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Sample records for pattern generation involved

  1. Central pattern generation involved in oral and respiratory control for feeding in the term infant

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Drinking and eating are essential skills for survival and benefit from the coordination of several pattern generating networks and their musculoskeletal effectors to achieve safe swallows. Oral-pharyngo-esophageal motility develops during infancy and early childhood, and is influenced by various factors, including neuromuscular maturation, dietary and postural habits, arousal state, ongoing illnesses, congenital anomalies, and the effects of medical or surgical interventions. Gastroesophageal reflux is frequent in neonates and infants, and its role in neonatal morbidity including dysphagia, chronic lung disease, or apparent life-threatening events is not well understood. This review highlights recent studies aimed at understanding the development of oral feeding skills, and cross-system interactions among the brainstem, spinal, and cerebral networks involved in feeding. Recent Findings Functional linkages between suck-swallow and swallow-respiration manifest transitional forms during late gestation through the first year of life which can be delayed or modified by sensory experience and/or disease processes. Relevant central pattern generator (CPG) networks and their neuromuscular targets attain functional status at different rates, which ultimately influences cross-system CPG interactions. Entrainment of trigeminal primary afferents accelerates pattern genesis for the suck CPG and transition-to-oral feed in the RDS preterm infant. Summary The genesis of within-system CPG control for rate and amplitude scaling matures differentially for suck, mastication, swallow, and respiration. Cross-system interactions among these CPGs represent targets of opportunity for new interventions which optimize experience-dependent mechanisms to promote safe swallows among newborn and pediatric patients. PMID:19417662

  2. Sonographic patterns of ribs with tumor involvement.

    PubMed

    Yang, G G; Wu, H D; Yang, P C; Kuo, S H; Luh, K T

    1991-02-01

    We analyzed the sonographic appearance of the ribs when there was tumor involvement in 16 patients (12 men and 4 women). The tumors included 11 carcinomas, 3 nonepithelial malignancies and 2 benign tumors. Three sonographic patterns on the cross section of abnormal ribs were identified. Pattern I was an eccentrical hyperechoic plate-like shadow inside a hypoechoic tumor. Pattern II was a round hyperechoic shadow or ring in the center of a hypoechoic tumor. Pattern III was a hypoechoic tumor only. The Pancoast tumor manifested pattern I. Metastatic cancer, mostly squamous cell carcinoma, manifested pattern II, and both malignant and benign tumors could manifest pattern III. In sonography, the margin and shape of the tumors, the change in the acoustic shadow of the rib and the pleural line did not differentiate the malignant tumors from benign tumors. When we routinely took a biopsy of these tumors under sonar guidance, the diagnostic yield was 100% without any complications. We conclude that the rib should be evaluated in chest sonography, and that pattern recognition and biopsy under sonar guidance are most useful.

  3. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, Michiyuki

    1981-01-01

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Also, apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  4. Apparatus for generating nonlinear pulse patterns

    DOEpatents

    Nakamura, N.M.I.

    Apparatus for generating a plurality of nonlinear pulse patterns from a single linear pulse pattern. A first counter counts the pulses of the linear pulse pattern and a second counter counts the pulses of the nonlinear pulse pattern. A comparator compares the counts of both counters, and in response to an equal count, a gate is enabled to gate a pulse of the linear pattern as a pulse of the nonlinear pattern, the latter also resetting the first counter. Presettable dividers divide the pulses of each pattern before they are counted by the respective counters. Apparatus for generating a logarithmic pulse pattern from a linear pulse pattern to any log base is described. In one embodiment, a shift register is used in place of the second counter to be clocked by each pulse of the logarithmic pattern to generate the pattern. In another embodiment, a memory stores the logarithmic pattern and is addressed by the second counter which is clocked by the pulses of the logarithmic pulse pattern.

  5. Nonlinear ring resonator: spatial pattern generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, Vladimir Y.; Lachinova, Svetlana L.; Irochnikov, Nikita G.

    2000-03-01

    We consider theoretically spatial pattern formation processes in a unidirectional ring cavity with thin layer of Kerr-type nonlinear medium. Our method is based on studying of two coupled equations. The first is a partial differential equation for temporal dynamics of phase modulation of light wave in the medium. It describes nonlinear interaction in the Kerr-type lice. The second is a free propagation equation for the intracavity field complex amplitude. It involves diffraction effects of light wave in the cavity.

  6. Automatically generating extraction patterns from untagged text

    SciTech Connect

    Riloff, E.

    1996-12-31

    Many corpus-based natural language processing systems rely on text corpora that have been manually annotated with syntactic or semantic tags. In particular, all previous dictionary construction systems for information extraction have used an annotated training corpus or some form of annotated input. We have developed a system called AutoSlog-TS that creates dictionaries of extraction patterns using only untagged text. AutoSlog-TS is based on the AutoSlog system, which generated extraction patterns using annotated text and a set of heuristic rules. By adapting AutoSlog and combining it with statistical techniques, we eliminated its dependency on tagged text. In experiments with the MUC-4 terrorism domain, AutoSlog-TS created a dictionary of extraction patterns that performed comparably to a dictionary created by AutoSlog, using only preclassified texts as input.

  7. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  8. 5-HT receptors involved in initiation or modulation of motor patterns: opportunities for drug development.

    PubMed

    Wallis, D I

    1994-08-01

    A clearer understanding of the role of descending systems in motor control can be achieved by using in vitro preparations of mammalian spinal cord that display patterned motor output, together with the use of selective pharmacological agents. It has been suggested that 5-HT is involved in either the initiation or the modulation of certain motor behaviours, and that it acts to enhance or regulate the motor pattern. Most attention has been paid to the locomotor rhythms underlying walking or swimming, and in respiratory pattern generation. In this article, David Wallis discusses the involvement of 5-HT1 and 5-HT2 receptors in these processes and the possible therapeutic relevance.

  9. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases.

    PubMed

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-02-15

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin-Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  10. Silicon central pattern generators for cardiac diseases

    PubMed Central

    Nogaret, Alain; O'Callaghan, Erin L; Lataro, Renata M; Salgado, Helio C; Meliza, C Daniel; Duncan, Edward; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Paton, Julian F R

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac rhythm management devices provide therapies for both arrhythmias and resynchronisation but not heart failure, which affects millions of patients worldwide. This paper reviews recent advances in biophysics and mathematical engineering that provide a novel technological platform for addressing heart disease and enabling beat-to-beat adaptation of cardiac pacing in response to physiological feedback. The technology consists of silicon hardware central pattern generators (hCPGs) that may be trained to emulate accurately the dynamical response of biological central pattern generators (bCPGs). We discuss the limitations of present CPGs and appraise the advantages of analog over digital circuits for application in bioelectronic medicine. To test the system, we have focused on the cardio-respiratory oscillators in the medulla oblongata that modulate heart rate in phase with respiration to induce respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA). We describe here a novel, scalable hCPG comprising physiologically realistic (Hodgkin–Huxley type) neurones and synapses. Our hCPG comprises two neurones that antagonise each other to provide rhythmic motor drive to the vagus nerve to slow the heart. We show how recent advances in modelling allow the motor output to adapt to physiological feedback such as respiration. In rats, we report on the restoration of RSA using an hCPG that receives diaphragmatic electromyography input and use it to stimulate the vagus nerve at specific time points of the respiratory cycle to slow the heart rate. We have validated the adaptation of stimulation to alterations in respiratory rate. We demonstrate that the hCPG is tuneable in terms of the depth and timing of the RSA relative to respiratory phase. These pioneering studies will now permit an analysis of the physiological role of RSA as well as its any potential therapeutic use in cardiac disease. PMID:25433077

  11. Central pattern generator for swimming in Melibe.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Stuart; Watson, Winsor H

    2005-04-01

    The nudibranch mollusc Melibe leonina swims by bending from side to side. We have identified a network of neurons that appears to constitute the central pattern generator (CPG) for this locomotor behavior, one of only a few such networks to be described in cellular detail. The network consists of two pairs of interneurons, termed 'swim interneuron 1' (sint1) and 'swim interneuron 2' (sint2), arranged around a plane of bilateral symmetry. Interneurons on one side of the brain, which includes the paired cerebral, pleural and pedal ganglia, coordinate bending movements toward the same side and communicate via non-rectifying electrical synapses. Interneurons on opposite sides of the brain coordinate antagonistic movements and communicate over mutually inhibitory synaptic pathways. Several criteria were used to identify members of the swim CPG, the most important being the ability to shift the phase of swimming behavior in a quantitative fashion by briefly altering the firing pattern of an individual neuron. Strong depolarization of any of the interneurons produces an ipsilateral swimming movement during which the several components of the motor act occur in sequence. Strong hyperpolarization causes swimming to stop and leaves the animal contracted to the opposite side for the duration of the hyperpolarization. The four swim interneurons make appropriate synaptic connections with motoneurons, exciting synergists and inhibiting antagonists. Finally, these are the only neurons that were found to have this set of properties in spite of concerted efforts to sample widely in the Melibe CNS. This led us to conclude that these four cells constitute the CPG for swimming. While sint1 and sint2 work together during swimming, they play different roles in the generation of other behaviors. Sint1 is normally silent when the animal is crawling on a surface but it depolarizes and begins to fire in strong bursts once the foot is dislodged and the animal begins to swim. Sint2 also fires

  12. Three brainstem areas involved in respiratory rhythm generation in bullfrogs

    PubMed Central

    Baghdadwala, Mufaddal I; Duchcherer, Maryana; Paramonov, Jenny; Wilson, Richard J A

    2015-01-01

    Key points For most multiphasic motor patterns, rhythm and pattern are produced by the same circuit elements. For respiration, however, these functions have long been assumed to occur separately. In frogs, the ventilatory motor pattern produced by the isolated brainstem consists of buccal and biphasic lung bursts. Previously, two discrete necessary and sufficient sites for lung and buccal bursts were identified. Here we identify a third site, the Priming Area, important for and having neuronal activity correlated with the first phase of biphasic lung bursts. As each site is important for burst generation of a separate phase, we suggest each major phase of ventilation is produced by an anatomically distinct part of an extensive brainstem network. Embedding of discrete circuit elements producing major phases of respiration within an extensive rhythmogenic brainstem network may be a shared architectural characteristic of vertebrates. Abstract Ventilation in mammals consists of at least three distinct phases: inspiration, post-inspiration and late-expiration. While distinct brainstem rhythm generating and pattern forming networks have long been assumed, recent data suggest the mammalian brainstem contains two coupled neuronal oscillators: one for inspiration and the other for active expiration. However, whether additional burst generating ability is required for generating other phases of ventilation in mammals is controversial. To investigate brainstem circuit architectures capable of producing multiphasic ventilatory rhythms, we utilized the isolated frog brainstem. This preparation produces two types of ventilatory motor patterns, buccal and lung bursts. Lung bursts can be divided into two phases, priming and powerstroke. Previously we identified two putative oscillators, the Buccal and Lung Areas. The Lung Area produces the lung powerstroke and the Buccal Area produces buccal bursts and – we assumed – the priming phase of lung bursts. However, here we identify

  13. Generation 1.5 Written Error Patterns: A Comparative Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doolan, Stephen M.; Miller, Donald

    2012-01-01

    In an attempt to contribute to existing research on Generation 1.5 students, the current study uses quantitative and qualitative methods to compare error patterns in a corpus of Generation 1.5, L1, and L2 community college student writing. This error analysis provides one important way to determine if error patterns in Generation 1.5 student…

  14. Generating spatiotemporal joint torque patterns from dynamical synchronization of distributed pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Pitti, Alexandre; Lungarella, Max; Kuniyoshi, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    Pattern generators found in the spinal cord are no more seen as simple rhythmic oscillators for motion control. Indeed, they achieve flexible and dynamical coordination in interaction with the body and the environment dynamics giving to rise motor synergies. Discovering the mechanisms underlying the control of motor synergies constitutes an important research question not only for neuroscience but also for robotics: the motors coordination of high dimensional robotic systems is still a drawback and new control methods based on biological solutions may reduce their overall complexity. We propose to model the flexible combination of motor synergies in embodied systems via partial phase synchronization of distributed chaotic systems; for specific coupling strength, chaotic systems are able to phase synchronize their dynamics to the resonant frequencies of one external force. We take advantage of this property to explore and exploit the intrinsic dynamics of one specified embodied system. In two experiments with bipedal walkers, we show how motor synergies emerge when the controllers phase synchronize to the body's dynamics, entraining it to its intrinsic behavioral patterns. This stage is characterized by directed information flow from the sensors to the motors exhibiting the optimal situation when the body dynamics drive the controllers (mutual entrainment). Based on our results, we discuss the relevance of our findings for modeling the modular control of distributed pattern generators exhibited in the spinal cord, and for exploring the motor synergies in robots. PMID:20011216

  15. Standard Transistor Array (STAR). Volume 2: Test pattern generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, B. D.

    1979-01-01

    Testing of large scale integrated logic circuits is considered from the point-of-view of automatic test pattern generation. A logic simulator based approach for automatic test pattern generation is taken and is described. The logic model and the timing model used in the simulator are also described. Two methods are presented for generating test patterns from the output of the simulator. Recommendations for future study are also presented.

  16. Atypical patterns of cardiac involvement in Fabry disease.

    PubMed

    Coughlan, J J; Elkholy, K; O'Brien, J; Kiernan, T

    2016-01-01

    A 58-year-old woman was referred to our cardiology service with chest pain, exertional dyspnoea and palpitations on a background of known Fabry disease diagnosed with genetic testing in 1994. ECG showed sinus rhythm, shortened PR interval, widespread t wave inversion, q waves in the lateral leads and left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Coronary angiogram showed only mild atheroma. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed anterolateral LVH and reduced left ventricular cavity size in keeping with Fabry cardiomyopathy. Cardiac MRI demonstrated asymmetric hypertrophy with evidence of diffuse myocardial fibrosis in the maximally hypertrophied segments from base to apex with late gadolinium enhancement in the anterior and anteroseptal walls. This was quite an atypical appearance for Fabry cardiomyopathy. This case highlights the heterogeneity of patterns of cardiac involvement that may be associated with this rare X-linked lysosomal disorder. PMID:26989114

  17. Central pattern generator for locomotion: anatomical, physiological, and pathophysiological considerations.

    PubMed

    Guertin, Pierre A

    2012-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome.

  18. Central Pattern Generator for Locomotion: Anatomical, Physiological, and Pathophysiological Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Guertin, Pierre A.

    2013-01-01

    This article provides a perspective on major innovations over the past century in research on the spinal cord and, specifically, on specialized spinal circuits involved in the control of rhythmic locomotor pattern generation and modulation. Pioneers such as Charles Sherrington and Thomas Graham Brown have conducted experiments in the early twentieth century that changed our views of the neural control of locomotion. Their seminal work supported subsequently by several decades of evidence has led to the conclusion that walking, flying, and swimming are largely controlled by a network of spinal neurons generally referred to as the central pattern generator (CPG) for locomotion. It has been subsequently demonstrated across all vertebrate species examined, from lampreys to humans, that this CPG is capable, under some conditions, to self-produce, even in absence of descending or peripheral inputs, basic rhythmic, and coordinated locomotor movements. Recent evidence suggests, in turn, that plasticity changes of some CPG elements may contribute to the development of specific pathophysiological conditions associated with impaired locomotion or spontaneous locomotor-like movements. This article constitutes a comprehensive review summarizing key findings on the CPG as well as on its potential role in Restless Leg Syndrome, Periodic Leg Movement, and Alternating Leg Muscle Activation. Special attention will be paid to the role of the CPG in a recently identified, and uniquely different neurological disorder, called the Uner Tan Syndrome. PMID:23403923

  19. Computer-Assisted Generation of Patterns and Virtual Reality Techniques for Fashion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Mickael; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2009-03-01

    We present a methodology for the design of aesthetic patterns and their visualization on virtual clothes. Generated patterns are directly mapped on the dress of a virtual mannequin. Furthermore, patterns sets may be interactively mapped on the virtual dress using a specific 3D interaction technique called Back-and-Forth. Pattern generation involves different mathematical approaches such as iterated function systems (IFS) and nonlinear trajectory models. Both model parameters and color space exploration is performed through a simple user interface. This work contributes to promote both computer assistance in the context of mass customization for fashion design.

  20. The generation of antiphase oscillations and synchrony by a rebound-based vertebrate central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Chang; Merrison-Hort, Robert; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Borisyuk, Roman

    2014-04-23

    Many neural circuits are capable of generating multiple stereotyped outputs after different sensory inputs or neuromodulation. We have previously identified the central pattern generator (CPG) for Xenopus tadpole swimming that involves antiphase oscillations of activity between the left and right sides. Here we analyze the cellular basis for spontaneous left-right motor synchrony characterized by simultaneous bursting on both sides at twice the swimming frequency. Spontaneous synchrony bouts are rare in most tadpoles, and they instantly emerge from and switch back to swimming, most frequently within the first second after skin stimulation. Analyses show that only neurons that are active during swimming fire action potentials in synchrony, suggesting both output patterns derive from the same neural circuit. The firing of excitatory descending interneurons (dINs) leads that of other types of neurons in synchrony as it does in swimming. During synchrony, the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition is 7.9 ± 1 ms, shorter than that in swimming (41 ± 2.3 ms). The occasional, extra midcycle firing of dINs during swimming may initiate synchrony, and mismatches of timing in the left and right activity can switch synchrony back to swimming. Computer modeling supports these findings by showing that the same neural network, in which reciprocal inhibition mediates rebound firing, can generate both swimming and synchrony without circuit reconfiguration. Modeling also shows that lengthening the time window between phasic excitation and inhibition by increasing dIN synaptic/conduction delay can improve the stability of synchrony.

  1. Automated branching pattern report generation for laparoscopic surgery assistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oda, Masahiro; Matsuzaki, Tetsuro; Hayashi, Yuichiro; Kitasaka, Takayuki; Misawa, Kazunari; Mori, Kensaku

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents a method for generating branching pattern reports of abdominal blood vessels for laparoscopic gastrectomy. In gastrectomy, it is very important to understand branching structure of abdominal arteries and veins, which feed and drain specific abdominal organs including the stomach, the liver and the pancreas. In the real clinical stage, a surgeon creates a diagnostic report of the patient anatomy. This report summarizes the branching patterns of the blood vessels related to the stomach. The surgeon decides actual operative procedure. This paper shows an automated method to generate a branching pattern report for abdominal blood vessels based on automated anatomical labeling. The report contains 3D rendering showing important blood vessels and descriptions of branching patterns of each vessel. We have applied this method for fifty cases of 3D abdominal CT scans and confirmed the proposed method can automatically generate branching pattern reports of abdominal arteries.

  2. Characteristic flow patterns generated by macrozoobenthic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedrichs, M.; Graf, G.

    2009-02-01

    A laboratory flume channel, equipped with an acoustic Doppler flow sensor and a bottom scanning laser, was used for detailed, non-intrusive flow measurements (at 2 cm s - 1 and 10 cm s - 1 ) around solitary biogenic structures, combined with high-resolution mapping of the structure shape and position. The structures were replicates of typical macrozoobenthic species commonly found in the Mecklenburg Bight and with a presumed influence on both, the near-bed current regime and sediment transport dynamics: a worm tube, a snail shell, a mussel, a sand mound, a pit, and a cross-stream track furrow. The flow was considerably altered locally by the different protruding structures (worm tube, snail, mussel and mound). They reduced the horizontal approach velocity by 72% to 79% in the wake zone at about 1-2 cm height, and the flow was deflected around the structures with vertical and lateral velocities of up to 10% and 20% of the free-stream velocity respectively in a region adjacent to the structures. The resulting flow separation (at flow Reynolds number of about 4000 and 20,000 respectively) divided an outer deflection region from an inner region with characteristic vortices and the wake region. All protruding structures showed this general pattern, but also produced individual characteristics. Conversely, the depressions (track and pit) only had a weak influence on the local boundary layer flow, combined with a considerable flow reduction within their cavities (between 29% and 53% of the free-stream velocity). A longitudinal vortex formed, below which a stagnant space was found. The average height affected by the structure-related mass flow rate deficit for the two velocities was 1.6 cm and 1.3 cm respectively (80% of height and 64%) for the protruding structures and 0.6 cm and 0.9 cm (90% and 127% of depth) for the depressions. Marine benthic soft-bottom macrozoobenthos species are expected to benefit from the flow modifications they induce, particularly in terms of

  3. Parental Involvement in Adolescent Romantic Relationships: Patterns and Correlates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kan, Marni L.; McHale, Susan M.; Crouter, Ann C.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined dimensions of mothers' and fathers' involvement in adolescents' romantic relationships when offspring were age 17. Using cluster analysis, parents from 105 White, working and middle class families were classified as positively involved, negatively involved, or autonomy-oriented with respect to their adolescents' romantic…

  4. Contextual modulation of a multifunctional central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishnan, Siddharth; Arnett, Bridgette; Murphy, A Don

    2014-11-01

    The multifunctional buccal central pattern generator in snails, which controls different oral behaviors, has been well characterized. In this work we propose a role for the group of about 40 electrotonically coupled buccal A cluster cells as a context-dependant switch for the buccal central pattern generator, modulating motor patterns that elicit different oral behaviors. We characterize these cells based on location and morphology, and provide evidence for their selective activation under two different stimuli - Listerine perfusion and intestinal nerve stimulation - triggering buccal motor patterns putatively underlying egestion and substrate cleaning. A new role for these electrotonically coupled buccal A cluster neurons is shown. They serve as a context-dependant switch that alters buccal motor patterns depending on input stimuli, thereby eliciting the appropriate behavioral response.

  5. Examining Associations between Race, Urbanicity, and Patterns of Bullying Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldweber, Asha; Waasdorp, Tracy Evian; Bradshaw, Catherine P.

    2013-01-01

    Research on the role of race and urbanicity in bullying involvement has been limited. The present study examined bullying involvement subgroups that relate to race, urbanicity, and the perceived reason for the bullying. Self-report data were collected from 10,254 middle school youth (49.8% female; 62.4% Caucasian, 19.0% African American, and 5.6%…

  6. Similarity of superior colliculus involvement in microsaccade and saccade generation

    PubMed Central

    Krauzlis, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    The characteristics of microsaccades, or small fixational saccades, and their influence on visual function have been studied extensively. However, the detailed mechanisms for generating these movements are less understood. We recently found that the superior colliculus (SC), a midbrain structure involved in saccade generation, also plays a role in microsaccade generation. Here we compared the dynamics of neuronal activity in the SC associated with microsaccades to those observed in this structure in association with larger voluntary saccades. We found that microsaccade-related activity in the SC is characterized by a gradual increase in firing rate starting ∼100 ms prior to microsaccade onset, a peak of neuronal discharge just after movement onset, and a subsequent gradual decrease in firing rate until ∼100 ms after movement onset. These properties were shared with saccade-related SC neurons, recorded from the same monkeys but preferring larger eye movements, suggesting that at the level of the SC the neuronal control of microsaccades is similar to that for larger voluntary saccades. We also found that neurons exhibiting microsaccade-related activity often also exhibited saccade-related activity for slightly larger movements of similar direction, suggesting a continuity of the spatial representation in the SC, in both amplitude and direction, down to the smallest movements. Our results indicate that the mechanisms controlling microsaccades may be fundamentally the same as those for larger saccades, and thus shed new light on the functional role of these eye movements and their possible influence on sensory and sensory-motor processes. PMID:22236714

  7. Computer Generated Holography with Intensity-Graded Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Conti, Rossella; Assayag, Osnath; de Sars, Vincent; Guillon, Marc; Emiliani, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Computer Generated Holography achieves patterned illumination at the sample plane through phase modulation of the laser beam at the objective back aperture. This is obtained by using liquid crystal-based spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs), which modulate the spatial phase of the incident laser beam. A variety of algorithms is employed to calculate the phase modulation masks addressed to the LC-SLM. These algorithms range from simple gratings-and-lenses to generate multiple diffraction-limited spots, to iterative Fourier-transform algorithms capable of generating arbitrary illumination shapes perfectly tailored on the base of the target contour. Applications for holographic light patterning include multi-trap optical tweezers, patterned voltage imaging and optical control of neuronal excitation using uncaging or optogenetics. These past implementations of computer generated holography used binary input profile to generate binary light distribution at the sample plane. Here we demonstrate that using graded input sources, enables generating intensity graded light patterns and extend the range of application of holographic light illumination. At first, we use intensity-graded holograms to compensate for LC-SLM position dependent diffraction efficiency or sample fluorescence inhomogeneity. Finally we show that intensity-graded holography can be used to equalize photo evoked currents from cells expressing different levels of chanelrhodopsin2 (ChR2), one of the most commonly used optogenetics light gated channels, taking into account the non-linear dependence of channel opening on incident light. PMID:27799896

  8. Digitally based pattern generator for an electron-beam welder

    SciTech Connect

    Whitten, L.G. III

    1981-02-19

    A digitally based deflection generator for an electron-beam welder is presented. Up to seven patterns of any shape are stored in programmable read-only memory (PROM). The pattern resolution is 39% at frequencies from 10 Hz to 1 kHz and can be x-t, y-t, or x-y formed. Frequency and pattern selections may be chosen by the welder computer or manually selected on the front panel. The ability to repeatedly synchronize two waveforms of any shape and frequency enables an unlimited variety of welds.

  9. Identifying network topologies that can generate turing pattern.

    PubMed

    Zheng, M Mocarlo; Shao, Bin; Ouyang, Qi

    2016-11-01

    Turing pattern provides a paradigm of non-equilibrium self-organization in reaction-diffusion systems. On the basis of many mathematical studies, it has been proposed that various biological development processes use Turing instability to achieve periodic patterns. In this paper, we introduce a framework to systematic identify network topologies that are capable for Turing pattern formation. All possible 2, 3-node genetic regulatory networks are enumerated and linear stability analysis is applied to access their ability to generate Turing instability. We find that all 3-node networks that can achieve Turing pattern can be mapped to either pure or cross activator-inhibitor mechanisms, and the pure activator-inhibitor system is more robust for Turing pattern formation than the other one. Additional linkages can further increase the performance of the circuit by either introducing another core topology or complementing existing regulations. Moreover, we find that addition of a fixed node enables the formation of Turing pattern even when the diffusion coefficients of two morphogens are fairly close to each other. Our results provide the design principle of robust circuits for Turing pattern generation and can be further applied for systematically exploring other bifurcation phenomena. PMID:27519949

  10. Ring Counter Based ATPG for Low Transition Test Pattern Generation

    PubMed Central

    Begam, V. M. Thoulath; Baulkani, S.

    2015-01-01

    In test mode test patterns are applied in random fashion to the circuit under circuit. This increases switching transition between the consecutive test patterns and thereby increases dynamic power dissipation. The proposed ring counter based ATPG reduces vertical switching transitions by inserting test vectors only between the less correlative test patterns. This paper presents the RC-ATPG with an external circuit. The external circuit consists of XOR gates, full adders, and multiplexers. First the total number of transitions between the consecutive test patterns is determined. If it is more, then the external circuit generates and inserts test vectors in between the two test patterns. Test vector insertion increases the correlation between the test patterns and reduces dynamic power dissipation. The results prove that the test patterns generated by the proposed ATPG have fewer transitions than the conventional ATPG. Experimental results based on ISCAS'85 and ISCAS'89 benchmark circuits show 38.5% reduction in the average power and 50% reduction in the peak power attained during testing with a small size decoding logic. PMID:26075295

  11. Patterns of airway involvement in inflammatory bowel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Papanikolaou, Ilias; Kagouridis, Konstantinos; Papiris, Spyros A

    2014-01-01

    Extraintestinal manifestations occur commonly in inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD). Pulmonary manifestations (PM) of IBD may be divided in airway disorders, interstitial lung disorders, serositis, pulmonary vasculitis, necrobiotic nodules, drug-induced lung disease, thromboembolic lung disease and enteropulmonary fistulas. Pulmonary involvement may often be asymptomatic and detected solely on the basis of abnormal screening tests. The common embryonic origin of the intestine and the lungs from the primitive foregut, the co-existence of mucosa associated lymphoid tissue in both organs, autoimmunity, smoking and bacterial translocation from the colon to the lungs may all be involved in the pathogenesis of PM in IBD. PM are mainly detected by pulmonary function tests and high-resolution computed tomography. This review will focus on the involvement of the airways in the context of IBD, especially stenoses of the large airways, tracheobronchitis, bronchiectasis, bronchitis, mucoid impaction, bronchial granulomas, bronchiolitis, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome and the co-existence of IBD with asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis and a1-antitrypsin deficiency. PMID:25400999

  12. Actin Is Involved in Auxin-Dependent Patterning1

    PubMed Central

    Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Polar transport of auxin has been identified as a central element of pattern formation. The polarity of auxin transport is linked to the cycling of pin-formed proteins, a process that is related to actomyosin-dependent vesicle traffic. To get insight into the role of actin for auxin transport, we used patterned cell division to monitor the polarity of auxin fluxes. We show that cell division in the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright-Yellow 2) cell line is partially synchronized and that this synchrony can be perturbed by inhibition of auxin transport by 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid. To address the role of actin in this synchrony, we induced a bundled configuration of actin by overexpressing mouse talin. The bundling of actin impairs the synchrony of cell division and increases the sensitivity to 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid. Addition of the polarly transported auxins indole-3-acetic acid and 1-naphthyl acetic acid (but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) restored both the normal organization of actin and the synchrony of cell division. This study suggests that auxin controls its own transport by changing the state of actin filaments. PMID:17337532

  13. Actin is involved in auxin-dependent patterning.

    PubMed

    Maisch, Jan; Nick, Peter

    2007-04-01

    Polar transport of auxin has been identified as a central element of pattern formation. The polarity of auxin transport is linked to the cycling of pin-formed proteins, a process that is related to actomyosin-dependent vesicle traffic. To get insight into the role of actin for auxin transport, we used patterned cell division to monitor the polarity of auxin fluxes. We show that cell division in the tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv Bright-Yellow 2) cell line is partially synchronized and that this synchrony can be perturbed by inhibition of auxin transport by 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid. To address the role of actin in this synchrony, we induced a bundled configuration of actin by overexpressing mouse talin. The bundling of actin impairs the synchrony of cell division and increases the sensitivity to 1-N-naphthylphthalamic acid. Addition of the polarly transported auxins indole-3-acetic acid and 1-naphthyl acetic acid (but not 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid) restored both the normal organization of actin and the synchrony of cell division. This study suggests that auxin controls its own transport by changing the state of actin filaments.

  14. Cilia involvement in patterning and maintenance of the skeleton.

    PubMed

    Haycraft, Courtney J; Serra, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    Although the expression of cilia on chondrocytes was described over 40 years ago, the importance of this organelle in skeletal development and maintenance has only recently been recognized. Primary cilia are found on most mammalian cells and have been shown to play a role in chemosensation and mechanosensation. A growing number of human pleiotropic syndromes have been shown to be associated with ciliary or basal body dysfunction. Skeletal phenotypes, including alterations in limb patterning, endochondral bone formation, craniofacial development, and dentition, have been described in several of these syndromes. Additional insights into the potential roles and mechanisms of cilia action in the mammalian skeleton have been provided by research in model organisms including mouse and zebrafish. In this article we describe what is currently known about the localization of cilia in the skeleton as well as the roles and underlying molecular mechanisms of cilia in skeletal development. PMID:19147010

  15. Central pattern generator for vocalization: Is there a vertebrate morphotype?

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.

    2014-01-01

    Animals that generate acoustic signals for social communication are faced with two essential tasks: generate a temporally precise signal and inform the auditory system about the occurrence of one’s own sonic signal. Recent studies of sound producing fishes delineate a hindbrain network comprised of anatomically distinct compartments coding equally distinct neurophysiological properties that allow an organism to meet these behavioral demands. A set of neural characters comprising a vocal-sonic central pattern generator (CPG) morphotype is proposed for fishes and tetrapods that shares evolutionary developmental origins with pectoral appendage motor systems. PMID:25050813

  16. Distinct signals generate repeating striped pattern in the embryonic parasegment.

    PubMed

    Hatini, V; DiNardo, S

    2001-01-01

    How repeating striped patterns arise across cellular fields is unclear. To address this we examined the repeating pattern of Stripe (Sr) expression across the parasegment (PS) in Drosophila. This pattern is generated in two steps. First, the ligands Hedgehog (Hh) and Wingless (Wg) subdivide the PS into smaller territories. Second, the ligands Hh, Spitz (Spi), and Wg each emanate from a specific territory and induce Sr expression in an adjacent territory. We also show that the width of Sr expression is determined by signaling strength. Finally, an enhancer trap in the sr gene detects the response to Spi and Wg, but not to Hh, implying the existence of separable control elements in the sr gene. Thus, a distinct inductive event is used to initiate each element of the repeating striped pattern.

  17. Generating Coherent Patterns of Activity from Chaotic Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Sussillo, David; Abbott, L. F.

    2009-01-01

    Neural circuits display complex activity patterns both spontaneously and when responding to a stimulus or generating a motor output. How are these two forms of activity related? We develop a procedure called FORCE learning for modifying synaptic strengths either external to or within a model neural network to change chaotic spontaneous activity into a wide variety of desired activity patterns. FORCE learning works even though the networks we train are spontaneously chaotic and we leave feedback loops intact and unclamped during learning. Using this approach, we construct networks that produce a wide variety of complex output patterns, input-output transformations that require memory, multiple outputs that can be switched by control inputs, and motor patterns matching human motion capture data. Our results reproduce data on pre-movement activity in motor and premotor cortex, and suggest that synaptic plasticity may be a more rapid and powerful modulator of network activity than generally appreciated. PMID:19709635

  18. Modeling Scalable Pattern Generation in DNA Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Peter B.; Chen, Xi; Simpson, Zack B.; Ellington, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a theoretical framework for developing patterns in multiple dimensions using controllable diffusion and designed reactions implemented in DNA. This includes so-called strand displacement reactions in which one single-stranded DNA hybridizes to a hemi-duplex DNA and displaces another single-stranded DNA, reversibly or irreversibly. These reactions can be designed to proceed with designed rate and molecular specificity. By also controlling diffusion by partial complementarity to a stationary, cross-linked DNA, we can generate predictable patterns. We demonstrate this with several simulations showing deterministic, predictable shapes in space. PMID:25506295

  19. Neural Sequence Generation Using Spatiotemporal Patterns of Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jonathan; Kopell, Nancy; Gardner, Timothy; Markowitz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Stereotyped sequences of neural activity are thought to underlie reproducible behaviors and cognitive processes ranging from memory recall to arm movement. One of the most prominent theoretical models of neural sequence generation is the synfire chain, in which pulses of synchronized spiking activity propagate robustly along a chain of cells connected by highly redundant feedforward excitation. But recent experimental observations in the avian song production pathway during song generation have shown excitatory activity interacting strongly with the firing patterns of inhibitory neurons, suggesting a process of sequence generation more complex than feedforward excitation. Here we propose a model of sequence generation inspired by these observations in which a pulse travels along a spatially recurrent excitatory chain, passing repeatedly through zones of local feedback inhibition. In this model, synchrony and robust timing are maintained not through redundant excitatory connections, but rather through the interaction between the pulse and the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibition that it creates as it circulates the network. These results suggest that spatially and temporally structured inhibition may play a key role in sequence generation. PMID:26536029

  20. Override of spontaneous respiratory pattern generator reduces cardiovascular parasympathetic influence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patwardhan, A. R.; Vallurupalli, S.; Evans, J. M.; Bruce, E. N.; Knapp, C. F.

    1995-01-01

    We investigated the effects of voluntary control of breathing on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation. Variability in heart rate was compared between 5 min of spontaneous and controlled breathing. During controlled breathing, for 5 min, subjects voluntarily reproduced their own spontaneous breathing pattern (both rate and volume on a breath-by-breath basis). With the use of this experimental design, we could unmask the effects of voluntary override of the spontaneous respiratory pattern generator on autonomic function in cardiovascular regulation without the confounding effects of altered respiratory pattern. Results from 10 subjects showed that during voluntary control of breathing, mean values of heart rate and blood pressure increased, whereas fractal and spectral powers in heart rate in the respiratory frequency region decreased. End-tidal PCO2 was similar during spontaneous and controlled breathing. These results indicate that the act of voluntary control of breathing decreases the influence of the vagal component, which is the principal parasympathetic influence in cardiovascular regulation.

  1. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2012-09-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  2. Processing and analysis techniques involving in-vessel material generation

    DOEpatents

    Schabron, John F.; Rovani, Jr., Joseph F.

    2011-01-25

    In at least one embodiment, the inventive technology relates to in-vessel generation of a material from a solution of interest as part of a processing and/or analysis operation. Preferred embodiments of the in-vessel material generation (e.g., in-vessel solid material generation) include precipitation; in certain embodiments, analysis and/or processing of the solution of interest may include dissolution of the material, perhaps as part of a successive dissolution protocol using solvents of increasing ability to dissolve. Applications include, but are by no means limited to estimation of a coking onset and solution (e.g., oil) fractionating.

  3. Use of design pattern layout for automatic metrology recipe generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabery, Cyrus; Page, Lorena

    2005-05-01

    As critical dimension control requirements become more challenging, due to complex designs, aggressive lithography, and the constant need to shrink,metrology recipe generation and design evaluation have also become very complex. Hundreds of unique sites must be measured and monitored to ensure good device performance and high yield. The use of the design and layout for automated metrology recipe generation will be critical to that challenge. The DesignGauge from Hitachi implements a system enabling arbitrary recipe generation and control of SEM observations performed on the wafer, based only on the design information. This concept for recipe generation can reduce the time to develop a technology node from RET and design rule selection, through OPC model calibration and verification, and all the way to high volume manufacturing. Conventional recipe creation for a large number of measurement targets requires a significant amount of engineering time. Often these recipes are used only once or twice during mask and process verification or OPC calibration data acquisition. This process of manual setup and analysis is also potentially error prone. CD-SEM recipe creation typically requires an actual wafer, so the recipe creation cannot occur until the scanner and reticle are in house. All of these problems with conventional CD SEM lead to increased development time and reduced final process quality. The new model of CD-SEM recipe generation and management utilizes design-to-SEM matching technology. This new technology extracts an idealized shape from the designed pattern, and utilizes the shape information for pattern matching. As a result, the designed pattern is used as basis for the template instead of the actual SEM image. Recipe creation can be achieved in a matter of seconds once the target site list is finalized. The sequence of steps for creating a recipe are: generate a target site list, pass the design polygons (GDS) and site list to the CD SEM, define references

  4. Pattern generation requirements for mask making beyond 130 nm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abboud, Frank E.; Gesley, Mark A.; Maldonado, Juan R.

