because they lack argininosuccinatesynthetase (ASS), a key enzyme required for the synthesis of arginine. Patients and methods Patients with advanced melanoma were treated with 40, 80 or 160 IU/m(2) ADI-PEG 20 i.m. weekly. Primary endpoints were toxicity and tumor response, secondary endpoints included metabolic response by (18)FDG-PET, pharmacodynamic (PD) effects upon circulating arginine levels, and argininosuccinate synthetase tumor expression by immunohistochemistry. Results 31 previously treated patients were enrolled. The main toxicities were grade 1 and 2 adverse events including injection site pain, rash, and fatigue. No objective responses were seen. Nine patients achieved stable disease (SD), with 2 of these durable for >6 months. Four of the 9 patients with SD had uveal melanoma. PD analysis showed complete plasma arginine depletion in 30/31 patients by day 8. Mean plasma levels of ADI-PEG 20 correlated inversely with ADI-PEG 20 antibody levels. Immunohistochemical ASS expression analysis in tumor tissue was negative in 24 patients, whereas 5 patients had <5 % cells positive. Conclusions ADI-PEG 20 is well tolerated in advanced melanoma patients and leads to consistent, but transient, arginine depletion. Although no RECIST responses were observed, the encouraging rate of SD in uveal melanoma patients indicates that it may be worthwhile to evaluate ADI-PEG 20 in this melanoma subgroup.

  15. Phase I/II study of pegylated arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG 20) in patients with advanced melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal, Richard D.; Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Jungbluth, Achim A.; Hoffman, Eric W.; Wu, Bor-Wen; Bomalaski, John S.; Venhaus, Ralph; Pan, Linda; Old, Lloyd J.; Pavlick, Anna C.; Wolchok, Jedd D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Arginine deiminase (ADI) is an enzyme that degrades arginine, an amino acid that is important for growth and development of normal and neoplastic cells. Melanoma cells are auxotrophic for arginine, because they lack argininosuccinatesynthetase (ASS), a key enzyme required for the synthesis of arginine. Patients and methods Patients with advanced melanoma were treated with 40, 80 or 160 IU/m2 ADI-PEG 20 i.m. weekly. Primary endpoints were toxicity and tumor response, secondary endpoints included metabolic response by 18FDG-PET, pharmacodynamic (PD) effects upon circulating arginine levels, and argininosuccinate synthetase tumor expression by immunohistochemistry. Results 31 previously treated patients were enrolled. The main toxicities were grade 1 and 2 adverse events including injection site pain, rash, and fatigue. No objective responses were seen. Nine patients achieved stable disease (SD), with 2 of these durable for >6 months. Four of the 9 patients with SD had uveal melanoma. PD analysis showed complete plasma arginine depletion in 30/31 patients by day 8. Mean plasma levels of ADI-PEG 20 correlated inversely with ADI-PEG 20 antibody levels. Immunohistochemical ASS expression analysis in tumor tissue was negative in 24 patients, whereas 5 patients had <5 % cells positive. Conclusions ADI-PEG 20 is well tolerated in advanced melanoma patients and leads to consistent, but transient, arginine depletion. Although no RECIST responses were observed, the encouraging rate of SD in uveal melanoma patients indicates that it may be worthwhile to evaluate ADI-PEG 20 in this melanoma subgroup. PMID:22864522

  16. Phase III randomized study of bendamustine compared with chlorambucil in previously untreated patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knauf, Wolfgang U; Lissichkov, Toshko; Aldaoud, Ali; Liberati, Anna; Loscertales, Javier; Herbrecht, Raoul; Juliusson, Gunnar; Postner, Gerhard; Gercheva, Liana; Goranov, Stefan; Becker, Martin; Fricke, Hans-Joerg; Huguet, Francoise; Del Giudice, Ilaria; Klein, Peter; Tremmel, Lothar; Merkle, Karlheinz; Montillo, Marco

    2009-09-10

    This randomized, open-label, parallel-group, multicenter study was designed to compare the efficacy and safety of bendamustine and chlorambucil in previously untreated patients with advanced (Binet stage B or C) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Patients (patients were randomly assigned (162 bendamustine, 157 chlorambucil). Complete or partial responses were achieved in 110 (68%) of 162 bendamustine-treated and 48 (31%) of 157 chlorambucil-treated patients (P < .0001). More patients showed complete responses with bendamustine than with chlorambucil (31% v 2%). Median progression-free survival was 21.6 months with bendamustine and 8.3 months with chlorambucil (P < .0001). Bendamustine was also associated with an improvement in duration of remission, compared with chlorambucil (median, 21.8 v 8.0 months). Hematologic National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria grade 3 to 4 adverse events were more common with bendamustine than with chlorambucil (occurring in 40% v 19% of patients). Severe infections (grade 3 to 4) occurred in 8% of bendamustine-treated patients and 3% of chlorambucil-treated patients. Bendamustine offers significantly greater efficacy than chlorambucil, and a manageable toxicity profile, when used as first-line therapy in patients with advanced CLL.

  17. A Phase III, Randomized, Controlled Trial of Apremilast in Patients with Psoriatic Arthritis: Results of the PALACE 2 Trial.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, Maurizio; Myerson, Gary E; Fleischmann, Roy M; Lioté, Frédéric; Díaz-González, Federico; Van den Bosch, Filip; Marzo-Ortega, Helena; Feist, Eugen; Shah, Kamal; Hu, ChiaChi; Stevens, Randall M; Poder, Airi

    2016-09-01

    Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, downregulates intracellular inflammatory mediator synthesis by elevating cyclic adenosine monophosphate levels. The PALACE 2 trial evaluated apremilast efficacy and safety in patients with active psoriatic arthritis (PsA) despite prior conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic therapy. Eligible patients were randomized (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg BID, or apremilast 30 mg BID. At Week 16, patients with swollen and tender joint count improvement < 20% entered early escape, with placebo patients rerandomized (1:1) to apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID while apremilast patients continued on their initial apremilast dose. At Week 24, patients remaining on placebo were rerandomized to apremilast 20 mg BID or 30 mg BID. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patients achieving > 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria (ACR20) at Week 16. In the intent-to-treat population (N = 484), ACR20 at Week 16 was achieved by more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg BID [37.4% (p = 0.0002)] and 30 mg BID [32.1% (p = 0.0060)] versus placebo (18.9%). Clinically meaningful improvements in signs and symptoms of PsA, physical function, and psoriasis were observed with apremilast through Week 52. The most common adverse events were diarrhea, nausea, headache, and upper respiratory tract infection. Diarrhea and nausea generally occurred early and usually resolved spontaneously with continued treatment. Laboratory abnormalities were infrequent and transient. Apremilast demonstrated clinical improvements in PsA for up to 52 weeks, including signs and symptoms, physical function, and psoriasis. No new safety signals were observed. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01212757.

  18. A Phase III Clinical Trial of the Epidermal Growth Factor Vaccine CIMAvax-EGF as Switch Maintenance Therapy in Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Pedro C; Popa, Xitllaly; Martínez, Odeth; Mendoza, Silvia; Santiesteban, Eduardo; Crespo, Tatiana; Amador, Rosa M; Fleytas, Ricardo; Acosta, Soraida C; Otero, Yanine; Romero, Gala N; de la Torre, Ana; Cala, Mireysi; Arzuaga, Lina; Vello, Loisel; Reyes, Delmairis; Futiel, Niurka; Sabates, Teresa; Catala, Mauricio; Flores, Yoanna I; Garcia, Beatriz; Viada, Carmen; Lorenzo-Luaces, Patricia; Marrero, Maria A; Alonso, Liuba; Parra, Jenelin; Aguilera, Nadia; Pomares, Yaisel; Sierra, Patricia; Rodríguez, Gryssell; Mazorra, Zaima; Lage, Agustin; Crombet, Tania; Neninger, Elia

    2016-08-01

    EGFR is a well-validated target for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). CIMAvax-EGF is a therapeutic cancer vaccine composed of human recombinant EGF conjugated to a carrier protein and Montanide ISA51 as adjuvant. The vaccine is intended to induce antibodies against self EGFs that block EGF-EGFR interaction. To evaluate overall survival, safety, immunogenicity, and EGF concentration in serum after CIMAvax-EGF, a randomized phase III trial was done in patients with advanced NSCLC. Four to 6 weeks after first-line chemotherapy, 405 patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC were randomly assigned to a vaccine group, which received CIMAvax-EGF or a control group, treated with best supportive care. Long-term vaccination was very safe. Most frequent adverse reactions were grade 1 or 2 injection-site pain, fever, vomiting, and headache. Vaccination induced anti-EGF antibodies and decreased serum EGF concentration. In the safety population, median survival time (MST) was 10.83 months in the vaccine arm versus 8.86 months in the control arm. These differences were not significant according the standard log rank (HR, 0.82; P = 0.100), but according a weighted log rank (P = 0.04) that was applied once the nonproportionality of the HR was verified. Survival benefit was significant (HR, 0.77; P = 0.036) in the per-protocol setting (patients receiving at least four vaccine doses): MST was 12.43 months for the vaccine arm versus 9.43 months for the control arm. MST was higher (14.66 months) for vaccinated patients with high EGF concentration at baseline. Switch maintenance with CIMAvax-EGF was well tolerated and significantly increased MST of patients that completed induction vaccination. Baseline EGF concentration predicted survival benefit. Clin Cancer Res; 22(15); 3782-90. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Efficacy and safety of bilastine in Japanese patients with perennial allergic rhinitis: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase III study.

    PubMed

    Okubo, Kimihiro; Gotoh, Minoru; Asako, Mikiya; Nomura, Yasuyuki; Togawa, Michinori; Saito, Akihiro; Honda, Takayuki; Ohashi, Yoshihiro

    2017-01-01

    Bilastine, a novel non-sedating second-generation H1 antihistamine, has been approved in most European countries since 2010. This study aimed to evaluate the superiority of bilastine over placebo in Japanese patients with perennial allergic rhinitis (PAR). This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase III study (trial registration number JapicCTI-142600) evaluated the effect of a 2-week treatment period with bilastine (20 mg once daily), fexofenadine (60 mg twice daily), or a matched placebo (double dummy) in patients with PAR. All patients were instructed to record individual nasal and ocular symptoms in diaries daily. The primary endpoint was the mean change in total nasal symptom scores (TNSS) from baseline to Week 2 (Days 10-13). A total of 765 patients were randomly allocated to receive bilastine, fexofenadine, or placebo (256, 254, and 255 patients, respectively). The mean change in TNSS from baseline at Week 2 was significantly decreased by bilastine (-0.98) compared to placebo (-0.63, P = 0.023). Bilastine and fexofenadine showed no significant difference in the primary endpoint. However, the mean change in TNSS from baseline on Day 1 was more significantly decreased by bilastine (-0.99) than by placebo (-0.28, P < 0.001) or fexofenadine (-0.62, P = 0.032). The active drugs also improved instantaneous TNSS 1 h after the first and before the second drug administration on Day 1 (P < 0.05). The study drugs were well tolerated. After 2-week treatment period, bilastine 20 mg once daily was effective and tolerable in Japanese patients with PAR, and exhibited a rapid onset of action. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients' self-assessment versus investigators' evaluation in a phase III trial in non-castrate metastatic prostate cancer (GETUG-AFU 15).

    PubMed

    Gravis, Gwenaelle; Marino, Patricia; Joly, Florence; Oudard, Stéphane; Priou, Franck; Esterni, Benjamin; Latorzeff, Igor; Delva, Remy; Krakowski, Ivan; Laguerre, Brigitte; Rolland, Fréderic; Théodore, Christine; Deplanque, Gael; Ferrero, Jean Marc; Pouessel, Damien; Mourey, Loïc; Beuzeboc, Philippe; Zanetta, Sylvie; Habibian, Muriel; Berdah, Jean François; Dauba, Jerome; Baciuchka, Marjorie; Platini, Christian; Linassier, Claude; Labourey, Jean Luc; Machiels, Jean Pascal; El Kouri, Claude; Ravaud, Alain; Suc, Etienne; Eymard, Jean Christophe; Hasbini, Ali; Bousquet, Guilhem; Soulie, Michel; Fizazi, Karim

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity, which is a key parameter in the evaluation of cancer treatments, can be underestimated by clinicians. We investigated differences between patients and physicians in reporting adverse events of androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) with or without docetaxel in a multicentre phase III trial in non-castrate metastatic prostate cancer. The 385 patients included were invited to complete a 26-symptom questionnaire 3 and 6 months after the start of treatment, among which eighteen symptoms were also assessed by physicians, reported in medical records and graded using the Common Toxicity Criteria of the National Cancer Institute. Positive and negative agreements as well as Kappa concordance coefficients were computed. Data were available for 220 and 165 patients at 3 and 6 months respectively. Physicians systematically under-reported patients' symptoms. Positive agreement rates (at respectively 3 and 6 months) for the five most commonly reported symptoms were: 61.0% and 64.3% hot flushes, 50.0% and 43.6% fatigue, 29.4% and 31.1% sexual dysfunction, 24.4% and 14.4% weigh gain/loss, 16.7% and 19.3% for joint/muscle pain. For symptoms most frequently reported as disturbing or very disturbing by patients, the clinicians' failure to report them ranged from 50.8% (hot flushes) to 89.5% (joint/muscle pain) at 3 months, and from 48.2% (hot flushes) to 88.4% (joint/muscle pain) at 6 months. Physicians often failed to report treatment-related symptoms, even the most common and disturbing ones. Patients' self-evaluation of toxicity should be used in clinical trials to improve the process of drug assessment in oncology. French Health Ministry and Institut National du Cancer (PHRC), Sanofi-Aventis, Astra-Zeneca, and Amgen. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Facilitated patient experience feedback can improve nursing care: a pilot study for a phase III cluster randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background England’s extensive NHS patient survey programme has not fulfilled government promises of widespread improvements in patients’ experiences, and media reports of poor nursing care in NHS hospitals are increasingly common. Impediments to the surveys’ impact on the quality of nursing care may include: the fact that they are not ward-specific, so nurses claim “that doesn’t happen on my ward”; nurses’ scepticism about the relevance of patient feedback to their practice; and lack of prompt communication of results. The surveys’ impact could be increased by: conducting ward-specific surveys; returning results to ward staff more quickly; including patients’ written comments in reports; and offering nurses an opportunity to discuss the feedback. Very few randomised trials have been conducted to test the effectiveness of patient feedback on quality improvement and there have been few, if any, published trials of ward-specific patient surveys. Methods Over two years, postal surveys of recent inpatients were conducted at four-monthly intervals in 18 wards in two NHS Trusts in England. Wards were randomly allocated to Basic Feedback (ward-specific printed patient survey results including patients’ written comments sent to nurses by letter); Feedback Plus (in addition to printed results, ward meetings to discuss results and plan improvements) or Control (no active feedback of survey results). Patient survey responses to questions about nursing care were used to compute wards’ average Nursing Care Scores at each interval. Nurses’ reactions to the patient feedback were recorded. Results Conducting ward-level surveys and delivering ward-specific results was feasible. Ward meetings were effective for engaging nurses and challenging scepticism and patients’ written comments stimulated interest. 4,236 (47%) patients returned questionnaires. Nursing Care Scores improved more for Feedback Plus than Basic Feedback or Control (difference between

  2. Impact of ixekizumab on facial psoriasis and related quality of life measures in moderate-to-severe psoriasis patients: 12-week results from two phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Paul, C; Guenther, L; Torii, H; Sofen, H; Burge, R; Lin, C Y; Potts Bleakman, A; Mallbris, L; Poulin, Y

    2017-09-07

    Facial psoriasis was reported in 17-68% of patients with psoriasis and shown to have a negative impact on patients' personal and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). To explore the association of facial psoriasis with patients' HRQoL and to assess the relationship between ixekizumab (IXE) and improvement in facial psoriasis and changes in HRQoL. This work reports the combined results of two phase III multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, active-comparator trials in patients with moderate-to-severe psoriasis. Patients received placebo, etanercept (ETN; 50 mg twice weekly) or IXE [80 mg every 4 weeks (Q4W) or every 2 weeks (Q2W)] for up to 12 weeks following an initial 160-mg dose. HRQoL parameters were analysed based on facial psoriasis status at baseline using analysis of covariance models. Improvement was assessed as percentage of patients with no facial psoriasis. The combined database included 1133 patients with facial psoriasis and 1437 without. Patients treated with IXE whose facial psoriasis cleared had improved Dermatology Life Quality Index 0.1 responses (P < 0.01) compared with patients with facial psoriasis at Week 12. At Week 12, clearance of facial psoriasis compared with the presence of facial psoriasis was independently associated with significantly better improvement in Psoriasis Skin Appearance Bothersomeness scores in the IXE Q2W treatment group (P < 0.01). At Week 12, facial clearance and overall Psoriasis Area Severity Index (PASI) improvement were observed in significant numbers of patients treated with IXE compared with ETN and placebo. Facial psoriasis clearance at Week 12 in patients treated with IXE or ETN was positively associated with PASI75 and PASI90 achievement. Facial psoriasis had a larger negative impact on HRQoL than no facial psoriasis. Facial psoriasis clearance was associated with improved HRQoL. Significantly more IXE-treated patients had rapid facial clearance vs. ETN and PBO, which led to better

  3. Allogeneic marrow transplantation following cyclophosphamide and escalating doses of hyperfractionated total body irradiation in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies: A phase I/II trial

    SciTech Connect

    Demirer, T.; Petersen, F.B.; Appelbaum, F.R.

    1995-07-15

    The purpose of this investigation was to define the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of unshielded total body irradiation (TBI) delivered from dual {sup 60}C sources at an exposure rate of 0.08 Gy/min and given in thrice daily fractions of 1.2 Gy in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. Forty-four patients with a median age of 28 (range 6-48) years were entered into a Phase I/II study. All patients received cyclophosphamide (Cy), 120 mg/kg administered over 2 days before TBI. Marrow from human leukocyte antigen (HLA) identical siblings was infused following the last dose of TBI. An escalation-deescalation schema designed to not exceed an incidence of 25% of Grade 3-4 regimen-related toxicities (RRTs) was used. The first dose level tested was 13.2 Gy followed by 14.4 Gy. None of the four patients at the dose level of 13.2 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT. Two of the first eight patients receiving 14.4 Gy developed Grade 3-4 RRT, establishing this as the MTD. An additional 32 patients were evaluated at the 14.4 Gy level to confirm these initial observations. Of 40 patients receiving 14.4 Gy, 13 (32.5%) developed Grade 3-4 RRTs; 46% in adults and 12% in children. The primary dose limiting toxicity was Grade 3-4 hepatic toxicity, which occurred in 12.5% of patients. Noninfectious Grade 3-4 interstitial pneumonia syndrome occurred in 5% of patients. The actuarial probabilities of event-free survival, relapse, and nonrelapse mortality at 2 years were 0.10, 0.81, and 0.47, respectively, for patients who received 14.4 Gy of TBI. The outcome for patients receiving 14.4 Gy of TBI was not different from previous studies of other CY and TBI regimens in patients with advanced lymphoid malignancies. These data showed that the incidence of Grade 3-4 RRTs in adults was greater than the 25% maximum set as the goal of this study, suggesting that 13.2 Gy is a more appropriate dose of TBI for adults, while 14.4 Gy is an appropriate dose for children. 36 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  4. Efficacy and safety of sorafenib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma: subanalyses of a phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Bruix, Jordi; Raoul, Jean-Luc; Sherman, Morris; Mazzaferro, Vincenzo; Bolondi, Luigi; Craxi, Antonio; Galle, Peter R; Santoro, Armando; Beaugrand, Michel; Sangiovanni, Angelo; Porta, Camillo; Gerken, Guido; Marrero, Jorge A; Nadel, Andrea; Shan, Michael; Moscovici, Marius; Voliotis, Dimitris; Llovet, Josep M

    2012-10-01

    The Sorafenib Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC) Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP) trial demonstrated that sorafenib improves overall survival and is safe for patients with advanced HCC. In this trial, 602 patients with well-preserved liver function (>95% Child-Pugh A) were randomized to receive either sorafenib 400mg or matching placebo orally b.i.d. on a continuous basis. Because HCC is a heterogeneous disease, baseline patient characteristics may affect individual responses to treatment. In a comprehensive series of exploratory subgroup analyses, data from the SHARP trial were analyzed to discern if baseline patient characteristics influenced the efficacy and safety of sorafenib. Five subgroup domains were assessed: disease etiology, tumor burden, performance status, tumor stage, and prior therapy. Overall survival (OS), time to progression (TTP), disease control rate (DCR), and safety were assessed for subgroups within each domain. Subgroup analyses showed that sorafenib consistently improved median OS compared with placebo, as reflected by hazard ratios (HRs) of 0.50-0.85, similar to the complete cohort (HR=0.69). Sorafenib also consistently improved median TTP (HR, 0.40-0.64), except in HBV-positive patients (HR, 1.03), and DCR. Results are limited by small patient numbers in some subsets. The most common grade 3/4 adverse events included diarrhea, hand-foot skin reaction, and fatigue; the incidence of which did not differ appreciably among subgroups. These exploratory subgroup analyses showed that sorafenib consistently improved median OS and DCR compared with placebo in patients with advanced HCC, irrespective of disease etiology, baseline tumor burden, performance status, tumor stage, and prior therapy. Copyright © 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Oral mucositis prevention by low-level laser therapy in head-and-neck cancer patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiotherapy: a phase III randomized study.

    PubMed

    Gouvêa de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosângela Correa; de Castro, Gilberto; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moisés Longo

    2012-01-01

    Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm(2) or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might translate into improved CRT efficacy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier

  6. Oral Mucositis Prevention By Low-Level Laser Therapy in Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients Undergoing Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy: A Phase III Randomized Study

    SciTech Connect

    Gouvea de Lima, Aline; Villar, Rosangela Correa; Castro, Gilberto de; Antequera, Reynaldo; Gil, Erlon; Rosalmeida, Mauro Cabral; Federico, Miriam Hatsue Honda; Snitcovsky, Igor Moises Longo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Oral mucositis is a major complication of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in head-and-neck cancer patients. Low-level laser (LLL) therapy is a promising preventive therapy. We aimed to evaluate the efficacy of LLL therapy to decrease severe oral mucositis and its effect on RT interruptions. Methods and Materials: In the present randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, patients received either gallium-aluminum-arsenide LLL therapy 2.5 J/cm{sup 2} or placebo laser, before each radiation fraction. Eligible patients had to have been diagnosed with squamous cell carcinoma or undifferentiated carcinoma of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, or metastases to the neck with an unknown primary site. They were treated with adjuvant or definitive CRT, consisting of conventional RT 60-70 Gy (range, 1.8-2.0 Gy/d, 5 times/wk) and concurrent cisplatin. The primary endpoints were the oral mucositis severity in Weeks 2, 4, and 6 and the number of RT interruptions because of mucositis. The secondary endpoints included patient-reported pain scores. To detect a decrease in the incidence of Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis from 80% to 50%, we planned to enroll 74 patients. Results: A total of 75 patients were included, and 37 patients received preventive LLL therapy. The mean delivered radiation dose was greater in the patients treated with LLL (69.4 vs. 67.9 Gy, p = .03). During CRT, the number of patients diagnosed with Grade 3 or 4 oral mucositis treated with LLL vs. placebo was 4 vs. 5 (Week 2, p = 1.0), 4 vs. 12 (Week 4, p = .08), and 8 vs. 9 (Week 6, p = 1.0), respectively. More of the patients treated with placebo had RT interruptions because of mucositis (6 vs. 0, p = .02). No difference was detected between the treatment arms in the incidence of severe pain. Conclusions: LLL therapy was not effective in reducing severe oral mucositis, although a marginal benefit could not be excluded. It reduced RT interruptions in these head-and-neck cancer patients, which might

  7. 75 FR 14575 - Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-26

    ... National Institute of Standards and Technology Voting Equipment Evaluations Phase III AGENCY: National... Phase III of the benchmark research for voting equipment used in an election in 2008 or later and/ or... Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will be conducting Phase III research on voting equipment...

  8. Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in preventing radiation-induced dermatitis in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer: results from a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Niazi, Tamim M; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Silver Clear Nylon Dressing is Effective in Preventing Radiation-Induced Dermatitis in Patients With Lower Gastrointestinal Cancer: Results From a Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Niazi, Tamim M.; Vuong, Te; Azoulay, Laurant; Marijnen, Corrie; Bujko, Kryzstof; Nasr, Elie; Lambert, Christine; Duclos, Marie; Faria, Sergio; David, Marc; Cummings, Bernard

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: For patients with anal canal and advanced rectal cancer, chemoradiation therapy is a curative modality or an important adjunct to surgery. Nearly all patients treated with chemoradiation experience some degree of radiation-induced dermatitis (RID). Prevention and effective treatment of RID, therefore, is of considerable clinical relevance. The present phase III randomized trial compared the efficacy of silver clear nylon dressing (SCND) with that of standard skin care for these patients. Methods and Materials: A total of 42 rectal or anal canal cancer patients were randomized to either a SCND or standard skin care group. SCND was applied from Day 1 of radiation therapy (RT) until 2 weeks after treatment completion. In the control arm, sulfadiazine cream was applied at the time of skin dermatitis. Printed digital photographs taken 2 weeks prior to, on the last day, and two weeks after the treatment completion were scored by 10 blinded readers, who used the common toxicity scoring system for skin dermatitis. Results: The radiation dose ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy, and there were no differences between the 2 groups. On the last day of RT, when the most severe RID occurs, the mean dermatitis score was 2.53 (standard deviation [SD], 1.17) for the standard and 1.67 (SD, 1.2; P=.01) for the SCND arm. At 2 weeks after RT, the difference was 0.39 points in favor of SCND (P=.39). There was considerable intraclass correlation among the 10 observers. Conclusions: Silver clear nylon dressing is effective in reducing RID in patients with lower gastrointestinal cancer treated with combined chemotherapy and radiation treatment.

  10. Efficacy of lanreotide Autogel® administered every 4–8 weeks in patients with acromegaly previously responsive to lanreotide microparticles 30 mg: a phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, T; Astorga, R

    2006-01-01

    Objective and design Depot somatostatin analogues are well accepted as either adjuvant or primary therapy for acromegaly, and their long dosage intervals facilitate adherence to treatment. Our objective was to evaluate whether lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg, every 4–8 weeks, was as effective in controlling acromegaly as lanreotide microparticles 30 mg, every 1–2 weeks. Patients design and measurements Patients who had used lanreotide microparticles 30 mg, ≥ 2 months prestudy, and had responded to treatment were recruited to this open, prospective, multicentre phase III trial. Three to five injections of lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg were administered. Lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg was injected every 4, 6 or 8 weeks in patients previously receiving lanreotide microparticles every 7, 10 or 14 days, respectively. GH and insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 levels were assessed one dosing interval after the final injections. Results Ninety-eight patients were enrolled and 93 completed. Steady-state GH concentrations demonstrated similar efficacy between the formulations (upper 95% confidence interval of the quotient, 77·7%). Mean (SE) GH levels were lower with lanreotide Autogel® than with lanreotide microparticles (3·8 (0·5) vs 4·3 (0·5) ng/ml; P < 0·001). GH levels < 2·5 ng/ml were observed in 54% and 46% of patients; 40% and 35% having GH < 2·5 ng/ml and normalized IGF-1 with lanreotide Autogel® and microparticles, respectively. Symptoms were controlled better with lanreotide Autogel® and treatment was well accepted. Conclusions Lanreotide Autogel® 120 mg every 4–8 weeks, is at least as effective and as well tolerated in acromegaly as lanreotide microparticles 30 mg injected every 7–14 days. PMID:16918950

  11. Phase III Randomized Trial of Induction Chemotherapy in Patients With N2 or N3 Locally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ezra E.W.; Karrison, Theodore G.; Kocherginsky, Masha; Mueller, Jeffrey; Egan, Robyn; Huang, Chao H.; Brockstein, Bruce E.; Agulnik, Mark B.; Mittal, Bharat B.; Yunus, Furhan; Samant, Sandeep; Raez, Luis E.; Mehra, Ranee; Kumar, Priya; Ondrey, Frank; Marchand, Patrice; Braegas, Bettina; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Villaflor, Victoria M.; Haraf, Daniel J.; Vokes, Everett E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Induction chemotherapy (IC) before radiotherapy lowers distant failure (DF) rates in locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). The goal of this phase III trial was to determine whether IC before chemoradiotherapy (CRT) further improves survival compared with CRT alone in patients with N2 or N3 disease. Patients and Methods Treatment-naive patients with nonmetastatic N2 or N3 SCCHN were randomly assigned to CRT alone (CRT arm; docetaxel, fluorouracil, and hydroxyurea plus radiotherapy 0.15 Gy twice per day every other week) versus two 21-day cycles of IC (docetaxel 75 mg/m2 on day 1, cisplatin 75 mg/m2 on day 1, and fluorouracil 750 mg/m2 on days 1 to 5) followed by the same CRT regimen (IC + CRT arm). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Secondary end points included DF-free survival, failure pattern, and recurrence-free survival (RFS). Results A total of 285 patients were randomly assigned. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities during IC were febrile neutropenia (11%) and mucositis (9%); during CRT (both arms combined), they were mucositis (49%), dermatitis (21%), and leukopenia (18%). Serious adverse events were more common in the IC arm (47% v 28%; P = .002). With a minimum follow-up of 30 months, there were no statistically significant differences in OS (hazard ratio, 0.91; 95% CI, 0.59 to 1.41), RFS, or DF-free survival. Conclusion IC did not translate into improved OS compared with CRT alone. However, the study was underpowered because it did not meet the planned accrual target, and OS was higher than predicted in both arms. IC cannot be recommended routinely in patients with N2 or N3 locally advanced SCCHN. PMID:25049329

  12. Protocol for PIT: a phase III trial of prophylactic irradiation of tracts in patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma following invasive chest wall intervention

    PubMed Central

    Bayman, N; Ardron, D; Ashcroft, L; Baldwin, D R; Booton, R; Darlison, L; Edwards, J G; Lang-Lazdunski, L; Lester, J F; Peake, M; Rintoul, R C; Snee, M; Taylor, P; Lunt, C

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Histological diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma requires an invasive procedure such as CT-guided needle biopsy, thoracoscopy, video-assisted thorascopic surgery (VATs) or thoracotomy. These invasive procedures encourage tumour cell seeding at the intervention site and patients can develop tumour nodules within the chest wall. In an effort to prevent nodules developing, it has been widespread practice across Europe to irradiate intervention sites postprocedure—a practice known as prophylactic irradiation of tracts (PIT). To date there has not been a suitably powered randomised trial to determine whether PIT is effective at reducing the risk of chest wall nodule development. Methods and analysis In this multicentre phase III randomised controlled superiority trial, 374 patients who can receive radiotherapy within 42 days of a chest wall intervention will be randomised to receive PIT or no PIT. Patients will be randomised on a 1:1 basis. Radiotherapy in the PIT arm will be 21 Gy in three fractions. Subsequent chemotherapy is given at the clinicians’ discretion. A reduction in the incidence of chest wall nodules from 15% to 5% in favour of radiotherapy 6 months after randomisation would be clinically significant. All patients will be followed up for up to 2 years with monthly telephone contact and at least four outpatient visits in the first year. Ethics and dissemination PIT was approved by NRES Committee North West—Greater Manchester West (REC reference 12/NW/0249) and recruitment is currently on-going, the last patient is expected to be randomised by the end of 2015. The analysis of the primary end point, incidence of chest wall nodules 6 months after randomisation, is expected to be published in 2016 in a peer reviewed journal and results will also be presented at scientific meetings and summary results published online. A follow-up analysis is expected to be published in 2018. Trial registration number ISRCTN04240319; NCT01604005; Pre

  13. Effect of Aclidinium Bromide on Exacerbations in Patients with Moderate-to-Severe COPD: A Pooled Analysis of Five Phase III, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Studies

    PubMed Central

    Wedzicha, Jadwiga A.; Agusti, Alvar; Donaldson, Gavin; Chuecos, Ferran; Lamarca, Rosa; Garcia Gil, Esther

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We investigated the effect of the long-acting muscarinic antagonist aclidinium bromide on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) exacerbations by pooling data from five randomized, placebo-controlled, parallel-group Phase III studies of 3–6 months’ duration. Data were pooled from the aclidinium 400 μg twice-daily (BID) and placebo arms (N  =  2,521) and stratified by Global initiative for chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) group (A, B, C and D). Results showed that fewer patients experienced ≥1 exacerbation with aclidinium (any severity: 12.5%; moderate to severe: 10.9%) compared with placebo (any severity: 15.7%; moderate to severe: 13.3%) and the odds of experiencing ≥1 exacerbation of any severity were reduced in patients receiving aclidinium (odds ratio  =   0.78, p  =  0.039). Furthermore, aclidinium reduced the rate of exacerbations compared with placebo (any severity: rate ratio  =  0.79, p  =  0.026; moderate to severe: 0.80, p  =  0.044). The time to first exacerbation of any severity was delayed with aclidinium compared with placebo (hazard ratio  =  0.79, p  =  0.026) and there was a numerical delay in time to first moderate-to-severe exacerbation. Finally, the effects of aclidinium on exacerbations versus placebo were greater in patients in GOLD Groups B and D; however, it is of note that only 10.7% of patients were classified in Group A or C. In summary, the results indicate that aclidinium 400 μg BID reduces the frequency of COPD exacerbations compared with placebo and that these effects are greater in symptomatic patients. PMID:27159613

  14. Phase I/II Trial of Epothilone Analog BMS-247550, Mitoxantrone, and Prednisone in HRPC Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy or decision unless so designated by other...and Prednisone in HRPC Patients Previously Treated with Chemotherapy 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0403 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ...5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jonathan E. Rosenberg, M.D. 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES

  15. Phase I-II studies on accelerated IMRT in breast carcinoma: technical comparison and acute toxicity in 332 patients.

    PubMed

    Morganti, Alessio G; Cilla, Savino; Valentini, Vincenzo; Digesu', Cinzia; Macchia, Gabriella; Deodato, Francesco; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Cece, M Grazia; Cirocco, Massimo; Garganese, Giorgia; Di Lullo, Liberato; Traficante, Divina; Scarabeo, Francesca; Panunzi, Simona; De Gaetano, Andrea; Sallustio, Giuseppina; Cellini, Numa; Sofo, Luigi; Piermattei, Angelo; Scambia, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the results in terms of dosimetric parameters and acute toxicity of two clinical studies (MARA-1 and MARA-2) on accelerated IMRT-based postoperative radiotherapy. These results are compared with historical control group (CG) of patients treated with "standard" 3D postoperative radiotherapy. Prescribed dose to the breast was 50.4Gy in the CG, 40Gy in MARA-1 (low risk of local recurrence), and 50Gy in MARA-2 (medium-high risk of recurrence). The tumor bed total dose was 60.4Gy (sequential 10Gy electron boost), 44Gy (concomitant 4Gy boost), and 60Gy (concomitant 10Gy boost) in CG, MARA-1 and MARA-2 studies, respectively. Overall treatment time was of 32 fractions for CG (6.4weeks); 16 fractions for MARA-1 study (3.2weeks) and 25 fractions for MARA-2 study (5weeks). Three hundred and thirty two patients were included in the analysis. Dosimetric analysis showed D(max) and V(107%) reduction (p<0.001) and D(min) improvement (p<0.001) in the PTV in patients treated with IMRT. Grade 2 acute skin toxicity was 33.6%, 13.1%, and 45.1% in the CG, MARA-1, and MARA-2, respectively (p<0.001), and grade 3 acute skin toxicity was 3.1%, 1.0%, and 2.0%, respectively. Similarly, larger PTV and use of chemotherapy with anthracyclines and taxanes were associated with a greater acute toxicity. With a median follow-up of 31 months, no patients showed local or nodal relapse. A simplified step and shoot IMRT technique allowed better PTV coverage and reduced overall treatment time (CG, 6.6weeks; MARA-1, 3.2weeks; MARA-2, 5weeks) with acceptable short-term toxicity.

  16. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program: Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    G.T. Amrhein; R.T. Bailey; W. Downs; M.J. Holmes; G.A. Kudlac; D.A. Madden

    1999-07-01

    The primary objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. The project goal is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPs), fabric filters (baghouses - BH), and wet flue gas desulfurization systems (WFGD). Development work concentrated on the capture of trace metals, fine particulate, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, with an emphasis on the control of mercury. The AECDP project is jointly funded by the US Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (OCDO), and Babcock and Wilcox, a McDermott company (B and W). This report discusses results of all three phases of the AECDP project with an emphasis on Phase III activities. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on characterization of the emissions of mercury and other air toxics and the control of these emissions for typical operating conditions of conventional flue gas clean-up equipment. Some general comments that can be made about the control of air toxics while burning a high-sulfur bituminous coal are as follows: (1) particulate control devices such as ESP's and baghouses do a good job of removing non-volatile trace metals, (2) particulate control devices (ESPs and baghouses) effectively remove the particulate-phase mercury, but the particulate-phase mercury was only a small fraction of the total for the coals tested, (3) wet scrubbing can effectively remove hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride, and (4) wet scrubbers show good potential for the removal of mercury when operated under certain conditions, however, for certain applications, system enhancements can be required to achieve high

  17. A phase III, randomized, non-inferiority study comparing the efficacy and safety of biosimilar filgrastim versus originator filgrastim for chemotherapy-induced neutropenia in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hegg, Roberto; Mattar, André; de Matos, João Nunes; Pedrini, José Luiz; Aleixo, Sabina Bandeira; Rocha, Roberto Odebrecht; Cramer, Renato Peixoto; van-Eyll-Rocha, Sylvie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare the efficacy and safety of two filgrastim formulations for controlling chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and to evaluate the non-inferiority of the test drug relative to the originator. METHODS: This phase III non-inferiority study had a randomized, multicenter, and open-label design. The patients were randomized at a ratio of 1:1 with a follow-up period of 6 weeks for each patient. In both study arms, filgrastim was administered subcutaneously at a daily dose of 5 mg/kg body weight. The primary endpoint was the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. The secondary endpoints were the duration of grade 4 neutropenia, the generation of anti-filgrastim antibodies, and the rates of adverse events, laboratory abnormalities, febrile neutropenia, and neutropenia of any grade. RESULTS: The primary efficacy analysis demonstrated the non-inferiority of the test drug compared with the originator drug; the upper limit of the 90% confidence interval (CI) for the rate of neutropenia between the two groups (12.61%) was lower than the established margin of non-inferiority. The two treatments were similar with respect to the secondary endpoints and safety. CONCLUSION: The efficacy and safety profile of the test drug were similar to those of the originator product based on the rate of grade 4 neutropenia in the first treatment cycle. This study supports Anvisa's approval of the first biosimilar drug manufactured by the Brazilian industry (Fiprima®). PMID:27759847

  18. The Pharmacological Costs of First-Line Therapies in Unselected Patients With Advanced Colorectal Cancer: A Review of Published Phase III Trials.

    PubMed

    Giuliani, Jacopo; Bonetti, Andrea

    2016-12-01

    In light of the relevant expenses of pharmacologic interventions, it might be interesting to make a balance between the cost of the new drugs administered and the difference in progression-free survival in first-line treatments for advanced colorectal cancer. We calculated the pharmacologic costs necessary to get the benefit in progression-free survival for each trial. The costs are from the pharmacy of our hospital in Legnago, Italy. We evaluated 28 phase III randomized controlled trials that included 19,958 patients. The treatment with oxaliplatin with fluorouracil and folinic acid (FOLFOX) was the most cost-effective. The addition of irinotecan to FOLFOX (FOLFOXIRI) increased the costs only marginally. The increase is bigger for combinations that include biologic agents. The pharmacologic costs of commonly used first-line regimens for the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer are highly variable, and the performance of the published chemotherapy schemes depends on the selection of patients, the tumor characteristics, and the type of the scheme. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Efficacy and safety of maintenance erlotinib in Asian patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a subanalysis of the phase III, randomized SATURN study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Long; Kim, Joo-Hang; Park, Keunchil; Zaatar, Adel; Klingelschmitt, Gaëlle; Ng, Christina

    2012-08-01

    Maintenance therapy, commenced immediately after the completion of first-line chemotherapy, is a promising strategy for improving treatment outcomes in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The global phase III SequentiAl Tarceva in UnResectable NSCLC (SATURN) study evaluated the efficacy and safety of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine-kinase inhibitor erlotinib as maintenance treatment in NSCLC patients without progression after first-line chemotherapy. We report a retrospective subanalysis of Asian patients enrolled in SATURN. Patients with advanced NSCLC with no evidence of progression after four cycles of chemotherapy were randomized to receive erlotinib 150 mg/day or placebo, until progressive disease or limiting toxicity. The co-primary endpoints of SATURN were progression-free survival (PFS) in all patients and in those with positive EGFR immunohistochemistry (IHC) status. Secondary endpoints included overall survival (OS), disease control rate, safety, quality of life (QoL) and biomarker analyses. In total, 126 patients from East and South-East Asian centers were randomized (14% of the intent-to-treat population): 88 from Korea, 28 from China and 10 from Malaysia; one patient was excluded from this analysis due to Indian ethnicity. PFS was significantly prolonged in the erlotinib treatment arm, both overall (hazard ratio [HR]: 0.57; p=0.0067) and in patients with EGFR IHC-positive disease (HR=0.50; p=0.0057). There was a trend towards an increase in OS, which reached statistical significance in the EGFR IHC-positive subgroup (p=0.0233). The overall response rate was significantly higher with erlotinib compared with placebo (24% versus 5%; p=0.0025). Erlotinib was generally well tolerated and had no negative impact on QoL in this subpopulation. The most common treatment-related adverse events were rash, diarrhea and pruritus. Erlotinib was effective and well tolerated in Asian patients, producing benefits consistent with those

  20. Long-term safety of naproxen and esomeprazole magnesium fixed-dose combination: phase III study in patients at risk for NSAID-associated gastric ulcers.

    PubMed

    Sostek, Mark B; Fort, John G; Estborn, Lennart; Vikman, Kerstin

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate long-term safety of enteric-coated naproxen 500 mg and immediate-release esomeprazole magnesium 20 mg fixed-dose combination (FDC) in patients at risk of NSAID-associated upper gastrointestinal (UGI) ulcers. In this open-label, multicenter, phase III study, Helicobacter pylori-negative patients aged ≥50 years or 18-49 years with history of uncomplicated ulcer within the past 5 years, who had osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, or other condition requiring daily NSAIDs for ≥12 months received naproxen/esomeprazole twice daily for 12 months. NCT00527904. Adverse events (AEs), vital signs, physical examination, and laboratory tests. Subgroup analyses included age and low-dose aspirin (LDA) use. Predefined NSAID-associated UGI and cardiovascular AEs were analyzed. Of 239 patients treated (safety population), 135 completed ≥348 treatment days (12-month completers). AE incidence was approximately 70%; dyspepsia, constipation, upper respiratory tract infection, nausea, back pain, and contusion were most frequent (≥5% patients, either population). Treatment-related AEs occurred in 28.0% and 23.7% of patients in the safety and 12-month completer populations, respectively; 18.8% of patients withdrew due to AEs (safety population). Few serious AEs and no deaths occurred. In the safety population, AE incidence was 71.4% and 76.9% in patients aged <65 years (n = 161) and ≥65 years (n = 78), respectively, and 67.6% and 75.8% in LDA users (n = 74) and non-users (n = 165), respectively. Predefined UGI and cardiovascular AEs were observed in 18.8% and 6.3% of patients, respectively, in the safety population, and 16.3% and 5.2%, respectively, in 12-month completers. Dyspepsia and hypertension were most common. Additional assessments showed no unexpected findings. Based on these outcome measures, long-term treatment with FDC naproxen/esomeprazole is not associated with any new safety issues, including predefined UGI and cardiovascular AEs

  1. Late-night salivary cortisol may be valuable for assessing treatment response in patients with Cushing's disease: 12-month, Phase III pasireotide study.

    PubMed

    Findling, James W; Fleseriu, Maria; Newell-Price, John; Petersenn, Stephan; Pivonello, Rosario; Kandra, Albert; Pedroncelli, Alberto M; Biller, Beverly M K

    2016-11-01

    Measuring salivary cortisol is a simple, convenient and accurate technique with potential value in monitoring patients with hypercortisolism. This analysis reports changes in late-night salivary cortisol (LNSC) during a 12-month, multicentre, Phase III study of patients with Cushing's disease who were randomized to pasireotide 600 or 900 μg sc bid. LNSC assessment was an exploratory objective based on a single, optional measurement at midnight ± 1 h on the same day as one of the 24-h urinary free cortisol (UFC) measurements. Of 162 enrolled patients, baseline LNSC was measured in 93. Sixty-seven patients had levels above the upper limit of normal (ULN); median baseline levels were 19.7 and 20.7 nmol/L in the groups subsequently randomized to 600 μg (n = 40) and 900 μg (n = 27), respectively. Median LNSC levels decreased from baseline to month 12; median changes in patients who had baseline LNSC > ULN in the 600 and 900 μg groups were -13.4 nmol/L (-52.6 %; n = 19) and -11.8 nmol/L (-56.1 %; n = 14), respectively. LNSC normalized at months 6 and 12 in 25/67 (37.3 %) and 13/67 (19.4 %) patients, respectively; 10/25 and 8/13 patients also had normalized UFC, and 7/25 and 4/13 had partial UFC control (UFC > ULN and ≥50 % decrease from baseline). There was a moderate correlation (r = 0.55) on the log scale between individual patient LNSC and UFC values when all time points were pooled. Pasireotide decreased LNSC levels during 12 months of treatment. Salivary cortisol may be a simple, convenient biomarker for assessing treatment response in patients with Cushing's disease.

  2. Afatinib beyond progression in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer following chemotherapy, erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib: phase III randomized LUX-Lung 5 trial

    PubMed Central

    Schuler, M.; Yang, J. C.-H.; Park, K.; Kim, J.-H.; Bennouna, J.; Chen, Y.-M.; Chouaid, C.; De Marinis, F.; Feng, J.-F.; Grossi, F.; Kim, D.-W.; Liu, X.; Lu, S.; Strausz, J.; Vinnyk, Y.; Wiewrodt, R.; Zhou, C.; Wang, B.; Chand, V. K.; Planchard, D.

    2016-01-01

    Background Afatinib has demonstrated clinical benefit in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer progressing after treatment with erlotinib/gefitinib. This phase III trial prospectively assessed whether continued irreversible ErbB-family blockade with afatinib plus paclitaxel has superior outcomes versus switching to chemotherapy alone in patients acquiring resistance to erlotinib/gefitinib and afatinib monotherapy. Patients and methods Patients with relapsed/refractory disease following ≥1 line of chemotherapy, and whose tumors had progressed following initial disease control (≥12 weeks) with erlotinib/gefitinib and thereafter afatinib (50 mg/day), were randomized 2:1 to receive afatinib plus paclitaxel (40 mg/day; 80 mg/m2/week) or investigator's choice of single-agent chemotherapy. The primary end point was progression-free survival (PFS). Other end points included objective response rate (ORR), overall survival (OS), safety and patient-reported outcomes. Results Two hundred and two patients with progressive disease following clinical benefit from afatinib were randomized to afatinib plus paclitaxel (n = 134) or single-agent chemotherapy (n = 68). PFS (median 5.6 versus 2.8 months, hazard ratio 0.60, P = 0.003) and ORR (32.1% versus 13.2%, P = 0.005) significantly improved with afatinib plus paclitaxel. There was no difference in OS. Global health status/quality of life was maintained with afatinib plus paclitaxel over the entire treatment period. The median treatment duration was 133 and 51 days with afatinib plus paclitaxel and single-agent chemotherapy, respectively; 48.5% of patients receiving afatinib plus paclitaxel and 30.0% of patients receiving single-agent chemotherapy experienced drug-related grade 3/4 adverse events. Treatment-related adverse events were consistent with those previously reported with each agent. Conclusion Afatinib plus paclitaxel improved PFS and ORR compared with single-agent chemotherapy in patients who acquired resistance to

  3. Lesinurad, a Selective Uric Acid Reabsorption Inhibitor, in Combination With Febuxostat in Patients With Tophaceous Gout: Findings of a Phase III Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Jones, Graeme; Terkeltaub, Robert; Khanna, Dinesh; Kopicko, Jeff; Bhakta, Nihar; Adler, Scott; Fung, Maple; Storgard, Chris; Baumgartner, Scott; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando

    2017-09-01

    To investigate the efficacy and safety of lesinurad in combination with febuxostat in a 12-month phase III trial in patients with tophaceous gout. Patients with serum urate (UA) ≥8.0 mg/dl (≥6.0 mg/dl with urate-lowering therapy) and ≥1 measurable target tophus were given febuxostat 80 mg/day for 3 weeks before randomization to receive lesinurad (200 or 400 mg daily) or placebo in addition to the febuxostat. The primary end point was the proportion of patients achieving a serum UA level of <5.0 mg/dl (month 6). The key secondary end point was the proportion of patients with complete resolution of ≥1 target tophus (month 12). Other end points included the percentage change in total target tophi area. Safety assessments included adverse events and laboratory data. Patients (n = 324) were predominantly male, with a mean age of 54.1 years. Significantly more patients achieved the serum UA target by month 6 with the addition of lesinurad 400 mg (76.1%; P < 0.0001), but not 200 mg (56.6%; P = 0.13), to the febuxostat therapy as compared with febuxostat alone (46.8%). At all other time points, significantly more patients in the lesinurad 200 mg group achieved the serum UA target. The number of patients with complete tophus resolution was not different between groups. Treatment with lesinurad (200 mg and 400 mg) plus febuxostat reduced the total target tophi area as compared with febuxostat alone (50.1% and 52.9% versus 28.3%, respectively; P < 0.05). Safety was generally comparable with that of febuxostat alone, except for higher rates of predominantly reversible elevations in the serum creatinine level, particularly with lesinurad 400 mg. Treatment with lesinurad in combination with febuxostat demonstrated superior lowering of serum UA levels as compared with febuxostat alone, with clinically relevant added effects on tophi and an acceptable safety profile with lesinurad 200 mg in patients with tophaceous gout warranting additional therapy.

  4. Improved health-related quality of life and physical function in patients with refractory chronic gout following treatment with pegloticase: evidence from phase III randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Strand, Vibeke; Khanna, Dinesh; Singh, Jasvinder A; Forsythe, Anna; Edwards, N Lawrence

    2012-07-01

    To assess the efficacy of pegloticase on pain, physical function, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with refractory chronic gout. Subjects in 2 replicate, 6-month, randomized controlled phase III trials received intravenous infusions of pegloticase 8 mg twice monthly (biweekly group), pegloticase alternating with placebo (8-mg monthly group), or placebo. Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36 (SF-36), Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index (HAQ-DI), patient global assessment of disease activity (PtGA), and pain by visual analog scale were completed at weeks 1 (baseline), 13, 19, and 25. Prespecified pooled analyses of patient-reported outcomes were performed by combining values for each treatment group (biweekly treatment, monthly treatment, and placebo) at Week 25. Of 212 patients enrolled, 157 (74.1%) completed treatment. At entry, mean age was 55.4 years (range 23-89 yrs) and mean plasma uric acid was 9.7 mg/dl; most were male (81.6%) and white (67.5%). Subjects reported an average of 9.8 flares in the previous 18 months. Baseline SF-36 physical component summary (PCS) scores were > 1.5 SD below US normative values. At Week 25, mean changes from baseline in PtGA, pain, HAQ-DI, and PCS scores were statistically significant and exceeded minimum clinically important differences (MCID) in the biweekly treatment group, compared with little to no improvement in placebo group. Statistically significant improvements greater than or equal to MCID were reported in 6 of 8 SF-36 domains. Monthly pegloticase resulted in significantly improved PtGA, HAQ-DI, PCS, and 3 SF-36 domains. Pegloticase therapy resulted in statistically significant and clinically meaningful improvements in PtGA, pain, physical function, and HRQOL.

  5. Efficacy and safety of secukinumab in patients with generalized pustular psoriasis: A 52-week analysis from phase III open-label multicenter Japanese study.