    1998-06-01

    It is commonly accepted in the semiconductor industry that optical lithography will be the most cost-effective solution for 150 nm and 130 nm device generations. Some selected layers at the 130 nm device generation may be produced using electron-beam direct-write or x-ray during the development phase. However, for the production phase, it is expected that 193 nm optical lithography with reticle enhancement techniques such as optical proximity correction (OPC) and phase shift masks (PSM) will be the technology of choice. What about post 193 nm. The range of solutions is more diverse and a clear winner has not yet emerged. The topic, however, is becoming more visible and has taken a prominent place in technical conferences in the past year. The five leading potential alternatives to optical lithography are proximity x-ray, e-beam projection (EBP), extended UV (EUV), ion projection lithography (IPL), and e-beam direct write. The search for the right answer will most likely continue for a few years, and possibly more than one alternative will emerge as an effective solution at and below 100 nm. All of the alternatives, with the exception of e-beam direct write, have one thing in common, the mask. Except for proximity x- ray, all solutions at present envision a 4x reduction of the mask-to-wafer image plane. Instead of chrome-coated quartz, a silicon wafer substrate is used. Aside from patterning, mask fabrication varies depending on the lithography absorbing substrate, and EUV requires a reflective multilayer stack. Most key lithography requirements needed to pattern the imaging layer are common to all of the candidates, at least for the reduction methods. For x-ray lithography, the requirements are significantly more stringent but at a smaller field. This paper will consolidate the requirements of the various types of masks from a pattern generation point of view and will focus on the pattern generation tool requirements to meet those mask requirements. In addition, it

  5. Pattern Recognition on Read Positioning in Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Boseon; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The usefulness and the utility of the next generation sequencing (NGS) technology are based on the assumption that the DNA or cDNA cleavage required to generate short sequence reads is random. Several previous reports suggest the existence of sequencing bias of NGS reads. To address this question in greater detail, we analyze NGS data from four organisms with different GC content, Plasmodium falciparum (19.39%), Arabidopsis thaliana (36.03%), Homo sapiens (40.91%) and Streptomyces coelicolor (72.00%). Using machine learning techniques, we recognize the pattern that the NGS read start is positioned in the local region where the nucleotide distribution is dissimilar from the global nucleotide distribution. We also demonstrate that the mono-nucleotide distribution underestimates sequencing bias, and the recognized pattern is explained largely by the distribution of multi-nucleotides (di-, tri-, and tetra- nucleotides) rather than mono-nucleotides. This implies that the correction of sequencing bias needs to be performed on the basis of the multi-nucleotide distribution. Providing companion software to quantify the effect of the recognized pattern on read positioning, we exemplify that the bias correction based on the mono-nucleotide distribution may not be sufficient to clean sequencing bias. PMID:27299343

  6. Stochastic Generation of Wind Patterns over Lake Geneva

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barry, D. A.; Barry, C. E.; Razmi, A. M.; Lemmin, U.; Le Dantec, N.

    2011-12-01

    stochastic generator of wind-pattern indices, i.e., the INAR(1) model produces a sequence of integers, each of which corresponds to a wind pattern. For a given index, the aforementioned binned COSMO wind fields were sampled randomly to produce the stochastic wind-field sequence.

  7. Gene regulation networks generate diverse pigmentation patterns in plants.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nick W; Davies, Kevin M; Schwinn, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    The diversity of pigmentation patterns observed in plants occurs due to the spatial distribution and accumulation of colored compounds, which may also be associated with structural changes to the tissue. Anthocyanins are flavonoids that provide red/purple/blue coloration to plants, often forming complex patterns such as spots, stripes, and vein-associated pigmentation, particularly in flowers. These patterns are determined by the activity of MYB-bHLH-WDR (MBW) transcription factor complexes, which activate the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes, resulting in anthocyanin pigment accumulation. Recently, we established that the MBW complex controlling anthocyanin synthesis acts within a gene regulation network that is conserved within at least the Eudicots. This network involves hierarchy, reinforcement, and feedback mechanisms that allow for stringent and responsive regulation of the anthocyanin biosynthesis genes. The gene network and mobile nature of the WDR and R3-MYB proteins provide exciting new opportunities to explore the basis of pigmentation patterning, and to investigate the evolutionary history of the MBW components in land plants.

  8. MULTIOBJECTIVE OPTIMIZATION POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS INVOLVING CHEMICAL LOOPING COMBUSTION

    SciTech Connect

    Juan M. Salazar; Urmila M. Diwekar; Stephen E. Zitney

    2009-01-01

    Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system using coal gasification is an important approach for future energy options. This work focuses on understading the system operation and optimizing it in the presence of uncertain operating conditions using ASPEN Plus and CAPE-OPEN compliant stochastic simulation and multiobjective optimization capabilities developed by Vishwamitra Research Institute. The feasible operating surface for the IGCC system is generated and deterministic multiobjective optimization is performed. Since the feasible operating space is highly non-convex, heuristics based techniques that do not require gradient information are used to generate the Pareto surface. Accurate CFD models are simultaneously developed for the gasifier and chemical looping combustion system to characterize and quantify the process uncertainty in the ASPEN model.

  9. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  10. Temperature-Dependent Regulation of Vocal Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W.

    2008-01-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  11. Evolution of central pattern generators and rhythmic behaviours.

    PubMed

    Katz, Paul S

    2016-01-01

    Comparisons of rhythmic movements and the central pattern generators (CPGs) that control them uncover principles about the evolution of behaviour and neural circuits. Over the course of evolutionary history, gradual evolution of behaviours and their neural circuitry within any lineage of animals has been a predominant occurrence. Small changes in gene regulation can lead to divergence of circuit organization and corresponding changes in behaviour. However, some behavioural divergence has resulted from large-scale rewiring of the neural network. Divergence of CPG circuits has also occurred without a corresponding change in behaviour. When analogous rhythmic behaviours have evolved independently, it has generally been with different neural mechanisms. Repeated evolution of particular rhythmic behaviours has occurred within some lineages due to parallel evolution or latent CPGs. Particular motor pattern generating mechanisms have also evolved independently in separate lineages. The evolution of CPGs and rhythmic behaviours shows that although most behaviours and neural circuits are highly conserved, the nature of the behaviour does not dictate the neural mechanism and that the presence of homologous neural components does not determine the behaviour. This suggests that although behaviour is generated by neural circuits, natural selection can act separately on these two levels of biological organization.

  12. Temperature-dependent regulation of vocal pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Ayako; Gooler, David; Herrold, Amy; Patel, Shailja; Pong, Winnie W

    2008-12-01

    Vocalizations of Xenopus laevis are generated by central pattern generators (CPGs). The advertisement call of male X. laevis is a complex biphasic motor rhythm consisting of fast and slow trills (a train of clicks). We found that the trill rate of these advertisement calls is sensitive to temperature and that this rate modification of the vocal rhythms originates in the central pattern generators. In vivo the rates of fast and slow trills increased linearly with an increase in temperature. In vitro a similar linear relation between temperature and compound action potential frequency in the laryngeal nerve was found when fictive advertisement calls were evoked in the isolated brain. Temperature did not limit the contractile properties of laryngeal muscles within the frequency range of vocalizations. We next took advantage of the temperature sensitivity of the vocal CPG in vitro to localize the source of the vocal rhythms. We focused on the dorsal tegmental area of the medulla (DTAM), a brain stem nucleus that is essential for vocal production. We found that bilateral cooling of DTAM reduced both fast and slow trill rates. Thus we conclude that DTAM is a source of biphasic vocal rhythms. PMID:18829853

  13. Involvement of Working Memory in College Students' Sequential Pattern Learning and Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kundey, Shannon M. A.; De Los Reyes, Andres; Rowan, James D.; Lee, Bern; Delise, Justin; Molina, Sabrina; Cogdill, Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    When learning highly organized sequential patterns of information, humans and nonhuman animals learn rules regarding the hierarchical structures of these sequences. In three experiments, we explored the role of working memory in college students' sequential pattern learning and performance in a computerized task involving a sequential…

  14. Patterns of Romantic Involvement among Emerging Adults: Psychosocial Correlates and Precursors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shulman, Shmuel; Scharf, Miri; Livne, Yaara; Barr, Tamuz

    2013-01-01

    The present study examined patterns of romantic involvement in 100 Israeli emerging adults (54 males) who were followed from age 22 to 29 years. Analyses of interviews at age 29 yielded four distinctive relational patterns that are associated with different levels of concurrent wellbeing: Intimately committed, Intimate, Non- intimately committed,…

  15. The generation of vertebral segmental patterning in the chick embryo.

    PubMed

    Senthinathan, Biruntha; Sousa, Cátia; Tannahill, David; Keynes, Roger

    2012-06-01

    We have carried out a series of experimental manipulations in the chick embryo to assess whether the notochord, neural tube and spinal nerves influence segmental patterning of the vertebral column. Using Pax1 expression in the somite-derived sclerotomes as a marker for segmentation of the developing intervertebral disc, our results exclude such an influence. In contrast to certain teleost species, where the notochord has been shown to generate segmentation of the vertebral bodies (chordacentra), these experiments indicate that segmental patterning of the avian vertebral column arises autonomously in the somite mesoderm. We suggest that in amniotes, the subdivision of each sclerotome into non-miscible anterior and posterior halves plays a critical role in establishing vertebral segmentation, and in maintaining left/right alignment of the developing vertebral elements at the body midline.

  16. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Sreenath Nagamani, Sandesh C.; Dhar, Shweta U.; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E.; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V.; Cooper, M. Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A.; Bacino, Carlos A.; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A.; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R.; McLean, Scott D.; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L.; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P. J.; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R.; Bi, Weimin

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Complex genomic rearrangements (CGR) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism’s life cycle. PMID:21925314

  17. Chromosome catastrophes involve replication mechanisms generating complex genomic rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengfei; Erez, Ayelet; Nagamani, Sandesh C Sreenath; Dhar, Shweta U; Kołodziejska, Katarzyna E; Dharmadhikari, Avinash V; Cooper, M Lance; Wiszniewska, Joanna; Zhang, Feng; Withers, Marjorie A; Bacino, Carlos A; Campos-Acevedo, Luis Daniel; Delgado, Mauricio R; Freedenberg, Debra; Garnica, Adolfo; Grebe, Theresa A; Hernández-Almaguer, Dolores; Immken, LaDonna; Lalani, Seema R; McLean, Scott D; Northrup, Hope; Scaglia, Fernando; Strathearn, Lane; Trapane, Pamela; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Patel, Ankita; Cheung, Sau Wai; Hastings, P J; Stankiewicz, Paweł; Lupski, James R; Bi, Weimin

    2011-09-16

    Complex genomic rearrangements (CGRs) consisting of two or more breakpoint junctions have been observed in genomic disorders. Recently, a chromosome catastrophe phenomenon termed chromothripsis, in which numerous genomic rearrangements are apparently acquired in one single catastrophic event, was described in multiple cancers. Here, we show that constitutionally acquired CGRs share similarities with cancer chromothripsis. In the 17 CGR cases investigated, we observed localization and multiple copy number changes including deletions, duplications, and/or triplications, as well as extensive translocations and inversions. Genomic rearrangements involved varied in size and complexities; in one case, array comparative genomic hybridization revealed 18 copy number changes. Breakpoint sequencing identified characteristic features, including small templated insertions at breakpoints and microhomology at breakpoint junctions, which have been attributed to replicative processes. The resemblance between CGR and chromothripsis suggests similar mechanistic underpinnings. Such chromosome catastrophic events appear to reflect basic DNA metabolism operative throughout an organism's life cycle.

  18. Mexican-Origin Mothers' and Fathers' Involvement in Adolescents' Peer Relationships: A Pattern-Analytic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Baril, Megan E.; McHale, Susan M.; Umana-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2012-01-01

    Using latent profile analysis, the authors examined patterns of mother-father involvement in adolescents' peer relationships along three dimensions--support, guidance, and restrictions--in 240 Mexican-origin families. Three profiles were identified: (a) High Mother Involvement (mothers higher than fathers on all three dimensions), (b) High…

  19. Patterns of Parental Involvement in Selected OECD Countries: Cross-National Analyses of PISA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartas, Dimitra

    2015-01-01

    Using data from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), patterns of parental involvement were examined in selected OECD countries. The findings showed that, irrespective of educational qualifications, parents were frequently involved in their children's learning at the start of primary school and at age 15. Cross-national…

  20. Mask patterning for the 22nm node using a proton multi-beam projection pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butschke, Joerg; Irmscher, Mathias; Sailer, Holger; Nedelmann, Lorenz; Pritschow, Marcus; Loeschner, Hans; Platzgummer, Elmar

    2008-10-01

    Decreasing throughput of high-end pattern generators and insufficient line edge roughness (LER) of chemically amplified resists (CAR) might become limitations for future mask making. An alternative could be the introduction of less sensitive resists, linked to a turning away from today's electron beam pattern generators. Moderate exposure doses of around 25μC/cm2 could be achieved for non-CAR materials like HSQ by the use of 10keV protons. Targeting optimized absorber performance, Shin-Etsu has developed an Opaque-molybdenum-over-glass (OMOG) material, designed for 32mn mask technology and beyond. This hard mask concept allows using thin resist layers, as required by an ion beam exposure. Goal of this work was to assess a HSQ based non-CAR process using a multiple ion beam pattern generator including subsequent transfer into the absorber by dry etch processes. Proton exposures have been done on the IMS Nanofabrication proof of concept tool which is designed for 40,000 programmable ion beams. For comparison, an electron based reference process has been set up in parallel to the proton multi-beam approach. Hard mask opening and subsequent absorber etching have been accomplished in a state of the art mask etcher. Assessment of the process flow has been done in terms of feature profile, LER and resolution capability.

  1. Symmetry in locomotor central pattern generators and animal gaits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golubitsky, Martin; Stewart, Ian; Buono, Pietro-Luciano; Collins, J. J.

    1999-10-01

    Animal locomotion is controlled, in part, by a central pattern generator (CPG), which is an intraspinal network of neurons capable of generating a rhythmic output. The spatio-temporal symmetries of the quadrupedal gaits walk, trot and pace lead to plausible assumptions about the symmetries of locomotor CPGs. These assumptions imply that the CPG of a quadruped should consist of eight nominally identical subcircuits, arranged in an essentially unique matter. Here we apply analogous arguments to myriapod CPGs. Analyses based on symmetry applied to these networks lead to testable predictions, including a distinction between primary and secondary gaits, the existence of a new primary gait called `jump', and the occurrence of half-integer wave numbers in myriapod gaits. For bipeds, our analysis also predicts two gaits with the out-of-phase symmetry of the walk and two gaits with the in-phase symmetry of the hop. We present data that support each of these predictions. This work suggests that symmetry can be used to infer a plausible class of CPG network architectures from observed patterns of animal gaits.

  2. Sequentially firing neurons confer flexible timing in neural pattern generators

    SciTech Connect

    Urban, Alexander; Ermentrout, Bard

    2011-05-15

    Neuronal networks exhibit a variety of complex spatiotemporal patterns that include sequential activity, synchrony, and wavelike dynamics. Inhibition is the primary means through which such patterns are implemented. This behavior is dependent on both the intrinsic dynamics of the individual neurons as well as the connectivity patterns. Many neural circuits consist of networks of smaller subcircuits (motifs) that are coupled together to form the larger system. In this paper, we consider a particularly simple motif, comprising purely inhibitory interactions, which generates sequential periodic dynamics. We first describe the dynamics of the single motif both for general balanced coupling (all cells receive the same number and strength of inputs) and then for a specific class of balanced networks: circulant systems. We couple these motifs together to form larger networks. We use the theory of weak coupling to derive phase models which, themselves, have a certain structure and symmetry. We show that this structure endows the coupled system with the ability to produce arbitrary timing relationships between symmetrically coupled motifs and that the phase relationships are robust over a wide range of frequencies. The theory is applicable to many other systems in biology and physics.

  3. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotstein, Horacio G.; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-01

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling.

  4. Dynamic mechanisms of generation of oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled chemical system.

    PubMed

    Rotstein, Horacio G; Wu, Hui

    2012-09-14

    We use simulations and dynamical systems tools to investigate the mechanisms of generation of phase-locked and localized oscillatory cluster patterns in a globally coupled Oregonator model where the activator receives global feedback from the inhibitor, mimicking experimental results observed in the photosensitive Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction. A homogeneous two-cluster system (two clusters with equal cluster size) displays antiphase patterns. Heterogenous two-cluster systems (two clusters with different sizes) display both phase-locked and localized patterns depending on the parameter values. In a localized pattern the oscillation amplitude of the largest cluster is roughly an order of magnitude smaller than the oscillation amplitude of the smaller cluster, reflecting the effect of self-inhibition exerted by the global feedback term. The transition from phase-locked to localized cluster patterns occurs as the intensity of global feedback increases. Three qualitatively different basic mechanisms, described previously for a globally coupled FitzHugh-Nagumo model, are involved in the generation of the observed patterns. The swing-and-release mechanism is related to the canard phenomenon (canard explosion of limit cycles) in relaxation oscillators. The hold-and-release and hold-and-escape mechanisms are related to the release and escape mechanisms in synaptically connected neural models. The methods we use can be extended to the investigation of oscillatory chemical reactions with other types of non-local coupling. PMID:22979891

  5. Flexibility of the axial central pattern generator network for locomotion in the salamander.

    PubMed

    Ryczko, D; Knüsel, J; Crespi, A; Lamarque, S; Mathou, A; Ijspeert, A J; Cabelguen, J M

    2015-03-15

    In tetrapods, limb and axial movements are coordinated during locomotion. It is well established that inter- and intralimb coordination show considerable variations during ongoing locomotion. Much less is known about the flexibility of the axial musculoskeletal system during locomotion and the neural mechanisms involved. Here we examined this issue in the salamander Pleurodeles waltlii, which is capable of locomotion in both aquatic and terrestrial environments. Kinematics of the trunk and electromyograms from the mid-trunk epaxial myotomes were recorded during four locomotor behaviors in freely moving animals. A similar approach was used during rhythmic struggling movements since this would give some insight into the flexibility of the axial motor system. Our results show that each of the forms of locomotion and the struggling behavior is characterized by a distinct combination of mid-trunk motor patterns and cycle durations. Using in vitro electrophysiological recordings in isolated spinal cords, we observed that the spinal networks activated with bath-applied N-methyl-d-aspartate could generate these axial motor patterns. In these isolated spinal cord preparations, the limb motor nerve activities were coordinated with each mid-trunk motor pattern. Furthermore, isolated mid-trunk spinal cords and hemicords could generate the mid-trunk motor patterns. This indicates that each side of the cord comprises a network able to generate coordinated axial motor activity. The roles of descending and sensory inputs in the behavior-related changes in axial motor coordination are discussed.

  6. Two-stage Turing model for generating pigment patterns on the leopard and the jaguar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, R. T.; Liaw, S. S.; Maini, P. K.

    2006-07-01

    Based on the results of phylogenetic analysis, which showed that flecks are the primitive pattern of the felid family and all other patterns including rosettes and blotches develop from it, we construct a Turing reaction-diffusion model which generates spot patterns initially. Starting from this spotted pattern, we successfully generate patterns of adult leopards and jaguars by tuning parameters of the model in the subsequent phase of patterning.

  7. Positive Selection Linked with Generation of Novel Mammalian Dentition Patterns.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Paulo; Philip, Siby; Maldonado, Emanuel; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-01-01

    A diverse group of genes are involved in the tooth development of mammals. Several studies, focused mainly on mice and rats, have provided a detailed depiction of the processes coordinating tooth formation and shape. Here we surveyed 236 tooth-associated genes in 39 mammalian genomes and tested for signatures of selection to assess patterns of molecular adaptation in genes regulating mammalian dentition. Of the 236 genes, 31 (∼13.1%) showed strong signatures of positive selection that may be responsible for the phenotypic diversity observed in mammalian dentition. Mammalian-specific tooth-associated genes had accelerated mutation rates compared with older genes found across all vertebrates. More recently evolved genes had fewer interactions (either genetic or physical), were associated with fewer Gene Ontology terms and had faster evolutionary rates compared with older genes. The introns of these positively selected genes also exhibited accelerated evolutionary rates, which may reflect additional adaptive pressure in the intronic regions that are associated with regulatory processes that influence tooth-gene networks. The positively selected genes were mainly involved in processes like mineralization and structural organization of tooth specific tissues such as enamel and dentin. Of the 236 analyzed genes, 12 mammalian-specific genes (younger genes) provided insights on diversification of mammalian teeth as they have higher evolutionary rates and exhibit different expression profiles compared with older genes. Our results suggest that the evolution and development of mammalian dentition occurred in part through positive selection acting on genes that previously had other functions. PMID:27613398

  8. Positive Selection Linked with Generation of Novel Mammalian Dentition Patterns.

    PubMed

    Machado, João Paulo; Philip, Siby; Maldonado, Emanuel; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2016-09-11

    A diverse group of genes are involved in the tooth development of mammals. Several studies, focused mainly on mice and rats, have provided a detailed depiction of the processes coordinating tooth formation and shape. Here we surveyed 236 tooth-associated genes in 39 mammalian genomes and tested for signatures of selection to assess patterns of molecular adaptation in genes regulating mammalian dentition. Of the 236 genes, 31 (∼13.1%) showed strong signatures of positive selection that may be responsible for the phenotypic diversity observed in mammalian dentition. Mammalian-specific tooth-associated genes had accelerated mutation rates compared with older genes found across all vertebrates. More recently evolved genes had fewer interactions (either genetic or physical), were associated with fewer Gene Ontology terms and had faster evolutionary rates compared with older genes. The introns of these positively selected genes also exhibited accelerated evolutionary rates, which may reflect additional adaptive pressure in the intronic regions that are associated with regulatory processes that influence tooth-gene networks. The positively selected genes were mainly involved in processes like mineralization and structural organization of tooth specific tissues such as enamel and dentin. Of the 236 analyzed genes, 12 mammalian-specific genes (younger genes) provided insights on diversification of mammalian teeth as they have higher evolutionary rates and exhibit different expression profiles compared with older genes. Our results suggest that the evolution and development of mammalian dentition occurred in part through positive selection acting on genes that previously had other functions.

  9. Caregiving Practice Patterns of Asian, Hispanic, and Non-Hispanic White American Family Caregivers of Older Adults Across Generations.

    PubMed

    Miyawaki, Christina E

    2016-03-01

    This study is a cross-sectional investigation of caregiving practice patterns among Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White American family caregivers of older adults across three immigrant generations. The 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) dataset was used, and 591 Asian, 989 Hispanic and 6537 non-Hispanic White American caregivers of older adults were selected. First, descriptive analyses of caregivers' characteristics, caregiving situations and practice patterns were examined by racial/ethnic groups and immigrant generations. Practice patterns measured were respite care use, hours and length of caregiving. Three hypotheses on caregiving patterns based on assimilation theory were tested and analyzed using logistic regression and generalized linear models by racial/ethnic groups and generations. Caregiving patterns of non-Hispanic White caregivers supported all three hypotheses regarding respite care use, caregiving hours and caregiving duration, showing less caregiving involvement in later generations. However, Asian and Hispanic counterparts showed mixed results. Third generation Asian and Hispanic caregivers used respite care the least and spent the most caregiving hours per week and had the longest caregiving duration compared to earlier generations. These caregiving patterns revealed underlying cultural values related to filial responsibility, even among later generations of caregivers of color. Findings suggest the importance of considering the cultural values of each racial/ethnic group regardless of generation when working with racially and ethnically diverse populations of family caregivers of older adults.

  10. Search for complexity generating chemical transformations by combining connectivity analysis and cascade transformation patterns.

    PubMed

    Nowak, Grazyna; Fic, Grzegorz

    2010-08-23

    Retrosynthetic analysis involved in a backward search for strategic disconnections is still the most powerful strategy, recently advanced by topology-based complexity estimation, for discovering the shortest sequences of transformations and chemical synthesis planning. Therein, we propose an alternative strategy that combines backward and forward search embodied within a mathematical model of generating chemical transformations. The backward reasoning involves a new concept of the strategic bond tree for alternative multibond disconnections of a target molecule. In the forward direction, each combination of the resulted structural fragments is examined for reconstruction of the target structure by means of biomimetic transformation patterns that describe one-pot multibond forming reactions. The algorithm has been implemented into the CSB system, and its performance is illustrated by examples of published complex molecule syntheses for comparison and analysis. This paper describes the strategy for discovering the shortest synthetic pathways based on the multibond forming cascade transformations for application in synthesis design and generating synthetically accessible product libraries.

  11. Neural basis of singing in crickets: central pattern generation in abdominal ganglia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2011-12-01

    The neural mechanisms underlying cricket singing behavior have been the focus of several studies, but the central pattern generator (CPG) for singing has not been localized conclusively. To test if the abdominal ganglia contribute to the singing motor pattern and to analyze if parts of the singing CPG are located in these ganglia, we systematically truncated the abdominal nerve cord of fictively singing crickets while recording the singing motor pattern from a front-wing nerve. Severing the connectives anywhere between terminal ganglion and abdominal ganglion A3 did not preclude singing, although the motor pattern became more variable and failure-prone as more ganglia were disconnected. Singing terminated immediately and permanently after transecting the connectives between the metathoracic ganglion complex and the first unfused abdominal ganglion A3. The contribution of abdominal ganglia for singing pattern generation was confirmed by intracellular interneuron recordings and current injections. During fictive singing, an ascending interneuron with its soma and dendrite in A3 depolarized rhythmically. It spiked 10 ms before the wing-opener activity and hyperpolarized in phase with the wing-closer activity. Depolarizing current injection elicited rhythmic membrane potential oscillations and spike bursts that elicited additional syllables and reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. Our results disclose that the abdominal ganglion A3 is directly involved in generating the singing motor pattern, whereas the more posterior ganglia seem to provide only stabilizing feedback to the CPG circuit. Localizing the singing CPG in the anterior abdominal neuromeres now allows analyzing its circuitry at the level of identified interneurons in subsequent studies.

  12. Electronic Tongue Generating Continuous Recognition Patterns for Protein Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Yanxia; Genua, Maria; Garçon, Laurie-Amandine; Buhot, Arnaud; Calemczuk, Roberto; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Livache, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    In current protocol, a combinatorial approach has been developed to simplify the design and production of sensing materials for the construction of electronic tongues (eT) for protein analysis. By mixing a small number of simple and easily accessible molecules with different physicochemical properties, used as building blocks (BBs), in varying and controlled proportions and allowing the mixtures to self-assemble on the gold surface of a prism, an array of combinatorial surfaces featuring appropriate properties for protein sensing was created. In this way, a great number of cross-reactive receptors can be rapidly and efficiently obtained. By combining such an array of combinatorial cross-reactive receptors (CoCRRs) with an optical detection system such as surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi), the obtained eT can monitor the binding events in real-time and generate continuous recognition patterns including 2D continuous evolution profile (CEP) and 3D continuous evolution landscape (CEL) for samples in liquid. Such an eT system is efficient for discrimination of common purified proteins. PMID:25286325

  13. The Network Spinal Wave as a Central Pattern Generator

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Donald M.; Lemberger, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives: This article explains the research on a unique spinal wave visibly observed in association with network spinal analysis care. Since 1997, the network wave has been studied using surface electromyography (sEMG), characterized mathematically, and determined to be a unique and repeatable phenomenon. Methods: The authors provide a narrative review of the research and a context for the network wave's development. Results: The sEMG research demonstrates that the movement of the musculature of the spine during the wave phenomenon is electromagnetic and mechanical. The changes running along the spine were characterized mathematically at three distinct levels of care. Additionally, the wave has the mathematical properties of a central pattern generator (CPG). Conclusions: The network wave may be the first CPG discovered in the spine unrelated to locomotion. The mathematical characterization of the signal also demonstrates coherence at a distance between the sacral to cervical spine. According to mathematical engineers, based on studies conducted a decade apart, the wave itself is a robust phenomenon and the detection methods for this coherence may represent a new measure for central nervous system health. This phenomenon has implications for recovery from spinal cord injury and for reorganizational healing development. PMID:27243963

  14. Viewing Generativity and Social Capital as Underlying Factors of Parent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Sharon; Patel, Nimisha

    2015-01-01

    Parent involvement in education is a multifaceted support that has many well-documented benefits for students of all ages. Parent involvement is also a common expression of generativity as defined in Erik Erikson's theory of psychosocial development. The activities parents engage in during their children's educational pursuits, as well as their…

  15. Principal-Generated YouTube Video as a Method of Improving Parental Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Joey

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the involvement level of parents and reveal whether principal-generated YouTube videos for regular communication would enhance levels of parental involvement at one North Texas Christian Middle School (pseudonym). The following questions guided this study: 1. What is the beginning level of parental…

  16. Redefining Parent Involvement in Head Start: A Two-Generation Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Duch, Helena

    2005-01-01

    The present review of the literature aims to look at two-generation programs and their effects on children and parents as a potential strategy to improve parent involvement in Head Start while responding to the self-sufficiency needs of families. This paper reviews several two-generation program evaluations: Comprehensive Child Development…

  17. Mexican-origin Mothers’ and Fathers’ Involvement in Adolescents’ Peer Relationships: A Pattern-Analytic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Updegraff, Kimberly A.; Perez-Brena, Norma J.; Baril, Megan E.; McHale, Susan M.; Umaña-Taylor, Adriana J.

    2013-01-01

    Using latent profile analysis, this study examined patterns of mother-father involvement in adolescents’ peer relationships along three dimensions, support, guidance, and restrictions, in 240 Mexican-origin families. Three profiles were identified: (a) High Mother Involvement (mothers higher than fathers on all three dimensions); (b) High Support/Congruent (mothers and fathers reported the highest levels of peer support and similar levels of guidance and restrictions); and (c) Differentiated (more guidance and restrictions by fathers than by mothers, similar levels of parent support). These profiles were linked to mothers’ and fathers’ familism values, traditional patriarchal gender role attitudes, and socioeconomic status, and to adolescents’ friendship intimacy and risky behaviors measured longitudinally from early to late adolescence. Adolescent gender moderated the linkages between parents’ involvement in adolescents’ peer relationships and youth adjustment. PMID:24092949

  18. Generation of 1D interference patterns of Bloch surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadomina, E. A.; Bezus, E. A.; Doskolovich, L. L.

    2016-09-01

    Interference patterns of Bloch surface waves with a period that is significantly less than the wavelength of incident radiation are formed using dielectric diffraction gratings located on the surface of photonic crystal. The simulation based on electromagnetic diffraction theory is used to demonstrate the possibility of high-quality interference patterns due to resonant enhancement of higher evanescent diffraction orders related to the excitation of the Bloch surface waves. The contrast of the interference patterns is close to unity, and the period is less than the period of the diffraction structure by an order of magnitude.

  19. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations: Proximity? Generativity? Minority stress? Social location?

    PubMed

    Paceley, Megan S; Oswald, Ramona Faith; Hardesty, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Little is known about involvement in LGBTQ organizations. Factors associated with involvement in nonmetropolitan LGBTQ organizations were examined using logistic regression and survey data from 426 LGBTQ individuals residing in a nonmetropolitan region. Involvement was examined in five types of organizations (professional, social/recreational, religious, political, and community center/charity). The same model testing proximity, generativity, minority stress, and social location hypotheses was repeated for each organization type. Results demonstrate that the generativity hypothesis is most strongly supported. Indeed, emotional attachment to the LGBTQ community significantly increased the odds of involvement in every type of organization. However, the factors associated with involvement otherwise differed by organization type. Implications for organizational leaders are discussed.

  20. Computer program for automatic generation of BWR control rod patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Taner, M.S.; Levine, S.H.; Hsia, M.Y. )

    1990-01-01

    A computer program named OCTOPUS has been developed to automatically determine a control rod pattern that approximates some desired target power distribution as closely as possible without violating any thermal safety or reactor criticality constraints. The program OCTOPUS performs a semi-optimization task based on the method of approximation programming (MAP) to develop control rod patterns. The SIMULATE-E code is used to determine the nucleonic characteristics of the reactor core state.

  1. Evolution of oropharyngeal patterning mechanisms involving Dlx and endothelins in vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kuraku, Shigehiro; Takio, Yoko; Sugahara, Fumiaki; Takechi, Masaki; Kuratani, Shigeru

    2010-05-01

    In jawed vertebrates, the Dlx code, or nested expression patterns of Dlx genes, specify the dorsoventral polarity of pharyngeal arches, downstream of endothelin-1 (Edn-1) and its effectors, Bapx1 (Nkx3.2) and dHand (Hand2). To elucidate the evolution of the specification mechanism of the oropharyngeal skeletal system, lamprey homologs of Dlx, Edn, endothelin receptor (Ednr), Bapx1, and dHand were identified. Our analysis suggested that the Edn gene family emerged at the advent of vertebrates, and that gene duplications leading to the different Edn gnathostome subtypes (Edn1-3) occurred before the cyclostome-gnathostome split. This timing of gene duplications, giving rise to multiple subtypes, was also implied for Dlx, Ednr, Hand, and Bapx. In lamprey embryos, nested expressions of Dlx genes were not observed in pharyngeal arches, nor was any focal expression of Bapx1, known in gnathostomes to specify the jaw joint. The dHand homolog, however, was expressed more intensively ventrally, as in gnathostomes. Lamprey homologs of Edn-1 and EdnrA were also shown to be expressed as described in mice, indicating involvement of this signaling pathway in the craniofacial patterning early in vertebrate evolution. These results suggest that the last common ancestor of all the extant vertebrates would have possessed basic gene repertoires involved in oropharyngeal patterning in gnathostomes, but the elaborate genetic program leading to the Dlx code is likely to have been acquired uniquely in gnathostomes. PMID:20171204

  2. Expression of Genes Involved in Drosophila Wing Morphogenesis and Vein Patterning Are Altered by Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parsons-Wingerter, Patricia A.; Hosamani, Ravikumar; Bhattacharya, Sharmila

    2015-01-01

    Imaginal wing discs of Drosophila melanogaster (fruit fly) defined during embryogenesis ultimately result in mature wings of stereotyped (specific) venation patterning. Major regulators of wing disc development are the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF), Notch, Hedgehog (Hh), Wingless (Wg), and Dpp signaling pathways. Highly stereotyped vascular patterning is also characteristic of tissues in other organisms flown in space such as the mouse retina and leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic and other adaptations of vascular patterning to space environmental factors have not yet been systematically quantified, despite widespread recognition of their critical importance for terrestrial and microgravity applications. Here we report changes in gene expression with space flight related to Drosophila wing morphogenesis and vein patterning. In addition, genetically modified phenotypes of increasingly abnormal ectopic wing venation in the Drosophila wing1 were analyzed by NASA's VESsel GENeration Analysis (VESGEN) software2. Our goal is to further develop insightful vascular mappings associated with bioinformatic dimensions of genetic or other molecular phenotypes for correlation with genetic and other molecular profiling relevant to NASA's GeneLab and other Space Biology exploration initiatives.

  3. Micropunching lithography for generating micro- and submicron-patterns on polymer substrates.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Anirban; Liu, Xinchuan; Luo, Cheng

    2012-07-02

    Conducting polymers have attracted great attention since the discovery of high conductivity in doped polyacetylene in 1977(1). They offer the advantages of low weight, easy tailoring of properties and a wide spectrum of applications(2,3). Due to sensitivity of conducting polymers to environmental conditions (e.g., air, oxygen, moisture, high temperature and chemical solutions), lithographic techniques present significant technical challenges when working with these materials(4). For example, current photolithographic methods, such as ultra-violet (UV), are unsuitable for patterning the conducting polymers due to the involvement of wet and/or dry etching processes in these methods. In addition, current micro/nanosystems mainly have a planar form(5,6). One layer of structures is built on the top surfaces of another layer of fabricated features. Multiple layers of these structures are stacked together to form numerous devices on a common substrate. The sidewall surfaces of the microstructures have not been used in constructing devices. On the other hand, sidewall patterns could be used, for example, to build 3-D circuits, modify fluidic channels and direct horizontal growth of nanowires and nanotubes. A macropunching method has been applied in the manufacturing industry to create macropatterns in a sheet metal for over a hundred years. Motivated by this approach, we have developed a micropunching lithography method (MPL) to overcome the obstacles of patterning conducting polymers and generating sidewall patterns. Like the macropunching method, the MPL also includes two operations (Fig. 1): (i) cutting; and (ii) drawing. The "cutting" operation was applied to pattern three conducting polymers(4), polypyrrole (PPy), Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophen)-poly(4-styrenesulphonate) (PEDOT) and polyaniline (PANI). It was also employed to create Al microstructures(7). The fabricated microstructures of conducting polymers have been used as humidity(8), chemical(8), and glucose

  4. Subthalamic nucleus involvement in children: a neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach.

    PubMed

    Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Anghelescu, Cristina; Boltshauser, Eugen; Hoon, Alexander H; Pearl, Phillip L; Craiu, Dana; Johnston, Michael V; Huisman, Thierry A G M; Poretti, Andrea

    2014-05-01

    A neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach has been shown to be very helpful in the diagnosis of a wide range of pediatric central nervous system diseases. Few disorders may selectively affect the subthalamic nucleus in children including Leigh syndrome, succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase deficiency, kernicterus, chronic end-stage liver failure and near total hypoxic-ischemic injury in the full-term neonates. The consideration of the constellation of clinical history and findings as well as additional neuroimaging findings should allow planning the appropriate diagnostic tests to make the correct diagnosis in children with involvement of the subthalamic nucleus.

  5. Tactical emergency medical support: physician involvement and injury patterns in tactical teams.

    PubMed

    Gildea, Jon R; Janssen, Alan R

    2008-11-01

    Medical support provided by physicians in police tactical teams has been firmly embraced by the medical community. Our study revisited the 1995 study inquiring into injury patterns in police tactical teams. A national survey was completed by 209 members of tactical teams throughout the country over a 6-week period. An electronic survey was submitted to the National Tactical Officers Association, the International Tactical Emergency Medical Support Association, and state tactical associations. Teams reporting physician utilization were 47% of the whole (69% were presentinvolved in training exercises. Physician benefit was reported in 94%. Most injuries were low acuity, occurring during training. Fatalities were low, mostly occurring during call-outs. The study findings support physician presence within police tactical teams and a need for extensive involvement in all aspects of team health, with special attention to daily health and physical fitness.

  6. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-01

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning.

  7. Polychromatic Optical Vortex Generation from Patterned Cholesteric Liquid Crystals.

    PubMed

    Kobashi, Junji; Yoshida, Hiroyuki; Ozaki, Masanori

    2016-06-24

    Generation of optical vortices is described in cholesteric liquid crystals with a singular point in the spatial distribution of a helix phase. The phenomenon uses the fact that a Bragg reflected light phase varies in proportion to the spatial phase of the helix, both at normal and oblique incidences. Our proposal enables high-efficiency, polychromatic generation of optical vortices without the need of a cumbersome fabrication process and fine-tuning. PMID:27391724

  8. Object-adapted inverse pattern projection: generation, evaluation, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bothe, Thorsten; Li, Wansong; von Kopylow, Christoph; Juptner, Werner P.

    2003-05-01

    Fast and robust 3D quality control as well as fast deformation measurement is of particular importance for industrial inspection. Additionally a direct response about measured properties is desired. Therefore, robust optical techniques are needed which use as few images as possible for measurement and visualize results in an efficient way. One promising technique for this aim is the inverse pattern projection which has the following advantages: The technique codes the information of a preceding measurement into the projected inverse pattern. Thus, it is possible to do differential measurements using only one camera frame for each state. Additionally, the results are optimized straight fringes for sampling which are independent of the object curvature. The ability to use any image for inverse projection enables the use for augmented reality, i.e. any properties can be visualized directly on the object's surface which makes inspections easier than with use of a separated indicating device. The hardware needs are low as just a programmable projector and a standard camera are necessary. The basic idea of inverse pattern projection, necessary algorithms ane found optimizations are demonstrated, roughly. Evaluation techniques were found to preserve a high quality phase measurement under imperfect conditions. The different application fields can be sorted out by the type of pattern used for inverse projection. We select two main topics for presentation. One is the incremental (one image per state) deformation measurement which is a promising technique for high speed deformation measurements. A video series of a wavering flag with projected inverse pattern was evaluated to show the complete deformation series. The other application is the optical feature marking (augmented reality) that allows to map any measured result directly onto the object under investigation. The general ability to straighten any kind of information on 3D surfaces is shown while preserving an exact

  9. Skeletal muscle imaging in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, pattern and asymmetry of individual muscle involvement.

    PubMed

    Rijken, N H M; van der Kooi, E L; Hendriks, J C M; van Asseldonk, R J G P; Padberg, G W; Geurts, A C H; van Engelen, B G M

    2014-12-01

    To better understand postural and movement disabilities, the pattern of total body muscle fat infiltration was analyzed in a large group of patients with facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. Additionally, we studied whether residual D4Z4 repeat array length adjusted for age and gender could predict the degree of muscle involvement. Total body computed tomography scans of 70 patients were used to assess the degree of fat infiltration of 42 muscles from neck to ankle level on a semi-quantitative scale. Groups of muscles that highly correlated regarding fat infiltration were identified using factor analysis. Linear regression analysis was performed using muscle fat infiltration as the dependent variable and D4Z4 repeat length and age as independent variables. A pattern of muscle fat infiltration in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy could be constructed. Trunk muscles were most frequently affected. Of these, back extensors were more frequently affected than previously reported. Asymmetry in muscle involvement was seen in 45% of the muscles that were infiltrated with fat. The right-sided upper extremity showed significantly higher scores for fat infiltration compared to the left side, which could not be explained by handedness. It was possible to explain 29% of the fat infiltration based on D4Z4 repeat length, corrected for age and gender. Based on our results we conclude that frequent involvement of fat infiltration in back extensors, in addition to the abdominal muscles, emphasizes the extent of trunk involvement, which may have a profound impact on postural control even in otherwise mildly affected patients.

  10. Pattern-set generation algorithm for the one-dimensional multiple stock sizes cutting stock problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Yaodong; Cui, Yi-Ping; Zhao, Zhigang

    2015-09-01

    A pattern-set generation algorithm (PSG) for the one-dimensional multiple stock sizes cutting stock problem (1DMSSCSP) is presented. The solution process contains two stages. In the first stage, the PSG solves the residual problems repeatedly to generate the patterns in the pattern set, where each residual problem is solved by the column-generation approach, and each pattern is generated by solving a single large object placement problem. In the second stage, the integer linear programming model of the 1DMSSCSP is solved using a commercial solver, where only the patterns in the pattern set are considered. The computational results of benchmark instances indicate that the PSG outperforms existing heuristic algorithms and rivals the exact algorithm in solution quality.

  11. The Oncoprotein BRD4-NUT Generates Aberrant Histone Modification Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Zee, Barry M.; Dibona, Amy B.; Alekseyenko, Artyom A.; French, Christopher A.; Kuroda, Mitzi I.

    2016-01-01

    Defects in chromatin proteins frequently manifest in diseases. A striking case of a chromatin-centric disease is NUT-midline carcinoma (NMC), which is characterized by expression of NUT as a fusion partner most frequently with BRD4. ChIP-sequencing studies from NMC patients revealed that BRD4-NUT (B4N) covers large genomic regions and elevates transcription within these domains. To investigate how B4N modulates chromatin, we performed affinity purification of B4N when ectopically expressed in 293-TREx cells and quantified the associated histone posttranslational modifications (PTM) using proteomics. We observed significant enrichment of acetylation particularly on H3 K18 and of combinatorial patterns such as H3 K27 acetylation paired with K36 methylation. We postulate that B4N complexes override the preexisting histone code with new PTM patterns that reflect aberrant transcription and that epigenetically modulate the nucleosome environment toward the NMC state. PMID:27698495

  12. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    DOE PAGES

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniquesmore » with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.« less

  13. Microstencils to generate defined, multi-species patterns of bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel J.; Retterer, Scott T.; Pelletier, Dale A.; Timm, Collin M.; Hansen, Ryan R.

    2015-11-12

    Microbial communities are complex heterogeneous systems that are influenced by physical and chemical interactions with their environment, host, and community members. Techniques that facilitate the quantitative evaluation of how microscale organization influences the morphogenesis of multispecies communities could provide valuable insights into the dynamic behavior and organization of natural communities, the design of synthetic environments for multispecies culture, and the engineering of artificial consortia. In this work, we demonstrate a method for patterning microbes into simple arrangements that allow the quantitative measurement of growth dynamics as a function of their proximity to one another. The method combines parylene-based liftoff techniques with microfluidic delivery to simultaneously pattern multiple bacterial species with high viability using low-cost, customizable methods. Furthermore, quantitative measurements of bacterial growth for two competing isolates demonstrate that spatial coordination can play a critical role in multispecies growth and structure.

  14. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  15. Crashes involving motorised rickshaws in urban India: Characteristics and injury patterns

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Uli; Dandona, Rakhi; Kumar, G. Anil; Dandona, Lalit

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Motorised three-wheeled vehicles (motorised rickshaw) are popular in Asian countries including India. This study aims to describe the crash characteristics and injury patterns for motorised rickshaw occupants and the road users hit-by-motorised rickshaw in urban India. Methods Consecutive cases of road traffic crashes involving motorised rickshaw, irrespective of injury severity, whether alive or dead, presenting to the emergency departments of two large government hospitals and three branches of a private hospital in Hyderabad city were recruited. Crash characteristics, details of injuries, injury severity parameters and outcome were documented in detailed interviews. Results A total of 139 (18%) of the 781 participants recruited were injured as a motorised rickshaw occupant (11%) or were hit by a motorised rickshaw (7%) in 114 crashes involving motorised rickshaw. Amongst motorised rickshaw occupants, single-vehicle collisions (54%) were more frequent than multi-vehicle collisions (46%), with overturning of motorised rickshaw in 73% of the single-vehicle collisions. Mortality (12%), the mean Injury Severity Score (5.8) and rate of multiple injured (60%) indicated a substantial trauma load. No significant differences in injury pattern were found between motorised rickshaw occupants and hit-by-motorised rickshaw subjects, with the pattern being similar to that of the pedestrians and two-wheeled vehicle users. With bivariate analysis for motorised rickshaw occupants, the risk of fatal outcome (odds ratio (OR) 2.60, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.64–10.54), upper limb injury (OR 2.25, 95% CI: 0.94–5.37) and multiple injuries (OR 2.03, 95% CI 0.85–4.83) was high, although not statistically significant in multi-motorised-vehicle collisions as compared with the single-vehicle collisions or overturning. The risk of having multiple injuries (OR 4.55, 95% CI: 1.15–17.95) was significantly higher in motorised rickshaw occupants involved in front

  16. Perceptions of Father Involvement Patterns in Teenage-Mother Families: Predictors and Links to Mothers' Psychological Adjustment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kalil, Ariel; Ziol-Guest, Kathleen M.; Coley, Rebekah Levine

    2005-01-01

    Based on adolescent mothers' reports, longitudinal patterns of involvement of young, unmarried biological fathers (n=77) in teenage-mother families using cluster analytic techniques were examined. Approximately one third of fathers maintained high levels of involvement over time, another third demonstrated low involvement at both time points, and…

  17. GENERATING FRACTAL PATTERNS BY USING p-CIRCLE INVERSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, José L.; Rubiano, Gustavo N.; Zlobec, Borut Jurčič

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, we introduce the p-circle inversion which generalizes the classical inversion with respect to a circle (p = 2) and the taxicab inversion (p = 1). We study some basic properties and we also show the inversive images of some basic curves. We apply this new transformation to well-known fractals such as Sierpinski triangle, Koch curve, dragon curve, Fibonacci fractal, among others. Then we obtain new fractal patterns. Moreover, we generalize the method called circle inversion fractal be means of the p-circle inversion.

  18. Interference pattern generation in evanescent electromagnetic waves for nanoscale lithography using waveguide diffraction gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Bezus, E A; Doskolovich, L L; Kazanskii, N L

    2011-08-31

    The generation of interference patterns of evanescent electromagnetic waves with an essentially subwavelength period using dielectric waveguide diffraction gratings is considered. Using simulations within the framework of the electromagnetic theory, the possibility of obtaining high-quality interference patterns due to enhancement of evanescent diffraction orders under resonance conditions is demonstrated. The contrast of the interference patterns in the case of TE polarisation of the incident wave is close to unity. The field intensity in the near-field interference maxima exceeds the intensity of the incident wave by 25-100 times. The possibility of generation of the interference patterns of evanescent waves corresponding to higher diffraction orders is shown. The use of higher orders reduces the requirements to the fabrication technology and allows generation of interference patterns with a high spatial frequency, using diffraction gratings with a low spatial frequency. Examples of generating interference patters with periods six times smaller than those of the used diffraction gratings are presented. (nanolithography)

  19. Brain structures and mechanisms involved in the generation of REM sleep.

    PubMed

    Reinoso-Suárez, Fernando; de Andrés, Isabel; Rodrigo-Angulo, Margarita L.; Garzón, Miguel

    2001-02-01

    This article reviews the central nervous mechanisms involved in the broad network that generates and maintains REM sleep. Experimental investigations have identified the pontine tegmentum as the critical substrate for REM sleep mechanisms. Several pontine structures are involved in the generation of each particular polygraphic event that characterizes REM sleep: desynchronization in the electroencephalogram, theta rhythm in the hippocampus, muscle atonia, pontogeniculooccipital waves and rapid eye movements. The pontine tegmentum also holds the region where cholinergic stimulation can trigger all the behavioural and bioelectric signs of REM sleep. The exact location has been investigated and amply discussed over the last few years. Studies in the authors> laboratory, mapping the pontine tegmentum with small volume carbachol (a cholinergic agonist) microinjections, have demonstrated that the executive neurons for REM sleep generation are neither located in the dorsal part of the pontine tegmentum, nor diffusely spread through the medial pontine reticular formation: they are concentrated in a discrete area in the ventral part of the oral pontine reticular nucleus (vRPO). In turn, the vRPO has connections with structures involved in the generation of the other states of the sleep-wake cycle as well as with structures responsible for the generation of each of the different events characterizing REM sleep. This allows us to propose the vRPO as the crucial region for REM sleep generation. Related research, with invivo and invitro experiments, into the actions of different neurotransmitters on vRPO neurones indicates that not only acetylcholine but other neurotransmitters have an active key role in vRPO REM sleep generation mechanisms.

  20. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail. PMID:26388832

  1. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Kevin P; Horner, Richard L

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep - characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity - is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the "pontine REM sleep generator" by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail.

  2. Morphodynamics and anabranching patterns generated in the Madeira River, Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Bonthius, C.; Abad, J. D.; Stevaux, J.; Filizola, N.; Frias, C. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Madeira River is the largest tributary in water discharge and sediment transport of the Amazon River. At present, this river is at the center of a controversial political discussion because the Brazilian government is building two hydroelectric plants on the Bolivia-Brazil border, flooding a long reach from near Cachuela Esperanza in the tributary Beni River, close to the Brazil-Bolivia border, up to Porto Velho. We present results from three field expeditions carried out in July-August 2011, December 2012 and March 2013. The main scope of this article is to disseminate the environmental threat suffered by the Madeira from regulation/disruption, and to present preliminary results on the geomorphologic characteristics of the Madeira channel and floodplain. Using historical radar and satellite imagery, the floodplain morpho-sedimentary units and morphology of the channel were assessed and quantified. Sediment bed and bank sampling, bathymetric surveys and velocity measurements were recorded using a single beam echo sounder and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), respectively. Velocity data were analyzed using TRDI's WinRiverII and a MATLAB-based software package Velocity Mapping Tool. We consider that the Madeira River offers some ideal conditions to provide information on critical conditions and geomorphologic thresholds in mega-rivers. The Madeira River has been classified as a simple to moderate anabranching low-sinuosity river. The Madeira flows through a relatively simple pattern, alternating straight reaches with others that exhibit an incipient tendency to anabranch. Single beam and ADCP data yields insight into the bathymetry and flow characteristics in the channel through straight, pseudo-meandering, and anabranching stretches. We studied in detail three selected three reaches zones where three primary mechanisms for anabranching were identified: a) branches upstream and downstream in box shape pseudo-meanders; b) simple branch patterns

  3. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    PubMed Central

    Geslin, Pierre-Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Moreover, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics. PMID:26582248

  4. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    DOE PAGES

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growthmore » of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.« less

  5. Topology-generating interfacial pattern formation during liquid metal dealloying

    SciTech Connect

    Geslin, Pierre -Antoine; McCue, Ian; Gaskey, Bernard; Erlebacher, Jonah; Karma, Alain

    2015-11-19

    Liquid metal dealloying has emerged as a novel technique to produce topologically complex nanoporous and nanocomposite structures with ultra-high interfacial area and other unique properties relevant for diverse material applications. This process is empirically known to require the selective dissolution of one element of a multicomponent solid alloy into a liquid metal to obtain desirable structures. However, how structures form is not known. Here we demonstrate, using mesoscale phase-field modelling and experiments, that nano/microstructural pattern formation during dealloying results from the interplay of (i) interfacial spinodal decomposition, forming compositional domain structures enriched in the immiscible element, and (ii) diffusion-coupled growth of the enriched solid phase and the liquid phase into the alloy. We highlight how those two basic mechanisms interact to yield a rich variety of topologically disconnected and connected structures. Furthermore, we deduce scaling laws governing microstructural length scales and dealloying kinetics.

  6. Pattern Generator for Bench Test of Digital Boards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berkun, Andrew C.; Chu, Anhua J.

    2012-01-01

    All efforts to develop electronic equipment reach a stage where they need a board test station for each board. The SMAP digital system consists of three board types that interact with each other using interfaces with critical timing. Each board needs to be tested individually before combining into the integrated digital electronics system. Each board needs critical timing signals from the others to be able to operate. A bench test system was developed to support test of each board. The test system produces all the outputs of the control and timing unit, and is delivered much earlier than the timing unit. Timing signals are treated as data. A large file is generated containing the state of every timing signal at any instant. This file is streamed out to an IO card, which is wired directly to the device-under-test (DUT) input pins. This provides a flexible test environment that can be adapted to any of the boards required to test in a standalone configuration. The problem of generating the critical timing signals is then transferred from a hardware problem to a software problem where it is more easily dealt with.

  7. Signaling Pathways Involved in Striatal Synaptic Plasticity are Sensitive to Temporal Pattern and Exhibit Spatial Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Kim, BoHung; Hawes, Sarah L.; Gillani, Fawad; Wallace, Lane J.; Blackwell, Kim T.

    2013-01-01

    The basal ganglia is a brain region critically involved in reinforcement learning and motor control. Synaptic plasticity in the striatum of the basal ganglia is a cellular mechanism implicated in learning and neuronal information processing. Therefore, understanding how different spatio-temporal patterns of synaptic input select for different types of plasticity is key to understanding learning mechanisms. In striatal medium spiny projection neurons (MSPN), both long term potentiation (LTP) and long term depression (LTD) require an elevation in intracellular calcium concentration; however, it is unknown how the post-synaptic neuron discriminates between different patterns of calcium influx. Using computer modeling, we investigate the hypothesis that temporal pattern of stimulation can select for either endocannabinoid production (for LTD) or protein kinase C (PKC) activation (for LTP) in striatal MSPNs. We implement a stochastic model of the post-synaptic signaling pathways in a dendrite with one or more diffusionally coupled spines. The model is validated by comparison to experiments measuring endocannabinoid-dependent depolarization induced suppression of inhibition. Using the validated model, simulations demonstrate that theta burst stimulation, which produces LTP, increases the activation of PKC as compared to 20 Hz stimulation, which produces LTD. The model prediction that PKC activation is required for theta burst LTP is confirmed experimentally. Using the ratio of PKC to endocannabinoid production as an index of plasticity direction, model simulations demonstrate that LTP exhibits spine level spatial specificity, whereas LTD is more diffuse. These results suggest that spatio-temporal control of striatal information processing employs these Gq coupled pathways. PMID:23516346

  8. Evaluating the Evidence Surrounding Pontine Cholinergic Involvement in REM Sleep Generation

    PubMed Central

    Grace, Kevin P.; Horner, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Rapid eye movement (REM) sleep – characterized by vivid dreaming, motor paralysis, and heightened neural activity – is one of the fundamental states of the mammalian central nervous system. Initial theories of REM sleep generation posited that induction of the state required activation of the “pontine REM sleep generator” by cholinergic inputs. Here, we review and evaluate the evidence surrounding cholinergic involvement in REM sleep generation. We submit that: (i) the capacity of pontine cholinergic neurotransmission to generate REM sleep has been firmly established by gain-of-function experiments, (ii) the function of endogenous cholinergic input to REM sleep generating sites cannot be determined by gain-of-function experiments; rather, loss-of-function studies are required, (iii) loss-of-function studies show that endogenous cholinergic input to the PTF is not required for REM sleep generation, and (iv) cholinergic input to the pontine REM sleep generating sites serve an accessory role in REM sleep generation: reinforcing non-REM-to-REM sleep transitions making them quicker and less likely to fail. PMID:26388832

  9. [Expression pattern of genes involved in tropane alkaloids biosynthesis and tropane alkaloids accumulation in Atropa belladonna].

    PubMed

    Qiang, Wei; Wang, Ya-Xiong; Zhang, Qiao-Zhuo; Li, Jin-Di; Xia, Ke; Wu, Neng-Biao; Liao, Zhi-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Atropa belladonna is a medicinal plant and main commercial source of tropane alkaloids (TAs) including scopolamine and hyoscyamine, which are anticholine drugs widely used clinically. Based on the high throughput transcriptome sequencing results, the digital expression patterns of UniGenes representing 9 structural genes (ODC, ADC, AIH, CPA, SPDS, PMT, CYP80F1, H6H, TRII) involved in TAs biosynthesis were constructed, and simultaneously expression analysis of 4 released genes in NCBI (PMT, CYP80F1, H6H, TRII) for verification was performed using qPCR, as well as the TAs contents detection in 8 different tissues. Digital expression patterns results suggested that the 4 genes including ODC, ADC, AIH and CPA involved in the upstream pathway of TAs, and the 2 branch pathway genes including SPDS and TRII were found to be expressed in all the detected tissues with high expression level in secondary root. While the 3 TAs-pathway-specific genes including PMT, CYP80F1, H6H were only expressed in secondary roots and primary roots, mainly in secondary roots. The qPCR detection results of PMT, CYP80F1 and H6H were consistent with the digital expression patterns, but their expression levels in primary root were too low to be detected. The highest content of hyoscyamine was found in tender stems (3.364 mg x g(-1)), followed by tender leaves (1.526 mg x g(-1)), roots (1.598 mg x g(-1)), young fruits (1.271 mg x g(-1)) and fruit sepals (1.413 mg x g(-1)). The highest content of scopolamine was detected in fruit sepals (1.003 mg x g(-1)), then followed by tender stems (0.600 mg x g(-1)) and tender leaves (0.601 mg x g(-1)). Both old stems and old leaves had the lowest content of hyoscyamine and scopolamine. The gene expression profile and TAs accumulation indicated that TAs in Atropa belladonna were mainly biosynthesized in secondary root, and then transported and deposited in tender aerial parts. Screening Atropa belladonna secondary root transcriptome database will facilitate

  10. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy.

    PubMed

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S; Østergaard, Lars

    2016-09-15

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  11. Fruit shape diversity in the Brassicaceae is generated by varying patterns of anisotropy

    PubMed Central

    Eldridge, Tilly; Łangowski, Łukasz; Stacey, Nicola; Jantzen, Friederike; Moubayidin, Laila; Sicard, Adrien; Southam, Paul; Kennaway, Richard; Lenhard, Michael; Coen, Enrico S.

    2016-01-01

    Fruits exhibit a vast array of different 3D shapes, from simple spheres and cylinders to more complex curved forms; however, the mechanism by which growth is oriented and coordinated to generate this diversity of forms is unclear. Here, we compare the growth patterns and orientations for two very different fruit shapes in the Brassicaceae: the heart-shaped Capsella rubella silicle and the near-cylindrical Arabidopsis thaliana silique. We show, through a combination of clonal and morphological analyses, that the different shapes involve different patterns of anisotropic growth during three phases. These experimental data can be accounted for by a tissue-level model in which specified growth rates vary in space and time and are oriented by a proximodistal polarity field. The resulting tissue conflicts lead to deformation of the tissue as it grows. The model allows us to identify tissue-specific and temporally specific activities required to obtain the individual shapes. One such activity may be provided by the valve-identity gene FRUITFULL, which we show through comparative mutant analysis to modulate fruit shape during post-fertilisation growth of both species. Simple modulations of the model presented here can also broadly account for the variety of shapes in other Brassicaceae species, thus providing a simplified framework for fruit development and shape diversity. PMID:27624834

  12. Expression pattern of glycoside hydrolase genes in Lutzomyia longipalpis reveals key enzymes involved in larval digestion

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Caroline da Silva; Diaz-Albiter, Hector M.; Faria, Maiara do Valle; Sant'Anna, Maurício R. V.; Dillon, Rod J.; Genta, Fernando A.

    2014-01-01

    The sand fly Lutzomyia longipalpis is the most important vector of American Visceral Leishmaniasis. Adults are phytophagous (males and females) or blood feeders (females only), and larvae feed on solid detritus. Digestion in sand fly larvae has scarcely been studied, but some glycosidase activities putatively involved in microorganism digestion were already described. Nevertheless, the molecular nature of these enzymes, as the corresponding genes and transcripts, were not explored yet. Catabolism of microbial carbohydrates in insects generally involves β-1,3-glucanases, chitinases, and digestive lysozymes. In this work, the transcripts of digestive β-1,3-glucanase and chitinases were identified in the L. longipalpis larvae throughout analysis of sequences and expression patterns of glycoside hydrolases families 16, 18, and 22. The activity of one i-type lysozyme was also registered. Interestingly, this lysozyme seems to play a role in immunity, rather than digestion. This is the first attempt to identify the molecular nature of sand fly larval digestive enzymes. PMID:25140153

  13. Beyond participation: the association between school extracurricular activities and involvement in violence across generations of immigration.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D

    2012-03-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, this study explores how the relationship between extracurricular activities and youth violence varies by type of extracurricular activity profile (sports alone, non-sports alone, and a combination of sports and non-sports) and by generations of immigration (first, second, and third-plus). The sample is composed of 9.3% (n = 1,233) first-generation youth, 15.7% (n = 2,080) second generation, and 74.9% (n = 9,923) third-plus generation. The results reveal that adolescents from the third-plus generation (i.e., non-immigrant youth) who participate in non-sports alone or sports plus non-sports have lower odds of involvement in violence than adolescents from the same generation who do not participate in extracurricular activities. However, for first- and second-generation adolescents, participation in extracurricular activities is associated with higher rather than lower odds of violence compared to their non-participating counterparts. These findings challenge the viewpoint that participation in mainstream extracurricular activities as afforded by US schools is equally beneficial for all youth. They also call for additional research that explores why immigrant youth are less likely than non-immigrant youth to gain violence-reducing benefits when they participate in extracurricular activities.

  14. Dot patterns from second-harmonic and sum-frequency generation in polycrystalline ZnSe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chinh, Tran Duc; Seibt, Wolfgang; Siegbahn, Kai

    2001-09-01

    During a comparative study of second-harmonic generation (SHG) and sum-frequency generation (SFG) in single-crystal and polycrystalline ZnSe, the polycrystalline material showed a dot pattern in the SHG as well as in the SFG output. No such pattern was found in the output from the single-crystal ZnSe sample. The second-harmonic and also the sum-frequency dot pattern, resembling a diffraction pattern, could be observed over a wide tuning range of the fundamental beam, between 1.1 and 1.6 μm, generated by a femtosecond optical parametric amplifier. The size of the observed pattern is dependent on wavelength and the dots show a characteristic polarization.

  15. A Novel Wideband Subarray Technique for Shaped Pattern Generation and Adaptively Interference Rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Q. Md.; Chakravarty, T.; Singh, G.; Sanyal, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    In this article, a simple and efficient technique for the wideband shaped beam and sector beam pattern generation with their adaptive interference rejection is proposed. A microcontroller controlled and time delay based beam forming network for simultaneously generating multiple beams, shaped beam and sector beam is conceptualized. The antenna patterns considered here is formed by linear array of isotropic elements grouped as subarray. The shaped and sector beam synthesis procedure is practically simplified by simultaneous adding the constituents beams from the subarrays, was theoretically established by Woodward and Lawson (Proc. IEE. 95(1):362 370, 1948). Apart from the shaped beam generation a technique for adaptive interference rejection in shaped patterns using combination of time delay and phase shifter is discussed. This topic promises good prospect for wideband pattern generation and interference rejection.

  16. Involvement of the Terminal Oxygenase β Subunit in the Biphenyl Dioxygenase Reactivity Pattern toward Chlorobiphenyls

    PubMed Central

    Hurtubise, Yves; Barriault, Diane; Sylvestre, Michel

    1998-01-01

    Biphenyl dioxygenase (BPH dox) oxidizes biphenyl on adjacent carbons to generate 2,3-dihydro-2,3-dihydroxybiphenyl in Comamonas testosteroni B-356 and in Pseudomonas sp. strain LB400. The enzyme comprises a two-subunit (α and β) iron sulfur protein (ISPBPH), a ferredoxin (FERBPH), and a ferredoxin reductase (REDBPH). B-356 BPH dox preferentially catalyzes the oxidation of the double-meta-substituted congener 3,3′-dichlorobiphenyl over the double-para-substituted congener 4,4′-dichlorobiphenyl or the double-ortho-substituted congener 2,2′-dichlorobiphenyl. LB400 BPH dox shows a preference for 2,2′-dichlorobiphenyl, and in addition, unlike B-356 BPH dox, it can catalyze the oxidation of selected chlorobiphenyls such as 2,2′,5,5′-tetrachlorobiphenyl on adjacent meta-para carbons. In this work, we examine the reactivity pattern of BPH dox toward various chlorobiphenyls and its capacity to catalyze the meta-para dioxygenation of chimeric enzymes obtained by exchanging the ISPBPH α or β subunit of strain B-356 for the corresponding subunit of strain LB400. These hybrid enzymes were purified by an affinity chromatography system as His-tagged proteins. Both types, the chimera with the α subunit of ISPBPH of strain LB400 and the β subunit of ISPBPH of strain B-356 (the αLB400βB-356 chimera) and the αB-356βLB400 chimera, were functional. Results with purified enzyme preparations showed for the first time that the ISPBPH β subunit influences BPH dox’s reactivity pattern toward chlorobiphenyls. Thus, if the α subunit were the sole determinant of the enzyme reactivity pattern, the αB-356βLB400 chimera should have behaved like B-356 ISPBPH; instead, its reactivity pattern toward the substrates tested was similar to that of LB400 ISPBPH. On the other hand, the αLB400βB-356 chimera showed features of both B-356 and LB400 ISPBPH where the enzyme was able to metabolize 2,2′- and 3,3′-dichlorobiphenyl and where it was able to catalyze the meta

  17. Proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project : Final Environmental Impact Statement. Volume 2: Public Involvement.

    SciTech Connect

    United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

    1994-01-01

    In regard to the proposed Tenaska Washington II Generation Project, the goal of the Bonneville Power Administration`s (BPA) Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) public involvement process is to determine the issues to be examined and pertinent analyses to be conducted and to solicit comments on the content and quality of information presented in the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (DEIS). Comments and questions are solicited from the public and government agencies during the scoping process and during the comment period and public hearing on the DEIS, to find out what is of most concern to them. The end product of the public involvement process is the Comment Report which follows in part of this volume on Public Involvement.

  18. Differences in Parental Involvement Typologies among Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y Parents: A Study of Select Bay Area Region of Houston Elementary Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veloz, Elizabeth Andrea

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether differences existed among generations (Baby Boomers, Generation X, and Generation Y) regarding the levels of parental involvement within each of these generations. Also examined were additional factors such as the parents. socioeconomic status, educational level, marital status, and ethnicity. The…

  19. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    PubMed Central

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-01-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment. PMID:26902520

  20. Generation of Customizable Micro-wavy Pattern through Grayscale Direct Image Lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Ran; Wang, Shunqiang; Andrews, Geoffrey; Shi, Wentao; Liu, Yaling

    2016-02-01

    With the increasing amount of research work in surface studies, a more effective method of producing patterned microstructures is highly desired due to the geometric limitations and complex fabricating process of current techniques. This paper presents an efficient and cost-effective method to generate customizable micro-wavy pattern using direct image lithography. This method utilizes a grayscale Gaussian distribution effect to model inaccuracies inherent in the polymerization process, which are normally regarded as trivial matters or errors. The measured surface profiles and the mathematical prediction show a good agreement, demonstrating the ability of this method to generate wavy patterns with precisely controlled features. An accurate pattern can be generated with customizable parameters (wavelength, amplitude, wave shape, pattern profile, and overall dimension). This mask-free photolithography approach provides a rapid fabrication method that is capable of generating complex and non-uniform 3D wavy patterns with the wavelength ranging from 12 μm to 2100 μm and an amplitude-to-wavelength ratio as large as 300%. Microfluidic devices with pure wavy and wavy-herringbone patterns suitable for capture of circulating tumor cells are made as a demonstrative application. A completely customized microfluidic device with wavy patterns can be created within a few hours without access to clean room or commercial photolithography equipment.

  1. Making a Swim Central Pattern Generator Out of Latent Parabolic Bursters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaçam, Deniz; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2015-06-01

    We study the rhythmogenesis of oscillatory patterns emerging in network motifs composed of inhibitory coupled tonic spiking neurons represented by the Plant model of R15 nerve cells. Such motifs are argued to be used as building blocks for a larger central pattern generator network controlling swim locomotion of sea slug Melibe leonina.

  2. Central Pattern Generation and the Motor Infrastructure for Suck, Respiration, and Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Steven M.; Estep, Meredith

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the current report is to review experimental findings on centrally patterned movements and sensory and descending modulation of central pattern generators (CPGs) in a variety of animal and human models. Special emphasis is directed toward speech production muscle systems, including the chest wall and orofacial complex during…

  3. From Central Pattern Generator to Sensory Template in the Evolution of Birdsong

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Konishi, Masakazu

    2010-01-01

    Central nervous networks, be they a part of the human brain or a group of neurons in a snail, may be designed to produce distinct patterns of movement. Central pattern generators can account for the development and production of normal vocal signals without auditory feedback in non-songbirds. Songbirds need auditory feedback to develop and…

  4. Biological oscillations for learning walking coordination: dynamic recurrent neural network functionally models physiological central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Hoellinger, Thomas; Petieau, Mathieu; Duvinage, Matthieu; Castermans, Thierry; Seetharaman, Karthik; Cebolla, Ana-Maria; Bengoetxea, Ana; Ivanenko, Yuri; Dan, Bernard; Cheron, Guy

    2013-01-01

    The existence of dedicated neuronal modules such as those organized in the cerebral cortex, thalamus, basal ganglia, cerebellum, or spinal cord raises the question of how these functional modules are coordinated for appropriate motor behavior. Study of human locomotion offers an interesting field for addressing this central question. The coordination of the elevation of the 3 leg segments under a planar covariation rule (Borghese et al., 1996) was recently modeled (Barliya et al., 2009) by phase-adjusted simple oscillators shedding new light on the understanding of the central pattern generator (CPG) processing relevant oscillation signals. We describe the use of a dynamic recurrent neural network (DRNN) mimicking the natural oscillatory behavior of human locomotion for reproducing the planar covariation rule in both legs at different walking speeds. Neural network learning was based on sinusoid signals integrating frequency and amplitude features of the first three harmonics of the sagittal elevation angles of the thigh, shank, and foot of each lower limb. We verified the biological plausibility of the neural networks. Best results were obtained with oscillations extracted from the first three harmonics in comparison to oscillations outside the harmonic frequency peaks. Physiological replication steadily increased with the number of neuronal units from 1 to 80, where similarity index reached 0.99. Analysis of synaptic weighting showed that the proportion of inhibitory connections consistently increased with the number of neuronal units in the DRNN. This emerging property in the artificial neural networks resonates with recent advances in neurophysiology of inhibitory neurons that are involved in central nervous system oscillatory activities. The main message of this study is that this type of DRNN may offer a useful model of physiological central pattern generator for gaining insights in basic research and developing clinical applications.

  5. Interactions between zebrafish pigment cells responsible for the generation of Turing patterns

    PubMed Central

    Nakamasu, Akiko; Takahashi, Go; Kanbe, Akio; Kondo, Shigeru

    2009-01-01

    The reaction–diffusion system is one of the most studied nonlinear mechanisms that generate spatially periodic structures autonomous. On the basis of many mathematical studies using computer simulations, it is assumed that animal skin patterns are the most typical examples of the Turing pattern (stationary periodic pattern produced by the reaction–diffusion system). However, the mechanism underlying pattern formation remains unknown because the molecular or cellular basis of the phenomenon has yet to be identified. In this study, we identified the interaction network between the pigment cells of zebrafish, and showed that this interaction network possesses the properties necessary to form the Turing pattern. When the pigment cells in a restricted region were killed with laser treatment, new pigment cells developed to regenerate the striped pattern. We also found that the development and survival of the cells were influenced by the positioning of the surrounding cells. When melanophores and xanthophores were located at adjacent positions, these cells excluded one another. However, melanophores required a mass of xanthophores distributed in a more distant region for both differentiation and survival. Interestingly, the local effect of these cells is opposite to that of their effects long range. This relationship satisfies the necessary conditions required for stable pattern formation in the reaction–diffusion model. Simulation calculations for the deduced network generated wild-type pigment patterns as well as other mutant patterns. Our findings here allow further investigation of Turing pattern formation within the context of cell biology. PMID:19433782

  6. Interactions between zebrafish pigment cells responsible for the generation of Turing patterns.

    PubMed

    Nakamasu, Akiko; Takahashi, Go; Kanbe, Akio; Kondo, Shigeru

    2009-05-26

    The reaction-diffusion system is one of the most studied nonlinear mechanisms that generate spatially periodic structures autonomous. On the basis of many mathematical studies using computer simulations, it is assumed that animal skin patterns are the most typical examples of the Turing pattern (stationary periodic pattern produced by the reaction-diffusion system). However, the mechanism underlying pattern formation remains unknown because the molecular or cellular basis of the phenomenon has yet to be identified. In this study, we identified the interaction network between the pigment cells of zebrafish, and showed that this interaction network possesses the properties necessary to form the Turing pattern. When the pigment cells in a restricted region were killed with laser treatment, new pigment cells developed to regenerate the striped pattern. We also found that the development and survival of the cells were influenced by the positioning of the surrounding cells. When melanophores and xanthophores were located at adjacent positions, these cells excluded one another. However, melanophores required a mass of xanthophores distributed in a more distant region for both differentiation and survival. Interestingly, the local effect of these cells is opposite to that of their effects long range. This relationship satisfies the necessary conditions required for stable pattern formation in the reaction-diffusion model. Simulation calculations for the deduced network generated wild-type pigment patterns as well as other mutant patterns. Our findings here allow further investigation of Turing pattern formation within the context of cell biology. PMID:19433782

  7. Alcohol Consumption Patterns in Immigrant and Later Generation Mexican American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbert, M. Jean

    1987-01-01

    Immigrant Mexican women's drinking patterns were compared with those of Mexican women in Mexico, other United States Latinas, later-generation Mexican-American women, and male immigrants. Changes in the direction of greater permissiveness and rationalization of alcohol use among later-generation Mexican-American women are demonstrated. (JMM)

  8. Effects of Differences in Working Memory Capacity on Patterns of Word Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kawamura, Mimpei; Kobayashi, Yasutaka; Morioka, Shu

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, it has been reported that WM (working memory) is concerned with word generation, but many points regarding the relationship between the individual differences of WM capacity and the patterns of word generation remain unclear. This study is to investigate these unclear points by using three types of word fluency task with different…

  9. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  10. Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis: typical patterns of bone involvement in whole-body bone scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Acikgoz, Gunsel; Averill, Lauren W

    2014-08-01

    Chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) is an autoinflammatory bone disease of unknown etiology. It affects children and adolescents predominantly and occurs mostly in the female population. It is characterized by the insidious onset of pain and swelling, with a fluctuating clinical course of relapses and remissions. Typically, several bones are affected, either synchronously or metachronously, and bilateral involvement is common. CRMO most commonly affects the metaphysis of long bones, especially the tibia, femur, and clavicle. The spine, pelvis, ribs, sternum, and mandible may also be affected. Although lesions are mostly multiple, patients may present with a single symptomatic focus. Radiographic findings may be negative early in the course of the disease. Bone scintigraphy is useful in determining the presence of abnormality and the extent of disease. The imaging and clinical features of CRMO overlap with those of infectious osteomyelitis, bone malignancy, and inflammatory arthritis. Nonetheless, CRMO can be confidently diagnosed with the recognition of typical imaging patterns in the appropriate clinical setting. This article reviews imaging findings with special emphasis on bone scintigraphy and specific disease sites.

  11. Automatic Generation of English-Japanese Translation Pattern Utilizing Genetic Programming Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Koki; Tamekuni, Yuji; Kimura, Shuhei

    There are a lot of constructional differences in an English-Japanese phrase template, and that often makes the act of translation difficult. Moreover, there exist various and tremendous phrase templates and sentence to be refered to. It is not easy to prepare the corpus that covers the all. Therefore, it is very significant to generate the translation pattern of the sentence pattern automatically from a viewpoint of the translation success rate and the capacity of the pattern dictionary. Then, for the purpose of realizing the automatic generation of the translation pattern, this paper proposed the new method for the generation of the translation pattern by using the genetic programming technique (GP). The technique tries to generate the translation pattern of various sentences which are not registered in the phrase template dictionary automatically by giving the genetic operation to the parsing tree of a basic pattern. The tree consists of the pair of the English-Japanese sentence generated as the first stage population. The analysis tree data base with 50,100,150,200 pairs was prepared as the first stage population. And this system was applied and executed for an English input of 1,555 sentences. As a result, the analysis tree increases from 200 to 517, and the accuracy rate of the translation pattern has improved from 42.57% to 70.10%. And, 86.71% of the generated translations was successfully done, whose meanings are enough acceptable and understandable. It seemed that this proposal technique became a clue to raise the translation success rate, and to find the possibility of the reduction of the analysis tree data base.