    PubMed

    Imafuku, Shinichi; Honma, Masaru; Okubo, Yukari; Komine, Mayumi; Ohtsuki, Mamitaro; Morita, Akimichi; Seko, Noriko; Kawashima, Naoko; Ito, Saori; Shima, Tomohiro; Nakagawa, Hidemi

    2016-09-01

    Generalized pustular psoriasis (GPP) is a severe inflammatory skin disease characterized by the presence of sterile pustules covering almost the entire body and systemic symptoms such as fever. Secukinumab, a fully human-recombinant anti-interleukin-17A monoclonal antibody was indicated for psoriasis vulgaris and psoriatic arthritis in Japan but is not yet investigated for GPP. In this phase III, open-label multicenter single arm study, the efficacy and safety of secukinumab as monotherapy or with co-medication was evaluated in 12 Japanese patients with GPP. All the patients received secukinumab 150 mg s.c. at baseline, week 1, 2, 3 and 4, and then every 4 weeks. Two non-responders were up-titrated to 300 mg. Change in GPP severity from baseline was evaluated by clinical global impression (CGI) categorized as "worsened", "no change", "minimally improved", "much improved" or "very much improved". Treatment success was achieved by 83.3% (n = 10) of patients at week 16 (primary end-point) with CGI evaluated as "very much improved" (n = 9) and "much improved" (n = 1). Moreover, the area of erythema with pustules improved as early as week 1 and resolved by week 16 in most of the patients. The improvements were sustained throughout 52 weeks. Over the 52-week treatment period, secukinumab was well tolerated with no unexpected safety signals. Nasopharyngitis, urticaria, diabetes mellitus and arthralgia were the frequent adverse events reported. The data from this study shows that secukinumab can become one of the potent treatment options for GPP. © 2016 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  6. High-Dose Intravenous Vitamin C Combined with Cytotoxic Chemotherapy in Patients with Advanced Cancer: A Phase I-II Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Hoffer, L. John; Robitaille, Line; Zakarian, Robert; Melnychuk, David; Kavan, Petr; Agulnik, Jason; Cohen, Victor; Small, David; Miller, Wilson H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Biological and some clinical evidence suggest that high-dose intravenous vitamin C (IVC) could increase the effectiveness of cancer chemotherapy. IVC is widely used by integrative and complementary cancer therapists, but rigorous data are lacking as to its safety and which cancers and chemotherapy regimens would be the most promising to investigate in detail. Methods and Findings We carried out a phase I-II safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetic and efficacy trial of IVC combined with chemotherapy in patients whose treating oncologist judged that standard-of-care or off-label chemotherapy offered less than a 33% likelihood of a meaningful response. We documented adverse events and toxicity associated with IVC infusions, determined pre- and post-chemotherapy vitamin C and oxalic acid pharmacokinetic profiles, and monitored objective clinical responses, mood and quality of life. Fourteen patients were enrolled. IVC was safe and generally well tolerated, although some patients experienced transient adverse events during or after IVC infusions. The pre- and post-chemotherapy pharmacokinetic profiles suggested that tissue uptake of vitamin C increases after chemotherapy, with no increase in urinary oxalic acid excretion. Three patients with different types of cancer experienced unexpected transient stable disease, increased energy and functional improvement. Conclusions Despite IVC’s biological and clinical plausibility, career cancer investigators currently ignore it while integrative cancer therapists use it widely but without reporting the kind of clinical data that is normally gathered in cancer drug development. The present study neither proves nor disproves IVC’s value in cancer therapy, but it provides practical information, and indicates a feasible way to evaluate this plausible but unproven therapy in an academic environment that is currently uninterested in it. If carried out in sufficient numbers, simple studies like this one could identify

  7. STRATEGIC-1: A multiple-lines, randomized, open-label GERCOR phase III study in patients with unresectable wild-type RAS metastatic colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Bonnetain, Franck; Tournigand, Christophe; de Larauze, Marine Hug; de Gramont, Armand; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Paget, Jérôme; Hadengue, Alexandra; Notelet, Dominique; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; André, Thierry; de Gramont, Aimery

    2015-07-04

    The management of unresectable metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) is a comprehensive treatment strategy involving several lines of therapy, maintenance, salvage surgery, and treatment-free intervals. Besides chemotherapy (fluoropyrimidine, oxaliplatin, irinotecan), molecular-targeted agents such as anti-angiogenic agents (bevacizumab, aflibercept, regorafenib) and anti-epidermal growth factor receptor agents (cetuximab, panitumumab) have become available. Ultimately, given the increasing cost of new active compounds, new strategy trials are needed to define the optimal use and the best sequencing of these agents. Such new clinical trials require alternative endpoints that can capture the effect of several treatment lines and be measured earlier than overall survival to help shorten the duration and reduce the size and cost of trials. STRATEGIC-1 is an international, open-label, randomized, multicenter phase III trial designed to determine an optimally personalized treatment sequence of the available treatment modalities in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC. Two standard treatment strategies are compared: first-line FOLFIRI-cetuximab, followed by oxaliplatin-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab (Arm A) vs. first-line OPTIMOX-bevacizumab, followed by irinotecan-based second-line chemotherapy with bevacizumab, and by an anti-epidermal growth factor receptor monoclonal antibody with or without irinotecan as third-line treatment (Arm B). The primary endpoint is duration of disease control. A total of 500 patients will be randomized in a 1:1 ratio to one of the two treatment strategies. The STRATEGIC-1 trial is designed to give global information on the therapeutic sequences in patients with unresectable RAS wild-type mCRC that in turn is likely to have a significant impact on the management of this patient population. The trial is open for inclusion since August 2013. STRATEGIC-1 is registered at Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01910610, 23 July, 2013

  8. A prospective phase I-II trial of the cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor celecoxib in patients with carcinoma of the cervix with biomarker assessment of the tumor microenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    Herrera, Fernanda G.; Chan, Philip; Doll, Corinne; Milosevic, Michael; Oza, Amit; Syed, Amy; Pintilie, Melania; Levin, Wilfred; Manchul, Lee; Fyles, Anthony . E-mail: Anthony.Fyles@rmp.uhn.on.ca

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the toxicity and effectiveness of celecoxib in combination with definitive chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in women with locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Thirty-one patients were accrued to a phase I-II trial of celecoxib 400 mg by mouth twice per day for 2 weeks before and during CRT. Tumor oxygenation (HP{sub 5}) and interstitial fluid pressure (IFP) were measured before and 2 weeks after celecoxib administration alone. The median follow-up time was 2.7 years (range, 1.1-4.4 years). Results: The most common acute G3/4 toxicities were hematologic (4/31, 12.9%) and gastrointestinal (5/31, 16.1%) largely attributed to chemotherapy. Late G3/4 toxicity was seen in 4 of 31 patients (13.7% actuarial risk at 2 yr), including fistulas in 3 patients (9.7%). Within the first year of follow-up, 25 of 31 patients (81%) achieved complete response (CR), of whom 20 remained in CR at last follow-up. After 2 weeks of celecoxib administration before CRT, the median IFP decreased slightly (median absolute, -4.6 mm Hg; p = 0.09; relative, -21%; p = 0.07), whereas HP{sub 5} did not change significantly (absolute increase, 3.6%; p = 0.51; median relative increase, 11%; p = 0.27). No significant associations were seen between changes in HP{sub 5} or IFP and response to treatment (p = 0.2, relative HP{sub 5} change and p = 0.14, relative IFP change). Conclusions: Celecoxib in combination with definitive CRT is associated with acceptable acute toxicity, but higher than expected late complications. Celecoxib is associated with a modest reduction in the angiogenic biomarker IFP, but this does not correspond with tumor response.

  9. Phase I-II trial of oral cyclophosphamide, prednisone and lenalidomide for the treatment of patients with relapsed and refractory multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Reece, Donna E; Masih-Khan, Esther; Atenafu, Eshetu G; Jimenez-Zepeda, Victor H; Anglin, Peter; Chen, Christine; Kukreti, Vishal; Mikhael, Joseph R; Trudel, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    This single institution, open label Phase I-II dose escalation trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of the combination of lenalidomide (Revlimid®), cyclophosphamide and prednisone (CPR) in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma. The maximal administered dose of CPR consisted of cyclophosphamide 300 mg/m(2) on day 1, 8, and 15, lenalidomide 25 mg on d 1-21 and prednisone 100 mg every other day in a 28-d cycle. Between November 2007 and June 2009, 32 patients were entered in cohorts of three at three dose levels. The median age was 64 years, 59% were male, with a median two prior regimens. Responding patients could stay on treatment until progression. The full-dose CPR regimen produced no dose-limiting toxicity and was delivered for a median of 16 months (3·5-65 months) with acceptable safety and tolerance. The overall response rate (≥ partial response) was 94% at a median follow up of 28 months. The median progression-free survival was 16·1 months [95% confidence interval (CI); 10·9-22·5 months], while the median overall survival was 27·6 months (95% CI; 16·8-36·6 months). Only the beta-2 microglobulin level at protocol entry correlated with a better survival (P = 0·047). These observations compare favourably with other 2- and 3- drug combinations for relapsed/refractory myeloma, and suggest that CPR should be evaluated further in the setting of relapsed/refractory disease, or in newly diagnosed patients.

  10. Randomized Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Pazopanib Versus Placebo After Nephrectomy in Patients With Localized or Locally Advanced Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Motzer, Robert J; Haas, Naomi B; Donskov, Frede; Gross-Goupil, Marine; Varlamov, Sergei; Kopyltsov, Evgeny; Lee, Jae Lyun; Melichar, Bohuslav; Rini, Brian I; Choueiri, Toni K; Zemanova, Milada; Wood, Lori A; Reaume, M Neil; Stenzl, Arnulf; Chowdhury, Simon; Lim, Ho Yeong; McDermott, Ray; Michael, Agnieszka; Bao, Weichao; Carrasco-Alfonso, Marlene J; Aimone, Paola; Voi, Maurizio; Doehn, Christian; Russo, Paul; Sternberg, Cora N

    2017-09-13

    Purpose This phase III trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of pazopanib versus placebo in patients with locally advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) at high risk for relapse after nephrectomy. Patients and Methods A total of 1,538 patients with resected pT2 (high grade) or ≥ pT3, including N1, clear cell RCC were randomly assigned to pazopanib or placebo for 1 year; 403 patients received a starting dose of 800 mg or placebo. To address toxicity attrition, the 800-mg starting dose was lowered to 600 mg, and the primary end point analysis was changed to disease-free survival (DFS) for pazopanib 600 mg versus placebo (n = 1,135). Primary analysis was performed after 350 DFS events in the intent-to-treat (ITT) pazopanib 600 mg group (ITT600mg), and DFS follow-up analysis was performed 12 months later. Secondary end point analyses included DFS with ITT pazopanib 800 mg (ITT800mg) and safety. Results The primary analysis results of DFS ITT600mg favored pazopanib but did not show a significant improvement over placebo (hazard ratio [HR], 0.86; 95% CI, 0.70 to 1.06; P = .165). The secondary analysis of DFS in ITT800mg (n = 403) yielded an HR of 0.69 (95% CI, 0.51 to 0.94). Follow-up analysis in ITT600mg yielded an HR of 0.94 (95% CI, 0.77 to 1.14). Increased ALT and AST were common adverse events leading to treatment discontinuation in the pazopanib 600 mg (ALT, 16%; AST, 5%) and 800 mg (ALT, 18%; AST, 7%) groups. Conclusion The results of the primary DFS analysis of pazopanib 600 mg showed no benefit over placebo in the adjuvant setting.

  11. Effect of pilocarpine during radiation therapy: results of RTOG 97-09, a phase III randomized study in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Scarantino, Charles; LeVeque, Francis; Swann, R Suzanne; White, Robert; Schulsinger, Alan; Hodson, D Ian; Meredith, Ruby; Foote, Robert; Brachman, David; Lee, Nancy

    2006-05-01

    Radiation therapy is an important curative modality in the treatment of patients with head and neck cancer. However, radiation-induced changes in the oral cavity, such as xerostomia and mucositis, are among the most debilitating treatment sequelae experienced by patients undergoing radiation therapy, and attempts at ameliorating these side effects have been poor at best. Pilocarpine has been approved for post-radiation xerostomia, and the effect of its use during radiation therapy on salivary flow, xerostomia, mucositis, and quality of life (QOL) was assessed in a phase III study conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG 97-09). In total, 245 evaluable patients were randomized to pilocarpine or placebo. Selected patients were required to have > or = 50% of the volume of the major salivary glands receive > or = 50Gy; to agree to provide stimulated and unstimulated samples of saliva (measured in g) before treatment, at the end of treatment, and 3 and 6 months after completion of radiation therapy; and to complete the University of Washington Head and Neck Symptom Scale. Following the completion of radiation therapy, the average unstimulated salivary flow was statistically greater in the pilocarpine group, whereas no difference was noted following parotid stimulation. There was no effect on the amelioration of mucositis. The results of the QOL scales did not reveal any significant difference between the pilocarpine and placebo groups with regard to xerostomia and mucositis. The significant difference in unstimulated salivary flow supports the concomitant use of oral pilocarpine to decrease radiation-associated xerostomia. However, the absent correlation between improved salivary flow and QOL scores is of some concern (though not a new finding) and may be related to the existence of comorbidities and the lack of effect on mucositis.

  12. Secukinumab and Sustained Improvement in Signs and Symptoms of Patients With Active Ankylosing Spondylitis Through Two Years: Results From a Phase III Study.

    PubMed

    Marzo-Ortega, H; Sieper, J; Kivitz, A; Blanco, R; Cohen, M; Martin, R; Readie, A; Richards, H B; Porter, B

    2017-07-01

    Secukinumab improved the signs and symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) over 52 weeks in the phase III MEASURE 2 study. Here, we report longer-term (104 weeks) efficacy and safety results. Patients with active AS were randomized to subcutaneous secukinumab 150 mg, 75 mg, or placebo at baseline; weeks 1, 2, and 3; and every 4 weeks from week 4. The primary end point was the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society criteria for 20% improvement (ASAS20) response rate at week 16. Other end points included ASAS40, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, ASAS5/6, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Short Form 36 health survey physical component summary, ASAS partial remission, EuroQol 5-domain measure, and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy fatigue subscale. End points were assessed through week 104, with multiple imputation for binary variables and a mixed-effects model repeated measures for continuous variables. Of 219 randomized patients, 60 of 72 (83.3%) and 57 of 73 (78.1%) patients completed 104 weeks of treatment with secukinumab 150 mg and 75 mg, respectively; ASAS20/ASAS40 response rates at week 104 were 71.5% and 47.5% with both secukinumab doses, respectively. Clinical improvements with secukinumab were sustained through week 104 across all secondary end points. Across the entire treatment period (mean secukinumab exposure 735.6 days), exposure-adjusted incidence rates for serious infections and infestations, Crohn's disease, malignant or unspecified tumors, and major adverse cardiac events with secukinumab were 1.2, 0.7, 0.5, and 0.7 per 100 patient-years, respectively. No cases of tuberculosis reactivation, opportunistic infections, or suicidal ideation were reported. Secukinumab provided sustained improvement through 2 years in the signs and symptoms of AS, with a safety profile consistent with previous reports. © 2017 The Authors. Arthritis Care & Research published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  13. Rilonacept for gout flare prevention in patients receiving uric acid-lowering therapy: results of RESURGE, a phase III, international safety study.

    PubMed

    Sundy, John S; Schumacher, H Ralph; Kivitz, Alan; Weinstein, Steven P; Wu, Richard; King-Davis, Shirletta; Evans, Robert R

    2014-08-01

    To evaluate the safety and efficacy of once-weekly subcutaneous rilonacept 160 mg for prevention of gout flares in patients initiating or continuing urate-lowering therapy (ULT). This phase III study was conducted in the United States, South Africa, Europe, and Asia. Adults (n = 1315, 18-80 yrs) with gout, who were initiating or continuing ULT, were randomized to treatment with weekly subcutaneous injections of rilonacept 160 mg or placebo for 16 weeks followed by a 4-week safety followup. The primary endpoint was safety, assessed by adverse events (AE) and laboratory values. Efficacy was a secondary endpoint. Demographic and clinical characteristics were similar between treatments; predominantly male (87.8%), mean age 52.7 ± 11.3 years. Patients with ≥ 1 AE were 66.6% with rilonacept versus 59.1% placebo, with slightly more AE-related withdrawals with rilonacept (4.7% vs 3.0%) because of the greater incidence of injection site reactions (15.2% rilonacept, 3.3% placebo). Serious AE were similar in both groups, as were serious infections (0.9% placebo, 0.5% rilonacept); no tuberculosis or opportunistic infections occurred. Most common AE were headache, arthralgia, injection site erythema, accidental overdose, and pain in extremity. Of the 6 deaths, only 1 in the placebo group was considered treatment-related. At Week 16, rilonacept resulted in 70.3% fewer gout flares per patient (p < 0.0001), fewer patients with ≥ 1 and ≥ 2 gout flares (p < 0.0001), and 64.9% fewer gout flare days (p < 0.0001) relative to placebo. Weekly subcutaneous administration of rilonacept 160 mg showed no new safety signals. The safety profile was consistent with previous studies. Rilonacept also significantly reduced the risk of gout flares. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00856206; EudraCT No. 2008-007784-16.

  14. Improved Survival from Ovarian Cancer in Patients Treated in Phase III Trial Active Cancer Centres in the UK.

    PubMed

    Khoja, L; Nolan, K; Mekki, R; Milani, A; Mescallado, N; Ashcroft, L; Hasan, J; Edmondson, R; Winter-Roach, B; Kitchener, H C; Mould, T; Hutson, R; Hall, G; Clamp, A R; Perren, T; Ledermann, J; Jayson, G C

    2016-12-01

    Ovarian cancer is the principal cause of gynaecological cancer death in developed countries, yet overall survival in the UK has been reported as being inferior to that in some Western countries. As there is a range of survival across the UK we hypothesised that in major regional centres, outcomes are equivalent to the best internationally. Data from patients treated in multicentre international and UK-based trials were obtained from three regional cancer centres in the UK; Manchester, University College London and Leeds (MUL). The median progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival were calculated for each trial and compared with the published trial data. Normalised median survival values and the respective 95% confidence intervals (ratio of pooled MUL data to trial median survival) were calculated to allow inter-trial survival comparisons. This strategy then allowed a comparison of median survival across the UK, in three regional UK centres and in international centres. The analysis showed that the trial-reported PFS was the same in the UK, in the MUL centres and in international centres for each of the trials included in the study. Overall survival was, however, 45% better in major regional centre-treated patients (95% confidence interval 9-73%) than the median overall survival reported in UK trials, whereas the median overall survival in MUL centres equated with that achieved in international centres. The data suggest that international survival statistics are achieved in UK regional cancer centres. Copyright © 2016 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Long-term efficacy and safety of Raltegravir combined with optimized background therapy in treatment-experienced patients with drug-resistant HIV infection: week 96 results of the BENCHMRK 1 and 2 Phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Steigbigel, Roy T; Cooper, David A; Teppler, Hedy; Eron, Joseph J; Gatell, Jose M; Kumar, Princy N; Rockstroh, Jurgen K; Schechter, Mauro; Katlama, Christine; Markowitz, Martin; Yeni, Patrick; Loutfy, Mona R; Lazzarin, Adriano; Lennox, Jeffrey L; Clotet, Bonaventura; Zhao, Jing; Wan, Hong; Rhodes, Rand R; Strohmaier, Kim M; Barnard, Richard J; Isaacs, Robin D; Nguyen, Bach-Yen T

    2010-02-15

    BENCHMRK-1 and -2 are ongoing double-blind phase III studies of raltegravir in patients experiencing failure of antiretroviral therapy with triple-class drug-resistant human immunodeficiency virus infection. At week 96 (combined data), raltegravir (400 mg twice daily) plus optimized background therapy was generally well tolerated, with superior and durable antiretroviral and immunological efficacy, compared with optimized background therapy alone.

  16. EORTC (30885) randomised phase III study with recombinant interferon alpha and recombinant interferon alpha and gamma in patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. The EORTC Genitourinary Group.

    PubMed Central

    De Mulder, P. H.; Oosterhof, G.; Bouffioux, C.; van Oosterom, A. T.; Vermeylen, K.; Sylvester, R.

    1995-01-01

    In the treatment of renal cell carcinoma both complete (CRs) and partial remissions (PRs) have been obtained using recombinant (r) interferon alpha (IFN-alpha), with response rates ranging from 0 to 31% (mean 16%). rIFN-gamma is a potent immunostimulating agent, but the clinical experience of its use is limited and results are conflicting. In a phase II study with the combination of rIFN-alpha 2c (Boehringer Ingelheim) and rIFN-gamma (Genentech, supplied by Boehringer Ingelheim) in 31 eligible patients, a response rate of 25% was recorded. Based on this observation a randomised phase III study was initiated to investigate the possible advantage of the addition rIFN-gamma to rIFN-alpha 2c treatment. Treatment consisted of rIFN-alpha 2c 30 micrograms m-2 = 10 x 10(6) IU m-2 s.c. twice weekly in arm A and the same dose of rIFN-alpha combined with rIFN-gamma 100 micrograms m-2 = 2 x 10(6) IU m-2 in arm B. Eligibility criteria included documented progression of disease; patients with bone lesions only and overt central nervous system metastases were excluded. Between November 1988 and September 1990, 102 patients were entered into the study. An interim analysis showed a response in 7/53 (13%) patients (two CRs and five PRs) in the rIFN-alpha 2c monotherapy arm and in 2/45 (4%) (one CR and one PR) patients in the combination arm. This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.17). The probability of missing an eventual 10% advantage for the combination is 0.001. The numbers are insufficient to rule out a negative effect of the addition of rIFN-gamma. The dose intensity of IFN-alpha 2c for the two treatment arms was the same. The addition of rIFN-gamma does not improve the response rate of rIFN-alpha 2c monotherapy. A possible detrimental effect cannot be excluded. PMID:7841054

  17. Interleukin-1 Receptor Blockade Is Associated With Reduced Mortality in Sepsis Patients With Features of Macrophage Activation Syndrome: Reanalysis of a Prior Phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Shakoory, Bita; Carcillo, Joseph A; Chatham, W Winn; Amdur, Richard L; Zhao, Huaqing; Dinarello, Charles A; Cron, Randall Q; Opal, Steven M

    2016-02-01

    To determine the efficacy of anakinra (recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) in improving 28-day survival in sepsis patients with features of macrophage activation syndrome. Despite equivocal results in sepsis trials, anakinra is effective in treating macrophage activation syndrome, a similar entity with fever, disseminated intravascular coagulation, hepatobiliary dysfunction, cytopenias, and hyperferritinemia. Hence, sepsis patients with macrophage activation syndrome features may benefit from interleukin-1 receptor blockade. Reanalysis of deidentified data from the phase III randomized interleukin-1 receptor antagonist trial in severe sepsis. Multicenter study recruiting through 91 centers from 11 countries in Europe and North America. Sepsis patients with multiorgan dysfunction syndrome and/or shock (original study) were regrouped based on the presence or the absence of concurrent hepatobiliary dysfunction and disseminated intravascular coagulation as features of macrophage activation syndrome. The non-hepatobiliary dysfunction/disseminated intravascular coagulation group included patients with only hepatobiliary dysfunction, only disseminated intravascular coagulation, or neither. Treatment with anakinra or placebo. Main outcome was 28-day mortality. Descriptive and comparative statistics were performed. Data were available for 763 adults from the original study cohort, randomized to receive either anakinra or placebo. Concurrent hepatobiliary dysfunction/disseminated intravascular coagulation was noted in 43 patients (5.6% of total; 18-75 years old; 47% women). The 28-day survival was similar in both anakinra and placebo-treated non-hepatobiliary dysfunction/disseminated intravascular coagulation patients (71.4% vs 70.8%; p = 0.88). Treatment with anakinra was associated with significant improvement in the 28-day survival rate in hepatobiliary dysfunction/disseminated intravascular coagulation patients (65.4% anakinra vs 35.3% placebo), with hazard

  18. Triptorelin 6-month formulation in the management of patients with locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer: an open-label, non-comparative, multicentre, phase III study.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Eija A; Rencken, Rupert K; van Wyk, Johann H; Coetzee, Lance J E; Bahlmann, Johann C M; Reif, Simon; Strasheim, Erdam A; Bigalke, Martin C; Pontin, Alan R; Goedhals, Louis; Steyn, Douw G; Heyns, Chris F; Aldera, Luigi A; Mackenzie, Thomas M; Purcea, Daniela; Grosgurin, Pierre Y; Porchet, Hervé C

    2009-01-01

    Triptorelin 6-month formulation was developed to offer greater convenience to both patients and physicians by reducing the injection frequency. The efficacy, pharmacokinetics and safety of a new 6-month formulation of triptorelin were investigated over 12 months (48 weeks). The primary objective was to evaluate the formulation in achieving castrate serum testosterone levels (< or = 1.735 nmol/L or < or = 50 ng/dL) on day 29 and in maintaining castration at months 2-12. Absence of luteinizing hormone (LH) stimulation and change in prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level were also assessed. An open-label, non-comparative, phase III study in 120 patients with advanced prostate cancer was conducted from July 2006 to August 2007 in private and public institutions in South Africa. Each patient received two consecutive intramuscular injections of triptorelin embonate (pamoate) 22.5 mg at an interval of 24 weeks. In all patients, testosterone (primary outcome measurement) was measured at baseline and then every 4 weeks; LH was measured before and 2 hours after the two injections. PSA was measured on day 1 and at weeks 12, 24, 36 and 48. Adverse events were recorded at each visit. In the intent-to-treat population, 97.5% (95% CI 92.9, 99.5) of patients achieved castrate serum testosterone levels by day 29, and 93.0% (95% CI 86.8, 97.0) maintained castration at months 2-12. After the second injection, 98.3% of patients showed absence of LH stimulation. The most frequent drug-related adverse events were hot flushes (71.7% of patients). No patient withdrew from the study as a result of an adverse event. The triptorelin 6-month formulation was well tolerated and was able to achieve and maintain castration for the treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. By reducing the frequency of required injections, this new formulation offers a more convenient treatment regimen. (Clinical Trial Registration,NCT00751790 at www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  19. Sunitinib Plus Paclitaxel Versus Bevacizumab Plus Paclitaxel for First-Line Treatment of Patients With Advanced Breast Cancer: A Phase III, Randomized, Open-Label Trial

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Nicholas J.; Saleh, Mansoor N.; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S.; Brufsky, Adam M.; Minton, Susan E.; Giguere, Jeffrey K.; Smith, John W.; Richards, Paul D.; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F.; Kern, Kenneth A.; Davis, John

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer. Patients and Methods Patients with HER2− advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m2 every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. Results The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18–2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16–2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. Conclusion The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. PMID:21569994

  20. Interleukin-1 receptor blockade is associated with reduced mortality in sepsis patients with features of the macrophage activation syndrome: Re-analysis of a prior Phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    Shakoory, B.; Carcillo, J.A.; Chatham, W. W.; Amdur, R. L.; Zhao, H.; Dinarello, C.A.; Cron, R.Q.; Opal, S.M.

    2017-01-01

    Objective To determine the efficacy of anakinra (recombinant interleukin-1 receptor antagonist) in improving 28-day survival in sepsis patients with features of macrophage activation syndrome (MAS). Despite equivocal results in sepsis trials, anakinra is effective in treating MAS, a similar entity with fever, disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), hepatobiliary dysfunction (HBD), cytopenias, and hyperferritinemia. Hence, sepsis patients with MAS features may benefit from IL-1 receptor blockade. Design Re-analysis of de-identified data from the phase III randomized interleukin-1 receptor antagonist trial in severe sepsis (Opal, et. al. Crit Care Med. 1997 Jul;25(7):1115–24). Setting Multi-center study recruiting through 91 centers from 11 countries in Europe and North America. Participants Sepsis patients with MODS and/or shock (original study) were re-grouped based on presence or absence of concurrent HBD and DIC as features of MAS (HBD/DIC group). The “non-HBD/DIC” group included patients with only HBD, only DIC or neither. Intervention Treatment with anakinra or placebo. Main Outcome(s) and Measure(s) 28-day mortality. Statistical analysis descriptive statistics, chi-square, ANOVA, logistic and Cox regression. Results Data were available for 763 adults from the original study cohort, randomized to receive either anakinra or placebo. Concurrent HBD/DIC was noted in 43 patients (5.6% of total, ages 18–75; 47% women). The 28-day survival was similar in both anakinra and placebo-treated non-HBD/DIC patients (71.4% vs. 70.8%, p=.88). Treatment with anakinra was associated with significant improvement in the 28-day survival rate in HBD/DIC patients (65.4% anakinra vs. 35.3% placebo), with HR for death 0.28 (0.11–0.71, p = 0.0071) for the treatment group in Cox regression. Conclusions and Relevance In this subgroup analysis, IL-1 receptor blockade was associated with significant improvement in survival of patients with sepsis and concurrent HBD/DIC. A

  1. Phase III randomized trial comparing the efficacy of cediranib as monotherapy, and in combination with lomustine, versus lomustine alone in patients with recurrent glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Batchelor, Tracy T; Mulholland, Paul; Neyns, Bart; Nabors, L Burt; Campone, Mario; Wick, Antje; Mason, Warren; Mikkelsen, Tom; Phuphanich, Surasak; Ashby, Lynn S; Degroot, John; Gattamaneni, Rao; Cher, Lawrence; Rosenthal, Mark; Payer, Franz; Jürgensmeier, Juliane M; Jain, Rakesh K; Sorensen, A Gregory; Xu, John; Liu, Qi; van den Bent, Martin

    2013-09-10

    A randomized, phase III, placebo-controlled, partially blinded clinical trial (REGAL [Recent in in Glioblastoma Alone and With Lomustine]) was conducted to determine the efficacy of cediranib, an oral pan-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, either as monotherapy or in combination with lomustine versus lomustine in patients with recurrent glioblastoma. Patients (N = 325) with recurrent glioblastoma who previously received radiation and temozolomide were randomly assigned 2:2:1 to receive (1) cediranib (30 mg) monotherapy; (2) cediranib (20 mg) plus lomustine (110 mg/m(2)); (3) lomustine (110 mg/m(2)) plus a placebo. The primary end point was progression-free survival based on blinded, independent radiographic assessment of postcontrast T1-weighted and noncontrast T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain scans. The primary end point of progression-free survival (PFS) was not significantly different for either cediranib alone (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.05; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.50; two-sided P = .90) or cediranib in combination with lomustine (HR = 0.76; 95% CI, 0.53 to 1.08; two-sided P = .16) versus lomustine based on independent or local review of postcontrast T1-weighted MRI. This study did not meet its primary end point of PFS prolongation with cediranib either as monotherapy or in combination with lomustine versus lomustine in patients with recurrent glioblastoma, although cediranib showed evidence of clinical activity on some secondary end points including time to deterioration in neurologic status and corticosteroid-sparing effects.

  2. A phase III randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study comparing SB4 with etanercept reference product in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Paul; Vencovský, Jiří; Sylwestrzak, Anna; Leszczyński, Piotr; Porawska, Wieslawa; Baranauskaite, Asta; Tseluyko, Vira; Zhdan, Vyacheslav M; Stasiuk, Barbara; Milasiene, Roma; Barrera Rodriguez, Aaron Alejandro; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Ghil, Jeehoon

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To compare the efficacy and safety of SB4 (an etanercept biosimilar) with reference product etanercept (ETN) in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) therapy. Methods This is a phase III, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre study with a 24-week primary endpoint. Patients with moderate to severe RA despite MTX treatment were randomised to receive weekly dose of 50 mg of subcutaneous SB4 or ETN. The primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 24. Other efficacy endpoints as well as safety, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. Results 596 patients were randomised to either SB4 (N=299) or ETN (N=297). The ACR20 response rate at week 24 in the per-protocol set was 78.1% for SB4 and 80.3% for ETN. The 95% CI of the adjusted treatment difference was −9.41% to 4.98%, which is completely contained within the predefined equivalence margin of −15% to 15%, indicating therapeutic equivalence between SB4 and ETN. Other efficacy endpoints and pharmacokinetic endpoints were comparable. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was comparable (55.2% vs 58.2%), and the incidence of antidrug antibody development up to week 24 was lower in SB4 compared with ETN (0.7% vs 13.1%). Conclusions SB4 was shown to be equivalent with ETN in terms of efficacy at week 24. SB4 was well tolerated with a lower immunogenicity profile. The safety profile of SB4 was comparable with that of ETN. Trial registration numbers NCT01895309, EudraCT 2012-005026-30. PMID:26150601

  3. Secukinumab and Sustained Improvement in Signs and Symptoms of Patients With Active Ankylosing Spondylitis Through Two Years: Results From a Phase III Study

    PubMed Central

    Sieper, J.; Kivitz, A.; Blanco, R.; Cohen, M.; Martin, R.; Readie, A.; Richards, H. B.; Porter, B.

    2017-01-01

    Objective Secukinumab improved the signs and symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) over 52 weeks in the phase III MEASURE 2 study. Here, we report longer‐term (104 weeks) efficacy and safety results. Methods Patients with active AS were randomized to subcutaneous secukinumab 150 mg, 75 mg, or placebo at baseline; weeks 1, 2, and 3; and every 4 weeks from week 4. The primary end point was the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society criteria for 20% improvement (ASAS20) response rate at week 16. Other end points included ASAS40, high‐sensitivity C‐reactive protein, ASAS5/6, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index, Short Form 36 health survey physical component summary, ASAS partial remission, EuroQol 5‐domain measure, and Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy fatigue subscale. End points were assessed through week 104, with multiple imputation for binary variables and a mixed‐effects model repeated measures for continuous variables. Results Of 219 randomized patients, 60 of 72 (83.3%) and 57 of 73 (78.1%) patients completed 104 weeks of treatment with secukinumab 150 mg and 75 mg, respectively; ASAS20/ASAS40 response rates at week 104 were 71.5% and 47.5% with both secukinumab doses, respectively. Clinical improvements with secukinumab were sustained through week 104 across all secondary end points. Across the entire treatment period (mean secukinumab exposure 735.6 days), exposure‐adjusted incidence rates for serious infections and infestations, Crohn's disease, malignant or unspecified tumors, and major adverse cardiac events with secukinumab were 1.2, 0.7, 0.5, and 0.7 per 100 patient‐years, respectively. No cases of tuberculosis reactivation, opportunistic infections, or suicidal ideation were reported. Conclusion Secukinumab provided sustained improvement through 2 years in the signs and symptoms of AS, with a safety profile consistent with previous reports. PMID:28235249

  4. A phase III randomised, double-blind, parallel-group study comparing SB4 with etanercept reference product in patients with active rheumatoid arthritis despite methotrexate therapy.

    PubMed

    Emery, Paul; Vencovský, Jiří; Sylwestrzak, Anna; Leszczyński, Piotr; Porawska, Wieslawa; Baranauskaite, Asta; Tseluyko, Vira; Zhdan, Vyacheslav M; Stasiuk, Barbara; Milasiene, Roma; Barrera Rodriguez, Aaron Alejandro; Cheong, Soo Yeon; Ghil, Jeehoon

    2017-01-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of SB4 (an etanercept biosimilar) with reference product etanercept (ETN) in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate (MTX) therapy. This is a phase III, randomised, double-blind, parallel-group, multicentre study with a 24-week primary endpoint. Patients with moderate to severe RA despite MTX treatment were randomised to receive weekly dose of 50 mg of subcutaneous SB4 or ETN. The primary endpoint was the American College of Rheumatology 20% (ACR20) response at week 24. Other efficacy endpoints as well as safety, immunogenicity and pharmacokinetic parameters were also measured. 596 patients were randomised to either SB4 (N=299) or ETN (N=297). The ACR20 response rate at week 24 in the per-protocol set was 78.1% for SB4 and 80.3% for ETN. The 95% CI of the adjusted treatment difference was -9.41% to 4.98%, which is completely contained within the predefined equivalence margin of -15% to 15%, indicating therapeutic equivalence between SB4 and ETN. Other efficacy endpoints and pharmacokinetic endpoints were comparable. The incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events was comparable (55.2% vs 58.2%), and the incidence of antidrug antibody development up to week 24 was lower in SB4 compared with ETN (0.7% vs 13.1%). SB4 was shown to be equivalent with ETN in terms of efficacy at week 24. SB4 was well tolerated with a lower immunogenicity profile. The safety profile of SB4 was comparable with that of ETN. NCT01895309, EudraCT 2012-005026-30. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  5. SEARCH: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of sorafenib plus erlotinib in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Andrew X; Rosmorduc, Olivier; Evans, T R Jeffry; Ross, Paul J; Santoro, Armando; Carrilho, Flair Jose; Bruix, Jordi; Qin, Shukui; Thuluvath, Paul J; Llovet, Josep M; Leberre, Marie-Aude; Jensen, Markus; Meinhardt, Gerold; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2015-02-20

    To compare the clinical outcomes of sorafenib plus either erlotinib or placebo in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in a multicenter, multinational, randomized, phase III trial. Patients with advanced HCC and underlying Child-Pugh class A cirrhosis, who were naive to systemic treatment (N = 720), were randomly assigned to sorafenib plus either erlotinib (n = 362) or placebo (n = 358). The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Median OS was similar in the sorafenib plus erlotinib and sorafenib plus placebo groups (9.5 v 8.5 months, respectively; hazard ratio [HR], 0.929; P = .408), as was median time to progression (3.2 v 4.0 months, respectively; HR, 1.135; P = .18). In the sorafenib/erlotinib arm versus the sorafenib/placebo arm, the overall response rate trended higher (6.6% v 3.9%, respectively; P = .102), whereas the disease control rate was significantly lower (43.9% v 52.5%, respectively; P = .021). The median durations of treatment with sorafenib were 86 days in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm and 123 days in the sorafenib/placebo arm. In the sorafenib/erlotinib and sorafenib/placebo arms, the rates of treatment-emergent serious AEs (58.0% v 54.6%, respectively) and drug-related serious AEs (21.0% v 22.8%, respectively) were similar. AEs matched the known safety profiles of both agents, but rates of rash/desquamation, anorexia, and diarrhea were higher in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm, whereas rates of alopecia and hand-foot skin reaction were higher in the sorafenib/placebo arm. Withdrawal rates for AEs during cycles 1 to 3 were higher in the sorafenib/erlotinib arm. Adding erlotinib to sorafenib did not improve survival in patients with advanced HCC. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Efficacy and safety of the dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor linagliptin in black/African American patients with type 2 diabetes: Pooled analysis from eight Phase III trials.

    PubMed

    Thrasher, James; Kountz, David S; Crowe, Susanne; Woerle, Hans-Juergen; von Eynatten, Maximilian

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of type 2 diabetes in black/African Americans from North and South America is high; yet data evaluating antidiabetic agents in this population is scarce. To address this gap, we pooled data from the clinical development program for linagliptin. A retrospective pooled analysis of eight completed randomized, placebo-controlled Phase III trials of linagliptin identified 336 patients with type 2 diabetes who self-identified their ethnicity as black or African American. Participants received linagliptin (n = 173, 5 mg/day) or placebo (n = 163) as monotherapy, or as add-on to other antidiabetic agents, including insulin. The primary end point was the change in glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) from baseline to week 18 or 24. The placebo-adjusted mean change (95% confidence interval [CI]) in HbA1c from baseline was -0.69% (-0.92 to -0.46; p < 0.0001) at week 18 (eight trials), and -0.64% (-0.90 to -0.39; p < 0.0001) at week 24 (six trials). The placebo-adjusted mean change (95% CI) in fasting plasma glucose from baseline was -11.7 mg/dL (-23.1 to -0.3; p = 0.0446) at week 18 and -14.7 mg/dL (-25.7 to -3.8; p = 0.0087) at week 24. Incidence of investigator-defined hypoglycemia was similar between the two groups (linagliptin, 12.1%; placebo, 11.7%). Overall, the safety profile of linagliptin in this patient group was comparable to that of placebo, with comparable incidence of adverse events; linagliptin was weight-neutral in this patient population. Linagliptin provided clinically significant improvements in glycemic control without increased risk of hypoglycemia and without weight gain, representing a useful type 2 diabetes therapy option for the black/African American population.

  7. Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy via Turbuhaler versus fixed-dose budesonide/formoterol plus terbutaline in patients with asthma: phase III study results.

    PubMed

    Atienza, Tito; Aquino, Teresita; Fernández, Marcelo; Boonsawat, Watchara; Kawai, Mitsuru; Kudo, Takahide; Ekelund, Jan; Ivanov, Stefan; Carlsson, Lars-Goran

    2013-02-01

    To evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of budesonide/formoterol as maintenance and reliever therapy versus budesonide/formoterol maintenance plus terbutaline in adults with persistent asthma not adequately controlled with inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy alone. In this 12-month, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, phase III study (NCT00839800), patients (age ≥ 16 years; receiving maintenance ICS; ≥ 1 severe exacerbation in the 12 months prior to study entry) were randomized to either budesonide/formoterol 160/4.5 μg 1 inhalation twice daily plus budesonide/formoterol 160/4.5 μg as-needed or budesonide/formoterol 160/4.5 μg 1 inhalation twice daily plus terbutaline 0.4 mg as-needed for 12 months. time to first severe asthma exacerbation; secondary outcomes included: lung function, asthma symptom variables and tolerability. Two thousand and ninety-one patients were randomized: 170 (16%) receiving budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy experienced 259 severe exacerbations versus 229 patients (22%) receiving budesonide/formoterol plus terbutaline who experienced 363 severe exacerbations. Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy prolonged the time to first severe exacerbation versus budesonide/formoterol plus terbutaline (P = 0.0007) and reduced the instantaneous risk of an exacerbation by 30% (hazard ratio 0.70, 95% confidence interval 0.57-0.85, P = 0.0003). Times to first oral steroid use, first hospitalization and first emergency room treatment were all significantly prolonged in the budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever group versus budesonide/formoterol plus terbutaline. Both treatment groups were well tolerated. Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy provided more effective asthma control, including a prolonged time to first severe asthma exacerbation, than budesonide/formoterol plus terbutaline and was well tolerated. Budesonide/formoterol maintenance and reliever therapy also improved

  8. Double-blind randomised placebo-controlled phase III study of an E. coli extract plus 5-fluorouracil versus 5-fluorouracil in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Unger, C; Häring, B; Kruse, A; Thumann, A; Schneider, B; Clemm, C; Weber, B; Clevert, H D; Hockertz, S; Kalousek, M B

    2001-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the toxicity (mucositis, diarrhea and leucopenia) of a therapy with 5-fluorouracil (CAS 51-21-8; 5-FU) plus an E. coli extract (LC-Extract, Laves coli extract, Colibiogen inject, cell-free soluble fraction from lysed E. coli, Laves strain) in comparison with 5-FU plus placebo. Secondary endpoints included general toxicity, response rate according to WHO, survival time and quality of life. 164 patients with advanced colorectal cancer were enrolled in this randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, multicenter phase III study. The treatment consisted of 0.167 ml/kg/d LC-Extract or placebo followed by 500-750 mg/m2/d 5-FU on five consecutive days, repeated every three weeks for up to six treatment cycles. 158 (77 verum, 81 placebo) patients were evaluable for toxicity, 144 (72 verum, 72 placebo) evaluable for response. The therapy with LC-Extract was well tolerated. Adverse events that occurred during the study were mainly judged as 5-FU- or tumor-related. Toxicity from treatment with 600 mg/m2/d 5-FU in both treatment groups was very low. After treatment with 750 mg/m2/d 5-FU patients in the placebo-group experienced a higher CTC toxicity than in the LC-Extract groups. Remission rate and survival time showed a slight trend in favour of LC-Extract. These results suggest a positive benefit-risk ratio of the additional application of LC-Extract to 5-FU in the treatment of advanced colorectal cancer especially for administration of high doses of 5-FU.

  9. Sunitinib plus paclitaxel versus bevacizumab plus paclitaxel for first-line treatment of patients with advanced breast cancer: a phase III, randomized, open-label trial.

    PubMed

    Robert, Nicholas J; Saleh, Mansoor N; Paul, Devchand; Generali, Daniele; Gressot, Laurent; Copur, Mehmet S; Brufsky, Adam M; Minton, Susan E; Giguere, Jeffrey K; Smith, John W; Richards, Paul D; Gernhardt, Diana; Huang, Xin; Liau, Katherine F; Kern, Kenneth A; Davis, John

    2011-04-01

    A multicenter, open-label phase III study was conducted to test whether sunitinib plus paclitaxel prolongs progression-free survival (PFS) compared with bevacizumab plus paclitaxel as first-line treatment for patients with HER2(-) advanced breast cancer. Patients with HER2(-) advanced breast cancer who were disease free for ≥ 12 months after adjuvant taxane treatment were randomized (1:1; planned enrollment 740 patients) to receive intravenous (I.V.) paclitaxel 90 mg/m(2) every week for 3 weeks in 4-week cycles plus either sunitinib 25 to 37.5 mg every day or bevacizumab 10 mg/kg I.V. every 2 weeks. [corrected] The trial was terminated early because of futility in reaching the primary endpoint as determined by the independent data monitoring committee during an interim futility analysis. At data cutoff, 242 patients had been randomized to sunitinib-paclitaxel and 243 patients to bevacizumab-paclitaxel. Median PFS was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (7.4 vs. 9.2 months; hazard ratio [HR] 1.63 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.18-2.25]; 1-sided P = .999). At a median follow-up of 8.1 months, with 79% of sunitinib-paclitaxel and 87% of bevacizumab-paclitaxel patients alive, overall survival analysis favored bevacizumab-paclitaxel (HR 1.82 [95% CI, 1.16-2.86]; 1-sided P = .996). The objective response rate was 32% in both arms, but median duration of response was shorter with sunitinib-paclitaxel (6.3 vs. 14.8 months). Bevacizumab-paclitaxel was better tolerated than sunitinib-paclitaxel. This was primarily due to a high frequency of grade 3/4, treatment-related neutropenia with sunitinib-paclitaxel (52%) precluding delivery of the prescribed doses of both drugs. The sunitinib-paclitaxel regimen evaluated in this study was clinically inferior to the bevacizumab-paclitaxel regimen and is not a recommended treatment option for patients with advanced breast cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    seriously sick children, improvements to care delivery and a robust training and evaluation programme for clinicians. Conclusions The case definition developed for the pivotal phase III RTS, S vaccine study is consistent with WHO recommendations, is locally applicable and appropriately balances sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of severe malaria. Processes set up to standardize severe malaria data collection will allow robust assessment of the efficacy of the RTS, S vaccine against severe malaria, strengthen local capacity and benefit patient care for subjects in the trial. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619 PMID:21816031

  11. Assessment of severe malaria in a multicenter, phase III, RTS, S/AS01 malaria candidate vaccine trial: case definition, standardization of data collection and patient care.

    PubMed

    Vekemans, Johan; Marsh, Kevin; Greenwood, Brian; Leach, Amanda; Kabore, William; Soulanoudjingar, Solange; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Ansong, Daniel; Evans, Jennifer; Sacarlal, Jahit; Bejon, Philip; Kamthunzi, Portia; Salim, Nahya; Njuguna, Patricia; Hamel, Mary J; Otieno, Walter; Gesase, Samwel; Schellenberg, David

    2011-08-04

    , improvements to care delivery and a robust training and evaluation programme for clinicians. The case definition developed for the pivotal phase III RTS, S vaccine study is consistent with WHO recommendations, is locally applicable and appropriately balances sensitivity and specificity in the diagnosis of severe malaria. Processes set up to standardize severe malaria data collection will allow robust assessment of the efficacy of the RTS, S vaccine against severe malaria, strengthen local capacity and benefit patient care for subjects in the trial. Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00866619.

  12. Dolutegravir in Antiretroviral-Experienced Patients With Raltegravir- and/or Elvitegravir-Resistant HIV-1: 24-Week Results of the Phase III VIKING-3 Study

    PubMed Central

    Castagna, Antonella; Maggiolo, Franco; Penco, Giovanni; Wright, David; Mills, Anthony; Grossberg, Robert; Molina, Jean-Michel; Chas, Julie; Durant, Jacques; Moreno, Santiago; Doroana, Manuela; Ait-Khaled, Mounir; Huang, Jenny; Min, Sherene; Song, Ivy; Vavro, Cindy; Nichols, Garrett; Yeo, Jane M.; Aberg, J.; Akil, B.; Arribas, J. R.; Baril, J.-G.; Blanco Arévalo, J. L.; Blanco Quintana, F.; Blick, G.; Boix Martínez, V.; Bouchaud, O.; Branco, T.; Bredeek, U. F.; Castro Iglesias, M.; Clumeck, N.; Conway, B.; DeJesus, E.; Delassus, J.-L.; De Truchis, P.; Di Perri, G.; Di Pietro, M.; Duggan, J.; Duvivier, C.; Elion, R.; Eron, J.; Fish, D.; Gathe, J.; Haubrich, R.; Henderson, H.; Hicks, C.; Hocqueloux, L.; Hodder, S.; Hsiao, C.-B.; Katlama, C.; Kozal, M.; Kumar, P.; Lalla-Reddy, S.; Lazzarin, A.; Leoncini, F.; Llibre, J. M.; Mansinho, K.; Morlat, P.; Mounzer, K.; Murphy, M.; Newman, C.; Nguyen, T.; Nseir, B.; Philibert, P.; Pialoux, G.; Poizot-Martin, I.; Ramgopal, M.; Richmond, G.; Salmon Ceron, D.; Sax, P.; Scarsella, A.; Sension, M.; Shalit, P.; Sighinolfi, L.; Sloan, L.; Small, C.; Stein, D.; Tashima, K.; Tebas, P.; Torti, C.; Tribble, M.; Troisvallets, D.; Tsoukas, C.; Viciana Fernández, P.; Ward, D.; Wheeler, D.; Wilkin, T.; Yeni, G.-P.; Louise Martin-Carpenter, J.; Uhlenbrauck, Gina

    2014-01-01

    Background. The pilot phase IIb VIKING study suggested that dolutegravir (DTG), a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) integrase inhibitor (INI), would be efficacious in INI-resistant patients at the 50 mg twice daily (BID) dose. Methods. VIKING-3 is a single-arm, open-label phase III study in which therapy-experienced adults with INI-resistant virus received DTG 50 mg BID while continuing their failing regimen (without raltegravir or elvitegravir) through day 7, after which the regimen was optimized with ≥1 fully active drug and DTG continued. The primary efficacy endpoints were the mean change from baseline in plasma HIV-1 RNA at day 8 and the proportion of subjects with HIV-1 RNA <50 c/mL at week 24. Results. Mean change in HIV-1 RNA at day 8 was −1.43 log10 c/mL, and 69% of subjects achieved <50 c/mL at week 24. Multivariate analyses demonstrated a strong association between baseline DTG susceptibility and response. Response was most reduced in subjects with Q148 + ≥2 resistance-associated mutations. DTG 50 mg BID had a low (3%) discontinuation rate due to adverse events, similar to INI-naive subjects receiving DTG 50 mg once daily. Conclusions. DTG 50 mg BID–based therapy was effective in this highly treatment-experienced population with INI-resistant virus. Clinical Trials Registration. www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01328041) and http://www.gsk-clinicalstudywww.gsk-clinicalstudyregister.com (112574). PMID:24446523

  13. Ethnic sensitivity assessment of fluticasone furoate/vilanterol in East Asian asthma patients from randomized double-blind multicentre Phase IIb/III trials.

    PubMed

    Gross, Annette S; Goldfrad, Caroline; Hozawa, Soichiro; James, Mark H; Clifton, Christine S; Sugiyama, Yutaro; Jacques, Loretta

    2015-12-24

    Fluticasone furoate (FF)/vilanterol (VI) is a once daily (OD) inhaled corticosteroid/long-acting β2-agonist combination asthma therapy approved in Japan and the EU. FF/VI efficacy and safety data from asthma studies including patients in East Asia were evaluated to assess ethnic sensitivity. Randomized, double-blind, multicenter Phase IIb/III trials were assessed. Change from baseline relative to placebo or twice-daily fluticasone propionate 500 μg in trough FEV1 was compared between patients from Japan (N = 148) and Not-Japan (N = 3,066; three studies). Adverse events (AEs), laboratory results, and electrocardiograms were compared between patients from Japan + Korea (N = 188) and Not-Japan + Korea (N = 3,840; five studies). For trough FEV1, improvements from baseline (least-squares mean difference [95% confidence interval]) were reported for FF/VI 100/25 μg OD versus placebo at Week 12 (Japan: 0.323 L [0.104-0.542]; Not-Japan: 0.168 L [0.095-0.241]). Improvements from baseline (least-squares mean change [standard error]) were reported with FF/VI 200/25 μg OD at Week 24 (Japan: 0.355 L [0.1152]; Not-Japan: 0.396 L [0.0313]). A greater proportion of patients from Japan + Korea versus Not-Japan + Korea reported AEs in all treatment arms including placebo (FF/VI 100/25 μg: 79% versus 57%; FF/VI 200/25 μg: 64% versus 45%; placebo: 41% versus 23%). There were no notable differences in treatment-related or class-related AEs. No clinically significant changes in electrocardiogram assessments or statistically significant differences in 24 h urinary cortisol excretion were observed between the Japan + Korea and Not-Japan + Korea cohorts. Good efficacy and an acceptable safety profile were observed for FF/VI 100/25 μg and 200/25 μg OD in East Asian asthma patients; these globally recommended doses are appropriate for asthma patients in Japan. Clinicaltrials.gov registration numbers: NCT01165138 , NCT01134042 , NCT01086384 , NCT

  14. Omalizumab Improves Quality of Life and Asthma Control in Chinese Patients With Moderate to Severe Asthma: A Randomized Phase III Study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Kang, Jian; Wang, Changzheng; Yang, Jing; Wang, Linda; Kottakis, Ioannis; Humphries, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Omalizumab is the preferred add-on therapy for patients with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma and has demonstrated efficacy and safety in various ethnicities. This study evaluated the efficacy and safety of omalizumab in Chinese patients with moderate-to-severe allergic asthma. Methods This randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, phase III study assessed lung function, quality of life, asthma control, and safety of omalizumab after 24-week therapy in Chinese patients (18-75 years of age). Results A total of 616 patients were randomized (1:1) to omalizumab or placebo. The primary endpoint, least squares mean treatment difference (LSM-TD) in morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) (omalizumab vs placebo), at Weeks >20-24 was 8.85 L/min (Full analysis set; P=0.062). Per-protocol analysis set showed significant improvements with LSM-TD of 11.53 L/min in mean mPEF at Weeks >20-24 (P=0.022). The FEV1 % predicted was significantly improved with omalizumab vs placebo from 8 to 24 weeks (after 24-week treatment: LSM-TD=4.12%; P=0.001). At Week 24, a higher proportion of omalizumab-treated patients achieved clinically relevant improvements in standardized AQLQ (58.2% vs 39.3%; LSM=0.51 vs 0.10; P<0.001) and ACQ (49.5% vs 35.5%; LSM=-0.51 vs -0.34; P=0.002) scores vs placebo. Total and nighttime symptom scores reduced significantly with omalizumab vs placebo (LSM-TD=-0.21, P=0.048 and -0.12, P=0.011, respectively). Although the study was not powered to study differences in exacerbation rates (P=0.097), exacerbations in winter months were less frequent in the omalizumab vs placebo group (2 vs 21). Adverse event and severe adverse event rates were comparable between omalizumab and placebo. Conclusions Omalizumab improves lung function, quality of life, and asthma control in Chinese patients with moderate-to-severe persistent allergic asthma and has a good safety profile. PMID:27126725

  15. A phase III trial comparing oral S-1/cisplatin and intravenous 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin in patients with untreated diffuse gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Ajani, J A; Abramov, M; Bondarenko, I; Shparyk, Y; Gorbunova, V; Hontsa, A; Otchenash, N; Alsina, M; Lazarev, S; Feliu, J; Elme, A; Esko, V; Abdalla, K; Verma, U; Benedetti, F; Aoyama, T; Mizuguchi, H; Makris, L; Rosati, G

    2017-09-01

    The effect of histology-based treatment regimen on diffuse gastric adenocarcinoma has not been evaluated in clinical trials. This international phase III trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of S-1 (a contemporary oral fluoropyrimidine)/cisplatin versus 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)/cisplatin in chemotherapy-naïve patients with diffuse-type adenocarcinoma involving the gastroesophageal junction or stomach. Eligibility criteria included untreated, measurable, advanced diffuse adenocarcinoma confirmed by central pathology and performance status of 0-1. Patients were randomized (2 : 1) to receive S-1/cisplatin or 5-FU/cisplatin. Primary end point was overall survival (OS), and secondary end points were progression-free survival, time to treatment failure, overall response rate, and safety. A multivariable analysis was also carried out. Overall, 361 patients were randomized (S-1/cisplatin, n = 239; 5-FU/cisplatin, n = 122); half (51%) were men, and median age was 56.0 years. In each group, median number of treatment cycles per patient was 4 (range, S-1/cisplatin: 1-20; 5-FU/cisplatin: 1-30), and dose intensity was >95%. OS was not different in the two groups {median OS with S-1/cisplatin, 7.5 [95% confidence interval (CI): 6.7, 9.3]; 5-FU/cisplatin, 6.6 [95% CI: 5.7, 8.1] months; hazard ratio, 0.99 [95% CI: 0.76, 1.28]; P = 0.9312}. Overall response rate was significantly higher in the S-1/cisplatin than 5-FU/cisplatin group (34.7% versus 19.8%; P = 0.01), but progression-free survival and time to treatment failure were not different. Safety was similar between the 2 groups; however, fewer patients treated with S-1/cisplatin than 5-FU/cisplatin had ≥1 grade 3/4 treatment-emergent adverse event or ≥1 adverse event resulting in treatment discontinuation. One treatment-related death occurred in each group. Slow accrual led to early termination. These data suggest that S-1/cisplatin and 5-FU/cisplatin are similar in efficacy and safety in

  16. Benchmark On Sensitivity Calculation (Phase III)

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Tatiana; Laville, Cedric; Dyrda, James; Mennerdahl, Dennis; Golovko, Yury; Raskach, Kirill; Tsiboulia, Anatoly; Lee, Gil Soo; Woo, Sweng-Woong; Bidaud, Adrien; Patel, Amrit; Bledsoe, Keith C; Rearden, Bradley T; Gulliford, J.