  12. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    PubMed Central

    Bullara, D.; De Decker, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction–diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction–diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns. PMID:25959141

  13. Pigment cell movement is not required for generation of Turing patterns in zebrafish skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bullara, D.; de Decker, Y.

    2015-05-01

    The zebrafish is a model organism for pattern formation in vertebrates. Understanding what drives the formation of its coloured skin motifs could reveal pivotal to comprehend the mechanisms behind morphogenesis. The motifs look and behave like reaction-diffusion Turing patterns, but the nature of the underlying physico-chemical processes is very different, and the origin of the patterns is still unclear. Here we propose a minimal model for such pattern formation based on a regulatory mechanism deduced from experimental observations. This model is able to produce patterns with intrinsic wavelength, closely resembling the experimental ones. We mathematically prove that their origin is a Turing bifurcation occurring despite the absence of cell motion, through an effect that we call differential growth. This mechanism is qualitatively different from the reaction-diffusion originally proposed by Turing, although they both generate the short-range activation and the long-range inhibition required to form Turing patterns.

  14. Inspiring the Next Generation of Explorers: Scientist Involvement in the Expedition Earth and Beyond Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graff, Paige; Stefanov, William; Willis, Kim; Runco, Susan

    2012-01-01

    Scientists, science experts, graduate and even undergraduate student researchers have a unique ability to inspire the next generation of explorers. These science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) experts can serve as role models for students and can help inspire them to consider future STEM-related careers. They have an exceptional ability to instill a sense of curiosity and fascination in the minds of students as they bring science to life in the classroom. Students and teachers are hungry for opportunities to interact with scientists. They feel honored when these experts take time out of their busy day to share their science, their expertise, and their stories. The key for teachers is to be cognizant of opportunities to connect their students with scientists. For scientists, the key is to know how to get involved, to have options for participation that involve different levels of commitment, and to work with educational specialists who can help facilitate their involvement. The Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) Program, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students by getting them actively involved with NASA exploration, discovery, and the process of science. One of the main goals of the program is to facilitate student research in the classroom. The program uses astronaut photographs, provided through the ARES Crew Earth Observations (CEO) payload on the International Space Station (ISS) as the hook to help students gain an interest in a research topic. Student investigations can focus on Earth or involve comparative planetology. Student teams are encouraged to use additional imagery and data from Earth or planetary orbital spacecraft, or ground-based data collection tools, to augment the astronaut photography dataset. A second goal of the program is to provide

  15. K+ homeostasis and central pattern generation in the metathoracic ganglion of the locust.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Corinne I; Labrie, John D; Robertson, R Meldrum

    2009-07-01

    Stress-induced arrest of ventilatory motor pattern generation is tightly correlated with an abrupt increase in extracellular potassium concentration ([K+]o) within the metathoracic neuropil of the locust, Locusta migratoria. Na+/K+-ATPase inhibition with ouabain elicits repetitive surges of [K+]o that coincide with arrest and recovery of motor activity. Here we show that ouabain induces repetitive [K+]o events in a concentration-dependent manner. 10(-5)M, 10(-4)M, and 10(-3)M ouabain was bath-applied in semi-intact locust preparations. 10(-4)M and 10(-3)M ouabain reliably induced repetitive [K+]o events whereas 10(-5)M ouabain had no significant effect. In comparison to 10(-4)M ouabain, 10(-3)M ouabain increased the number and hastened the time to onset of repetitive [K+]o waves, prolonged [K+]o event duration, increased resting [K+]o, and diminished the absolute value of [K+]o waves. Recovery of motor patterning following [K+]o events was less likely in 10(-3)M ouabain. In addition, we show that K+ channel inhibition using TEA suppressed the onset and decreased the amplitude of ouabain-induced repetitive [K+]o waves. Our results demonstrate that ventilatory circuit function in the locust CNS is dependent on the balance between mechanisms of [K+] accumulation and [K+] clearance. We suggest that with an imbalance in favour of accumulation the system tends towards a bistable state with transitions mediated by positive feedback involving voltage-dependent K+ channels. PMID:19482133

  16. Coupling relationship between the central pattern generator and the cerebral cortex with time delay.

    PubMed

    Lu, Qiang

    2015-08-01

    Brain activity is a cooperative process among neurons and involves the coupling relationship, which is crucial to perform operational tasks in various specialized areas of the nervous system. A finite signal transmission speed along the axons results in a space-dependent time delay. The central pattern generator (CPG) can in principle produce basic locomotor rhythm in the absence of inputs from higher brain centers and peripheral sensory feedback. To study the dynamic performance of CPG with time delay and its coupling relationship with the cerebral cortex, a new CPG model with time delay and a model of the neural mass model (NMM) and the CPG are developed. The coupling model is based on biological experimental results. Bifurcation theories and maximal Lyapunov exponent are used to analyze the dynamic performance. From the results, some CPGs are suggested to be embedded in limbs and composed of the parameters space which corresponds to the one of the cerebral cortex. This embodiment of humans can reduce the burden of the brain and simplify the control of the locomotion. The results also show that the phase diagram of the CPG cannot keep the limit cycle, and that the state of the NMM becomes increasingly chaotic as time delay increases. This finding implies that a person with slow reaction can easily lose the stability of his or her locomotion.

  17. Successful retrieval of competing spatial environments in humans involves hippocampal pattern separation mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kyle, Colin T; Stokes, Jared D; Lieberman, Jennifer S; Hassan, Abdul S; Ekstrom, Arne D

    2015-01-01

    The rodent hippocampus represents different spatial environments distinctly via changes in the pattern of "place cell" firing. It remains unclear, though, how spatial remapping in rodents relates more generally to human memory. Here participants retrieved four virtual reality environments with repeating or novel landmarks and configurations during high-resolution functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Both neural decoding performance and neural pattern similarity measures revealed environment-specific hippocampal neural codes. Conversely, an interfering spatial environment did not elicit neural codes specific to that environment, with neural activity patterns instead resembling those of competing environments, an effect linked to lower retrieval performance. We find that orthogonalized neural patterns accompany successful disambiguation of spatial environments while erroneous reinstatement of competing patterns characterized interference errors. These results provide the first evidence for environment-specific neural codes in the human hippocampus, suggesting that pattern separation/completion mechanisms play an important role in how we successfully retrieve memories. PMID:26613414

  18. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Yong; Noh, JungHyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-01-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns. PMID:27230944

  19. High-fidelity spherical cholesteric liquid crystal Bragg reflectors generating unclonable patterns for secure authentication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Yong; Noh, Junghyun; Drevensek-Olenik, Irena; Rupp, Romano; Lenzini, Gabriele; Lagerwall, Jan P. F.

    2016-05-01

    Monodisperse cholesteric liquid crystal microspheres exhibit spherically symmetric Bragg reflection, generating, via photonic cross communication, dynamically tuneable multi-coloured patterns. These patterns, uniquely defined by the particular sphere arrangement, could render cholesteric microspheres very useful in countless security applications, as tags to identify and authenticate their carriers, mainly physical objects or persons. However, the optical quality of the cholesteric droplets studied so far is unsatisfactory, especially after polymerisation, a step required for obtaining durable samples that can be used for object identification. We show that a transition from droplets to shells solves all key problems, giving rise to sharp patterns and excellent optical quality even after polymerisation, the polymerised shells sustaining considerable mechanical deformation. Moreover, we demonstrate that, counter to prior expectation, cross communication takes place even between non-identical shells. This opens additional communication channels that add significantly to the complexity and unique character of the generated patterns.

  20. Note: A novel dielectric barrier discharge system for generating stable patterns in wide range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weibo; Wang, Yongjie; Zhang, Hao; Pan, Yuyang; Dong, Lifang

    2016-05-01

    We develop a novel dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system with a meshed water electrode to generate stable square superlattice patterns (MSSP) in Ar/air mixture in a wide range of experimental environments. Discharge scenarios with the applied voltage increasing in the meshed DBD and ordinary DBD are presented respectively under the same experimental conditions. It is found that a square pattern and MSSP can be obtained stably and easily in meshed DBD, while no pattern emerges in ordinary DBD. MSSP can be formed when the Ar content is from 0% to 70%, and the corresponding applied voltage decreases with Ar content increasing. Results based on optical methods show that MSSP is generated by artificially designed electrodes together with nonlinear characteristics of DBD, which may account for why patterns in meshed DBD exist in a wide range.

  1. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae.

    PubMed

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  2. Localization of Motor Neurons and Central Pattern Generators for Motor Patterns Underlying Feeding Behavior in Drosophila Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hückesfeld, Sebastian; Schoofs, Andreas; Schlegel, Philipp; Miroschnikow, Anton; Pankratz, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor systems can be functionally organized into effector organs (muscles and glands), the motor neurons, central pattern generators (CPG) and higher control centers of the brain. Using genetic and electrophysiological methods, we have begun to deconstruct the motor system driving Drosophila larval feeding behavior into its component parts. In this paper, we identify distinct clusters of motor neurons that execute head tilting, mouth hook movements, and pharyngeal pumping during larval feeding. This basic anatomical scaffold enabled the use of calcium-imaging to monitor the neural activity of motor neurons within the central nervous system (CNS) that drive food intake. Simultaneous nerve- and muscle-recordings demonstrate that the motor neurons innervate the cibarial dilator musculature (CDM) ipsi- and contra-laterally. By classical lesion experiments we localize a set of CPGs generating the neuronal pattern underlying feeding movements to the subesophageal zone (SEZ). Lesioning of higher brain centers decelerated all feeding-related motor patterns, whereas lesioning of ventral nerve cord (VNC) only affected the motor rhythm underlying pharyngeal pumping. These findings provide a basis for progressing upstream of the motor neurons to identify higher regulatory components of the feeding motor system. PMID:26252658

  3. Characterization of sacral interneurons that mediate activation of locomotor pattern generators by sacrocaudal afferent input.

    PubMed

    Etlin, Alex; Finkel, Eran; Mor, Yoav; O'Donovan, Michael J; Anglister, Lili; Lev-Tov, Aharon

    2013-01-01

    Identification of the neural pathways involved in retraining the spinal central pattern generators (CPGs) by afferent input in the absence of descending supraspinal control is feasible in isolated rodent spinal cords where the locomotor CPGs are potently activated by sacrocaudal afferent (SCA) input. Here we study the involvement of sacral neurons projecting rostrally through the ventral funiculi (VF) in activation of the CPGs by sensory stimulation. Fluorescent labeling and immunostaining showed that VF neurons are innervated by primary afferents immunoreactive for vesicular glutamate transporters 1 and 2 and by intraspinal neurons. Calcium imaging revealed that 55% of the VF neurons were activated by SCA stimulation. The activity of VF neurons and the sacral and lumbar CPGs was abolished when non-NMDA receptors in the sacral segments were blocked by the antagonist CNQX. When sacral NMDA receptors were blocked by APV, the sacral CPGs were suppressed, VF neurons with nonrhythmic activity were recruited and a moderate-drive locomotor rhythm developed during SCA stimulation. In contrast, when the sacral CPGs were activated by SCA stimulation, rhythmic and nonrhythmic VF neurons were recruited and the locomotor rhythm was most powerful. The activity of 73 and 27% of the rhythmic VF neurons was in-phase with the ipsilateral and contralateral motor output, respectively. Collectively, our studies indicate that sacral VF neurons serve as a major link between SCA and the hindlimb CPGs and that the ability of SCA to induce stepping can be enhanced by the sacral CPGs. The nature of the ascending drive to lumbar CPGs, the identity of subpopulations of VF neurons, and their potential role in activating the locomotor rhythm are discussed. PMID:23303951

  4. Second harmonic generation in a low-loss orientation-patterned GaAs waveguide.

    PubMed

    Fedorova, K A; McRobbie, A D; Sokolovskii, G S; Schunemann, P G; Rafailov, E U

    2013-07-15

    The technology of low-loss orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) waveguided crystals was developed and realized by reduction of diffraction scattering on the waveguide pattern. The propagation losses in the OP-GaAs waveguide were estimated to be as low as 2.1 dB/cm, thus demonstrating the efficient second harmonic generation at 1621 nm under an external pumping.

  5. Differential Amino Acid, Carbohydrate and Lipid Metabolism Perpetuations Involved in a Subtype of Rheumatoid Arthritis with Chinese Medicine Cold Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Hongtao; Niu, Xuyan; Gu, Yan; Lu, Cheng; Xiao, Cheng; Yue, Kevin; Zhang, Ge; Pan, Xiaohua; Jiang, Miao; Tan, Yong; Kong, Hongwei; Liu, Zhenli; Xu, Guowang; Lu, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Pattern classification is a key approach in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), and it is used to classify the patients for intervention selection accordingly. TCM cold and heat patterns, two main patterns of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) had been explored with systems biology approaches. Different regulations of apoptosis were found to be involved in cold and heat classification in our previous works. For this study, the metabolic profiling of plasma was explored in RA patients with typical TCM cold or heat patterns by integrating liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) platforms in conjunction with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) software. Three main processes of metabolism, including amino acid, carbohydrate and lipid were focused on for function analysis. The results showed that 29 and 19 differential metabolites were found in cold and heat patterns respectively, compared with healthy controls. The perturbation of amino acid metabolism (increased essential amino acids), carbohydrate metabolism (galactose metabolism) and lipid metabolism, were found to be involved in both cold and heat pattern RA. In particular, more metabolic perturbations in protein and collagen breakdown, decreased glycolytic activity and aerobic oxidation, and increased energy utilization associated with RA cold pattern patients. These findings may be useful for obtaining a better understanding of RA pathogenesis and for achieving a better efficacy in RA clinical practice. PMID:27775663

  6. When does colonisation of a semi-arid hillslope generate vegetation patterns?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    Patterned vegetation occurs in many semi-arid regions of the world. Most previous studies have assumed that patterns form from a starting point of uniform vegetation, for example as a response to a decrease in mean annual rainfall. However an alternative possibility is that patterns are generated when bare ground is colonised. This paper investigates the conditions under which colonisation leads to patterning on sloping ground. The slope gradient plays an important role because of the downhill flow of rainwater. One long-established consequence of this is that patterns are organised into stripes running parallel to the contours; such patterns are known as banded vegetation or tiger bush. This paper shows that the slope also has an important effect on colonisation, since the uphill and downhill edges of an isolated vegetation patch have different dynamics. For the much-used Klausmeier model for semi-arid vegetation, the author shows that without a term representing water diffusion, colonisation always generates uniform vegetation rather than a pattern. However the combination of a sufficiently large water diffusion term and a sufficiently low slope gradient does lead to colonisation-induced patterning. The author goes on to consider colonisation in the Rietkerk model, which is also in widespread use: the same conclusions apply for this model provided that a small threshold is imposed on vegetation biomass, below which plant growth is set to zero. Since the two models are quite different mathematically, this suggests that the predictions are a consequence of the basic underlying assumption of water redistribution as the pattern generation mechanism. PMID:26547308

  7. When does colonisation of a semi-arid hillslope generate vegetation patterns?

    PubMed

    Sherratt, Jonathan A

    2016-07-01

    Patterned vegetation occurs in many semi-arid regions of the world. Most previous studies have assumed that patterns form from a starting point of uniform vegetation, for example as a response to a decrease in mean annual rainfall. However an alternative possibility is that patterns are generated when bare ground is colonised. This paper investigates the conditions under which colonisation leads to patterning on sloping ground. The slope gradient plays an important role because of the downhill flow of rainwater. One long-established consequence of this is that patterns are organised into stripes running parallel to the contours; such patterns are known as banded vegetation or tiger bush. This paper shows that the slope also has an important effect on colonisation, since the uphill and downhill edges of an isolated vegetation patch have different dynamics. For the much-used Klausmeier model for semi-arid vegetation, the author shows that without a term representing water diffusion, colonisation always generates uniform vegetation rather than a pattern. However the combination of a sufficiently large water diffusion term and a sufficiently low slope gradient does lead to colonisation-induced patterning. The author goes on to consider colonisation in the Rietkerk model, which is also in widespread use: the same conclusions apply for this model provided that a small threshold is imposed on vegetation biomass, below which plant growth is set to zero. Since the two models are quite different mathematically, this suggests that the predictions are a consequence of the basic underlying assumption of water redistribution as the pattern generation mechanism.

  8. Implementation and characterization of a DUV raster-scanned mask pattern generation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohan, Michael J.; Hamaker, Henry Chris; Montgomery, Warren

    2002-03-01

    Etec Systems, Inc., an Applied Materials company, has completed the implementation and characterization of a deep ultraviolet (DUV), multibeam, raster-scanned mask patterning and integrated process solution. The ALTA® 4000 mask pattern generation system integrates a new data path, environmental control system, DUV optics, a 257nm DUV continuous-wave laser source, and an environmentally stable chemically amplified resist (CAR) process to deliver superior productivity, improved resolution, and critical dimension (CD) control required for volume 130nm mask production. Additionally, to obtain the maximum benefit of this mask pattern generation system, Etec has completed development of an environmentally stable CAR process, which has been tailored to allow the maskmaking industry to continue to receive pre-coated mask blanks from commercial suppliers. This paper details the system architecture and presents system performance and characterization data. The characterization results of the integrated system and process solution are also presented. This integrated pattern generation and process solution continues the tradition of the production workhorse ALTA product line with the introduction of the ALTA 4000 scanned-laser mask pattern generation system.

  9. Oscillatory Pattern Generation of the Olfactory Center Using Pulse-Type Hardware Chaotic Neuron Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Ken; Hatano, Hirokazu; Saito, Minoru; Sekine, Yoshifumi

    Oscillatory patterns of electrical activity are a ubiquitous feature in nervous systems. Oscillatory patterns play an important role in the processing of sensory information pattern recognition. For example, earlier reports describe that the oscillatory patterns in the olfactory center of the land slug are changed by odor stimuli to the tentacles. Olfactory processing has also been studied in relation to rabbits and land slugs through the construction and use of mathematical neural network models. However, a large-scale model is necessary for the study of a model which has sensory information recognition by the oscillatory pattern. Therefore, the construction of a hardware model that can generate oscillatory patterns is desired because nonlinear operations can be processed at higher speeds than the mathematical model. We are studying about the neural network using hardware neuron models to construct the olfactory center model of the living organisms. In the present study, we discuss about the oscillatory pattern generation of the olfactory center using pulse-type hardware chaotic neuron models. Our model shows periodic, quasi-periodic and chaotic oscillations such as the olfactory center of living organisms by changing the synaptic connection weights.

  10. Kikuchi Disease-Like Inflammatory Pattern in Cutaneous Inflammatory Infiltrates Without Lymph Node Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Thai, Lan-Huong; Ingen-Housz-Oro, Saskia; Godeau, Bertrand; Rethers, Luc; Wolkenstein, Pierre; Limal, Nicolas; Papillon, Virginie; Kapfer, Jean; Chosidow, Olivier; Ortonne, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    not be considered a variant of classical KFD, but rather as an elementary pattern of cutaneous inflammation, that might be the expression of the same cytotoxic process within skin infiltrates as that involved in KFD. This lesion might reflect a particular T-cell-mediated autoimmune process directed against mononuclear cells within cutaneous lupus infiltrates. PMID:26579818

  11. Ponto-medullary nuclei involved in the generation of sequential pharyngeal swallowing and concomitant protective laryngeal adduction in situ

    PubMed Central

    Bautista, Tara G; Dutschmann, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Both swallowing and respiration involve postinspiratory laryngeal adduction. Swallowing-related postinspiratory neurons are likely to be located in the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and those involved in respiration are found in the Kölliker–Fuse nucleus (KF). The function of KF and NTS in the generation of swallowing and its coordination with respiration was investigated in perfused brainstem preparations of juvenile rats (n = 41). Orally injected water evoked sequential pharyngeal swallowing (s-PSW) seen as phasic, spindle-shaped bursting of vagal nerve activity (VNA) against tonic postinspiratory discharge. KF inhibition by microinjecting isoguvacine (GABAA receptor agonist) selectively attenuated tonic postinspiratory VNA (n = 10, P < 0.001) but had no effect on frequency or timing of s-PSW. KF disinhibition after bicuculline (GABAA receptor antagonist) microinjections caused an increase of the tonic VNA (n = 8, P < 0.01) resulting in obscured and delayed phasic s-PSW. Occurrence of spontaneous PSW significantly increased after KF inhibition (P < 0.0001) but not after KF disinhibition (P = 0.14). NTS isoguvacine microinjections attenuated the occurrence of all PSW (n = 5, P < 0.01). NTS bicuculline microinjections (n = 6) resulted in spontaneous activation of a disordered PSW pattern and long-lasting suppression of respiratory activity. Pharmacological manipulation of either KF or NTS also triggered profound changes in respiratory postinspiratory VNA. Our results indicate that the s-PSW comprises two functionally distinct components. While the primary s-PSW is generated within the NTS, a KF-mediated laryngeal adductor reflex safeguards the lower airways from aspiration. Synaptic interaction between KF and NTS is required for s-PSW coordination with respiration as well as for proper gating and timing of s-PSW. PMID:24639482

  12. Automating the generation of lexical patterns for processing free text in clinical documents

    PubMed Central

    Morioka, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Objective Many tasks in natural language processing utilize lexical pattern-matching techniques, including information extraction (IE), negation identification, and syntactic parsing. However, it is generally difficult to derive patterns that achieve acceptable levels of recall while also remaining highly precise. Materials and Methods We present a multiple sequence alignment (MSA)-based technique that automatically generates patterns, thereby leveraging language usage to determine the context of words that influence a given target. MSAs capture the commonalities among word sequences and are able to reveal areas of linguistic stability and variation. In this way, MSAs provide a systemic approach to generating lexical patterns that are generalizable, which will both increase recall levels and maintain high levels of precision. Results The MSA-generated patterns exhibited consistent F1-, F.5-, and F2- scores compared to two baseline techniques for IE across four different tasks. Both baseline techniques performed well for some tasks and less well for others, but MSA was found to consistently perform at a high level for all four tasks. Discussion The performance of MSA on the four extraction tasks indicates the method’s versatility. The results show that the MSA-based patterns are able to handle the extraction of individual data elements as well as relations between two concepts without the need for large amounts of manual intervention. Conclusion We presented an MSA-based framework for generating lexical patterns that showed consistently high levels of both performance and recall over four different extraction tasks when compared to baseline methods. PMID:25977405

  13. Integument pattern formation involves genetic and epigenetic controls: feather arrays simulated by digital hormone models

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ting-Xin; Widelitz, Randall B.; Shen, Wei-Min; Will, Peter; Wu, Da-Yu; Lin, Chih-Min; Jung, Han-Sung; Chuong, Cheng-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Pattern formation is a fundamental morphogenetic process. Models based on genetic and epigenetic control have been proposed but remain controversial. Here we use feather morphogenesis for further evaluation. Adhesion molecules and/or signaling molecules were first expressed homogenously in feather tracts (restrictive mode, appear earlier) or directly in bud or inter-bud regions (de novo mode, appear later). They either activate or inhibit bud formation, but paradoxically co-localize in the bud. Using feather bud reconstitution, we showed that completely dissociated cells can reform periodic patterns without reference to previous positional codes. The patterning process has the characteristics of being self-organizing, dynamic and plastic. The final pattern is an equilibrium state reached by competition, and the number and size of buds can be altered based on cell number and activator/inhibitor ratio, respectively. We developed a Digital Hormone Model which consists of (1) competent cells without identity that move randomly in a space, (2) extracellular signaling hormones which diffuse by a reaction-diffusion mechanism and activate or inhibit cell adhesion, and (3) cells which respond with topological stochastic actions manifested as changes in cell adhesion. Based on probability, the results are cell clusters arranged in dots or stripes. Thus genetic control provides combinational molecular information which defines the properties of the cells but not the final pattern. Epigenetic control governs interactions among cells and their environment based on physical-chemical rules (such as those described in the Digital Hormone Model). Complex integument patterning is the sum of these two components of control and that is why integument patterns are usually similar but non-identical. These principles may be shared by other pattern formation processes such as barb ridge formation, fingerprints, pigmentation patterning, etc. The Digital Hormone Model can also be applied to

  14. Impact of cercal air currents on singing motor pattern generation in the cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer).

    PubMed

    Jacob, Pedro F; Hedwig, Berthold

    2015-11-01

    The cercal system of crickets detects low-frequency air currents produced by approaching predators and self-generated air currents during singing, which may provide sensory feedback to the singing motor network. We analyzed the effect of cercal stimulation on singing motor pattern generation to reveal the response of a singing interneuron to predator-like signals and to elucidate the possible role of self-generated air currents during singing. In fictive singing males, we recorded an interneuron of the singing network while applying air currents to the cerci; additionally, we analyzed the effect of abolishing the cercal system in freely singing males. In fictively singing crickets, the effect of short air stimuli is either to terminate prematurely or to lengthen the interchirp interval, depending on their phase in the chirp cycle. Within our stimulation paradigm, air stimuli of different velocities and durations always elicited an inhibitory postsynaptic potential in the singing interneuron. Current injection in the singing interneuron elicited singing motor activity, even during the air current-evoked inhibitory input from the cercal pathway. The disruptive effects of air stimuli on the fictive singing pattern and the inhibitory response of the singing interneuron point toward the cercal system being involved in initiating avoidance responses in singing crickets, according to the established role of cerci in a predator escape pathway. After abolishing the activity of the cercal system, the timing of natural singing activity was not significantly altered. Our study provides no evidence that self-generated cercal sensory activity has a feedback function for singing motor pattern generation.

  15. Directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids: Effects of optical and thermal parameters.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids are investigated theoretically. Two main approaches to the calculation of directivity patterns of laser-generated sound are discussed for the most important case of thermo-optical regime of generation. The first approach, which is widely used in practice, is based on the simple modelling of the equivalent thermo-optical source as a mechanical dipole comprising two horizontal forces applied to the surface in opposite directions. The second approach is based on the rigorous theory that takes into account all acoustical, optical and thermal parameters of a solid material and all geometrical and physical parameters of a laser beam. Directivity patterns of laser-generated bulk longitudinal and shear elastic waves, as well as the amplitudes of generated Rayleigh surface waves, are calculated for different values of physical and geometrical parameters and compared with the directivity patterns calculated in case of dipole-source representation. It is demonstrated that the simple approach using a dipole-source representation of laser-generated sound is rather limited, especially for description of generated longitudinal acoustic waves. A practical criterion is established to define the conditions under which the dipole-source representation gives predictions with acceptable errors. It is shown that, for radiation in the normal direction to the surface, the amplitudes of longitudinal waves are especially sensitive to the values of thermal parameters and of the acoustic reflection coefficient from a free solid surface. A discussion is given on the possibility of using such a high sensitivity to the values of the reflection coefficient for investigation of surface properties of real solids.

  16. Directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids: Effects of optical and thermal parameters.

    PubMed

    Krylov, Victor V

    2016-07-01

    In the present paper, directivity patterns of laser-generated sound in solids are investigated theoretically. Two main approaches to the calculation of directivity patterns of laser-generated sound are discussed for the most important case of thermo-optical regime of generation. The first approach, which is widely used in practice, is based on the simple modelling of the equivalent thermo-optical source as a mechanical dipole comprising two horizontal forces applied to the surface in opposite directions. The second approach is based on the rigorous theory that takes into account all acoustical, optical and thermal parameters of a solid material and all geometrical and physical parameters of a laser beam. Directivity patterns of laser-generated bulk longitudinal and shear elastic waves, as well as the amplitudes of generated Rayleigh surface waves, are calculated for different values of physical and geometrical parameters and compared with the directivity patterns calculated in case of dipole-source representation. It is demonstrated that the simple approach using a dipole-source representation of laser-generated sound is rather limited, especially for description of generated longitudinal acoustic waves. A practical criterion is established to define the conditions under which the dipole-source representation gives predictions with acceptable errors. It is shown that, for radiation in the normal direction to the surface, the amplitudes of longitudinal waves are especially sensitive to the values of thermal parameters and of the acoustic reflection coefficient from a free solid surface. A discussion is given on the possibility of using such a high sensitivity to the values of the reflection coefficient for investigation of surface properties of real solids. PMID:26851995

  17. Student-Generated Content in College Teaching: Content Quality, Behavioural Pattern and Learning Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, X.; Guo, X.; Yu, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates the quality of course content, behavioural patterns of students and learning performance in teaching of student-generated content (SGC). A total of 49 third-year university students in educational technology participated in this study. By combining the methods of questionnaire, lag sequence analysis and interview, the study…

  18. Parental Involvement in Infant Sleep Routines Predicts Differential Sleep Patterns in Children With and Without Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Cowie, Jennifer; Palmer, Cara A; Hussain, Hira; Alfano, Candice A

    2016-08-01

    This study compared parents' retrospective reports of their involvement in infant settling strategies and their relation to current sleep patterns among children (N = 84, ages 7-11) with generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) and healthy controls. Parents of children with GAD were significantly more likely to report rocking their infants to sleep and putting infants down when they were already asleep than parents of healthy controls, even when accounting for infant health-related factors and parental anxiety. Greater involvement in infant sleep routines also predicted sleep patterns (measured via actigraphy) during childhood, though opposite relationships were observed in the two groups. Early involvement was related to poorer sleep in control children but better sleep for children with GAD even after controlling for current parenting practices. Findings suggest differential effects of early sleep-related parenting for children with and without later anxiety disorders with possible implications for early intervention. PMID:26493392

  19. Physical components of soft-tissue ballistic wounding and their involvement in the generation of blood backspatter.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Peter L; Taylor, Michael C; Wilson, Suzanne J; Walsh, Kevan A J; Kieser, Jules A

    2012-09-01

    Gunshot backspatter comprises biological material expelled backward through bullet entry holes. Crime scene investigators analyze backspatter patterns to infer wounding circumstances. An understanding of the mechanism of backspatter generation, and the relationship between spatter patterns and bullet and tissue characteristics, would enhance the predictive value of such analysis. We examined soft-tissue ballistic wounding responses to determine the underlying components and how these might be relevant to the generation of backspatter. We identified five mechanistic components to ballistic wounding (elastic, viscous, crushing, cutting, and thermal), each related to mechanical disciplines (respectively, solid mechanics, fluid mechanics, fracture mechanics, rheology, and thermodynamics). We identified potential roles for these five components in backspatter formation and provide a scenario whereby a sequence of events incorporating these components could lead to backspatter generation and expulsion. This research provides a framework for the mathematical representation, and subsequent computational predictive modeling, of backspatter generation and pattern formation.

  20. Synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates the mosaic cellular pattern of the olfactory epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Katsunuma, Sayaka; Honda, Hisao; Shinoda, Tomoyasu; Ishimoto, Yukitaka; Miyata, Takaki; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Abe, Takaya; Nibu, Ken-ichi; Takai, Yoshimi

    2016-01-01

    In the olfactory epithelium (OE), olfactory cells (OCs) and supporting cells (SCs), which express different cadherins, are arranged in a characteristic mosaic pattern in which OCs are enclosed by SCs. However, the mechanism underlying this cellular patterning is unclear. Here, we show that the cellular pattern of the OE is established by cellular rearrangements during development. In the OE, OCs express nectin-2 and N-cadherin, and SCs express nectin-2, nectin-3, E-cadherin, and N-cadherin. Heterophilic trans-interaction between nectin-2 on OCs and nectin-3 on SCs preferentially recruits cadherin via α-catenin to heterotypic junctions, and the differential distributions of cadherins between junctions promote cellular intercalations, resulting in the formation of the mosaic pattern. These observations are confirmed by model cell systems, and various cellular patterns are generated by the combinatorial expression of nectins and cadherins. Collectively, the synergistic action of nectins and cadherins generates mosaic pattern, which cannot be achieved by a single mechanism. PMID:26929452

  1. Dependence of gait pattern on the type of coupling between hind- and forelimb generators: modelling study.

    PubMed

    Zmysłowski, W; Kasicki, S

    1982-01-01

    Dependence of gait pattern on the way of possible coupling between fore and hindlimb girdles was investigated. This dependence was analysed using the analog model of neuronal net of spinal generator. Both nets (i.e., for fore and hind girdles) could be synchronized by any coupling between the executive and intrinsic elements. However, only few of them assured generation of patterns corresponding to physiological gaits. Patterns corresponding to walk and trot were obtained with inhibitory connections from hind intrinsic elements to fore executive ones. Pace was obtained at the coupling connections directed from hind executive elements to fore ones. To obtain gallop it was necessary to couple fore executive elements with hind ones by inhibitory connections.

  2. Generation of mask patterns for diffractive optical elements using Mathematica{sup T}{sup M}

    SciTech Connect

    OShea, D.C.

    1996-07-01

    The generation of binary and grayscale masks used in the fabrication of diffractive optical elements is usually performed using a proprietary piece of software or a computer-aided drafting package. Once the pattern is computed or designed, it must be output to a plotting or imaging system that will produce a reticle plate. This article describes a number of short Mathematica modules that can be used to generate binary and grayscale patterns in a PostScript-compatible format. Approaches to ensure that the patterns are directly related to the function of the element and the design wavelength are discussed. A procedure to preserve the scale of the graphic output when it is transferred to another application is given. Examples of surfaces for a 100 mm effective focal length lens and an Alvarez surface are given. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  3. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites.

    PubMed

    González Pericot, N; Villoria Sáez, P; Del Río Merino, M; Liébana Carrasco, O

    2014-11-01

    The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites. PMID:25081852

  4. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites.

    PubMed

    González Pericot, N; Villoria Sáez, P; Del Río Merino, M; Liébana Carrasco, O

    2014-11-01

    The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  5. First car-to-car crashes involving young adult drivers: main patterns and their relation to car and driver characteristics.

    PubMed

    Laflamme, L; Hasselberg, M; Kullgren, A; Vaez, M

    2006-09-01

    The primary objective of the study was to examine the relationship between patterns in car-to-car crashes involving young drivers and car and driver characteristics and the research design was a national register-based prospective cohort study. Individual records in a cohort born 1970-1972 are linked to road-traffic-crash data (1988-2000). Subjects' first police-registered two-car crash leading to severe or fatal injury (n = 4875) are identified. Typical crash patterns are highlighted and associations between pattern and both car and individual socio-demographic characteristics are tested. Four crash patterns are highlighted. Male drivers and those with lower educational attainment are over-represented in all patterns. Pattern-based risk levels vary considerably according to car safety level and driver's age at time of injury and socio-economic status. Crash patterns might be considered in young adult driver education systems, bearing in mind the consistent higher risks of male drivers and of drivers with lower educational attainment. PMID:16943161

  6. Generational Patterns in Mexican Americans' Academic Performance in an Unwelcoming Political Context

    PubMed Central

    Moosmann, Danyel A. V.; Roosa, Mark W.; Knight, George P.

    2014-01-01

    Research has shown that immigrant students often do better academically than their U.S.-born peers from the same ethnic group but it is unclear whether this pattern holds for Mexican Americans. We examined the academic performance of four generations of Mexican American students from fifth to 10th grade looking for generation differences and explanations for them. Using data from 749 families, we tested a model with fifth grade variables that differed by generation as potential mediators linking student generation to 10th grade academic performance. Results showed that immigrants were academically behind at fifth grade but caught up by seventh. Only economic hardship mediated the long term relationship between student generation and 10th grade academic performance; maternal educational expectations and child language hassles, English usage, discrimination, and mainstream values helped explained the early academic deficit of immigrant children. The results identified potential targets for interventions to improve Mexican American students' academic performance. PMID:24578588

  7. A bloodstain pattern interpretation in a homicide case involving an apparent "stomping".

    PubMed

    Ristenbatt, R R; Shaler, R C

    1995-01-01

    A New York City homicide case was investigated at the request of the District Attorney's office. The deceased had been violently beaten about the face, neck, and chest area. The bludgeoning left the victim unrecognizable, and produced blood-spatter patterns at the scene that attained heights over nine feet. The suspect claimed that he reacted in self-defense to the victim's attack with a table leg at which point he "knocked him down" and possibly "kicked him a few times." Our investigation was intended to determine whether the bloodspatter patterns observed at the crime scene were consistent with the statements made by the defendant. Conclusions were drawn from an analysis of the crime scene, autopsy photos and report, physical evidence submitted to the laboratory, and reconstruction experimentation performed at the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME). The spatter patterns observed at the scene were found to be consistent with those that would be produced from a "stomping" incident. PMID:7876798

  8. A bloodstain pattern interpretation in a homicide case involving an apparent "stomping".

    PubMed

    Ristenbatt, R R; Shaler, R C

    1995-01-01

    A New York City homicide case was investigated at the request of the District Attorney's office. The deceased had been violently beaten about the face, neck, and chest area. The bludgeoning left the victim unrecognizable, and produced blood-spatter patterns at the scene that attained heights over nine feet. The suspect claimed that he reacted in self-defense to the victim's attack with a table leg at which point he "knocked him down" and possibly "kicked him a few times." Our investigation was intended to determine whether the bloodspatter patterns observed at the crime scene were consistent with the statements made by the defendant. Conclusions were drawn from an analysis of the crime scene, autopsy photos and report, physical evidence submitted to the laboratory, and reconstruction experimentation performed at the Office of Chief Medical Examiner (OCME). The spatter patterns observed at the scene were found to be consistent with those that would be produced from a "stomping" incident.

  9. Inferior olivary nucleus involvement in pediatric neurodegenerative disorders: does it play a role in neuroimaging pattern-recognition approach?

    PubMed

    Mirabelli-Badenier, Marisol; Morana, Giovanni; Bruno, Claudio; Di Rocco, Maja; Striano, Pasaquale; De Grandis, Eusa; Veneselli, Edvige; Rossi, Andrea; Biancheri, Roberta

    2015-04-01

    The diagnostic work up of neurometabolic/degenerative disorders is complex. In such context, identification of neuroradiological features suggestive of specific diagnoses is useful to prompt further diagnostic tests. Involvement of the inferior olivary nucleus (ION) has been reported in several pathologic conditions, either as a primary manifestation of disease or secondary to hypertrophic olivary degeneration (HOD). In this study, we analyzed a cohort of 95 children with different neurometabolic/degenerative diseases involving the brainstem and cerebellum, with the aim to evaluate whether ION involvement plays a role in a neuroimaging-based pattern-recognition approach. A total of 13 patients (13.7%) showed bilateral high-signal intensity and enlargement of the ION on T2-weighted images, while 16 (16.8%) had ION T2-hyperintensity without olivary nucleus enlargement. Our study demonstrates that ION involvement is not rare in children with neurometabolic/degenerative disorders. Two main neuroradiological patterns, that is, "T2-hyperintense signal" and "T2-hyperintense signal with enlargement" are found. These patterns can be related to different etiologies, and do not suggest specific diagnoses. Primary ION lesion can be characterized by olivary swelling, and the differentiation from typical secondary HOD may be difficult.