    2012-01-01

    The sensitivities of the keff eigenvalue to neutron cross sections have become commonly used in similarity studies and as part of the validation algorithm for criticality safety assessments. To test calculations of the sensitivity coefficients, a benchmark study (Phase III) has been established by the OECD-NEA/WPNCS/EG UACSA (Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment). This paper presents some sensitivity results generated by the benchmark participants using various computational tools based upon different computational methods: SCALE/TSUNAMI-3D and -1D, MONK, APOLLO2-MORET 5, DRAGON-SUSD3D and MMKKENO. The study demonstrates the performance of the tools. It also illustrates how model simplifications impact the sensitivity results and demonstrates the importance of 'implicit' (self-shielding) sensitivities. This work has been a useful step towards verification of the existing and developed sensitivity analysis methods.

  17. Eslicarbazepine acetate as adjunctive therapy in patients with uncontrolled partial-onset seizures: Results of a phase III, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Sperling, Michael R; Abou-Khalil, Bassel; Harvey, Jay; Rogin, Joanne B; Biraben, Arnaud; Galimberti, Carlo A; Kowacs, Pedro A; Hong, Seung Bong; Cheng, Hailong; Blum, David; Nunes, Teresa; Soares-da-Silva, Patrício

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficacy and safety of adjunctive eslicarbazepine acetate (ESL) in patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. Methods This randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel-group, phase III study was conducted at 173 centers in 19 countries, including the United States and Canada. Eligible patients were aged ≥16 years and had uncontrolled partial-onset seizures despite treatment with 1–2 antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). After an 8-week baseline period, patients were randomized to once-daily placebo (n = 226), ESL 800 mg (n = 216), or ESL 1,200 mg (n = 211). Following a 2-week titration period, patients received ESL 800 or 1,200 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. Seizure data were captured and documented using event-entry or daily entry diaries. Results Standardized seizure frequency (SSF) during the maintenance period (primary end point) was reduced with ESL 1,200 mg (p = 0.004), and there was a trend toward improvement with ESL 800 mg (p = 0.06), compared with placebo. When data for titration and maintenance periods were combined, ESL 800 mg (p = 0.001) and 1,200 mg (p < 0.001) both reduced SSF. There were no statistically significant interactions between treatment response and geographical region (p = 0.38) or diary version (p = 0.76). Responder rate (≥50% reduction in SSF) was significantly higher with ESL 1,200 mg (42.6%, p < 0.001) but not ESL 800 mg (30.5%, p = 0.07) than placebo (23.1%). Incidence of treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) and TEAEs leading to discontinuation increased with ESL dose. The most common TEAEs were dizziness, somnolence, nausea, headache, and diplopia. Significance Adjunctive ESL 1,200 mg once-daily was more efficacious than placebo in adult patients with refractory partial-onset seizures. The once-daily 800 mg dose showed a marginal effect on SSF, but did not reach statistical significance. Both doses were well tolerated. Efficacy assessment was not affected by

  18. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III study of ixazomib plus lenalidomide-dexamethasone in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma: China Continuation study.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jian; Jin, Jie; Xu, Yan; Wu, Depei; Ke, Xiaoyan; Zhou, Daobin; Lu, Jin; Du, Xin; Chen, Xiequn; Li, Junmin; Liu, Jing; Gupta, Neeraj; Hanley, Michael J; Li, Hongmei; Hua, Zhaowei; Wang, Bingxia; Zhang, Xiaoquan; Wang, Hui; van de Velde, Helgi; Richardson, Paul G; Moreau, Philippe

    2017-07-06

    The China Continuation study was a separate regional expansion of the global, double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized phase III TOURMALINE-MM1 study of ixazomib plus lenalidomide-dexamethasone (Rd) in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM) following one to three prior therapies. Patients were randomized (1:1) to receive ixazomib 4.0 mg or placebo on days 1, 8, and 15, plus lenalidomide 25 mg on days 1-21 and dexamethasone 40 mg on days 1, 8, 15, and 22, in 28-day cycles. Randomization was stratified according to number of prior therapies, disease stage, and prior proteasome inhibitor exposure. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). In total, 115 Chinese patients were randomized (57 ixazomib-Rd, 58 placebo-Rd). At the preplanned final analysis for PFS, after median PFS follow-up of 7.4 and 6.9 months, respectively, PFS was improved with ixazomib-Rd versus placebo-Rd (median 6.7 vs 4.0 months; HR 0.598; p = 0.035). At the preplanned final analysis of overall survival (OS), after median follow-up of 20.2 and 19.1 months, respectively, OS was improved with ixazomib-Rd versus placebo-Rd (median 25.8 vs 15.8 months; HR 0.419; p = 0.001). On the ixazomib-Rd and placebo-Rd arms, respectively, 38 (67%) and 43 (74%) patients reported grade ≥3 adverse events (AEs), 19 (33%) and 18 (31%) reported serious AEs, and 4 (7%) and 5 (9%) died on-study. The most frequent grade 3/4 AEs were thrombocytopenia (18%/7% vs 14%/5%), neutropenia (19%/5% vs 19%/2%), and anemia (12%/0 vs 26%/2%). This study demonstrated that PFS and OS were significantly improved with ixazomib-Rd versus placebo-Rd, with limited additional toxicity, in patients with RRMM. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01564537.

  19. A phase III, double-blind, placebo-controlled, flexible-dose study of levomilnacipran extended-release in patients with major depressive disorder.

    PubMed

    Sambunaris, Angelo; Bose, Anjana; Gommoll, Carl P; Chen, Changzheng; Greenberg, William M; Sheehan, David V

    2014-02-01

    Levomilnacipran (1S, 2R-milnacipran) is a potent and selective serotonin and norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor; an extended-release (ER) formulation allows for once-daily dosing. This phase III study (NCT01034462) evaluated the efficacy, the safety, and the tolerability of 40 to 120 mg/d of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo in the treatment of patients (18-80 y) with major depressive disorder. This multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, flexible-dose study comprised a 1-week single-blind, placebo run-in period; an 8-week double-blind treatment; and a 2-week double-blind down-taper period. The primary efficacy parameter was total score change from baseline to week 8 on the Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS); the secondary efficacy was the Sheehan Disability Scale. Analysis was performed using the mixed-effects model for repeated measures on a modified intent-to-treat population. A total of 434 patients received at least 1 dose of double-blind treatment (safety population); 429 patients also had 1 or more postbaseline MADRS assessments (modified intent-to-treat population). The least squares mean differences and 95% confidence interval were statistically significant in favor of levomilnacipran ER versus placebo for the MADRS total score (-3.095 [-5.256, -0.935]; P = 0.0051) and the SDS total score (-2.632 [-4.193, -1.070]; P = 0.0010) change from baseline to week 8. Adverse events were reported in 61.8% of the placebo patients and in 81.6% of the levomilnacipran ER patients. Frequently reported adverse events (≥ 5% in levomilnacipran ER and twice the rate of placebo) were nausea, dizziness, constipation, tachycardia, urinary hesitation, hyperhidrosis, insomnia, vomiting, hypertension, and ejaculation disorder. In conclusion, there was a statistically significant difference in the score change from baseline to week 8 between levomilnacipran ER and placebo on several depression rating scales, reflecting symptomatic

  20. Randomized phase II/III trial of post-operative chemoradiotherapy comparing 3-weekly cisplatin with weekly cisplatin in high-risk patients with squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study (JCOG1008).

    PubMed

    Kunieda, Futoshi; Kiyota, Naomi; Tahara, Makoto; Kodaira, Takeshi; Hayashi, Ryuichi; Ishikura, Satoshi; Mizusawa, Junki; Nakamura, Kenichi; Fukuda, Haruhiko; Fujii, Masato

    2014-08-01

    A randomized Phase II/III study was launched in Japan to evaluate the non-inferiority of concurrent chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin (40 mg/m(2)) compared with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with 3-weekly cisplatin (100 mg/m(2)) for post-operative high-risk patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of head and neck. This study began in October 2012, and a total of 260 patients will be accrued from 18 institutions within 5 years. The primary endpoint of the Phase II part is proportion of treatment completion and that of the Phase III part is overall survival. The secondary endpoints are relapse-free survival, local relapse-free survival, nutrition-support-free survival, non-hospitalized treatment period during permissible treatment period and adverse events. This trial was registered at the UMIN Clinical Trials Registry as UMIN 000009125 [http://www.umin.ac.jp/ctr/].

  1. Results of a phase I-II study on intraductal confocal microscopy (IDCM) in patients with common bile duct (CBD) stenosis.

    PubMed

    Giovannini, M; Bories, E; Monges, G; Pesenti, C; Caillol, F; Delpero, J R

    2011-07-01

    accuracy rate of 86%, sensitivity of 83%, and specificity of 75%. The respective numbers for standard histopathology were 53, 65, and 53%. This phase I-II study on IDCM showed that IDCM is feasible. This new technique will open a new door for optical biopsy of the CBD.

  2. Efficacy and safety of the biosimilar ABP 501 compared with adalimumab in patients with moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis: a randomised, double-blind, phase III equivalence study.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Stanley; Genovese, Mark C; Choy, Ernest; Perez-Ruiz, Fernando; Matsumoto, Alan; Pavelka, Karel; Pablos, Jose L; Rizzo, Warren; Hrycaj, Pawel; Zhang, Nan; Shergy, William; Kaur, Primal

    2017-10-01

    ABP 501 is a Food and Drug Administration-approved biosimilar to adalimumab; structural, functional and pharmacokinetic evaluations have shown that the two are highly similar. We report results from a phase III study comparing efficacy, safety and immunogenicity between ABP 501 and adalimumab. In this randomised, double-blind, active comparator-controlled, 26-week equivalence study, patients with moderate to severe active rheumatoid arthritis (RA) despite methotrexate were randomised (1:1) to ABP 501 or adalimumab (40 mg) every 2 weeks. Primary endpoint was risk ratio (RR) of ACR20 between groups at week 24. Primary hypothesis that the treatments were equivalent would be confirmed if the 90% CI for RR of ACR20 at week 24 fell between 0.738 and 1.355, demonstrating that ABP 501 is similar to adalimumab. Secondary endpoints included Disease Activity Score 28-joint count-C reactive protein (DAS28-CRP). Safety was assessed via adverse events (AEs) and laboratory evaluations. Antidrug antibodies were assessed to determine immunogenicity. A total of 526 patients were randomised (n=264, ABP 501; n=262 adalimumab) and 494 completed the study. ACR20 response at week 24 was 74.6% (ABP 501) and 72.4% (adalimumab). At week 24, the RR of ACR20 (90% CI) between groups was 1.039 (0.954, 1.133), confirming the primary hypothesis. Changes from baseline in DAS28-CRP, ACR50 and ACR70 were similar. There were no clinically meaningful differences in AEs and laboratory abnormalities. A total of 38.3% (ABP 501) and 38.2% (adalimumab) of patients tested positive for binding antidrug antibodies. Results from this study demonstrate that ABP 501 is similar to adalimumab in clinical efficacy, safety and immunogenicity in patients with moderate to severe RA. NCT01970475; Results. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Phase I/II clinical trial of dendritic-cell based immunotherapy (DCVAC/PCa) combined with chemotherapy in patients with metastatic, castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Becht, Etienne; Rozkova, Daniela; Bilkova, Pavla; Sochorova, Klara; Hromadkova, Hana; Kayserova, Jana; Vavrova, Katerina; Lastovicka, Jan; Vrabcova, Petra; Kubackova, Katerina; Gasova, Zdenka; Jarolim, Ladislav; Babjuk, Marek; Spisek, Radek; Bartunkova, Jirina; Fucikova, Jitka

    2015-01-01

    Purpose We conducted an open-label, single-arm Phase I/II clinical trial in metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) patients eligible for docetaxel combined with treatment with autologous mature dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with killed LNCaP prostate cancer cells (DCVAC/PCa). The primary and secondary endpoints were safety and immune responses, respectively. Overall survival (OS), followed as a part of the safety evaluation, was compared to the predicted OS according to the Halabi and MSKCC nomograms. Experimental design Twenty-five patients with progressive mCRPC were enrolled. Treatment comprised of initial 7 days administration of metronomic cyclophosphamide 50 mg p.o. DCVAC/PCa treatment consisted of a median twelve doses of 1 × 107 dendritic cells per dose injected s.c. (Aldara creme was applied at the site of injection) during a one-year period. The initial 2 doses of DCVAC/PCa were administered at a 2-week interval, followed by the administration of docetaxel (75 mg/m2) and prednisone (5 mg twice daily) given every 3 weeks until toxicity or intolerance was observed. The DCVAC/PCa was then injected every 6 weeks up to the maximum number of doses manufactured from one leukapheresis. Results No serious DCVAC/PCa-related adverse events have been reported. The median OS was 19 months, whereas the predicted median OS was 11.8 months with the Halabi nomogram and 13 months with the MSKCC nomogram. Kaplan-Meier analyses showed that patients had a lower risk of death compared with both MSKCC (Hazard Ratio 0.26, 95% CI: 0.13–0.51) and Halabi (Hazard Ratio 0.33, 95% CI: 0.17–0.63) predictions. We observed a significant decrease in Tregs in the peripheral blood. The long-term administration of DCVAC/PCa led to the induction and maintenance of PSA specific T cells. We did not identify any immunological parameter that significantly correlated with better OS. Conclusions In patients with mCRPC, the combined chemoimmunotherapy with DCVAC/PCa and docetaxel was safe and resulted in

  4. Dapagliflozin as monotherapy in drug-naive Asian patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a randomized, blinded, prospective phase III study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Linong; Ma, Jianhua; Li, Hongmei; Mansfield, Traci A; T'joen, Caroline L; Iqbal, Nayyar; Ptaszynska, Agata; List, James F

    2014-01-01

    Dapagliflozin is a highly selective, orally active inhibitor of renal sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 that reduces hyperglycemia by increasing urinary glucose excretion. The goal of this study was to evaluate dapagliflozin as monotherapy in drug-naive Asian patients with type 2 diabetes whose disease was inadequately controlled with diet and exercise. In this Phase III, multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind study, drug-naive patients with glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels ≥7.0% to ≤10.5% (≥53-≤91 mmol/mol) were randomized (by using an interactive voice response system) to receive placebo (n = 132), dapagliflozin 5 mg (n = 128), or dapagliflozin 10 mg (n = 133). The primary end point was mean change from baseline in HbA1c level at week 24 (last-observation-carried-forward). Secondary end points included changes in fasting plasma glucose, 2-hour postprandial glucose, body weight, and other glycemic parameters. Baseline characteristics were balanced across groups. Most patients (89%) were Chinese, median disease duration was 0.2 year, and mean HbA1c level was 8.26%. Most patients (87%) completed the study. At week 24, mean reductions in HbA1c were -0.29% for placebo versus -1.04% and -1.11% for dapagliflozin 5 and 10 mg, respectively (P < 0.0001 for both doses). Changes in fasting plasma glucose were 2.5, -25.1, and -31.6 mg/dL (0.14, -1.39, and -1.75 mmol/L) for placebo, dapagliflozin 5 mg, and dapagliflozin 10 mg. Changes in 2-hour postprandial glucose were 1.1, -46.8, and -54.9 mg/dL (0.06, -2.60, and -3.05 mmol/L). Reductions in body weight were -0.27, -1.64, and -2.25 kg. Proportions of patients achieving HbA1c levels <7.0% (53 mmol/mol) were 21.3%, 42.6%, and 49.8%. Adverse events (AEs) occurred in 63.6%, 61.7%, and 60.9% of patients, and serious AEs occurred in 1.5%, 3.9%, and 3.0% of patients. No deaths occurred. Hypoglycemia was uncommon (1.5%, 0.8%, and 0.8%); no hypoglycemic event led to discontinuation. Genital infections occurred in 0

  5. A Phase I/II Study of Docetaxel, Oxaliplatin, and Fluorouracil (D-FOX) Chemotherapy in Patients With Untreated Locally Unresectable or Metastatic Adenocarcinoma of the Stomach and Gastroesophageal Junction.

    PubMed

    Blum Murphy, Mariela A; Qiao, Wei; Mewada, Nishith; Wadhwa, Roopma; Elimova, Elena; Takashi, Taketa; Ho, Linus; Phan, Alexandria; Baker, Jackie; Ajani, Jaffer

    2016-02-22

    A randomized phase III study established docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (DCF) as one of the standard treatments for patients with untreated advanced gastric cancer (AGC). However, DCF use is limited due toxicity. With the purpose to evaluate a less toxic regimen, we conducted a single arm, phase I/II trial of modified DCF (oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil, and docetaxel [D-FOX]) for untreated AGC patients. The primary objective of the phase I study was to determine the maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel and for the phase II study was to assess the progression-free survival (PFS) at 6 months and overall survival (OS). We enrolled a total of 98 patients with AGC. Docetaxel and oxaliplatin were administered intravenously on day 1 and 5-fluorouracil was infused starting on day 1 over 48 hours. Cycles were repeated every 2 weeks and patients were monitored for toxicities. Kaplan-Meir curve was used to estimate unadjusted OS and PFS. The maximum tolerated dose of docetaxel was 50 mg/m. In total, 24 (45%) patients experienced grade 2 adverse events, 22 (41%) experienced grade 3, and 1 (1.9%) experienced grade 4 toxicity. The median PFS in the phase II portion of the study was approximately 6.5 (95% confidence interval, 5.5-9.5) months and the median OS was 11.1 (95% confidence interval, 9.4-18.8) months. D-FOX administered every 2 weeks is a well-tolerated and active regimen in untreated AGC patients.

  6. Effect of Secukinumab on Patient‐Reported Outcomes in Patients With Active Ankylosing Spondylitis: A Phase III Randomized Trial (MEASURE 1)

    PubMed Central

    Dougados, Maxime; Baeten, Dominique L.; Cheng‐Chung Wei, James; Geusens, Piet; Readie, Aimee; Richards, Hanno B.; Martin, Ruvie; Porter, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effect of secukinumab (interleukin‐17A inhibitor) on patient‐reported outcomes in patients with active ankylosing spondylitis (AS). Methods In this phase III study, 371 patients were randomized (1:1:1) to receive intravenous (IV) secukinumab 10 mg/kg at baseline and weeks 2 and 4 followed by subcutaneous (SC) secukinumab 150 mg every 4 weeks (IV→150 mg group), or SC secukinumab 75 mg every 4 weeks (IV→75 mg group), or placebo. Patient‐reported outcomes included the Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Disease Activity Index (BASDAI), BASDAI criteria for 50% improvement (BASDAI 50), Short Form 36 (SF‐36) physical component summary (PCS) score and mental component summary (MCS) score, Ankylosing Spondylitis Quality of Life (ASQoL) questionnaire, Bath Ankylosing Spondylitis Functional Index (BASFI), EuroQol 5‐domain (EQ‐5D) questionnaire, Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy–Fatigue (FACIT‐F), and Work Productivity and Activity Impairment–General Health questionnaire (WPAI‐GH). Results At week 16, secukinumab IV→150 mg or IV→75 mg was associated with statistically and clinically significant improvements from baseline versus placebo in the BASDAI (−2.3 for both regimens versus −0.6; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively), SF‐36 PCS (5.6 for both regimens versus 1.0; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively), and ASQoL (−3.6 for both regimens versus −1.0; P < 0.0001 and P < 0.001, respectively). Clinically significant improvements in the SF‐36 MCS, BASFI, EQ‐5D, and BASDAI 50 were observed with both secukinumab groups versus placebo at week 16; improvements were also observed in the FACIT‐F and WPAI‐GH. All improvements were sustained through week 52. Conclusion Our findings indicate that secukinumab provides significant and sustained improvements in patient‐reported disease activity and health‐related quality of life, and reduces functional impairment, fatigue, and

  7. [Principle and practice of clinical phase III studies].

    PubMed

    Morant, Rudolf

    2008-01-01

    Randomized phase III studies compare new treatments with standard therapy according to defined guidelines and legal rules. Large international randomized phase III studies are some of the most complex and expensive medical experiments. The results of such trials will decide about the future of new drugs and are the basis of evidence-based medicine and the development of clinical guidelines. This contribution discusses randomization, endpoints, inclusion and exclusion criteria of phase III trials as well as further challenges when developing and conducting phase III studies in oncology. Copyright 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. A Phase I/II trial of radiotherapy concurrent with TS-1 plus cisplatin in patients with clinically resectable type 4 or large type 3 gastric cancer: Osaka Gastrointestinal Cancer Chemotherapy Study Group OGSG1205.

    PubMed

    Imano, Motohiro; Furukawa, Hiroshi; Yokokawa, Masaki; Nishimura, Yasumasa; Kurokawa, Yukinori; Satoh, Taroh; Sakai, Daisuke; Yasuda, Takushi; Imamoto, Haruhiko; Tujinaka, Toshimasa; Shimokawa, Toshio; Shiozaki, Hitoshi

    2013-04-01

    A Phase I/II trial of radiotherapy administered concurrently with TS-1 plus cisplatin has been initiated in Japanese patients with clinical resectable type 4 or large type 3 gastric cancer. The aim of this trial is to determine the recommended dose of TS-1 and cisplatin combined with radiotherapy at a fixed dose in the Phase I study, and to evaluate the efficacy and safety in the Phase II study. The primary endpoint for Phase II is the pathological complete response rate, assessed using surgically resected specimens. Secondary endpoints are the response rate, progression-free survival, overall survival, operation transitional rate, R0 resection rate, rate of treatment completion, rate of down-staging and rates of postoperative complications and adverse events. In Phase II, a total of 30 patients will be enrolled in the Osaka Gastrointestinal Cancer Chemotherapy Study Group trial over a period of 6 years.

  9. CONVERSION EXTRACTION DESULFURIZATION (CED) PHASE III

    SciTech Connect

    James Boltz

    2005-03-01

    This project was undertaken to refine the Conversion Extraction Desulfurization (CED) technology to efficiently and economically remove sulfur from diesel fuel to levels below 15-ppm. CED is considered a generic term covering all desulfurization processes that involve oxidation and extraction. The CED process first extracts a fraction of the sulfur from the diesel, then selectively oxidizes the remaining sulfur compounds, and finally extracts these oxidized materials. The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded Petro Star Inc. a contract to fund Phase III of the CED process development. Phase III consisted of testing a continuous-flow process, optimization of the process steps, design of a pilot plant, and completion of a market study for licensing the process. Petro Star and the Degussa Corporation in coordination with Koch Modular Process Systems (KMPS) tested six key process steps in a 7.6-centimeter (cm) (3.0-inch) inside diameter (ID) column at gas oil feed rates of 7.8 to 93.3 liters per hour (l/h) (2.1 to 24.6 gallons per hour). The team verified the technical feasibility with respect to hydraulics for each unit operation tested and successfully demonstrated pre-extraction and solvent recovery distillation. Test operations conducted at KMPS demonstrated that the oxidation reaction converted a maximum of 97% of the thiophenes. The CED Process Development Team demonstrated that CED technology is capable of reducing the sulfur content of light atmospheric gas oil from 5,000-ppm to less than 15-ppm within the laboratory scale. In continuous flow trials, the CED process consistently produced fuel with approximately 20-ppm of sulfur. The process economics study calculated an estimated process cost of $5.70 per product barrel. The Kline Company performed a marketing study to evaluate the possibility of licensing the CED technology. Kline concluded that only 13 refineries harbored opportunity for the CED process. The Kline study and the research team's discussions with

  10. 76 FR 33589 - Standards Improvement Project-Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ...Phase III of the Standards Improvement Project (SIP-III) is the third in a series of rulemaking actions to improve and streamline OSHA standards. The Standards Improvement Project removes or revises individual requirements within rules that are confusing, outdated, duplicative, or inconsistent. OSHA identified several requirements for SIP-III (e.g., rigging, NIOSH records, and training......

  11. Results of a Randomized Controlled Multicenter Phase III Trial of Percutaneous Hepatic Perfusion Compared with Best Available Care for Patients with Melanoma Liver Metastases.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Marybeth S; Zager, Jonathan; Faries, Mark; Alexander, H Richard; Royal, Richard E; Wood, Bradford; Choi, Junsung; McCluskey, Kevin; Whitman, Eric; Agarwala, Sanjiv; Siskin, Gary; Nutting, Charles; Toomey, Mary Ann; Webb, Carole; Beresnev, Tatiana; Pingpank, James F

    2016-04-01

    There is no consensus for the treatment of melanoma metastatic to the liver. Percutaneous hepatic perfusion with melphalan (PHP-Mel) is a method of delivering regional chemotherapy selectively to the liver. In this study, we report the results of a multicenter, randomized controlled trial comparing PHP-Mel with best alternative care (BAC) for patients with ocular or cutaneous melanoma metastatic to the liver. A total of 93 patients were randomized to PHP-Mel (n = 44) or BAC (n = 49). On the PHP-Mel arm, melphalan was delivered via the hepatic artery, and the hepatic effluent captured and filtered extracorporeally prior to return to the systemic circulation via a venovenous bypass circuit. PHP-Mel was repeatable every 4-8 weeks. The primary endpoint was hepatic progression-free survival (hPFS), and secondary endpoints included overall PFS (oPFS), overall survival (OS), hepatic objective response (hOR), and safety. hPFS was 7.0 months for PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p < 0.0001), while oPFS was 5.4 months for PHP-Mel and 1.6 months for BAC (p < 0.0001). Median OS was not significantly different (PHP-Mel 10.6 months vs. BAC 10.0 months), likely due to crossover to PHP-Mel treatment (57.1 %) from the BAC arm, and the hOR was 36.4 % for PHP-Mel and 2.0 % for BAC (p < 0.001). The majority of adverse events were related to bone marrow suppression. Four deaths were attributed to PHP-Mel, three in the primary PHP-Mel group, and one post-crossover to PHP-Mel from BAC. This randomized, phase III study demonstrated the efficacy of the PHP-Mel procedure. hPFS, oPFS, and hOR were significantly improved with PHP-Mel. PHP with melphalan should provide a new treatment option for unresectable metastatic melanoma in the liver.

  12. Phase III study of pasireotide long-acting release in patients with metastatic neuroendocrine tumors and carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Edward M; Jarzab, Barbara; Eriksson, Barbro; Walter, Thomas; Toumpanakis, Christos; Morse, Michael A; Tomassetti, Paola; Weber, Matthias M; Fogelman, David R; Ramage, John; Poon, Donald; Gadbaw, Brian; Li, Jiang; Pasieka, Janice L; Mahamat, Abakar; Swahn, Fredrik; Newell-Price, John; Mansoor, Wasat; Öberg, Kjell

    2015-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, Phase III study, we compared pasireotide long-acting release (pasireotide LAR) with octreotide long-acting repeatable (octreotide LAR) in managing carcinoid symptoms refractory to first-generation somatostatin analogues. Adults with carcinoid tumors of the digestive tract were randomly assigned (1:1) to receive pasireotide LAR (60 mg) or octreotide LAR (40 mg) every 28 days. Primary outcome was symptom control based on frequency of bowel movements and flushing episodes. Objective tumor response was a secondary outcome. Progression-free survival (PFS) was calculated in a post hoc analysis. Adverse events were recorded. At the time of a planned interim analysis, the data monitoring committee recommended halting the study because of a low predictive probability of showing superiority of pasireotide over octreotide for symptom control (n=43 pasireotide LAR, 20.9%; n=45 octreotide LAR, 26.7%; odds ratio, 0.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.27–1.97; P=0.53). Tumor control rate at month 6 was 62.7% with pasireotide and 46.2% with octreotide (odds ratio, 1.96; 95% CI, 0.89–4.32; P=0.09). Median (95% CI) PFS was 11.8 months (11.0 – not reached) with pasireotide versus 6.8 months (5.6 – not reached) with octreotide (hazard ratio, 0.46; 95% CI, 0.20–0.98; P=0.045). The most frequent drug-related adverse events (pasireotide vs octreotide) included hyperglycemia (28.3% vs 5.3%), fatigue (11.3% vs 3.5%), and nausea (9.4% vs 0%). We conclude that, among patients with carcinoid symptoms refractory to available somatostatin analogues, similar proportions of patients receiving pasireotide LAR or octreotide LAR achieved symptom control at month 6. Pasireotide LAR showed a trend toward higher tumor control rate at month 6, although it was statistically not significant, and was associated with a longer PFS than octreotide LAR. PMID:26366058

  13. Efficacy and safety of leuprorelin acetate 6-month depot in prostate cancer patients: a Phase III, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, comparative study in Japan.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Namiki, Mikio; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Kudou, Kentarou; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-12-01

    Leuprorelin acetate (TAP-144-SR) is commonly used worldwide in prostate cancer patients. This study was conducted to assess the non-inferiority of a 6-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [6M]) 22.5 mg to a 3-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [3M]) 11.25 mg in prostate cancer patients in Japan. This was a 48-week Phase III, open-label, parallel-group comparative study. TAP-144-SR (6M) 22.5 mg (6M group) and TAP-144-SR (3M) 11.25 mg (3M group) were administered to 81 and 79 subjects, respectively. The primary endpoint was the rate of serum testosterone suppression to the castrate level (≤100 ng/dl). Serum testosterone of all subjects excluding one subject in the 3M group was suppressed to the castrate level throughout 48 weeks. The estimated between-group difference (6M group - 3M group) in suppression rate was 1.3% (95% confidence interval: -3.4, 6.8), and its lower confidence interval was more than -10% of the pre-determined allowable limit value to judge the non-inferiority. The prostate-specific antigen concentrations were stable throughout the study in both groups. Progressive disease in the best overall response based on the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors was 0.0% for the 6M group and 2.6% for the 3M group. Adverse events occurred in 92.6% in the 6M group and 89.9% in the 3M group. Adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported in 2.5% in the 6M group and 3.8% in the 3M group. TAP-144-SR (6M) was not inferior to TAP-144-SR (3M) for the suppressive effect on serum testosterone level. TAP-144-SR (6M) was also as well tolerated as TAP-144-SR (3M). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. Efficacy and safety of leuprorelin acetate 6-month depot in prostate cancer patients: a Phase III, randomized, open-label, parallel-group, comparative study in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kazuhiro; Namiki, Mikio; Fujimoto, Tsukasa; Takabayashi, Nobuyoshi; Kudou, Kentarou; Akaza, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Objective Leuprorelin acetate (TAP-144-SR) is commonly used worldwide in prostate cancer patients. This study was conducted to assess the non-inferiority of a 6-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [6M]) 22.5 mg to a 3-month depot formulation of TAP-144-SR (TAP-144-SR [3M]) 11.25 mg in prostate cancer patients in Japan. Methods This was a 48-week Phase III, open-label, parallel-group comparative study. TAP-144-SR (6M) 22.5 mg (6M group) and TAP-144-SR (3M) 11.25 mg (3M group) were administered to 81 and 79 subjects, respectively. The primary endpoint was the rate of serum testosterone suppression to the castrate level (≤100 ng/dl). Results Serum testosterone of all subjects excluding one subject in the 3M group was suppressed to the castrate level throughout 48 weeks. The estimated between-group difference (6M group − 3M group) in suppression rate was 1.3% (95% confidence interval: −3.4, 6.8), and its lower confidence interval was more than −10% of the pre-determined allowable limit value to judge the non-inferiority. The prostate-specific antigen concentrations were stable throughout the study in both groups. Progressive disease in the best overall response based on the Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors was 0.0% for the 6M group and 2.6% for the 3M group. Adverse events occurred in 92.6% in the 6M group and 89.9% in the 3M group. Adverse events leading to discontinuation were reported in 2.5% in the 6M group and 3.8% in the 3M group. Conclusions TAP-144-SR (6M) was not inferior to TAP-144-SR (3M) for the suppressive effect on serum testosterone level. TAP-144-SR (6M) was also as well tolerated as TAP-144-SR (3M). PMID:26486824

  15. Intensive dose ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide followed by autologous stem cell rescue: results of a phase I/II study in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Fields, K K; Perkins, J P; Hiemenz, J W; Zorsky, P E; Janssen, W E; Kronish, L E; Machak, M C; Elfenbein, G J

    1993-01-01

    We have recently treated 66 women with breast cancer with escalating doses of ifosfamide, carboplatin, and etoposide (ICE) followed by autologous stem cell rescue (ASCR). Patients received ifosfamide (6000-24,000 mg m-2), carboplatin (1200-2100 mg m-2), and etoposide (1800-3000 mg m-2) divided over 6 days with ASCR 48 h after completion of chemotherapy. Our patient population consisted of seven patients with stage II disease with eight or more positive nodes being treated in the adjuvant setting, 16 patients with a history of stage III or inflammatory breast cancer, and 43 patients with stage IV disease. Six patients were not evaluable for response due to early death from infection (three patients) and incomplete restaging (three patients). The overall response rate in patients with measurable metastatic disease was 50%. Of those patients with stage II disease, 85% remain alive and progression-free with a median follow-up of greater than one year. The two most frequent toxicities encountered were reversible elevations of liver function tests and mucositis/enteritis. The dose-limiting toxicities were central nervous system toxicity and nephrotoxicity.

  16. Patients with stage III/IV Hodgkin's disease in partial remission after MOPP/ABV chemotherapy have excellent prognosis after additional involved-field radiotherapy: interim results from the ongoing EORTC-LCG and GPMC phase III trial. The EORTC Lymphoma Cooperative Group and Groupe Pierre-et-Marie-Curie.

    PubMed

    Raemaekers, J; Burgers, M; Henry-Amar, M; Pinna, A; Mandard, A; Monfardini, S; Hagenbeek, A; Breed, W; Carde, P; Vovk, M; van Hoof, A; Thomas, J; Noordijk, E

    1997-01-01

    Failure to reach complete remission (CR) with chemotherapy in advanced stages of Hodgkin's disease is considered a poor prognostic factor for progression-free and overall survival. The role of radiotherapy after chemotherapy-induced remission is controversial. In 1989, the EORTC/GPMC started a randomized phase III trial on involved-field RT (IF-RT) after MOPP/ABV hybrid-induced remission in patients with stage III/IV Hodgkin's disease. In this ongoing trial, patients in CR after chemotherapy are randomized between IF-RT and no further treatment. Patients in partial remission (PR) all receive IF-RT. Patients, age 15-70 years, with previously untreated stage III/IV Hodgkin's disease are eligible. The randomized treatment arms are still blinded. The interim analysis of May 1996 focuses on the outcome of patients in chemotherapy-induced PR. A total of 405 of 493 registered patients were evaluable for response to chemotherapy. Fifty-nine percent of patients attained a CR, 37% a PR, and only 4% failed to respond. The IF-RT was actually given to 90% of the PR patients. After a median follow-up of 43 months, the five year progression-free and overall survival for patients in PR was 75% and 87%, respectively. IF-RT after MOPP/ABV-induced partial remission in stage III/IV Hodgkin's disease produces excellent failure-free and overall survival. Early intensification of treatment of this group of patients is not indicated.

  17. A randomized, multicenter, phase II/III study to determine the optimal dose and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pegteograstim (GCPGC) on chemotherapy-induced neutropenia compared to pegfilgrastim in breast cancer patients: KCSG PC10-09.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ki Hyeong; Kim, Ji-Yeon; Lee, Moon Hee; Han, Hye Sook; Lim, Joo Han; Park, Keon Uk; Park, In Hae; Cho, Eun Kyung; Yoon, So Young; Kim, Jee Hyun; Choi, In Sil; Park, Jae Hoo; Choi, Young Jin; Kim, Hee-Jun; Jung, Kyung Hae; Kim, Si-Young; Oh, Do-Youn; Im, Seock-Ah

    2016-04-01

    Pegylated granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) is frequently used to prevent febrile neutropenia (FN) in patients undergoing chemotherapy with a high risk of myelosuppression. This phase II/III study was conducted to determine the adequate dose of pegteograstim, a new formulation of pegylated G-CSF, and to evaluate the efficacy and safety of pegteograstim compared to pegfilgrastim. In the phase II part, 60 breast cancer patients who were undergoing DA (docetaxel and doxorubicin) or TAC (docetaxel, doxorubicin, and cyclophosphamide) chemotherapy were randomly selected to receive a single subcutaneous injection of 3.6 or 6.0 mg pegteograstim on day 2 of each chemotherapy cycle. The phase III part was seamlessly started to compare the dose of pegteograstim at selected in phase II with 6.0 mg pegfilgrastim in 117 breast cancer patients. The primary endpoint of both the phase II and III parts was the duration of grade 4 neutropenia in the chemotherapy cycle 1. The mean duration of grade 4 neutropenia for the 3.6 mg pegteograstim (n = 33) was similar to that for the 6.0 mg pegteograstim (n = 26) (1.97 ± 1.79 days vs. 1.54 ± 0.95 days, p = 0.33). The 6.0 mg pegteograstim was selected to be compared with the 6.0 mg pegfilgrastim in the phase III part. In the phase III part, the primary analysis revealed that the efficacy of pegteograstim (n = 56) was non-inferior to that of pegfilgrastim (n = 59) [duration of grade 4 neutropenia, 1.64 ± 1.18 days vs. 1.80 ± 1.05 days; difference, -0.15 ± 1.11 (p = 0.36, 97.5 % confidence intervals = 0.57 and 0.26)]. The time to the absolute neutrophil count (ANC) recovery of pegteograstim (≥2000/μL) was significantly shorter than that of pegfilgrastim (8.85 ± 1.45 days vs. 9.83 ± 1.20 days, p < 0.0001). Other secondary endpoints showed no significant difference between the two groups. The safety profiles of the two groups did not differ significantly. Pegteograstim was shown to be as effective as pegfilgrastim in the

  18. A new approach to designing phase I-II cancer trials for cytotoxic chemotherapies.

    PubMed

    Bartroff, Jay; Lai, Tze Leung; Narasimhan, Balasubramanian

    2014-07-20

    Recently, there has been much work on early phase cancer designs that incorporate both toxicity and efficacy data, called phase I-II designs because they combine elements of both phases. However, they do not explicitly address the phase II hypothesis test of H0 : p ≤ p0 , where p is the probability of efficacy at the estimated maximum tolerated dose η from phase I and p0 is the baseline efficacy rate. Standard practice for phase II remains to treat p as a fixed, unknown parameter and to use Simon's two-stage design with all patients dosed at η. We propose a phase I-II design that addresses the uncertainty in the estimate p=p(η) in H0 by using sequential generalized likelihood theory. Combining this with a phase I design that incorporates efficacy data, the phase I-II design provides a common framework that can be used all the way from the first dose of phase I through the final accept/reject decision about H0 at the end of phase II, utilizing both toxicity and efficacy data throughout. Efficient group sequential testing is used in phase II that allows for early stopping to show treatment effect or futility. The proposed phase I-II design thus removes the artificial barrier between phase I and phase II and fulfills the objectives of searching for the maximum tolerated dose and testing if the treatment has an acceptable response rate to enter into a phase III trial.

  19. A phase I/II study of cancer peptide vaccine S-288310 in patients with advanced urothelial carcinoma of the bladder.

    PubMed

    Obara, W; Eto, M; Mimata, H; Kohri, K; Mitsuhata, N; Miura, I; Shuin, T; Miki, T; Koie, T; Fujimoto, H; Minami, K; Enomoto, Y; Nasu, T; Yoshida, T; Fuse, H; Hara, I; Kawaguchi, K; Arimura, A; Fujioka, T

    2017-04-01

    S-288310, a cancer peptide vaccine composed of two HLA-A*24:02-restricted peptides derived from two oncoantigens, DEP domain-containing 1 (DEPDC1) and M-phase phosphoprotein 1 (MPHOSPH1), was investigated in urothelial carcinoma (UC) of the bladder. Thirty eight HLA-A*24:02-positive patients with progressive UC were enrolled in this study. In the phase I part of the study, three patients each were treated with S-288310 at 1 mg or 2 mg/peptide subcutaneously once a week to evaluate safety and tolerability. In the phase II, 32 patients were randomized to receive either 1 mg or 2 mg to evaluate the difference in cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) induction and safety. S-288310 was safe and well tolerated in the phase I. Of 27 patients evaluable for immune responses in the phase II, there was no difference in CTL induction rate between the 1 mg (100%) and 2 mg (80.0%) groups. Of 32 patients receiving S-288310 in the phase II, the most frequent drug-related AE was the injection site reaction that was observed in 29 patients (90.6%), but none of the patients discontinued administration due to these reactions and no dose relationship in the frequency and severity was observed. The objective response rate of the 32 patients was 6.3% and the disease control rate was 56.3%. The median overall survival (OS) rates for patients vaccinated with S-288310 after one regimen of chemotherapy, 2 regimens, or 3 or more were 14.4, 9.1 and 3.7 months, respectively, and 32.2% of patients post first-line treatment were alive at 2 years. OS of patients who showed CTL induction to both peptides was longer than that of those with CTL induction to no or one peptide. S-288310 was well-tolerated and effectively induced peptide-specific CTLs, which were correlated with longer survival for patients with UC of the bladder. JapicCTI-090980.

  20. Tumor Regression and Autoimmunity in Patients Treated With Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte–Associated Antigen 4 Blockade and Interleukin 2: A Phase I/II Study

    PubMed Central

    Maker, Ajay V.; Phan, Giao Q.; Attia, Peter; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Haworth, Leah R.; Levy, Catherine; Kleiner, David; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Yellin, Michael; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Background Cytotoxic T lymphocyte–associated antigen (CTLA)-4 can inhibit T-cell responses and is involved in tolerance against self antigens. We previously reported autoimmune manifestations and objective cancer regressions in patients with metastatic melanoma treated with CTLA-4 blockade. The possibility of activating tumor-reactive T cells while removing inhibitory activity with CTLA-4 blockade has stimulated interest in using anti–CTLA-4 antibodies in combination with other cancer immunotherapies to improve clinical outcomes. In this study, we assessed the antitumor activity and autoimmune toxicity of CTLA-4 blockade in combination with an immune-activating stimulus, interleukin (IL)-2, in patients with metastatic melanoma. Methods Thirty-six patients received anti–CTLA-4 antibody every 3 weeks. Three patients per cohort received doses of .1, .3, 1.0, and 2.0 mg/kg. Twenty-four patients received 3.0 mg/kg. All patients received IL-2 therapy (720,000 IU/kg every 8 hours to a maximum of 15 doses). Results Eight patients (22%) experienced objective tumor responses (three complete and five partial), including metastases in the lungs, lymph nodes, mediastinum, and subcutaneous tissues. Six of the eight patients have ongoing objective responses at 11 to 19 months. Five patients (14%) developed grade III/IV autoimmune toxicities secondary to anti–CTLA-4 administration, including four patients with enterocolitis and one with arthritis and uveitis. Conclusions There is not evidence to support a synergistic effect of CTLA-4 blockade plus IL-2 administration, because the 22% objective response rate is that expected from the sum of these two agents administered alone. Durable cancer regressions were seen in patients treated with this combination. PMID:16283570

  1. Phase II proof-of-concept study of pazopanib monotherapy in treatment-naive patients with stage I/II resectable non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Altorki, Nasser; Lane, Maureen E; Bauer, Thomas; Lee, Paul C; Guarino, Michael J; Pass, Harvey; Felip, Enriqueta; Peylan-Ramu, Nili; Gurpide, Alfonso; Grannis, Frederic W; Mitchell, John D; Tachdjian, Sabrina; Swann, R Suzanne; Huff, Anne; Roychowdhury, Debasish F; Reeves, Anthony; Ottesen, Lone H; Yankelevitz, David F

    2010-07-01

    Patients with early-stage, resectable, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are at risk for recurrent disease, and 5-year survival rates do not exceed 75%. Angiogenesis inhibitors have shown clinical activity in patients with late-stage NSCLC, raising the possibility that targeting the vascular endothelial growth factor pathway in earlier-stage disease may be beneficial. This proof-of-concept study examined safety and efficacy of short-term, preoperative pazopanib monotherapy in patients with operable stage I/II NSCLC. Patients scheduled for resection received oral pazopanib 800 mg/d for 2 to 6 weeks preoperatively. Tumor response was measured by high-resolution computed tomography, permitting estimation of change in tumor volume and diameter. Gene-expression profiling was performed on 77 pre- and post-treatment lung samples from 34 patients. Of 35 patients enrolled, 33 (94%) had clinical stage I NSCLC and two (6%) had clinical stage II NSCLC. Median treatment duration was 16 days (range, 3 to 29 days). Thirty patients (86%) achieved tumor-volume reduction after pazopanib treatment. Two patients achieved tumor-volume reduction > or = 50%, and three patients had partial response according to Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Pazopanib was generally well tolerated. The most common adverse events included grade 2 hypertension, diarrhea, and fatigue. One patient developed pulmonary embolism 11 days after surgery. Several pazopanib target genes and other angiogenic factors were dysregulated post-treatment. Short-duration pazopanib was generally well tolerated and demonstrated single-agent activity in patients with early-stage NSCLC. Several target genes were dysregulated after pazopanib treatment, validating target-specific response and indicating a persistent pazopanib effect on lung cancer tissue. Further clinical evaluation of pazopanib in NSCLC is planned.

  2. Phase I/II Study Evaluating Early Tolerance in Breast Cancer Patients Undergoing Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Treated With the MammoSite Balloon Breast Brachytherapy Catheter Using a 2-Day Dose Schedule

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, Michelle; Martinez, Alvaro; Mitchell, Christina; Chen, Peter Y.; Ghilezan, Mihai; Benitez, Pamela; Brown, Eric; Vicini, Frank

    2010-06-01

    Purpose: Initial Phase I/II results using balloon brachytherapy to deliver accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) in 2 days in patients with early-stage breast cancer are presented. Materials and Methods: Between March 2004 and August 2007, 45 patients received adjuvant radiation therapy after lumpectomy with balloon brachytherapy in a Phase I/II trial delivering 2800 cGy in four fractions of 700 cGy. Toxicities were evaluated using the National Cancer Institute Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v3.0 scale and cosmesis was documented at >=6 months. Results: The median age was 66 years (range, 48-83) and median skin spacing was 12 mm (range, 8-24). The median follow-up was 11.4 months (5.4-48 months) with 21 patients (47%) followed >=1 year, 11 (24%) >=2 years, and 7 (16%) >=3 years. At <6 months (n = 45), Grade II toxicity rates were 9% radiation dermatitis, 13% breast pain, 2% edema, and 2% hyperpigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 13% (n = 6). At >=6 months (n = 43), Grade II toxicity rates were: 2% radiation dermatitis, 2% induration, and 2% hypopigmentation. Grade III breast pain was reported in 2%. Infection was 13% (n = 6) at <6 months and 5% (n = 2) at >=6 months. Persistent seroma >=6 months was 30% (n = 13). Fat necrosis developed in 4 cases (2 symptomatic). Rib fractures were seen in 4% (n = 2). Cosmesis was good/excellent in 96% of cases. Conclusions: Treatment with balloon brachytherapy using a 2-day dose schedule resulted acceptable rates of Grade II/III chronic toxicity rates and similar cosmetic results observed with a standard 5-day accelerated partial breast irradiation schedule.

  3. Separation studies of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) by reversed-phase paper chromatographic technique

    SciTech Connect

    Raman, B.; Shinde, V.M.

    1987-07-01

    Reversed-phase paper chromatographic separations of As(III), Sb(III) and Bi(III) have been carried out on Whatman No 1 filter paper impregnated with triphenylphosphine oxide as stationary phase and using organic complexing agents such as sodium acetate, sodium succinate and sodium malonate solutions as active mobile phases. Results for the separation of binary and ternary mixtures are reported and the method has been successfully applied to the separation and detection of these elements present in real samples and at ppm level concentration.

  4. Phase I/II study of a combination of capecitabine, cisplatin, and intraperitoneal docetaxel (XP ID) in advanced gastric cancer patients with peritoneal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyungwoo; Ryu, Min-Hee; Kim, Kyu-Pyo; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Park, Sook Ryun; Kim, Bum Soo; Lee, In-Seob; Kim, Hee-Sung; Yoo, Moon-Won; Yook, Jeong Hwan; Oh, Seong Tae; Kim, Byung Sik; Kang, Yoon-Koo

    2017-03-16

    This study was conducted to determine the recommended dose (RD) of intraperitoneal docetaxel (ID) in combination with systemic capecitabine and cisplatin (XP) and to evaluate its efficacy and safety at the RD in advanced gastric cancer (AGC) patients with peritoneal metastasis. AGC patients with peritoneal metastasis received XP ID, which consists of 937.5 mg/m(2) of capecitabine twice daily on days 1-14, 60 mg/m(2) of intravenous cisplatin on day 1, and intraperitoneal docetaxel at 3 different dose levels (60, 80, or 100 mg/m(2)) on day 1, every 3 weeks. In the phase I study, the standard 3 + 3 method was used to determine the RD of XP ID. In the phase II study, patients received RD of XP ID. In the phase I study, ID 100 mg/m(2) was chosen as the RD, with one dose-limiting toxicity (ileus) out of six patients. The 39 AGC patients enrolled in the phase II study received the RD of XP ID. The median progression-free survival was 11.0 months (95% CI 6.9-15.1), and median overall survival was 15.1 months (95% CI 9.1-21.1). The most frequent grade 3/4 adverse events were neutropenia (38.6%) and abdominal pain (30.8%). The incidence of abdominal pain cumulatively increased in the later treatment cycles. Our study indicated that XP ID was effective, with manageable toxicities, in AGC patients with peritoneal metastasis. As the cumulative incidence of abdominal pain was probably related to bowel irritation by ID, it might be necessary to modify the dose.

  5. Everolimus Combined With Gefitinib in Patients with Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Phase I/II Results and Signaling Pathway Implications

    PubMed Central

    Rathkopf, Dana E.; Larson, Steven M.; Anand, Aseem; Morris, Michael J.; Slovin, Susan F.; Shaffer, David R.; Heller, Glenn; Carver, Brett; Rosen, Neal; Scher, Howard I.

    2015-01-01

    Background The effects of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibition are limited by feedback reactivation of receptor tyrosine kinase signaling in PTEN-null tumors, thus we tested the combination of mTOR inhibition (everolimus) and EGFR inhibition (gefitinib) in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Methods In phase I, 12 patients (10 CRPC, 2 glioblastoma) received daily gefitinib (250 mg) with weekly everolimus (30, 50, or 70 mg). In phase II, 27 CRPC patients received gefitinib with everolimus 70 mg. Results Phase I revealed no pharmacokinetic interactions and no dose-limiting toxicities. In phase II, 18 of 27 (67%) patients discontinued treatment before the 12-week evaluation due to progression as evidenced by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels (n=6) or imaging (n=5), or grade ≥2 toxicity (n=7). Thirteen of the total 37 (35%) CRPC patients exhibited a rapidly rising PSA after starting treatment which declined upon discontinuation. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography at 24 to 72 hours after starting treatment showed a decrease in standardized uptake value consistent with mTOR inhibition in 27 of 33 (82%) evaluable patients; there was a corresponding rise in PSA in 20 of these 27 patients (74%). Conclusions The combination of gefitinib and everolimus did not result in significant antitumor activity. The induction of PSA in tumors treated with mTOR inhibitors was consistent with preclinical data that PI3K pathway signaling feedback inhibits the androgen receptor (AR). This clinical evidence of relief of feedback inhibition promoting enhanced AR activity supports future studies combining PI3K pathway inhibitors and second-generation AR inhibitors in CRPC. PMID:26178426

  6. Effects of induction docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B nasopharyngeal cancer treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy: Final results of 2 parallel phase 2 clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lin; Zhang, Youwang; Hu, Chaosu; Guo, Ye; Lu, Jiade J

    2017-06-15

    The effects of docetaxel, platinum, and fluorouracil (TPF) induction chemotherapy plus concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) on locoregionally advanced nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) are unclear. This study examined the long-term outcomes of the addition of this regimen to CCRT for stage III and IVA/B NPC. Two parallel, single-arm phase 2 trials were performed synchronously to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of TPF-based induction chemotherapy in patients with stage III or IVA/B NPC. The induction chemotherapy, which preceded standard intensity-modulated radiation therapy/platinum-based chemoradiation, consisted of 3 cycles of docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), cisplatin (75 mg/m(2) on day 1), and a continuous infusion of fluorouracil (500 mg/m(2) /d on days 1-5) every 4 weeks. The primary endpoint for both trials was 5-year overall survival (OS). Between January 2007 and July 2010, 52 eligible patients with stage III NPC and 64 eligible patients with nonmetastatic stage IV NPC were accrued to the 2 trials. With a median follow-up of 67 months, the 5-year OS, progression-free survival, distant metastasis-free survival, and local progression-free survival (LPFS) rates were all improved in comparison with historical benchmarks for patients with stage III or IVA/IVB NPC. Multivariate analyses indicated that T and N classifications (T1/T2 vs T3/T4 and N3 vs N0-N2) were the only significant prognosticators for OS. The number of induction chemotherapy cycles was the only significant prognostic factor for predicting LPFS. TPF-based induction chemotherapy appears to significantly improve outcomes in comparison with historical data when it is administered before CCRT for locoregionally advanced NPC. A phase 3 trial is currently being performed to confirm this benefit. Cancer 2017;123:2258-2267. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Phase III: Where Do We Go From Here?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sutton, James H.

    Iowa has implemented educational reform by providing state financing without state mandates. This paper describes the achievements of Iowa's decentralized educational reform effort. Phase I of the reform effort provided salary relief to the beginning teacher, Phase II provided salary relief for the experienced teacher, and Phase III linked future…

  8. Patient-reported outcome results in patients with type 2 diabetes treated with once-weekly dulaglutide: data from the AWARD phase III clinical trial programme.

    PubMed

    Yu, M; Van Brunt, K; Varnado, O J; Boye, K S

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated patient-reported outcome (PRO) measures from the Assessment of Weekly AdministRation of LY2189265 (dulaglutide) in Diabetes (AWARD) clinical trial programme for dulaglutide (1.5 mg and 0.75 mg) in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D). The Impact of Weight on Self-Perception (IW-SP), Impact of Weight on Ability to Perform Physical Activities of Daily Living (APPADL), Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, EQ-5D, Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire (DTSQ), Diabetes Symptom Checklist-Revised and Adult Low Blood Sugar Survey were administered and analysed for changes from baseline in one or more AWARD studies. Significant within-group changes from baseline to the primary time point were observed for several PRO measures across all studies. Compared with insulin glargine, significantly greater improvements in the IW-SP score were observed with dulaglutide 1.5 mg and with both dulaglutide doses in the APPADL score. Both dulaglutide doses resulted in significantly greater improvement in DTSQ scores (all subscales) compared with exenatide. Dulaglutide 1.5 mg also resulted in significantly greater improvement on the DTSQ hyperglycaemia subscale compared with metformin. Overall, these PRO results suggest that dulaglutide is beneficial in the treatment of T2D.