  10. Molecular interactions and residues involved in force generation in the T4 viral DNA packaging motor.

    PubMed

    Migliori, Amy D; Smith, Douglas E; Arya, Gaurav

    2014-12-12

    Many viruses utilize molecular motors to package their genomes into preformed capsids. A striking feature of these motors is their ability to generate large forces to drive DNA translocation against entropic, electrostatic, and bending forces resisting DNA confinement. A model based on recently resolved structures of the bacteriophage T4 motor protein gp17 suggests that this motor generates large forces by undergoing a conformational change from an extended to a compact state. This transition is proposed to be driven by electrostatic interactions between complementarily charged residues across the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains of gp17. Here we use atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to investigate in detail the molecular interactions and residues involved in such a compaction transition of gp17. We find that although electrostatic interactions between charged residues contribute significantly to the overall free energy change of compaction, interactions mediated by the uncharged residues are equally if not more important. We identify five charged residues and six uncharged residues at the interface that play a dominant role in the compaction transition and also reveal salt bridging, van der Waals, and solvent hydrogen-bonding interactions mediated by these residues in stabilizing the compact form of gp17. The formation of a salt bridge between Glu309 and Arg494 is found to be particularly crucial, consistent with experiments showing complete abrogation in packaging upon Glu309Lys mutation. The computed contributions of several other residues are also found to correlate well with single-molecule measurements of impairments in DNA translocation activity caused by site-directed mutations. PMID:25311860

  11. Lay Referral Patterns Involved in Cardiac Treatment Decision Making among Middle-Aged and Older Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schoenberg, Nancy E.; Amey, Cheryl H.; Stoller, Eleanor Palo; Muldoon, Susan B.

    2003-01-01

    Purpose: This study examined age and contextually related factors that are influential in lay referral patterns during cardiac treatment decision making. Design and Methods: A complementary design was used. The Myocardial Infarction (MI) Onset Study identified demographic correlates of who sought medical care for 1,388 MI (heart attack) survivors.…

  12. Production patterns of packaging waste categories generated at typical Mediterranean residential building worksites

    SciTech Connect

    González Pericot, N.; Villoria Sáez, P.; Del Río Merino, M.; Liébana Carrasco, O.

    2014-11-15

    Highlights: • On-site segregation level: 1.80%; training and motivation strategies were not effective. • 70% Cardboard waste: from switches and sockets during the building services stage. • 40% Plastic waste: generated during structures and partition works due to palletizing. • >50% Wood packaging waste, basically pallets, generated during the envelope works. - Abstract: The construction sector is responsible for around 28% of the total waste volume generated in Europe, which exceeds the amount of household waste. This has led to an increase of different research studies focusing on construction waste quantification. However, within the research studies made, packaging waste has been analyzed to a limited extent. This article focuses on the packaging waste stream generated in the construction sector. To this purpose current on-site waste packaging management has been assessed by monitoring ten Mediterranean residential building works. The findings of the experimental data collection revealed that the incentive measures implemented by the construction company to improve on-site waste sorting failed to achieve the intended purpose, showing low segregation ratios. Subsequently, through an analytical study the generation patterns for packaging waste are established, leading to the identification of the prevailing kinds of packaging and the products responsible for their generation. Results indicate that plastic waste generation maintains a constant trend throughout the whole construction process, while cardboard becomes predominant towards the end of the construction works with switches and sockets from the electricity stage. Understanding the production patterns of packaging waste will be beneficial for adapting waste management strategies to the identified patterns for the specific nature of packaging waste within the context of construction worksites.

  13. Cellular basis for singing motor pattern generation in the field cricket (Gryllus bimaculatus DeGeer)

    PubMed Central

    Schöneich, Stefan; Hedwig, Berthold

    2012-01-01

    The singing behavior of male crickets allows analyzing a central pattern generator (CPG) that was shaped by sexual selection for reliable production of species-specific communication signals. After localizing the essential ganglia for singing in Gryllus bimaculatus, we now studied the calling song CPG at the cellular level. Fictive singing was initiated by pharmacological brain stimulation. The motor pattern underlying syllables and chirps was recorded as alternating spike bursts of wing-opener and wing-closer motoneurons in a truncated wing nerve; it precisely reflected the natural calling song. During fictive singing, we intracellularly recorded and stained interneurons in thoracic and abdominal ganglia and tested their impact on the song pattern by intracellular current injections. We identified three interneurons of the metathoracic and first unfused abdominal ganglion that rhythmically de- and hyperpolarized in phase with the syllable pattern and spiked strictly before the wing-opener motoneurons. Depolarizing current injection in two of these opener interneurons caused additional rhythmic singing activity, which reliably reset the ongoing chirp rhythm. The closely intermeshing arborizations of the singing interneurons revealed the dorsal midline neuropiles of the metathoracic and three most anterior abdominal neuromeres as the anatomical location of singing pattern generation. In the same neuropiles, we also recorded several closer interneurons that rhythmically hyper- and depolarized in the syllable rhythm and spiked strictly before the wing-closer motoneurons. Some of them received pronounced inhibition at the beginning of each chirp. Hyperpolarizing current injection in the dendrite revealed postinhibitory rebound depolarization as one functional mechanism of central pattern generation in singing crickets. PMID:23170234

  14. A Petroleum Vapor Intrusion Model Involving Upward Advective Soil Gas Flow Due to Methane Generation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Wu, Yun; Wang, Yue; Verginelli, Iason; Zeng, Tian; Suuberg, Eric M; Jiang, Lin; Wen, Yuezhong; Ma, Jie

    2015-10-01

    At petroleum vapor intrusion (PVI) sites at which there is significant methane generation, upward advective soil gas transport may be observed. To evaluate the health and explosion risks that may exist under such scenarios, a one-dimensional analytical model describing these processes is introduced in this study. This new model accounts for both advective and diffusive transport in soil gas and couples this with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, limited by oxygen availability. The predicted results from the new model are shown to be in good agreement with the simulation results obtained from a three-dimensional numerical model. These results suggest that this analytical model is suitable for describing cases involving open ground surface beyond the foundation edge, serving as the primary oxygen source. This new analytical model indicates that the major contribution of upward advection to indoor air concentration could be limited to the increase of soil gas entry rate, since the oxygen in soil might already be depleted owing to the associated high methane source vapor concentration.

  15. An approach toward an analysis of the pattern recognition involved in the stellar orientation of birds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallraff, H. G.

    1972-01-01

    A conditioning method was used to investigate the orientational responses of ducks as affected by manipulations of the stellar patterns in a planetarium. Under simulated natural skies it was possible to train a bird to a particular direction successively under all positions of the rotating sphere at a constant latitude. The responses were independent of the phase relationships between local time, season, and appearance of the sky provided the bird had been trained under the particular sector of the sphere some time before.

  16. Officer-involved shooting: reaction patterns, response protocols, and psychological intervention strategies.

    PubMed

    Miller, Laurence

    2006-01-01

    Psychologists who work with law enforcement agencies may be called upon to respond to an officer-involved shooting (OIS). These need not be the most traumatic critical incidents in policing, but when they are, the reasons usually involve a mix of incident characteristics, officer response styles, and departmental handling. This article describes some of the psychological reactions experienced by officers during and following an OIS and provides a model of administrative, legal, mental health, and peer support services for officers in need. Finally, the article discusses several key roles that the police psychologist can play in the process of managing an OIS. PMID:17131770

  17. "Simply the Best for My Children": Patterns of Parental Involvement in Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ule, Mirjana; Živoder, Andreja; du Bois-Reymond, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    This article explores parental involvement in the educational trajectories of children in Europe. The analysis is embedded in the framework of the three dominant contemporary social processes that have been acknowledged as crucial factors for the educational and life trajectories of young people today, i.e. familialization, institutionalization,…

  18. Changing Patterns of Parent-Teacher Communication and Parent Involvement from Preschool to School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Elizabeth; McFarland-Piazza, Laura; Harrison, Linda J.

    2015-01-01

    PreschoolThis study investigated the nature of parent involvement and parent-educator communication in prior-to-school early childhood settings and school, to explore relations to social capital variables and consistencies and changes in practices over time. Parent interview and teacher questionnaire data from two waves of the Longitudinal Study…

  19. Localization of central rhythm generator involved in cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, S; Iriki, A; Nakamura, Y

    1986-04-01

    The location of the central rhythm generator involved in the cortically induced rhythmical masticatory jaw-opening movement was studied in the ketamine-anesthetized guinea pig. These studies show that a population of neurons is activated by a nonrhythmical input from the cortical masticatory area (CMA) and produces a rhythmical output to the trigeminal motoneurons innervating the jaw-opening muscles. Repetitive stimulation (30 Hz) of the pyramidal tract (PT) rostral to the middle level of the medulla oblongata, in the animal with a precollicular transection as well as with an intact neuraxis, induced a rhythmical reciprocal EMG activity in the anterior digastric and masseter muscles. The rhythmical activity could be monitored by a rhythmical burst in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve innervating the anterior digastric muscle. Essentially the same pattern was observed when stimulating the PT as that induced by repetitive stimulation of the CMA. The rhythmical efferent burst in the mylohyoid nerve could still be induced after paralyzing the animal. Repetitive PT stimulation in the isolated brain stem after precollicular and bulbospinal transections induced a rhythmical pattern in the anterior digastric EMG and an efferent activity in the mylohyoid nerve. The rhythmical mylohyoid nerve burst could be induced after paralyzing the animal. After section of the medial part of the brain stem at the pontobulbar junction, including the PT, repetitive PT stimulation at the pontine level did not induce any masticatory activity either in the digastric EMG or in the efferent discharge in the mylohyoid nerve, while stimulation at the rostral bulbar level still induced a rhythmicity that was essentially the same pattern as before the section. By testing the effects of total and partial transections of the brain stem in coronal and sagittal planes at various locations, we found that the medial bulbar reticular formation, the lateral pons including the trigeminal motor

  20. Experimental observation of multistability and dynamic attractors in silicon central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Le; Nogaret, Alain

    2015-11-01

    We report on the multistability of chaotic networks of silicon neurons and demonstrate how spatiotemporal sequences of voltage oscillations are selected with timed current stimuli. A three neuron central pattern generator was built by interconnecting Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with mutually inhibitory links mimicking gap junctions. By systematically varying the timing of current stimuli applied to individual neurons, we generate the phase lag maps of neuronal oscillators and study their dependence on the network connectivity. We identify up to six attractors consisting of triphasic sequences of unevenly spaced pulses propagating clockwise and anticlockwise. While confirming theoretical predictions, our experiments reveal more complex oscillatory patterns shaped by the ratio of the pulse width to the oscillation period. Our work contributes to validating the command neuron hypothesis.

  1. A rule-based expert system for automatic control rod pattern generation for boiling water reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, L.S.; Lin, C. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on an expert system for generating control rod patterns that has been developed. The knowledge is transformed into IF-THEN rules. The inference engine uses the Rete pattern matching algorithm to match facts, and rule premises and conflict resolution strategies to make the system function intelligently. A forward-chaining mechanism is adopted in the inference engine. The system is implemented in the Common Lisp programming language. The three-dimensional core simulation model performs the core status and burnup calculations. The system is successfully demonstrated by generating control rod programming for the 2894-MW (thermal) Kuosheng nuclear power plant in Taiwan. The computing time is tremendously reduced compared to programs using mathematical methods.

  2. Guided corona generates wettability patterns that selectively direct cell attachment inside closed microchannels.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Angela; Takayama, Shuichi

    2010-10-01

    We present a method to create plasma mediated linear protein patterns along the lengths of simple one-inlet-one-outlet straight polydimethylsiloxane microchannels by biasing the delivery of corona discharge at the capillary openings. Pattern widths ranging from 500-1,000 microm were generated in 2 mm wide microchannels with lengths of 0.5, 1.0, or 1.5 cm. Corona-treated surfaces enabled the spatial alignment of C2C12 myoblasts to the adhesive protein-coated regions, facilitating myoblast differentiation into myotubes. Although limited in precision, this protein patterning technique offers the advantages of simplicity and low cost, making it attractive for educational and research environments that lack access to extensive microfabrication facilities. The results also provide a cautionary note to those using corona discharge to increase wettability of microchannels; the surface modification may not be uniform, even within single microchannels being treated depending on settings and positioning of the corona device tips.

  3. Reaction kinetics of non-reciprocal photo-base generator (NRPBG) patterning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shykind, D.; Bristol, R.; Roberts, J.; Blackwell, J.; Borodovsky, Y.

    2010-04-01

    We present a simple reaction rate analysis of lithographic patterning using the Non-Reciprocal Photo Base Generation (NRPBG) scheme of Bristol (Bristol, et. al., to be published in Proceedings of the SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, 2010, presentation 7639-4). Multistep reaction kinetics simulations demonstrate that the NRPBG scheme produces clear pitch division upon 193 nm double-exposure, over a range of photochemical reaction rate constants.

  4. 160 Mpx/Sec Laser Pattern Generator For Mask And Reticle Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, D. B.; Nagler, M.; Van Peski, C.; Whitney, T. R.

    1984-06-01

    A new Laser Pattern Generator (LPG) designed for reticle production was recently introduced by THE Semiconductor Equipment Corporation. The system uses HeCd laser radiation with a wavelength of 441.6 nm to expose commercial photoresist (e.g. AZ 1350J or AZ 1470). A writing rate of 160 Mpx/sec is achieved by parallel operation of sixteen (16) independently modulated channels. The binary light intensity distribution is controlled in each channel by acousto-optic modulation. The sixteen (16) independent chan-nels are brought to a common crossover and scanned simultaneously using a single acousto-optic deflector. Pattern data must be expanded into a pixel format in two steps due to the inherent writing speed of the LPG. Prior to run time, geometrical data is trans-lated from Electromask or Mann format into a compact vector format using an off-line preprocessing unit. The vector data is stored on a 300 Mbyte portable disk pack which has a nominal data transfer rate of 9.67 Mbits/sec. During run time, vector data is read from the disk and expanded in the real time processing unit to supply pixel data to the optical modulation system. The placement of data in the correct position is controlled by a laser interferometry system and a control computer. The LPG system throughput of 160 Mpx/ sec permits the writing of 100 mm x 100 mm rejicles with information equivalent to 10' optical pattern generator flashes in less than 30 minutes, independent of pat-tern complexity. Although the specified minimum geometry is 2.5 pm, patterns with 1 pm features have been resolved. The address resolution is 0.25 μm, and the individual beam spot size is 0.5 μm (FWHM). Examples of printed patterns are included.

  5. A method to engineer phase-encoded photon sieve for intensity pattern generations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhenhua; Ma, Li; Gao, Yaru; Liu, Chunxiang; Xu, Shicai; Zhang, Meina; Cheng, Chuanfu

    2015-11-01

    We propose a novel type of photon sieve where phases of its sieved waves are encoded as radial positions of the pinholes and use such phase-encoded sieves for generating designed intensity patterns in Fresnel domain. The sieve pinholes are arranged around Fresnel-rings to eliminate the quadratic Fresnel phase factor of diffraction of the sieved waves, leading the wave propagation to be equivalent to Fraunhofer diffraction. The pinholes take constant size in this paper and realize equal amplitude in the multiple sieved waves. Their positions are adjusted radially from corresponding rings to encode wave phases, taking effect by resulting in different optical paths from them to the observation plane origin. Then along with wave propagation, the encoded phases are decoded and the required phase differences are obtained in the discrete waves. We first conduct numerical simulations to show satisfactory performance of such phase-encoded photon sieves in generating arbitrarily designed intensity patterns and describe the quality of the reconstructed patterns. Then for qualitatively verifying the phase-encoding method, we experimentally fabricate three such sieves with relatively small pinhole number and obtain the designed patterns.

  6. From spinal central pattern generators to cortical network: integrated BCI for walking rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cheron, G; Duvinage, M; De Saedeleer, C; Castermans, T; Bengoetxea, A; Petieau, M; Seetharaman, K; Hoellinger, T; Dan, B; Dutoit, T; Sylos Labini, F; Lacquaniti, F; Ivanenko, Y

    2012-01-01

    Success in locomotor rehabilitation programs can be improved with the use of brain-computer interfaces (BCIs). Although a wealth of research has demonstrated that locomotion is largely controlled by spinal mechanisms, the brain is of utmost importance in monitoring locomotor patterns and therefore contains information regarding central pattern generation functioning. In addition, there is also a tight coordination between the upper and lower limbs, which can also be useful in controlling locomotion. The current paper critically investigates different approaches that are applicable to this field: the use of electroencephalogram (EEG), upper limb electromyogram (EMG), or a hybrid of the two neurophysiological signals to control assistive exoskeletons used in locomotion based on programmable central pattern generators (PCPGs) or dynamic recurrent neural networks (DRNNs). Plantar surface tactile stimulation devices combined with virtual reality may provide the sensation of walking while in a supine position for use of training brain signals generated during locomotion. These methods may exploit mechanisms of brain plasticity and assist in the neurorehabilitation of gait in a variety of clinical conditions, including stroke, spinal trauma, multiple sclerosis, and cerebral palsy.

  7. Towards pattern generation and chaotic series prediction with photonic reservoir computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonik, Piotr; Hermans, Michiel; Duport, François; Haelterman, Marc; Massar, Serge

    2016-03-01

    Reservoir Computing is a bio-inspired computing paradigm for processing time dependent signals that is particularly well suited for analog implementations. Our team has demonstrated several photonic reservoir computers with performance comparable to digital algorithms on a series of benchmark tasks such as channel equalisation and speech recognition. Recently, we showed that our opto-electronic reservoir computer could be trained online with a simple gradient descent algorithm programmed on an FPGA chip. This setup makes it in principle possible to feed the output signal back into the reservoir, and thus highly enrich the dynamics of the system. This will allow to tackle complex prediction tasks in hardware, such as pattern generation and chaotic and financial series prediction, which have so far only been studied in digital implementations. Here we report simulation results of our opto-electronic setup with an FPGA chip and output feedback applied to pattern generation and Mackey-Glass chaotic series prediction. The simulations take into account the major aspects of our experimental setup. We find that pattern generation can be easily implemented on the current setup with very good results. The Mackey-Glass series prediction task is more complex and requires a large reservoir and more elaborate training algorithm. With these adjustments promising result are obtained, and we now know what improvements are needed to match previously reported numerical results. These simulation results will serve as basis of comparison for experiments we will carry out in the coming months.

  8. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species

    PubMed Central

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-01-01

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells. PMID:26861392

  9. Cancer Therapy by Catechins Involves Redox Cycling of Copper Ions and Generation of Reactive Oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Farhan, Mohd; Khan, Husain Yar; Oves, Mohammad; Al-Harrasi, Ahmed; Rehmani, Nida; Arif, Hussain; Hadi, Sheikh Mumtaz; Ahmad, Aamir

    2016-02-04

    Catechins, the dietary phytochemicals present in green tea and other beverages, are considered to be potent inducers of apoptosis and cytotoxicity to cancer cells. While it is believed that the antioxidant properties of catechins and related dietary agents may contribute to lowering the risk of cancer induction by impeding oxidative injury to DNA, these properties cannot account for apoptosis induction and chemotherapeutic observations. Catechin (C), epicatechin (EC), epigallocatechin (EGC) and epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) are the four major constituents of green tea. In this article, using human peripheral lymphocytes and comet assay, we show that C, EC, EGC and EGCG cause cellular DNA breakage and can alternatively switch to a prooxidant action in the presence of transition metals such as copper. The cellular DNA breakage was found to be significantly enhanced in the presence of copper ions. Catechins were found to be effective in providing protection against oxidative stress induced by tertbutylhydroperoxide, as measured by oxidative DNA breakage in lymphocytes. The prooxidant action of catechins involved production of hydroxyl radicals through redox recycling of copper ions. We also determined that catechins, particularly EGCG, inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 leading to a prooxidant cell death. Since it is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies, cancer cells would be more subject to redox cycling between copper ions and catechins to generate reactive oxygen species (ROS) responsible for DNA breakage. Such a copper dependent prooxidant cytotoxic mechanism better explains the anticancer activity and preferential cytotoxicity of dietary phytochemicals against cancer cells.

  10. Polaris, a protein involved in left-right axis patterning, localizes to basal bodies and cilia.

    PubMed

    Taulman, P D; Haycraft, C J; Balkovetz, D F; Yoder, B K

    2001-03-01

    Mutations in Tg737 cause a wide spectrum of phenotypes, including random left-right axis specification, polycystic kidney disease, liver and pancreatic defects, hydrocephalus, and skeletal patterning abnormalities. To further assess the biological function of Tg737 and its role in the mutant pathology, we identified the cell population expressing Tg737 and determined the subcellular localization of its protein product called Polaris. Tg737 expression is associated with cells possessing either motile or immotile cilia and sperm. Similarly, Polaris concentrated just below the apical membrane in the region of the basal bodies and within the cilia or flagellar axoneme. The data suggest that Polaris functions in a ciliogenic pathway or in cilia maintenance, a role supported by the loss of cilia on the ependymal cell layer in ventricles of Tg737(orpk) brains and by the lack of node cilia in Tg737(Delta2-3betaGal) mutants. PMID:11251073

  11. Intercellular communication patterns are involved in cell determination in early molluscan development.

    PubMed

    de Laat, S W; Tertoolen, L G; Dorresteijn, A W; van den Biggelaar, J A

    1980-10-01

    The formation of specialized intercellular junctions, allowing the passage of low-molecular weight regulatory molecules, has been considered as a possible mechanism for regulating embryonic development. No direct evidence for this concept has been found in early development. In the mollusc Pattella vulgata it was demonstrated that cell positioning and specific cellular interactions are key factors in the control of early development. We have now investigated the pattern of intercellular communication during early development of this embryo by intracellular iontophoresis of the fluorescent dye Lucifer Yellow CH. We demonstrate that the formation of regional- and temporal-specific cell-to-cell coupling is correlated with the determination of the mesentoblast--the stem cell of the mesoderm--and the establishment of dorso-ventral polarity. PMID:7422006

  12. Preclinical evidence supporting the clinical development of central pattern generator-modulating therapies for chronic spinal cord-injured patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ambulation or walking is one of the main gaits of locomotion. In terrestrial animals, it may be defined as a series of rhythmic and bilaterally coordinated movement of the limbs which creates a forward movement of the body. This applies regardless of the number of limbs—from arthropods with six or more limbs to bipedal primates. These fundamental similarities among species may explain why comparable neural systems and cellular properties have been found, thus far, to control in similar ways locomotor rhythm generation in most animal models. The aim of this article is to provide a comprehensive review of the known structural and functional features associated with central nervous system (CNS) networks that are involved in the control of ambulation and other stereotyped motor patterns—specifically Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) that produce basic rhythmic patterned outputs for locomotion, micturition, ejaculation, and defecation. Although there is compelling evidence of their existence in humans, CPGs have been most studied in reduced models including in vitro isolated preparations, genetically-engineered mice and spinal cord-transected animals. Compared with other structures of the CNS, the spinal cord is generally considered as being well-preserved phylogenetically. As such, most animal models of spinal cord-injured (SCI) should be considered as valuable tools for the development of novel pharmacological strategies aimed at modulating spinal activity and restoring corresponding functions in chronic SCI patients. PMID:24910602

  13. Implementation of a Data Packet Generator Using Pattern Matching for Wearable ECG Monitoring Systems

    PubMed Central

    Noh, Yun Hong; Jeong, Do Un

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a packet generator using a pattern matching algorithm for real-time abnormal heartbeat detection is proposed. The packet generator creates a very small data packet which conveys sufficient crucial information for health condition analysis. The data packet envelopes real time ECG signals and transmits them to a smartphone via Bluetooth. An Android application was developed specifically to decode the packet and extract ECG information for health condition analysis. Several graphical presentations are displayed and shown on the smartphone. We evaluate the performance of abnormal heartbeat detection accuracy using the MIT/BIH Arrhythmia Database and real time experiments. The experimental result confirm our finding that abnormal heart beat detection is practically possible. We also performed data compression ratio and signal restoration performance evaluations to establish the usefulness of the proposed packet generator and the results were excellent. PMID:25029280

  14. Implementation of a data packet generator using pattern matching for wearable ECG monitoring systems.

    PubMed

    Noh, Yun Hong; Jeong, Do Un

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a packet generator using a pattern matching algorithm for real-time abnormal heartbeat detection is proposed. The packet generator creates a very small data packet which conveys sufficient crucial information for health condition analysis. The data packet envelopes real time ECG signals and transmits them to a smartphone via Bluetooth. An Android application was developed specifically to decode the packet and extract ECG information for health condition analysis. Several graphical presentations are displayed and shown on the smartphone. We evaluate the performance of abnormal heartbeat detection accuracy using the MIT/BIH Arrhythmia Database and real time experiments. The experimental result confirm our finding that abnormal heart beat detection is practically possible. We also performed data compression ratio and signal restoration performance evaluations to establish the usefulness of the proposed packet generator and the results were excellent. PMID:25029280

  15. Gas generation and migration studies involving recently generated /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste for the TRU Waste Sampling Program

    SciTech Connect

    Zerwekh, A.; Warren, J.L.

    1986-07-01

    This study is part of the multicontractor TRU Waste Sampling Program. Radiolytically generated gases were vented through a filtering device to determine its effectiveness in maintaining hydrogen concentrations within acceptably safe levels. In the second part of the study measurements were made to determine the ability of these gases, particularly hydrogen, to migrate through a sealed rigid polyethylene drum liner. Void volumes in these drums were found to be generally in excess of 90%. The carbon composite filter was found to satisfactorily vent hydrogen up to moderately high levels of alpha activity in the waste substrate. The sealed 90-mil liner was found to inhibit, but not prevent, the migration of hydrogen and other radiolytically generated gases.

  16. Simultaneously Uncovering the Patterns of Brain Regions Involved in Different Story Reading Subprocesses

    PubMed Central

    Wehbe, Leila; Murphy, Brian; Talukdar, Partha; Fyshe, Alona; Ramdas, Aaditya; Mitchell, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders. PMID:25426840

  17. Identification of gene expression patterns crucially involved in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis and multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Martin M.; Barth, Silvia; Greve, Bernhard; Schumann, Kathrin M.; Bartels, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT After encounter with a central nervous system (CNS)-derived autoantigen, lymphocytes leave the lymph nodes and enter the CNS. This event leads only rarely to subsequent tissue damage. Genes relevant to CNS pathology after cell infiltration are largely undefined. Myelin-oligodendrocyte-glycoprotein (MOG)-induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an animal model of multiple sclerosis (MS), a chronic autoimmune disease of the CNS that results in disability. To assess genes that are involved in encephalitogenicity and subsequent tissue damage mediated by CNS-infiltrating cells, we performed a DNA microarray analysis from cells derived from lymph nodes and eluted from CNS in LEW.1AV1 (RT1av1) rats immunized with MOG 91-108. The data was compared to immunizations with adjuvant alone or naive rats and to immunizations with the immunogenic but not encephalitogenic MOG 73-90 peptide. Here, we show involvement of Cd38, Cxcr4 and Akt and confirm these findings by the use of Cd38-knockout (B6.129P2-Cd38tm1Lnd/J) mice, S1P-receptor modulation during EAE and quantitative expression analysis in individuals with MS. The hereby-defined underlying pathways indicate cellular activation and migration pathways mediated by G-protein-coupled receptors as crucial events in CNS tissue damage. These pathways can be further explored for novel therapeutic interventions. PMID:27519689

  18. Simultaneously uncovering the patterns of brain regions involved in different story reading subprocesses.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Leila; Murphy, Brian; Talukdar, Partha; Fyshe, Alona; Ramdas, Aaditya; Mitchell, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders. PMID:25426840

  19. Simultaneously uncovering the patterns of brain regions involved in different story reading subprocesses.

    PubMed

    Wehbe, Leila; Murphy, Brian; Talukdar, Partha; Fyshe, Alona; Ramdas, Aaditya; Mitchell, Tom

    2014-01-01

    Story understanding involves many perceptual and cognitive subprocesses, from perceiving individual words, to parsing sentences, to understanding the relationships among the story characters. We present an integrated computational model of reading that incorporates these and additional subprocesses, simultaneously discovering their fMRI signatures. Our model predicts the fMRI activity associated with reading arbitrary text passages, well enough to distinguish which of two story segments is being read with 74% accuracy. This approach is the first to simultaneously track diverse reading subprocesses during complex story processing and predict the detailed neural representation of diverse story features, ranging from visual word properties to the mention of different story characters and different actions they perform. We construct brain representation maps that replicate many results from a wide range of classical studies that focus each on one aspect of language processing and offer new insights on which type of information is processed by different areas involved in language processing. Additionally, this approach is promising for studying individual differences: it can be used to create single subject maps that may potentially be used to measure reading comprehension and diagnose reading disorders.

  20. Motor pattern specification by dual descending pathways to a lobster rhythm-generating network.

    PubMed

    Combes, D; Meyrand, P; Simmers, J

    1999-05-01

    In the European lobster Homarus gammarus, rhythmic masticatory movements of the three foregut gastric mill teeth are generated by antagonistic sets of striated muscles that are driven by a neural network in the stomatogastric ganglion. In vitro, this circuit can spontaneously generate a single (type I) motor program, unlike in vivo in which gastric mill patterns with different phase relationships are found. By using paired intrasomatic recordings, all elements of the gastric mill network, which consists mainly of motoneurons, have been identified and their synaptic relationships established. The gastric mill circuit of Homarus is similar to that of other decapod crustaceans, although some differences in neuron number and synaptic connectivity were found. Moreover, specific members of the lobster network receive input from two identified interneurons, one excitatory and one inhibitory, that project from each rostral commissural ganglion. Integration of input from these projection elements is mediated by synaptic interactions within the gastric mill network itself. In arrhythmic preparations, direct phasic stimulation of the previously identified commissural gastric (CG) interneuron evokes gastric mill output similar to the type I pattern spontaneously expressed in vitro and in vivo. The newly identified gastric inhibitor interneuron makes inhibitory synapses onto a different subset of gastric mill neurons and, when activated with the CG neuron, drives gastric mill output similar to the type II pattern that is only observed in the intact animal. Thus, two distinct phenotypes of gastric mill network activity can be specified by the concerted actions of parallel input pathways and synaptic connectivity within a target central pattern generator. PMID:10212319

  1. General patterns of managerial approaches to work motivation: Implications for rehabilitation professionals involved in occupational rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Murphy, G C; Foreman, P

    1993-03-01

    Calls for rehabilitation counselors to learn more about the world of work have been recently repeated. The validity of these calls is suggested by a group of studies which indicate that the rehabilitation counseling literature has an established emphasis on matters of counseling and adjustment rather than on matters related to behavior in organizations. A survey of rehabilitation counsellors' beliefs about key topics in organizational behavior indicates that their beliefs are often discrepant with those of practicing managers and supervisors. A summary of dominant models of work motivation adopted by managerial workers is presented and some implications for occupational rehabilitation practice identified. Finally, some contemporary literature relevant to managerial approaches to employee motivation are identified and it is suggested that familiarity with this literature could assist rehabilitation practitioners move from a more narrow occupational rehabilitation role to a broader involvement in organizational life via the expansion of the disability management approach in work organizations. PMID:24243152

  2. Changes in polyamine pattern are involved in floral initiation and development in Polianthes tuberosa.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Chang, Bao-Su; Wang, Kuo-Cheng; Her, Sheng-Jou; Chen, Tian-Wen; Chen, Yun-An; Cho, Chung-Lung; Liao, Li-Jen; Huang, Kuang-Liang; Chen, Wen-Shaw; Liu, Zin-Huang

    2004-06-01

    In the day-neutral plant Polianthes tuberosa (cv. Double) putrescine and spermine in corms at the early floral initiation stage decreased by 26 and 36%, respectively, compared with that in the vegetative stage. In contrast, a sharp increase in spermidine and cadaverine titers in corms was recorded at the early floral initiation stage. However, cadaverine in corms disappeared at the flower development stage. Polyamines in the roots were generally lower than those in the leaves and corms. In no case was the change in endogenous polyamine titers in the roots and leaves associated with floral initiation and flower development in P. tuberosa. Exogenous application of spermidine at 5, 25 or 150 microg per plant at the vegetative stage did not affect flower primordium counts. However, addition of a spermidine synthase inhibitor, cyclohexylamine, at 150 or 250 microg per plant (each dose was applied two times in total at an interval of 4 days) significantly reduced flower primordium counts, indicating that spermidine is involved in floral initiation and floral development in P. tuberosa. In P. tuberosa corms at the vegetative stage arginine decarboxylase activity rises and decreases at the early floral initiation stage. In contrast, ornithine decarboxylase activity reaches the highest level at the early floral initiation stage and declines significantly at the vegetative stage. Results indicate that an increase in spermidine and a transient increase in cadaverine titers in the corms seem characteristic of early floral initiation in P. tuberosa. It is also suggested that a significant reduction in putrescine and spermine in the corms is involved in the early floral initiation in P. tuberosa.

  3. Structural insights into HetR-PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  4. Structural insights into HetR−PatS interaction involved in cyanobacterial pattern formation

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Zhao, Meng-Xi; Cai, Kun; Liu, Sanling; Wen, Bin; Lv, Pei; Zhang, Yonghui; Peng, Junhui; Zhong, Hui; Yu, Hong-Mei; Ren, Yan-Min; Zhang, Zhiyong; Tian, Changlin; Wu, Qingfa; Oliveberg, Mikael; Zhang, Cheng-Cai; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2015-01-01

    The one-dimensional pattern of heterocyst in the model cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 is coordinated by the transcription factor HetR and PatS peptide. Here we report the complex structures of HetR binding to DNA, and its hood domain (HetRHood) binding to a PatS-derived hexapeptide (PatS6) at 2.80 and 2.10 Å, respectively. The intertwined HetR dimer possesses a couple of novel HTH motifs, each of which consists of two canonical α-helices in the DNA-binding domain and an auxiliary α-helix from the flap domain of the neighboring subunit. Two PatS6 peptides bind to the lateral clefts of HetRHood, and trigger significant conformational changes of the flap domain, resulting in dissociation of the auxiliary α-helix and eventually release of HetR from the DNA major grove. These findings provide the structural insights into a prokaryotic example of Turing model. PMID:26576507

  5. Generation of spatially periodic patterns by a mechanical instability: a mechanical alternative to the Turing model.

    PubMed

    Harris, A K; Stopak, D; Warner, P

    1984-04-01

    We have studied the generation of spatial patterns created by mechanical (rather than chemical) instabilities. When dissociated fibroblasts are suspended in a gel of reprecipitated collagen, and the contraction of the gel as a whole is physically restrained by attachment of its margin to a glass fibre meshwork, then the effect of the fibroblasts' traction is to break up the cell-matrix mixture into a series of clumps or aggregations of cells and compressed matrix. These aggregations are interconnected by linear tracts of collagen fibres aligned under the tensile stress exerted by fibroblast traction. The patterns generated by this mechanical instability vary depending upon cell population density and other factors. Over a certain range of cell concentrations, this mechanical instability yields geometric patterns which resemble but are usually much less regular than the patterns which develop normally in the dermis of developing bird skin. We propose that an equivalent mechanical instability, occurring during the embryonic development of this skin, could be the cause not only of the clumping of dermal fibroblasts to form the feather papillae, but also of the alignment of collagen fibres into the characteristic polygonal network of fibre bundles - which interconnect these papillae and which presage the subsequent pattern of the dermal muscles serving to control feather movements. More generally, we suggest that this type of mechanical instability can serve the morphogenetic functions for which Turing's chemical instability and other reaction-diffusion systems have been proposed. Mechanical instabilities can create physical structures directly, in one step, in contrast to the two or more steps which would be required if positional information first had to be specified by chemical gradients and then only secondarily implemented in physical form. In addition, physical forces can act more quickly and at much longer range than can diffusing chemicals and can generate a

  6. Frequency spectrum of focused broadband pulses of electromagnetic radiation generated by polarization currents with superluminally rotating distribution patterns.

    PubMed

    Ardavan, Houshang; Ardavan, Arzhang; Singleton, John

    2003-11-01

    We investigate the spectral features of the emission from a superluminal polarization current whose distribution pattern rotates (with an angular frequency omega) and oscillates (with a frequency omega > omega differing from an integral multiple of omega) at the same time. This type of polarization current is found in recent practical machines designed to investigate superluminal emission. Although all of the processes involved are linear, we find that the broadband emission contains frequencies that are higher than omega by a factor of the order of (omega/omega)2. This generation of frequencies not required for the creation of the source stems from mathematically rigorous consequences of the familiar classical expression for the retarded potential. The results suggest practical applications for superluminal polarization currents as broadband radio-frequency and infrared sources.

  7. Central generation of grooming motor patterns and interlimb coordination in locusts.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, A; Laurent, G

    1996-12-15

    Coordinated bursts of leg motoneuron activity were evoked in locusts with deefferented legs by tactile stimulation of sites that evoke grooming behavior. This suggests that insect thoracic ganglia contain central pattern generators for directed leg movements. Motoneuron recordings were made from metathoracic and mesothoracic nerves, after eliminating all leg motor innervation, as well as all input from the brain, subesophageal ganglion, and prothoracic ganglion. Strong, brief trochanteral levator motoneuron bursts occurred, together with silence of the slow and fast trochanteral depressor motoneurons and activation of the common inhibitor motoneuron. The metathoracic slow tibial extensor motoneuron was active in a pattern distinct from its activity during walking or during rhythms evoked by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine. Preparations in which the metathoracic ganglion was isolated from all other ganglia could still produce fictive motor patterns in response to tactile stimulation of metathoracic locations. Bursts of trochanteral levator and depressor motoneurons were clearly coordinated between the left and right metathoracic hemiganglia and also between the mesothoracic and the ipsilateral metathoracic ganglia. These data provide clear evidence for centrally generated interlimb coordination in an insect.

  8. Sequential developmental acquisition of neuromodulatory inputs to a central pattern-generating network.

    PubMed

    Fénelon, V S; Kilman, V; Meyrand, P; Marder, E

    1999-06-01

    The activity of the adult stomatogastric ganglion (STG) depends on a large number of aminergic and peptidergic modulatory inputs. Our aim is to understand the role of these modulatory inputs in the development of the central pattern-generating networks of the STG. Therefore, we analyze the developmental and adult expressions of three neuropeptides in the stomatogastric nervous system of the lobsters Homarus americanus and Homarus gammarus by using wholemount immunocytochemistry and confocal microscopy. In adults, red pigment-concentrating hormone (RPCH)-like, proctolin-like, and a tachykinin-like immunoreactivity are present in axonal projections to the STG. At 50% of embryonic development (E50), all three peptides stain the commissural ganglia and brain, but only RPCH- and proctolin-like immunoreactivities stain axonal arbors in the STG. Tachykinin-like immunoreactivity is not apparent in the STG until larval stage II (LII). The RPCH-immunoreactive projection to the STG consists of two pairs of fibers. One pair stains for RPCH immunoreactivity at E50; the second RPCH-immunoreactive pair does not stain until about LII. One pair of the RPCH fibers double labels for tachykinin-like immunoreactivity. The adult complement of neuromodulatory inputs is not fully expressed until close to the developmental time at which major changes in the STG motor patterns occur, suggesting that neuromodulators play a role in the tuning of the central pattern generators during development. PMID:10340510

  9. Toward robust phase-locking in Melibe swim central pattern generator models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalil, Sajiya; Allen, Dane; Youker, Joseph; Shilnikov, Andrey

    2013-12-01

    Small groups of interneurons, abbreviated by CPG for central pattern generators, are arranged into neural networks to generate a variety of core bursting rhythms with specific phase-locked states, on distinct time scales, which govern vital motor behaviors in invertebrates such as chewing and swimming. These movements in lower level animals mimic motions of organs in higher animals due to evolutionarily conserved mechanisms. Hence, various neurological diseases can be linked to abnormal movement of body parts that are regulated by a malfunctioning CPG. In this paper, we, being inspired by recent experimental studies of neuronal activity patterns recorded from a swimming motion CPG of the sea slug Melibe leonina, examine a mathematical model of a 4-cell network that can plausibly and stably underlie the observed bursting rhythm. We develop a dynamical systems framework for explaining the existence and robustness of phase-locked states in activity patterns produced by the modeled CPGs. The proposed tools can be used for identifying core components for other CPG networks with reliable bursting outcomes and specific phase relationships between the interneurons. Our findings can be employed for identifying or implementing the conditions for normal and pathological functioning of basic CPGs of animals and artificially intelligent prosthetics that can regulate various movements.

  10. Distorted Patterns of Dentinogenesis and Eruption in Msx2 Null Mutants: Involvement of Sost/Sclerostin.

    PubMed

    Amri, Nawel; Djolé, Stéphane X; Petit, Stéphane; Babajko, Sylvie; Coudert, Amélie E; Castaneda, Beatriz; Simon, Stéphane; Berdal, Ariane

    2016-10-01

    The muscle segment homeogenes Msx1 and Msx2 play a major role in tooth and bone formation. Periodontal osteoclast impairment also occurs in Msx2 null mutant mice, which is restored by overexpression of the receptor activator of NF-κB targeted in osteoclast lineage. Here, we investigated the role of Msx2 in dentinogenesis. Experiments were performed on Msx2(-/-) mice and the MDPC-23 odontoblastic cell line. After Msx2 gene silencing, real-time quantitative RT-PCR data showed significant overexpression of Runx2, Bglap, Dspp, and Alpl. Of three inhibitors of Wnt/β-catenin signaling (Dkk1, SostDc1, and Sost/Sclerostin), only Sost was expressed in postnatal teeth and overexpressed in Msx2(-/-) tooth samples. Initial crown dentin formation-primary dentinogenesis-occurred fairly normally in Msx2(-/-) teeth, albeit with distorted cusp patterns. Later stages of tooth development were characterized by a deviation from secondary toward tertiary dentinogenesis with osteodentin formation and impaired dentin deposition leading to limited root elongation. In Msx2(-/-)/receptor activator of NF-κB-transgenic double mutants, the dentin phenotype, notably in the roots, was rescued and sclerostin levels were normalized. These data suggest that Msx2 may act indirectly on dentinogenesis by controlling osteoclast activity and the signaling network related to eruption, supporting and further extending the concept that Msx2 controls formation of mineralized tissues by inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway; Sost in dentin and Dkk1 in bone, as previously demonstrated. PMID:27524798

  11. Patterns and rates of riverbank erosion involving ice-rich permafrost (yedoma) in northern Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanevskiy, Mikhail; Shur, Yuri; Strauss, Jens; Jorgenson, Torre; Fortier, Daniel; Stephani, Eva; Vasiliev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Yedoma, a suite of syngenetically frozen silty ice- and organic-rich deposits with large ice wedges that accumulated during the late Pleistocene, is vulnerable to thermal degradation and erosion because of the extremely high ice contents. This degradation can result in significant surface subsidence and retreat of coastal bluffs and riverbanks with large consequences to landscape evolution, infrastructure damage, and water quality. We used remote sensing and field observations to assess patterns and rates of riverbank erosion at a 35-m-high active yedoma bluff along the Itkillik River in northern Alaska. The total volumetric ground-ice content-including wedge, segregated, and pore ice-was estimated to be ~ 86%. The process of riverbank erosion and stabilization include three main stages typical of the areas with ice-rich permafrost: (1) thermal erosion combined with thermal denudation, (2) thermal denudation, and (3) slope stabilization. Active riverbank erosion at the main study site started in July 1995, when the Itkillik River changed its channel. The total retreat of the riverbank during 1995-2010 within different segments of the bluff varied from 180 to 280 m; the average retreat rate for the most actively eroded part of the riverbank was almost 19 m/y. From August 2007 to August 2011, the total retreat varied from 10 to almost 100 m. The average retreat rate for the whole 680-m-long bluff was 11 m/y. For the most actively eroded central part of the bluff (150 m long) it was 20 m/y, ranging from 16 to 24 m/y. More than 180,000 m3 of ground ice and organic-rich frozen soil, or almost 70,000 metric tons (t) of soil solids including 880 t of organic carbon, were transported to the river from the retreating bank annually. This study reports the highest long-term rates of riverbank erosion ever observed in permafrost regions of Eurasia and North America.

  12. [Central Pattern Generators: Mechanisms of the Activity and Their Role in the Control of "Automatic" Movements].

    PubMed

    Arshavsky, I; Deliagina, T G; Orlovsky, G N

    2015-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are a set of interconnected neurons capable of generating a basic pattern of motor output underlying "automatic" movements (breathing, locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and so on) in the absence of afferent signals from the executive motor apparatus. They can be divided into the constitutive CPGs active throughout the entire lifetime (respiratory CPGs) and conditional CPGs controlling episodic movements (locomotion, chewing, swallowing, and others). Since a motor output of CPGs is determined by their internal organization, the activities of the conditional CPGs are initiated by simple commands coming from higher centers. We describe the structural and functional organization of the locomotor CPGs in the marine mollusk Clione limacina, lamprey, frog embryo, and laboratory mammals (cat, mouse, and rat), CPGs controlling the respiratory and swallowing movements in mammals, and CPGs controlling discharges of the electric organ in the gymnotiform fish. It is shown that in all these cases, the generation of rhythmic motor output is based both on the endogenous (pacemaker) activity of specific groups of interneurons and on interneural interactions. These two interrelated mechanisms complement each other, ensuring the high reliability of CPG functionality. We discuss how the experience obtained in studying CPGs can be used to understand mechanisms of more complex functions of the brain, including its cognitive functions.

  13. An Historical Comparison of Parental Involvement of Three Generations of Japanese Americans (Isseis, Niseis, and Sanseis) in the Education of Their Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoho, Alan R.

    A study was done that compared the parental involvement of three generations of Japanese Americans in their children's education, particularly their involvement in academic work and extracurricular activities and perceived barriers to involvement. First generation Japanese American immigrants are called "Isseis" in Japanese; second generation,…

  14. Generation pattern of sulfur containing gases from anaerobically digested sludge cakes.

    PubMed

    Novak, John T; Adams, Gregory; Chen, Yen-Chih; Erdal, Zeynep; Forbes, Robert H; Glindemann, Dietmar; Hargreaves, J Ronald; Hentz, Lawrence; Higgins, Matthew J; Murthy, Sudhir N; Witherspoon, Jay

    2006-08-01

    Eleven dewatered sludge cakes collected from anaerobic digesters at different treatment plants were evaluated for the amount, type, and pattern of odorous gas production. All but one of the sludge cakes were from mesophilic anaerobic digesters. One was from a thermophilic digester. The pattern and quantities of sulfur gases were found to be unique for each of the samples with regard to the products produced, magnitude, and subsequent decline. The main odor-causing chemicals were volatile sulfur compounds, which included hydrogen sulfide, methanethiol, and dimethyl sulfide. Volatile sulfur compound production peaked in 3 to 8 days and then declined. The decline was a result of conversion of organic sulfur compounds to sulfide. In one side-by-side test, a high-solids centrifuge cake generated more odorous compounds than the low-solids centrifuge cake. The data show that anaerobic digestion does not eliminate the odor potential of anaerobically digested dewatered cakes.

  15. Multiplexed recording with uncorrelated computer-generated reference patterns in coaxial holographic data storage.

    PubMed

    Nobukawa, Teruyoshi; Wani, Yotaro; Nomura, Takanori

    2015-05-15

    A computer-generated reference pattern (CGRP) allows improvement in light efficiency and the quality of reconstructed data in coaxial holographic data storage. In this Letter, a multiplexed recording method with uncorrelated CGRPs is proposed. With this method, crosstalk from adjacent holograms is suppressed without shifting a medium. To confirm the feasibility of the proposed method experimentally, shift selectivity is investigated, and then multiplexed recording is performed. Experimental results show that the proposed method enables high-density recording compared with conventional shift multiplexing. In addition, a theoretical analysis implies that at least 100 uncorrelated CGRPs can be designed and used for multiplexed recording. PMID:26393689

  16. Connection and coordination: the interplay between architecture and dynamics in evolved model pattern generators.

    PubMed

    Psujek, Sean; Ames, Jeffrey; Beer, Randall D

    2006-03-01

    We undertake a systematic study of the role of neural architecture in shaping the dynamics of evolved model pattern generators for a walking task. First, we consider the minimum number of connections necessary to achieve high performance on this task. Next, we identify architectural motifs associated with high fitness. We then examine how high-fitness architectures differ in their ability to evolve. Finally, we demonstrate the existence of distinct parameter subgroups in some architectures and show that these subgroups are characterized by differences in neuron excitabilities and connection signs. PMID:16483415

  17. Bio-inspired Optimal Locomotion Reconfigurability of Quadruped Rovers using Central Pattern Generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohra, Murtaza

    Legged rovers are often considered as viable solutions for traversing unknown terrain. This work addresses the optimal locomotion reconfigurability of quadruped rovers, which consists of obtaining optimal locomotion modes, and transitioning between them. A 2D sagittal plane rover model is considered based on a domestic cat. Using a Genetic Algorithm, the gait, pose and control variables that minimize torque or maximize speed are found separately. The optimization approach takes into account the elimination of leg impact, while considering the entire variable spectrum. The optimal solutions are consistent with other works on gait optimization, and are similar to gaits found in quadruped animals as well. An online model-free gait planning framework is also implemented, that is based on Central Pattern Generators is implemented. It is used to generate joint and control trajectories for any arbitrarily varying speed profile, and shown to regulate locomotion transition and speed modulation, both endogenously and continuously.

  18. Pattern of inner retinal layers involvement in pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy as determined by SD-OCT: case report.

    PubMed

    Junqueira, Daniela Laura Melo; Lopes, Flavio Siqueira Santos; Biteli, Luís Gustavo; Prata, Tiago Santos

    2013-01-01

    Pigmented paravenous retinochoroidal atrophy is an ocular disease characterized by outer retina and choroidal atrophy often with overlying intraretinal bone spicule pigment deposition along the retinal veins. As a rare condition, there is scant information in the literature regarding the pattern of inner retinal layers involvement. We present a case of a 41-year-old white man initially referred for a glaucoma evaluation. Fundoscopy revealed patches of retinochoroidal atrophy and light pigmentation extending from the optic nerve head along the inferior-temporal retinal veins in both eyes. Using different spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) protocols we identified a significant thinning of the inner retinal layers along the inferior-temporal veins, but with a lucid interval surrounding the optic nerve head. Standard automated perimetry revealed a superior absolute arcuate scotoma sparing the central fixation (good structure-functional correlation). This pattern of inner retinal layers involvement was not previously described. We believe SD-OCT added significantly to the anatomical description of this case. Physicians should consider these new anatomical findings and correlate them with functional status while assessing these patients.

  19. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    SciTech Connect

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hill, David P.; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 new classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.

  20. TermGenie – a web-application for pattern-based ontology class generation

    DOE PAGES

    Dietze, Heiko; Berardini, Tanya Z.; Foulger, Rebecca E.; Hill, David P.; Lomax, Jane; Osumi-Sutherland, David; Roncaglia, Paola; Mungall, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Biological ontologies are continually growing and improving from requests for new classes (terms) by biocurators. These ontology requests can frequently create bottlenecks in the biocuration process, as ontology developers struggle to keep up, while manually processing these requests and create classes. TermGenie allows biocurators to generate new classes based on formally specified design patterns or templates. The system is web-based and can be accessed by any authorized curator through a web browser. Automated rules and reasoning engines are used to ensure validity, uniqueness and relationship to pre-existing classes. In the last 4 years the Gene Ontology TermGenie generated 4715 newmore » classes, about 51.4% of all new classes created. The immediate generation of permanent identifiers proved not to be an issue with only 70 (1.4%) obsoleted classes. Lastly, TermGenie is a web-based class-generation system that complements traditional ontology development tools. All classes added through pre-defined templates are guaranteed to have OWL equivalence axioms that are used for automatic classification and in some cases inter-ontology linkage. At the same time, the system is simple and intuitive and can be used by most biocurators without extensive training.« less

  1. Organisation of the spinal central pattern generators for locomotion in the salamander: biology and modelling.

    PubMed

    Chevallier, Stéphanie; Jan Ijspeert, Auke; Ryczko, Dimitri; Nagy, Frédéric; Cabelguen, Jean-Marie

    2008-01-01

    Among living tetrapods, salamanders are regarded as most closely resembling the first terrestrial vertebrates, and are therefore an interesting group in which the evolutionary changes in the locomotor behaviour from aquatic to terrestrial habitats can be inferred. Salamanders exhibit two locomotor modes: swimming and terrestrial stepping. The swimming is anguilliform and resembles closely that of the lamprey. On the ground, the salamander switches to a stepping gait with axial undulations that is also observed in many reptiles. The salamander is therefore ideally suited for examining the neural mechanisms for the generation of these two locomotor modes, as well as the neural mechanisms of gait transition. In the present paper, we describe the kinematics and patterns of activation of axial and limb muscles during stepping and swimming in adult salamanders. We then review the current neurobiological data about the organisation of the spinal networks underlying swimming and stepping, and the mechanisms of gait transition. Finally we report modelling studies aimed at understanding the organisation and operation of the salamander locomotor circuits. Altogether, the neurobiological and the modelling data support the hypothesis of a phylogenetic conservatism from agnathians to amphibians of the spinal locomotor networks generating axial motor patterns.

  2. Helical Striation Pattern Generation and Axial Field Compression in Aluminum Liner Experiments at 1 MA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atoyan, Levon; Byvank, Tom; Greenly, John; Kusse, Bruce; Pikuz, Sergei; Potter, William; Shelkovenko, Tania; Hammer, David

    2015-11-01

    Awe et al. [Phys. Plasmas 21, 235005, 2014] found on the 20 MA Z machine that applying an externally generated axial magnetic field to an imploding liner produces a helical plasma pattern near the surface of the liner. Here we show that this phenomenon is also observed using 10 mm long cylindrical metal liners having 16 mm diameter and 3 to 6 μm wall thickness on the 1 MA, 100-200 ns COBRA pulsed power generator [T. A. Shelkovenko et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10F521, 2006]. The magnetic field in these experiments is created using a 150 μs rise time Helmholtz coil, and the pattern is observed using extreme ultraviolet imaging. Moreover, using B-dot probes we show that there is a 4-8% axial magnetic field compression relative to the initially applied Bz. Using a visible light framing camera, we show that this compression begins before the outside surface of the liner has become a visible light emitting plasma. This research was sponsored by the NNSA SSAP under DOE Coop Agreement DE-NA0001836 and DOE grant DE-NA0001847 as well as by NSF grant PHY-1102471.

  3. Endogenous rhythm and pattern-generating circuit interactions in cockroach motor centres.

    PubMed

    David, Izhak; Holmes, Philip; Ayali, Amir

    2016-09-15

    Cockroaches are rapid and stable runners whose gaits emerge from the intricate, and not fully resolved, interplay between endogenous oscillatory pattern-generating networks and sensory feedback that shapes their rhythmic output. Here we studied the endogenous motor output of a brainless, deafferented preparation. We monitored the pilocarpine-induced rhythmic activity of levator and depressor motor neurons in the mesothoracic and metathoracic segments in order to reveal the oscillatory networks' architecture and interactions. Data analyses included phase relations, latencies between and overlaps of rhythmic bursts, spike frequencies, and the dependence of these parameters on cycle frequency. We found that, overall, ipsilateral connections are stronger than contralateral ones. Our findings revealed asymmetries in connectivity among the different ganglia, in which meta-to-mesothoracic ascending coupling is stronger than meso-to-metathoracic descending coupling. Within-ganglion coupling between the metathoracic hemiganglia is stronger than that in the mesothoracic ganglion. We also report differences in the role and mode of operation of homologue network units (manifested by levator and depressor nerve activity). Many observed characteristics are similar to those exhibited by intact animals, suggesting a dominant role for feedforward control in cockroach locomotion. Based on these data we posit a connectivity scheme among components of the locomotion pattern generating system.

  4. Endogenous rhythm and pattern-generating circuit interactions in cockroach motor centres

    PubMed Central

    David, Izhak; Holmes, Philip

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cockroaches are rapid and stable runners whose gaits emerge from the intricate, and not fully resolved, interplay between endogenous oscillatory pattern-generating networks and sensory feedback that shapes their rhythmic output. Here we studied the endogenous motor output of a brainless, deafferented preparation. We monitored the pilocarpine-induced rhythmic activity of levator and depressor motor neurons in the mesothoracic and metathoracic segments in order to reveal the oscillatory networks’ architecture and interactions. Data analyses included phase relations, latencies between and overlaps of rhythmic bursts, spike frequencies, and the dependence of these parameters on cycle frequency. We found that, overall, ipsilateral connections are stronger than contralateral ones. Our findings revealed asymmetries in connectivity among the different ganglia, in which meta-to-mesothoracic ascending coupling is stronger than meso-to-metathoracic descending coupling. Within-ganglion coupling between the metathoracic hemiganglia is stronger than that in the mesothoracic ganglion. We also report differences in the role and mode of operation of homologue network units (manifested by levator and depressor nerve activity). Many observed characteristics are similar to those exhibited by intact animals, suggesting a dominant role for feedforward control in cockroach locomotion. Based on these data we posit a connectivity scheme among components of the locomotion pattern generating system. PMID:27422902

  5. Low frequency variability of European weather patterns and its impact on power generation in northern Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masato, Giacomo; Slavov, Georgi

    2016-04-01

    It is well known that Europe is becoming increasingly reliant on the power generation from the solar and wind sources. Germany is a leader in such a trend - it is then interesting to study to what extent the low-frequency variability of the European weather patterns impacts the power production in this country. Rather than identifying such patterns starting from the weather angle, four weather regimes are identified that maximize and minimize the production of solar and wind power. The analysis of their past occurrence and trends allows us to estimate the potential amount of energy produced for any given year (assuming a constant installed capacity). It is found that the sole change in such weather regimes over the recent years is able to drive up to a 20% annual difference in power generation. This also throws an interesting challenge at the scientific community, whereby the future projection of these regimes can heavily influence both the short- and long-term Eurozone plans in terms of European renewable energy targets.

  6. Scalable and enhanced triboelectric output power generation by surface functionalized nanoimprint patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyeog Kwon, Yang; Shin, Sung-Ho; Jung, Joo-Yun; Nah, Junghyo

    2016-05-01

    We report nanoimprint lithographic submicron surface patterning for scalable output power generation and performance enhancement in triboelectric nanogenerators (TENGs). Specifically, one contact surface of a TENG is nanoimprinted with polyurethane acrylate (PUA) lines in different pitches and the counter contact surface is coated with perfluoropolyether (PFPE). The results show that a TENG with 200 nm pitch PUA lines exhibits voltage and current up to ˜430 V and ˜55 μA cm-2, generating about a sixfold higher output power than that with a flat PUA surface at an applied force of 0.3 MPa. In addition, scalable output power was obtained by adjusting line pitches. Further enhancement in output power was also demonstrated by chemically functionalizing the PUA line patterns with poly (diallyldimethylammonium chloride) (PDDA). The PDDA functionalization boosted voltage and current up to ˜500 V and ˜100 μA cm-2, respectively, which corresponds to ˜50% power density enhancement. The approach introduced here is a simple, effective, scalable and reproducible way to fabricate TENGs.

  7. Catabolic and regulatory systems in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 involved in electricity generation in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kasai, Takuya; Hirose, Atsumi; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2015-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a facultative anaerobe that respires using a variety of inorganic and organic compounds. MR-1 is also capable of utilizing extracellular solid materials, including anodes in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), as electron acceptors, thereby enabling electricity generation. As MFCs have the potential to generate electricity from biomass waste and wastewater, MR-1 has been extensively studied to identify the molecular systems that are involved in electricity generation in MFCs. These studies have demonstrated the importance of extracellular electron-transfer (EET) pathways that electrically connect the quinone pool in the cytoplasmic membrane to extracellular electron acceptors. Electricity generation is also dependent on intracellular catabolic pathways that oxidize electron donors, such as lactate, and regulatory systems that control the expression of genes encoding the components of catabolic and electron-transfer pathways. In addition, recent findings suggest that cell-surface polymers, e.g., exopolysaccharides, and secreted chemicals, which function as electron shuttles, are also involved in electricity generation. Despite these advances in our knowledge on the EET processes in MR-1, further efforts are necessary to fully understand the underlying intra- and extracellular molecular systems for electricity generation in MFCs. We suggest that investigating how MR-1 coordinates these systems to efficiently transfer electrons to electrodes and conserve electrochemical energy for cell proliferation is important for establishing the biological basis for MFCs. PMID:26136738

  8. Surveys on specific patterns of facility intallation of photovoltaic power generating technologies for international cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1993-03-01

    The objective is to contribute to the international introduction of photovoltaic power generation. To do this, its load patterns, device constitution, land areas, and prices were rearranged and standardized so that design standardization and efficiency improvement may be achieved, and appropriate introduction patterns may be selected from climatic conditions at various sites. Areas dealt with are Africa, Asia, Oceania, and South and Central America. The basic design consists of combination of solar cells with storage batteries for DC load, whereas inverters were added for AC load. Facility capacities were designed so that they can be calculated by assuming general load menus comprising lighting, pumps, and electric appliances, as well as load patterns. Because of non-electrified areas requiring insolation to take care of all of the annual load, minimum monthly average insolation on slopes was used to calculate solar cell capacities. While storage battery capacities will be established upon investigating climatic conditions at proposed sites, arrangements were made on selecting charge controllers that can avoid overcharging and overdischarging due to variation in insolation. A design procedure document was prepared so that the basic design could be carried out efficiently.

  9. Central pattern generators for social vocalization: Androgen-dependent neurophysiological mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Andrew H.; Remage-Healey, Luke

    2008-01-01

    Historically, most studies of vertebrate central pattern generators (CPGs) have focused on mechanisms for locomotion and respiration. Here, we highlight new results for ectothermic vertebrates, namely teleost fish and amphibians, showing how androgenic steroids can influence the temporal patterning of CPGs for social vocalization. Investigations of vocalizing teleosts show how androgens can rapidly (within minutes) modulate the neurophysiological output of the vocal CPG (fictive vocalizations that mimic the temporal properties of natural vocalizations) inclusive of their divergent actions between species, as well as intraspecific differences between male reproductive morphs. Studies of anuran amphibians (frogs) demonstrate that long-term steroid treatments (wks) can masculinize the fictive vocalizations of females, inclusive of its sensitivity to rapid modulation by serotonin. Given the conserved organization of vocal control systems across vertebrate groups, the vocal CPGs of fish and amphibians provide tractable models for identifying androgen-dependent events that are fundamental to the mechanisms of vocal motor patterning. These basic mechanisms can also inform our understanding of the more complex CPGs for vocalization, and social behaviors in general, that have evolved among birds and mammals. PMID:18262186

  10. Atomic layer deposition on phase-shift lithography generated photoresist patterns for 1D nanochannel fabrication.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Krüger, Michael; Stevens, Gregory B; Zacharias, Margit

    2010-12-01

    A versatile, low-cost, and flexible approach is presented for the fabrication of millimeter-long, sub-100 nm wide 1D nanochannels with tunable wall properties (wall thickness and material) over wafer-scale areas on glass, alumina, and silicon surfaces. This approach includes three fabrication steps. First, sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns were generated by near-field contact phase-shift lithography (NFC-PSL) using an inexpensive homemade borosilicate mask (NFC-PSM). Second, various metal oxides were directly coated on the resist patterns with low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). Finally, the remaining photoresist was removed via an acetone dip, and then planar nanochannel arrays were formed on the substrate. In contrast to all the previous fabrication routes, the sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns produced by NFC-PSL are directly employed as a sacrificial layer for the creation of nanochannels. Because both the NFC-PSL and the ALD deposition are highly reproducible processes, the strategy proposed here can be regarded as a general route for nanochannel fabrication in a simplified and reliable manner. In addition, the fabricated nanochannels were used as templates to synthesize various organic and inorganic 1D nanostructures on the substrate surface. PMID:21047101

  11. Atomic layer deposition on phase-shift lithography generated photoresist patterns for 1D nanochannel fabrication.

    PubMed

    Güder, Firat; Yang, Yang; Krüger, Michael; Stevens, Gregory B; Zacharias, Margit

    2010-12-01

    A versatile, low-cost, and flexible approach is presented for the fabrication of millimeter-long, sub-100 nm wide 1D nanochannels with tunable wall properties (wall thickness and material) over wafer-scale areas on glass, alumina, and silicon surfaces. This approach includes three fabrication steps. First, sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns were generated by near-field contact phase-shift lithography (NFC-PSL) using an inexpensive homemade borosilicate mask (NFC-PSM). Second, various metal oxides were directly coated on the resist patterns with low-temperature atomic layer deposition (ALD). Finally, the remaining photoresist was removed via an acetone dip, and then planar nanochannel arrays were formed on the substrate. In contrast to all the previous fabrication routes, the sub-100 nm photoresist line patterns produced by NFC-PSL are directly employed as a sacrificial layer for the creation of nanochannels. Because both the NFC-PSL and the ALD deposition are highly reproducible processes, the strategy proposed here can be regarded as a general route for nanochannel fabrication in a simplified and reliable manner. In addition, the fabricated nanochannels were used as templates to synthesize various organic and inorganic 1D nanostructures on the substrate surface.

  12. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, H.; Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.

    2012-12-01

    A dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012, is used to simulate two-dimensional explosions in a brittle material. The theoretical patterns of circumferential and radial fractures are quantitatively compared with those produced by point explosions in very brittle "candy glass" plates. In these experiments the evolution of the fracture pattern is monitored using high-speed digital photography, which also images the resultant elastic waves (P and S). Theoretical estimates of the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking as well as the propagation speed of the comminution front and the growth-rate of individual radial cracks all compare well with the experimental observations. The wave-forms of the P and S waves, specifically the local particle velocities, are also recorded at selected points using laser vibrometers. Asymmetric fracture patterns caused by a non isotropic pre-stress, the preferred orientation of initial flaws (a rift plane), or a lithostatic gradient lead to the generation of strong S-waves from the otherwise spherically symmetric point source.

  13. Properties of the Higgs particle in a model involving a single unified fermion generation

    SciTech Connect

    Libanov, M. V. Nugaev, E. Ya.

    2007-05-15

    The properties of the Higgs boson are studied within a model where three generations of Standard Model fermions emerge from one generation in a theory featuring two extra spatial dimensions. It is shown that, despite a nontrivial external field forming a brane, the interactions of the Higgs particle in the effective four-dimensional theory are virtually identical to the interactions of this particle in the Standard Model. Arguments in favor of the statement that the Higgs boson must be rather light in the model being considered are also presented.

  14. Mechanisms of left-right coordination in mammalian locomotor pattern generation circuits: a mathematical modeling view.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Bacak, Bartholomew J; Talpalar, Adolfo E; Rybak, Ilya A

    2015-05-01

    The locomotor gait in limbed animals is defined by the left-right leg coordination and locomotor speed. Coordination between left and right neural activities in the spinal cord controlling left and right legs is provided by commissural interneurons (CINs). Several CIN types have been genetically identified, including the excitatory V3 and excitatory and inhibitory V0 types. Recent studies demonstrated that genetic elimination of all V0 CINs caused switching from a normal left-right alternating activity to a left-right synchronized "hopping" pattern. Furthermore, ablation of only the inhibitory V0 CINs (V0D subtype) resulted in a lack of left-right alternation at low locomotor frequencies and retaining this alternation at high frequencies, whereas selective ablation of the excitatory V0 neurons (V0V subtype) maintained the left-right alternation at low frequencies and switched to a hopping pattern at high frequencies. To analyze these findings, we developed a simplified mathematical model of neural circuits consisting of four pacemaker neurons representing left and right, flexor and extensor rhythm-generating centers interacting via commissural pathways representing V3, V0D, and V0V CINs. The locomotor frequency was controlled by a parameter defining the excitation of neurons and commissural pathways mimicking the effects of N-methyl-D-aspartate on locomotor frequency in isolated rodent spinal cord preparations. The model demonstrated a typical left-right alternating pattern under control conditions, switching to a hopping activity at any frequency after removing both V0 connections, a synchronized pattern at low frequencies with alternation at high frequencies after removing only V0D connections, and an alternating pattern at low frequencies with hopping at high frequencies after removing only V0V connections. We used bifurcation theory and fast-slow decomposition methods to analyze network behavior in the above regimes and transitions between them. The model

  15. Beyond Participation: The Association between School Extracurricular Activities and Involvement in Violence across Generations of Immigration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiang, Xin; Peterson, Ruth D.

    2012-01-01

    Participation in extracurricular activities is purported to protect the broad spectrum of youth from a host of behavioral risks. Yet, empirical research on the extent to which this assumption holds for involvement in violence by immigrant youth is limited. Thus, using data for 13,236 (51.8% female) adolescents from the National Longitudinal Study…

  16. Family food involvement and frequency of family dinner meals among Australian children aged 10-12years. Cross-sectional and longitudinal associations with dietary patterns.

    PubMed

    Leech, Rebecca M; McNaughton, Sarah A; Crawford, David A; Campbell, Karen J; Pearson, Natalie; Timperio, Anna

    2014-04-01

    Involvement in meal preparation and eating meals with the family are associated with better dietary patterns in adolescents, however little research has included older children or longitudinal study designs. This 3-year longitudinal study examines cross-sectional and longitudinal associations between family food involvement, family dinner meal frequency and dietary patterns during late childhood. Questionnaires were completed by parents of 188 children from Greater Melbourne, Australia at baseline in 2002 (mean age=11.25years) and at follow-up in 2006 (mean age=14.16years). Principal components analysis (PCA) was used to identify dietary patterns. Factor analysis (FA) was used to determine the principal factors from six indicators of family food involvement. Multiple linear regression models were used to predict the dietary patterns of children and adolescents at baseline and at follow-up, 3years later, from baseline indicators of family food involvement and frequency of family dinner meals. PCA revealed two dietary patterns, labeled a healthful pattern and an energy-dense pattern. FA revealed one factor for family food involvement. Cross-sectionally among boys, family food involvement score (β=0.55, 95% CI: 0.02, 1.07) and eating family dinner meals daily (β=1.11, 95% CI: 0.27, 1.96) during late childhood were positively associated with the healthful pattern. Eating family dinner meals daily was inversely associated with the energy-dense pattern, cross-sectionally among boys (β=-0.56, 95% CI: -1.06, -0.06). No significant cross-sectional associations were found among girls and no significant longitudinal associations were found for either gender. Involvement in family food and eating dinner with the family during late childhood may have a positive influence on dietary patterns of boys. No evidence was found to suggest the effects on dietary patterns persist into adolescence.

  17. Controlling the magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale and generation of magnetic bead patterns for microfluidic applications.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xu; Feng, Xuan; Hu, Jun; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2011-04-19

    As is well known, controlling the local magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale in a microfluidic chip is significant and has many applications in bioanalysis based on magnetic beads. However, it is a challenge to tailor the magnetic field introduced by external permanent magnets or electromagnets on the micrometer scale. Here, we demonstrated a simple approach to controlling the local magnetic field distribution on the micrometer scale in a microfluidic chip by nickel patterns encapsulated in a thin poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) film under the fluid channel. With the precisely controlled magnetic field, magnetic bead patterns were convenient to generate. Moreover, two kinds of fluorescent magnetic beads were patterned in the microfluidic channel, which demonstrated that it was possible to generate different functional magnetic bead patterns in situ, and could be used for the detection of multiple targets. In addition, this method was applied to generate cancer cell patterns.

  18. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  19. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-08-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns.

  20. Bisphenol A Exposure May Induce Hepatic Lipid Accumulation via Reprogramming the DNA Methylation Patterns of Genes Involved in Lipid Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Zhang-Hong; Pan, Jie-Xue; Jin, Lu-Yang; Xu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Tian-Tian; Ullah, Kamran; Rahman, Tanzil Ur; Ren, Jun; Cheng, Yi; Dong, Xin-Yan; Sheng, Jian-Zhong; Huang, He-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a role of bisphenol A (BPA) in metabolic disorders. However, the underlying mechanism is still unclear. Using a mouse BPA exposure model, we investigated the effects of long-term BPA exposure on lipid metabolism and the underlying mechanisms. The male mice exposed to BPA (0.5 μg BPA /kg/day, a human relevant dose) for 10 months exhibited significant hepatic accumulation of triglycerides and cholesterol. The liver cells from the BPA-exposed mice showed significantly increased expression levels of the genes related to lipid synthesis. These liver cells showed decreased DNA methylation levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2, and increased expression levels of Srebf1 and Srebf2 that may upregulate the genes related to lipid synthesis. The expression levels of DNA methyltransferases were decreased in BPA-exposed mouse liver. Hepa1-6 cell line treated with BPA showed decreased expression levels of DNA methyltransferases and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. DNA methyltransferase knockdown in Hepa1-6 led to hypo-methylation and increased expression levels of genes involved in lipid synthesis. Our results suggest that long-term BPA exposure could induce hepatic lipid accumulation, which may be due to the epigenetic reprogramming of the genes involved in lipid metabolism, such as the alterations of DNA methylation patterns. PMID:27502578

  1. Investigation of vortex clouds and droplet sizes in heated water spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles.

    PubMed

    Naz, M Y; Sulaiman, S A; Ariwahjoedi, B; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit.

  2. Investigation of Vortex Clouds and Droplet Sizes in Heated Water Spray Patterns Generated by Axisymmetric Full Cone Nozzles

    PubMed Central

    Naz, M. Y.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ariwahjoedi, B.; Ku Shaari, Ku Zilati

    2013-01-01

    The hot water sprays are an important part of many industrial processes, where the detailed knowledge of physical phenomena involved in jet transportation, interaction, secondary breakup, evaporation, and coalescence of droplets is important to reach more efficient processes. The objective of the work was to study the water spray jet breakup dynamics, vortex cloud formation, and droplet size distribution under varying temperature and load pressure. Using a high speed camera, the spray patterns generated by axisymmetric full cone nozzles were visualized as a function water temperature and load pressure. The image analysis confirmed that the spray cone angle and width do not vary significantly with increasing Reynolds and Weber numbers at early injection phases leading to increased macroscopic spray propagation. The formation and decay of semitorus like vortex clouds were also noticed in spray structures generated at near water boiling point temperature. For the nozzle with smallest orifice diameter (1.19 mm), these vortex clouds were very clear at 90°C heating temperature and 1 bar water load pressure. In addition, the sauter mean diameter (SMD) of the spray droplets was also measured by using Phase Doppler Anemometry (PDA) at different locations downstream of the nozzle exit. It was noticed that SMD varies slightly w.r.t. position when measured at room temperature whereas at higher temperature values, it became almost constant at distance of 55 mm downstream of the nozzle exit. PMID:24307881

  3. Directivity patterns of ultrasonic waves generated by a laser pulse at the interface between two elastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anagnostopoulos, E.; Ségur, D.; Dehoux, T.; Audoin, B.

    2016-02-01

    Directivity patterns of an acoustic source generated by the absorption of a laser pulse at the interface between a transparent epoxy-resin half-space and an opaque CFRP isotropised half-space have been calculated using the reciprocity theorem. Longitudinal and shear radiation patterns of acoustic field emitted in the CFRP are compared in respect with the loading surface condition.

  4. Characterization of the NTRK1 genomic region involved in chromosomal rearrangements generating TRK oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    Greco, A.; Mariani, C.; Miranda, C.; Pagliardini, S.; Pierotti, M.A. )

    1993-11-01

    TRK oncogenes are created by chromosomal rearrangements linking the tyrosine-kinase domain of the NTRK1 gene (encoding one of the receptors for the nerve growth factor) to foreign activating sequences. TRK oncogenes are frequently detected in human papillary thyroid carcinoma, as a result of rearrangements involving at least three different activating genes. The authors have found that the rearrangements creating all the TRK oncogenes so far characterized fall within a 2.9-kb XbaI/SmaI restriction fragment of the NTRK1 gene. Here they report the nucleotide sequence and the exon organization of this fragment. 13 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Development-related expression patterns of protein-coding and miRNA genes involved in porcine muscle growth.

    PubMed

    Wang, F J; Jin, L; Guo, Y Q; Liu, R; He, M N; Li, M Z; Li, X W

    2014-01-01

    Muscle growth and development is associated with remarkable changes in protein-coding and microRNA (miRNA) gene expression. To determine the expression patterns of genes and miRNAs related to muscle growth and development, we measured the expression levels of 25 protein-coding and 16 miRNA genes in skeletal and cardiac muscles throughout 5 developmental stages by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The Short Time-Series Expression Miner (STEM) software clustering results showed that growth-related genes were downregulated at all developmental stages in both the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, indicating their involvement in early developmental stages. Furthermore, genes related to muscle atrophy, such as forkhead box 1 and muscle ring finger, showed unregulated expression with increasing age, suggesting a decrease in protein synthesis during the later stages of skeletal muscle development. We found that development of the cardiac muscle was a complex process in which growth-related genes were highly expressed during embryonic development, but they did not show uniform postnatal expression patterns. Moreover, the expression level of miR-499, which enhances the expression of the β-myosin heavy chain, was significantly different in the psoas major and longissimus dorsi muscles, suggesting the involvement of miR-499 in the determination of skeletal muscle fiber types. We also performed correlation analyses of messenger RNA and miRNA expression. We found negative relationships between miR-486 and forkhead box 1, and miR-133a and serum response factor at all developmental stages, suggesting that forkhead box 1 and serum response factor are potential targets of miR-486 and miR-133a, respectively.