  9. Phase I-II Trial of Concurrent Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin With Preoperative Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy in Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aristu, Jose Javier Arbea, Leire; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose Luis; Sola, Jesus Javier; Moreno, Marta M.D.; Azcona, Juan Diego; Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan Antonio; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus Miguel; Martinez-Monge, Rafael

    2008-07-01

    Purpose: To identify the maximal tolerated dose level of preoperative intensity-modulated radiotherapy combined with capecitabine and oxaliplatin and to evaluate the efficacy. Patients and Methods: Patients with rectal T3-T4 and/or N0-N+ rectal cancer received capecitabine 825 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily Monday through Friday and oxaliplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2} intravenously on Days 1, 8, and 15, concurrently with intensity-modulated radiotherapy. The radiation dose was increased in 5.0-Gy steps in cohorts of 3 patients starting from 37.5 Gy in 15 fractions (dose level [DL] 1). DL2 and DL3 were designed to reach 42.5 Gy in 17 fractions and 47.5 Gy in 19 fractions, respectively. Results: No dose-limiting toxicity was observed at DL1 or DL2. Of the 3 patients treated at DL3, 1 presented with Grade 3 diarrhea, which was considered a dose-limiting toxicity, and 3 additional patients were added. Of the 6 patients treated at DL3, no new dose-limiting toxicities were observed, and DL3 was identified as the recommended dose in this study. Eight additional patients were treated at 47.5 Gy. Grade 2 proctitis was the most frequent adverse event (40%); Grade 3 diarrhea occurred in 2 patients (10%). All patients underwent surgery, and 17 patients (85%) underwent R0 resection. Four patients (20%) presented with a histologic response of Grade 4, 11 (55%) with Grade 3+, 2 (15%) with Grade 3, and 2 patients (10%) with Grade 2. Conclusion: The maximal tolerated dose in this study was 47.5 Gy. The high rates of pathologic response of Grade 3+ and 4 must be confirmed through the accrual of new patients in the Phase II study.

  10. Phase I/II study of docetaxel combined with resminostat, an oral hydroxamic acid HDAC inhibitor, for advanced non-small cell lung cancer in patients previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tambo, Yuichi; Hosomi, Yukio; Sakai, Hiroshi; Nogami, Naoyuki; Atagi, Shinji; Sasaki, Yasutsuna; Kato, Terufumi; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Seto, Takashi; Maemondo, Makoto; Nokihara, Hiroshi; Koyama, Ryo; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Okamura, Yuta; Nakamura, Osamu; Nishio, Makoto; Tamura, Tomohide

    2017-04-01

    Objectives To determine the recommended dose and efficacy/safety of docetaxel combined with resminostat (DR) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients with previous platinum-based chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A multicenter, open-label, phase I/II study was performed in Japanese patients with stage IIIB/IV or recurrent NSCLC and prior platinum-based chemotherapy. The recommended phase II dose was determined using a standard 3 + 3 dose design in phase I part. Resminostat was escalated from 400 to 600 mg/day and docetaxel fixed at 75 mg/m(2). In phase II part, the patients were randomly assigned to docetaxel alone (75 mg/m(2)) or DR therapy. Docetaxel was administered on day 1 and resminostat on days 1-5 in the DR group. Treatment was repeated every 21 days until progression or unacceptable toxicity. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival (PFS). Results A total of 117 patients (phase I part, 9; phase II part, 108) were enrolled. There was no dose-limiting toxicity in phase I part; the recommended dose for resminostat was 600 mg/day with 75 mg/m(2) of docetaxel. In phase II part, median PFS (95% confidence interval [CI]) was 4.2 (2.8-5.7) months with docetaxel group and 4.1 (1.5-5.4) months with DR group (hazard ratio [HR]: 1.354, 95% CI: 0.835-2.195; p = 0.209). Grade ≥ 3 adverse events significantly more common with DR group than docetaxel group were leukopenia, febrile neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and anorexia. Conclusion In Japanese NSCLC patients previously treated with platinum-based chemotherapy, DR therapy did not improve PFS compared with docetaxel alone and increased toxicity.

  11. Sample exchange/evaluation (SEE) report - Phase III

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, W.I.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the results from Phase III of the Sample Exchange Evaluation (SEE) program. The SEE program is used to compare analytical laboratory performance on samples from the Hanford Site`s high level waste tanks.

  12. A Phase I/II Clinical Trial of Belinostat (PXD101) in Combination with Doxorubicin in Patients with Soft Tissue Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Robin L.; Rossen, Philip Blach; Lind-Hansen, Maja; Knoblauch, Poul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Belinostat is a novel histone deacetylase inhibitor. Primary Objectives. Maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and dose limiting toxicities (DLTs) of belinostat (Bel) in combination with doxorubicin (Dox) in solid tumours (phase I) and response rate (RR) in soft tissue sarcomas (phase II). Methods. Bel was administered as a 30-minute IV infusion on days 1–5 and on day 5 with Dox. The dose escalation schedule was as follows: cohort 1: Bel 600 mg/m2 and 50 mg/m2 Dox, cohort 2: Bel 600 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox, cohort 3: Bel 800 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox, and cohort 4: Bel 1000 mg/m2 and 75 mg/m2 Dox. Results. 41 patients were included (25 in phase I, 16 in phase II). Adverse events were fatigue (95%), nausea (76%), and alopecia (63%). There was one DLT, grade 3 rash/hand and foot syndrome. MTD was Bel 1000 mg/m2/d and Dox 75 mg/m2. Four responses were seen: 2 PR in phase I, RR of 8%; in phase II, 1 PR/1 CR, RR of 13%, and 9 patients (56%) with SD. Conclusion. The combination was well tolerated. Response rate was moderate but median time to progression was 6.0 months (95% CI, 1.6–9.7 months) which is superior to some reports of single-agent Dox. PMID:27403082

  13. Final report of the phase I/II clinical trial of the E75 (nelipepimut-S) vaccine with booster inoculations to prevent disease recurrence in high-risk breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Mittendorf, E. A.; Clifton, G. T.; Holmes, J. P.; Schneble, E.; van Echo, D.; Ponniah, S.; Peoples, G. E.

    2014-01-01

    Background E75 (nelipepimut-S) is a human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2/A3-restricted immunogenic peptide derived from the HER2 protein. We have conducted phase I/II clinical trials vaccinating breast cancer patients with nelipepimut-S and granulocyte–macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in the adjuvant setting to prevent disease recurrence. All patients have completed 60 months follow-up, and here, we report the final analyses. Patients and methods The studies were conducted as dose escalation/schedule optimization trials enrolling node-positive and high-risk node-negative patients with tumors expressing any degree of HER2 (immunohistochemistry 1–3+). HLA-A2/3+ patients were vaccinated; others were followed prospectively as controls. Local and systemic toxicity was monitored. Clinical recurrences were documented, and disease-free survival (DFS) was analyzed by Kaplan–Meier curves; groups were compared using log-rank tests. Results Of 195 enrolled patients, 187 were assessable: 108 (57.8%) in the vaccinated group (VG) and 79 (42.2%) in the control group (CG). The groups were well matched for clinicopathologic characteristics. Toxicities were minimal. Five-year DFS was 89.7% in the VG versus 80.2% in the CG (P = 0.08). Due to trial design, 65% of patients received less than the optimal vaccine dose. Five-year DFS was 94.6% in optimally dosed patients (P = 0.05 versus the CG) and 87.1% in suboptimally dosed patients. A voluntary booster program was initiated, and among the 21 patients that were optimally boosted, there was only one recurrence (DFS = 95.2%). Conclusion The E75 vaccine is safe and appears to have clinical efficacy. A phase III trial evaluating the optimal dose and including booster inoculations has been initiated. Clinical Trials NCT00841399, NCT00584789. PMID:24907636

  14. A phase I/II trial of hydroxychloroquine in conjunction with radiation therapy and concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma multiforme.

    PubMed

    Rosenfeld, Myrna R; Ye, Xiaobu; Supko, Jeffrey G; Desideri, Serena; Grossman, Stuart A; Brem, Steven; Mikkelson, Tom; Wang, Daniel; Chang, Yunyoung C; Hu, Janice; McAfee, Quentin; Fisher, Joy; Troxel, Andrea B; Piao, Shengfu; Heitjan, Daniel F; Tan, Kay-See; Pontiggia, Laura; O'Dwyer, Peter J; Davis, Lisa E; Amaravadi, Ravi K

    2014-08-01

    Preclinical studies indicate autophagy inhibition with hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) can augment the efficacy of DNA-damaging therapy. The primary objective of this trial was to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) and efficacy of HCQ in combination with radiation therapy (RT) and temozolomide (TMZ) for newly diagnosed glioblastoma (GB). A 3 + 3 phase I trial design followed by a noncomparative phase II study was conducted in GB patients after initial resection. Patients received HCQ (200 to 800 mg oral daily) with RT and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Quantitative electron microscopy and immunoblotting were used to assess changes in autophagic vacuoles (AVs) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Population pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling enabled PK-pharmacodynamic correlations. Sixteen phase I subjects were evaluable for dose-limiting toxicities. At 800 mg HCQ/d, 3/3 subjects experienced Grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and thrombocytopenia, 1 with sepsis. HCQ 600 mg/d was found to be the MTD in this combination. The phase II cohort (n = 76) had a median survival of 15.6 mos with survival rates at 12, 18, and 24 mo of 70%, 36%, and 25%. PK analysis indicated dose-proportional exposure for HCQ. Significant therapy-associated increases in AV and LC3-II were observed in PBMC and correlated with higher HCQ exposure. These data establish that autophagy inhibition is achievable with HCQ, but dose-limiting toxicity prevented escalation to higher doses of HCQ. At HCQ 600 mg/d, autophagy inhibition was not consistently achieved in patients treated with this regimen, and no significant improvement in overall survival was observed. Therefore, a definitive test of the role of autophagy inhibition in the adjuvant setting for glioma patients awaits the development of lower-toxicity compounds that can achieve more consistent inhibition of autophagy than HCQ.

  15. Prolonged survival in patients with breast cancer and a history of brain metastases: results of a preplanned subgroup analysis from the randomized phase III BEACON trial.

    PubMed

    Cortés, Javier; Rugo, Hope S; Awada, Ahmad; Twelves, Chris; Perez, Edith A; Im, Seock-Ah; Gómez-Pardo, Patricia; Schwartzberg, Lee S; Diéras, Veronique; Yardley, Denise A; Potter, David A; Mailliez, Audrey; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Zhao, Carol; Hoch, Ute; Tagliaferri, Mary; Hannah, Alison L; O'Shaughnessy, Joyce

    2017-09-01

    Conventional chemotherapy has limited activity in patients with breast cancer and brain metastases (BCBM). Etirinotecan pegol (EP), a novel long-acting topoisomerase-1 inhibitor, was designed using advanced polymer technology to preferentially accumulate in tumor tissue including brain metastases, providing sustained cytotoxic SN38 levels. The phase 3 BEACON trial enrolled 852 women with heavily pretreated locally recurrent or metastatic breast cancer between 2011 and 2013. BEACON compared EP with treatment of physician's choice (TPC; eribulin, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, nab-paclitaxel, paclitaxel, ixabepilone, or docetaxel) in patients previously treated with anthracycline, taxane, and capecitabine, including those with treated, stable brain metastases. The primary endpoint, overall survival (OS), was assessed in a pre-defined subgroup of BCBM patients; an exploratory post hoc analysis adjusting for the diagnosis-specific graded prognostic assessment (GPA) index was also conducted. In the trial, 67 BCBM patients were randomized (EP, n = 36; TPC, n = 31). Treatment subgroups were balanced for baseline characteristics and GPA indices. EP was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of death (HR 0.51; P < 0.01) versus TPC; median OS was 10.0 and 4.8 months, respectively. Improvement in OS was observed in both poorer and better GPA prognostic groups. Survival rates at 12 months were 44.4% for EP versus 19.4% for TPC. Consistent with the overall BEACON population, fewer patients on EP experienced grade ≥3 toxicity (50 vs. 70%). The significant improvement in survival in BCBM patients provides encouraging data for EP in this difficult-to-treat subgroup of patients. A phase three trial of EP in BCBM patients is underway (ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02915744).

  16. PLCO Ovarian Phase III Validation Study — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    Our preliminary data indicate that the performance of CA 125 as a screening test for ovarian cancer can be improved upon by additional biomarkers. With completion of one additional validation step, we will be ready to test the performance of a consensus marker panel in a phase III validation study. Given the original aims of the PLCO trial, we believe that the PLCO represents an ideal longitudinal cohort offering specimens for phase III validation of ovarian cancer biomarkers.

  17. Oxford phase III meniscal bearing fracture: case report.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hong-Chul; Shon, Won-Yong; Kim, Seung-Ju; Bae, Ji-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Meniscal bearing fracture is a rare complication of phase III Oxford unicompartmental knee replacement (UKR). We report a case of a meniscal bearing fracture that occurred 7 years after phase III Oxford medial UKR. The meniscal bearing showed uneven delamination of the polyethylene in the thinnest articular surface and an impingement lesion. This lesion initiated a fatigue crack that propagated to cause failure of the meniscal bearing. This is the first report of a meniscal bearing fracture without a posterior marker wire.

  18. Ramucirumab as second-line treatment in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma following first-line therapy with sorafenib: Patient-focused outcome results from the randomised phase III REACH study.

    PubMed

    Chau, Ian; Peck-Radosavljevic, Markus; Borg, Christophe; Malfertheiner, Peter; Seitz, Jean Francois; Park, Joon Oh; Ryoo, Baek-Yeol; Yen, Chia-Jui; Kudo, Masatoshi; Poon, Ronnie; Pastorelli, Davide; Blanc, Jean-Frederic; Chung, Hyun Cheol; Baron, Ari D; Okusaka, Takuji; Bowman, L; Cui, Zhanglin Lin; Girvan, Allicia C; Abada, Paolo B; Yang, Ling; Zhu, Andrew X

    2017-08-01

    To report patient-focused outcomes as measured by quality of life (QoL) and performance status (PS) in REACH, a phase III placebo-controlled randomised study, assessing ramucirumab in advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients who received prior sorafenib. Eligible patients had advanced HCC, Child-Pugh A, PS 0 or 1 and prior sorafenib. Patients received ramucirumab (8 mg/kg) or placebo (1:1) on day 1 of a 2-week cycle. QoL was assessed by FACT Hepatobiliary Symptom Index (FHSI)-8 and EuroQoL (EQ-5D) at baseline; cycles 4, 10, and 16; and end of treatment. PS was assessed at baseline, each cycle, and end of treatment. Deterioration in FHSI-8 was defined as a ≥3-point decrease from baseline and PS deterioration was defined as a change of ≥2. Both intention-to-treat and pre-specified subgroup of patients with baseline serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) ≥400 ng/mL were assessed. There were 565 patients randomised to ramucirumab and placebo. Compliance with FHSI and EQ-5D was high and similar between groups. In the ITT population, deterioration in FHSI-8, EQ-5D, and PS was similar between ramucirumab and placebo. In patients with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL, ramucirumab significantly reduced deterioration in FHSI-8 at the end of treatment compared with placebo (P = 0.0381), and there was a trend towards a delay in the deterioration of symptoms in FHSI-8 (HR 0.690; P = 0.054) and PS (HR 0.642; P = 0.057) in favour of ramucirumab. We report one of the most comprehensive data sets of QoL and symptom burden in patients undergoing systemic therapy for advanced HCC. Ramucirumab was associated with no worsening of QoL. In patients with baseline AFP ≥400 ng/mL, the significant survival benefit observed in patients treated with ramucirumab was coupled with a trend in patient-focused outcome benefits. NCT01140347. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neoadjuvant 5-FU or Capecitabine Plus Radiation With or Without Oxaliplatin in Rectal Cancer Patients: A Phase III Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yothers, Greg; O’Connell, Michael J.; Beart, Robert W.; Wozniak, Timothy F.; Pitot, Henry C.; Shields, Anthony F.; Landry, Jerome C.; Ryan, David P.; Arora, Amit; Evans, Lisa S.; Bahary, Nathan; Soori, Gamini; Eakle, Janice F.; Robertson, John M.; Moore, Dennis F.; Mullane, Michael R.; Marchello, Benjamin T.; Ward, Patrick J.; Sharif, Saima; Roh, Mark S.; Wolmark, Norman

    2015-01-01

    Background: National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project R-04 was designed to determine whether the oral fluoropyrimidine capecitabine could be substituted for continuous infusion 5-FU in the curative setting of stage II/III rectal cancer during neoadjuvant radiation therapy and whether the addition of oxaliplatin could further enhance the activity of fluoropyrimidine-sensitized radiation. Methods: Patients with clinical stage II or III rectal cancer undergoing preoperative radiation were randomly assigned to one of four chemotherapy regimens in a 2x2 design: CVI 5-FU or oral capecitabine with or without oxaliplatin. The primary endpoint was local-regional tumor control. Time-to-event endpoint distributions were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Hazard ratios were estimated from Cox proportional hazard models. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: Among 1608 randomized patients there were no statistically significant differences between regimens using 5-FU vs capecitabine in three-year local-regional tumor event rates (11.2% vs 11.8%), 5-year DFS (66.4% vs 67.7%), or 5-year OS (79.9% vs 80.8%); or for oxaliplatin vs no oxaliplatin for the three endpoints of local-regional events, DFS, and OS (11.2% vs 12.1%, 69.2% vs 64.2%, and 81.3% vs 79.0%). The addition of oxaliplatin was associated with statistically significantly more overall and grade 3–4 diarrhea (P < .0001). Three-year rates of local-regional recurrence among patients who underwent R0 resection ranged from 3.1 to 5.1% depending on the study arm. Conclusions: Continuous infusion 5-FU produced outcomes for local-regional control, DFS, and OS similar to those obtained with oral capecitabine combined with radiation. This study establishes capecitabine as a standard of care in the pre-operative rectal setting. Oxaliplatin did not improve the local-regional failure rate, DFS, or OS for any patient risk group but did add considerable toxicity. PMID:26374429

  20. Central State University: Phase III Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio Board of Regents, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This document is the final report on Central State University's implementation of Section 371 of Ohio Amended Substitute House Bill 153. Implementation of Phase I action items required that deliverables and timelines be shifted to give Central State the best opportunity for early success. In Phase II, Central State responded aggressively to a…

  1. Assessing the Eligibility Criteria in Phase III Randomized Controlled Trials of Drug Therapy in Heart Failure With Preserved Ejection Fraction: The Critical Play-Off Between a "Pure" Patient Phenotype and the Generalizability of Trial Findings.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hitesh C; Hayward, Carl; Dungu, Jason N; Papadopoulou, Sofia; Saidmeerasah, Abdel; Ray, Robin; Di Mario, Carlo; Shanmugam, Nesan; Cowie, Martin R; Anderson, Lisa J

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the effect of the different eligibility criteria used by phase III clinical studies in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF) on patient selection, phenotype, and survival. We applied the key eligibility criteria of 7 phase III HFpEF studies (Digitalis Investigation Group Ancillary, Candesartan in Patients With Chronic Heart Failure and Preserved Left-Ventricular Ejection Fraction, Perindopril in Elderly People With Chronic Heart Failure, Irbesartan in Heart Failure With Preserved Systolic Function, Japanese Diastolic Heart Failure, Treatment of Preserved Cardiac Function Heart Failure With an Aldosterone Antagonist, and Efficacy and Safety of LCZ696 Compared to Valsartan, on Morbidity and Mortality in Heart Failure Patients With Preserved Ejection Fraction [PARAGON-HF; ongoing]) to a typical and well-characterized HFpEF population (n = 557) seen in modern European cardiological practice. Follow-up was available for a minimum of 24 months in each patient. Increasing the number of study eligibility criteria identifies a progressively smaller group of patients from real-life practice suitable for recruitment into clinical trials; using the J-DHF criteria, 81% of our clinic patients would have been eligible, whereas the PARAGON-HF criteria significantly reduced this proportion to 32%. The patients identified from our clinical population had similar mortality rates using the different criteria, which were consistently higher than those reported in the actual clinic trials. Trial eligibility criteria have become stricter with time, which reduces the number of eligible patients, affecting both generalizability of any findings and feasibility of completing an adequately powered trial. We could not find evidence that the additional criteria used in more recent randomized trials in HFpEF have identified patients at higher risk of all-cause mortality. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Therapeutic vaccination with an interleukin-2-interferon-gamma-secreting allogeneic tumor vaccine in patients with progressive castration-resistant prostate cancer: a phase I/II trial.

    PubMed

    Brill, Thomas H; Kübler, Hubert R; Pohla, Heike; Buchner, Alexander; Fend, Falko; Schuster, Tibor; van Randenborgh, Heiner; Paul, Roger; Kummer, Tania; Plank, Christian; Eisele, Bernd; Breul, Jürgen; Hartung, Rudolf; Schendel, Dolores J; Gansbacher, Bernd

    2009-12-01

    Immunotherapy with whole cell cancer vaccines has been tested in various tumor types. This study investigated the safety profile and antitumor activity of an allogeneic prostate carcinoma cell line, LNCaP, expressing recombinant human interleukin-2 and human interferon-gamma. Thirty HLA-A*0201-matched patients with progressive, castration-resistant prostate cancer received four intradermal injections on days 1, 15, 29, and 92, and then every 90 days, as long as no tumor progression occurred. Three patients received a dose level of 7.5 million cells, and 27 patients received 15 million cells per injection. The primary study criteria were safety and the difference in prostate-specific antigen doubling time (PSA-DT), determined in the pretreatment phase (before the start of vaccination) and in the trial treatment phase (during vaccination). No dose-limiting or autoimmune toxicity was seen. During vaccination there was a significant prolongation of the PSA-DT compared with the prevaccination period (prolongation from 63 to 114 days; p < 0.01; intention to treat). In addition, results showed a period of PSA stabilization of at least 12 weeks, together with stable bone scans in 12 of 30 patients, and 3 patients sustained a >50% decrease in PSA versus baseline. The median overall survival time from first vaccination was 32 months (mean value, 34 months). Immune monitoring revealed T cell stimulation in the majority of patients. This vaccine strategy was found to be safe and well tolerated and was accompanied by prolongation of PSA-DT. The results of this trial warrant clinical development of this vaccine.

  3. Randomized Phase III Study Comparing Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/ Gemcitabine and Gemcitabine/Cisplatin in Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Urothelial Cancer Without Prior Systemic Therapy: EORTC Intergroup Study 30987

    PubMed Central

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; von der Maase, Hans; Mead, Graham M.; Skoneczna, Iwona; De Santis, Maria; Daugaard, Gedske; Boehle, Andreas; Chevreau, Christine; Paz-Ares, Luis; Laufman, Leslie R.; Winquist, Eric; Raghavan, Derek; Marreaud, Sandrine; Collette, Sandra; Sylvester, Richard; de Wit, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The combination of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) is a standard regimen in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial cancer. A phase I/II study suggested that a three-drug regimen that included paclitaxel had greater antitumor activity and might improve survival. Patients and Methods We conducted a randomized phase III study to compare paclitaxel/cisplatin/gemcitabine (PCG) with GC in patients with locally advanced or metastatic urothelial carcinoma. Primary outcome was overall survival (OS). Secondary outcomes were progression-free survival (PFS), overall response rate, and toxicity. Results From 2001 to 2004, 626 patients were randomly assigned; 312 patients were assigned to PCG, and 314 patients were assigned to GC. After a median follow-up of 4.6 years, the median OS was 15.8 months on PCG versus 12.7 months on GC (hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; P = .075). OS in the subgroup of all eligible patients was significantly longer on PCG (3.2 months; HR, 0.82; P = .03), as was the case in patients with bladder primary tumors. PFS was not significantly longer on PCG (HR, 0.87; P = .11). Overall response rate was 55.5% on PCG and 43.6% on GC (P = .0031). Both treatments were well tolerated, with more thrombocytopenia and bleeding on GC than PCG (11.4% v 6.8%, respectively; P = .05) and more febrile neutropenia on PCG than GC (13.2% v 4.3%, respectively; P < .001). Conclusion The addition of paclitaxel to GC provides a higher response rate and a 3.1-month survival benefit that did not reach statistical significance. Novel approaches will be required to obtain major improvements in survival of incurable urothelial cancer. PMID:22370319

  4. Interim analysis of a phase II trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) as adjuvant therapy in Japanese patients with operated stage III colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Danno, Katsuki; Hata, Taishi; Tamai, Koki; Fujie, Yujiro; Ide, Yoshihito; Kim, Ho Min; Ohnishi, Tadashi; Morita, Shunji; Yoshioka, Shinichi; Kudo, Toshihiro; Nishimura, Junichi; Matsuda, Chu; Akamatsu, Hiroki; Mizushima, Tsunekazu; Nezu, Riichiro; Doki, Yuichiro; Mori, Masaki

    2017-08-19

    Adjuvant oxaliplatin plus oral capecitabine (XELOX) is recommended for patients with curatively resected colon cancer. However, its safety and tolerability in Asian patients is unclear; therefore, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of adjuvant XELOX in Japanese patients with curatively resected stage III colon cancer (MCSCO-1024) and present the interim safety data. This prospective, multi-center, open-label, single-arm phase II study recruited patients with curatively resected stage III colon cancer. The protocol was a 120-min intravenous infusion of oxaliplatin (130 mg/m(2)) on day 1 and oral capecitabine (2000 mg/m(2)/day) in two divided doses for 14 days of a 3-week cycle, for a total of eight cycles (24 weeks). The primary endpoint was the 3-year disease-free survival, and secondary endpoints were the treatment completion rate, safety profile (rate and severity of adverse events), and correlation of adverse events, such as peripheral sensory neuropathy (PSN), with the administration period of oxaliplatin, etc. From November 2011 to August 2014 (34 months), 196 patients were enrolled. Safety was analyzed in 190 patients. The median total doses of capecitabine and oxaliplatin were 215,586.9 and 777.2 mg/m(2), respectively, while the median relative dose intensities were 82.5 and 76.0%, respectively. The overall treatment completion rate was 73.7%. The most frequent treatment-related adverse event was PSN (88.4%), while the most frequent grade ≥3 treatment-related adverse events were neutropenia (12.6%), PSN (6.3%), diarrhea (4.2%), and thrombocytopenia (4.2%). There were no treatment-related deaths. Adjuvant XELOX is tolerable for Japanese patients with Stage III colon cancer.

  5. Efficacy and safety of teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 24-week multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Hong, S; Park, C-Y; Han, K A; Chung, C H; Ku, B J; Jang, H C; Ahn, C W; Lee, M-K; Moon, M K; Son, H S; Lee, C B; Cho, Y-W; Park, S-W

    2016-05-01

    We assessed the 24-week efficacy and safety of teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitor, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that was inadequately controlled with diet and exercise. The present study was designed as a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group, phase III study. Patients (n = 142) were randomized 2 : 1 into two different treatment groups as follows: 99 received teneligliptin (20 mg) and 43 received placebo. The primary endpoint was change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level from baseline to week 24. Teneligliptin significantly reduced the HbA1c level from baseline compared with placebo after 24 weeks. At week 24, the differences between changes in HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FBG) in the teneligliptin and placebo groups were -0.94% [least-squares (LS) mean -1.22, -0.65] and -1.21 mmol/l (-1.72, -0.70), respectively (all p < 0.001). The incidence of hypoglycaemia and adverse events were not significantly different between the two groups. This phase III, randomized, placebo-controlled study provides evidence of the safety and efficacy of 24 weeks of treatment with teneligliptin as a monotherapy in Korean patients with T2DM.

  6. Efficacy and safety of teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitor, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: a 24‐week multicentre, randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled phase III trial

    PubMed Central

    Hong, S.; Park, C.‐Y.; Han, K. A.; Chung, C. H.; Ku, B. J.; Jang, H. C.; Ahn, C. W.; Lee, M.‐K.; Moon, M. K.; Son, H. S.; Lee, C. B.; Cho, Y.‐W.

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the 24‐week efficacy and safety of teneligliptin, a novel dipeptidyl peptidase‐4 inhibitor, in Korean patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) that was inadequately controlled with diet and exercise. The present study was designed as a multicentre, randomized, double‐blind, placebo‐controlled, parallel‐group, phase III study. Patients (n = 142) were randomized 2 : 1 into two different treatment groups as follows: 99 received teneligliptin (20 mg) and 43 received placebo. The primary endpoint was change in glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level from baseline to week 24. Teneligliptin significantly reduced the HbA1c level from baseline compared with placebo after 24 weeks. At week 24, the differences between changes in HbA1c and fasting plasma glucose (FBG) in the teneligliptin and placebo groups were −0.94% [least‐squares (LS) mean −1.22, −0.65] and −1.21 mmol/l (−1.72, −0.70), respectively (all p < 0.001). The incidence of hypoglycaemia and adverse events were not significantly different between the two groups. This phase III, randomized, placebo‐controlled study provides evidence of the safety and efficacy of 24 weeks of treatment with teneligliptin as a monotherapy in Korean patients with T2DM. PMID:26749529

  7. Phase I/II Trial of Labetuzumab Govitecan (Anti-CEACAM5/SN-38 Antibody-Drug Conjugate) in Patients With Refractory or Relapsing Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Dotan, Efrat; Cohen, Steven J; Starodub, Alexander N; Lieu, Christopher H; Messersmith, Wells A; Simpson, Pamela S; Guarino, Michael J; Marshall, John L; Goldberg, Richard M; Hecht, J Randolph; Wegener, William A; Sharkey, Robert M; Govindan, Serengulam V; Goldenberg, David M; Berlin, Jordan D

    2017-10-10

    Purpose The objectives were to evaluate dosing schedules of labetuzumab govitecan, an antibody-drug conjugate targeting carcinoembryonic antigen-related cell adhesion molecule 5 (CEACAM5) for tumor delivery of 7-ethyl-10-hydroxycamptothecin (SN-38), in an expanded phase II trial of patients with relapsed or refractory metastatic colorectal cancer. Patients and Methods Eligible patients with at least one prior irinotecan-containing therapy received labetuzumab govitecan once weekly at 8 and 10 mg/kg, or two times per week at 4 and 6 mg/km on weeks 1 and 2 of 3-week repeated cycles. End points were safety, response, pharmacokinetics, and immunogenicity. Results Eighty-six patients who had undergone a median of five prior therapies (range, one to 13) were each enrolled into one of the four cohorts. On the basis of Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors 1.1, 38% of these patients had a tumor as well as plasma carcinoembryonic antigen reduction from baseline after labetuzumab govitecan treatment; one patient achieved a partial response with a sustained response spanning > 2 years, whereas 42 patients had stable disease as the best overall response. Median progression-free survival and overall survival were 3.6 and 6.9 months, respectively. The major toxicities (grade ≥ 3) among all cohorts were neutropenia (16%), leukopenia (11%), anemia (9%), and diarrhea (7%). The antibody-drug conjugate's mean half-life was 16.5 hours for the four cohorts. Anti-drug/anti-antibody antibodies were not detected. The two once-weekly dose schedules, showing comparable toxicity and efficacy, were chosen for further study. Conclusion Monotherapy with labetuzumab govitecan demonstrated a manageable safety profile and therapeutic activity in heavily pretreated patients with metastatic colorectal cancer, all with prior irinotecan therapy. Further studies of labetuzumab govitecan treatment alone or in combination with other therapies in earlier settings are indicated.

  8. Sample size planning for phase II trials based on success probabilities for phase III.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Schüler, Armin; Kirchner, Marietta; Kieser, Meinhard

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, high failure rates in phase III trials were observed. One of the main reasons is overoptimistic assumptions for the planning of phase III resulting from limited phase II information and/or unawareness of realistic success probabilities. We present an approach for planning a phase II trial in a time-to-event setting that considers the whole phase II/III clinical development programme. We derive stopping boundaries after phase II that minimise the number of events under side conditions for the conditional probabilities of correct go/no-go decision after phase II as well as the conditional success probabilities for phase III. In addition, we give general recommendations for the choice of phase II sample size. Our simulations show that unconditional probabilities of go/no-go decision as well as the unconditional success probabilities for phase III are influenced by the number of events observed in phase II. However, choosing more than 150 events in phase II seems not necessary as the impact on these probabilities then becomes quite small. We recommend considering aspects like the number of compounds in phase II and the resources available when determining the sample size. The lower the number of compounds and the lower the resources are for phase III, the higher the investment for phase II should be.

  9. A phase II, randomized, single-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial on the efficacy of Curcumina and Calendula suppositories for the treatment of patients with chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III.

    PubMed

    Morgia, Giuseppe; Russo, Giorgio Ivan; Urzì, Daniele; Privitera, Salvatore; Castelli, Tommaso; Favilla, Vincenzo; Cimino, Sebastiano

    2017-06-30

    The management of chronic prostatitis/ chronic pelvic pain syndrome type III (CP/CPPS) has been always considered complex due to several biopsychological factors underling the disease. In this clinical study, we aimed to evaluate the efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula extract in patients with CP/CPPS III. From June 2015 to January 2016 we enrolled 60 consecutive patients affected by CP/CPPS III in our institution. Patients between 20 and 50 year of age with symptoms of pelvic pain for 3 months or more before study, a total National Institutes of Health Chronic Prostatitis Symptom Index (NIH-CPSI) score ≥ 15 point and diagnosed with NIH category III. Patients were then allocated to receive placebo (Group A) or treatment (Group B). Treatment consisted of rectal suppositories of Curcumin extract 350 mg (95%) and Calendula extract 80 mg (1 suppository/die for 1 month). Patients of Group B received 1 suppository/die for 1 month of placebo. The primary endpoint of the study was the reduction of NIH-CPSI. The secondary outcomes were the change of peak flow, IIEF-5, VAS score and of premature ejaculation diagnostic tool (PEDT). A total of 48 patients concluded the study protocol. The median age of the all cohort was 32.0 years, the median NIH-CPSI was 20.5, the median IIEF-5 was 18.5, the median PEDT was 11.0, the median VAS score was 7.5 and the median peak flow was 14.0. After 3 months of therapy in group A we observed a significant improvement of NIH-CPSI (-5.5; p < 0.01), IIEF-5 (+ 3.5; p < 0.01), PEDT (-6.5; p < 0.01), peak flow (+2.8; p < 0.01) and VAS (-6.5; p < 0.01) with significant differences over placebo group (all p-value significant). In this phase II clinical trial we showed the clinical efficacy of the treatment with Curcumin and Calendula in patients with CP/CPPS III. The benefits of this treatment could be related to the reduction of inflammatory cytokines and of inflammatory cells. These results should be confirmed in

  10. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with sustained volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics: a phase III open-label study.

    PubMed

    Fukunami, Masatake; Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru

    2011-12-01

    Volume overload is a common complication associated with heart failure (HF) and is recommended to be treated with loop or thiazide diuretics. However, use of diuretics can cause serum electrolyte imbalances and diuretic resistance. Tolvaptan, a selective, oral, non-peptide vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist, offers a new option for treating volume overload in HF patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in Japanese HF patients with volume overload. Fifty-one HF patients with volume overload, despite using conventional diuretics, were treated with 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 days. If the response was insufficient at Day 7, tolvaptan was continued for a further 7 days at either 15 mg/day or 30 mg/day. Outcomes included changes in body weight, symptoms and safety parameters. Thirty-six patients discontinued treatment within 7 days, therefore 15 patients entered the second phase of treatment. In two patients, tolvaptan was increased to 30 mg/day after 7 days. Body weight was reduced on Day 7 (-1.95 ± 1.98 kg; n = 41) and Day 14 (-2.35 ± 1.44 kg; n = 11, 15 mg/day). Symptoms of volume overload, including lower limb edema, pulmonary congestion, jugular venous distention and hepatomegaly, were improved by tolvaptan treatment for 7 or 14 days. Neither tolvaptan increased the incidence of severe or serious adverse events when administered for 7-14 days. This study confirms the efficacy and safety of 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7-14 days in Japanese HF patients with volume overload despite conventional diuretics.

  11. Safety, pharmacokinetics, and antiretroviral activity of the potent, specific human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitor nelfinavir: results of a phase I/II trial and extended follow-up in patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Moyle, G J; Youle, M; Higgs, C; Monaghan, J; Prince, W; Chapman, S; Clendeninn, N; Nelson, M R

    1998-08-01

    The safety, antiretroviral activity, and pharmacokinetic profile of nelfinavir, a potent and specific inhibitor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease, were assessed in a small open-label phase I/II dose-ranging study in protease inhibitor-naive HIV-positive men. A total of 22 patients with baseline plasma HIV RNA > or = 20,000 copies/mL and CD4+ counts between 200 and 500 cells/mm3 were enrolled in the study. Of the 22 patients, 20 were evaluated for activity; 10 patients assigned to 771 mg/day base equivalent (300 mg three times daily) and 10 patients assigned to 1,026 mg/day base equivalent (600 mg twice daily) given monotherapy. A capsule formulation of nelfinavir was used. The initial study period was 28 days; patients showing a virologic response of 1 log10 reduction were eligible for enrollment in an extension phase and addition of nucleoside analogues. A maximally tolerated dose of nelfinavir was not established. A dose-response relationship was observed for four (40%) patients in the 771-mg group and six (60%) patients in the 1,026-mg group experiencing a reduction from baseline in plasma HIV RNA of at lest 1 log during the 28-day study. Of these patients, five sustained the reduction in plasma HIV RNA beyond day 28 (2 patients receiving 771 mg/day and 3 patients receiving 1,026 mg/day). Median increases from baseline in CD4+ counts at day 28 were 216 cell/mm3 and 86 cell/mm3 in the 771-mg and 1,026-mg groups, respectively. After oral administration, median nelfinavir plasma concentrations on day 28 reached a maximum at 1 hour (2,966 ng/mL) in the 771-mg group and at 3 hours (3,157 ng/mL) in the 1,026-mg group. Data for 22 patients were included in the safety analysis; 12 patients (55%) reported at least one grade 2 or worse (moderate, severe, or very severe) adverse event. The most common grade 2 or worse adverse event was diarrhea, reported by two patients (20%) receiving 771 mg/day and seven patients (70%) receiving 1,026 mg/day; followed by

  12. Best supportive care (BSC) versus oxaliplatin, folinic acid and 5-fluorouracil (OFF) plus BSC in patients for second-line advanced pancreatic cancer: a phase III-study from the German CONKO-study group.

    PubMed

    Pelzer, Uwe; Schwaner, Ingo; Stieler, Jens; Adler, Mathias; Seraphin, Jörg; Dörken, Bernd; Riess, Hanno; Oettle, Helmut

    2011-07-01

    Gemcitabine usually given until progressive disease (PD) is the main first-line treatment option for patients with inoperable advanced pancreatic cancer (APC). Currently there is no accepted active regimen for second-line chemotherapy. Previous phase II studies suggest clinical relevant activity of oxaliplatin, folinic acid and 5-FU (OFF). We initiated a phase III multicentre study comparing OFF versus best supportive care (BSC) in patients with APC progressing while on gemcitabine therapy. In this open randomized study, patients with CT and/or MRI confirmed progressive disease while on gemcitabine therapy were randomized 1:1 to OFF or BSC. Stratification included duration of first-line therapy (<3, 3 to 6 and >6 months), performance status (KPS 70-80%; 90-100%) and tumour stage (M1/M0). OFF consisted of folinic acid 200mg/m(2) followed by 5-fluorouracil 2g/m(2) (24h) on d1, d8, d15, d22 and oxaliplatin 85 mg/m(2) on days 8 and 22. After a rest of 3 weeks the next cycle was started on d43. A total of 165 patients were calculated to demonstrate a doubling of survival time after progression on first-line therapy. After inclusion of forty six patients the trial was terminated according to predefined protocol regulations due to insufficient accrual (lack of acceptance of BSC by patients and physicians. Patient characteristics were well balanced between both study arms. The OFF regimen was well tolerated with more patients with grade I/II paraesthesia and grade II/III nausea/emesis and diarrhoea. Median second-line survival was 4.82 [95% Confidence Interval; 4.29-5.35] months for OFF treatment and 2.30 [95% CI; 1.76-2.83] months with BSC alone (0.45 [95% CI: 0.24-0.83], p = 0.008). Median overall survival for the sequence GEM-OFF was 9.09 [95% CI: 6.97-11.21] and 7.90 [95% CI: 4.95-10.84] months for GEM-BSC (0.50 [95% CI: 0.27-0.95], p = 0.031) respectively. Although stopped prematurely, this randomized trial provides at first time evidence for the benefit of second

  13. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) protocol: a prospective, randomized controlled phase II/III clinical trial of rivaroxaban versus warfarin in patients with thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome, with or without SLE.

    PubMed

    Cohen, H; Doré, C J; Clawson, S; Hunt, B J; Isenberg, D; Khamashta, M; Muirhead, N

    2015-09-01

    The current mainstay of the treatment of thrombotic antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is long-term anticoagulation with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) such as warfarin. Non-VKA oral anticoagulants (NOACs), which include rivaroxaban, have been shown to be effective and safe compared with warfarin for the treatment of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in major phase III prospective, randomized controlled trials (RCTs), but the results may not be directly generalizable to patients with APS. The primary aim is to demonstrate, in patients with APS and previous VTE, with or without systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), that the intensity of anticoagulation achieved with rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin. Secondary aims are to compare rates of recurrent thrombosis, bleeding and the quality of life in patients on rivaroxaban with those on warfarin. Rivaroxaban in antiphospholipid syndrome (RAPS) is a phase II/III prospective non-inferiority RCT in which eligible patients with APS, with or without SLE, who are on warfarin, target international normalized ratio (INR) 2.5 for previous VTE, will be randomized either to continue warfarin (standard of care) or to switch to rivaroxaban. Intensity of anticoagulation will be assessed using thrombin generation (TG) testing, with the primary outcome the percentage change in endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) from randomization to day 42. Other TG parameters, markers of in vivo coagulation activation, prothrombin fragment 1.2, thrombin antithrombin complex and D-dimer, will also be assessed. If RAPS demonstrates i) that the anticoagulant effect of rivaroxaban is not inferior to that of warfarin and ii) the absence of any adverse effects that cause concern with regard to the use of rivaroxaban, this would provide sufficient supporting evidence to make rivaroxaban a standard of care for the treatment of APS patients with previous VTE, requiring a target INR of 2.5. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. Two-phase titration of cerium(III) by permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarev, A.I.; Lazareva, V.I.; Gerko, V.V.

    1987-02-01

    This paper presents a method for the two-phase titrimetric determination of cerium(III) with permanganate which does not require an expenditure of sugar and preliminary removal of chlorides and nitrates. The interaction of cerium(III) with permanganate at room temperature was studied as a function of the pH, the concentration of pyrophosphate, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), permanganate, and extraneous compounds, the rate of titration, and the time of stay of the solution in air before titration. The investigations were conducted according to the following methodology: water, solution of cerium(III) pyrophosphate, and TPP were introduced into an Erlenmeyer flask with a side branch near the bottom for clearer observation of the color of the chloroform phase. The authors established the given pH value, poured the water into a volume of 50 ml, and added chloroform. The result was titrated with permanganate solutions of various concentrations until a violet color appeared in the chloroform phase.

  15. Biweekly Carboplatin Plus Gemcitabine as First-Line Treatment of Elderly Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small-cell Lung Cancer: A Multicenter Phase I-II Trial by the Hellenic Oncology Research Group.

    PubMed

    Karampeazis, Athanasios; Vamvakas, Lambros; Kentepozidis, Nikolaos; Polyzos, Aris; Chandrinos, Vassilis; Rigas, Georgios; Christofyllakis, Charalambos; Kotsakis, Athanasios; Hatzidaki, Dora; Pallis, Athanasios G; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-11-01

    The present study was a phase I/II study to determine the maximum tolerated doses (MTDs) and dose-limiting toxicities of the biweekly carboplatin/gemcitabine combination and evaluate its safety and efficacy in patients aged ≥ 70 years with advanced squamous non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients aged ≥ 70 years with advanced or metastatic squamous NSCLC received escalated doses of carboplatin (area under the curve [AUC] 2-2.5 intravenously) and gemcitabine (800-1100 mg/m(2) intravenously) every 2 weeks (phase I). In the phase II, the drugs were administered at their previously defined MTDs (carboplatin, AUC 2.5; gemcitabine, 1100 mg/m(2)). The primary endpoint was the overall response rate. A total of 69 patients were enrolled (phase I, n = 15). The median age was 76 years (range, 70-84 years); 52 patients had stage IV disease, and 61 and 8 patients had Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 to 1 and 2, respectively. The MTDs could not be reached at the predefined last dose levels. The dose-limiting toxicities were grade 5 renal toxicity and grade 3 thrombocytopenia. In the phase II study, the overall response rate was 35.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 23.0%-48.8%). In the intention-to-treat analysis, the median progression-free survival was 6.7 months (95% CI, 4.2-8.8 months), and the median overall survival was 13.3 months (95% CI, 7.1-19.6 months). Grade 3 or 4 neutropenia was observed in 7 patients (12.3%), grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia in 4 patients (7.1%), and grade 2 or 3 fatigue in 10 patients (17.5%). One toxic death occurred in the phase I of the study. The biweekly regimen of gemcitabine and carboplatin showed satisfactory efficacy and a favorable toxicity profile in elderly patients with advanced or metastatic squamous cell NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chiorean, E. G.; Von Hoff, D. D.; Reni, M.; Arena, F. P.; Infante, J. R.; Bathini, V. G.; Wood, T. E.; Mainwaring, P. N.; Muldoon, R. T.; Clingan, P. R.; Kunzmann, V.; Ramanathan, R. K.; Tabernero, J.; Goldstein, D.; McGovern, D.; Lu, B.; Ko, A.

    2016-01-01

    Background A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. Patients and methods Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. Results Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. Conclusion This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8. PMID:26802160

  17. Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label, Phase III Trial of Decitabine Versus Patient Choice, With Physician Advice, of Either Supportive Care or Low-Dose Cytarabine for the Treatment of Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kantarjian, Hagop M.; Thomas, Xavier G.; Dmoszynska, Anna; Wierzbowska, Agnieszka; Mazur, Grzegorz; Mayer, Jiri; Gau, Jyh-Pyng; Chou, Wen-Chien; Buckstein, Rena; Cermak, Jaroslav; Kuo, Ching-Yuan; Oriol, Albert; Ravandi, Farhad; Faderl, Stefan; Delaunay, Jacques; Lysák, Daniel; Minden, Mark; Arthur, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III trial compared the efficacy and safety of decitabine with treatment choice (TC) in older patients with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and poor- or intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Patients and Methods Patients (N = 485) age ≥ 65 years were randomly assigned 1:1 to receive decitabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a 1-hour intravenous infusion for five consecutive days every 4 weeks or TC (supportive care or cytarabine 20 mg/m2 per day as a subcutaneous injection for 10 consecutive days every 4 weeks). The primary end point was overall survival (OS); the secondary end point was the complete remission (CR) rate plus the CR rate without platelet recovery (CRp). Adverse events (AEs) were recorded. Results The primary analysis with 396 deaths (81.6%) showed a nonsignificant increase in median OS with decitabine (7.7 months; 95% CI, 6.2 to 9.2) versus TC (5.0 months; 95% CI, 4.3 to 6.3; P = .108; hazard ratio [HR], 0.85; 95% CI, 0.69 to 1.04). An unplanned analysis with 446 deaths (92%) indicated the same median OS (HR, 0.82; 95% CI, 0.68 to 0.99; nominal P = .037). The CR rate plus CRp was 17.8% with decitabine versus 7.8% with TC (odds ratio, 2.5; 95% CI, 1.4 to 4.8; P = .001). AEs were similar for decitabine and cytarabine, although patients received a median of four cycles of decitabine versus two cycles of TC. The most common drug-related AEs with decitabine were thrombocytopenia (27%) and neutropenia (24%). Conclusion In older patients with AML, decitabine improved response rates compared with standard therapies without major differences in safety. An unplanned survival analysis showed a benefit for decitabine, which was not observed at the time of the primary analysis. PMID:22689805

  18. Phase I/II Trial of Sequential Chemoradiotherapy Using a Novel Hypoxic Cell Radiosensitizer, Doranidazole (PR-350), in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer (WJTOG-0002)

    SciTech Connect

    Nishimura, Yasumasa Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Koji; Tanaka, Masahiro; Segawa, Yoshihiko; Tsujino, Kayoko; Negoro, Shunichi; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Hida, Toyoaki; Kawahara, Masaaki; Katakami, Nobuyuki; Hirokawa, Keiko; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Ariyoshi, Yutaka

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: This Phase I/II trial was conducted to assess the efficacy and safety of PR-350, a novel hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, when administered with thoracic radiation therapy (RT) after induction chemotherapy (CT) for locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Two cycles of cisplatin (80 mg/m{sup 2}) and paclitaxel (180 mg/m{sup 2}), or carboplatin (AUC = 6) and paclitaxel (200 mg/m{sup 2}) were given before RT of 60 Gy in 30 fractions. In the Phase I portion, the starting dosage of PR-350 was 10 daily administrations (2000 mg/m{sup 2}) in combination with RT, and this number was increased in increments of 10 for successive groups to 30 doses. Results: In total, 37 patients were enrolled. In Phase I (n = 20), PR-350 could be administered 30 times with concurrent thoracic RT. Thus, in Phase II (n = 17), PR-350 was administered 30 times. The major toxicity was radiation pneumonitis, with Grade 3 or more pneumonitis noted in 6 patients (16%) including 2 with treatment-related deaths. However, no Grade 3 or more esophageal toxicity was noted, and only Grade 1 peripheral neuropathy was noted in 9 patients (24%). For all 37 patients, the median survival time (MST) and the 2-year survival rate were 15.9 months and 24%, respectively. For 18 patients receiving 21 to 30 doses of PR-350, the MST and 2-year survival rate were 20.9 months and 33%, respectively. Conclusions: Thoracic RT combined with 30 daily administrations of PR-350 after induction CT was well tolerated and promising for locally advanced NSCLC.

  19. CA19-9 decrease at 8 weeks as a predictor of overall survival in a randomized phase III trial (MPACT) of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiorean, E G; Von Hoff, D D; Reni, M; Arena, F P; Infante, J R; Bathini, V G; Wood, T E; Mainwaring, P N; Muldoon, R T; Clingan, P R; Kunzmann, V; Ramanathan, R K; Tabernero, J; Goldstein, D; McGovern, D; Lu, B; Ko, A

    2016-04-01

    A phase I/II study and subsequent phase III study (MPACT) reported significant correlations between CA19-9 decreases and prolonged overall survival (OS) with nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) treatment for metastatic pancreatic cancer (MPC). CA19-9 changes at week 8 and potential associations with efficacy were investigated as part of an exploratory analysis in the MPACT trial. Untreated patients with MPC (N = 861) received nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. CA19-9 was evaluated at baseline and every 8 weeks. Patients with baseline and week-8 CA19-9 measurements were analyzed (nab-P + Gem: 252; Gem: 202). In an analysis pooling the treatments, patients with any CA19-9 decline (80%) versus those without (20%) had improved OS (median 11.1 versus 8.0 months; P = 0.005). In the nab-P + Gem arm, patients with (n = 206) versus without (n = 46) any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed overall response rate (ORR) of 40% versus 13%, and a median OS of 13.2 versus 8.3 months (P = 0.001), respectively. In the Gem-alone arm, patients with (n = 159) versus without (n = 43) CA19-9 decrease at week 8 had a confirmed ORR of 15% versus 5%, and a median OS of 9.4 versus 7.1 months (P = 0.404), respectively. In the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, by week 8, 16% (40/252) and 6% (13/202) of patients, respectively, had an unconfirmed radiologic response (median OS 13.7 and 14.7 months, respectively), and 79% and 84% of patients, respectively, had stable disease (SD) (median OS 11.1 and 9 months, respectively). Patients with SD and any CA19-9 decrease (158/199 and 133/170) had a median OS of 13.2 and 9.4 months, respectively. This analysis demonstrated that, in patients with MPC, any CA19-9 decrease at week 8 can be an early marker for chemotherapy efficacy, including in those patients with SD. CA19-9 decrease identified more patients with survival benefit than radiologic response by week 8. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European

  20. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) Pathway Biomarkers in the Randomized Phase III Trial of Erlotinib Versus Observation in Ovarian Cancer Patients with No Evidence of Disease Progression after First-Line Platinum-Based Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vergote, Ignace; Anderson, Ryan; Coens, Corneel; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Hirsch, Fred R.; Boeckx, Bram; Varella-Garcia, Marileila; Ferrero, Annamaria; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Berns, Els M. J. J.; Casado, Antonio; Lambrechts, Diether; Jimeno, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Background In this work, we aimed to identify molecular epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tissue biomarkers in patients with ovarian cancer who were treated within the phase III randomized European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Gynaecological Cancer Group (EORTC-GCG) 55041 study comparing erlotinib with observation in patients with no evidence of disease progression after first-line platinum-based chemotherapy. Methods Somatic mutations in KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, PIK3CA, EGFR, and PTEN were determined in 318 (38 %) and expression of EGFR, pAkt, pMAPK, E-cadherin and Vimentin, and EGFR and HER2 gene copy numbers in 218 (26 %) of a total of 835 randomized patients. Biomarker data were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Only 28 mutations were observed among KRAS, BRAF, NRAS, PIK3CA, EGFR, and PTEN (in 7.5 % of patients), of which the most frequent were in KRAS and PIK3CA. EGFR mutations occurred in only three patients. When all mutations were pooled, patients with at least one mutation in KRAS, NRAS, BRAF, PIK3CA, or EGFR had longer PFS (33.1 versus 12.3 months; HR 0.57; 95 % CI 0.33 to 0.99; P=0.042) compared to those with wild-type tumors. EGFR overexpression was detected in 93 of 218 patients (42.7 %), and 66 of 180 patients (36.7 %) had EGFR gene amplification or high levels of copy number gain. Fifty-eight of 128 patients had positive pMAPK expression (45.3 %), which was associated with inferior OS (38.9 versus 67.0 months; HR 1.81; 95 % CI 1.11 to 2.97; P=0.016). Patients with positive EGFR fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) status had worse OS (46.1 months) than those with negative status (67.0 months; HR 1.56; 95 % CI 1.01 to 2.40; P=0.044) and shorter PFS (9.6 versus 16.1 months; HR 1.57; 95 % CI 1.11 to 2.22; P=0.010). None of the investigated biomarkers correlated with responsiveness to erlotinib. Conclusions In this phase III study, increased EGFR gene copy number was associated

  1. A Phase II Study of Synchronous Three-Dimensional Conformal Boost to the Gross Tumor Volume for Patients With Unresectable Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Results of Korean Radiation Oncology Group 0301 Study

    SciTech Connect

    Cho, Kwan Ho Ahn, Sung Ja; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Kyu-Sik; Kim, Young-Chul; Moon, Sung Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Kim, Heung Tae; Koom, Woong Sub; Lee, Jin Soo

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: We evaluated the efficacy of synchronous three-dimensional (3D) conformal boost to the gross tumor volume (GTV) in concurrent chemoradiotherapy for patients with locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility included unresectable Stage III NSCLC with no pleural effusion, no supraclavicular nodal metastases, and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance score of 0-1. Forty-nine patients with pathologically proven NSCLC were enrolled. Eighteen patients had Stage IIIA and 31 had Stage IIIB. By using 3D conformal radiotherapy (RT) techniques, a dose of 1.8 Gy was delivered to the planning target volume with a synchronous boost of 0.6 Gy to the GTV, with a total dose of 60 Gy to the GTV and 45 Gy to the planning target volume in 25 fractions during 5 weeks. All patients received weekly chemotherapy consisting of paclitaxel and carboplatin during RT. Results: With a median follow-up of 36.8 months (range, 29.0-45.5 months) for surviving patients, median survival was 28.1 months. One-, 2- and 3-year overall survival rates were 77%, 56.4%, and 43.8%, respectively. Corresponding local progression-free survival rates were 71.2%, 53.7%, and 53.7%. Compliance was 90% for RT and 88% for chemotherapy. Acute esophagitis of Grade 2 or higher occurred in 29 patients. Two patients with T4 lesions died of massive bleeding and hemoptysis during treatment (Grade 5). Overall late toxicity was acceptable. Conclusions: Based on the favorable outcome with acceptable toxicity, the acceleration scheme using 3D conformal GTV boost in this trial is warranted to compare with conventional fractionation in a Phase III trial.