  6. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement in chromosome 6p25 deletion syndrome with concomitant 5p15 duplication

    PubMed Central

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Smith, Kath; Williams, Steve; Griffiths, Paul D.; Parker, Michael J.; Mordekar, Santosh R.

    2012-01-01

    Sub-telomeric deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are a well-described clinical entity characterized by developmental impairment, hypotonia, eye abnormalities and defects in the heart and kidneys. Chromosome 5p terminal duplication is a rarer entity, associated with developmental impairment and facial dysmorphism. We report a 3-year-old patient with a chromosome 6p25.1pter deletion and chromosome 5p15.1pter duplication who had global developmental impairment and unusual cerebral white matter changes, with hypoplastic corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan. We discuss the differential diagnosis to consider in patients with this appearance on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan and reiterate the need for chromosome analysis in patients with this pattern of developmental anomaly. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement has not been reported in chromosomal deletion/duplication syndromes. With the increasing use of molecular karyotyping for patients with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay, it is important to consider the exact size and nature of chromosomal deletion/duplication, in order to provide families with prognostic information and recurrence risk. This in turn, will help provide valuable information regarding the natural history of rare chromosomal imbalances.

  7. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement in chromosome 6p25 deletion syndrome with concomitant 5p15 duplication.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, Meena; Smith, Kath; Williams, Steve; Griffiths, Paul D; Parker, Michael J; Mordekar, Santosh R

    2012-12-01

    Sub-telomeric deletions of the short arm of chromosome 6 are a well-described clinical entity characterized by developmental impairment, hypotonia, eye abnormalities and defects in the heart and kidneys. Chromosome 5p terminal duplication is a rarer entity, associated with developmental impairment and facial dysmorphism. We report a 3-year-old patient with a chromosome 6p25.1pter deletion and chromosome 5p15.1pter duplication who had global developmental impairment and unusual cerebral white matter changes, with hypoplastic corpus callosum and cerebellar vermis on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan. We discuss the differential diagnosis to consider in patients with this appearance on magnetic resonance imaging -brain scan and reiterate the need for chromosome analysis in patients with this pattern of developmental anomaly. Tigroid pattern of cerebral white matter involvement has not been reported in chromosomal deletion/duplication syndromes. With the increasing use of molecular karyotyping for patients with multiple congenital anomalies and developmental delay, it is important to consider the exact size and nature of chromosomal deletion/duplication, in order to provide families with prognostic information and recurrence risk. This in turn, will help provide valuable information regarding the natural history of rare chromosomal imbalances. PMID:27625832

  8. Minisatellite variants generated in yeast meiosis involve DNA removal during gene conversion.

    PubMed Central

    Bishop, A J; Louis, E J; Borts, R H

    2000-01-01

    Two yeast minisatellite alleles were cloned and inserted into a genetically defined interval in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Analysis of flanking markers in combination with sequencing allowed the determination of the meiotic events that produced minisatellites with altered lengths. Tetrad analysis revealed that gene conversions, deletions, or complex combinations of both were involved in producing minisatellite variants. Similar changes were obtained following selection for nearby gene conversions or crossovers among random spores. The largest class of events involving the minisatellite was a 3:1 segregation of parental-size alleles, a class that would have been missed in all previous studies of minisatellites. Comparison of the sequences of the parental and novel alleles revealed that DNA must have been removed from the recipient array while a newly synthesized copy of donor array sequences was inserted. The length of inserted sequences did not appear to be constrained by the length of DNA that was removed. In cases where one or both sides of the insertion could be determined, the insertion endpoints were consistent with the suggestion that the event was mediated by alignment of homologous stretches of donor/recipient DNA. PMID:10978271

  9. Multi-Generational Perspectives: How They Interact and Impact Service to Students and Their Families in an Age of Highly-Involved Parents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wawrzusin, Andrea C.

    2013-01-01

    Although there have always been differences in how generations navigate decision-making in higher education, highly involved parents have led to conflicting inter-generational educational expectations. This research study investigated the phenomenon of parental involvement and how meanings on educational expectations vary depending on generation.…

  10. Development of a morphing structure with the incorporation of central pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bliss, Thomas K.; Bart-Smith, Hilary; Iwasaki, Tetsuya

    2006-03-01

    The Manta Ray, Manta birostris, is an amazing creature, propelling itself through the water with the elegant and complex flapping of its wings. Achieving outstanding efficiencies, engineers are looking for ways to mimic its flight through the water and harness its propulsive techniques. This study combines two biologically inspired aspects to achieve this goal: morphing structures actuated with a biomimetic neural network control system. It is believed that this combination will prove capable of producing the oscillatory motions necessary for locomotion. In this paper, a four-truss structure with three actuators is chosen and its performance capabilities are analyzed. A synthetic central pattern generator, which provides the fundamental control mechanisms for rhythmic motion in animals, is designed to realize an oscillatory control of the three actuators. The control system is simulated using Matlab, then combined with LabVIEW to control the four-truss structure. The system's performance is analyzed, with specific attention to both transient and steady-state behavior.

  11. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-10-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators.

  12. A model of a flexible anguilliform swimmer driven by a central pattern generator with proprioceptive feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlet, Christina; Tytell, Eric; Hoffman, Kathleen; Fauci, Lisa

    2015-11-01

    The swimming of a simple vertebrate, the lamprey, can shed light on how a flexible body can couple with a fluid environment to swim rapidly and efficiently. Animals use proprioceptive sensory information to sense how their bodies are bending, and then adjust the neural signals to their muscles to improve performance. We will present recent progress in the development of a computational model of a lamprey swimming in a Navier-Stokes fluid where a simple central pattern generator model, based on phase oscillators, is coupled to the evolving body dynamics of the swimmer through curvature and curvature derivative feedback. Such feedback can be positive (frequency decreasing), negative (frequency increasing), or mixed (positive to one side of the body and negative to the other, or vice versa). We will examine how the emergent swimming behavior and cost of transport depends upon these functional forms of proprioceptive feedback chosen in the model.

  13. A new Pulse-Pattern Generator based on LabVIEW FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziegler, F.; Beck, D.; Brand, H.; Hahn, H.; Marx, G.; Schweikhard, L.

    2012-07-01

    For the control of experimental sequences composed of triggers, gates and delays a Pulse-Pattern Generator (PPG) has been developed based on a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) addressed in a LabVIEW environment. It allows a highly reproducible timing of measurement procedures by up to 64 individual channels with pulse and delay periods from the nanoseconds to the minutes range. The PPG has been implemented in the context of the development of a new control system for the ClusterTrap setup, an ion storage device for atomic-cluster research, in close contact with the SHIPTRAP and ISOLTRAP collaborations at GSI and CERN, respectively. As the new PPG is not ion-trap specific it can be employed in any experiment based on sequences of triggers, pulses and delays.

  14. [Study on the control of dynamic artificial limb ankle based on central pattern generator].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Xu, Caiyu; Li, Mingyue; Su, Longtao

    2014-12-01

    In order to obtain the normal gait for the prosthesis-carrier with the change of external environment and gait, we designed a model of dynamic ankle prosthesis and control system and introduced the strategy of central pattern generator (CPG) about the moving trail of dynamic ankle prosthesis. The dynamic parts, which are incorporated in the model of dynamic ankle prosthesis, provide power in order to have anthropic function and character. The tool of Matlab/simulink was used to simulate the strategy. The simulation results showed that the strategy of CPG learn- ing control in this study was effective and could track the reference trail rapidly and fit the moving trail of a person's normal limb. It can make the prosthetic timely regulation and action, enhance the prosthetic intelligence. It has im- portant practical value for intelligent prosthesis development based on this analysis of technology.

  15. Reticular activating system of a central pattern generator: premovement electrical potentials

    PubMed Central

    Tapia, Jesus A; Trejo, Argelia; Linares, Pablo; Alva, J Manuel; Kristeva, Rumyana; Manjarrez, Elias

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, here we characterize a bulbar reticular activating system (RAS) of neurons in decerebrate, deafferented and decerebellated cats producing a premovement electrical potential that we named obex slow potential (OSP). The OSP occurs about 0.8 ± 0.4 sec prior to the onset of a fictive-scratching-episode. Here, we describe two classes of bulbar neurons, off-on, which are silent but exhibit a 80 ± 56 Hz firing discharge at the beginning of (and during) the OSP, and on-off interneurons, with a 27 ± 14 Hz firing activity that stops at the beginning of (and during) the OSP. We suggest that these OSP-associated neurons belong to a descending RAS, which contributes to the activation of the spinal central pattern generators. PMID:24303193

  16. Dynamic control of a central pattern generator circuit: a computational model of the snail feeding network.

    PubMed

    Vavoulis, Dimitris V; Straub, Volko A; Kemenes, Ildikó; Kemenes, György; Feng, Jianfeng; Benjamin, Paul R

    2007-05-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are networks underlying rhythmic motor behaviours and they are dynamically regulated by neuronal elements that are extrinsic or intrinsic to the rhythmogenic circuit. In the feeding system of the pond snail, Lymnaea stagnalis, the extrinsic slow oscillator (SO) interneuron controls the frequency of the feeding rhythm and the N3t (tonic) has a dual role; it is an intrinsic CPG interneuron, but it also suppresses CPG activity in the absence of food, acting as a decision-making element in the feeding circuit. The firing patterns of the SO and N3t neurons and their synaptic connections with the rest of the CPG are known, but how these regulate network function is not well understood. This was investigated by building a computer model of the feeding network based on a minimum number of cells (N1M, N2v and N3t) required to generate the three-phase motor rhythm together with the SO that was used to activate the system. The intrinsic properties of individual neurons were represented using two-compartment models containing currents of the Hodgkin-Huxley type. Manipulations of neuronal activity in the N3t and SO neurons in the model produced similar quantitative effects to food and electrical stimulation in the biological network indicating that the model is a useful tool for studying the dynamic properties of the feeding circuit. The model also predicted novel effects of electrical stimulation of two CPG interneurons (N1M and N2v). When tested experimentally, similar effects were found in the biological system providing further validation of our model.

  17. Correlation of hierarchal Upper Silurian stacking patterns generated by Milankovitch orbital forcing

    SciTech Connect

    Mauriello, D.J.; Ketterer, M.W. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    The Upper Silurian Wills Creek Formation in Pennsylvania and Maryland is entirely divisible into meter-scale allocycles. Stacking patterns of these allocycles reveal a hierarchy consistent with predictions based on the Milankovitch model of orbital forcing. Asymmetrical Sixth-Order cycles (PACs), bounded by surfaces produced by precessional sea-level rises, are divisible into a lower highstand portion and an upper lowstand portion separated by a sharp sea-level fall surface produced by a rapid sea-level drop within the precessional cycle. Sixth-Order cycles may be genetically grouped into Fifth-Order (100 ky.) and subsequently, Fourth-Order (400 ky.) cycles, each of which exhibits a distinct internal symmetry. Fifth-Order cycles, on average three to four meters in thickness, are composed of a basal transgressive portion consisting of two PACs followed by two or three successively regressive PACs. Four Fifth-Order cycles constitute a complete Fourth-Order cycle, in which the second Fifth-Order cycle contains facies representing the deepest or least restricted paleoenvironments. In each case, the fundamental Sixth-Order cycles were generated by the precessional signal modulated by orbital eccentricity variations. Over distances in excess of 100 km, Wills Creek facies change laterally from nearshore marine to fluvial coastal plain. Stacking patterns in these distinct facies are identical, and thus correlative, indicating the basin-wide extent of the stratigraphic events which produced these patterns. These correlations demonstrate that Milankovitch-driven eustatic sea-level fluctuations were occurring during the Late Silurian.

  18. Diversity of wing patterns and abdomen-generated substrate sounds in 3 European scorpionfly species

    PubMed Central

    Hartbauer, Manfred; Gepp, Johannes; Hinteregger, Karin; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    In the genus Panorpa (Insecta: Mecoptera), also known as scorpionflies, premating behavior includes repeated sequences of slow wing movements (waving, fanning, flagging) which are accompanied by rapid abdomen vibrations that generate substantial substrate-borne sound. It is still unknown whether wing patterns or vibratory signals contain information about species identity, sex and/or the quality of potential mating partners. Besides species-specific pheromones, these multimodal signals may be of particular importance for the maintenance of reproductive isolation in sympatrically occurring scorpionfly species. Here, we analyzed phyologenetic relationships among, and the pattern of forewings as well as substrate-borne sound in 3 different sympatric Central-European scorpionfly species (P. communis, P. germanica, and P. alpina). Divergence time estimates, based on 879 bp of the mitochondrial COI gene, indicate longstanding separate evolutionary histories for the studied Panorpa species. Morphological analysis revealed that wing length as an indicator of body size increased in the following order: P. alpina < P. germanica < P. communis. Individuals can be assigned to the correct species and sex with high accuracy just by evaluation of the number of dark spots and the proportion of wing pigmentation. Despite high variability of interpulse period at an individual level, across species analysis revealed a positive correlation of average interpulse period as well as mean signal amplitude with forewing length. These results suggest wing patterns, but less likely vibratory signals, to contain information about species identity. Furthermore, receivers may be able to estimate the body size of a signaler solely on the basis of substrate-borne sound. PMID:24818592

  19. Homologues of serotonergic central pattern generator neurons in related nudibranch molluscs with divergent behaviors.

    PubMed

    Newcomb, James M; Katz, Paul S

    2007-04-01

    Homologues of a neuron that contributes to a species-specific behavior were identified and characterized in species lacking that behavior. The nudibranch Tritonia diomedea swims by flexing its body dorsally and ventrally. The dorsal swim interneurons (DSIs) are components of the central pattern generator (CPG) underlying this rhythmic motor pattern and also activate crawling. Homologues of the DSIs were identified in six nudibranchs that do not exhibit dorsal-ventral swimming: Tochuina tetraquetra, Melibe leonina, Dendronotus iris, D. frondosus, Armina californica, and Triopha catalinae. Homology was based upon shared features that distinguish the DSIs from all other neurons: (1) serotonin immunoreactivity, (2) location in the Cerebral serotonergic posterior (CeSP) cluster, and (3) axon projection to the contralateral pedal ganglion. The DSI homologues, named CeSP-A neurons, share additional features with the DSIs: irregular basal firing, synchronous inputs, electrical coupling, and reciprocal inhibition. Unlike the DSIs, the CeSP-A neurons were not rhythmically active in response to nerve stimulation. The CeSP-A neurons in Tochuina and Triopha also excited homologues of the Tritonia Pd5 neuron, a crawling efferent. Thus, the CeSP-A neurons and the DSIs may be part of a conserved network related to crawling that may have been co-opted into a rhythmic swim CPG in Tritonia. PMID:17180703

  20. Directed functional connectivity matures with motor learning in a cortical pattern generator

    PubMed Central

    Day, Nancy F.; Terleski, Kyle L.; Nykamp, Duane Q.

    2013-01-01

    Sequential motor skills may be encoded by feedforward networks that consist of groups of neurons that fire in sequence (Abeles 1991; Long et al. 2010). However, there has been no evidence of an anatomic map of activation sequence in motor control circuits, which would be potentially detectable as directed functional connectivity of coactive neuron groups. The proposed pattern generator for birdsong, the HVC (Long and Fee 2008; Vu et al. 1994), contains axons that are preferentially oriented in the rostrocaudal axis (Nottebohm et al. 1982; Stauffer et al. 2012). We used four-tetrode recordings to assess the activity of ensembles of single neurons along the rostrocaudal HVC axis in anesthetized zebra finches. We found an axial, polarized neural network in which sequential activity is directionally organized along the rostrocaudal axis in adult males, who produce a stereotyped song. Principal neurons fired in rostrocaudal order and with interneurons that were rostral to them, suggesting that groups of excitatory neurons fire at the leading edge of travelling waves of inhibition. Consistent with the synchronization of neurons by caudally travelling waves of inhibition, the activity of interneurons was more coherent in the orthogonal mediolateral axis than in the rostrocaudal axis. If directed functional connectivity within the HVC is important for stereotyped, learned song, then it may be lacking in juveniles, which sing a highly variable song. Indeed, we found little evidence for network directionality in juveniles. These data indicate that a functionally directed network within the HVC matures during sensorimotor learning and may underlie vocal patterning. PMID:23175804

  1. Pectin methylesterase-generated methanol may be involved in tobacco leaf growth.

    PubMed

    Komarova, T V; Pozdyshev, D V; Petrunia, I V; Sheshukova, E V; Dorokhov, Y L

    2014-02-01

    Plant leaves undergo a sink-source modification of intercellular macromolecular transport during the transition from carbon import to carbon export. After assessing the role of metabolite signaling in gene regulation in Nicotiana tabacum sink and source leaves, we observed increased pectin methylesterase (PME)-mediated methanol generation in immature leaves. Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH), we identified a number of genes whose activity changes from sink to source leaves. The most abundant SSH-identified genes appeared to be sensitive to methanol. We hypothesize that tobacco leaf maturation and the sink-source transition are accompanied by a change in mRNA levels of genes that function in methanol-dependent cell signaling.

  2. Probability matching involves rule-generating ability: a neuropsychological mechanism dealing with probabilities.

    PubMed

    Unturbe, Jesús; Corominas, Josep

    2007-09-01

    Probability matching is a nonoptimal strategy consisting of selecting each alternative in proportion to its reinforcement contingency. However, matching is related to hypothesis testing in an incidental, marginal, and methodologically disperse manner. Although some authors take it for granted, the relationship has not been demonstrated. Fifty-eight healthy participants performed a modified, bias-free probabilistic two-choice task, the Simple Prediction Task (SPT). Self-reported spurious rules were recorded and then graded by two independent judges. Participants who produced the most complex rules selected the probability matching strategy and were therefore less successful than those who did not produce rules. The close relationship between probability matching and rule generating makes SPT a complementary instrument for studying decision making, which might throw some light on the debate about irrationality. The importance of the reaction times, both before and after responding, is also discussed.

  3. Pattern of Pulmonary Involvement and Outcome of Aspiration Pneumonia in Patients with Altered Consciousness Admitted in Dhaka Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, R A; Azad, A K; Sardar, H; Siddiqui, M R; Saad, S; Rahman, S; Sikder, A S

    2016-01-01

    Aspiration is well recognized as a cause of pulmonary disease and is not uncommon in patients with altered consciousness.The mortality rate of aspiration pneumonia is approximately 1% in outpatient setting and upto 25% in those requiring hospitalization. This study was done to see the pattern of pulmonary involvement and outcome of aspiration pneumonia in patients with altered consciousness admitted in medicine department of a tertiary care hospital in our country. This was a prospective observational study conducted among the 52 adult patients of aspiration pneumonia with altered consciousness admitted in the medicine department of Dhaka Medical College Hospital (DMCH), during June 2010 to December 2010. Aspiration pneumonia was confirmed by clinical examination and laboratory investigations. Hematologic measurements (TC of WBC, Hb%, ESR, platelet count), chest X-ray, blood gas analysis, blood urea, creatinine and random blood sugar, sputum for Gram staining, sputum for culture sensitivity and blood culture were done in all patients.Assessment of altered conscious patient was done by application of the Glasgow Coma Scale. Case record forms with appropriate questionnaire were filled for all patients. The mean±SD age was 57.42±13.63 years with ranged from 25 to 90 years. Out of 52 patients, 37(71.15%) patients were male and 15(28.85%) patients were female. Following aspiration 76.92% patients developed pneumonitis, 13.46% patients developed lung abscess and only 9.62% patients developed ARDS. Most (33) of the patients had opacity in right lower zone and 13 patients had opacity in the left lower zone, 6 patients had opacity in right mid zone. Only 10 patients had opacity in both lower zones. In this study overall mortality rate was 23%. If only one lobe was involved radiologically, mortality was 8.33%. If two or more lobes on one or both sides were involved, mortality was in the range of 25-91%.

  4. The Graphic Pattern Generation Test in Healthy Aging and Alzheimer's Disease: Psychometric Properties and Normative Data

    PubMed Central

    Sunderaraman, Preeti; Sokolov, Elisaveta; Cines, Sarah; Sullo, Elizabeth; Orly, Aidan; Lerer, Bianca; Karlawish, Jason; Huey, Edward; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Design fluency tests, commonly used in both clinical and research contexts to evaluate nonverbal concept generation, have the potential to offer useful information in the differentiation of healthy versus pathological aging. While normative data for older adults are available for multiple timed versions of this test, similar data have been unavailable for a previously published untimed task, the Graphic Pattern Generation Task (GPG). Time constraints common to almost all of the available design fluency tests may cloud interpretation of higher level executive abilities, for example in individuals with slow processing speed. The current study examined the psychometric properties of the GPG and presents normative data in a sample of 167 healthy older adults (OAs) and 110 individuals diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Results suggest that a brief version of the GPG can be administered reliably, and that this short form has high test-retest and inter-rater reliability. Number of perseverations was higher in individuals with AD as compared to OAs. A cut-off score of 4 or more perseverations showed a moderate degree of sensitivity (76%) and specificity (37%) in distinguishing individuals with AD and OAs. Finally, perseverations were associated with nonmemory indices, underscoring the nonverbal nature of this error in OAs and individuals with AD. PMID:25679880

  5. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  6. Nanophotonic reservoir computing with photonic crystal cavities to generate periodic patterns.

    PubMed

    Fiers, Martin Andre Agnes; Van Vaerenbergh, Thomas; Wyffels, Francis; Verstraeten, David; Schrauwen, Benjamin; Dambre, Joni; Bienstman, Peter

    2014-02-01

    Reservoir computing (RC) is a technique in machine learning inspired by neural systems. RC has been used successfully to solve complex problems such as signal classification and signal generation. These systems are mainly implemented in software, and thereby they are limited in speed and power efficiency. Several optical and optoelectronic implementations have been demonstrated, in which the system has signals with an amplitude and phase. It is proven that these enrich the dynamics of the system, which is beneficial for the performance. In this paper, we introduce a novel optical architecture based on nanophotonic crystal cavities. This allows us to integrate many neurons on one chip, which, compared with other photonic solutions, closest resembles a classical neural network. Furthermore, the components are passive, which simplifies the design and reduces the power consumption. To assess the performance of this network, we train a photonic network to generate periodic patterns, using an alternative online learning rule called first-order reduced and corrected error. For this, we first train a classical hyperbolic tangent reservoir, but then we vary some of the properties to incorporate typical aspects of a photonics reservoir, such as the use of continuous-time versus discrete-time signals and the use of complex-valued versus real-valued signals. Then, the nanophotonic reservoir is simulated and we explore the role of relevant parameters such as the topology, the phases between the resonators, the number of nodes that are biased and the delay between the resonators. It is important that these parameters are chosen such that no strong self-oscillations occur. Finally, our results show that for a signal generation task a complex-valued, continuous-time nanophotonic reservoir outperforms a classical (i.e., discrete-time, real-valued) leaky hyperbolic tangent reservoir (normalized root-mean-square errors=0.030 versus NRMSE=0.127).

  7. Structure of a bifunctional alcohol dehydrogenase involved in bioethanol generation in Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius.

    PubMed

    Extance, Jonathan; Crennell, Susan J; Eley, Kirstin; Cripps, Roger; Hough, David W; Danson, Michael J

    2013-10-01

    Bifunctional alcohol/aldehyde dehydrogenase (ADHE) enzymes are found within many fermentative microorganisms. They catalyse the conversion of an acyl-coenzyme A to an alcohol via an aldehyde intermediate; this is coupled to the oxidation of two NADH molecules to maintain the NAD(+) pool during fermentative metabolism. The structure of the alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) domain of an ADHE protein from the ethanol-producing thermophile Geobacillus thermoglucosidasius has been determined to 2.5 Å resolution. This is the first structure to be reported for such a domain. In silico modelling has been carried out to generate a homology model of the aldehyde dehydrogenase domain, and this was subsequently docked with the ADH-domain structure to model the structure of the complete ADHE protein. This model suggests, for the first time, a structural mechanism for the formation of the large multimeric assemblies or `spirosomes' that are observed for this ADHE protein and which have previously been reported for ADHEs from other organisms.

  8. Auxin-induced hydrogen sulfide generation is involved in lateral root formation in tomato.

    PubMed

    Fang, Tao; Cao, Zeyu; Li, Jiale; Shen, Wenbiao; Huang, Liqin

    2014-03-01

    Similar to auxin, hydrogen sulfide (H2S), mainly produced by l-cysteine desulfhydrase (DES; EC 4.4.1.1) in plants, could induce lateral root formation. The objective of this study was to test whether H2S is also involved in auxin-induced lateral root development in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) seedlings. We observed that auxin depletion-induced down-regulation of transcripts of SlDES1, decreased DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and the inhibition of lateral root formation were rescued by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS, an H2S donor). However, No additive effects were observed when naphthalene acetic acid (NAA) was co-treated with NaHS (lower than 10 mM) in the induction of lateral root formation. Subsequent work revealed that a treatment with NAA or NaHS could simultaneously induce transcripts of SlDES1, DES activity and endogenous H2S contents, and thereafter the stimulation of lateral root formation. It was further confirmed that H2S or HS(-), not the other sulfur-containing components derived from NaHS, was attributed to the stimulative action. The inhibition of lateral root formation and decreased of H2S metabolism caused by an H2S scavenger hypotaurine (HT) were reversed by NaHS, but not NAA. Molecular evidence revealed that both NaHS- or NAA-induced modulation of some cell cycle regulatory genes, including the up-regulation of SlCDKA;1, SlCYCA2;1, together with simultaneous down-regulation of SlKRP2, were differentially reversed by HT pretreatment. To summarize, above results clearly suggested that H2S might, at least partially, act as a downstream component of auxin signaling to trigger lateral root formation.

  9. Antithrombin Regulates Matriptase Activity Involved in Plasmin Generation, Syndecan Shedding, and HGF Activation in Keratinocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ya-Wen; Xu, Zhenghong; Baksh, Adrienne N. H.; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Chen, Chiu-Yuan; Swanson, Richard; Olson, Steve T.; Kataoka, Hiroaki; Johnson, Michael D.; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Matriptase, a membrane-associated serine protease, plays an essential role in epidermal barrier function through activation of the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored serine protease prostasin. The matriptase-prostasin proteolytic cascade is tightly regulated by hepatocyte growth factor activator inhibitor (HAI)-1 such that matriptase autoactivation and prostasin activation occur simultaneously and are followed immediately by the inhibition of both enzymes by HAI-1. However, the mechanisms whereby matriptase acts on extracellular substrates remain elusive. Here we report that some active matriptase can escape HAI-1 inhibition by being rapidly shed from the cell surface. In the pericellular environment, shed active matriptase is able to activate hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), accelerate plasminogen activation, and shed syndecan 1. The amount of active matriptase shed is inversely correlated with the amount of antithrombin (AT) bound to the surface of the keratinocytes. Binding of AT to the surface of keratinocytes is dependent on a functional heparin binding site, Lys-125, and that the N-glycosylation site Asn-135 be unglycosylated. This suggests that β-AT, and not α-AT, is responsible for regulation of pericellular matriptase activity in keratinocytes. Keratinocytes appear to rely on AT to regulate the level of pericellular active matriptase much more than breast and prostate epithelial cells in which AT regulation of matriptase activity occurs at much lower levels than keratinocytes. These results suggest that keratinocytes employ two distinct serine protease inhibitors to control the activation and processing of two different sets of matriptase substrates leading to different biological events: 1) HAI-1 for prostasin activation/inhibition, and 2) AT for the pericellular proteolysis involved in HGF activation, accelerating plasminogen activation, and shedding of syndecans. PMID:23675430

  10. Involvement of nitric oxide generation in noise-induced temporary threshold shift in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Shyang; Tseng, Fen-Yu; Liu, Tien-Chen; Lin-Shiau, Shoei Yn; Hsu, Chuan-Jen

    2005-05-01

    The present study explored the role of endogenous nitric oxide (NO) in the temporary threshold shift caused by acoustic trauma. Guinea pigs were exposed to broadband white noise at a level of 105+/-2dB sound pressure level (SPL) for 10min, causing a temporary threshold shift (TTS). The guinea pigs were divided into six groups (N-1 to N-6) according to survival days after noise exposure (0, 1, 2, 3, 7, 28days). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were recorded before noise exposure, immediately after noise exposure and before sacrifice. Immediately after animals were sacrificed, the stria vascularis and the spiral ligament of the lateral wall of each individual cochlea were harvest as a unit and prepared for assay of NO. There was a significant correlation (P<0.001) between the NO concentration and final ABR threshold in the noise exposure groups. But the return of ABR threshold to pre-noise-exposed level is early than that of NO concentration. An average 16.2dB threshold shift was found immediately after noise exposure. The threshold returned to the pre-noise-exposed level on the second post-exposure day. Comparing to unexposed control animals, the NO concentration increased nearly threefold immediately following noise exposure and decreased to twofold when the hearing threshold had returned to the pre-noise-exposed level. On the seventh post-exposure day the NO concentration was not different from that in unexposed control animals. Those findings indicate that endogenous NO is generated in the noise-induced temporal threshold shift and its concentration is correlated with the hearing loss.

  11. Parenting across Racial and Class Lines: Assortative Mating Patterns of New Parents Who Are Married, Cohabiting, Dating or No Longer Romantically Involved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstein, Joshua R.; Harknett, Kristen

    2006-01-01

    We examine the assortative mating patterns of new parents who are married, cohabiting, romantically involved and no longer romantically involved. Using data from the Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing study, we find that relationship status at the time of a birth depends mainly on father's race rather than on whether mother and father's…

  12. PtLGBP, a pattern recognition receptor in Portunus trituberculatus involved in the immune response against different challenges.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y-E; Jin, S; Zhao, Q-S; Zhang, Y; Wang, C-L

    2014-09-01

    Lipopolysaccharide and b-1,3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) is a pattern recognition receptor that can recognize and bind LPS and b-1,3-glucan. LGBP has crucial roles in innate immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. In this study, LGBP functions in Portunus trituberculatus innate immunity were analyzed. First, the mRNA expression of PtLGBP in hemocytes, hepatopancreas, and muscle toward three typical pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) stimulations were examined using real-time PCR. Results show that the overall trend of relative expressions of the LGBP gene in three tissues is consistent, showing up-down trend. In each group, the highest expression of the LGBP gene was at 3 and 12 h post-injection. The LGBP gene is also expressed significantly higher in the hemocytes and hepatopancreas than in the muscle. The highest level of LGBP was in the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) and glucan-injected group, whereas the lowest level was in the PGN-injected group. Furthermore, bacterial agglutination assay with polyclonal antibody specifically for PtLGBP proved that the recombinant PtLGBP (designated as rPtLGBP) could exhibit obvious agglutination activity toward Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and V. alginolyticus; Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis; and fungi Saccharomyces cerevisiae. LGBP in Portunus trituberculatus possibly served as a multi-functional PRR. In addition, LGBP is not only involved in the immune response against Gram-negative and fungi, as manifested in other invertebrates, but also has a significant role in anti-Gram-positive bacteria infection.

  13. Next Generation Sequencing Analysis Reveals Segmental Patterns of microRNA Expression in Mouse Epididymal Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Brett; Stanger, Simone J.; Mihalas, Bettina P.; Reilly, Jackson N.; Anderson, Amanda L.; Dun, Matthew D.; Tyagi, Sonika; Holt, Janet E.; McLaughlin, Eileen A.

    2015-01-01

    The functional maturation of mammalian spermatozoa is accomplished as the cells descend through the highly specialized microenvironment of the epididymis. This dynamic environment is, in turn, created by the combined secretory and absorptive activity of the surrounding epithelium and displays an extraordinary level of regionalization. Although the regulatory network responsible for spatial coordination of epididymal function remains unclear, recent evidence has highlighted a novel role for the RNA interference pathway. Indeed, as noncanonical regulators of gene expression, small noncoding RNAs have emerged as key elements of the circuitry involved in regulating epididymal function and hence sperm maturation. Herein we have employed next generation sequencing technology to profile the genome-wide miRNA signatures of mouse epididymal cells and characterize segmental patterns of expression. An impressive profile of some 370 miRNAs were detected in the mouse epididymis, with a subset of these specifically identified within the epithelial cells that line the tubule (218). A majority of the latter miRNAs (75%) were detected at equivalent levels along the entire length of the mouse epididymis. We did however identify a small cohort of miRNAs that displayed highly regionalized patterns of expression, including miR-204-5p and miR-196b-5p, which were down- and up-regulated by approximately 39- and 45-fold between the caput/caudal regions, respectively. In addition we identified 79 miRNAs (representing ~ 21% of all miRNAs) as displaying conserved expression within all regions of the mouse, rat and human epididymal tissue. These included 8/14 members of let-7 family of miRNAs that have been widely implicated in the control of androgen signaling and the repression of cell proliferation and oncogenic pathways. Overall these data provide novel insights into the sophistication of the miRNA network that regulates the function of the male reproductive tract. PMID:26270822

  14. Involvement of dachshund and Distal-less in distal pattern formation of the cricket leg during regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ishimaru, Yoshiyasu; Nakamura, Taro; Bando, Tetsuya; Matsuoka, Yuji; Ohuchi, Hideyo; Noji, Sumihare; Mito, Taro

    2015-01-01

    Cricket nymphs have the remarkable ability to regenerate a functional leg following amputation, indicating that the regenerating blastemal cells contain information for leg morphology. However, the molecular mechanisms that underlie regeneration of leg patterns remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed phenotypes of the tibia and tarsus (three tarsomeres) obtained by knockdown with regeneration-dependent RNA interference (rdRNAi) against Gryllus dachshund (Gb'dac) and Distal-less (Gb'Dll). We found that depletion of Gb'Dll mRNA results in loss of the tarsal segments, while rdRNAi against Gb'dac shortens the tibia at the two most distal tarsomeres. These results indicate that Gb'Dll expression is indispensable for formation of the tarsus, while Gb'dac expression is necessary for elongation of the tibia and formation of the most proximal tarsomere. These findings demonstrate that mutual transcriptional regulation between the two is indispensable for formation of the tarsomeres, whereas Gb'dac is involved in determination of tibial size through interaction with Gb'ds/Gb'ft. PMID:25669615

  15. Distinct rhythmic locomotor patterns can be generated by a simple adaptive neural circuit: biology, simulation, and VLSI implementation.

    PubMed

    Ryckebusch, S; Wehr, M; Laurent, G

    1994-12-01

    Rhythmic motor patterns can be induced in leg motor neurons of isolated locust thoracic ganglia by bath application of pilocarpine. We observed that the relative phases of levators and depressors differed in the three thoracic ganglia. Assuming that the central pattern generating circuits underlying these three segmental rhythms are probably very similar, we developed a simple model circuit that can produce any one of the three activity patterns and characteristic phase relationships by modifying a single synaptic weight. We show results of a computer simulation of this circuit using the neuronal simulator NeuraLOG/Spike. We built and tested an analog VLSI circuit implementation of this model circuit that exhibits the same range of "behaviors" as the computer simulation. This multidisciplinary strategy will be useful to explore the dynamics of central pattern generating networks coupled to physical actuators, and ultimately should allow the design of biologically realistic walking robots.

  16. Concept and analytical basis for revistas - A fast, flexible computer/graphic system for generating periodic satellite coverage patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    The generation of satellite coverage patterns is facilitated by three basic strategies: use of a simplified physical model, permitting rapid closed-form calculation; separation of earth rotation and nodal precession from initial geometric analyses; and use of symmetries to construct traces of indefinite length by repetitive transposition of basic one-quadrant elements. The complete coverage patterns generated consist of a basic nadir trace plus a number of associated off-nadir traces, one for each sensor swath edge to be delineated. Each trace is generated by transposing one or two of the basic quadrant elements into a circle on a nonrotating earth model sphere, after which the circle is expanded into the actual 'helical' pattern by adding rotational displacements to the longitude coordinates. The procedure adapts to the important periodic coverage cases by direct insertion of the characteristic integers N and R (days and orbital revolutions, respectively, per coverage period).

  17. Stereotypic Laryngeal and Respiratory Motor Patterns Generate Different Call Types in Rat Ultrasound Vocalization

    PubMed Central

    RIEDE, TOBIAS

    2014-01-01

    Rodents produce highly variable ultrasound whistles as communication signals unlike many other mammals, who employ flow-induced vocal fold oscillations to produce sound. The role of larynx muscles in controlling sound features across different call types in ultrasound vocalization (USV) was investigated using laryngeal muscle electromyographic (EMG) activity, subglottal pressure measurements and vocal sound output in awake and spontaneously behaving Sprague–Dawley rats. Results support the hypothesis that glottal shape determines fundamental frequency. EMG activities of thyroarytenoid and cricothyroid muscles were aligned with call duration. EMG intensity increased with fundamental frequency. Phasic activities of both muscles were aligned with fast changing fundamental frequency contours, for example in trills. Activities of the sternothyroid and sternohyoid muscles, two muscles involved in vocal production in other mammals, are not critical for the production of rat USV. To test how stereotypic laryngeal and respiratory activity are across call types and individuals, sets of ten EMG and subglottal pressure parameters were measured in six different call types from six rats. Using discriminant function analysis, on average 80% of parameter sets were correctly assigned to their respective call type. This was significantly higher than the chance level. Since fundamental frequency features of USV are tightly associated with stereotypic activity of intrinsic laryngeal muscles and muscles contributing to build-up of subglottal pressure, USV provide insight into the neurophysiological control of peripheral vocal motor patterns. PMID:23423862

  18. The contribution of a central pattern generator in a reflex-based neuromuscular model

    PubMed Central

    Dzeladini, Florin; van den Kieboom, Jesse; Ijspeert, Auke

    2014-01-01

    Although the concept of central pattern generators (CPGs) controlling locomotion in vertebrates is widely accepted, the presence of specialized CPGs in human locomotion is still a matter of debate. An interesting numerical model developed in the 90s’ demonstrated the important role CPGs could play in human locomotion, both in terms of stability against perturbations, and in terms of speed control. Recently, a reflex-based neuro-musculo-skeletal model has been proposed, showing a level of stability to perturbations similar to the previous model, without any CPG components. Although exhibiting striking similarities with human gaits, the lack of CPG makes the control of speed/step length in the model difficult. In this paper, we hypothesize that a CPG component will offer a meaningful way of controlling the locomotion speed. After introducing the CPG component in the reflex model, and taking advantage of the resulting properties, a simple model for gait modulation is presented. The results highlight the advantages of a CPG as feedforward component in terms of gait modulation. PMID:25018712

  19. Multislit interference patterns in high-order harmonic generation in C{sub 60}

    SciTech Connect

    Ciappina, M. F.; Becker, A.; Jaron-Becker, A.