  2. A phase I/II study of oral clofarabine plus low-dose cytarabine in previously treated acute myeloid leukaemia and high-risk myelodysplastic syndrome patients at least 60 years of age.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Sarah A; Mawad, Raya; Gooley, Ted A; Becker, Pamela S; Sandhu, Vicky; Hendrie, Paul; Scott, Bart L; Wood, Brent L; Walter, Roland B; Smith, Kelly; Dean, Carol; Estey, Elihu H; Pagel, John M

    2015-08-01

    Outcomes for older adults with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) are generally poor, and new effective therapies are needed. We investigated oral clofarabine combined with low-dose cytarabine (LDAC) in patients aged 60 years and above with relapsed or refractory AML or high-risk MDS in a phase I/II trial. A 3 + 3 dose escalation of oral clofarabine was followed by a phase II expansion with the aim of obtaining a complete response (CR) rate ≥30%. We identified 20 mg/d for 5 d as the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of oral clofarabine. A total of 35 patients, with a median age of 72 years, were treated. Of 26 patients enrolled at the MTD, 4 had treatment-related grade 3-4 non-haematological toxicities, but none died within 28 d. The observed CR rate and median survival were 34% [95% confidence interval (CI), 18-50%] and 6.8 months overall and 38% [95% CI, 19-57%] and 7.2 months at the MTD. The median disease-free survival was 7.4 months. Fifty-two percent (23/44) of cycles administered at the MTD were done without hospital admission. This combination of oral clofarabine and LDAC demonstrated efficacy with a CR rate of >30% and acceptable toxicity in older patients.

  3. Long-term evaluation of combined prolonged-release oxycodone and naloxone in patients with moderate-to-severe chronic pain: pooled analysis of extension phases of two Phase III trials

    PubMed Central

    Blagden, M; Hafer, J; Duerr, H; Hopp, M; Bosse, B

    2014-01-01

    Background While opioids provide effective analgesia, opioid-induced constipation (OIC) can severely impact quality of life and treatment compliance. This pooled analysis evaluated the maintenance of efficacy and safety during long-term treatment with combined oxycodone/naloxone prolonged-release tablets (OXN PR) in adults with moderate-to-severe chronic pain. Methods Patients (N = 474) received open-label OXN PR during 52-week extension phases of two studies, having completed 12-week, double-blind, randomized treatment with oxycodone prolonged-release tablets (Oxy PR) or OXN PR. Analgesia and bowel function were assessed at each study visit using ‘Average pain over last 24 h scale and Bowel Function Index (BFI), respectively. Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire for Medication was assessed at study end only. Key Results Improvement in bowel function was particularly marked in patients who switched from Oxy PR in the double-blind phase to OXN PR during the extension phase, resulting in a clinically meaningful reduction (≥12 points) in BFI score: at the start of the extension phases, mean (SD) BFI score was 44.3 (28.13), and was 29.8 (26.36) for patients who had received OXN PR in the double-blind phase. One week later, BFI scores were similar for the two groups (26.5 [24.40] and 27.5 [25.60], respectively), as was observed throughout the following months. Fewer than 10% of patients received laxatives regularly. Mean 24-h pain scores were low and stable throughout the extension phases. No unexpected adverse events were observed. Conclusions & Inferences Pooled data demonstrate OXN PR is an effective long-term therapy for patients with chronic non-cancer pain, and can address symptoms of OIC. No new safety issues were observed which were attributable to the long-term administration of OXN PR. PMID:25346155

  4. High Voltage, Low Inductance Hydrogen Thyratron Study Program, Phase III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    results and supporting information that bear on the progress of the Program as a whole. The Government’s Contract Monitor for Phase III was Mr. William ...ST ATTN: DRDEL-LL; -SB; -AP (IN TURN) I DRSEL-MA-MP 2800 Powder Mill Road 2 DRSEL-PA Adelphi, MD 20783 001 CINDAS 001 Cdr, ERADCOM Purdue Industrial

  5. Randomized Phase III Trial Comparing ABVD Plus Radiotherapy With the Stanford V Regimen in Patients With Stages I or II Locally Extensive, Bulky Mediastinal Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Subset Analysis of the North American Intergroup E2496 Trial

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Ranjana H.; Hong, Fangxin; Fisher, Richard I.; Bartlett, Nancy L.; Robinson, K. Sue; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Wagner, Henry; Stiff, Patrick J.; Cheson, Bruce D.; Stewart, Douglas A.; Gordon, Leo I.; Kahl, Brad S.; Friedberg, Jonathan W.; Blum, Kristie A.; Habermann, Thomas M.; Tuscano, Joseph M.; Hoppe, Richard T.; Horning, Sandra J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The phase III North American Intergroup E2496 Trial (Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Hodgkin's Lymphoma) compared doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD) with mechlorethamine, doxorubicin, vincristine, bleomycin, vinblastine, etoposide, and prednisone (Stanford V). We report results of a planned subgroup analysis in patients with stage I or II bulky mediastinal Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). Patients and Methods Patients were randomly assigned to six to eight cycles of ABVD every 28 days or Stanford V once per week for 12 weeks. Two to 3 weeks after completion of chemotherapy, all patients received 36 Gy of modified involved field radiotherapy (IFRT) to the mediastinum, hila, and supraclavicular regions. Patients on the Stanford V arm received IFRT to additional sites ≥ 5 cm at diagnosis. Primary end points were failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Of 794 eligible patients, 264 had stage I or II bulky disease, 135 received ABVD, and 129 received Stanford V. Patient characteristics were matched. The overall response rate was 83% with ABVD and 88% with Stanford V. At a median follow-up of 6.5 years, the study excluded a difference of more than 21% in 5-year FFS and more than 16% in 5-year OS between ABVD and Stanford V (5-year FFS: 85% v 79%; HR, 0.68; 95% CI, 0.37 to 1.25; P = .22; 5-year OS: 96% v 92%; HR, 0.49; 95% CI, 0.16 to 1.47; P = .19). In-field relapses occurred in < 10% of the patients in each arm. Conclusion For patients with stage I or II bulky mediastinal HL, no substantial statistically significant differences were detected between the two regimens, although power was limited. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first prospective trial reporting outcomes specific to this subgroup, and it sets a benchmark for comparison of ongoing and future studies. PMID:25897153

  6. Simeprevir in combination with sofosbuvir in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients with hepatitis C virus genotype 4 infection: a Phase III, open-label, single-arm study (PLUTO).

    PubMed

    Buti, M; Calleja, J L; Lens, S; Diago, M; Ortega, E; Crespo, J; Planas, R; Romero-Gómez, M; Rodríguez, F G; Pascasio, J M; Fevery, B; Kurland, D; Corbett, C; Kalmeijer, R; Jessner, W

    2017-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis and subsequent hepatocellular carcinoma. HCV genotype 4 is found widely in the Middle East, Egypt and Africa, and has also spread into Europe. There are limited data available regarding the use of direct-acting antiviral agents in HCV genotype 4-infected patients with cirrhosis. To evaluate in the phase III, open-label, single-arm PLUTO study the efficacy and safety of 12 weeks of simeprevir (HCV NS3/4A protease inhibitor) plus sofosbuvir (HCV nucleotide-analogue NS5B polymerase inhibitor) in treatment-naïve and (peg)interferon ± ribavirin-experienced HCV genotype 4-infected patients, with or without compensated cirrhosis. Adult patients with chronic HCV genotype 4 infection received simeprevir 150 mg once-daily and sofosbuvir 400 mg once-daily for 12 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was sustained virologic response 12 weeks after the end of treatment (SVR12). Safety was also assessed. Forty patients received treatment; the majority were male (73%) and treatment-experienced (68%). Overall, 7/40 (18%) patients had compensated cirrhosis. All patients achieved SVR12 [100% (Clopper-Pearson 95% confidence interval: 91-100%)]. Adverse events, all Grade 1 or 2, were reported in 20/40 (50%) patients. No serious adverse events were reported and no patients discontinued study treatment. Grade 3 treatment-emergent laboratory abnormalities were noted in 2/40 (5%) patients. Treatment with simeprevir plus sofosbuvir for 12 weeks resulted in SVR12 rates of 100% in treatment-naïve and -experienced patients with HCV genotype 4 infection with or without compensated cirrhosis, and was well tolerated. [NCT02250807]. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Tofacitinib improves pruritus and health-related quality of life up to 52 weeks: Results from 2 randomized phase III trials in patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

    PubMed

    Feldman, Steven R; Thaçi, Diamant; Gooderham, Melinda; Augustin, Matthias; de la Cruz, Claudia; Mallbris, Lotus; Buonanno, Marjorie; Tatulych, Svitlana; Kaur, Mandeep; Lan, Shuping; Valdez, Hernan; Mamolo, Carla

    2016-12-01

    Tofacitinib is an oral Janus kinase inhibitor that improves clinical measures of psoriasis. We sought to assess patient-reported outcomes in tofacitinib-treated patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis over 52 weeks. In 2 identical, phase III studies (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1 [NCT01276639], n = 901, and Pivotal 2 [NCT01309737], n = 960), patients were randomized 2:2:1 to receive 5 or 10 mg of tofacitinib or placebo, twice daily. At week 16, placebo-treated patients were re-randomized to tofacitinib. Dermatology Life Quality Index score, Itch Severity Item score, Patient Global Assessment score, and patient satisfaction were assessed. Baseline Dermatology Life Quality Index score indicated substantial health-related quality of life impairment. At week 16, a greater proportion of patients achieved Dermatology Life Quality Index score of 1 or less (no effect of psoriasis on health-related quality of life) with tofacitinib 5 and 10 mg twice daily versus placebo (Oral treatment for Psoriasis Trial Pivotal 1/2: 26.7%/28.6% and 40.2%/48.2% vs 4.6%/6.0%, respectively; P < .0001); improvements were maintained through week 52. Similar patterns were observed with Patient Global Assessment. Improvements in itch were particularly rapid, observed 1 day after treatment initiation for both tofacitinib doses versus placebo (P < .05). At week 16, more patients were satisfied with tofacitinib versus placebo (P < .0001). Clinical nonresponders discontinued at week 28. Tofacitinib demonstrated improvement in health-related quality of life and patient-reported symptoms that persisted over 52 weeks. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Treatment of older patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel: subgroup analyses from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial (CLEOPATRA).

    PubMed

    Miles, David; Baselga, José; Amadori, Dino; Sunpaweravong, Patrapim; Semiglazov, Vladimir; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Ross, Graham; Swain, Sandra M

    2013-11-01

    Although the incidence of cancer increases with age, older patients are under-represented in cancer treatment trials, resulting in limited data availability in this patient population. Here we present results from pre-defined subgroup analyses conducted by age group (<65 vs ≥ 65 years) from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial in patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. Patients who had not received previous chemotherapy or biological therapy for HER2-positive locally recurrent, unresectable or metastatic breast cancer were randomly assigned to treatment with placebo, trastuzumab, and docetaxel or with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel. Primary endpoint was independently assessed progression-free survival. We performed pre-specified subgroup analyses of progression-free survival according to age. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00567190. 808 patients were enrolled. Of those, 127 patients were 65 years of age or older (placebo arm: 67, pertuzumab arm: 60). Patients in both age groups experienced progression-free survival benefit with treatment in the pertuzumab arm (<65 years: HR: 0.65; 95 % CI 0.53-0.80; ≥65 years: HR: 0.52; 95 % CI 0.31-0.86). Diarrhoea, fatigue, asthenia, decreased appetite, vomiting, and dysgeusia were reported more frequently in patients 65 years of age or older compared with younger patients. Neutropenia and febrile neutropenia were reported less frequently in the older age group. The efficacy and safety data reported in CLEOPATRA suggest that the combined use of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel should not be limited by patient age.

  9. Ethnic difference in hematological toxicity in patients with non-small cell lung cancer treated with chemotherapy: a pooled analysis on Asian versus non-Asian in phase II and III clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Kawaguchi, Tomoya; Kubo, Akihito; Ando, Masahiko; Shiraishi, Junji; Isa, Shun-ichi; Tsuji, Taisuke; Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Ou, Sai-Hong I; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko; Takada, Minoru

    2011-11-01

    There are a large number of global clinical trials ongoing for patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Ethnic difference in toxicity has not been adequately studied. We performed a systematic search in PubMed for randomized phase II and III trials of NSCLC from January 2000 to December 2009, examining ethnic difference in hematological toxicity due to cytotoxic chemotherapy. Ethnicity was classified into Asian and non-Asian. We chose three treatment regimens used for NSCLC globally: cisplatin plus gemcitabine (CG), cisplatin plus vinorelbine (CV), and carboplatin plus paclitaxel (CP). We applied sensitivity analysis to examine unreported ethnic differences in hematological toxicities by changing the percentage of Asian patients from 0 to 18% in trials reported from the United States and Europe. We identified 12 phase II trials and 38 phase III trials of NSCLC with a total of 11,271 patients. Among these, 14 trials had reported ethnic origins. Grade 3/4 toxicities were more frequently observed in the Asian studies. On the basis of sensitivity analysis, odds ratio of grade 3/4 neutropenia was significantly higher in Asian patients than non-Asian, when treated with CG (OR = 1.55-3.45, p < 0.001), CV (OR = 2.99-4.43, p < 0.001), and CP (OR = 4.79-6.22, p < 0.001). Grade 3/4 anemia was also significantly higher in Asians with CG (OR = 3.10-3.27, p < 0.001), CV (OR = 1.99-2.43, p < 0.001), and CP (OR = 1.34-1.52, p < 0.001-0.004). However, no significant difference was observed in thrombocytopenia with CG (OR = 0.66-2.04, p < 0.001-1.000), CV (OR = 0.42-0.57, p = 0.097-0.323), or CP (OR = 1.21-1.39, p = 0.114-0.152). Severe hematological toxicity was frequently observed in Asian patients compared with non-Asian (mostly whites) in the treatment of chemotherapy for NSCLC.

  10. Phase I-II trial of gemcitabine-based first-line chemotherapies for small cell lung cancer in elderly patients with performance status 0-2: the G-STEP trial.

    PubMed

    Gridelli, Cesare; Gallo, Ciro; Morabito, Alessandro; Iaffaioli, Rosario Vincenzo; Favaretto, Adolfo; Isa, Luciano; Barbera, Santi; Gamucci, Teresa; Ceribelli, Anna; Filipazzi, Virginio; Maione, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Barletta, Emiddio; Signoriello, Simona; De Maio, Ermelinda; Piccirillo, Maria Carmela; Di Maio, Massimo; Rocco, Gaetano; Vecchione, Aldo; Perrone, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of elderly patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is based on scanty evidence. Patients with extensive SCLC, age >70 years, and performance status 0-2 were eligible for a study looking for optimal two-drug combination of gemcitabine (Gem) with vinorelbine (Vin), etoposide (Eto), cisplatin (Cis), or carboplatin (Car). Gemcitabine dose was the same (1000 mg/m2, days 1-8) in all combinations. A two-stage minimax flexible design for response was applied to GemVin combination (Vin 25 mg/m2, days 1-8). For GemCar, GemCis, GemEto, a phase I-II Bayesian design was applied, looking for the optimal dose of the partner drugs. Objective response rate ≥ 60% and unacceptable toxicity ≤ 25% were required to define a combination worthy of further studies. Median age of 78 eligible patients was 74 years. GemVin produced a 36.7% objective response rate. GemEto and GemCis arms were found not sufficiently active. GemCar produced 16 responses (14 with area under the curve [AUC] 3.5 and 2 with AUC 4.0) in 26 patients (61.5%) and 6 cases of unacceptable toxicity (3 at each Car dose). In elderly patients with extensive SCLC, GemVin, GemEto, and GemCis are not enough active and do not merit further studies. Gem plus Car might deserve further attention.

  11. First-Line XELOX Plus Bevacizumab Followed by XELOX Plus Bevacizumab or Single-Agent Bevacizumab as Maintenance Therapy in Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer: The Phase III MACRO TTD Study

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Massutí, Bartomeu; Sastre, Javier; Abad, Albert; Valladares, Manuel; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, Maria J.; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Gallén, Manuel; González, Encarnación; Marcuello, Eugenio; Benavides, Manuel; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Losa, Ferrán; Escudero, Pilar; Arrivi, Antonio; Cervantes, Andrés; Dueñas, Rosario; López-Ladrón, Amelia; Lacasta, Adelaida; Llanos, Marta; Tabernero, Jose M.; Antón, Antonio; Aranda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. The aim of this phase III trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab alone with those of bevacizumab and capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) as maintenance treatment following induction chemotherapy with XELOX plus bevacizumab in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients and Methods. Patients were randomly assigned to receive six cycles of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin every 3 weeks followed by XELOX plus bevacizumab or bevacizumab alone until progression. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival (PFS) interval; secondary endpoints were the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (RR), time to response, duration of response, and safety. Results. The intent-to-treat population comprised 480 patients (XELOX plus bevacizumab, n = 239; bevacizumab, n = 241); there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. The median follow-up was 29.0 months (range, 0–53.2 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the median PFS or OS times or in the RR between the two arms. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities in the XELOX plus bevacizumab versus bevacizumab arms were diarrhea, hand–foot syndrome, and neuropathy. Conclusion. Although the noninferiority of bevacizumab versus XELOX plus bevacizumab cannot be confirmed, we can reliably exclude a median PFS detriment >3 weeks. This study suggests that maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab may be an appropriate option following induction XELOX plus bevacizumab in mCRC patients. PMID:22234633

  12. Efficacy and safety of Qing-Feng-Gan-Ke Granules in patients with postinfectious cough: study protocol of a novel-design phase III placebo-controlled, double-blind randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Jiang, Hongli; Zhang, Ruiming; Jin, Faguang; Liu, Liangji; Long, Youyu; Cui, Liying; Li, Suyun; Zhong, Yunqing; Mao, Bing

    2015-08-19

    Postinfectious cough (PIC) is a common condition that affects millions of people worldwide every year. There is Western medicine for this condition but the treatment effect is often incomplete. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) has been increasingly prescribed for patients with PIC. Preliminary trials on Qing-Feng-Gan-Ke-Granules (QFGKG) conveyed promising results in treating PIC. This protocol describes an ongoing phase III randomized controlled clinical trial, designed according to a novel methodology of "one study, one primary outcome", with the objective of evaluating the efficacy and safety of QFGKG in patients suffering from PIC. This is a multicenter, phase III, randomized, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled clinical trial, comprising two simultaneously conducted study parts, part A and part B, intending to investigate two primary outcomes, i.e. time to cough resolution and cough symptom score, respectively. A total of 480 patients, aged 18 to 65 years, who complain of an ongoing persistent cough that has been lasting ≥ 3 weeks, will be recruited from six participating sites and then randomized to receive QFGKG 12.0 g twice daily or placebo 12.0 g twice daily. Each part will enroll 240 patients, with 180 patients being allocated to the QFGKG group and 60 to the placebo group. Although traditional Chinese medicine is a structured intervention that has shown some promise in treating persistent cough, existing unconvincing evidence has noted limitations. This is a rare well-designed and rigorously-controlled, randomized, double-blind trial to evaluate the effects and safety of a Chinese herbal medicine in patients with postinfectious cough, providing tangible benefits for clinical research. Results of this trial are inclined to be conjectured as more truthful by implementing separate study parts that specifically estimate exclusive primary outcome. It will not only provide robust clinical evidence on the efficacy and safety of QFGKG for

  13. Controversial HIV vaccine enters phase III trials amid skepticism.

    PubMed

    1998-12-01

    Clinics have begun enrolling volunteers in the first phase III trial of an HIV vaccine. Developing the vaccine has been a goal for nearly two decades, but leading scientists are skeptical about the effectiveness of a vaccine which does not use live viruses. More than 34 different candidate vaccines have been tested in phase I, and three are in phase II. The vaccine, AIDSVAX, is designed to train the immune system to protect itself against infection by creating antibodies. The scientific and political issues associated with the vaccine are presented.

  14. Phase transitions in i-butylammonium halogenoantimonate(III) and bismuthate(III) crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakubas, R.; Jóźków, J.; Bator, G.; Zaleski, J.; Baran, J.; François, P.

    1997-12-01

    Differential scanning calorimetry, dielectric, thermal expansion, infrared and preliminary X-ray diffraction studies on i-butylammonium halogenoantimonate(III) and bismuthate(III) crystals are reported. All crystals: (i-C 4H 9NH 3) 2BiCl 5, (i-C 4H 9NH 3) 2SbBr 5, (i-C 4H 9NH 3) 3BiCl 6, (i-C 4H 9NH 3) 3Bi 2Br 9, (i-C 4H 9NH 3) 3Sb 2Br 9, show one or more structural phase transitions of first order type. The values of the transition entropies suggest that the most of the phase transitions are of the order-disorder type. The infrared studies confirmed the contribution of the i-butylammonium cations in the phase transition mechanism.

  15. Dose Escalation of Gemcitabine Is Possible With Concurrent Chest Three-Dimensional Rather Than Two-Dimensional Radiotherapy: A Phase I Trial in Patients With Stage III Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Zinner, Ralph G. Cox, James D.; Glisson, Bonnie S.; Pisters, Katherine M.W.; Herbst, Roy S.; Kies, Merril; Hong, Waun K.; Fossella, Frank V.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine in a Phase I study the maximum tolerated dose of weekly gemcitabine concurrent with radiotherapy in locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as the relationship between the volume of the esophagus irradiated and severe esophagitis. Methods and Materials: Twenty-one patients with Stage III NSCLC received gemcitabine initially at 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk over 7 weeks concurrently with chest radiotherapy to 63 Gy in 34 fractions. The first 9 patients underwent treatment with two-dimensional (2D) radiotherapy; the remaining 12 patients, with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT) and target volume reduced to clinically apparent disease. Consolidation was 4 cycles of gemcitabine at 1000 mg/m{sup 2}/wk and cisplatin 60 mg/m{sup 2}. Results: In the 2D group, the dose-limiting toxicity, Grade 3 esophagitis, occurred in 3 of 6 patients in the 150-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort and 2 of 3 patients in the 125-mg/m{sup 2}/wk cohort. No cases of Grade 3 esophagitis occurred at these doses in the 3D group. At gemcitabine 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk, 2 of 6 patients in the 3D cohort had Grade 3 esophagitis. The mean percentages of esophagus irradiated to 60 Gy were 68% in the 2D cohort and 18% in the 3D cohort. Conclusions: We could not escalate the dose of gemcitabine with concurrent radiotherapy when using 2D planning because of severe acute esophagitis. However, we could escalate the dose of gemcitabine to 190 mg/m{sup 2}/wk when using 3D planning. The Phase II dose is 150 mg/m{sup 2}/wk. Three-dimensional CRT permitted the use of higher doses of gemcitabine.

  16. Efficacy and safety of talimogene laherparepvec versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in patients with stage IIIB/C and IVM1a melanoma: subanalysis of the Phase III OPTiM trial

    PubMed Central

    Harrington, Kevin J; Andtbacka, Robert HI; Collichio, Frances; Downey, Gerald; Chen, Lisa; Szabo, Zsolt; Kaufman, Howard L

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Talimogene laherparepvec is the first oncolytic immunotherapy to receive approval in Europe, the USA and Australia. In the randomized, open-label Phase III OPTiM trial (NCT00769704), talimogene laherparepvec significantly improved durable response rate (DRR) versus granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) in 436 patients with unresectable stage IIIB–IVM1c melanoma. The median overall survival (OS) was longer versus GM-CSF in patients with earlier-stage melanoma (IIIB–IVM1a). Here, we report a detailed subgroup analysis of the OPTiM study in patients with IIIB–IVM1a disease. Patients and methods The patients were randomized (2:1 ratio) to intralesional talimogene laherparepvec or subcutaneous GM-CSF and were evaluated for DRR, overall response rate (ORR), OS, safety, benefit–risk and numbers needed to treat. Descriptive statistics were used for subgroup comparisons. Results Among 249 evaluated patients with stage IIIB–IVM1a melanoma, DRR was higher with talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF (25.2% versus 1.2%; P<0.0001). ORR was also higher in the talimogene laherparepvec arm (40.5% versus 2.3%; P<0.0001), and 27 patients in the talimogene laherparepvec arm had a complete response, compared with none in GM-CSF-treated patients. The incidence rates of exposure-adjusted adverse events (AE) and serious AEs were similar with both treatments. Conclusion The subgroup of patients with stage IIIB, IIIC and IVM1a melanoma (57.1% of the OPTiM intent-to-treat population) derived greater benefit in DRR and ORR from talimogene laherparepvec compared with GM-CSF. Talimogene laherparepvec was well tolerated. PMID:27895500

  17. Phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy for primary liver cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinger, D.S.; Order, S.E.; Wharam, M.D.; Parker, M.K.; Klein, J.L.; Leichner, P.K.

    1982-02-01

    A phase I-II study of isotopic immunoglobulin therapy was performed in 18 patients with primary liver cancer; 14 were evaluable for toxicity. The patients received a dose of 37-157 millicuries of 131I-labeled antibody. The dose-limiting factor appears to be hematologic toxicity, especially thrombocytopenia. An objective antitumor effect was seen in six of nine patients who were evaluable for response. Present results suggest that further clinical studies with isotopic immunoglobulin are indicated.

  18. CHAOS III: Gas-phase Abundances in NGC 5457

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croxall, Kevin V.; Pogge, Richard W.; Berg, Danielle A.; Skillman, Evan D.; Moustakas, John

    2016-10-01

    We present Large Binocular Telescope observations of 109 H ii regions in NGC 5457 (M101) obtained with the Multi-Object Double Spectrograph. We have robust measurements of one or more temperature-sensitive auroral emission lines for 74 H ii regions, permitting the measurement of “direct” gas-phase abundances. Comparing the temperatures derived from the different ionic species, we find: (1) strong correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii], consistent with little or no intrinsic scatter; (2) a correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii], but with significant intrinsic dispersion; (3) overall agreement between T[N ii], T[S ii], and T[O ii], as expected, but with significant outliers; (4) the correlations of T[N ii] with T[S iii] and T[O iii] match the predictions of photoionization modeling while the correlation of T[S iii] with T[O iii] is offset from the prediction of photoionization modeling. Based on these observations, which include significantly more observations of lower excitation H ii regions, missing in many analyses, we inspect the commonly used ionization correction factors (ICFs) for unobserved ionic species and propose new empirical ICFs for S and Ar. We have discovered an unexpected population of H ii regions with a significant offset to low values in Ne/O, which defies explanation. We derive radial gradients in O/H and N/O which agree with previous studies. Our large observational database allows us to examine the dispersion in abundances, and we find intrinsic dispersions of 0.074 ± 0.009 in O/H and 0.095 ± 0.009 in N/O (at a given radius). We stress that this measurement of the intrinsic dispersion comes exclusively from direct abundance measurements of H ii regions in NGC 5457.

  19. Efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in heart failure patients with volume overload despite the standard treatment with conventional diuretics: a phase III, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study (QUEST study).

    PubMed

    Matsuzaki, Masunori; Hori, Masatsugu; Izumi, Tohru; Fukunami, Masatake

    2011-12-01

    Diuretics are recommended to treat volume overload with heart failure (HF), however, they may cause serum electrolyte imbalance, limiting their use. Moreover, patients with advanced HF could poorly respond to these diuretics. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy and safety of Tolvaptan, a competitive vasopressin V2-receptor antagonist developed as a new drug to treat volume overload in HF patients. A phase III, multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled parallel study was performed to assess the efficacy and safety of tolvaptan in treating HF patients with volume overload despite the use of conventional diuretics. One hundred and ten patients were randomly assigned to receive either placebo or 15 mg/day tolvaptan for 7 consecutive days. Compared with placebo, tolvaptan administered for 7 days significantly reduced body weight and improved symptoms associated with volume overload. The safety profile of tolvaptan was considered acceptable for clinical use with minimal adverse effects. Tolvaptan reduced volume overload and improved congestive symptoms associated with HF by a potent water diuresis (aquaresis).

  20. First-line XELOX plus bevacizumab followed by XELOX plus bevacizumab or single-agent bevacizumab as maintenance therapy in patients with metastatic colorectal cancer: the phase III MACRO TTD study.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Rubio, Eduardo; Gómez-España, Auxiliadora; Massutí, Bartomeu; Sastre, Javier; Abad, Albert; Valladares, Manuel; Rivera, Fernando; Safont, Maria J; Martínez de Prado, Purificación; Gallén, Manuel; González, Encarnación; Marcuello, Eugenio; Benavides, Manuel; Fernández-Martos, Carlos; Losa, Ferrán; Escudero, Pilar; Arrivi, Antonio; Cervantes, Andrés; Dueñas, Rosario; López-Ladrón, Amelia; Lacasta, Adelaida; Llanos, Marta; Tabernero, Jose M; Antón, Antonio; Aranda, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this phase III trial was to compare the efficacy and safety of bevacizumab alone with those of bevacizumab and capecitabine plus oxaliplatin (XELOX) as maintenance treatment following induction chemotherapy with XELOX plus bevacizumab in the first-line treatment of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Patients were randomly assigned to receive six cycles of bevacizumab, capecitabine, and oxaliplatin every 3 weeks followed by XELOX plus bevacizumab or bevacizumab alone until progression. The primary endpoint was the progression-free survival (PFS) interval; secondary endpoints were the overall survival (OS) time, objective response rate (RR), time to response, duration of response, and safety. The intent-to-treat population comprised 480 patients (XELOX plus bevacizumab, n = 239; bevacizumab, n = 241); there were no significant differences in baseline characteristics. The median follow-up was 29.0 months (range, 0-53.2 months). There were no statistically significant differences in the median PFS or OS times or in the RR between the two arms. The most common grade 3 or 4 toxicities in the XELOX plus bevacizumab versus bevacizumab arms were diarrhea, hand-foot syndrome, and neuropathy. Although the noninferiority of bevacizumab versus XELOX plus bevacizumab cannot be confirmed, we can reliably exclude a median PFS detriment >3 weeks. This study suggests that maintenance therapy with single-agent bevacizumab may be an appropriate option following induction XELOX plus bevacizumab in mCRC patients.

  1. Dacarbazine (DTIC) versus vaccination with autologous peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DC) in first-line treatment of patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomized phase III trial of the DC study group of the DeCOG.

    PubMed

    Schadendorf, D; Ugurel, S; Schuler-Thurner, B; Nestle, F O; Enk, A; Bröcker, E-B; Grabbe, S; Rittgen, W; Edler, L; Sucker, A; Zimpfer-Rechner, C; Berger, T; Kamarashev, J; Burg, G; Jonuleit, H; Tüttenberg, A; Becker, J C; Keikavoussi, P; Kämpgen, E; Schuler, G

    2006-04-01

    This randomized phase III trial was designed to demonstrate the superiority of autologous peptide-loaded dendritic cell (DC) vaccination over standard dacarbazine (DTIC) chemotherapy in stage IV melanoma patients. DTIC 850 mg/m2 intravenously was applied in 4-week intervals. DC vaccines loaded with MHC class I and II-restricted peptides were applied subcutaneously at 2-week intervals for the first five vaccinations and every 4 weeks thereafter. The primary study end point was objective response (OR); secondary end points were toxicity, overall (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). At the time of the first interim analysis 55 patients had been enrolled into the DTIC and 53 into the DC-arm (ITT). OR was low (DTIC: 5.5%, DC: 3.8%), but not significantly different in the two arms. The Data Safety & Monitoring Board recommended closure of the study. Unscheduled subset analyses revealed that patients with normal serum LDH and/or stage M1a/b survived longer in both arms than those with elevated serum LDH and/or stage M1c. Only in the DC-arm did those patients with (i) an initial unimpaired general health status (Karnofsky = 100) or (ii) an HLA-A2+/HLA-B44- haplotype survive significantly longer than patients with a Karnofsky index <100 (P = 0.007 versus P = 0.057 in the DTIC-arm) or other HLA haplotypes (P = 0.04 versus P = 0.57 in DTIC-treated patients). DC vaccination could not be demonstrated to be more effective than DTIC chemotherapy in stage IV melanoma patients. The observed association of overall performance status and HLA haplotype with overall survival for patients treated by DC vaccination should be tested in future trials employing DC vaccines.

  2. Ixabepilone plus capecitabine in metastatic breast cancer patients with reduced performance status previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes: a pooled analysis by performance status of efficacy and safety data from 2 phase III studies.

    PubMed

    Roché, Henri; Conte, Pierfranco; Perez, Edith A; Sparano, Joseph A; Xu, Binghe; Jassem, Jacek; Peck, Ronald; Kelleher, Thomas; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N

    2011-02-01

    Patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC) previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes often have decreased performance status secondary to extensive tumor involvement. Here, we report the pooled analysis of efficacy and safety data from two similarly designed phase III studies to provide a more precise estimate of benefit of ixabepilone plus capecitabine in MBC patients with Karnofsky's performance status (KPS) 70-80. Across the studies, anthracycline/taxane-pretreated MBC patients were randomized to receive ixabepilone plus capecitabine or capecitabine alone. Individual patient data for KPS 70-80 subset (n = 606) or KPS 90-100 subset (n = 1349) from the two studies were pooled by treatment. Analysis included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), objective response rate (ORR), and safety. In patients with reduced performance status (KPS 70-80), ixabepilone plus capecitabine was associated with improvements in OS (median: 12.3 vs. 9.5 months; HR, 0.75; P = 0.0015), PFS (median: 4.6 vs. 3.1 months; HR, 0.76; P = 0.0021) and ORR (35 vs. 19%) over capecitabine alone. Corresponding results in patients with high performance status (KPS 90-100) were median OS of 16.7 versus 16.2 months (HR, 0.98; P = 0.8111), median PFS of 6.0 versus 4.4 months (HR, 0.58; P = 0.0009), and ORR of 45 versus 28%. The safety profile of combination therapy was similar between the subgroups. Ixabepilone plus capecitabine appeared to show superior efficacy compared to capecitabine alone in MBC patients previously treated with anthracyclines and taxanes, regardless of performance status, with a possible OS benefit favoring KPS 70-80 patients (ClinicalTrials.gov identifiers: NCT00080301 and NCT00082433).

  3. Efficacy and safety of Privigen® in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: results of a prospective, single-arm, open-label Phase III study (the PRIMA study)

    PubMed Central

    Léger, Jean-Marc; De Bleecker, Jan L; Sommer, Claudia; Robberecht, Wim; Saarela, Mika; Kamienowski, Jerzy; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew; Mielke, Orell; Tackenberg, Björn; Shebl, Amgad; Bauhofer, Artur; Zenker, Othmar; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2013-01-01

    This prospective, multicenter, single-arm, open-label Phase III study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Privigen® (10% liquid human intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIG], stabilized with l-proline) in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Patients received one induction dose of Privigen (2 g/kg body weight [bw]) and up to seven maintenance doses (1 g/kg bw) at 3-week intervals. The primary efficacy endpoint was the responder rate at completion, defined as improvement of ≥1 point on the adjusted Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) disability scale. The preset success criterion was the responder rate being ≥35%. Of the 31 screened patients, 28 patients were enrolled including 13 (46.4%) IVIG-pretreated patients. The overall responder rate at completion was 60.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 42.41%–76.43%). IVIG-pretreated patients demonstrated a higher responder rate than IVIG-naïve patients (76.9% vs. 46.7%). The median (25%–75% quantile) INCAT score improved from 3.5 (3.0–4.5) points at baseline to 2.5 (1.0–3.0) points at completion, as did the mean (standard deviation [SD]) maximum grip strength (66.7 [37.24] kPa vs. 80.9 [31.06] kPa) and the median Medical Research Council sum score (67.0 [61.5–72.0] points vs. 75.5 [71.5–79.5] points). Of 108 adverse events (AEs; 0.417 AEs per infusion), 95 AEs (88.0%) were mild or moderate in intensity and resolved by the end of study. Two serious AEs of hemolysis were reported that resolved after discontinuation of treatment. Thus, Privigen provided efficacious and well-tolerated induction and maintenance treatment in patients with CIDP. PMID:23781960

  4. Q-TWiST analysis of patients with metastatic castrate naive prostate cancer treated by androgen deprivation therapy with or without docetaxel in the randomised phase III GETUG-AFU 15 trial.

    PubMed

    Marino, P; Sfumato, P; Joly, F; Fizazi, K; Oudard, S; Culine, S; Habibian, M; Boher, J-M; Gravis, G

    2017-10-01

    Early chemotherapy has recently become a new standard of care for patients with metastatic castrate-naive prostate cancer (mCNPC). The survival benefit is evident in patients with high-volume disease, but less clear in those with low-volume disease. Here, we assessed the trade-offs between toxicity and survival using a Quality-adjusted Time Without Symptoms of disease and Toxicity of treatment (Q-TWiST) analysis. This analysis was performed from the data of the Genito-Urinary Oncology Group (GETUG)-AFU 15 phase III trial evaluating the benefits of docetaxel (D) combined with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) versus ADT alone in 385 mCNPC patients. Overall survival was partitioned into three periods, namely toxic phase of treatment (TOX), time before progression without toxicity (TWIST), and progression (PROG). These health states were weighted according to patients' utility to determine quality-adjusted survival times. In threshold analyses, utility for TOX and PROG were varied from 0 to 1. A better quality-adjusted survival was found in the ADT + D arm when the utility for PROG and TOX states were ≤0.2 and ≥ 0.8, respectively. When the utility for PROG was 0.4 or more, ADT + D and ADT alone yielded similar quality-adjusted survival. When patients were stratified into high-volume versus low-volume disease, we found a significant Q-TWiST benefit in favour of the ADT + D arm only for high-volume patients when the utility for PROG was less than 0.35, while we found no benefit in low-volume disease patients, whatever the coefficients tested. Early docetaxel may provide significant quality-adjusted survival benefits for patients with mCNPC, especially those with high-volume disease, depending on the values assigned to the times spent in the toxicity phase and after PROG. The Q-TWiST methodology is a useful tool for decision-making regarding trade-offs between survival, PROG and toxicity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Which patients with ES-SCLC are most likely to benefit from more aggressive radiotherapy: A secondary analysis of the Phase III CREST trial.

    PubMed

    Slotman, Ben J; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; van Tinteren, Harm; Keijser, Astrid; Praag, John; Knegjens, Joost; Hatton, Matthew; van Dam, Iris; van der Leest, Annija; Reymen, Bart; Stigt, Jos; Haslett, Kate; Tripathi, Devashish; Smit, Egbert F; Senan, Suresh

    2017-06-01

    In ES-SCLC patients with residual intrathoracic disease after first-line chemotherapy, the addition of thoracic radiotherapy reduces the risk of intrathoracic recurrence, and improves 2-year survival. To identify patient subgroups for future trials investigating higher dose (extra)thoracic radiotherapy, we investigated the prognostic importance of number and sites of metastases in patients included in the CREST trial. Additional data on sites and numbers of metastases were collected from individual records of 260 patients from the top 9 recruiting centers in the randomized CREST trial (53% of 495 study patients), which compared thoracic radiotherapy (TRT) to no TRT in ES-SCLC patients after any response to chemotherapy. All patients received prophylactic cranial irradiation. The clinical characteristics and outcomes of the 260 patients analyzed here did not differ significantly from that of the other 235 patients included in the CREST trial, except that fewer patients had a WHO=0 performance status (24% vs 45%), and a higher proportion had WHO=2 (15% vs 5%; p<0.0001). No distant metastases were recorded in 5%, 39% had metastases confined to one organ, 34% to two, and 22% to three or more organ sites. Metastases were present in the liver (47%), bone (40%), lung (28%), extrathoracic (non-supraclavicular) lymph nodes (19%), supraclavicular nodes (18%), adrenals (17%) and other sites (12%). The OS (p=0.02) and PFS (p=0.04) were significantly better in patients with 2 or fewer metastases, with OS significantly worse if liver (p=0.03) and/or bone metastases (p=0.04) were present. This analysis of patients recruited from the top 9 accruing centers in the CREST trial suggests that future studies evaluating more intensive thoracic and extra-thoracic radiotherapy in ES-SCLC should focus on patients with fewer than 3 distant metastases. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Impact of Diabetes, Insulin, and Metformin Use on the Outcome of Patients With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Primary Breast Cancer: Analysis From the ALTTO Phase III Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Sonnenblick, Amir; Agbor-Tarh, Dominique; Bradbury, Ian; Di Cosimo, Serena; Azim, Hatem A; Fumagalli, Debora; Sarp, Severine; Wolff, Antonio C; Andersson, Michael; Kroep, Judith; Cufer, Tanja; Simon, Sergio D; Salman, Pamela; Toi, Masakazu; Harris, Lyndsay; Gralow, Julie; Keane, Maccon; Moreno-Aspitia, Alvaro; Piccart-Gebhart, Martine; de Azambuja, Evandro

    2017-05-01

    Purpose Previous studies have suggested an association between metformin use and improved outcome in patients with diabetes and breast cancer. In the current study, we aimed to explore this association in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2 ) -positive primary breast cancer in the context of a large, phase III adjuvant trial. Patients and Methods The ALTTO trial randomly assigned patients with HER2-positive breast cancer to receive 1 year of either trastuzumab alone, lapatinib alone, their sequence, or their combination. In this substudy, we evaluated whether patients with diabetes at study entry-with or without metformin treatment-were associated with different disease-free survival (DFS), distant disease-free survival (DDFS), and overall survival (OS) compared with patients without diabetes. Results A total of 8,381 patients were included in the current analysis: 7,935 patients (94.7%) had no history of diabetes at diagnosis, 186 patients (2.2%) had diabetes with no metformin treatment, and 260 patients (3.1%) were diabetic and had been treated with metformin. Median follow-up was 4.5 years (0.16 to 6.31 years), at which 1,205 (14.38%), 929 (11.08%), and 528 (6.3%) patients experienced DFS, DDFS, and OS events, respectively. Patients with diabetes who had not been treated with metformin experienced worse DFS (multivariable hazard ratio [HR], 1.40; 95% CI, 1.01 to 1.94; P = .043), DDFS (multivariable HR, 1.56; 95% CI, 1.10 to 2.22; P = .013), and OS (multivariable HR, 1.87; 95% CI, 1.23 to 2.85; P = .004). This effect was limited to hormone receptor-positive patients. Whereas insulin treatment was associated with a detrimental effect, metformin had a salutary effect in patients with diabetes who had HER2-positive and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Conclusion Metformin may improve the worse prognosis that is associated with diabetes and insulin treatment, mainly in patients with primary HER2-positive and hormone receptor-positive breast cancer.

  7. Phase I clinical trial of the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody nimotuzumab with concurrent external thoracic radiotherapy in Canadian patients diagnosed with stage IIb, III or IV non-small cell lung cancer unsuitable for radical therapy.

    PubMed

    Bebb, Gwyn; Smith, Colum; Rorke, Stewart; Boland, William; Nicacio, Leonardo; Sukhoo, Ryan; Brade, Anthony

    2011-04-01

    Many patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) are eligible only for palliative radiation (RT) at presentation. This study was designed to assess the feasibility of adding the anti-EGFR monoclonal antibody nimotuzumab to palliative thoracic RT. Patients with stage IIB, III or IV NSCLC considered unsuitable for radical radiation or chemo-radiation received nimotuzumab weekly 8× (100, 200 or 400 mg) with radiation (30 or 36 Gy in 3 Gy fractions). If response or disease stability was observed, nimotuzumab was continued every other week starting from week 10 until progression or toxicity. Eighteen patients were enrolled: 6 at 100 mg, 7 at 200 mg, 5 at 400 mg nimotuzumab. Patient characteristics included median age 69 years, 11 males, 17 smokers, 17 Caucasians, stage IIIA/IIIB/IV 2/7/9, 5 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status (PS) 2; 9 adenocarcinoma. The most commonly reported adverse events were fatigue, anorexia, chills, pain and hypophosphatemia (grades 1 to 2 in most patients). No severe skin or allergic toxicity was noted. No dose-limiting toxicity was encountered. Objective response rate and disease control rate inside the radiation field were 66 and 94.0%, respectively. Nimotuzumab administered concurrently with palliative thoracic radiation is well tolerated at each of the three doses investigated in NSCLC patients unsuitable for radical treatment. The low toxicity and absence of rash make this combination therapeutically attractive for frail patients with other co-morbidities and poor performance status. These results support further testing of this regimen in the phase II setting.

  8. Efficacy and safety of bilastine in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria: A multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group phase II/III study.

    PubMed

    Hide, Michihiro; Yagami, Akiko; Togawa, Michinori; Saito, Akihiro; Furue, Masutaka

    2017-04-01

    Bilastine, a novel non-sedating second-generation H1-antihistamine, has been widely used in the treatment of allergic rhinoconjunctivitis and urticaria with a recommended dose of 20 mg once daily in most European countries since 2010. We evaluated its efficacy and safety in Japanese patients with chronic spontaneous urticaria (CSU). We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase II/III study (trial registration No. JapicCTI-142574). Patients (age, 18-74 years) were randomly assigned to receive bilastine 20 mg, 10 mg or placebo once daily for 2 weeks. The primary efficacy endpoint was the change from baseline (Day -3 to 0) in total symptom score (TSS) at 2 weeks (Day 8-14), consisting of the itch and rash scores. A total of 304 patients were randomly allocated to bilastine 20 mg (101 patients), bilastine 10 mg (100 patients), and placebo (103 patients). The changes in TSS at 2 weeks were significantly decreased by bilastine 20 mg than did placebo (p < 0.001), demonstrating the superiority of bilastine 20 mg. Bilastine 10 mg also showed a significant difference from placebo (p < 0.001). The TSS changes for the bilastine showed significant improvement from Day 1, and were maintained during the treatment period. The Dermatology Life Quality Index scores were also improved in bilastine than in placebo. The bilastine treatments were safe and well tolerated. Two-week treatment with bilastine (20 or 10 mg) once daily was effective and tolerable in Japanese patients with CSU, demonstrating an early onset of action. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Motexafin Gadolinium Combined With Prompt Whole Brain Radiotherapy Prolongs Time to Neurologic Progression in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients With Brain Metastases: Results of a Phase III Trial

    SciTech Connect

    Mehta, Minesh P. Shapiro, William R.; Phan, See C.; Gervais, Radj; Carrie, Christian; Chabot, Pierre; Patchell, Roy A.; Glantz, Michael J.; Recht, Lawrence; Langer, Corey; Sur, Ranjan K.; Roa, Wilson H.; Mahe, Marc A.; Fortin, Andre; Nieder, Carsten; Meyers, Christina A.; Smith, Jennifer A.; Miller, Richard A.; Renschler, Markus F.

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To determine the efficacy of motexafin gadolinium (MGd) in combination with whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) for the treatment of brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: In an international, randomized, Phase III study, patients with brain metastases from non-small-cell lung cancer were randomized to WBRT with or without MGd. The primary endpoint was the interval to neurologic progression, determined by a centralized Events Review Committee who was unaware of the treatment the patients had received. Results: Of 554 patients, 275 were randomized to WBRT and 279 to WBRT+MGd. Treatment with MGd was well tolerated, and 92% of the intended doses were administered. The most common MGd-related Grade 3+ adverse events included liver function abnormalities (5.5%), asthenia (4.0%), and hypertension (4%). MGd improved the interval to neurologic progression compared with WBRT alone (15 vs. 10 months; p = 0.12, hazard ratio [HR] = 0.78) and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.057, HR = 0.78). The WBRT patients required more salvage brain surgery or radiosurgery than did the WBRT+MGd patients (54 vs. 25 salvage procedures, p < 0.001). A statistically significant interaction between the geographic region and MGd treatment effect (which was in the prespecified analysis plan) and between treatment delay and MGd treatment effect was found. In North American patients, where treatment was more prompt, a statistically significant prolongation of the interval to neurologic progression, from 8.8 months for WBRT to 24.2 months for WBRT+MGd (p = 0.004, HR = 0.53), and the interval to neurocognitive progression (p = 0.06, HR = 0.73) were observed. Conclusion: In the intent-to-treat analysis, MGd exhibited a favorable trend in neurologic outcomes. MGd significantly prolonged the interval to neurologic progression in non-small-cell lung cancer patients with brain metastases receiving prompt WBRT. The toxicity was acceptable.

  10. Induction therapy with cetuximab plus docetaxel, cisplatin, and 5-fluorouracil (ETPF) in patients with resectable nonmetastatic stage III or IV squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx. A GERCOR phase II ECHO-07 study.

    PubMed

    Chibaudel, Benoist; Lacave, Roger; Lefevre, Marine; Soussan, Patrick; Antoine, Martine; Périé, Sophie; Belloc, Jean-Baptiste; Banal, Alain; Albert, Sébastien; Chabolle, Frédéric; Céruse, Philippe; Baril, Philippe; Gatineau, Michel; Housset, Martin; Moukoko, Rachel; Benetkiewicz, Magdalena; de Gramont, Aimery; Bonnetain, Franck; Lacau St Guily, Jean

    2015-05-01

    Induction TPF regimen is a standard treatment option for squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oropharynx. The efficacy and safety of adding cetuximab to induction TPF (ETPF) therapy was evaluated. Patients with nonmetastatic resectable stage III/IV SCC of the oropharynx were treated with weekly cetuximab followed the same day by docetaxel and cisplatin and by a continuous infusion of 5-fluorouracil on days 1-5 (every 3 weeks, 3 cycles). The primary endpoint was clinical and radiological complete response (crCR) of primary tumor at 3 onths. Secondary endpoints were crCR rates, overall response, pathological CR, progression-free survival, overall survival, and safety. Forty-two patients were enrolled, and 41 received ETPF. The all nine planned cetuximab doses and the full three doses of planned chemotherapy were completed in 31 (76%) and 36 (88%) patients, respectively. Twelve (29%) patients required dose reduction. The crCR of primary tumor at the completion of therapy was observed in nine (22%) patients. ETPF was associated with a tumor objective response rate (ORR) of 58%. The most frequent grade 3-4 toxicities were as follows: nonfebrile neutropenia (39%), febrile neutropenia (19%), diarrhea (10%), and stomatitis (12%). Eighteen (44%) patients experienced acne-like skin reactions of any grade. One toxic death occurred secondary to chemotherapy-induced colitis with colonic perforation. This phase II study reports an interesting response rate for ETPF in patients with moderately advanced SCC of the oropharynx. The schedule of ETPF evaluated in this study cannot be recommended at this dosage.

  11. Efficacy and safety of adalimumab among patients with moderate to severe psoriasis with co-morbidities: Subanalysis of results from a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Kimball, Alexa B; Bensimon, Arielle G; Guerin, Annie; Yu, Andrew P; Wu, Eric Q; Okun, Martin M; Bao, Yanjun; Gupta, Shiraz R; Mulani, Parvez M

    2011-02-01

    Psoriasis is associated with a variety of major physical and mental co-morbidities. To assess the incremental burden of co-morbidities on patient-reported outcomes and evaluate the efficacy and safety of adalimumab in psoriasis patients with co-morbidities. Data were obtained from the initial 16-week, double-blind treatment period of REVEAL (Randomized controlled EValuation of adalimumab Every other week dosing in moderate to severe psoriasis triAL), a randomized, multicenter, phase III clinical trial. Patients with moderate to severe psoriasis were randomized in a 2 : 1 ratio to receive adalimumab 80 mg (two 40 mg injections administered subcutaneously) at baseline followed by one 40 mg injection every other week from week 1 to week 15 or placebo. Clinical severity (Psoriasis Area and Severity Index [PASI]) and patient-reported outcomes (Dermatology Life Quality Index [DLQI], Short Form 36 [SF-36] health survey, Work Productivity and Activity Impairment [WPAI] questionnaire) were assessed during the trial. The effect of selected co-morbidities (i.e. hypertension, psoriatic arthritis, hyperlipidemia, obesity, depression, other forms of arthritis, diabetes mellitus, and other cardiovascular diseases) on patient-reported outcomes was evaluated using multivariate analysis of covariance models. Subgroup analyses were performed by co-morbidity type to statistically compare the clinical efficacy, patient-reported outcome benefits, and safety of adalimumab with placebo in the presence of these conditions. Study co-morbidities were each independently associated with significantly greater impairment on at least one general patient-reported outcome measured at baseline (all p < 0.05), with the exception of hyperlipidemia. During the 16-week study, adalimumab patients demonstrated significantly greater PASI 75 response rates (defined as a reduction of at least 75% in PASI scores from baseline) compared with placebo patients for all co-morbidity subgroups

  12. Comparative effectiveness of combined therapy inhibiting EGFR and VEGF pathways in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis of 16 phase II/III randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shangli; Wu, Tongwei; Yan, Guangyue; Cheng, Sijin; Cui, Kang; Xi, Ying; Qi, Xiaolong; Zhang, Jie; Ma, Wang

    2017-01-01

    Background & Aims Combined therapy inhibiting EGFR and VEGF pathways is becoming a promising therapy in the treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), however, with controversy. The study aims to compare the efficacy of combined inhibition therapy versus control therapy (including placebo, single EGFR inhibition and single VEGF inhibition) in patients with advanced NSCLC. Materials and Methods An adequate literature search in EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and European Society of Medical Oncology (ESMO) was conducted. Phase II or III randomized controlled trials (RCTs) that compared effectiveness between combined inhibition therapy and control therapy in patients with advanced NSCLC were eligible. The endpoint was overall response rate (ORR), progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Sixteen phase II or III RCTs involving a total of 7,109 patients were included. The results indicated that the combined inhibition therapy significantly increased the ORR (OR = 1.59, 95% CI = 1.36-1.87, p<0.00001; I2 = 36%) when compared to control therapy. In the subgroup analysis, the combined inhibition therapy clearly increased the ORR (OR = 2.04, 95% CI = 1.60-2.60, p<0.00001; I2 = 0%) and improved the PFS (HR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.71-0.85, p<0.00001;I2 = 0%) when compared with the placebo, and similar results was detected when compared with the single EGFR inhibition in terms of ORR (OR = 1.39, 95% CI = 1.12-1.74, p = 0.003; I2 = 30%) and PFS (HR = 0.73, 95% CI = 0.67-0.81, p<0.0001; I2 = 50%). No obvious difference was found between the combined inhibition therapy and single VEGF inhibition in term of ORR, however, combined inhibition therapy significantly decreased the PFS when compared to the single VEGF inhibition therapy (HR = 1.70, 95% CI = 1.34-2.17, p<0.0001; I2 = 50%). Besides, no significant difference was observed between the combined inhibition therapy

  13. Comparison of Provider-Assessed and Patient-Reported Outcome Measures of Acute Skin Toxicity During a Phase III Trial of Mometasone Cream Versus Placebo During Breast Radiotherapy: The North Central Cancer Treatment Group (N06C4)

    SciTech Connect

    Neben-Wittich, Michelle A.; Atherton, Pamela J.; Schwartz, David J.; Sloan, Jeff A.; Griffin, Patricia C.; Deming, Richard L.; Anders, Jon C.; Loprinzi, Charles L.; Burger, Kelli N.; Martenson, James A.; Miller, Robert C.

    2011-10-01

    Purpose: Considerable interobserver variability exists among providers and between providers and patients when measuring subjective symptoms. In the recently published Phase III N06C4 trial of mometasone cream vs. placebo to prevent radiation dermatitis, the primary provider-assessed (PA) endpoint, using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), was negative. However, prospectively planned secondary analyses of patient-reported outcomes (PROs), using the Skindex-16 and Skin Toxicity Assessment Tool (STAT), were positive. This study assesses the relationship between PA outcomes and PROs. Methods and Materials: Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to compare the three tools. Statistical correlations were defined as follows: <0.5, mild; 0.5-0.7, moderate; and >0.7, strong. Results: CTCAE dermatitis moderately correlated with STAT erythema, and CTCAE pruritus strongly correlated with STAT itching. CTCAE pruritus had a moderate correlation with Skindex-16 itching. Comparing the 2 PRO tools, Skindex-16 itching correlated moderately with STAT itching. Skindex-16 burning, hurting, irritation, and persistence all showed the strongest correlation with STAT burning; they showed moderate correlations with STAT itching and tenderness. Conclusions: The PRO Skindex-16 correlated well with the PRO portions of STAT, but neither tool correlated well with CTCAE. PROs delineated a wider spectrum of toxicity than PA measures and provided more information on rash, redness, pruritus, and annoyance measures compared with CTCAE findings of rash and pruritus. PROs may provide a more complete measure of patient experience than single-symptom, PA endpoints in clinical trials assessing radiation skin toxicity.

  14. Comprehensive immunological analyses of colorectal cancer patients in the phase I/II study of quickly matured dendritic cell vaccine pulsed with carcinoembryonic antigen peptide.

    PubMed

    Sakakibara, Mitsuru; Kanto, Tatsuya; Hayakawa, Michiyo; Kuroda, Shoko; Miyatake, Hideki; Itose, Ichiyo; Miyazaki, Masanori; Kakita, Naruyasu; Higashitani, Koyo; Matsubara, Tokuhiro; Hiramatsu, Naoki; Kasahara, Akinori; Takehara, Tetsuo; Hayashi, Norio

    2011-11-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccine has been used to treat patients with advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). The results of vaccine-induced clinical responses have not always been satisfactory partially because of DC incompetence. In order to evaluate the feasibility of novel mature DCs for therapeutic adjuvants against CRC, we conducted clinical trials with carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) peptide-loaded DC quickly generated with a combination of OK432 (Streptococcuspyogenes preparation), prostanoid, and interferon-α (OPA-DC). In the ten patients enrolled in this study, the OPA-DC vaccine was well tolerated and administered four times every 2 weeks except for two patients, who were switched to other treatments due to disease progression. Among the eight evaluable patients, one displayed stable disease (SD), while the remaining seven showed progressive disease (PD). In the SD patient, natural killer (NK) cell frequency and cytolytic activity were increased. In the same patient, the frequency of CEA-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) increased stepwise with repetitive vaccinations; however, most of the CTLs exhibited central memory phenotype. In those with PD, NK cells proliferated well regardless of failure of response, whereas CTLs failed to do so. We concluded that the OPA-DC vaccine is well tolerated and has immune-stimulatory capacity in patients with CRC. Additional modulation is needed to attain significant clinical impact.

  15. Preliminary results of a phase I/II clinical trial using in situ photoimmunotherapy combined with imiquimod for metastatic melanoma patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiaosong; Naylor, Mark F.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Teague, T. Kent; Howard, C. Anthony; Murray, Cynthia; Chen, Wei R.

    2010-02-01

    In Situ Photoimmunotherapy (ISPI), a newly developed modality for cancer therapy, has been shown to be able to modulate the body's own immune response. This clinical trial was designed to evaluate the safety and therapeutic effect of ISPI, using imiquimod as its immunoadjuvant for metastatic melanoma patients. ISPI consisted of three main components applied directly to the cutaneous metastases: 1) local application of topical imiquimod; 2) injection of indocyanine green; and 3) an 805 nm laser for local irradiation. All patients completed at least one cycle of treatment. All the patients completed at least one cycle of treatments; one patient received 6 cycles. The most common adverse effects were rash, pruritus, pain, fatigue and anorexia. Fever, chills, vomiting and cellulitis were relative rare. No grade 4 toxicity was observed. Complete Response (CR) was observed in 6 patients. Median overall survival of the 11 evaluated patients was 12.2 months. Six of the eleven patients were still alive at the time of this report. Treatment of ISPI using imiquimod is safe and well tolerant. Our preliminary clinical results suggest that this new method can be a promising modality for metastatic melanoma.

  16. Impact of Viral Status on Survival in Patients Receiving Sorafenib for Advanced Hepatocellular Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Phase III Trials.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Richard; Psarelli, Eftychia-Eirini; Berhane, Sarah; Khan, Harun; Johnson, Philip

    2017-02-20

    Purpose Following the Sorafenib Hepatocellular Carcinoma Assessment Randomized Protocol (SHARP) trial, sorafenib has become the standard of care for patients with advanced unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma, but the relation between survival advantage and disease etiology remains unclear. To address this, we undertook an individual patient data meta-analysis of three large prospective randomized trials in which sorafenib was the control arm. Methods Of a total of 3,256 patients, 1,643 (50%) who received sorafenib were available. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). A Bayesian hierarchical approach for individual patient data meta-analyses was applied using a piecewise exponential model. Results are presented in terms of hazard ratios comparing sorafenib with alternative therapies according to hepatitis C virus (HCV) or hepatitis B virus (HBV) status. Results Hazard ratios show improved OS for sorafenib in patients who are both HBV negative and HCV positive (log [hazard ratio], -0.27; 95% CI, -0.46 to -0.06). Median unadjusted survival is 12.6 (11.15 to 13.8) months for sorafenib and 10.2 (8.88 to 12.2) months for "other" treatments in this subgroup. There was no evidence of improvement in OS for any other patient subgroups defined by HBV and HCV. Results were consistent across all trials with heterogeneity assessed using Cochran's Q statistic. Conclusion There is consistent evidence that the effect of sorafenib on OS is dependent on patients' hepatitis status. There is an improved OS for patients negative for HBV and positive for HCV when treated with sorafenib. There was no evidence of any improvement in OS attributable to sorafenib for patients positive for HBV and negative for HCV.

  17. Overall Survival in Patients With Advanced Melanoma Who Received Nivolumab Versus Investigator's Choice Chemotherapy in CheckMate 037: A Randomized, Controlled, Open-Label Phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Larkin, James; Minor, David; D'Angelo, Sandra; Neyns, Bart; Smylie, Michael; Miller, Wilson H; Gutzmer, Ralf; Linette, Gerald; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Lao, Christopher D; Lorigan, Paul; Grossmann, Kenneth; Hassel, Jessica C; Sznol, Mario; Daud, Adil; Sosman, Jeffrey; Khushalani, Nikhil; Schadendorf, Dirk; Hoeller, Christoph; Walker, Dana; Kong, George; Horak, Christine; Weber, Jeffrey

    2017-07-03

    Purpose Until recently, limited options existed for patients with advanced melanoma who experienced disease progression while receiving treatment with ipilimumab. Here, we report the coprimary overall survival (OS) end point of CheckMate 037, which has previously shown that nivolumab resulted in more patients achieving an objective response compared with chemotherapy regimens in ipilimumab-refractory patients with advanced melanoma. Patients and Methods Patients were stratified by programmed death-ligand 1 expression, BRAF status, and best prior cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 therapy response, then randomly assigned 2:1 to nivolumab 3 mg/kg intravenously every 2 weeks or investigator's choice chemotherapy (ICC; dacarbazine 1,000 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks or carboplatin area under the curve 6 plus paclitaxel 175 mg/m(2) every 3 weeks). Patients were treated until they experienced progression or unacceptable toxicity, with follow-up of approximately 2 years. Results Two hundred seventy-two patients were randomly assigned to nivolumab (99% treated) and 133 to ICC (77% treated). More nivolumab-treated patients had brain metastases (20% v 14%) and increased lactate dehydrogenase levels (52% v 38%) at baseline; 41% of patients treated with ICC versus 11% of patients treated with nivolumab received anti-programmed death 1 agents after randomly assigned therapy. Median OS was 16 months for nivolumab versus 14 months for ICC (hazard ratio, 0.95; 95.54% CI, 0.73 to 1.24); median progression-free survival was 3.1 months versus 3.7 months, respectively (hazard ratio, 1.0; 95.1% CI, 0.78 to 1.436). Overall response rate (27% v 10%) and median duration of response (32 months v 13 months) were notably higher for nivolumab versus ICC. Fewer grade 3 and 4 treatment-related adverse events were observed in patients on nivolumab (14% v 34%). Conclusion Nivolumab demonstrated higher, more durable responses but no difference in survival compared with ICC. OS should be interpreted with

  18. Incidence of bone pain in patients with breast cancer treated with lipegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim: an integrated analysis from phase II and III studies.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, I M; Bias, P; Buchner, A

    2016-01-01

    Lipegfilgrastim is a once-per-cycle, fixed-dose, glycoPEGylated recombinant granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) recently approved in Europe to reduce the duration of chemotherapy-induced neutropenia and incidence of febrile neutropenia in patients with cancer receiving chemotherapy. Bone pain-related (BPR) adverse events are commonly associated with G-CSF therapy. This post hoc analysis examined BPR treatment-emergent adverse events (TEAEs) in two comparative studies of lipegfilgrastim or pegfilgrastim in patients receiving chemotherapy. A post hoc analysis was conducted using integrated data from two double-blind randomized studies in patients with breast cancer receiving docetaxel and doxorubicin and treated prophylactically with subcutaneous lipegfilgrastim 6 mg or pegfilgrastim 6 mg once per cycle. BPR TEAEs were defined as arthralgia, back pain, bone pain, musculoskeletal chest pain, musculoskeletal discomfort, musculoskeletal pain, myalgia, neck pain, noncardiac chest pain, and pain in extremity. Relationship of BPR TEAEs to study treatment or chemotherapy was also reported by the investigators. The analysis included 306 patients (lipegfilgrastim: n = 151; pegfilgrastim: n = 155). The proportion of patients experiencing BPR TEAEs was similar with lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim (25.2 vs 21.9%, respectively), as was the proportion of patients experiencing BPR treatment-emergent adverse drug reactions (TEADRs) (18.5 vs 16.8%, respectively). No BPR TEADRs were serious, and none led to discontinuation. Nonsevere BPR TEAEs and TEADRs were observed in patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy and G-CSF; rates of BPR events were similar between lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim. The similar BPR safety profile of lipegfilgrastim and pegfilgrastim provides support for use in patients with breast cancer receiving chemotherapy.

  19. Phase III Study to Assess Long-Term (52-Week) Safety and Efficacy of Mirabegron, a β3 -Adrenoceptor Agonist, in Japanese Patients with Overactive Bladder.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Osamu; Ikeda, Yasushi; Ohkawa, Sumito

    2017-01-01

    To investigate safety, tolerability and efficacy of long-term (52 weeks) open-label treatment with mirabegron 50 mg, with an optional dose increase to 100 mg, in patients with overactive bladder (OAB). Patients received mirabegron 50 mg once daily for 52 weeks. If efficacy was insufficient at week 8, the dose could be increased to 100 mg. Safety was evaluated based on vital signs, adverse events (AEs), laboratory findings, electrocardiogram and post-void residual volume. Treatment efficacy was assessed with a 3-day micturition diary and the King's Health Questionnaire (KHQ). Two hundred and four patients were enrolled; mirabegron dose was maintained at 50 mg in 153 patients and increased to 100 mg in 50 patients. Mirabegron was well tolerated at both doses. Incidences of AEs and treatment-related AEs were 91.4% and 33.6% in patients on 50 mg, and 100% and 30.0% in patients on 100 mg, respectively. Time course changes in systolic or diastolic blood pressure and pulse rate were not considered clinically significant. At the end of treatment (EOT), patients on 50 mg and 100 mg showed improvement in frequency and urgency. Improvements from baseline to EOT in quality of life scores were observed for all KHQ domains. There were no safety or tolerability concerns associated with mirabegron 50 mg (with an optional dose increase to 100 mg) over 52 weeks. Improvement in micturition variables was maintained with mirabegron 50 mg from weeks 8 to 52. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. 5-Year Survival in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Randomized, Phase III Trial of Fludarabine Plus Cyclophosphamide With or Without Oblimersen

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Susan; Moore, Joseph O.; Boyd, Thomas E.; Larratt, Loree M.; Skotnicki, Aleksander B.; Koziner, Benjamin; Chanan-Khan, Asher A.; Seymour, John F.; Gribben, John; Itri, Loretta M.; Rai, Kanti R.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose A randomized trial of oblimersen plus fludarabine/cyclophosphamide (OBL-FC; n = 120) versus FC (n = 121) was conducted in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The primary end point was met: the complete response (CR) rate, defined as complete or nodular partial response, was significantly greater with OBL-FC than with FC (17% v 7%; P = .025). Among patients with CR, response duration was significantly longer with OBL-FC than with FC (median not reached; > 36 months v 22 months; P = .03). Maximum benefit with OBL-FC, including a four-fold increase in CR rate and a survival benefit with 3 years of follow-up (hazard ratio, 0.53; P = .05), was observed in patients with fludarabine-sensitive disease. We evaluated long-term survival and poststudy CLL therapy among all randomly assigned patients. Methods Poststudy CLL treatment information was collected. Patients were observed for survival for up to 5 years from the date of random assignment. Results Poststudy CLL treatment was balanced between arms. Intent-to-treat analysis of 5-year survival showed no significant between-treatment difference (hazard ratio, 0.87; P = .34). Among the greater than 40% of patients with complete or partial remission, a significant 5-year survival benefit was observed with OBL-FC (hazard ratio, 0.60; P = .038). Among patients with fludarabine-sensitive disease who had previously demonstrated maximum benefit with OBL-FC, the previously observed survival benefit improved: a 50% reduction in the risk of death was observed (P = .004). Conclusion In relapsed/refractory CLL, OBL combined with FC offers patients who achieve complete or partial remission, as well as those who have fludarabine-sensitive disease, a significant survival benefit. PMID:19738118

  1. Mobilisation of Hematopoietic CD34+ Precursor Cells in Patients with Acute Stroke Is Safe - Results of an Open-Labeled Non Randomized Phase I/II Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kraemer, Mathias; Schormann, Thorsten; Schlachetzki, Felix; Schuierer, Gerhard; Luerding, Ralph; Hennemann, Burkhard; Orso, Evelyn; Dabringhaus, Andreas; Winkler, Jürgen; Bogdahn, Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Background Regenerative strategies in the treatment of acute stroke may have great potential. Hematopoietic growth factors mobilize hematopoietic stem cells and may convey neuroprotective effects. We examined the safety, potential functional and structural changes, and CD34+ cell–mobilization characteristics of G-CSF treatment in patients with acute ischemic stroke. Methods and Results Three cohorts of patients (8, 6, and 6 patients per cohort) were treated subcutaneously with 2.5, 5, or 10 µg/kg body weight rhG-CSF for 5 consecutive days within 12 hrs of onset of acute stroke. Standard treatment included IV thrombolysis. Safety monitoring consisted of obtaining standardized clinical assessment scores, monitoring of CD34+ stem cells, blood chemistry, serial neuroradiology, and neuropsychology. Voxel-guided morphometry (VGM) enabled an assessment of changes in the patients' structural parenchyma. 20 patients (mean age 55 yrs) were enrolled in this study, 5 of whom received routine thrombolytic therapy with r-tPA. G-CSF treatment was discontinued in 4 patients because of unrelated adverse events. Mobilization of CD34+ cells was observed with no concomitant changes in blood chemistry, except for an increase in the leukocyte count up to 75,500/µl. Neuroradiological and neuropsychological follow-up studies did not disclose any specific G-CSF toxicity. VGM findings indicated substantial atrophy of related hemispheres, a substantial increase in the CSF space, and a localized increase in parenchyma within the ischemic area in 2 patients. Conclusions We demonstrate a good safety profile for daily administration of G-CSF when begun within 12 hours after onset of ischemic stroke and, in part in combination with routine IV thrombolysis. Additional analyses using VGM and a battery of neuropsychological tests indicated a positive functional and potentially structural effect of G-CSF treatment in some of our patients. Trial Registration German Clinical Trial Register DRKS

  2. A Phase III, randomized, controlled, non-inferiority trial of ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg every 8 h versus vancomycin plus aztreonam in patients with complicated skin and soft tissue infection with systemic inflammatory response or underlying comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Dryden, Matthew; Zhang, Yingyuan; Wilson, David; Iaconis, Joseph P.; Gonzalez, Jesus

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Increasing the ceftaroline fosamil dose beyond 600 mg every 12 h may provide additional benefit for patients with complicated skin and soft tissue infections (cSSTIs) with severe inflammation and/or reduced pathogen susceptibility. A Phase III multicentre, randomized trial evaluated the safety and efficacy of ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg every 8 h in this setting. Methods Adult patients with cSSTI and systemic inflammation or comorbidities were randomized 2:1 to intravenous ceftaroline fosamil (600 mg every 8 h) or vancomycin (15 mg/kg every 12 h) plus aztreonam (1 g every 8 h) for 5–14 days. Clinical cure was assessed at the test of cure (TOC) visit (8–15 days after the final dose) in the modified ITT (MITT) and clinically evaluable (CE) populations. Non-inferiority was defined as a lower limit of the 95% CI around the treatment difference greater than –10%. An MRSA-focused expansion period was initiated after completion of the main study. Clinicaltrials.gov registration numbers NCT01499277 and NCT02202135. Results Clinical cure rates at TOC demonstrated non-inferiority of ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg every 8 h versus vancomycin plus aztreonam in the MITT and CE populations: 396/506 (78.3%) versus 202/255 (79.2%) patients (difference −1.0%, 95% CI −6.9, 5.4) and 342/395 (86.6%) versus 180/211 (85.3%) patients (difference 1.3%, 95% CI −4.3, 7.5), respectively. In the expansion period, 3/4 (75%) patients treated with ceftaroline fosamil were cured at TOC. The frequency of adverse events was similar between groups. Conclusions Ceftaroline fosamil 600 mg every 8 h was effective for cSSTI patients with evidence of systemic inflammation and/or comorbidities. No new safety signals were identified. PMID:27585969

  3. A phase III adjuvant randomised trial of 6 cycles of 5-fluorouracil-epirubicine-cyclophosphamide (FEC100) versus 4 FEC 100 followed by 4 Taxol (FEC-T) in node positive breast cancer patients (Trial B2000).

    PubMed

    Delbaldo, C; Serin, D; Mousseau, M; Greget, S; Audhuy, B; Priou, F; Berdah, J F; Teissier, E; Laplaige, P; Zelek, L; Quinaux, E; Buyse, M; Piedbois, P

    2014-01-01

    Standard adjuvant chemotherapy regimens for patients with node positive (N+) breast cancer consisted of anthracycline followed by taxane. The European Association for Research in Oncology embarked in 2000 on a phase III trial comparing 6 cycles of FEC100 versus 4 FEC100 followed by 4 Taxol. Primary end-point was disease free survival. Secondary end-points were overall survival, local recurrence free interval, metastases free interval and safety. Between March 2000 and December 2002, 837 patients were randomised between 6FEC100 for 6 cycles (417patients) or FEC100 for 4 cycles then Taxol 175mg/m(2)/3 weeks for 4 cycles (4FEC100-4T) (420 patients). One thousand patients had been planned initially but the trial was closed earlier due to slow accrual. Hazard ratios (HRs) were 0.99 for disease-free survival (DFS) (95%CI: 0.77-1.26; p=0.91), and 0.85 for overall survival (OS) (95%CI: 0.62-1.15; p=0.29). Nine-year DFS were 62.9% versus 62.5% for 6FEC100 and 4FEC100-4T, respectively. Nine-year OS were 73.9% versus 77% for 6FEC100 and 4FEC100-4T, respectively. Toxicity analyses based on 803 evaluable patients showed that overall grade 3-4 toxicities were similar in both arms (63% versus 58% for 6FEC100 arm and 4FEC100-4T arm, respectively; p=0.16). In this trial replacing the last 2 FEC100 cycles of 6FEC100 regimen by 4 Taxol does not lead to a discernable DFS or OS advantage. The lack of a significant difference between the randomised treatment arms may however be due to a lack of power of this trial to detect small, yet clinically worthwhile, treatment benefits. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Phase I/II study of adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with zoledronic acid and IL-2 to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Yagi, Junji; Minato, Nagahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2011-08-01

    Human Vγ2 Vδ2-bearing T cells have recently received much attention in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we conducted a phase I/II clinical trial of the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Eleven patients who had undergone nephrectomy and had lung metastasis were enrolled. Peripheral blood γδ T cells obtained from the patients were stimulated ex vivo with 2-methyl-3-butenyl-1-pyrophosphate (2M3B1PP), a synthetic pyrophosphomonoester antigen, and transferred in combination with zoledronic acid (Zol) and teceleukin (recombinant human interleukin-2). Expanded γδ T cells exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against tumor cells in vitro, and the proportion of peripheral blood γδ T cells among CD3(+) cells typically peaked three to 5 days after transfer. Tumor doubling time was prolonged in all 11 patients, and the best overall responses were 1 CR, 5 SD, and 5 PD, as defined based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Although ten patients developed adverse reactions of grade ≥3, they were likely to have been the result of the concomitant infusion of Zol and IL-2, and most symptoms swiftly reverted to normal during the course of treatment. In conclusion, this clinical trial demonstrated that our regimen for the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with Zol and IL-2 was well tolerated and that objective clinical responses could be achieved in some patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  5. Dose-Reduced Versus Standard Conditioning Followed by Allogeneic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome: A Prospective Randomized Phase III Study of the EBMT (RICMAC Trial).

    PubMed

    Kröger, Nicolaus; Iacobelli, Simona; Franke, Georg-Nikolaus; Platzbecker, Uwe; Uddin, Ruzena; Hübel, Kai; Scheid, Christof; Weber, Thomas; Robin, Marie; Stelljes, Matthias; Afanasyev, Boris; Heim, Dominik; Deliliers, Giorgio Lambertenghi; Onida, Francesco; Dreger, Peter; Pini, Massimo; Guidi, Stefano; Volin, Liisa; Günther, Andreas; Bethge, Wolfgang; Poiré, Xavier; Kobbe, Guido; van Os, Marleen; Brand, Ronald; de Witte, Theo

    2017-07-01

    Purpose To compare a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen (RIC) with a myeloablative conditioning regimen (MAC) before allogeneic transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) within a randomized trial. Patients and Methods Within the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation, we conducted a prospective, multicenter, open-label, randomized phase III trial that compared a busulfan-based RIC with MAC in patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia. A total of 129 patients were enrolled from 18 centers. Patients were randomly assigned in a 1:1 ratio and were stratified according to donor, age, and blast count. Results Engraftment was comparable between both groups. The CI of acute graft-versus-host disease II to IV was 32.3% after RIC and 37.5% after MAC ( P = .35). The CI of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 61.6% after RIC and 64.7% after MAC ( P = .76). The CI of nonrelapse mortality after 1 year was 17% (95% CI, 8% to 26%) after RIC and 25% (95% CI, 15% to 36%) after MAC ( P = .29). The CI of relapse at 2 years was 17% (95% CI, 8% to 26%) after RIC and 15% (95% CI, 6% to 24%) after MAC ( P = .6), which resulted in a 2-year relapse-free survival and overall survival of 62% (95% CI, 50% to 74%) and 76% (95% CI, 66% to 87%), respectively, after RIC, and 58% (95% CI, 46% to 71%) and 63% (95% CI, 51% to 75%), respectively, after MAC ( P = .58 and P = .08, respectively). Conclusion This prospective, randomized trial of the European Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation provides evidence that RIC resulted in at least a 2-year relapse-free survival and overall survival similar to MAC in patients with MDS or secondary acute myeloid leukemia.

  6. Failure to Adhere to Protocol Specified Radiation Therapy Guidelines Was Associated With Decreased Survival in RTOG 9704-A Phase III Trial of Adjuvant Chemotherapy and Chemoradiotherapy for Patients With Resected Adenocarcinoma of the Pancreas

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, Ross A.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Regine, William F.; Safran, Howard; Hoffman, John P.; Lustig, Robert; Konski, Andre A.; Benson, Al B.; Macdonald, John S.; Rich, Tyvin A.; Willett, Christopher G.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: In Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704, as previously published, patients with resected pancreatic adenocarcinoma received continuous infusion 5-FU and concurrent radiotherapy (5FU-RT). 5FU-RT treatment was preceded and followed by randomly assigned chemotherapy, either 5-FU or gemcitabine. This analysis explored whether failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines influenced survival and/or toxicity. Methods and Materials: RT requirements were protocol specified. Adherence was scored as per protocol (PP) or less than per protocol (patient treatment outcomes. Scoring was done for all tumor locations and for the subset of pancreatic head location. Results: RT was scored for 416 patients: 216 PP and 200 patients with pancreatic head tumors, both PP score and gemcitabine treatment correlated with improved MS (p = 0.016, p = 0.043, respectively). For all tumor locations, PP score was associated with decreased risk of failure (p = 0.016) and, for gemcitabine patients, a trend toward reduced Grade 4/5 nonhematologic toxicity (p = 0.065). Conclusions: This is the first Phase III, multicenter, adjuvant protocol for pancreatic adenocarcinoma to evaluate the impact of adherence to specified RT protocol guidelines on protocol outcomes. Failure to adhere to specified RT guidelines was associated with reduced survival and, for patients receiving gemcitabine, trend toward increased nonhematologic toxicity.

  7. Rationale and design of LUX-Head & Neck 1: a randomised, Phase III trial of afatinib versus methotrexate in patients with recurrent and/or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma who progressed after platinum-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with recurrent and/or metastatic (R/M) head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) receiving platinum-based chemotherapy as their first-line treatment have a dismal prognosis, with a median overall survival (OS) of ~7 months. Methotrexate is sometimes used following platinum failure or in patients not fit enough for platinum therapy, but this agent has not demonstrated any OS improvement. Targeted therapies are a novel approach, with the EGFR-targeting monoclonal antibody cetuximab (plus platinum-based chemotherapy) approved in the US and Europe in the first-line R/M setting, and as monotherapy following platinum failure in the US. However, there is still a high unmet medical need for new treatments that improve outcomes in the second-line R/M setting following failure on first-line platinum-containing regimens. Afatinib, an irreversible ErbB family blocker, was recently approved for the first-line treatment of EGFR mutation-positive metastatic non-small cell lung cancer. Afatinib has also shown clinical activity similar to cetuximab in a Phase II proof-of-concept HNSCC trial. Based on these observations, the Phase III, LUX-Head & Neck 1 study is evaluating afatinib versus methotrexate in R/M HNSCC patients following progression on platinum-based chemotherapy in the R/M setting. Methods/Design Patients with progressive disease after one first-line platinum-based chemotherapy are randomised 2:1 to oral afatinib (starting dose 40 mg once daily) or IV methotrexate (starting dose 40 mg/m2 once weekly) administered as monotherapy with best supportive care until progression or intolerable adverse events. Efficacy of afatinib versus methotrexate will be assessed in terms of progression-free survival (primary endpoint). Disease progression will be evaluated according to RECIST v1.1 by investigator and independent central review. Secondary endpoints include OS, tumour response and safety. Health-related quality of life and biomarker assessments will

  8. A randomized phase III trial of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) versus observation for patients with asymptomatic cerebral oligo-metastases in non-small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Lim, S H; Lee, J Y; Lee, M-Y; Kim, H S; Lee, J; Sun, J-M; Ahn, J S; Um, S-W; Kim, H; Kim, B S; Kim, S T; Na, D L; Sun, J Y; Jung, S H; Park, K; Kwon, O J; Lee, J-I; Ahn, M-J

    2015-04-01

    It is unclear whether treating brain metastasis before starting systemic chemotherapy can improve survival compared with upfront chemotherapy in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with asymptomatic cerebral oligo-metastases. We undertook a randomized, controlled trial of 105 patients with one to four brain metastases, admitted to Samsung Medical Center between 2008 and 2013. Patients were randomly assigned to receive stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) (49 patients) followed by chemotherapy or upfront chemotherapy (49 patients). The primary end point was overall survival (OS) and secondary end points included central nervous system (CNS) progression-free survival, progression to symptomatic brain metastasis and brain functional outcome. The median age was 58 years (range, 29-85) with ECOG 0-1 performance status, and 40% of patients were never smokers. Most patients had adenocarcinoma, and about half of patients had only one brain metastasis, while the rest had multiple cerebral metastases. The median OS time was 14.6 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 9.2-20.0] in the SRS group and 15.3 months (95% CI, 7.2-23.4) for the upfront chemotherapy group (P = 0.418). There was no significant difference in time to CNS disease progression [median, 9.4 months (SRS) versus 6.6 months (upfront chemotherapy), P = 0.248]. Symptomatic progression of brain metastases was observed more frequently in the upfront chemotherapy group (26.5%) than the SRS group (18.4%) but without statistical significance. Although this study included smaller sample size than initially anticipated due to early termination, SRS followed by chemotherapy did not improve OS in oligo-brain metastases NSCLC patients compared with upfront chemotherapy. Further study with large number of patients should be needed to confirm the use of upfront chemotherapy alone in this subgroup of patients. NCT01301560. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology

  9. Patient-Reported Outcome Results From the Open-Label Phase III AURELIA Trial Evaluating Bevacizumab-Containing Therapy for Platinum-Resistant Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stockler, Martin R.; Hilpert, Felix; Friedlander, Michael; King, Madeleine T.; Wenzel, Lari; Lee, Chee Khoon; Joly, Florence; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Arranz, José Angel; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sorio, Roberto; Freudensprung, Ulrich; Sneller, Vesna; Hales, Gill; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of bevacizumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs; secondary end point) in the AURELIA trial. Patients and Methods Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to chemotherapy alone (CT) or with bevacizumab (BEV-CT). PROs were assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire–Ovarian Cancer Module 28 (EORTC QLQ-OV28) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy–Ovarian Cancer symptom index (FOSI) at baseline and every two or three cycles (8/9 weeks) until disease progression. The primary PRO hypothesis was that more patients receiving BEV-CT than CT would achieve at least a 15% (≥ 15-point) absolute improvement on the QLQ-OV28 abdominal/GI symptom subscale (items 31-36) at week 8/9. Patients with missing week 8/9 questionnaires were included as unimproved. Questionnaires from all assessments until disease progression were analyzed using mixed-model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine the effects of differing assumptions and methods for missing data. Results Baseline questionnaires were available from 89% of 361 randomly assigned patients. More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved a ≥ 15% improvement in abdominal/GI symptoms at week 8/9 (primary PRO end point, 21.9% v 9.3%; difference, 12.7%; 95% CI, 4.4 to 20.9; P = .002). MMRM analysis covering all time points also favored BEV-CT (difference, 6.4 points; 95% CI, 1.3 to 11.6; P = .015). More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved ≥ 15% improvement in FOSI at week 8/9 (12.2% v 3.1%; difference, 9.0%; 95% CI, 2.9% to 15.2%; P = .003). Sensitivity analyses gave similar results and conclusions. Conclusion Bevacizumab increased the proportion of patients achieving a 15% improvement in patient-reported abdominal/GI symptoms during chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:24687829

  10. Pooled Analysis of Clinical Outcome of Patients with Chemorefractory Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treated within Phase I/II Clinical Studies Based on Individual Biomarkers of Susceptibility: A Single-Institution Experience.

    PubMed

    Sartore-Bianchi, Andrea; Amatu, Alessio; Bonazzina, Erica; Stabile, Stefano; Giannetta, Laura; Cerea, Giulio; Schiavetto, Ilaria; Bencardino, Katia; Funaioli, Chiara; Ricotta, Riccardo; Cipani, Tiziana; Schirru, Michele; Gambi, Valentina; Palmeri, Laura; Carlo-Stella, Giulia; Rusconi, Francesca; Di Bella, Sara; Burrafato, Giovanni; Cassingena, Andrea; Valtorta, Emanuele; Lauricella, Calogero; Pazzi, Federica; Gambaro, Alessandra; Ghezzi, Silvia; Marrapese, Giovanna; Tarenzi, Emiliana; Veronese, Silvio; Truini, Mauro; Vanzulli, Angelo; Siena, Salvatore

    2017-08-01

    Patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) refractory to standard therapies have a poor prognosis. In this setting, recruitment into clinical trials is warranted, and studies driven by selection according to individual tumor molecular characteristics are expected to provide added value. We retrospectively analyzed data from patients with mCRC refractory to or following failure of standard therapies who were enrolled into phase I/II clinical studies at the Niguarda Cancer Center based on the presence of a specific molecular profile expected to represent the target of susceptibility to the experimental drug(s). From June 2011 to May 2016, 2044 patients with mCRC underwent molecular screening. Eighty patients (3.9%) were enrolled in ad hoc studies; the median age was 60 years (range 36-86) and the median number of previous treatment lines was five (range 2-8). Molecular characteristics exploited within these studies were MGMT promoter hypermethylation (48.7%), HER2 amplification (28.8%), BRAF (V600E) mutation (20%), and novel gene fusions involving ALK or NTRK (2.5%). One patient (1%) had RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria In Solid Tumors) complete response (CR), 13 patients (16.5%) experienced a partial response (PR), and 28 (35%) stable disease (SD). Median progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.8 months (range 2.63-3.83), with 24% of patients displaying PFS >5 months. Median growth modulation index (GMI) was 0.85 (range 0-15.61) and 32.5% of patients had GMI >1.33. KRAS exon 2 mutations were found in 38.5% of patients, and among the 78 patients with known KRAS status, those with wild-type tumors had longer PFS than those with mutated tumors (3.80 [95% CI 2.80-5.03] vs. 2.13 months [95% CI 1.77-2.87], respectively, p = 0.001). Median overall survival (OS) was 7.83 months (range 7.17-9.33) for all patients, and patients with KRAS wild-type tumors had longer OS than those with mutated tumors (7.83 [95% CI 7.33-10.80] vs. 7.18 months [95% CI 5

  11. Phase II study of induction chemotherapy with gemcitabine and vinorelbine followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin in patients with inoperable stage III non-small-cell lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dae Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Cho, Kwan Ho; Pyo, Hong Ryull; Kim, Hyae Young; Yoon, Sung Jin B.S.; Lee, Jin Soo . E-mail: jslee@ncc.re.kr

    2005-11-15

    Purpose: For locoregionally advanced inoperable non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), concurrent chemoradiotherapy has become a standard therapy. We conducted a Phase II trial to examine the efficacy and toxicity of adding gemcitabine and vinorelbine induction chemotherapy to concurrent chemoradiotherapy with oral etoposide and cisplatin. Methods and Materials: Eligibility included inoperable clinical Stage III NSCLC without pleural effusion, ECOG performance status 0-1, and weight loss {<=}5%. Induction chemotherapy consisted of three cycles of gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} and vinorelbine 30 mg/m{sup 2}, each given i.v. on Days 1 and 8, every 3 weeks. During once-daily thoracic radiotherapy (1.8 Gy/day, total 63 Gy), two cycles of oral etoposide (100 mg on Days 1-5 and 8-12) plus cisplatin (50 mg/m{sup 2} on Days 1 and 8) were given concurrently 4 weeks apart. Results: Between April 2002 and November 2003, 42 patients were enrolled and 40 were included in response and toxicity evaluation. The median age was 59 years and 13 patients had IIIA and 27 had IIIB; 24 had squamous ca, 12 had adenocarcinoma, and 4 had others. Objective tumor responses were obtained in 29 patients (72.5%), including 18 (45.0%) after induction chemotherapy. After a median follow-up of 23.8 months, the median survival time and progression-free survival was 23.2 months and 10.9 months, respectively, with 2-year survival rate of 43.9%. For the patients with supraclavicular nodal involvement, the median survival time was 11.8 months with 2-year survival rate of 16.7%, whereas the corresponding figures were 27.8 months and 52.0%, respectively, for those without supraclavicular nodal involvement. Toxicity of induction chemotherapy was mild and well tolerated. However, concurrent chemoradiotherapy was associated with G3/4 hematologic toxicity in 75.7%, G3 esophagitis in 24.2%, and two treatment-related deaths. There were nonlife-threatening late toxicities in additional 6 patients. Conclusions

  12. Apremilast, an oral phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor, in patients with psoriatic arthritis and current skin involvement: a phase III, randomised, controlled trial (PALACE 3)

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Christopher J; Blanco, Francisco J; Crowley, Jeffrey; Birbara, Charles A; Jaworski, Janusz; Aelion, Jacob; Stevens, Randall M; Vessey, Adele; Zhan, Xiaojiang; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate apremilast treatment in patients with active psoriatic arthritis, including current skin involvement, despite prior therapy with conventional disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs and/or biologic agents. Methods Patients (N=505) were randomised (1:1:1) to placebo, apremilast 20 mg twice daily, or apremilast 30 mg twice daily. Rescue therapy with apremilast was designated at week 16 for placebo patients not achieving 20% improvement in swollen and tender joint counts. At week 24, the remaining placebo patients were then randomised to apremilast 20 mg twice daily or 30 mg twice daily. The efficacy and safety of apremilast were assessed over 52 weeks. Results At week 16, significantly more patients receiving apremilast 20 mg twice daily (28%) and 30 mg twice daily (41%) achieved 20% improvement in American College of Rheumatology response criteria versus placebo (18%; p=0.0295 and p<0.0001, respectively), and mean decrease in the Health Assessment Questionnaire-Disability Index score was significantly greater with apremilast 30 mg twice daily (−0.20) versus placebo (−0.07; p=0.0073). In patients with baseline psoriasis body surface area involvement ≥3%, significantly more apremilast 30 mg twice daily patients achieved 50% reduction from baseline Psoriasis Area and Severity Index score (41%) versus placebo (24%; p=0.0098) at week 16. At week 52, observed improvements in these measures demonstrated sustained response with continued apremilast treatment. Most adverse events were mild to moderate in severity; the most common were diarrhoea, nausea, headache and upper respiratory tract infection. Conclusions Apremilast demonstrated clinically meaningful improvements in psoriatic arthritis and psoriasis at week 16; sustained improvements were seen with continued treatment through 52 weeks. Apremilast was generally well tolerated and demonstrated an acceptable safety profile. Trial registration number NCT01212770. PMID:26792812

  13. Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Phase III Chemoprevention Trial of Selenium Supplementation in Patients With Resected Stage I Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer: ECOG 5597

    PubMed Central

    Karp, Daniel D.; Lee, Sandra J.; Keller, Steven M.; Wright, Gail Shaw; Aisner, Seena; Belinsky, Steven Alan; Johnson, David H.; Johnston, Michael R.; Goodman, Gary; Clamon, Gerald; Okawara, Gordon; Marks, Randolph; Frechette, Eric; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Lippman, Scott M.; Ruckdeschel, John; Khuri, Fadlo R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Selenium has been reported to have chemopreventive benefits in lung cancer. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with resected non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving selenium supplementation. Patients and Methods Patients with completely resected stage I NSCLC were randomly assigned to take selenized yeast 200 μg versus placebo daily for 48 months. Participation was 6 to 36 months postoperatively and required a negative mediastinal node biopsy, no excessive vitamin intake, normal liver function, negative chest x-ray, and no other evidence of recurrence. Results The first interim analysis in October 2009, with 46% of the projected end points accumulated, showed a trend in favor of the placebo group with a low likelihood that the trial would become positive; thus, the study was stopped. One thousand seven hundred seventy-two participants were enrolled, with 1,561 patients randomly assigned. Analysis was updated in June 2011 with the maturation of 54% of the planned end points. Two hundred fifty-two SPTs (from 224 patients) developed, of which 98 (from 97 patients) were lung cancer (38.9%). Lung and overall SPT incidence were 1.62 and 3.54 per 100 person-years, respectively, for selenium versus 1.30 and 3.39 per 100 person-years, respectively, for placebo (P = .294). Five-year disease-free survival was 74.4% for selenium recipients versus 79.6% for placebo recipients. Grade 1 to 2 toxicity occurred in 31% of selenium recipients and 26% of placebo recipients, and grade ≥ 3 toxicity occurred in less than 2% of selenium recipients versus 3% of placebo recipients. Compliance was excellent. No increase in diabetes mellitus or skin cancer was detected. Conclusion Selenium was safe but conferred no benefit over placebo in the prevention of SPT in patients with resected NSCLC. PMID:24002495

  14. Geriatric factors analyses from FFCD 2001-02 phase III study of first-line chemotherapy for elderly metastatic colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Aparicio, Thomas; Gargot, Dany; Teillet, Laurent; Maillard, Emilie; Genet, Dominique; Cretin, Jacques; Locher, Christophe; Bouché, Olivier; Breysacher, Gilles; Seitz, Jean-François; Gasmi, Mohamed; Stefani, Laetitia; Ramdani, Mohamed; Lecomte, Thierry; Auby, Dominique; Faroux, Roger; Bachet, Jean-Baptiste; Lepère, Céline; Khemissa, Faiza; Sobhani, Iradj; Boulat, Olivier; Mitry, Emmanuel; Jouve, Jean-Louis

    2017-03-01

    Several predictors of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) outcomes have been described. Specific geriatric characteristics could be of interest to determine prognosis. Elderly patients (75+) with previously untreated mCRC were randomly assigned to receive infusional 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy, either alone (FU) or in combination with irinotecan (IRI). Geriatric evaluations were included as an optional procedure. The predictive value of geriatric parameters was determined for the objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS). From June 2003 to May 2010, the FFCD 2001-02 randomised trial enrolled 282 patients. A baseline geriatric evaluation was done in 123 patients; 62 allocated to the FU arm and 61 to the IRI arm. The baseline Charlson index was ≤1 in 75%, Mini-Mental State Examination was ≤27/30 in 31%, Geriatric Depression Scale was >2 in 10% and Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL) was impaired in 34% of the patients. Multivariate analyses revealed that no geriatric parameter was predictive for ORR or PFS. Normal IADL was independently associated with better OS. The benefit of doublet chemotherapy on PFS differed in subgroups of patients ≤80 years, with unresected primary tumour, leucocytes >11,000 mm(3) and carcinoembryonic antigen >2N. There was a trend towards better OS in patients with normal IADL. The autonomy score was an independent predictor for OS. A trend toward a better efficacy of doublet chemotherapy in some subgroups of patients was reported and should be further explored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Late Patient-Reported Toxicity After Preoperative Radiotherapy or Chemoradiotherapy in Nonresectable Rectal Cancer: Results From a Randomized Phase III Study

    SciTech Connect

    Braendengen, Morten; Tveit, Kjell Magne; Bruheim, Kjersti; Cvancarova, Milada; Berglund, Ake; Glimelius, Bengt

    2011-11-15

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is superior to radiotherapy (RT) in locally advanced rectal cancer, but the survival gain is limited. Late toxicity is, therefore, important. The aim was to compare late bowel, urinary, and sexual functions after CRT or RT. Methods and Materials: Patients (N = 207) with nonresectable rectal cancer were randomized to preoperative CRT or RT (2 Gy Multiplication-Sign 25 {+-} 5-fluorouracil/leucovorin). Extended surgery was often required. Self-reported late toxicity was scored according to the LENT SOMA criteria in a structured telephone interview and with questionnaires European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30), International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF), and sexual function -vaginal changes questionnaire (SVQ). Results: Of the 105 patients alive in Norway and Sweden after 4 to 12 years of follow-up, 78 (74%) responded. More patients in the CRT group had received a stoma (73% vs. 52%, p = 0.09). Most patients without a stoma (7 of 12 in CRT group and 9 of 16 in RT group) had incontinence for liquid stools or gas. No stoma and good anal function were seen in 5 patients (11%) in the CRT group and in 11 (30%) in the RT group (p = 0.046). Of 44 patients in the CRT group, 12 (28%) had had bowel obstruction compared with 5 of 33 (15%) in the RT group (p = 0.27). One-quarter of the patients reported urinary incontinence. The majority of men had severe erectile dysfunction. Few women reported sexual activity during the previous month. However, the majority did not have concerns about their sex life. Conclusions: Fecal incontinence and erectile dysfunction are frequent after combined treatment for locally advanced rectal cancer. There was a clear tendency for the problems to be more common after CRT than after RT.

  16. Cumulative Corticosteroid Dose Over Fifty‐Two Weeks in Patients With Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Pooled Analyses From the Phase III Belimumab Trials

    PubMed Central

    Petri, Michelle; Wallace, Daniel J.; Roth, David A.; Molta, Charles T.; Hammer, Anne E.; Tang, Yongqiang; Thompson, April

    2016-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of treatment with belimumab on corticosteroid dose in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) over 52 weeks in 2 randomized, controlled trials. Methods Data on patients who were taking corticosteroids at baseline in the Study of Belimumab in Subjects with SLE trials were pooled post hoc to compare patients who received belimumab 10 mg/kg plus standard therapy with those who received placebo plus standard therapy. The primary end point was cumulative change from baseline in corticosteroid dose (prednisone equivalent) through week 52. Further analyses specifically examined oral corticosteroid dose. Results At baseline, 966 of 1,125 patients (86%) were receiving corticosteroids (478 belimumab 10 mg/kg and 488 placebo). Most were women (94%), their mean age was 37.1 years, mean Safety of Estrogens in Lupus Erythematosus National Assessment version of the SLE Disease Activity Index score was 9.8, and mean corticosteroid dosage was 12.5 mg/day. Over 52 weeks, there was a smaller increase in mean cumulative corticosteroid dose for the belimumab group than for the placebo group (531.2 mg versus 916.3 mg; P < 0.0001). Compared with placebo, the mean of all decreases in cumulative corticosteroid dose was higher with belimumab (P = 0.0165), and the mean of all increases was lower (P = 0.0005). More patients in the belimumab group had decreases in oral corticosteroid dose (38.5% versus 30.9%), and fewer had increases in dose (18.4% versus 30.7%), compared with placebo. Adverse events were comparable across groups. Conclusion Our findings show a significantly smaller increase in cumulative corticosteroid dose over 1 year, more patients with decreases in oral corticosteroid dose, and fewer patients with increases in oral corticosteroid dose in the belimumab group compared with the placebo group. These data suggest that belimumab may be steroid sparing. PMID:26992106

  17. Virology analyses of HCV genotype 4 isolates from patients treated with simeprevir and peginterferon/ribavirin in the Phase III RESTORE study.

    PubMed

    Fevery, B; Verbinnen, T; Peeters, M; Janssen, K; Witek, J; Jessner, W; De Meyer, S; Lenz, O

    2017-01-01

    Simeprevir is a hepatitis C virus NS3/4A protease inhibitor. Hepatitis C virus baseline NS3/4A polymorphisms and emerging mutations were characterized in treatment-naїve and treatment-experienced genotype 4-infected patients treated with simeprevir+peginterferon/ribavirin in the RESTORE study. Population sequencing of the NS3/4A region was performed and in vitro simeprevir activity against site-directed mutants or chimeric replicons with patient-derived NS3 protease sequences was assessed in a transient replicon assay. Simeprevir remained active against most (83/91 [91%]) baseline isolates tested in the chimeric replicon assay. Eight baseline isolates reduced simeprevir activity; these carried I132L or D168E substitutions reducing simeprevir median activity by 4.6- and 39-fold, respectively. Six of these eight isolates were from patients achieving sustained virologic response. Baseline NS3 Q80K polymorphism was not observed in the genotype 4-infected patients. Of the 107 simeprevir-treated patients, 37 did not achieve sustained virologic response for any reason. Of the 32 patients who failed treatment and had sequencing information, 28 (88%) had emerging mutations at NS3 positions 80, 122, 155, 156 and/or 168 at time of failure, similar to those in genotype 1. Emerging mutations were mainly D168V and D168E alone or combined with mutations at position 80. In general, isolates obtained at time of failure displayed high-level in vitro resistance to simeprevir (fold change ≥50) in a chimeric replicon assay with a median simeprevir fold change value of 440, consistent with observed mutations. In conclusion, emerging mutations in genotype 4 patients failing simeprevir+peginterferon/ribavirin treatment were similar to those in genotype 1 and conferred high-level resistance to simeprevir.

  18. Patient-reported outcome results from the open-label phase III AURELIA trial evaluating bevacizumab-containing therapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Stockler, Martin R; Hilpert, Felix; Friedlander, Michael; King, Madeleine T; Wenzel, Lari; Lee, Chee Khoon; Joly, Florence; de Gregorio, Nikolaus; Arranz, José Angel; Mirza, Mansoor Raza; Sorio, Roberto; Freudensprung, Ulrich; Sneller, Vesna; Hales, Gill; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric

    2014-05-01

    To determine the effects of bevacizumab on patient-reported outcomes (PROs; secondary end point) in the AURELIA trial. Patients with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer were randomly assigned to chemotherapy alone (CT) or with bevacizumab (BEV-CT). PROs were assessed using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire-Ovarian Cancer Module 28 (EORTC QLQ-OV28) and Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Ovarian Cancer symptom index (FOSI) at baseline and every two or three cycles (8/9 weeks) until disease progression. The primary PRO hypothesis was that more patients receiving BEV-CT than CT would achieve at least a 15% (≥ 15-point) absolute improvement on the QLQ-OV28 abdominal/GI symptom subscale (items 31-36) at week 8/9. Patients with missing week 8/9 questionnaires were included as unimproved. Questionnaires from all assessments until disease progression were analyzed using mixed-model repeated-measures (MMRM) analysis. Sensitivity analyses were used to determine the effects of differing assumptions and methods for missing data. Baseline questionnaires were available from 89% of 361 randomly assigned patients. More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved a ≥ 15% improvement in abdominal/GI symptoms at week 8/9 (primary PRO end point, 21.9% v 9.3%; difference, 12.7%; 95% CI, 4.4 to 20.9; P = .002). MMRM analysis covering all time points also favored BEV-CT (difference, 6.4 points; 95% CI, 1.3 to 11.6; P = .015). More BEV-CT than CT patients achieved ≥ 15% improvement in FOSI at week 8/9 (12.2% v 3.1%; difference, 9.0%; 95% CI, 2.9% to 15.2%; P = .003). Sensitivity analyses gave similar results and conclusions. Bevacizumab increased the proportion of patients achieving a 15% improvement in patient-reported abdominal/GI symptoms during chemotherapy for platinum-resistant ovarian cancer.

  19. Variability in surgical quality in a phase III clinical trial of radical cystectomy in patients with organ-confined, node-negative urothelial carcinoma of the bladder

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Douglas A.; Groshen, Susan; von Rundstedt, Friedrich-Carl; Skinner, Donald G.; Stadler, Walter M.; Cote, Richard J.; Lerner, Seth P.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Previous studies have shown that variability in surgical technique can affect the outcomes of cooperative group trials. We analyzed measures of surgical quality and clinical outcomes in patients enrolled in the p53-MVAC trial. Methods We performed a post-hoc analysis of patients with pT1-T2N0M0 urothelial carcinoma of the bladder following radical cystectomy (RC) and bilateral pelvic and iliac lymphadenectomy (LND). Measures of surgical quality were examined for associations with time to recurrence (TTR) and overall survival (OS). Results We reviewed operative and/or pathology reports for 440 patients from 35 sites. We found that only 31% of patients met all suggested trial eligibility criteria of having ≥15 lymph nodes identified in the pathologic specimen (LN#) and having undergone both extended and presacral LND. There was no association between extent of LND, LN#, or presacral LND and TTR or OS after adjustment for confounders and multiple testing. Conclusions We demonstrated that there was substantial variability in surgical technique within a cooperative group trial. Despite explicit entry criteria, many patients did not undergo per-protocol LNDs. While outcomes were not apparently affected, it is nonetheless evident that careful attention to study design and quality monitoring will be critical to successful future trials. PMID:25873574

  20. Protons or megavoltage X-rays as boost therapy for patients irradiated for localized prostatic carcinoma. An early phase I/II comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duttenhaver, J.R.; Shipley, W.U.; Perrone, T.; Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Prout, G.R.; Parkhurst, E.C.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    A total of 180 patients with carcinoma of the prostate limited to the pelvis were treated with one of two external beam irradiation techniques between 1972 and 1979. One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with conventional pelvic megavoltage x-ray therapy. Sixty-four patients were treated with combined pelvic x-ray therapy plus a perineal proton beam boost to a carefully defined prostatic tumor volume. A 160 MeV proton beam has been modified to irradiate patients with localized tumors by using conventional treatment schedules. This proton beam has the physical advantage over megavoltage x-rays of reducing the dose to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor volume. By using the proton beam boost we have delivered an increased prostatic tumor dose of 500 to 700 cGy without increasing treatment morbidity at all. The two groups are actuarially analyzed for patient survival, disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, and thus far, no significant differences have been noted. Because of the minimal complications observed in the proton group despite a 10% increase in dose, a randomized clinical trial comparing these two treatment techniques is studied.

  1. Correlation between pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic indices and clinical outcomes in Japanese patients with skin and soft tissue infections treated with daptomycin: analysis of a phase III study.

    PubMed

    Takesue, Yoshio; Mikamo, Hiroshige; Kusachi, Shinya; Watanabe, Shinichi; Takahashi, Kenichi; Yoshinari, Tomoko; Ishii, Mikio; Aikawa, Naoki

    2015-09-01

    The relationships between pharmacokinetic (PK)/pharmacodynamic (PD) indices and outcomes were investigated in patients with skin and soft tissue infection (SSTI) who received daptomycin at 4 mg/kg/day. Efficacy was evaluated in 55 patients from whom Staphylococcus aureus was isolated, with success rates of 94.5% and 69.1% for clinical and microbiological responses, respectively. The odds ratio for the relationship between the area under the day 1 concentration-time curve (AUC0-24h) to the MIC and the probability of clinical success was 1.03 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73-1.45), and that for the relationship for probability of microbiological success was 0.94 (95% CI 0.81-1.09). In 82 patients in the safety analysis, only 1 met the creatine phosphokinase (CPK) elevation criteria, and this patient's minimum concentration (C(min)) of plasma daptomycin was 5.37 μg/mL. No significant relationship was found between peak CPK and C(min) (Pearson's correlation coefficient -0.0452). In conclusion, no clear correlation between PK/PD indices and the probability of efficacy or safety events was demonstrated when daptomycin was administered in SSTI patients using the clinically recommended dosage of 4 mg/kg/day.

  2. Therapeutic efficacy and safety of red blood cells treated with a chemical process (S-303) for pathogen inactivation: a Phase III clinical trial in cardiac surgery patients.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Richard J; McCullough, Jeffrey; Mintz, Paul D; Snyder, Edward; Spotnitz, William D; Rizzo, Robert J; Wages, David; Lin, Jin-Sying; Wood, Lindsey; Corash, Laurence; Conlan, Maureen G

    2005-11-01

    A randomized, double-blind trial is reported of the clinical efficacy of red blood cells (RBCs) treated for pathogen inactivation with S-303, a synthetic labile alkylating agent. Patients undergoing complex cardiac surgeries were randomly assigned to receive either S-303-treated (test) or conventional (control) RBC transfusion during surgery and for 6 days thereafter. Efficacy was evaluated by comparing the occurrence of a composite primary endpoint of treatment-related morbidity (myocardial infarction and renal failure) and mortality. Two-hundred twenty-three patients were randomly assigned and 148 patients who received transfusions (74 with S-303-treated RBCs and 74 with control RBCs) were evaluable. The incidence of the primary endpoint was equivalent between the two groups (22 and 21% in the S-303-treated and control RBC groups, respectively). Secondary endpoints, including hemoglobin increment (mean, 1.4 vs. 1.5 g/dL), number of RBC transfusions (mean, 4.4 vs. 3.8 units), and other blood product support, were also comparable. The adverse event profile was similar between groups; however, patients who received S-303 RBCs were significantly more likely to develop constipation and less likely to suffer supraventricular extrasystoles. Four patients (2 test and 2 control) demonstrated positive indirect antiglobulin tests with reactivity for S-303 RBCs at one or more time points before or after transfusion, without evidence of hemolysis. S-303-treated and conventional RBCs were equivalent with respect to clinical efficacy and safety in supporting the transfusion needs of cardiac surgery patients. Investigations are under way to ascertain the significance of S-303 RBC antibodies and to prevent their occurrence.

  3. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III chemoprevention trial of selenium supplementation in patients with resected stage I non-small-cell lung cancer: ECOG 5597.

    PubMed

    Karp, Daniel D; Lee, Sandra J; Keller, Steven M; Wright, Gail Shaw; Aisner, Seena; Belinsky, Steven Alan; Johnson, David H; Johnston, Michael R; Goodman, Gary; Clamon, Gerald; Okawara, Gordon; Marks, Randolph; Frechette, Eric; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Lippman, Scott M; Ruckdeschel, John; Khuri, Fadlo R

    2013-11-20

    Selenium has been reported to have chemopreventive benefits in lung cancer. We conducted a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the incidence of second primary tumors (SPTs) in patients with resected non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) receiving selenium supplementation. Patients with completely resected stage I NSCLC were randomly assigned to take selenized yeast 200 μg versus placebo daily for 48 months. Participation was 6 to 36 months postoperatively and required a negative mediastinal node biopsy, no excessive vitamin intake, normal liver function, negative chest x-ray, and no other evidence of recurrence. The first interim analysis in October 2009, with 46% of the projected end points accumulated, showed a trend in favor of the placebo group with a low likelihood that the trial would become positive; thus, the study was stopped. One thousand seven hundred seventy-two participants were enrolled, with 1,561 patients randomly assigned. Analysis was updated in June 2011 with the maturation of 54% of the planned end points. Two hundred fifty-two SPTs (from 224 patients) developed, of which 98 (from 97 patients) were lung cancer (38.9%). Lung and overall SPT incidence were 1.62 and 3.54 per 100 person-years, respectively, for selenium versus 1.30 and 3.39 per 100 person-years, respectively, for placebo (P = .294). Five-year disease-free survival was 74.4% for selenium recipients versus 79.6% for placebo recipients. Grade 1 to 2 toxicity occurred in 31% of selenium recipients and 26% of placebo recipients, and grade ≥ 3 toxicity occurred in less than 2% of selenium recipients versus 3% of placebo recipients. Compliance was excellent. No increase in diabetes mellitus or skin cancer was detected. Selenium was safe but conferred no benefit over placebo in the prevention of SPT in patients with resected NSCLC.

  4. Is there need for radioimmunotherapy? results of a phase I/II study in patients with indolent B-cell lymphomas using lutetium-177-DOTA-rituximab.

    PubMed

    Forrer, F; Oechslin-Oberholzer, C; Campana, B; Maecke, H; Mueller-Brand, J; Lohri, A

    2012-12-01

    The aim of the study was to explore the clinical response to 177Lutetium-DOTA-rituximab (177Lu-D-R) and to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) in the treatment of patients with relapsed follicular, mantle cell or other indolent lymphomas such as marginal zone lymphoma as well as to put these results into context with other therapy options for these patients. Treatment consisted of cold rituximab (250 mg/m2) on day 1 and day 8 and 177Lu-DOTA-Rituximab on day 8. Reassessment was done at week 10. Thirty-one patients (males=17, females=14, median number of pretreatments: 3) were treated in seven cohorts. Escalation of injected activity was carried out in steps of 5 mCi/m². Dosimetry was performed in the first 20 patients. The MTD was found to be 45 mCi/m2. Thrombocytopenia and leukopenia were the dose-limiting toxicities. Significant anemia only occurred at dose level 7. We observed the nadir of platelets after a median of 36 days from treatment with 177Lu-D-R and a nadir of granulocytes after a median of 50 days from 177Lu-D-R treatment. Non-hematological toxicity was negligible. We observed clinical responses at all dose levels and for all lymphoma entities. Some of the responses were durable; the longest follow up in complete remission is currently over eight years. The MTD of 177Lu-DOTA-Rituximab was found to be 45 mCi/m². Non hematologic toxicity was negligible. Responses were seen in all lymphoma entities and at all dose levels tested. Further testing seems to be most promising mainly in follicular and marginal zone lymphoma in particular as the results compare well to other therapy options for these patients with regard to effectiveness, toxicity and discomfort for the patients.

  5. A Phase III, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Prospective Randomized Clinical Trial of d-Threo-Methylphenidate HCl in Brain Tumor Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, Jerome M. Case, L. Douglas; Atkins, James; Frizzell, Bart; Sanders, George; Griffin, Patricia; Lesser, Glenn; McMullen, Kevin; McQuellon, Richard; Naughton, Michelle; Rapp, Stephen; Stieber, Volker; Shaw, Edward G.

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: The quality of life (QOL) and neurocognitive function of patients with brain tumors are negatively affected by the symptoms of their disease and brain radiation therapy (RT). We assessed the effect of prophylactic d-threo-methylphenidate HCl (d-MPH), a central nervous system (CNS) stimulant on QOL and cognitive function in patients undergoing RT. Methods and Materials: Sixty-eight patients with primary or metastatic brain tumors were randomly assigned to receive d-MPH or placebo. The starting dose of d-MPH was 5 mg twice daily (b.i.d.) and was escalated by 5 mg b.i.d. to a maximum of 15 mg b.i.d. The placebo was administered as one pill b.i.d. escalating three pills b.i.d. The primary outcome was fatigue. Patients were assessed at baseline, the end of radiation therapy, and 4, 8, and 12 weeks after brain RT using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy with brain and fatigue (FACIT-F) subscales, as well as the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Scale and Mini-Mental Status Exam. Results: The Mean Fatigue Subscale Score at baseline was 34.7 for the d-MPH arm and 33.3 for the placebo arm (p = 0.61). At 8 weeks after the completion of brain RT, there was no difference in fatigue between patient groups. The adjusted least squares estimate of the Mean Fatigue Subscale Score was 33.7 for the d-MPH and 35.6 for the placebo arm (p = 0.64). Secondary outcomes were not different between the two treatment arms. Conclusions: Prophylactic use of d-MPH in brain tumor patients undergoing RT did not result in an improvement in QOL.

  6. Phase III randomized equivalence trial of early breast cancer treatments with or without axillary clearance in post-menopausal patients results after 5 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Avril, A; Le Bouëdec, G; Lorimier, G; Classe, J M; Tunon-de-Lara, C; Giard, S; MacGrogan, G; Debled, M; Mathoulin-Pélissier, S; Mauriac, L

    2011-07-01

    Axillary lymph node clearance (ALNC) improves locoregional control and provides prognostic information for early breast cancer treatment, but effects on survival are controversial. This multicentre, randomized pragmatic equivalence trial compares outcomes for post-menopausal early invasive breast cancer patients after locoregional treatment with ALNC and adjuvant therapies to outcomes after locoregional treatment without ALNC and adjuvant therapies. From 1995-2005, women aged ≥ 50 years with early breast cancer (tumor ≤ 10 mm) and clinically-negative axillary nodes were randomized to receive treatment with ALNC (Ax) or without (no-Ax). Adjuvant therapies were prescribed according to hormonal receptor status and individual histological results. The primary endpoint was overall survival (OS); secondary endpoints were event-free survival (EFS) and functional outcomes. The trial was terminated due to lack of equivalence and low accrual after first interim analyses. NCT00210236. Of 625 patients, 297 no-Ax and 310 Ax patients were maintained for final per-protocol analyses. OS and EFS at five years were not equivalent (Ax vs. no-Ax: 98% vs. 94% and 96% vs. 90% respectively). Recurrence was higher for no-Ax, particularly in the first five years after surgery. Axillary nodes were positive for 14% Ax patients but only 2% no-Ax patients experienced axillary node recurrence. Functional impairments were greater after ALNC. Our results fail to demonstrate equivalence of outcomes when ALNC is omitted from post-menopausal early breast cancer patient treatment. However the low locoregional recurrence rates warrant further examination over a longer duration, in particular to consider whether these would impact on survival. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A phase III clinical trial comparing the combination cyclophosphamide, adriamycin, cisplatin with cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, prednisone in patients with advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Creagan, E T; Green, S J; Ahmann, D L; Ingle, J N; Edmonson, J H; Marschke, R F

    1984-11-01

    We assessed the efficacy of a regimen consisting of four cycles of cyclophosphamide, Adriamycin (Adria Laboratories, Inc, Columbus, Ohio), cisplatin (CAP) followed by maintenance with cyclophosphamide, 5-fluorouracil, prednisone (CFP) compared with CFP alone in a randomized trial of 86 patients with advanced breast cancer. The objective regression rates were 46% (CFP) and 49% (CAP with CFP) which included complete regression rates of 7% (CFP) and 4% (CAP with CFP). The median time to progression was nine months for CFP and six months for CAP with CFP. Median survival in the CFP group was 18 months v 11 months in the CAP recipients. Due to the therapeutic trend in favor of patients receiving CFP, we terminated the study before achieving our initially projected accrual. We observed over a twofold excess of substantial nausea and vomiting among patients receiving the platinum-based regimen. In our view, the CAP followed by the CFP regimen is a more toxic program that offers no clinically meaningful improvement over CFP to patients with advanced breast cancer.

  8. Identification of SNPs associated with response of breast cancer patients to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in the EORTC-10994 randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Le Morvan, V; Litière, S; Laroche-Clary, A; Ait-Ouferoukh, S; Bellott, R; Messina, C; Cameron, D; Bonnefoi, H; Robert, J

    2015-02-01

    Using cell line panels we identified associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and chemosensitivity. To validate these findings in clinics, we genotyped a subset of patients included in a neoadjuvant breast cancer trial to explore the relationship between genotypes and clinical outcome according to treatment received and p53 status. We genotyped 384 selected SNPs in the germline DNA extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded non-invaded lymph nodes of 243 patients. The polymorphisms of five selected genes were first studied, and then all 384 SNPs were considered. Correction for multiple testing was applied. CYP1B1 polymorphism was significantly associated with pathological complete response (pCR) in patients who had received DNA-damaging agents. MDM2, MDM4 and TP53BP1 polymorphisms were significantly associated with pCR in patients harboring a p53-positive tumor. In the complete SNP panel, there was a significant association between overall survival (OS) and a SNP of ADH1C, R272Q (P=0.0023). By multivariate analysis, only ADH1C genotype and p53 status were significantly associated with OS.

  9. Phase III randomized, double-blind study comparing single-dose intravenous peramivir with oral oseltamivir in patients with seasonal influenza virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kohno, Shigeru; Yen, Muh-Yong; Cheong, Hee-Jin; Hirotsu, Nobuo; Ishida, Tadashi; Kadota, Jun-ichi; Mizuguchi, Masashi; Kida, Hiroshi; Shimada, Jingoro

    2011-11-01

    Antiviral medications with activity against influenza viruses are important in controlling influenza. We compared intravenous peramivir, a potent neuraminidase inhibitor, with oseltamivir in patients with seasonal influenza virus infection. In a multinational, multicenter, double-blind, double-dummy randomized controlled study, patients aged ≥ 20 years with influenza A or B virus infection were randomly assigned to receive either a single intravenous infusion of peramivir (300 or 600 mg) or oral administration of oseltamivir (75 mg twice a day [b.i.d.] for 5 days). To demonstrate the noninferiority of peramivir in reducing the time to alleviation of influenza symptoms with hazard model analysis and a noninferiority margin of 0.170, we planned to recruit 1,050 patients in South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan. A total of 1,091 patients (364 receiving 300 mg and 362 receiving 600 mg of peramivir; 365 receiving oseltamivir) were included in the intent-to-treat infected population. The median durations of influenza symptoms were 78.0, 81.0, and 81.8 h in the groups treated with 300 mg of peramivir, 600 mg of peramivir, and oseltamivir, respectively. The hazard ratios of the 300- and 600-mg-peramivir groups compared to the oseltamivir group were 0.946 (97.5% confidence interval [CI], 0.793, 1.129) and 0.970 (97.5% CI, 0.814, 1.157), respectively. Both peramivir groups were noninferior to the oseltamivir group (97.5% CI, <1.170). The overall incidence of adverse drug reactions was significantly lower in the 300-mg-peramivir group, but the incidence of severe reactions in either peramivir group was not different from that in the oseltamivir group. Thus, a single intravenous dose of peramivir may be an alternative to a 5-day oral dose of oseltamivir for patients with seasonal influenza virus infection.

  10. Prognostic value of health-related quality-of-life data in predicting survival in patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas, from a phase III EORTC brain cancer group study.

    PubMed

    Mauer, Murielle E L; Taphoorn, Martin J B; Bottomley, Andrew; Coens, Corneel; Efficace, Fabio; Sanson, Marc; Brandes, Alba A; van der Rijt, Carin C D; Bernsen, Hans J J A; Frénay, Marc; Tijssen, Cees C; Lacombe, Denis; van den Bent, Martin J

    2007-12-20

    This is one of a few studies that have explored the value of baseline symptoms and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in predicting survival in patients with brain cancer. Baseline HRQOL scores (from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer [EORTC] Quality of Life Questionnaire C30 and the EORTC Brain Cancer Module) were examined in 247 patients with anaplastic oligodendrogliomas to determine the relationship with overall survival by using Cox proportional hazards regression models. Refined techniques as the bootstrap resampling procedure and the computation of C indexes and R2 coefficients were used to explore the stability of the models as well as better assess the potential benefit of using HRQOL to predict survival in clinical practice and research. Classical analysis controlled for major clinical prognostic factors selected emotional functioning (P = .0016), communication deficit (P = .0261), future uncertainty (P = .0481), and weakness of legs (P = .0001) as statistically significant prognostic factors of survival. However, several issues question the validity of these findings and no single model was found to be preferable over all others. C indexes, which estimate the probability of a model to correctly predict which patient among a randomly chosen pair of patients will survive longer, and R2 coefficients, which measure the proportion of variability explained by the model, did not exhibit major improvement when adding selected or all HRQOL scores to clinical factors. While classical techniques lead to positive results, more refined analyses suggest that baseline HRQOL scores add relatively little to clinical factors to predict survival. These results may have implications for future use of HRQOL as a prognostic factor for patients with cancer.

  11. Pemetrexed combined with paclitaxel in patients with advanced or metastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: a phase I-II trial.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulos, George P; Dimitroulis, John; Toubis, Michael; Katis, Costas; Karaindros, Dimitris; Stathopoulos, John; Koutandos, John

    2007-07-01

    Pemetrexed, a novel multi-targeted agent established for the treatment of mesothelioma, has been under investigation for other malignancies, and in recent years particularly for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In the present trial we investigated pemetrexed in combination with paclitaxel as front-line treatment in advanced or metastatic NSCLC. Our objectives were to determine the response rate, median and overall survival and toxicity. From April 2005 until May 2006, 51 patients with advanced or metastatic NSCLC were enrolled and 48 were considered evaluable. There were 39 males and nine females, median age 62 years (range 37-81 years), one patient stage IIIA N(2), 23 patients, IIIB and 24, stage IV. All patients had a cytologically- or histologically-confirmed diagnosis. Pemetrexed was administered at a standard dose of 500mg/m(2) and paclitaxel at an escalating dose starting at 135mg/m(2), then 150mg/m(2) and ending at a dose of 175mg/m(2); the level was increased every three patients. Both agents were administered on day 1, repeated every 3 weeks for six courses. A 39.6% partial response rate was observed with a median survival of 14 months. Toxicity was mild with 8.3% grade 3 and 4 neutropenia and other very mild hematologic and non-hematologic adverse reactions. The combination of pemetrexed and paclitaxel at doses of 500mg/m(2) and 175mg/m(2), respectively, has been shown to be an effective combination with very limited toxicity.

  12. Randomized Phase III Study to Assess Efficacy and Safety of Adjuvant CAPOX with or without Bevacizumab in Patients after Resection of Colorectal Liver Metastases: HEPATICA study.

    PubMed

    Snoeren, Nikol; van Hillegersberg, Richard; Schouten, Sander B; Bergman, Andre M; van Werkhoven, Erikv; Dalesio, Otilia; Tollenaar, Rob A E M; Verheul, Henk M; van der Sijp, Joost; Borel Rinkes, Inne H M; Voest, E E

    2017-02-01

    Bevacizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Recurrence after resection of colorectal liver metastases (CRLMs), presumably caused by VEGF-mediated outgrowth of micrometastases, might decrease when VEGF is inhibited. This study examines the efficacy and safety of adding bevacizumab to an adjuvant regimen of CAPOX in patients undergoing radical resection for their CRLMs. Patients with resected CRLMs were randomized after surgery to receive CAPOX and bevacizumab (arm A) or CAPOX alone (arm B) as adjuvant treatment. CAPOX was given in both arms for a total of eight cycles. Bevacizumab was administered for 16 cycles. The primary end point was disease-free survival (DFS). Secondary outcomes were overall survival (OS), toxicity, and quality of life (QoL). In total, 79 patients were randomized. At the time of analysis, 23 events were encountered in arm A and 20 in arm B. One-year DFS rate was 79% [95% confidence interval (CI): 68%-93%] and 68% (95% CI: 55%-85%) for arm A and B, respectively (P=.89). Toxicity was evaluated for 75 patients. No significant differences in toxicity between the two arms were found. QoL scores were higher in arm A, of which emotional functioning and global QoL scores were significant. Adding bevacizumab to a CAPOX regimen in patients undergoing a resection for their CLM is safe and showed higher QoL scores compared with CAPOX alone. Because of premature closure of the study, conclusions about the effect on DFS of additional VEGF inhibition in this setting could not yet be made.

  13. Adjuvant chemotherapy with epirubicin, leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide regimen in resected gastric cancer patients: a randomized phase III trial by the Gruppo Oncologico Italia Meridionale (GOIM 9602 Study).

    PubMed

    De Vita, F; Giuliani, F; Orditura, M; Maiello, E; Galizia, G; Di Martino, N; Montemurro, F; Cartenì, G; Manzione, L; Romito, S; Gebbia, V; Ciardiello, F; Catalano, G; Colucci, G

    2007-08-01

    This randomized, multicenter, phase III trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of the combination of epirubicin, leucovorin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide (ELFE regimen) as adjuvant therapy for radically resected gastric cancer patients. From June 1996 to June 2001, 228 stage IB-IIIB gastric cancer patients were enrolled. All patients received a total or subtotal gastrectomy with at least a D1 lymphoadenectomy and were randomly assigned to receive surgery alone or surgery followed by chemotherapy. A total number of 630 cycles was delivered with a median number of 5. With a median follow-up of 60 months, the 5-year overall survival (OS) was 48% in the treatment arm and 43.5% in the control arm [hazard ratio (HR) 0.91; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.69-1.21; P = 0.610); the 5-year disease-free survival (DFS) was 44% in the treatment arm and 39% in the control arm (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.78-0.91; P = 0.305). In node-positive patients, the 5-year OS was 41% in the treatment arm and 34% in the control arm (HR 0.84; 95% CI 0.69-1.01; P = 0.068), while the 5-year DFS was 39% in the treatment arm and 31% in the control arm (HR 0.88; 95% CI 0.78-0.91; P = 0.051). The most common grade 3-4 toxic effects according to World Health Organization criteria were hematological and gastrointestinal. In radically resected gastric cancer patients, adjuvant chemotherapy with ELFE regimen does not improve OS over surgery alone.

  14. Pan Canadian Rash Trial: A Randomized Phase III Trial Evaluating the Impact of a Prophylactic Skin Treatment Regimen on Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor-Tyrosine Kinase Inhibitor-Induced Skin Toxicities in Patients With Metastatic Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Melosky, Barbara; Anderson, Helen; Burkes, Ronald L; Chu, Quincy; Hao, Desiree; Ho, Vincent; Ho, Cheryl; Lam, Wendy; Lee, Christopher W; Leighl, Natasha B; Murray, Nevin; Sun, Sophie; Winston, Robert; Laskin, Janessa J

    2016-03-10

    Erlotinib is an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor approved for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose epidermal growth factor receptor expression status is positive or unknown. Although it is efficacious, erlotinib can cause skin toxicity. This prospective, randomized phase III trial examined the effect of prophylactic treatment of erlotinib-induced skin rash. Patients receiving erlotinib in the second- or third-line setting for advanced NSCLC were randomly assigned to prophylactic minocycline (100 mg twice per day for 4 weeks), reactive treatment (after rash developed, per grade of rash), or no treatment unless severe (grade 3). Rash incidence and severity, time to maximal rash, time to resolution, and overall survival (OS) were compared among treatment groups. In all, 150 patients were randomly assigned, 50 to each of three treatment arms. The incidence of skin toxicity was 84% regardless of treatment arm. Prophylactic treatment with minocycline significantly lengthened the time to the most severe grade of rash. Grade 3 rash was significantly higher in the no-treatment arm. OS was not significantly different among treatment arms, but patients receiving prophylactic or reactive treatments had a longer OS (7.6 and 8 months, respectively) than those who received no rash treatment (6 months). Rash was not self-limiting. The incidence of all grades of rash did not differ statistically among the three arms, so the trial was negative. The incidence of grade 3 skin toxicities was reduced in patients who were treated with prophylactic minocycline or reactive treatment. Efficacy was not compromised. Prophylactic minocycline and reactive treatment are both acceptable options for the necessary treatment of erlotinib-induced rash in the second- or third-line setting of metastatic NSCLC. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Phase III Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study of Gabapentin for the Prevention of Delayed Chemotherapy-Induced Nausea and Vomiting in Patients Receiving Highly Emetogenic Chemotherapy, NCCTG N08C3 (Alliance)

    PubMed Central

    Barton, Debra L.; Thanarajasingam, Gita; Sloan, Jeff A.; Diekmann, Brent; Fuloria, Jyotsna; Kottschade, Lisa A.; Lyss, Alan P.; Jaslowski, Anthony J.; Mazurczak, Miroslaw A.; Blair, Scott C.; Terstriep, Shelby; Loprinzi, Charles L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite targeted antiemetics, data support an unmet need related to the management of delayed nausea and vomiting (NV). Promising pilot data informed this phase III trial evaluating gabapentin for delayed NV from highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC). METHODS Participants were randomized to receive prophylactic treatment with 20 mg of dexamethasone and a 5HT3 receptor antagonist (RA) on the day of chemotherapy, followed by gabapentin 300 mg twice a day and dexamethasone (dex) or placebo and dex after HEC. Gabapentin/placebo was started the day of chemotherapy and continued through day 5 for the first chemotherapy cycle, whereas dex was titrated down on days 2–4. The primary end point was complete response (CR), defined as no emesis and no use of rescue medications on days 2–6, using an NV diary. The percentages of those in each group with a CR were compared by Fisher’s exact test. RESULTS Four hundred thirty patients were enrolled in this study. Forty-seven percent of patients in the gabapentin arm and 41% in the placebo arm had a CR (P = .23). Mean number of emesis episodes was <0.5 daily, and mean nausea severity was <2 (mild). In both arms, patient satisfaction with NV control was greater than 8 (with 10 being perfectly satisfied). There were no significant differences in unwanted side effects. CONCLUSIONS In this study, gabapentin did not significantly improve delayed NV. Patients were satisfied with the control of their nausea and vomiting irrespective of arm. The use of a 5HT3 RA and dexamethasone provided good control of nausea and vomiting for most patients. PMID:25043153

  16. Randomized phase III trial of single-agent pemetrexed versus carboplatin and pemetrexed in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer and Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 2.

    PubMed

    Zukin, Mauro; Barrios, Carlos H; Pereira, Jose Rodrigues; Ribeiro, Ronaldo De Albuquerque; Beato, Carlos Augusto de Mendonça; do Nascimento, Yeni Neron; Murad, Andre; Franke, Fabio A; Precivale, Maristela; Araujo, Luiz Henrique de Lima; Baldotto, Clarissa Serodio Da Rocha; Vieira, Fernando Meton; Small, Isabele A; Ferreira, Carlos G; Lilenbaum, Rogerio C

    2013-08-10

    To compare single-agent pemetrexed (P) versus the combination of carboplatin and pemetrexed (CP) in first-line therapy for patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance status (PS) of 2. In a multicenter phase III randomized trial, patients with advanced NSCLC, ECOG PS of 2, any histology at first and later amended to nonsquamous only, no prior chemotherapy, and adequate organ function were randomly assigned to P alone (500 mg/m(2)) or CP (area under the curve of 5 and 500 mg/m(2), respectively) administered every 3 weeks for a total of four cycles. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). A total of 205 eligible patients were enrolled from eight centers in Brazil and one in the United States from April 2008 to July 2011. The response rates were 10.3% for P and 23.8% for CP (P = .032). In the intent-to-treat population, the median PFS was 2.8 months for P and 5.8 months for CP (hazard ratio [HR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.35 to 0.63; P < .001), and the median OS was 5.3 months for P and 9.3 months for CP (HR, 0.62; 95% CI, 0.46 to 0.83; P = .001). One-year survival rates were 21.9% and 40.1%, respectively. Similar results were seen when patients with squamous disease were excluded from the analysis. Anemia (grade 3, 3.9%; grade 4, 11.7%) and neutropenia (grade 3, 1%; grade 4, 6.8%) were more frequent with CP. There were four treatment-related deaths in the CP arm. Combination chemotherapy with CP significantly improves survival in patients with advanced NSCLC and ECOG PS of 2.

  17. Oral liarozole in the treatment of patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis: results of a randomized, double-blind, multinational, placebo-controlled phase II/III trial

    PubMed Central

    Vahlquist, A; Blockhuys, S; Steijlen, P; van Rossem, K; Didona, B; Blanco, D; Traupe, H

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Oral liarozole, a retinoic acid metabolism-blocking agent, may be an alternative to systemic retinoid therapy in patients with lamellar ichthyosis. Objective To demonstrate the efficacy and safety of once-daily oral liarozole in the treatment of moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. Methods This was a double-blind, multinational, parallel phase II/III trial (NCT00282724). Patients aged ≥ 14 years with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis [Investigator's Global Assessment (IGA) score ≥ 3] were randomized 3 : 3 : 1 to receive oral liarozole (75 or 150 mg) or placebo once daily for 12 weeks. Assessments included: IGA; a five-point scale for erythema, scaling and pruritus severity; Short Form-36 health survey; Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI); and safety parameters. The primary efficacy variable was response rate at week 12 (responder: ≥ 2-point decrease in IGA from baseline). Results Sixty-four patients were enrolled. At week 12, 11/27 (41%; liarozole 75 mg), 14/28 (50%; liarozole 150 mg) and one out of nine (11%; placebo) patients were responders; the difference between groups (liarozole 150 mg vs. placebo) was not significant (P = 0·056). Mean IGA and scaling scores decreased from baseline in both liarozole groups at weeks 8 and 12 vs. placebo; erythema and pruritus scores were similar between treatment groups. Improvement in DLQI score was observed in both liarozole groups. Treatment with liarozole for 12 weeks was well tolerated. Conclusions The primary efficacy variable did not reach statistical significance, possibly owing to the small sample size following premature termination. However, once-daily oral liarozole, 75 and 150 mg, improved scaling and DLQI and was well tolerated in patients with moderate/severe lamellar ichthyosis. PMID:24102348

  18. Randomized, Phase III Trial of First-Line Figitumumab in Combination With Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Versus Paclitaxel and Carboplatin Alone in Patients With Advanced Non–Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Corey J.; Novello, Silvia; Park, Keunchil; Krzakowski, Maciej; Karp, Daniel D.; Mok, Tony; Benner, Rebecca J.; Scranton, Judith R.; Olszanski, Anthony J.; Jassem, Jacek

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Figitumumab (CP-751,871), a fully human immunoglobulin G2 monoclonal antibody, inhibits the insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF-1R). Our multicenter, randomized, phase III study compared figitumumab plus chemotherapy with chemotherapy alone as first-line treatment in patients with advanced non–small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Patients and Methods Patients with stage IIIB/IV or recurrent NSCLC disease with nonadenocarcinoma histology received open-label figitumumab (20 mg/kg) plus paclitaxel (200 mg/m2) and carboplatin (area under the concentration-time curve, 6 mg · min/mL) or paclitaxel and carboplatin alone once every 3 weeks for up to six cycles. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). Results Of 681 randomly assigned patients, 671 received treatment. The study was closed early by an independent Data Safety Monitoring Committee because of futility and an increased incidence of serious adverse events (SAEs) and treatment-related deaths with figitumumab. Median OS was 8.6 months for figitumumab plus chemotherapy and 9.8 months for chemotherapy alone (hazard ratio [HR], 1.18; 95% CI, 0.99 to 1.40; P = .06); median progression-free survival was 4.7 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4) and 4.6 months (95% CI, 4.2 to 5.4), respectively (HR, 1.10; P = .27); the objective response rates were 33% and 35%, respectively. The respective rates of all-causality SAEs were 66% and 51%; P < .01). Treatment-related grade 5 adverse events were also more common with figitumumab (5% v 1%; P < .01). Conclusion Adding figitumumab to standard chemotherapy failed to increase OS in patients with advanced nonadenocarcinoma NSCLC. Further clinical development of figitumumab is not being pursued. PMID:24888810

  19. Safety and tolerability of subcutaneous trastuzumab for the adjuvant treatment of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive early breast cancer: SafeHer phase III study's primary analysis of 2573 patients.

    PubMed

    Gligorov, J; Ataseven, B; Verrill, M; De Laurentiis, M; Jung, K H; Azim, H A; Al-Sakaff, N; Lauer, S; Shing, M; Pivot, X

    2017-09-01

    To assess the safety and tolerability of adjuvant subcutaneous trastuzumab (Herceptin(®) SC, H SC), delivered from an H SC Vial via hand-held syringe (Cohort A) or single-use injection device (Cohort B), with or without chemotherapy, for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive stage I to IIIC early breast cancer (EBC) in the phase III SafeHer study (NCT01566721). Patients received 600 mg fixed-dose H SC every 3 weeks for 18 cycles. The chemotherapy partner was at the investigators' discretion (H SC monotherapy was limited to ≤10% of the population). Data from the first H SC dose until 28 days (plus a 5-day window) after the last dose are presented. Results are descriptive. In the overall population, 2282/2573 patients (88.7%) experienced adverse events (AEs). Of the above, 128 (5.0%) patients experienced AEs leading to study drug discontinuation; 596 (23.2%) experienced grade ≥ 3 AEs and 326 (12.7%) experienced serious AEs. Grade ≥ 3 cardiac disorders were reported in 24 patients (0.9%), including congestive heart failure in eight (0.3%). As expected, the AE rates varied according to the timing of chemotherapy in both cohorts, with higher rates in concurrent versus sequential chemotherapy subgroups. In the concurrent chemotherapy subgroup, AEs were more common during the actual period of concurrent chemotherapy compared with the period when patients did not receive concurrent chemotherapy. SafeHer confirms the safety and tolerability of the H SC 600 mg fixed dose for 1 year (every 3 weeks for 18 cycles) as adjuvant therapy with concurrent or sequential chemotherapy for HER2-positive EBC. These primary analysis results are consistent with the known safety profile for intravenous H and H SC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Safety and pharmacokinetics of recombinant human hepatocyte growth factor (rh-HGF) in patients with fulminant hepatitis: a phase I/II clinical trial, following preclinical studies to ensure safety.

    PubMed

    Ido, Akio; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Numata, Masatsugu; Murayama, Toshinori; Teramukai, Satoshi; Marusawa, Hiroyuki; Yamaji, Naohisa; Setoyama, Hitoshi; Kim, Il-Deok; Chiba, Tsutomu; Higuchi, Shuji; Yokode, Masayuki; Fukushima, Masanori; Shimizu, Akira; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2011-05-08

    Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) stimulates hepatocyte proliferation, and also acts as an anti-apoptotic factor. Therefore, HGF is a potential therapeutic agent for treatment of fatal liver diseases. We performed a translational medicine protocol with recombinant human HGF (rh-HGF), including a phase I/II study of patients with fulminant hepatitis (FH) or late-onset hepatic failure (LOHF), in order to examine the safety, pharmacokinetics, and clinical efficacy of this molecule. Potential adverse effects identified through preclinical safety tests with rh-HGF include a decrease in blood pressure (BP) and an increase in urinary excretion of albumin. Therefore, we further investigated the effect of rh-HGF on circulatory status and renal toxicity in preclinical animal studies. In a clinical trial, 20 patients with FH or LOHF were evaluated for participation in this clinical trial, and four patients were enrolled. Subjects received rh-HGF (0.6 mg/m2/day) intravenously for 12 to 14 days. We established an infusion method to avoid rapid BP reduction in miniature swine, and confirmed reversibility of renal toxicity in rats. Although administration of rh-HGF moderately decreased BP in the participating subjects, this BP reduction did not require cessation of rh-HGF or any vasopressor therapy; BP returned to resting levels after the completion of rh-HGF infusion. Repeated doses of rh-HGF did not induce renal toxicity, and severe adverse events were not observed. Two patients survived, however, there was no evidence that rh-HGF was effective for the treatment of FH or LOHF. Intravenous rh-HGF at a dose of 0.6 mg/m2 was well tolerated in patients with FH or LOHF; therefore, it is desirable to conduct further investigations to determine the efficacy of rh-HGF at an increased dose.

  1. WAIS-III and WMS-III profiles of mildly to severely brain-injured patients.

    PubMed

    Fisher, D C; Ledbetter, M F; Cohen, N J; Marmor, D; Tulsky, D S

    2000-01-01

    Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale-III (WAIS-III) and Wechsler Memory Scale-III (WMS-III; The Psychological Corporation, 1997) scores of patients with mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI, n = 23) to moderate-severe traumatic brain injury (M-S TBI, n = 22) were compared to those of 45 matched normal control patients. WAIS-III results revealed that IQ and index scores of MTBI patients did not significantly differ from those of controls, whereas M-S TBI patients received significantly lower mean scores on all measures. All M-S TBI patients' WMS-III index scores also revealed significantly lower scores in comparison to those of control participants, with the exception of Delayed Auditory Recognition. MTBI patients showed significantly lower mean index scores compared to normal controls on measures of immediate and delayed auditory memory, immediate memory, visual delayed memory, and general memory. Eta-squared analyses revealed that WMS-III visual indexes and WAIS-III processing speed showed particularly large effect sizes. These results suggest that symptomatic MTBI patients obtain some low WMS-III test scores comparable to those of more severely injured patients.

  2. Pomalidomide and Low-Dose Dexamethasone Improves Health-Related Quality of Life and Prolongs Time to Worsening in Relapsed/Refractory Patients With Multiple Myeloma Enrolled in the MM-003 Randomized Phase III Trial.

    PubMed

    Weisel, Katja; Dimopoulos, Meletios; Song, Kevin W; Moreau, Philippe; Palumbo, Antonio; Belch, Andrew; Schey, Stephen; Sonneveld, Pieter; Sternas, Lars; Yu, Xin; Amatya, Ramesh; Gibson, Craig J; Zaki, Mohamed; Jacques, Christian; San Miguel, Jesus

    2015-09-01

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is an important element for consideration in treatment decisions in patients with relapsed/refractory multiple myeloma (RRMM). The pivotal MM-003 (A Phase 3, Multicenter, Randomized, Open-Label Study to Compare the Efficacy and Safety of Pomalidomide in Combination With Low-Dose Dexamethasone vs. High-Dose Dexamethasone in Patients With Refractory Multiple Myeloma or Relapsed and Refractory Multiple Myeloma and Companion Study [NIMBUS]) randomized, open-label, multicenter, phase III trial demonstrated improved progression-free survival (PFS) and prolonged overall survival (OS) with pomalidomide (POM) plus low-dose dexamethasone (POM + LoDEX) versus high-dose dexamethasone (HiDEX) in patients with RRMM in whom lenalidomide (LEN) and bortezomib (BORT) had failed. MM-003 also investigated HRQoL as a predefined secondary end point. Recruited patients (n = 455) were refractory to their last treatment and had failed LEN and BORT after ≥ 2 consecutive cycles of each (alone or in combination). Eight clinically relevant and validated HRQoL domains from the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) QLQ-C30, EORTC QLQ-MY20, and EQ-5D questionnaires were selected for analysis. Time to symptom worsening based on minimally important differences (MIDs) was calculated. Clinically meaningful improvements in HRQoL as determined by MIDs, regression analyses, and best response analyses were observed more frequently in patients receiving POM + LoDEX than in those receiving HiDEX. POM + LoDEX significantly extended median time to clinically meaningful worsening in HRQoL versus HiDEX in 4 HRQoL domains and demonstrated a trend in an additional 3 domains. Patients in the HiDEX arm experienced earlier HRQoL deterioration compared with those in the POM + LoDEX arm in each domain analyzed. POM + LoDEX offer good clinical outcomes that lead to improved and prolonged HRQoL compared with HiDEX in patients with RRMM and end

  3. Randomized, Double-blind, Placebo-controlled Phase III Trial of Duloxetine Monotherapy in Japanese Patients With Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Konno, Shinichi; Oda, Natsuko; Ochiai, Toshimitsu; Alev, Levent

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. A 14-week, randomized, double-blind, multicenter, placebo-controlled study of Japanese patients with chronic low back pain (CLBP) who were randomized to either duloxetine 60 mg once daily or placebo. Objective. This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of duloxetine monotherapy in Japanese patients with CLBP. Summary of Background Data. In Japan, duloxetine is approved for the treatment of depression, diabetic neuropathic pain, and pain associated with fibromyalgia; however, no clinical study of duloxetine has been conducted for CLBP. Methods. The primary efficacy measure was the change in the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI) average pain score from baseline to Week 14. Secondary efficacy measures included BPI pain (worst pain, least pain, pain right now), Patient's Global Impression of Improvement, Clinical Global Impressions of Severity, and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire, among other measures, and safety and tolerability. Results. In total, 458 patients were randomized to receive either duloxetine (n = 232) or placebo (n = 226). The BPI average pain score improved significantly in the duloxetine group compared with that in the placebo group at Week 14 [−2.43 ± 0.11 vs. −1.96 ± 0.11, respectively; between-group difference (95% confidence interval), − 0.46 [−0.77 to−0.16]; P = 0.0026]. The duloxetine group showed significant improvement in many secondary measures compared with the placebo group, including BPI pain (least pain, pain right now) (between-group difference: −1.69 ± 0.10, P = 0.0009; −2.42 ± 0.12, P P = 0.0230, respectively), Patient's Global Impression of Improvement (2.46 ± 0.07, P = 0.0026), Clinical Global Impressions of Severity (−1.46 ± 0.06, P = 0.0019), and Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (−3.86 ± 0.22, P = 0.0439). Adverse events occurring at a significantly higher incidence in the duloxetine group were somnolence

  4. Effect of Kangfuxin Solution on Chemo/Radiotherapy-Induced Mucositis in Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Patients: A Multicenter, Prospective Randomized Phase III Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Yangkun; Feng, Mei; Fan, Zixuan; Zhu, Xiaodong; Jin, Feng; Li, Rongqing; Wu, Jingbo; Yang, Xia; Jiang, Qinghua; Bai, Hongfang; Huang, Yecai; Lang, Jinyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Kangfuxin Solution, a pure Chinese herbal medicine, on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy in nasopharyngeal carcinoma patients. Methods. A randomized, parallel-group, multicenter clinical study was performed. A total of 240 patients were randomized to receive either Kangfuxin Solution (test group) or compound borax gargle (control group) during chemoradiotherapy. Oral mucositis, upper gastrointestinal mucositis, and oral pain were evaluated by Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE) v3.0 and the Verbal Rating Scale (VRS). Results. Of 240 patients enrolled, 215 were eligible for efficacy analysis. Compared with the control group, the incidence and severity of oral mucositis in the test group were significantly reduced (P = 0.01). The time to different grade of oral mucositis occurrence (grade 1, 2, or 3) was longer in test group (P < 0.01), and the accumulated radiation dose was also higher in test group comparing to the control group (P < 0.05). The test group showed lower incidence of oral pain and gastrointestinal mucositis than the control group (P < 0.01). No significant adverse events were observed. Conclusion. Kangfuxin Solution demonstrated its superiority to compound borax gargle on mucositis induced by chemoradiotherapy. Its safety is acceptable for clinical application. PMID:27375766

  5. Fludarabine, cyclophosphamide and lenalidomide in patients with relapsed/refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. A multicenter phase I-II GIMEMA trial.

    PubMed

    Mauro, Francesca R; Carella, Angelo M; Molica, Stefano; Paoloni, Francesca; Liberati, Anna M; Zaja, Francesco; Belsito, Valeria; Cortellezzi, Agostino; Rizzi, Rita; Tosi, Patrizia; Spriano, Mauro; Ferretti, Antonietta; Nanni, Mauro; Marinelli, Marilisa; De Propris, Maria S; Orlando, Sonia M; Vignetti, Marco; Cuneo, Antonio; Guarini, Anna R; Foà, Robin

    2017-07-01

    The activity and safety of a regimen combining lenalidomide with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide (FC) was investigated in patients with relapsed/refractory (R/R) chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Treatment consisted of six monthly courses of the FC regimen combined with 14 days of lenalidomide given at the starting dose of 2.5 mg during course 1. The maximum tolerated dose of lenalidomide was 5 mg. Forty patients were assessed for response, 66% were IGHV unmutated, 45% showed deletion 11q or 17p. The overall response and complete remission rates were 62.5% and 22.5%, respectively, the median progression-free and overall survival (OS) were 19 and 45 months, respectively. Grade 3-4 granulocytopenia was observed in 65% of cases, severe infections in 7.5%, the lenalidomide-related toxicity was mild. In conclusion, the results of this study demonstrate that low-dose lenalidomide associated with the FC schedule is an effective treatment for R/R patients with CLL, associated with an acceptable safety profile.

  6. A phase II/III randomized study to compare the efficacy and safety of rigosertib plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone in patients with previously untreated metastatic pancreatic cancer†

    PubMed Central

    O'Neil, B. H.; Scott, A. J.; Ma, W. W.; Cohen, S. J.; Aisner, D. L.; Menter, A. R.; Tejani, M. A.; Cho, J. K.; Granfortuna, J.; Coveler, L.; Olowokure, O. O.; Baranda, J. C.; Cusnir, M.; Phillip, P.; Boles, J.; Nazemzadeh, R.; Rarick, M.; Cohen, D. J.; Radford, J.; Fehrenbacher, L.; Bajaj, R.; Bathini, V.; Fanta, P.; Berlin, J.; McRee, A. J.; Maguire, R.; Wilhelm, F.; Maniar, M.; Jimeno, A.; Gomes, C. L.; Messersmith, W. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Rigosertib (ON 01910.Na), a first-in-class Ras mimetic and small-molecule inhibitor of multiple signaling pathways including polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), has shown efficacy in preclinical pancreatic cancer models. In this study, rigosertib was assessed in combination with gemcitabine in patients with treatment-naïve metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Materials and methods Patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma were randomized in a 2:1 fashion to gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle plus rigosertib 1800 mg/m2 via 2-h continuous IV infusions given twice weekly for 3 weeks of a 4-week cycle (RIG + GEM) versus gemcitabine 1000 mg/m2 weekly for 3 weeks in a 4-week cycle (GEM). Results A total of 160 patients were enrolled globally and randomly assigned to RIG + GEM (106 patients) or GEM (54). The most common grade 3 or higher adverse events were neutropenia (8% in the RIG + GEM group versus 6% in the GEM group), hyponatremia (17% versus 4%), and anemia (8% versus 4%). The median overall survival was 6.1 months for RIG + GEM versus 6.4 months for GEM [hazard ratio (HR), 1.24; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.85–1.81]. The median progression-free survival was 3.4 months for both groups (HR = 0.96; 95% CI 0.68–1.36). The partial response rate was 19% versus 13% for RIG + GEM versus GEM, respectively. Of 64 tumor samples sent for molecular analysis, 47 were adequate for multiplex genetic testing and 41 were positive for mutations. The majority of cases had KRAS gene mutations (40 cases). Other mutations detected included TP53 (13 cases) and PIK3CA (1 case). No correlation between mutational status and efficacy was detected. Conclusions The combination of RIG + GEM failed to demonstrate an improvement in survival or response compared with GEM in patients with metastatic pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Rigosertib showed a similar safety profile to that seen in previous trials using the IV

  7. Safety and efficacy of golimumab in Chinese patients with active ankylosing spondylitis: 1-year results of a multicentre, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Bao, Chunde; Huang, Feng; Khan, Muhammad Asim; Fei, Kaiyin; Wu, Zhong; Han, Chenglong; Hsia, Elizabeth C

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of golimumab in Chinese patients with active AS. Two hundred and thirteen patients were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either s.c. injections of placebo from weeks 0 to 20 followed by golimumab 50 mg from weeks 24 to 48 (group 1, n = 105) or golimumab 50 mg from weeks 0 to 48 (group 2, n = 108), both every 4 weeks. Placebo crossover occurred at week 24, while early escape was at week 16. The primary endpoint was an improvement of at least 20% in the Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS20) criteria at week 14. Major secondary endpoints included week 24 ASAS20 response and week 14 change scores for BASFI and BASMI. Golimumab treatment elicited significantly better responses than placebo in week 14 ASAS20 response [49.1% (53/108) vs 24.8% (26/105), respectively, P < 0.001], week 24 ASAS20 response (50.0% vs 22.9%, P < 0.001) and mean improvements in BASFI (-1.26 vs 0.11, P < 0.001) and BASMI (-0.42 vs -0.19, P = 0.021) scores at week 14. Additionally, golimumab treatment led to significant improvements in the mental and physical components of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and sleep problems at week 24, all of which were further improved through week 52. During the 16-week placebo-controlled study period, 31.4% and 30.6% of patients had adverse events (AEs) in groups 1 and 2, respectively; similar AE reporting rates were observed through week 24 (34.3% and 32.0%) and among the golimumab-treated patients through week 56 (41.2%). Golimumab significantly reduced clinical symptoms/signs and improved physical function, range of motion and HRQoL in Chinese patients with active AS without unexpected safety concerns. ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01248793. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Nimotuzumab prolongs survival in patients with malignant gliomas: A phase I/II clinical study of concomitant radiochemotherapy with or without nimotuzumab.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jidong; Peng, Yuping; Liao, Yuping; Jiang, Wuzhong; Wei, Rui; Huo, Lei; Han, Zaide; Duan, Chaojun; Zhong, Meizuo

    2012-07-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether nimotuzumab enhances the effect of radiochemotherapy in malignant gliomas. Patients (n=41) with malignant gliomas were divided into 20 cases (treatment group) in which nimotuzumab plus radiochemotherapy were offered and 21 cases (control group) in which placebo and radiochemotherapy were administered to the patients. The response to treatment was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the mean and median survival times and 1-year survival rate, and the log-rank test and the Chi-square test were used to analyze the difference in the survival and response rate between the treatment and control groups. The mean survival times of the treatment and control groups were 14.3 and 10.4 months and the median survival times of the treatment and control groups were 16.5 and 10.5 months, respectively. The 1-year survival rates of the treatment and control groups were 81.3 and 69.1%, respectively, with no significant difference (P>0.05). The objective response rates of the treatment and control groups were 70.0 and 52.4%, respectively, with no significant difference (P>0.05). In conclusion, there was a trend towards improved treatment efficacy of radiochemotherapy combined with nimotuzumab against malignant gliomas. This study demonstrated that the use of nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide chemotherapy is effective for malignant gliomas.

  9. Nimotuzumab prolongs survival in patients with malignant gliomas: A phase I/II clinical study of concomitant radiochemotherapy with or without nimotuzumab

    PubMed Central

    HONG, JIDONG; PENG, YUPING; LIAO, YUPING; JIANG, WUZHONG; WEI, RUI; HUO, LEI; HAN, ZAIDE; DUAN, CHAOJUN; ZHONG, MEIZUO

    2012-01-01

    The present study aimed to determine whether nimotuzumab enhances the effect of radiochemotherapy in malignant gliomas. Patients (n=41) with malignant gliomas were divided into 20 cases (treatment group) in which nimotuzumab plus radiochemotherapy were offered and 21 cases (control group) in which placebo and radiochemotherapy were administered to the patients. The response to treatment was evaluated according to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, the Kaplan-Meier method was used to calculate the mean and median survival times and 1-year survival rate, and the log-rank test and the Chi-square test were used to analyze the difference in the survival and response rate between the treatment and control groups. The mean survival times of the treatment and control groups were 14.3 and 10.4 months and the median survival times of the treatment and control groups were 16.5 and 10.5 months, respectively. The 1-year survival rates of the treatment and control groups were 81.3 and 69.1%, respectively, with no significant difference (P>0.05). The objective response rates of the treatment and control groups were 70.0 and 52.4%, respectively, with no significant difference (P>0.05). In conclusion, there was a trend towards improved treatment efficacy of radiochemotherapy combined with nimotuzumab against malignant gliomas. This study demonstrated that the use of nimotuzumab combined with radiotherapy and concomitant temozolomide chemotherapy is effective for malignant gliomas. PMID:23060940

  10. Measuring quality of life in patients with head and neck cancer: Update of the EORTC QLQ-H&N Module, Phase III.

    PubMed

    Singer, Susanne; Araújo, Cláudia; Arraras, Juan Ignacio; Baumann, Ingo; Boehm, Andreas; Brokstad Herlofson, Bente; Castro Silva, Joaquim; Chie, Wei-Chu; Fisher, Sheila; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Hammerlid, Eva; Irarrázaval, María Elisa; Jensen Hjermstad, Marianne; Jensen, Kenneth; Kiyota, Naomi; Licitra, Lisa; Nicolatou-Galitis, Ourania; Pinto, Monica; Santos, Marcos; Schmalz, Claudia; Sherman, Allen C; Tomaszewska, Iwona M; Verdonck de Leeuw, Irma; Yarom, Noam; Zotti, Paola; Hofmeister, Dirk

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to pilot test an updated version of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Head and Neck Module (EORTC QLQ-H&N60). Patients with head and neck cancer were asked to complete a list of 60 head and neck cancer-specific items comprising the updated EORTC head and neck module and the core questionnaire EORTC QLQ-C30. Debriefing interviews were conducted to identify any irrelevant items and confusing or upsetting wording. Interviews were performed with 330 patients from 17 countries, representing different head and neck cancer sites and treatments. Forty-one of the 60 items were retained according to the predefined EORTC criteria for module development, for another 2 items the wording was refined, and 17 items were removed. The preliminary EORTC QLQ-H&N43 can now be used in academic research. Psychometrics will be tested in a larger field study. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. EGFR biomarkers predict benefit from vandetanib in combination with docetaxel in a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heymach, J. V.; Lockwood, S. J.; Herbst, R. S.; Johnson, B. E.; Ryan, A. J.

    2014-01-01

    Background ZODIAC was a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that evaluated the addition of vandetanib to docetaxel. The study showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate, but not in overall survival for unselected patients. This study evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation, copy number gain, and protein expression, and KRAS gene mutation, in pretreatment tumor samples as potential biomarkers predicting benefit from vandetanib as second-line treatment of NSCLC. Patients and methods After progression following first-line chemotherapy, 1391 patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIB/IV) NSCLC were randomized 1 : 1 to receive vandetanib (100 mg/day) plus docetaxel (75 mg/m2 every 21 days) or placebo plus docetaxel in the ZODIAC study. Archival tumor samples (n = 570) were collected from consenting patients (n = 958) for predefined, prospective biomarker analyses. Results Of evaluable samples, 14% were EGFR mutation positive, 35% were EGFR FISH positive, 88% were EGFR protein expression positive, and 13% were KRAS mutation positive. Compared with the overall study population, in which progression-free survival (PFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.79] but not OS (HR = 0.91) were significantly improved with vandetanib, there was greater relative clinical benefit for patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors [PFS HR 0.51, confidence interval (CI) 0.25–1.06 and OS HR 0.46, CI 0.14–1.57] and EGFR FISH-positive tumors (PFS HR 0.61, CI 0.39–0.94 and OS HR 0.48, CI 0.28–0.84). Similarly, patients with EGFR mutation or FISH-positive tumor samples who received vandetanib had an increased chance of objective tumor response (odds ratios 3.34, CI 0.8–13.89, and 3.90, CI 1.02–14.82, respectively). There did not appear to be benefit for vandetanib in patients with KRAS mutation-positive tumors. Conclusions

  12. Subgroup analysis in RAISE: a randomized, double-blind phase III study of irinotecan, folinic acid, and 5-fluorouracil (FOLFIRI) plus ramucirumab or placebo in patients with metastatic colorectal carcinoma progression†

    PubMed Central

    Obermannová, R.; Van Cutsem, E.; Yoshino, T.; Bodoky, G.; Prausová, J.; Garcia-Carbonero, R.; Ciuleanu, T.; Garcia Alfonso, P.; Portnoy, D.; Cohn, A.; Yamazaki, K.; Clingan, P.; Lonardi, S.; Kim, T. W.; Yang, L.; Nasroulah, F.; Tabernero, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background The RAISE phase III clinical trial demonstrated that ramucirumab + FOLFIRI improved overall survival (OS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.844, P = 0.0219] and progression-free survival (PFS) (HR = 0.793, P < 0.0005) compared with placebo + FOLFIRI for second-line metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC) patients previously treated with first-line bevacizumab, oxaliplatin, and a fluoropyrimidine. Since some patient or disease characteristics could be associated with differential efficacy or safety, prespecified subgroup analyses were undertaken. This report focuses on three of the most relevant ones: KRAS status (wild-type versus mutant), age (<65 versus ≥65 years), and time to progression (TTP) on first-line therapy (<6 versus ≥6 months). Patients and methods OS and PFS were evaluated by the Kaplan–Meier analysis, with HR determined by the Cox proportional hazards model. Treatment-by-subgroup interaction was tested to determine whether treatment effect was consistent between subgroup pairs. Results Patients with both wild-type and mutant KRAS benefited from ramucirumab + FOLFIRI treatment over placebo + FOLFIRI (interaction P = 0.526); although numerically, wild-type KRAS patients benefited more (wild-type KRAS: median OS = 14.4 versus 11.9 months, HR = 0.82, P = 0.049; mutant KRAS: median OS = 12.7 versus 11.3 months, HR = 0.89, P = 0.263). Patients with both longer and shorter first-line TTP benefited from ramucirumab (interaction P = 0.9434), although TTP <6 months was associated with poorer OS (TTP ≥6 months: median OS = 14.3 versus 12.5 months, HR = 0.86, P = 0.061; TTP <6 months: median OS = 10.4 versus 8.0 months, HR = 0.86, P = 0.276). The subgroups of patients ≥65 versus <65 years also derived a similar ramucirumab survival benefit (interaction P = 0.9521) (≥65 years: median OS = 13.8 versus 11.7 months, HR = 0.85, P = 0.156; <65 years: median OS = 13.1 versus 11.9 months, HR = 0.86, P = 0.098). The safety profile of ramucirumab + FOLFIRI was

  13. Effect of nivolumab on health-related quality of life in patients with treatment-naïve advanced melanoma: results from the phase III CheckMate 066 study

    PubMed Central

    Long, G. V.; Atkinson, V.; Ascierto, P. A.; Robert, C.; Hassel, J. C.; Rutkowski, P.; Savage, K. J.; Taylor, F.; Coon, C.; Gilloteau, I.; Dastani, H. B.; Waxman, I. M.; Abernethy, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Nivolumab has shown significant survival benefit and a favorable safety profile compared with dacarbazine chemotherapy among treatment-naïve patients with metastatic melanoma in the CheckMate 066 phase III study. Results from the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) analyses from CheckMate 066 are presented. Patients and methods HRQoL was evaluated at baseline and every 6 weeks while on treatment using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Care (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the EuroQoL Five Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D). Via a multi-step statistical plan, data were analyzed descriptively, cross-sectionally, and longitudinally, adjusting for baseline covariates, in patients having baseline plus ≥1 post-baseline assessment. Results Baseline-adjusted completion rates for all HRQoL questionnaires across treatment arms were 65% and 70% for dacarbazine and nivolumab, respectively, and remained similar throughout treatment. The mean baseline HRQoL scores were similar for patients treated with nivolumab and dacarbazine. Baseline HRQoL levels with nivolumab were maintained over time. This exploratory analysis showed a between-arm difference in favor of nivolumab on the EQ-5D utility index and clinically meaningful EQ-5D improvements from baseline at several time points for patients receiving nivolumab. Patients treated with nivolumab did not show increased symptom burden as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-C30. No HRQoL change was noted with dacarbazine patients up to week 43, although the high attrition rate after week 13 did not allow any meaningful analyses. Patients receiving nivolumab deteriorated significantly later than those receiving dacarbazine on several EORTC QLQ-C30 scales and the EQ-5D utility index. Conclusions In addition to prolonged survival, these exploratory HRQoL results show that nivolumab maintains baseline HRQoL levels to provide long-term quality of survival benefit, compared with dacarbazine

  14. Analysis of opioid-mediated analgesia in Phase III studies of methylnaltrexone for opioid-induced constipation in patients with chronic noncancer pain

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Lynn R; Brenner, Darren M; Barrett, Andrew C; Paterson, Craig; Bortey, Enoch; Forbes, William P

    2015-01-01

    Background Subcutaneous methylnaltrexone is efficacious and well tolerated for opioid-induced constipation (OIC) but may theoretically disrupt opioid-mediated analgesia. Methods Opioid use, pain intensity, and opioid withdrawal (Objective Opioid Withdrawal Scale [OOWS] and Subjective Opiate Withdrawal Scale [SOWS] scores) were reported in a randomized, double-blind trial with an open-label extension (RCT) and an open-label trial (OLT) evaluating safety in adults with chronic noncancer pain. In the RCT, patients taking ≥50 mg of oral morphine equivalents daily with <3 rescue-free bowel movements weekly received methyl naltrexone 12 mg once daily (n=150), every other day (n=148), or placebo (n=162) for 4 weeks, followed by open-label methylnaltrexone 12 mg (as needed [prn]; n=364) for 8 weeks. In the OLT, patients (n=1,034) on stable opioid doses with OIC received methylnaltrexone 12 mg prn for up to 48 weeks. Results Minimal fluctuations of median morphine equivalent dose from baseline (BL) were observed in the RCT double-blind period (BL, 154.8–161.0 mg/d; range, 137.1–168.0 mg/d), RCT open-label period (BL, 156.3–174.6; range, 144.0–180.0) and OLT (BL, 120 mg/d; range, 117.3–121.1 mg/d). No significant change from BL in pain intensity score occurred in any group at weeks 2 or 4 (both P≥0.1) of the RCT double-blind period, and scores remained stable during the open-label period and in the OLT (mean change, −0.2 to 0.1). Changes from BL in OOWS and SOWS scores during the double-blind period were not significantly impacted by methylnaltrexone exposure at weeks 2 or 4 (P>0.05 for all). Conclusion Methylnaltrexone did not affect opioid-mediated analgesia in patients with chronic noncancer pain and OIC. PMID:26586963

  15. 77 FR 40936 - 60-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ...: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III. OMB Control Number: None. Type of Request: Reinstatement of a... Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III ACTION: Notice of.... The data gathered from the Passport Demand Forecasting Study Phase III will be used to monitor, assess...

  16. Randomized phase III trial of APF530 versus palonosetron in the prevention of chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting in a subset of patients with breast cancer receiving moderately or highly emetogenic chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Boccia, Ralph; O'Boyle, Erin; Cooper, William

    2016-02-26

    APF530 provides controlled, sustained-release granisetron for preventing acute (0-24 h) and delayed (24-120 h) chemotherapy-induced nausea and vomiting (CINV). In a phase III trial, APF530 was noninferior to palonosetron in preventing acute CINV following single-dose moderately (MEC) or highly emetogenic chemotherapy (HEC) and delayed CINV in MEC (MEC and HEC defined by Hesketh criteria). This exploratory subanalysis was conducted in the breast cancer subpopulation. Patients were randomized to subcutaneous APF530 250 or 500 mg (granisetron 5 or 10 mg) or intravenous palonosetron 0.25 mg during cycle 1. Palonosetron patients were randomized to APF530 for cycles 2 to 4. The primary efficacy end point was complete response (CR, no emesis or rescue medication) in cycle 1. Among breast cancer patients (n = 423 MEC, n = 185 HEC), > 70 % received anthracycline-containing regimens in each emetogenicity subgroup. There were no significant between-group differences in CRs in cycle 1 for acute (APF530 250 mg: MEC 71 %, HEC 77 %; 500 mg: MEC 73 %, HEC 73 %; palonosetron: MEC 68 %, HEC 66 %) and delayed (APF530 250 mg: MEC 46 %, HEC 58 %; 500 mg: MEC 48 %, HEC 63 %; palonosetron: MEC 52 %, HEC 52 %) CINV. There were no significant differences in within-cycle CRs between APF530 doses for acute and delayed CINV in MEC or HEC in cycles 2 to 4; CRs trended higher in later cycles, with no notable differences in adverse events between breast cancer and overall populations. APF530 effectively prevented acute and delayed CINV over 4 chemotherapy cycles in breast cancer patients receiving MEC or HEC. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00343460 (June 22, 2006).

  17. Phase III Study of Radiation Therapy With or Without Cis-Platinum in Patients With Unresectable Squamous or Undifferentiated Carcinoma of the Head and Neck: An Intergroup Trial of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (E2382)

    SciTech Connect

    Quon, Harry; Leong, Traci; Haselow, Robert; Leipzig, Bruce; Cooper, Jay; Forastiere, Arlene

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: The Head and Neck Intergroup conducted a Phase III randomized trial to determine whether the addition weekly cisplatin to daily radiation therapy (RT) would improve survival in patients with unresectable squamous cell head-and-neck carcinoma. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients were randomized to RT (70 Gy at 1.8-2 Gy/day) or to the identical RT with weekly cisplatin dosed at 20 mg/m{sup 2}. Failure-free survival (FFS) and overall survival (OS) curves were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log rank test. Results: Between 1982 and 1987, 371 patients were accrued, and 308 patients were found eligible for analysis. Median follow-up was 62 months. The median FFS was 6.5 and 7.2 months for the RT and RT + cisplatin groups, respectively (p = 0.30). The p value for the treatment difference was p = 0.096 in multivariate modeling of FFS (compared to a p = 0.30 in univariate analysis). Expected acute toxicities were significantly increased with the addition of cisplatin except for in-field RT toxicities. Late toxicities were not significantly different except for significantly more esophageal (9% vs. 3%, p = 0.03) and laryngeal (11% vs. 4%, p = 0.05) late toxicities in the RT + cisplatin group. Conclusion: The addition of concurrent weekly cisplatin at 20 mg/m{sup 2} to daily radiation did not improve survival, although there was evidence of activity. Low-dose weekly cisplatin seems to have modest tumor radiosensitization but can increase the risk of late swallowing complications.

  18. A Phase III, randomized, open-label trial of ferumoxytol compared with iron sucrose for the treatment of iron deficiency anemia in patients with a history of unsatisfactory oral iron therapy.

    PubMed

    Hetzel, David; Strauss, William; Bernard, Kristine; Li, Zhu; Urboniene, Audrone; Allen, Lee F

    2014-06-01

    Iron deficiency anemia (IDA) is the most common form of anemia worldwide. Although oral iron is used as first-line treatment, many patients are unresponsive to or cannot take oral iron. This Phase III, open-label, non-inferiority study compared the efficacy and safety of ferumoxytol, a rapid, injectable intravenous (IV) iron product with low immunological reactivity and minimal detectable free iron, with IV iron sucrose in adults with IDA of any cause. Patients (N = 605) were randomized 2:1 to receive ferumoxytol (n = 406, two doses of 510 mg 5 ± 3 days apart) or iron sucrose (n = 199, five doses of 200 mg on five nonconsecutive days over 14 days) and followed for 5 weeks. Ferumoxytol demonstrated noninferiority to iron sucrose at the primary endpoint, the proportion of patients achieving a hemoglobin increase of ≥2 g dL(-1) at any time from Baseline to Week 5 (ferumoxytol, 84.0% [n = 406] vs. iron sucrose, 81.4% [n = 199]), with a noninferiority margin of 15%. Ferumoxytol was superior to iron sucrose (2.7 g dL(-1) vs. 2.4 g dL(-1) ) in the mean change in hemoglobin from Baseline to Week 5 (the alternative preplanned primary endpoint) with P = 0.0124. Transferrin saturation, quality-of-life measures, and safety outcomes were similar between the two treatment groups. Overall, ferumoxytol demonstrated comparable safety and efficacy to iron sucrose, suggesting that ferumoxytol may be a useful treatment option for patients with IDA in whom oral iron was unsatisfactory or could not be used.

  19. A Phase I/II Study of the Investigational Drug Alisertib in Combination With Abiraterone and Prednisone for Patients With Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer Progressing on Abiraterone

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Sheel A.; Sama, Ashwin R.; Hoffman-Censits, Jean H.; Kennedy, Brooke; Kilpatrick, Deborah; Ye, Zhong; Yang, Hushan; Mu, Zhaomei; Leiby, Benjamin; Lewis, Nancy; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Kelly, William Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Lessons Learned Patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer did not tolerate the combination of alisertib with abiraterone and prednisone. There was no clear signal indicating that adding alisertib might be beneficial for those patients progressing on abiraterone. Background. We hypothesized that Aurora A kinase (AK) contributes to castrate resistance in prostate cancer (PCa) and that inhibiting AK with alisertib can resensitize PCa cells to androgen receptor (AR) inhibitor abiraterone. Methods. This was a phase I/II trial to determine the safety and efficacy of alisertib when given in combination with abiraterone plus prednisone (AP). Metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients were treated with dose escalation (alisertib at 30, 40, and 50 mg orally b.i.d., days 1–7 every 21 days) per standard 3+3 design. Results. Nine of 43 planned subjects were enrolled. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was not reached, and the dose-limiting toxicities (DLTs) included neutropenic fever (1 of 9), neutropenia (1 of 9), fatigue with memory impairment (1 of 9), and diarrhea/mucositis (1 of 9). No prostate-specific antigen (PSA) decrease or circulating tumor cell (CTC) changes were observed during the study. Pharmacodynamically, adding alisertib did not affect total testosterone or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) levels. There was some change in neuroendocrine markers after therapy. Mean duration on study was 2.5 months. The trial was terminated early. Conclusion. A tolerable dose of alisertib in combination with AP in mCRPC was not established in this study. There was no clear signal indicating that alisertib might be beneficial for patients with mCRPC progressing on abiraterone. PMID:28178640

  20. A DOUBLE-BLIND, RANDOMIZED, PLACEBO-CONTROLLED, FIXED-DOSE PHASE III STUDY OF VILAZODONE IN PATIENTS WITH GENERALIZED ANXIETY DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Gommoll, Carl; Durgam, Suresh; Mathews, Maju; Forero, Giovanna; Nunez, Rene; Tang, Xiongwen; Thase, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Background Vilazodone, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor and 5-HT1A receptor partial agonist, is approved for treating major depressive disorder in adults. This study (NCT01629966 ClinicalTrials.gov) evaluated the efficacy and safety of vilazodone in adults with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). Methods A multicenter, double-blind, parallel-group, placebo-controlled, fixed-dose study in patients with GAD randomized (1:1:1) to placebo (n = 223), or vilazodone 20 mg/day (n = 230) or 40 mg/day (n = 227). Primary and secondary efficacy parameters were total score change from baseline to week 8 on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Anxiety (HAMA) and Sheehan Disability Scale (SDS), respectively, analyzed using a predefined mixed-effect model for repeated measures (MMRM). Safety outcomes were presented by descriptive statistics. Results The least squares mean difference (95% confidence interval) in HAMA total score change from baseline (MMRM) was statistically significant for vilazodone 40 mg/day versus placebo (–1.80 [–3.26, –0.34]; P = .0312 [adjusted for multiple comparisons]), but not for vilazodone 20 mg/day versus placebo. Mean change from baseline in SDS total score was not significantly different for either dose of vilazodone versus placebo when adjusted for multiplicity; significant improvement versus placebo was noted for vilazodone 40 mg/day without adjustment for multiplicity (P = .0349). The incidence of adverse events was similar for vilazodone 20 and 40 mg/day (∼71%) and slightly lower for placebo (62%). Nausea, diarrhea, dizziness, vomiting, and fatigue were reported in ≥5% of patients in either vilazodone group and at least twice the rate of placebo. Conclusions Vilazodone was effective in treating anxiety symptoms of GAD. No new safety concerns were identified. PMID:25891440

  1. EGFR biomarkers predict benefit from vandetanib in combination with docetaxel in a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment of patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Heymach, J V; Lockwood, S J; Herbst, R S; Johnson, B E; Ryan, A J

    2014-10-01

    ZODIAC was a randomized phase III study of second-line treatment in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that evaluated the addition of vandetanib to docetaxel. The study showed a statistically significant improvement in progression-free survival and objective response rate, but not in overall survival for unselected patients. This study evaluated epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutation, copy number gain, and protein expression, and KRAS gene mutation, in pretreatment tumor samples as potential biomarkers predicting benefit from vandetanib as second-line treatment of NSCLC. After progression following first-line chemotherapy, 1391 patients with locally advanced or metastatic (stage IIIB/IV) NSCLC were randomized 1 : 1 to receive vandetanib (100 mg/day) plus docetaxel (75 mg/m(2) every 21 days) or placebo plus docetaxel in the ZODIAC study. Archival tumor samples (n = 570) were collected from consenting patients (n = 958) for predefined, prospective biomarker analyses. Of evaluable samples, 14% were EGFR mutation positive, 35% were EGFR FISH positive, 88% were EGFR protein expression positive, and 13% were KRAS mutation positive. Compared with the overall study population, in which progression-free survival (PFS) [hazard ratio (HR) = 0.79] but not OS (HR = 0.91) were significantly improved with vandetanib, there was greater relative clinical benefit for patients with EGFR mutation-positive tumors [PFS HR 0.51, confidence interval (CI) 0.25-1.06 and OS HR 0.46, CI 0.14-1.57] and EGFR FISH-positive tumors (PFS HR 0.61, CI 0.39-0.94 and OS HR 0.48, CI 0.28-0.84). Similarly, patients with EGFR mutation or FISH-positive tumor samples who received vandetanib had an increased chance of objective tumor response (odds ratios 3.34, CI 0.8-13.89, and 3.90, CI 1.02-14.82, respectively). There did not appear to be benefit for vandetanib in patients with KRAS mutation-positive tumors. High EGFR gene copy number or activating EGFR mutations may

  2. Effect of nivolumab on health-related quality of life in patients with treatment-naïve advanced melanoma: results from the phase III CheckMate 066 study.

    PubMed

    Long, G V; Atkinson, V; Ascierto, P A; Robert, C; Hassel, J C; Rutkowski, P; Savage, K J; Taylor, F; Coon, C; Gilloteau, I; Dastani, H B; Waxman, I M; Abernethy, A P

    2016-10-01

    Nivolumab has shown significant survival benefit and a favorable safety profile compared with dacarbazine chemotherapy among treatment-naïve patients with metastatic melanoma in the CheckMate 066 phase III study. Results from the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) analyses from CheckMate 066 are presented. HRQoL was evaluated at baseline and every 6 weeks while on treatment using the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Care (EORTC) Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (QLQ-C30) and the EuroQoL Five Dimensions Questionnaire (EQ-5D). Via a multi-step statistical plan, data were analyzed descriptively, cross-sectionally, and longitudinally, adjusting for baseline covariates, in patients having baseline plus ≥1 post-baseline assessment. Baseline-adjusted completion rates for all HRQoL questionnaires across treatment arms were 65% and 70% for dacarbazine and nivolumab, respectively, and remained similar throughout treatment. The mean baseline HRQoL scores were similar for patients treated with nivolumab and dacarbazine. Baseline HRQoL levels with nivolumab were maintained over time. This exploratory analysis showed a between-arm difference in favor of nivolumab on the EQ-5D utility index and clinically meaningful EQ-5D improvements from baseline at several time points for patients receiving nivolumab. Patients treated with nivolumab did not show increased symptom burden as assessed by the EORTC QLQ-C30. No HRQoL change was noted with dacarbazine patients up to week 43, although the high attrition rate after week 13 did not allow any meaningful analyses. Patients receiving nivolumab deteriorated significantly later than those receiving dacarbazine on several EORTC QLQ-C30 scales and the EQ-5D utility index. In addition to prolonged survival, these exploratory HRQoL results show that nivolumab maintains baseline HRQoL levels to provide long-term quality of survival benefit, compared with dacarbazine in patients with advanced melanoma. © The Author

  3. Efficacy and safety of Privigen(®) in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: results of a prospective, single-arm, open-label Phase III study (the PRIMA study).

    PubMed

    Léger, Jean-Marc; De Bleecker, Jan L; Sommer, Claudia; Robberecht, Wim; Saarela, Mika; Kamienowski, Jerzy; Stelmasiak, Zbigniew; Mielke, Orell; Tackenberg, Björn; Shebl, Amgad; Bauhofer, Artur; Zenker, Othmar; Merkies, Ingemar S J

    2013-06-01

    This prospective, multicenter, single-arm, open-label Phase III study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of Privigen(®) (10% liquid human intravenous immunoglobulin [IVIG], stabilized with L-proline) in patients with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). Patients received one induction dose of Privigen (2 g/kg body weight [bw]) and up to seven maintenance doses (1 g/kg bw) at 3-week intervals. The primary efficacy endpoint was the responder rate at completion, defined as improvement of ≥1 point on the adjusted Inflammatory Neuropathy Cause and Treatment (INCAT) disability scale. The preset success criterion was the responder rate being ≥35%. Of the 31 screened patients, 28 patients were enrolled including 13 (46.4%) IVIG-pretreated patients. The overall responder rate at completion was 60.7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 42.41%-76.43%). IVIG-pretreated patients demonstrated a higher responder rate than IVIG-naïve patients (76.9% vs. 46.7%). The median (25%-75% quantile) INCAT score improved from 3.5 (3.0-4.5) points at baseline to 2.5 (1.0-3.0) points at completion, as did the mean (standard deviation [SD]) maximum grip strength (66.7 [37.24] kPa vs. 80.9 [31.06] kPa) and the median Medical Research Council sum score (67.0 [61.5-72.0] points vs. 75.5 [71.5-79.5] points). Of 108 adverse events (AEs; 0.417 AEs per infusion), 95 AEs (88.0%) were mild or moderate in intensity and resolved by the end of study. Two serious AEs of hemolysis were reported that resolved after discontinuation of treatment. Thus, Privigen provided efficacious and well-tolerated induction and maintenance treatment in patients with CIDP. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of the Peripheral Nervous System published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Peripheral Nerve Society.

  4. Run-In Phase III Trial Design With Pharmacodynamics Predictive Biomarkers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Developments in biotechnology have stimulated the use of predictive biomarkers to identify patients who are likely to benefit from a targeted therapy. Several randomized phase III designs have been introduced for development of a targeted therapy using a diagnostic test. Most such designs require biomarkers measured before treatment. In many cases, it has been very difficult to identify such biomarkers. Promising candidate biomarkers can sometimes be effectively measured after a short run-in period on the new treatment. Methods We introduce a new design for phase III trials with a candidate predictive pharmacodynamic biomarker measured after a short run-in period. Depending on the therapy and the biomarker performance, the trial would either randomize all patients but perform a separate analysis on the biomarker-positive patients or only randomize marker-positive patients after the run-in period. We evaluate the proposed design compared with the conventional phase III design and discuss how to design a run-in trial based on phase II studies. Results The proposed design achieves a major sample size reduction compared with the conventional randomized phase III design in many cases when the biomarker has good sensitivity (≥0.7) and specificity (≥0.7). This requires that the biomarker be measured accurately and be indicative of drug activity. However, the proposed design loses some of its advantage when the proportion of potential responders is large (>50%) or the effect on survival from run-in period is substantial. Conclusions Incorporating a pharmacodynamic biomarker requires careful consideration but can expand the capacity of clinical trials to personalize treatment decisions and enhance therapeutics development. PMID:24096624

  5. Computational Analysis of the SRS Phase III Salt Disposition Alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Dimenna, R.A.

    1999-10-07

    Completion of the Phase III evaluation and comparison of salt disposition alternatives was supported with enhanced computer models and analysis for each case on the ''short list'' of four options. SPEEDUP(TM) models and special purpose models describing mass and energy balances and flow rates were developed and used to predict performance and production characteristics for each of the options. Results from the computational analysis were a key part of the input used to select a primary and an alternate salt disposition alternative.

  6. Phase I/II Study of Neurosurgical Resection and Intra-operative Cesium-131 Radio-isotope Brachytherapy in Patients with Newly Diagnosed Brain Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Wernicke, A. Gabriella; Yondorf, Menachem Z; Peng, Luke; Trichter, Samuel; Nedialkova, Lucy; Sabbas, Albert; Khulidzhanov, Fridon; Parashar, Bhupesh; Nori, Dattatreyudu; Chao, K.S. Clifford; Christos, Paul; Pannullo, Susan; Boockvar, John A.; Stieg, Phillip; Schwartz, Theodore H.

    2014-01-01

    Object Resected brain metastases have a high rate of local recurrence without adjuvant therapy. Adjuvant whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) remains the standard of care with the rate of local control >90%. However, WBRT is delivered over 10–15 days, which can delay other therapy and is associated with acute and long-term toxicities. Intra-operative permanent Cesium-131 (Cs-131) implants can be performed at the time of surgery, thereby avoiding any additional therapy. We evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of a novel treatment approach of brain metastases with a permanent intra-operative Cs-131 brachytherapy. Methods After IRB approval, 24 patients with a newly diagnosed metastasis to the brain (n=24) were accrued on a prospective protocol between 2010 and 2012. There were 10 frontal, 7 parietal, 4 cerebellar, 2 occipital, and 1 temporal metastases. Histology included lung (16), breast (2), kidney (2), melanoma (2), colon (1), and cervix (1). Cs-131 stranded seeds were placed as a permanent volume implant. Prescription dose was 80Gy at 5mm depth from the resection cavity surface. Distant metastases were treated with stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) or WBRT, depending on the number of lesions. Primary end point was resection cavity freedom from progression (FFP). Secondary end points included distant metastases FFP, median survival, overall survival (OS), and toxicity. Results Median follow-up was 19.3 months (range, 12.89 – 29.57 months). Median age was 65 years (range, 45–84 years). Median volume of resected tumor was 10.31 cc (range, 1.77 - 87.11 cc). Median number of seeds employed was 12 (range, 4–35) with median activity per seed of 3.82 mCi (range, 3.31–4.83 mCi) and total activity of 46.91 mCi (range, 15.31–130.70 mCi). Local recurrence FFP was 100%. There was 1 adjacent leptomeningeal recurrence, resulting in a 1-year regional FFP of 93.8% (95% CI = 63.2%, 99.1%). Distant metastasis FFP was 48.4% (95% CI = 26.3%, 67.4%). Median OS was 9

  7. Phase III clinical study of maxacalcitol ointment in patients with palmoplantar pustulosis: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Umezawa, Yoshinori; Nakagawa, Hidemi; Tamaki, Kunihiko

    2016-03-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis (PPP) often shows resistance to treatment. Vitamin D3 analog (VitD3 ) has been widely used for the treatment of psoriasis, however, the efficacy and safety of topical VitD3 treatment of PPP are not fully confirmed. Maxacalcitol topical ointment (22-oxacalcitriol [OCT]) was applied twice daily for 8 weeks. Evaluation of efficacy was based on scored skin findings for three main symptoms (erythema, pustules/vesicles and keratinization/scales). The primary and secondary end-points were the total and symptom-specific scores of skin findings, respectively. A total of 188 patients with moderate or severe PPP were enrolled in the study and were randomized into either the OCT group (n = 95) or placebo group (n = 93). The total scores (mean ± standard error) of skin findings at the last observation adjusting for those on day 1 were 5.0 ± 0.20 in the OCT group and 6.9 ± 0.20 in the placebo group. There was a significant decrease in the total score of skin findings in the OCT group compared with the placebo group (P < 0.0001). In particular, the score of pustules/vesicles drastically decreased in the OCT group. In terms of safety, the incidence of adverse reactions in the OCT and placebo groups were 11.6% and 9.7%, respectively. These results indicate that OCT is effective and highly safe in the management of PPP. Topical OCT treatment was found to show a potent action on pustules/vesicles thereby contributing to the cure of PPP.

  8. A Phase I-II Study of Postoperative Capecitabine-Based Chemoradiotherapy in Gastric Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jansen, Edwin; Crosby, Tom D.L.; Dubbelman, Ria; Bartelink, Harry; Verheij, Marcel

    2007-12-01

    Background: The Intergroup 0116 randomized study showed that postoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy improved locoregional control and overall survival in patients with gastric cancer. We hypothesized that these results could be improved further by using a more effective, intensified, and convenient chemotherapy schedule. Therefore, this Phase I-II dose-escalation study was performed to determine the maximal tolerated dose and toxicity profile of postoperative radiotherapy combined with concurrent capecitabine. Patients and Methods: After recovery from surgery for adenocarcinoma of the gastroesophageal junction or stomach, all patients were treated with capecitabine monotherapy, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily for 2 weeks. After a 1-week treatment-free interval, patients received capecitabine (650-1,000 mg/m{sup 2} orally twice daily 5 days/week) in a dose-escalation schedule combined with radiotherapy on weekdays for 5 weeks. Radiotherapy was delivered to a total dose of 45 Gy in 25 fractions to the gastric bed, anastomoses, and regional lymph nodes. Results: Sixty-six patients were treated accordingly. Two patients went off study before or shortly after the start of chemoradiotherapy because of progressive disease. Therefore, 64 patients completed treatment as planned. During the chemoradiotherapy phase, 4 patients developed four items of Grade III dose-limiting toxicity (3 patients in Dose Level II and 1 patient in Dose Level IV). The predefined highest dose of capecitabine, 1,000 mg/m{sup 2} twice daily orally, was tolerated well and, therefore, considered safe for further clinical evaluation. Conclusions: This Phase I-II study shows that intensified chemoradiotherapy with daily capecitabine is feasible in postoperative patients with gastroesophageal junction and gastric cancer.

  9. Biomarker-Guided Adaptive Trial Designs in Phase II and Phase III: A Methodological Review

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Miranta; Jorgensen, Andrea L; Kolamunnage-Dona, Ruwanthi

    2016-01-01

    Background Personalized medicine is a growing area of research which aims to tailor the treatment given to a patient according to one or more personal characteristics. These characteristics can be demographic such as age or gender, or biological such as a genetic or other biomarker. Prior to utilizing a patient’s biomarker information in clinical practice, robust testing in terms of analytical validity, clinical validity and clinical utility is necessary. A number of clinical trial designs have been proposed for testing a biomarker’s clinical utility, including Phase II and Phase III clinical trials which aim to test the effectiveness of a biomarker-guided approach to treatment; these designs can be broadly classified into adaptive and non-adaptive. While adaptive designs allow planned modifications based on accumulating information during a trial, non-adaptive designs are typically simpler but less flexible. Methods and Findings We have undertaken a comprehensive review of biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs proposed in the past decade. We have identified eight distinct biomarker-guided adaptive designs and nine variations from 107 studies. Substantial variability has been observed in terms of how trial designs are described and particularly in the terminology used by different authors. We have graphically displayed the current biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs and summarised the characteristics of each design. Conclusions Our in-depth overview provides future researchers with clarity in definition, methodology and terminology for biomarker-guided adaptive trial designs. PMID:26910238

  10. A Multicenter, Open Labeled, Randomized, Phase III Study Comparing Lopinavir/Ritonavir Plus Atazanavir to Lopinavir/Ritonavir Plus Zidovudine and Lamivudine in Naive HIV-1-Infected Patients: 48-Week Analysis of the LORAN Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ulbricht, K.U; Behrens, G.M; Stoll, M; Salzberger, B; Jessen, H; Jessen, A.B; Kuhlmann, B; Heiken, H; Trein, A; Schmidt, R.E

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The primary aim of the study was to compare the metabolic side effects of a nucleoside analogue-containing regimen with a nucleoside analogue-sparing double protease inhibitor regimen. A secondary goal was to test for efficacy of a double-PI regimen. Design: Multicenter, randomized, open-label, phase III clinical trial. Subjects: Adult HIV-1-infected individuals naïve to antiretroviral therapy with viral load above 400 HIV-RNA copies/ml were randomized (1:1) to either 400 mg lopinavir /100 mg ritonavir (LPV/r) BID plus 150 mg lamivudine/300 mg zidovudine (CBV) BID versus LPV/r BID plus 300 mg atazanavir (ATV) QD. Main outcome measure was the virologic failure in both groups, defined as viral load ≥50 copies/ml at week 48. Results: In the CBV/LPV/r-arm, 29 out of 35 patients [(83%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 66.9-92.2%] and 18 out of 40 patients (45%; 95% CI 29.7-61.5%) in the ATV/LPV/r-arm had a HIV-RNA level <50 copies/ml at week 48. The intent-to-treat analysis revealed inferior virologic response in the ATV/LPV/r arm (Chi-Q and Fisher´s Exact Test p<0.001) and resulted in premature termination of the trial. Eleven patients in the ATV/LPV/r-arm discontinued therapy because of virological failure. These failures mostly presented with low level replication (<1,000 copies/ml). Increases in CD4 cell counts was significantly more rapid in the ATV/LPV/r arm (p=0.02), but comparable at week 48. Conclusions: ATV/LPV/r had less virologic efficacy than the conventional RTI-based regimen and resulted in a high virological failure rate with low level replication. PMID:21643422

  11. Is pre-trial quality assurance necessary? Experiences of the CONVERT Phase III randomized trial for good performance status patients with limited-stage small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, E; Lyn, E; Faivre-Finn, C

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study is an analysis of the pre-trial quality assurance (QA) exercises submitted by clinicians from radiotherapy (RT) centres across Europe and Canada to qualify for participation in the CONVERT trial. Methods: QA exercises submitted by 64 clinicians at 64 RT centres were included in this analysis. The exercises included the completion of a trial-specific questionnaire and submission of a treatment plan, for both trial arms, for a patient fitting the eligibility criteria of the trial. This article describes the QA programme set up for the CONVERT trial and identifies deviations from the trial protocol. Patient eligibility, disease and critical structure outlining and treatment planning technique were assessed. Results: Results from QA trial-specific questionnaires received between February 2008 and September 2011, returned as part of the QA exercise, indicated that the majority of centres (70.3%) were using 6-MV photons and type B treatment planning system algorithms (57.8%). 90.6% of clinicians assessed submitted data for patients who fitted the eligibility criteria for the trial. There were inconsistencies in outlining of gross tumour volume (GTV) and organs at risk, mainly heart and oesophagus, and in the use of margins around the GTV. Conclusion: Such a QA programme helps to ensure that centres conform to trial protocol and should reduce inconsistencies in RT planning that may confound the results of the CONVERT trial. Advances in knowledge: Few studies reporting pre-trial QA have been published to date. This article outlines the importance of such a QA programme in the context of multicentre Phase III studies. PMID:24620839

  12. Efficacy and safety of sucroferric oxyhydroxide compared with sevelamer hydrochloride in Japanese haemodialysis patients with hyperphosphataemia: A randomized, open‐label, multicentre, 12‐week phase III study

    PubMed Central

    Yokoyama, Keitaro; Fukagawa, Masafumi; Terao, Akira; Akizawa, Tadao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aim We aimed to investigate the non‐inferiority of PA21 (sucroferric oxyhydroxide) to sevelamer hydrochloride (sevelamer) in terms of efficacy and safety in Japanese haemodialysis patients with hyperphosphataemia. Methods In this Phase III, open‐label, multicentre study, 213 haemodialysis patients with hyperphosphataemia were randomized to PA21 or sevelamer treatment for 12 weeks. The primary outcome was adjusted serum phosphorus concentration at the end of treatment; the non‐inferiority of PA21 was confirmed if the upper limit of the two‐sided 95% confidence interval (CI) is ≤0.32 mmol/L. Secondary outcomes were corrected serum calcium and intact‐parathyroid hormone concentrations. Adverse events (AEs) and adverse drug reactions (ADRs) were evaluated. Results The adjusted mean serum phosphorus concentration at the end of treatment confirmed the non‐inferiority of PA21 for lowering serum phosphorus compared with sevelamer (1.62 vs 1.72 mmol/L; difference, −0.11 mmol/L; 95% CI, −0.20 to −0.02 mmol/L). The mean daily tablet intake was 5.6 ± 2.6 and 18.7 ± 7.1 tablets in the PA21 and sevelamer groups, respectively. The incidences of AEs and ADRs were not significantly different between the two groups. Conclusion The non‐inferiority of PA21 to sevelamer was confirmed for the treatment of Japanese haemodialysis patients with hyperphosphataemia. PA21 was effective, safe, and well tolerated, while having a considerably lower pill burden than sevelamer. PMID:27496336

  13. Randomized phase III trial of gemcitabine plus cisplatin compared with single-agent gemcitabine as first-line treatment of patients with advanced pancreatic cancer: the GIP-1 study.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Giuseppe; Labianca, Roberto; Di Costanzo, Francesco; Gebbia, Vittorio; Cartenì, Giacomo; Massidda, Bruno; Dapretto, Elisa; Manzione, Luigi; Piazza, Elena; Sannicolò, Mirella; Ciaparrone, Marco; Cavanna, Luigi; Giuliani, Francesco; Maiello, Evaristo; Testa, Antonio; Pederzoli, Paolo; Falconi, Massimo; Gallo, Ciro; Di Maio, Massimo; Perrone, Francesco

    2010-04-01

    Single-agent gemcitabine became standard first-line treatment for advanced pancreatic cancer after demonstration of superiority compared with fluorouracil. The Gruppo Italiano Pancreas 1 randomized phase III trial aimed to compare gemcitabine plus cisplatin versus gemcitabine alone (ClinicalTrials.gov ID NCT00813696). Patients with locally advanced or metastatic pancreatic cancer, age 18 to 75 years, and Karnofsky performance status (KPS) > or = 50, were randomly assigned to receive gemcitabine (arm A) or gemcitabine plus cisplatin (arm B). Arm A: gemcitabine 1,000 mg/m(2) weekly for 7 weeks, and, after a 1-week rest, on days 1, 8, and 15 every 4 weeks. Arm B: cisplatin 25 mg/m(2) added weekly to gemcitabine, except cycle 1 day 22. Primary end point was overall survival. To have 8% power of detecting a 0.74 hazard ratio (HR) of death, with bilateral alpha .05, 355 events were needed and 400 patients planned. Four hundred patients were enrolled (arm A: 199; arm B: 201). Median age was 63, 59% were male, 84% had stage IV, and 83% had KPS > or = 80. Median overall survival was 8.3 months versus 7.2 months in arm A and B, respectively (HR, 1.10; 95% CI, 0.89 to 1.35; P = .38). Median progression-free survival was 3.9 months versus 3.8 months in arm A and B, respectively (HR, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.19; P = .80). The objective response rate was 10.1% in A and 12.9% in B (P = .37). Clinical benefit was experienced by 23.0% in A and 15.1% in B (P = .057). Combination therapy produced more hematologic toxicity, without relevant differences in nonhematologic toxicity. The addition of weekly cisplatin to gemcitabine failed to demonstrate any improvement as first-line treatment of advanced pancreatic cancer.

  14. Phase III randomized trial comparing moderate-dose cisplatin to combined cisplatin and carboplatin in addition to mitomycin and ifosfamide in patients with stage IV non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sculier, J-P; Lafitte, J-J; Paesmans, M; Thiriaux, J; Alexopoulos, C G; Baumöhl, J; Schmerber, J; Koumakis, G; Florin, M C; Zacharias, C; Berghmans, T; Mommen, P; Ninane, V; Klastersky, J

    2000-01-01

    A phase III randomized trial was conducted in patients with metastatic NSCLC, to determine if, in association with mitomycin (6 mg m–2) and ifosfamide (3 g m–2), the combination of moderate dosages of cisplatin (60 mg m–2) and carboplatin (200 mg m–2) – CarboMIP regimen – improved survival in comparison with cisplatin (50 mg m–2) alone – MIP regimen. A total of 305 patients with no prior chemotherapy were randomized, including 297 patients assessable for survival (147 in the MIP arm and 150 in the CarboMIP arm) and 268 patients assessable for response to chemotherapy. All but eight (with malignant pleural effusion) had stage IV disease. There was a 27% (95% CI, 19–34) objective response (OR) rate to MIP (25% of the eligible patients) and a 33% (95% CI, 24–41) OR rate to CarboMIP (29% of the eligible patients). This difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.34). Duration of response was not significantly different between both arms. There was also no difference (P = 0.67) in survival: median survival times were 28 weeks (95% Cl, 24–32) for MIP and 32 weeks (95% Cl, 26–35) for CarboMIP, with respectively 1-year survival rates of 24% and 23% and 2-year survival rates of 5% and 2%. The main toxicities consisted in emesis, alopecia, leucopenia and thrombocytopenia, that were, except alopecia, significantly more severe in the CarboMIP arm. Our trial failed to demonstrate a significant improvement in response or survival when patients with metastatic NSCLC were treated, in addition to ifosfamide and mitomycin, by combination of moderate dosages of cisplatin and carboplatin instead of moderate dosage of cisplatin alone. The results support the use of a moderate dose (50 mg m–2) of cisplatin in combination with ifosfamide and mitomycin for the chemotherapy of this disease. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11027424

  15. Association between quality of response and outcomes in patients with newly diagnosed mantle cell lymphoma receiving VR-CAP versus R-CHOP in the phase III LYM-3002 study.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Gregor; Robak, Tadeusz; Huang, Huiqiang; Pylypenko, Halyna; Siritanaratkul, Noppadol; Pereira, Juliana; Drach, Johannes; Mayer, Jiri; Okamoto, Rumiko; Pei, Lixia; Rooney, Brendan; Cakana, Andrew; van de Velde, Helgi; Cavalli, Franco

    2017-02-09

    In the phase III LYM-3002 study comparing intravenous VR-CAP with R-CHOP in patients with newly-diagnosed, measurable stage II-IV mantle cell lymphoma, not considered, or ineligible for, transplant, median progression-free survival was significantly improved with VR-CAP (24.7 vs R-CHOP 14.4 months; P<0.001). This post-hoc analysis evaluated the association between the improved outcomes and quality of responses achieved with VR-CAP versus R-CHOP in LYM-3002. Patients were randomized to 6-8 21-day cycles of VR-CAP or R-CHOP. Outcomes included progression-free survival, duration of response (both IRC assessed), and time-to-next anti-lymphoma treatment, evaluated by response (complete response/unconfirmed complete response and partial response), MIPI risk status, and maximum reduction of lymph-node measurements expressed as the sum of the product of the diameters. Within each response category, median progression-free survival by independent review committee was longer for patients receiving VR-CAP versus R-CHOP who achieved complete response/unconfirmed complete response (40.9 vs 19.8 months) compared with those achieving partial response (17.1 vs 11.7 months); similarly, for median time-to-next anti-lymphoma treatment (complete response/unconfirmed complete response: not evaluable vs 26.6 months; partial response: 35.3 vs 24.3 months). Within the complete/unconfirmed complete and partial response categories, progression-free survival, duration of response and time-to-next anti-lymphoma treatment were more pronounced in patients with low- and intermediate-risk MIPI with VR-CAP versus R-CHOP. In each response category, more VR-CAP than R-CHOP patients had a sum of the product of the diameters nadir of 0 during serial radiological assessments. Results of this post-hoc analysis suggest a greater duration and quality of response in VR-CAP versus R-CHOP patients, which was more evident in patients with low- and intermediate-risk MIPI.

  16. Quality-of-life and performance status results from the phase III RAINBOW study of ramucirumab plus paclitaxel versus placebo plus paclitaxel in patients with previously treated gastric or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma†

    PubMed Central

    Al-Batran, S.-E.; Van Cutsem, E.; Oh, S. C.; Bodoky, G.; Shimada, Y.; Hironaka, S.; Sugimoto, N.; Lipatov, O. N.; Kim, T.-Y.; Cunningham, D.; Rougier, P.; Muro, K.; Liepa, A. M.; Chandrawansa, K.; Emig, M.; Ohtsu, A.; Wilke, H.

    2016-01-01

    Background The phase III RAINBOW trial demonstrated that the addition of ramucirumab to paclitaxel improved overall survival, progression-free survival, and tumor response rate in fluoropyrimidine–platinum previously treated patients with advanced gastric/gastroesophageal junction (GEJ) adenocarcinoma. Here, we present results from quality-of-life (QoL) and performance status (PS) analyses. Patients and methods Patients with Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group PS of 0/1 were randomized to receive ramucirumab (8 mg/kg i.v.) or placebo on days 1 and 15 of a 4-week cycle, with both arms receiving paclitaxel (80 mg/m2) on days 1, 8, and 15. Patient-reported outcomes were assessed with the QoL/health status questionnaires EORTC QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D at baseline and 6-week intervals. PS was assessed at baseline and day 1 of every cycle. Time to deterioration (TtD) in each QLQ-C30 scale was defined as randomization to first worsening of ≥10 points (on 100-point scale) and TtD in PS was defined as first worsening to ≥2. Hazard ratios (HRs) for treatment effect were estimated using stratified Cox proportional hazards models. Results Of the 665 patients randomized, 650 (98%) provided baseline QLQ-C30 and EQ-5D data, and 560 (84%) also provided data from ≥1 postbaseline time point. Baseline scores for both instruments were similar between arms. Of the 15 QLQ-C30 scales, 14 had HR < 1, indicating similar or longer TtD in QoL for ramucirumab + paclitaxel. Treatment with ramucirumab + paclitaxel was also associated with a delay in TtD in PS to ≥2 (HR = 0.798, P = 0.0941). Alternate definitions of PS deterioration yielded similar results: PS ≥ 3 (HR = 0.656, P = 0.0508), deterioration by ≥1 PS level (HR = 0.802, P = 0.0444), and deterioration by ≥2 PS levels (HR = 0.608, P = 0.0063). EQ-5D scores were comparable between treatment arms, stable during treatment, and worsened at discontinuation. Conclusion In patients with previously treated advanced gastric

  17. Safety Profile of Pertuzumab With Trastuzumab and Docetaxel in Patients From Asia With Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2-Positive Metastatic Breast Cancer: Results From the Phase III Trial CLEOPATRA

    PubMed Central

    Im, Young-Hyuck; Im, Seock-Ah; Chan, Valorie; Miles, David; Knott, Adam; Clark, Emma; Ross, Graham; Baselga, José

    2014-01-01

    Introduction. We report detailed safety analyses by geographic region from the phase III study CLEOPATRA with pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel in patients with human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive first-line metastatic breast cancer. Patients and Methods. Patients received pertuzumab/placebo at 840 mg in cycle 1 and 420 mg in subsequent cycles, and trastuzumab at 8 mg/kg in cycle 1 and 6 mg/kg in subsequent cycles; docetaxel was initiated at 75 mg/m2. All study drugs were given intravenously, 3 times weekly. Results. Docetaxel dose reductions below 75 mg/m2 were more common in patients from Asia (47.0%) than other regions (13.4%); docetaxel dose escalations to 100 mg/m2 were less frequent in Asia (2.4%) than other regions (18.7%). Rates of edema (26.1% and 5.4% for Asia and other regions, respectively), myalgia (42.3%, 14.7%), nail disorder (39.9%, 15.1%), febrile neutropenia (18.6%, 7.1%), upper respiratory tract infection (25.7%, 10.2%), decreased appetite (47.0%, 19.1%), and rash (44.3%, 22.0%) were at least twice as high in Asia as in other regions. Adverse events did not result in a reduction in the median number of study treatment cycles administered in patients from Asia. Efficacy analyses per region showed hazard ratios similar to those of the whole intention-to-treat (ITT) population for progression-free survival (ITT: 0.63; Asia: 0.68; other regions: 0.61) and overall survival (ITT: 0.66; Asia: 0.64; other regions: 0.66). Conclusion. Despite a higher proportion of docetaxel dose reductions in patients from Asia, survival benefits were comparable between regions. The benefit-risk profile of pertuzumab, trastuzumab, and docetaxel supports this regimen as the first-line therapy for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer from all geographic regions. PMID:24869931

  18. Positron emission tomography response evaluation from a randomized phase III trial of weekly nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine versus gemcitabine alone for patients with metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas†

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, R. K.; Goldstein, D.; Korn, R. L.; Arena, F.; Moore, M.; Siena, S.; Teixeira, L.; Tabernero, J.; Van Laethem, J.-L.; Liu, H.; McGovern, D.; Lu, B.; Von Hoff, D. D.

    2016-01-01

    Background In the phase III MPACT trial, nab-paclitaxel plus gemcitabine (nab-P + Gem) demonstrated superior efficacy versus Gem alone for patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer. We sought to examine the feasibility of positron emission tomography (PET) and to compare metabolic response rates and associated correlations with efficacy in the MPACT trial. Patients and methods Patients with previously untreated metastatic adenocarcinoma of the pancreas were randomized 1:1 to receive nab-P + Gem or Gem alone. Treatment continued until disease progression by RECIST or unacceptable toxicity. Results PET scans were carried out on the first 257 patients enrolled at PET-equipped centers (PET cohort). Most patients (252 of 257) had ≥2 PET-avid lesions, and median maximum standardized uptake values at baseline were 4.6 and 4.5 in the nab-P + Gem and Gem-alone arms, respectively. In a pooled treatment arm analysis, a metabolic response by PET (best response at any time during study) was associated with longer overall survival (OS) (median 11.3 versus 6.9 months; HR, 0.56; P < 0.001). Efficacy results within each treatment arm appeared better for patients with a metabolic response. The metabolic response rate (best response and week 8 response) was higher for nab-P + Gem (best response: 72% versus 53%, P = 0.002; week 8: 67% versus 51%; P = 0.014). Efficacy in the PET cohort was greater for nab-P + Gem versus Gem alone, including for OS (median 10.5 versus 8.4 months; hazard ratio [HR], 0.71; P = 0.009) and ORR by RECIST (31% versus 11%; P < 0.001). Conclusion Pancreatic lesions were PET avid at baseline, and the rate of metabolic response was significantly higher for nab-P + Gem versus Gem alone at week 8 and for best response during study. Having a metabolic response was associated with longer survival, and more patients experienced a metabolic response than a RECIST-defined response. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00844649. PMID:26802153

  19. [Plasma antithrombin III activity in patients with pulmonary thromboembolism].

    PubMed

    Vertun, B; Filipecki, S; Szczepański, M; Wawrzyńska, L; Rózycka, J

    A decreased plasma antithrombin III activity has been noted in 12 out of 20 patients. In 2 patients it was most probably congenital defect, whereas in the remaining 10 patients--acquired. The observed disorders in the activity of antithrombin III with particular reference to anticoagulant therapy have been discussed.

  20. Chemoradiotherapy with or without AE-941 in stage III non-small cell lung cancer: a randomized phase III trial.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Lee, J Jack; Komaki, Ritsuko; Herbst, Roy S; Feng, Lei; Evans, William K; Choy, Hak; Desjardins, Pierre; Esparaz, Benjamin T; Truong, Mylene T; Saxman, Scott; Kelaghan, Joseph; Bleyer, Archie; Fisch, Michael J

    2010-06-16

    BACKGROUND AE-941 is a standardized aqueous shark cartilage extract with antiangiogenic properties that has previously been evaluated in phase I and II clinical trials. Our objective was to determine the effect of adding AE-941 to chemoradiotherapy on overall survival of patients with unresectable stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). METHODS A randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, phase III clinical trial was designed to test the efficacy of AE-941 in unresectable stage III NSCLC patients who were treated with chemoradiotherapy. Between June 5, 2000, and February 6, 2006, 379 eligible patients were enrolled in community and academic oncology centers across the United States and Canada. In February 2006, the trial was closed to new patient entry before meeting the target sample size because of insufficient accrual. All subjects received induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemotherapy with chest radiotherapy. Each participating center administered one of the two chemotherapy regimens, either carboplatin and paclitaxel, or cisplatin and vinorelbine. The primary endpoint was overall survival, and secondary endpoints were time to progression, progression-free survival, tumor response rate, and toxic effects. Event-time distributions were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method. All statistical tests were two-sided. RESULTS There was no statistically significant difference in overall survival between the chemoradiotherapy plus AE-941 group (n = 188; median survival = 14.4 months, 95% confidence interval = 12.6 to 17.9 months) and the chemoradiotherapy plus placebo group (n = 191; median survival = 15.6 months, 95% confidence interval = 13.8 to 18.1 months) (P = .73). Time to progression, progression-free survival, and tumor response rates were not statistically significantly different between the AE-941 and the placebo groups. No differences between the two groups were observed in common grade 3 or higher toxic effects attributable to

  1. Efficacy, safety, and tolerability of dutasteride 0.5 mg once daily in male patients with male pattern hair loss: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase III study.

    PubMed

    Eun, Hee Chul; Kwon, Oh Sang; Yeon, Je Ho; Shin, Hyo Seung; Kim, Byung Yoon; Ro, Byung In; Cho, Han Kyong; Sim, Woo Young; Lew, Bark Lynn; Lee, Won-Soo; Park, Hwa Young; Hong, Seung Phil; Ji, Jae Hong

    2010-08-01

    Dutasteride (Avodart) is a dual inhibitor of both type I and type II 5 alpha reductases, and thus inhibits conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone, a key mediator of male pattern hair loss. The aim of this randomized double-blind phase III study was to compare the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of dutasteride (0.5 mg) and placebo for 6 months of treatment in male patients with male pattern hair loss. A total of 153 men, 18 to 49 years old, were randomized to receive 0.5 mg of dutasteride or placebo daily for 6 months. Efficacy was evaluated by the change of hair counts, subject assessment, and photographic assessment by investigators and panels. Mean change of hair counts from baseline to 6 months after treatment start was an increase of 12.2/cm(2) in dutasteride group and 4.7/cm(2) in placebo group and this difference was statistically significant (P = .0319). Dutasteride showed significantly higher efficacy than placebo group by subject self-assessment and by investigator and panel photographic assessment. There was no major difference in adverse events between two groups. The study was limited to 6 months. This study clearly showed that 0.5 mg of dutasteride improved hair growth and was relatively well tolerated for the treatment of male pattern hair loss. Copyright 2009 American Academy of Dermatology, Inc. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. High pressure phase transition in group III nitrides compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Shubhangi; Verma, S.; Kaurav, Netram; Choudhary, K. K.

    2016-05-01

    Using an effective interionic interaction potential (EIOP), the pressure induced structural phase transformation from ZnS-type (B3) to NaCl-type (B1) structure in group III Post-Transition Metal Nitrides [TMN; TM=Ga and Tl] were investigated. The long range Coulomb, van der Waals (vdW) interaction and the short-range repulsive interaction upto second-neighbor ions within the Hafemeister and Flygare approach with modified ionic charge are properly incorporated in the EIOP. The vdW coefficients are computed following the Slater-Kirkwood variational method, as both the ions are polarizable. The estimated value of the phase transition pressure (Pt) and the magnitude of the discontinuity in volume at the transition pressure are consistent as compared to the reported data.

  3. Probability of success for phase III after exploratory biomarker analysis in phase II.

    PubMed

    Götte, Heiko; Kirchner, Marietta; Sailer, Martin Oliver

    2017-02-23

    The probability of success or average power describes the potential of a future trial by weighting the power with a probability distribution of the treatment effect. The treatment effect estimate from a previous trial can be used to define such a distribution. During the development of targeted therapies, it is common practice to look for predictive biomarkers. The consequence is that the trial population for phase III is often selected on the basis of the most extreme result from phase II biomarker subgroup analyses. In such a case, there is a tendency to overestimate the treatment effect. We investigate whether the overestimation of the treatment effect estimate from phase II is transformed into a positive bias for the probability of success for phase III. We simulate a phase II/III development program for targeted therapies. This simulation allows to investigate selection probabilities and allows to compare the estimated with the true probability of success. We consider the estimated probability of success with and without subgroup selection. Depending on the true treatment effects, there is a negative bias without selection because of the weighting by the phase II distribution. In comparison, selection increases the estimated probability of success. Thus, selection does not lead to a bias in probability of success if underestimation due to the phase II distribution and overestimation due to selection cancel each other out. We recommend to perform similar simulations in practice to get the necessary information about the risk and chances associated with such subgroup selecti