    2007-12-15

    We study high-order harmonic generation in C{sub 60} molecules interacting with a linearly polarized intense short laser pulse at near- and mid-infrared wavelengths, using an extension of the so-called three-step or Lewenstein model to the molecular case. The results exhibit modulations in the plateaus of the spectra at the longer wavelengths, which are present for ensembles of aligned as well as randomly oriented fullerenes. The analysis of the results show that the minima can be explained by a multislit interference effect arising from the contributions of the 60 atomic centers to the dipole moment. Good agreement between the positions of the minima in the spectra obtained in the length gauge are found with those of the recombination matrix element, but not for those in the velocity gauge calculations. We further use a simple spherical model to analyze how geometrical information, such as the radius of the fullerene cage, can be obtained from the interference pattern in the harmonic spectra.

  20. Generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice revealed MAGI-2 expression patterns in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Kan-ichiro; Nishimura, Tomoki; Fukuda, Tomokazu; Ookura, Tetsuya; Nishimori, Katsuhiko

    2012-01-01

    The membrane-associated guanylate kinase inverted 2 (MAGI-2) protein, which is known to localize at the tight junction of epithelial cells, contains multiple copies of the PDZ and WW domains in its structure. Although the expression pattern of Magi2 mRNA in representative organs has been previously published, its detailed cellular distribution at the histological level remains unknown. Such detailed information would be useful to clarify the biological function of MAGI-2. Here, we report the generation of Venus reporter knock-in mice for Magi2 in which exon 6 of the gene was substituted by the Venus-encoding sequence. We detected the expression of the Venus reporter protein in kidney podocytes from these knock-in mice. We also detected Venus reporter protein expression in spermatids within the testes and within neurons in various regions of the brain. Detection of the reporter protein from these diverse locations indicated the endogenous expression of MAGI-2 in these tissues. Our data suggested a potential function of MAGI-2 in the glomerular filtration process and sperm cell maturation. These data indicate that the Venus reporter knock-in mouse for Magi2 is a useful model for the further study of Magi2 gene function.

  1. Initial benchmarking of a new electron-beam raster pattern generator for 130-100 nm maskmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sauer, Charles A.; Abboud, Frank E.; Babin, Sergey V.; Chakarian, Varoujan; Ghanbari, Abe; Innes, Robert; Trost, David; Raymond, Frederick, III

    2000-07-01

    The decision by the Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) to accelerate the continuing evolution to smaller linewidths is consistent with the commitment by Etec Systems, Inc. to rapidly develop new technologies for pattern generation systems with improved resolution, critical dimension (CD) uniformity, positional accuracy, and throughput. Current pattern generation designs are inadequate to meet the more advanced requirements for masks, particularly at or below the 100 nm node. Major changes to all pattern generation tools will be essential to meet future market requirements. An electron-beam (e-beam) system that is designed to meet the challenges for 130 - 100 nm device generation with extendibility to the 70-nm range will be discussed. This system has an architecture that includes a graybeam writing strategy, a new state system, and improved thermal management. Detailed changes include a pulse width modulated blanking system, per-pixel deflection, retrograde scanning multipass writing, and a column with a 50 kV accelerating voltage that supports a dose of up to 45 (mu) C/cm2 with minimal amounts of resist heating. This paper examines current issues, our approach to meeting International Technology Roadmap for Semiconductors (ITRS) requirements, and some preliminary results from a new pattern generator.

  2. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production. PMID:24289275

  3. Versatile pattern generation of periodic, high aspect ratio Si nanostructure arrays with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Jian-Wei; Wee, Qixun; Dumond, Jarrett; Tay, Andrew; Chua, Soo-Jin

    2013-12-01

    We report on a method of fabricating variable patterns of periodic, high aspect ratio silicon nanostructures with sub-50-nm resolution on a wafer scale. The approach marries step-and-repeat nanoimprint lithography (NIL) and metal-catalyzed electroless etching (MCEE), enabling near perfectly ordered Si nanostructure arrays of user-defined patterns to be controllably and rapidly generated on a wafer scale. Periodic features possessing circular, hexagonal, and rectangular cross-sections with lateral dimensions down to sub-50 nm, in hexagonal or square array configurations and high array packing densities up to 5.13 × 107 structures/mm2 not achievable by conventional UV photolithography are fabricated using this top-down approach. By suitably tuning the duration of catalytic etching, variable aspect ratio Si nanostructures can be formed. As the etched Si pattern depends largely on the NIL mould which is patterned by electron beam lithography (EBL), the technique can be used to form patterns not possible with self-assembly methods, nanosphere, and interference lithography for replication on a wafer scale. Good chemical resistance of the nanoimprinted mask and adhesion to the Si substrate facilitate good pattern transfer and preserve the smooth top surface morphology of the Si nanostructures as shown in TEM. This approach is suitable for generating Si nanostructures of controlled dimensions and patterns, with high aspect ratio on a wafer level suitable for semiconductor device production.

  4. Transcriptome profiling of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) root and identification of genes involved in response to Lead (Pb) stress with next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yinglong; Shen, Hong; Gong, Yiqin; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb), one of the most toxic heavy metals, can be absorbed and accumulated by plant roots and then enter the food chain resulting in potential health risks for human beings. The radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an important root vegetable crop with fleshy taproots as the edible parts. Little is known about the mechanism by which radishes respond to Pb stress at the molecular level. In this study, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)-based RNA-seq technology was employed to characterize the de novo transcriptome of radish roots and identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) during Pb stress. A total of 68,940 assembled unique transcripts including 33,337 unigenes were obtained from radish root cDNA samples. Based on the assembled de novo transcriptome, 4,614 DEGs were detected between the two libraries of untreated (CK) and Pb-treated (Pb1000) roots. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that upregulated DEGs under Pb stress are predominately involved in defense responses in cell walls and glutathione metabolism-related processes, while downregulated DEGs were mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism-related pathways. The expression patterns of 22 selected genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR, and the results were highly accordant with the Solexa analysis. Furthermore, many candidate genes, which were involved in defense and detoxification mechanisms including signaling protein kinases, transcription factors, metal transporters and chelate compound biosynthesis related enzymes, were successfully identified in response to heavy metal Pb. Identification of potential DEGs involved in responses to Pb stress significantly reflected alterations in major biological processes and metabolic pathways. The molecular basis of the response to Pb stress in radishes was comprehensively characterized. Useful information and new insights were provided for investigating the molecular regulation mechanism of heavy metal Pb accumulation and

  5. Transcriptome Profiling of Radish (Raphanus sativus L.) Root and Identification of Genes Involved in Response to Lead (Pb) Stress with Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yan; Xu, Liang; Chen, Yinglong; Shen, Hong; Gong, Yiqin; Limera, Cecilia; Liu, Liwang

    2013-01-01

    Lead (Pb), one of the most toxic heavy metals, can be absorbed and accumulated by plant roots and then enter the food chain resulting in potential health risks for human beings. The radish (Raphanus sativus L.) is an important root vegetable crop with fleshy taproots as the edible parts. Little is known about the mechanism by which radishes respond to Pb stress at the molecular level. In this study, Next Generation Sequencing (NGS)–based RNA-seq technology was employed to characterize the de novo transcriptome of radish roots and identify differentially expressed genes (DEGs) during Pb stress. A total of 68,940 assembled unique transcripts including 33,337 unigenes were obtained from radish root cDNA samples. Based on the assembled de novo transcriptome, 4,614 DEGs were detected between the two libraries of untreated (CK) and Pb-treated (Pb1000) roots. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis revealed that upregulated DEGs under Pb stress are predominately involved in defense responses in cell walls and glutathione metabolism-related processes, while downregulated DEGs were mainly involved in carbohydrate metabolism-related pathways. The expression patterns of 22 selected genes were validated by quantitative real-time PCR, and the results were highly accordant with the Solexa analysis. Furthermore, many candidate genes, which were involved in defense and detoxification mechanisms including signaling protein kinases, transcription factors, metal transporters and chelate compound biosynthesis related enzymes, were successfully identified in response to heavy metal Pb. Identification of potential DEGs involved in responses to Pb stress significantly reflected alterations in major biological processes and metabolic pathways. The molecular basis of the response to Pb stress in radishes was comprehensively characterized. Useful information and new insights were provided for investigating the molecular regulation mechanism of heavy metal Pb accumulation and

  6. Decomposing risk: landscape structure and wolf behavior generate different predation patterns in two sympatric ungulates.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Vincenzo; Sand, Hakan; Zimmermann, Barbara; Mattisson, Jenny; Wabakken, Petter; Linnell, John D C

    2013-10-01

    Recolonizing carnivores can have a large impact on the status of wild ungulates, which have often modified their behavior in the absence of predation. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of reestablished predator-prey systems is crucial to predict their potential ecosystem effects. We decomposed the spatial structure of predation by recolonizing wolves (Canis lupus) on two sympatric ungulates, moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), in Scandinavia during a 10-year study. We monitored 18 wolves with GPS collars, distributed over 12 territories, and collected records from predation events. By using conditional logistic regression, we assessed the contributions of three main factors, the utilization patterns of each wolf territory, the spatial distribution of both prey species, and fine-scale landscape structure, in determining the spatial structure of moose and roe deer predation risk. The reestablished predator-prey system showed a remarkable spatial variation in kill occurrence at the intra-territorial level, with kill probabilities varying by several orders of magnitude inside the same territory. Variation in predation risk was evident also when a spatially homogeneous probability for a wolf to encounter a prey was simulated. Even inside the same territory, with the same landscape structure, and when exposed to predation by the same wolves, the two prey species experienced an opposite spatial distribution of predation risk. In particular, increased predation risk for moose was associated with open areas, especially clearcuts and young forest stands, whereas risk was lowered for roe deer in the same habitat types. Thus, fine-scale landscape structure can generate contrasting predation risk patterns in sympatric ungulates, so that they can experience large differences in the spatial distribution of risk and refuge areas when exposed to predation by a recolonizing predator. Territories with an earlier recolonization were not associated with a lower

  7. Decomposing risk: landscape structure and wolf behavior generate different predation patterns in two sympatric ungulates.

    PubMed

    Gervasi, Vincenzo; Sand, Hakan; Zimmermann, Barbara; Mattisson, Jenny; Wabakken, Petter; Linnell, John D C

    2013-10-01

    Recolonizing carnivores can have a large impact on the status of wild ungulates, which have often modified their behavior in the absence of predation. Therefore, understanding the dynamics of reestablished predator-prey systems is crucial to predict their potential ecosystem effects. We decomposed the spatial structure of predation by recolonizing wolves (Canis lupus) on two sympatric ungulates, moose (Alces alces) and roe deer (Capreolus capreolus), in Scandinavia during a 10-year study. We monitored 18 wolves with GPS collars, distributed over 12 territories, and collected records from predation events. By using conditional logistic regression, we assessed the contributions of three main factors, the utilization patterns of each wolf territory, the spatial distribution of both prey species, and fine-scale landscape structure, in determining the spatial structure of moose and roe deer predation risk. The reestablished predator-prey system showed a remarkable spatial variation in kill occurrence at the intra-territorial level, with kill probabilities varying by several orders of magnitude inside the same territory. Variation in predation risk was evident also when a spatially homogeneous probability for a wolf to encounter a prey was simulated. Even inside the same territory, with the same landscape structure, and when exposed to predation by the same wolves, the two prey species experienced an opposite spatial distribution of predation risk. In particular, increased predation risk for moose was associated with open areas, especially clearcuts and young forest stands, whereas risk was lowered for roe deer in the same habitat types. Thus, fine-scale landscape structure can generate contrasting predation risk patterns in sympatric ungulates, so that they can experience large differences in the spatial distribution of risk and refuge areas when exposed to predation by a recolonizing predator. Territories with an earlier recolonization were not associated with a lower

  8. CfLGBP, a pattern recognition receptor in Chlamys farreri involved in the immune response against various bacteria.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jialong; Qiu, Limei; Wang, Lingling; Wei, Xiumei; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Ying; Liu, Lin; Song, Linsheng

    2010-11-01

    Lipopolysaccharide and beta-1, 3-glucan binding protein (LGBP) is a kind of pattern recognition receptor, which can recognize and bind LPS and beta-1, 3-glucan, and plays curial roles in the innate immune defense against Gram-negative bacteria and fungi. In this study, the functions of LGBP from Zhikong scallop Chlamys farreri performed in innate immunity were analyzed. Firstly, the mRNA expression of CfLGBP in hemocytes toward three typical PAMPS stimulation was examined by realtime PCR. It was up-regulated extremely (P < 0.01) post stimulation of LPS and beta-glucan, and also exhibited a moderate up-regulation (P < 0.01) after PGN injection. Further PAMPs binding assay with the polyclonal antibody specific for CfLGBP proved that the recombinant CfLGBP (designated as rCfLGBP) could bind not only LPS and beta-glucan, but also PGN in vitro. More importantly, rCfLGBP exhibited obvious agglutination activity towards Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis and fungi Pichia pastoris. Taking the results of immunofluorescence assay into account, which displayed CfLGBP was expressed specifically in the immune cells (hemocytes) and vulnerable organ (gill and mantle), we believed that LGBP in C. farreri, serving as a multi-functional PRR, not only involved in the immune response against Gram-negative and fungi as LGBP in other invertebrates, but also played significant role in the event of anti-Gram-positive bacteria infection. As the first functional research of LGBP in mollusks, our study provided new implication into the innate immune defense mechanisms of C. farreri and mollusks. PMID:20659562

  9. Physiological and pathophysiological interactions between the respiratory central pattern generator and the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Molkov, Yaroslav I; Zoccal, Daniel B; Baekey, David M; Abdala, Ana P L; Machado, Benedito H; Dick, Thomas E; Paton, Julian F R; Rybak, Ilya A

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory modulation seen in the sympathetic nerve activity (SNA) implies that the respiratory and sympathetic networks interact. During hypertension elicited by chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH), the SNA displays an enhanced respiratory modulation reflecting strengthened interactions between the networks. In this chapter, we review a series of experimental and modeling studies that help elucidate possible mechanisms of sympatho-respiratory coupling. We conclude that this coupling significantly contributes to both the sympathetic baroreflex and the augmented sympathetic activity after exposure to CIH. This conclusion is based on the following findings. (1) Baroreceptor activation results in perturbation of the respiratory pattern via transient activation of postinspiratory neurons in the Bötzinger complex (BötC). The same BötC neurons are involved in the respiratory modulation of SNA, and hence provide an additional pathway for the sympathetic baroreflex. (2) Under hypercapnia, phasic activation of abdominal motor nerves (AbN) is accompanied by synchronous discharges in SNA due to the common source of this rhythmic activity in the retrotrapezoid nucleus (RTN). CIH conditioning increases the CO2 sensitivity of central chemoreceptors in the RTN which results in the emergence of AbN and SNA discharges under normocapnic conditions similar to those observed during hypercapnia in naïve animals. Thus, respiratory-sympathetic interactions play an important role in defining sympathetic output and significantly contribute to the sympathetic activity and hypertension under certain physiological or pathophysiological conditions, and the theoretical framework presented may be instrumental in understanding of malfunctioning control of sympathetic activity in a variety of disease states.

  10. Focal high cell density generates a gradient of patterns in self-organizing vascular mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Henry; Reddy, Aneela; Sage, Andrew; Lu, Jinxiu; Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda L

    2012-01-01

    In embryogenesis, structural patterns, such as vascular branching, may form via a reaction-diffusion mechanism in which activator and inhibitor morphogens guide cells into periodic aggregates. We previously found that vascular mesenchymal cells (VMCs) spontaneously aggregate into nodular structures and that morphogen pairs regulate the aggregation into patterns of spots and stripes. To test the effect of a focal change in activator morphogen on VMC pattern formation, we created a focal zone of high cell density by plating a second VMC layer within a cloning ring over a confluent monolayer. After 24 h, the ring was removed and pattern formation monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. At days 2-8, the patterns progressed from uniform distributions to swirl, labyrinthine and spot patterns. Within the focal high-density zone (HDZ) and a narrow halo zone, cells aggregated into spot patterns, whilst in the outermost zone of the plate, cells formed a labyrinthine pattern. The area occupied by aggregates was significantly greater in the outermost zone than in the HDZ or halo. The rate of pattern progression within the HDZ increased as a function of its plating density. Thus, focal differences in cell density may drive pattern formation gradients in tissue architecture, such as vascular branching.

  11. Focal High Cell Density Generates a Gradient of Patterns in Self-Organizing Vascular Mesenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Henry; Reddy, Aneela; Sage, Andrew; Lu, Jinxiu; Garfinkel, Alan; Tintut, Yin; Demer, Linda

    2012-01-01

    In embryogenesis, structural patterns, such as vascular branching, may form via a reaction-diffusion mechanism in which activator and inhibitor morphogens guide cells into periodic aggregates. We previously found that vascular mesenchymal cells (VMC) spontaneously aggregate into nodular structures and that morphogen pairs regulate the aggregation into patterns of spots and stripes. To test the effect of a focal change in activator morphogen on VMC pattern formation, we created a focal zone of high cell density by plating a second layer VMC within a cloning ring over a confluent monolayer. After 24 hours, the ring was removed, and pattern formation monitored by phase-contrast microscopy. At days 2–8, the patterns progressed from uniform distributions to swirl, labyrinthine, and spot patterns. Within the focal high-density zone and a narrow halo zone, cells aggregated into spot patterns; in the outermost zone of the plate, cells formed a labyrinthine pattern. Area occupied by aggregates was significantly greater in the outermost zone than in the HDZ or halo. The rate of pattern progression within the HDZ increased as a function of its plating density. Thus, focal differences in cell density may drive pattern formation gradients in tissue architecture, such as vascular branching. PMID:22797747

  12. Setting the pace: new insights into central pattern generator interactions in box jellyfish swimming.

    PubMed

    Stöckl, Anna Lisa; Petie, Ronald; Nilsson, Dan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) produce rhythmic behaviour across all animal phyla. Cnidarians, which have a radially symmetric nervous system and pacemaker centres in multiples of four, provide an interesting comparison to bilaterian animals for studying the coordination between CPGs. The box jellyfish Tripedalia cystophora is remarkable among cnidarians due to its most elaborate visual system. Together with their ability to actively swim and steer, they use their visual system for multiple types of behaviour. The four swim CPGs are directly regulated by visual input. In this study, we addressed the question of how the four pacemaker centres of this radial symmetric cnidarian interact. We based our investigation on high speed camera observations of the timing of swim pulses of tethered animals (Tripedalia cystophora) with one or four rhopalia, under different simple light regimes. Additionally, we developed a numerical model of pacemaker interactions based on the inter pulse interval distribution of animals with one rhopalium. We showed that the model with fully resetting coupling and hyperpolarization of the pacemaker potential below baseline fitted the experimental data best. Moreover, the model of four swim pacemakers alone underscored the proportion of long inter pulse intervals (IPIs) considerably. Both in terms of the long IPIs as well as the overall swim pulse distribution, the simulation of two CPGs provided a better fit than that of four. We therefore suggest additional sources of pacemaker control than just visual input. We provide guidelines for future research on the physiological linkage of the cubozoan CPGs and show the insight from bilaterian CPG research, which show that pacemakers have to be studied in their bodily and nervous environment to capture all their functional features, are also manifest in cnidarians. PMID:22073288

  13. Neurochemical and neuroanatomical identification of central pattern generator neuron homologues in Nudipleura molluscs.

    PubMed

    Lillvis, Joshua L; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Certain invertebrate neurons can be identified by their behavioral functions. However, evolutionary divergence can cause some species to not display particular behaviors, thereby making it impossible to use physiological characteristics related to those behaviors for identifying homologous neurons across species. Therefore, to understand the neural basis of species-specific behavior, it is necessary to identify homologues using characteristics that are independent of physiology. In the Nudipleura mollusc Tritonia diomedea, Cerebral Neuron 2 (C2) was first described as being a member of the swim central pattern generator (CPG). Here we demonstrate that neurochemical markers, in conjunction with previously known neuroanatomical characteristics, allow C2 to be uniquely identified without the aid of electrophysiological measures. Specifically, C2 had three characteristics that, taken together, identified the neuron: 1) a white cell on the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglion, 2) an axon that projected to the contralateral pedal ganglion and through the pedal commissure, and 3) immunoreactivity for the peptides FMRFamide and Small Cardioactive Peptide B. These same anatomical and neurochemical characteristics also uniquely identified the C2 homologue in Pleurobranchaea californica (called A1), which was previously identified by its analogous role in the Pleurobranchaea swim CPG. Furthermore, these characteristics were used to identify C2 homologues in Melibe leonina, Hermissenda crassicornis, and Flabellina iodinea, species that are phylogenetically closer to Tritonia than Pleurobranchaea, but do not display the same swimming behavior as Tritonia or Pleurobranchaea. These identifications will allow future studies comparing and contrasting the physiological properties of C2 across species that can and cannot produce the type of swimming behavior exhibited by Tritonia.

  14. Real-time biomimetic Central Pattern Generators in an FPGA for hybrid experiments.

    PubMed

    Ambroise, Matthieu; Levi, Timothée; Joucla, Sébastien; Yvert, Blaise; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2013-01-01

    This investigation of the leech heartbeat neural network system led to the development of a low resources, real-time, biomimetic digital hardware for use in hybrid experiments. The leech heartbeat neural network is one of the simplest central pattern generators (CPG). In biology, CPG provide the rhythmic bursts of spikes that form the basis for all muscle contraction orders (heartbeat) and locomotion (walking, running, etc.). The leech neural network system was previously investigated and this CPG formalized in the Hodgkin-Huxley neural model (HH), the most complex devised to date. However, the resources required for a neural model are proportional to its complexity. In response to this issue, this article describes a biomimetic implementation of a network of 240 CPGs in an FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array), using a simple model (Izhikevich) and proposes a new synapse model: activity-dependent depression synapse. The network implementation architecture operates on a single computation core. This digital system works in real-time, requires few resources, and has the same bursting activity behavior as the complex model. The implementation of this CPG was initially validated by comparing it with a simulation of the complex model. Its activity was then matched with pharmacological data from the rat spinal cord activity. This digital system opens the way for future hybrid experiments and represents an important step toward hybridization of biological tissue and artificial neural networks. This CPG network is also likely to be useful for mimicking the locomotion activity of various animals and developing hybrid experiments for neuroprosthesis development.

  15. Designing responsive pattern generators: stable heteroclinic channel cycles for modeling and control.

    PubMed

    Horchler, Andrew D; Daltorio, Kathryn A; Chiel, Hillel J; Quinn, Roger D

    2015-04-01

    A striking feature of biological pattern generators is their ability to respond immediately to multisensory perturbations by modulating the dwell time at a particular phase of oscillation, which can vary force output, range of motion, or other characteristics of a physical system. Stable heteroclinic channels (SHCs) are a dynamical architecture that can provide such responsiveness to artificial devices such as robots. SHCs are composed of sequences of saddle equilibrium points, which yields exquisite sensitivity. The strength of the vector fields in the neighborhood of these equilibria determines the responsiveness to perturbations and how long trajectories dwell in the vicinity of a saddle. For SHC cycles, the addition of stochastic noise results in oscillation with a regular mean period. In this paper, we parameterize noise-driven Lotka-Volterra SHC cycles such that each saddle can be independently designed to have a desired mean sub-period. The first step in the design process is an analytic approximation, which results in mean sub-periods that are within 2% of the specified sub-period for a typical parameter set. Further, after measuring the resultant sub-periods over sufficient numbers of cycles, the magnitude of the noise can be adjusted to control the mean period with accuracy close to that of the integration step size. With these relationships, SHCs can be more easily employed in engineering and modeling applications. For applications that require smooth state transitions, this parameterization permits each state's distribution of periods to be independently specified. Moreover, for modeling context-dependent behaviors, continuously varying inputs in each state dimension can rapidly precipitate transitions to alter frequency and phase. PMID:25712192

  16. Massive alterations of the methylation patterns around DNA transposons in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid.

    PubMed

    Yaakov, Beery; Kashkush, Khalil

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and reproducible genomic changes can be induced during the early stages of the life of nascent allopolyploid species. In a previous study, it was shown that following allopolyploidization, cytosine methylation changes can affect up to 11% of the wheat genome. However, the methylation patterns around transposable elements (TEs) were never studied in detail. We used transposon methylation display (TMD) to assess the methylation patterns of CCGG sites flanking three TE families (Balduin, Apollo, and Thalos) in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid. In addition, transposon display (TD), using a methylation-insensitive restriction enzyme, was applied to search for genomic rearrangements at the TE insertion sites. We observed that up to 54% of CCGG sites flanking the three TE families showed changes in methylation patterns in the first four generations of a newly formed wheat allohexaploid, where hypermethylation was predominant. Over 70% of the changes in TMD patterns occurred in the first two generations of the newly formed allohexaploid. Furthermore, analysis of 555 TE insertion sites by TD and 18 cases by site-specific PCR revealed a full additive pattern in the allohexaploid, an indication for lack of massive rearrangements. These data indicate that following allopolyplodization, DNA-TE insertion sites can undergo a significantly high level of methylation changes compared with methylation changes of other genomic sequences.

  17. Generation of slow wave type action potentials in the mouse small intestine involves a non-L-type calcium channel.

    PubMed

    Malysz, J; Richardson, D; Farraway, L; Christen, M O; Huizinga, J D

    1995-10-01

    Intrinsic electrical activities in various isolated segments of the mouse small intestine were recorded (i) to characterize action potential generation and (ii) to obtain a profile on the ion channels involved in initiating the slow wave type action potentials (slow waves). Gradients in slow wave frequency, resting membrane potential, and occurrence of spiking activity were found, with the proximal intestine exhibiting the highest frequency, the most hyperpolarized cell membrane, and the greatest occurrence of spikes. The slow waves were only partially sensitive to L-type calcium channel blockers. Nifedipine, verapamil, and pinaverium bromide abolished spikes that occurred on the plateau phase of the slow waves in all tissues. The activity that remained in the presence of L-type calcium channel blockers, the upstroke potential, retained a similar amplitude to the original slow wave and was of identical frequency. The upstroke potential was not sensitive to a reduction in extracellular chloride or to the sodium channel blockers tetrodotoxin and mexiletine. Abolishment of the Na+ gradient by removal of 120 mM extracellular Na+ reduced the upstroke potential frequency by 13 - 18% and its amplitude by 50 - 70% in the ileum. The amplitude was similarly reduced by Ni2+ (up to 5 mM), and by flufenamic acid (100 mu M), a nonspecific cation and chloride channel blocker. Gadolinium, a nonspecific blocker of cation and stretch-activated channels, had no effect. Throughout these pharmacological manipulations, a robust oscillation remained at 5 - 10 mV. This oscillation likely reflects pacemaker activity. It was rapidly abolished by removal of extracellular calcium but not affected by L-type calcium channel blockers. In summary, the mouse small intestine has been established as a model for research into slow wave generation and electrical pacemaker activity. The upstroke part of the slow wave has two components, the pacemaker component involves a non-L-type calcium channel

  18. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  19. Activity and neuromodulatory input contribute to the recovery of rhythmic output after decentralization in a central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yili; Khorkova, Olga; Rodriguez, Rosa; Golowasch, Jorge; Golowaschi, Jorge

    2009-01-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neuronal networks that control vitally important rhythmic behaviors including breathing, heartbeat, and digestion. Understanding how CPGs recover activity after their rhythmic activity is disrupted has important theoretical and practical implications. Previous experimental and modeling studies indicated that rhythm recovery after central neuromodulatory input loss (decentralization) could be based entirely on activity-dependent mechanisms, but recent evidence of long-term conductance regulation by neuromodulators suggest that neuromodulator-dependent mechanisms may also be involved. Here we examined the effects of altering activity and the neuromodulatory environment before decentralization of the pyloric CPG in Cancer borealis on the initial phase of rhythmic activity recovery after decentralization. We found that pretreatments altering the network activity through shifting the ionic balance or the membrane potential of pyloric pacemaker neurons reduced the delay of recovery initiation after decentralization, consistent with the recovery process being triggered already during the pretreatment period through an activity-dependent mechanism. However, we observed that pretreatment with neuromodulators GABA and proctolin, acting via metabotropic receptors, also affected the initial phase of the recovery of pyloric activity after decentralization. Their distinct effects appear to result from interactions of their metabotropic effects with their effects on neuronal activity. Thus we show that the initial phase of the recovery process can be accounted for by the existence of distinct activity-and neuromodulator-dependent pathways. We propose a computational model that includes activity- and neuromodulator-dependent mechanisms of the activity recovery process, which successfully explains the experimental observations and predicts the results of key biological experiments.

  20. Modular organization of the multipartite central pattern generator for turtle rostral scratch: knee-related interneurons during deletions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul S G; Daniels-McQueen, Susan; Lai, Jessica; Liu, Z; Corman, Tanya S

    2016-06-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neuronal networks in the spinal cord that generate rhythmic patterns of motor activity in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. For many vertebrate rhythmic behaviors, CPGs generate normal patterns of motor neuron activities as well as variations of the normal patterns, termed deletions, in which bursts in one or more motor nerves are absent from one or more cycles of the rhythm. Prior work with hip-extensor deletions during turtle rostral scratch supports hypotheses of hip-extensor interneurons in a hip-extensor module and of hip-flexor interneurons in a hip-flexor module. We present here single-unit interneuronal recording data that support hypotheses of knee-extensor interneurons in a knee-extensor module and of knee-flexor interneurons in a knee-flexor module. Members of knee-related modules are not members of hip-related modules and vice versa. These results in turtle provide experimental support at the single-unit interneuronal level for the organizational concept that the rostral-scratch CPG for the turtle hindlimb is multipartite, that is, composed of more than two modules. This work, when combined with experimental and computational work in other vertebrates, does not support the classical view that the vertebrate limb CPG is bipartite with only two modules, one controlling all the flexors of the limb and the other controlling all the extensors of the limb. Instead, these results support the general principle that spinal CPGs are multipartite.

  1. Modular organization of the multipartite central pattern generator for turtle rostral scratch: knee-related interneurons during deletions.

    PubMed

    Stein, Paul S G; Daniels-McQueen, Susan; Lai, Jessica; Liu, Z; Corman, Tanya S

    2016-06-01

    Central pattern generators (CPGs) are neuronal networks in the spinal cord that generate rhythmic patterns of motor activity in the absence of movement-related sensory feedback. For many vertebrate rhythmic behaviors, CPGs generate normal patterns of motor neuron activities as well as variations of the normal patterns, termed deletions, in which bursts in one or more motor nerves are absent from one or more cycles of the rhythm. Prior work with hip-extensor deletions during turtle rostral scratch supports hypotheses of hip-extensor interneurons in a hip-extensor module and of hip-flexor interneurons in a hip-flexor module. We present here single-unit interneuronal recording data that support hypotheses of knee-extensor interneurons in a knee-extensor module and of knee-flexor interneurons in a knee-flexor module. Members of knee-related modules are not members of hip-related modules and vice versa. These results in turtle provide experimental support at the single-unit interneuronal level for the organizational concept that the rostral-scratch CPG for the turtle hindlimb is multipartite, that is, composed of more than two modules. This work, when combined with experimental and computational work in other vertebrates, does not support the classical view that the vertebrate limb CPG is bipartite with only two modules, one controlling all the flexors of the limb and the other controlling all the extensors of the limb. Instead, these results support the general principle that spinal CPGs are multipartite. PMID:27030737

  2. Integration and optimization of the DUV ALTA pattern generation system using a CAR process with the Tetra photomask etch system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buxbaum, Alex H.; Fuller, Scott E.; Montgomery, Warren; Ungureit, Michael E.

    2003-12-01

    Etec Systems, the Mask Business Group of Applied Materials, is in a unique position within the mask making industry - Etec has the opportunity to integrate individual parts of the overall mask manufacturing process to provide a more complete solution. Here we present the integration of the DUV ALTA laser pattern generator and the TetraTM photomask etch system with advanced CAR resist processes. Dry etch process effects of flow, overetch, and oxygen content (in a Cl2/O2/He plasma) are discussed for the baseline POR resist in terms of etch rate, selectivity, etch bias, CD uniformity and micro-loading; the optimized etch process space was then implemented for advanced CAR resists. Iso-dense bias, football pattern loading and other pattern transfer results influencing mask manufactureability are also presented. Within the synthesis and optimization of the pattern generation system, process, and dry etch sub 13 nm range process uniformity has been achieved. The integrated ALTA / Tetra / Advanced-CAR solution set is characterized on both Etec test patterns and customer demonstrations.

  3. Pigment pattern formation in the guppy, Poecilia reticulata, involves the Kita and Csf1ra receptor tyrosine kinases.

    PubMed

    Kottler, Verena A; Fadeev, Andrey; Weigel, Detlef; Dreyer, Christine

    2013-07-01

    Males of the guppy (Poecilia reticulata) vary tremendously in their ornamental patterns, which are thought to have evolved in response to a complex interplay between natural and sexual selection. Although the selection pressures acting on the color patterns of the guppy have been extensively studied, little is known about the genes that control their ontogeny. Over 50 years ago, two autosomal color loci, blue and golden, were described, both of which play a decisive role in the formation of the guppy color pattern. Orange pigmentation is absent in the skin of guppies with a lesion in blue, suggesting a defect in xanthophore development. In golden mutants, the development of the melanophore pattern during embryogenesis and after birth is affected. Here, we show that blue and golden correspond to guppy orthologs of colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor a (csf1ra; previously called fms) and kita. Most excitingly, we found that both genes are required for the development of the black ornaments of guppy males, which in the case of csf1ra might be mediated by xanthophore-melanophore interactions. Furthermore, we provide evidence that two temporally and genetically distinct melanophore populations contribute to the adult camouflage pattern expressed in both sexes: one early appearing and kita-dependent and the other late-developing and kita-independent. The identification of csf1ra and kita mutants provides the first molecular insights into pigment pattern formation in this important model species for ecological and evolutionary genetics.

  4. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-03-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli.

  5. Control strategies of 3-cell Central Pattern Generator via global stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Lozano, Álvaro; Rodríguez, Marcos; Barrio, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The study of the synchronization patterns of small neuron networks that control several biological processes has become an interesting growing discipline. Some of these synchronization patterns of individual neurons are related to some undesirable neurological diseases, and they are believed to play a crucial role in the emergence of pathological rhythmic brain activity in different diseases, like Parkinson’s disease. We show how, with a suitable combination of short and weak global inhibitory and excitatory stimuli over the whole network, we can switch between different stable bursting patterns in small neuron networks (in our case a 3-neuron network). We develop a systematic study showing and explaining the effects of applying the pulses at different moments. Moreover, we compare the technique on a completely symmetric network and on a slightly perturbed one (a much more realistic situation). The present approach of using global stimuli may allow to avoid undesirable synchronization patterns with nonaggressive stimuli. PMID:27021970

  6. Testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells via extrinsic apoptotic pathway with mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species involvement.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Rheure Alves Moreira; Neves, Karla Bianca; Pestana, Cezar Rangel; Queiroz, André Lima; Zanotto, Camila Ziliotto; Chignalia, Andréia Z; Valim, Yara Maria; Silveira, Leonardo R; Curti, Carlos; Tostes, Rita C

    2014-06-01

    Testosterone exerts both beneficial and harmful effects on the cardiovascular system. Considering that testosterone induces reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and ROS activate cell death signaling pathways, we tested the hypothesis that testosterone induces apoptosis in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) via mitochondria-dependent ROS generation. Potential mechanisms were addressed. Cultured VSMCs were stimulated with testosterone (10(-7) mol/l) or vehicle (2-12 h) in the presence of flutamide (10(-5) mol/l), CCCP (10(-6) mol/l), mimetic manganese(III) tetrakis(1-methyl-4-pyridyl)porphyrin (MnTMPyP; 3 × 10(-5) mol/l), Z-Ile-Glu(O-ME)-Thr-Asp(O-Me) fluoromethyl ketone (Z-IETD-FMK; 10(-5) mol/l), or vehicle. ROS were determined with lucigenin and dichlorodihydrofluorescein; apoptosis, with annexin V and calcein; O2 consumption, with a Clark-type electrode, and procaspases, caspases, cytochrome c, Bax, and Bcl-2 levels by immunoblotting. Testosterone induced ROS generation (relative light units/mg protein, 2 h; 162.6 ± 16 vs. 100) and procaspase-3 activation [arbitrary units, (AU), 6 h; 166.2 ± 19 vs. 100]. CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. Testosterone increased annexin-V fluorescence (AU, 197.6 ± 21.5 vs. 100) and decreased calcein fluorescence (AU, 34.4 ± 6.4 vs. 100), and O2 consumption (nmol O2/min, 18.6 ± 2.0 vs. 34.4 ± 3.9). Testosterone also reduced Bax-to-Bcl-2 ratio but not cytochrome-c release from mitochondria. Moreover, testosterone (6 h) induced cleavage of procaspase 8 (AU, 161.1 ± 13.5 vs. 100) and increased gene expression of Fas ligand (2(ΔΔCt), 3.6 ± 1.2 vs. 0.7 ± 0.5), and TNF-α (1.7 ± 0.4 vs. 0.3 ± 0.1). CCCP, MnTMPyP, and flutamide abolished these effects. These data indicate that testosterone induces apoptosis in VSMCs via the extrinsic apoptotic pathway with the involvement of androgen receptor activation and mitochondria-generated ROS.

  7. Convective thermal fluxes in unsteady non-homogeneous flows generating complex three dimensional vorticity patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tellez Alvarez, Jackson David; Redondo, Jose Manuel; Sanchez, Jesu Mary

    2016-04-01

    The improvements in experimental methods and high resolution image analysis are nowadays able to detect subtle changes in the structure of the turbulence over a wide range of temporal and spatial scales [1], we compare the scaling shown by different mixing fronts driven by buoyancy that form convective driven mixing. We use PIV and density front tracking in several experimental configurations akin to geophysical overturning [2, 3]. We parametrize the role of unstable stratification by means of the Rayleigh and Atwood numbers and compare the scaling and the multifractal structure functions of the different markers used to visualize the non-homogeneous. Both reactive and passive scalar tracers are used to investigate the mixing structure and the intermittency of the flow. Different initial conditions are compared and the mixing efficiency of the overall turbulent process is evaluated [4 - 6]. Diffusion is measured in the transition from a homogeneous linearly stratified fluid to a cellular or layered structure by means of Thermoelectric generated heating and cooling [2, 4]. Patterns arise by setting up a convective flow generated by a buoyant heat flux either in the base or in a side wall of the convective enclosure [1, 6]. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using brine or sugar solutions and fresh water in order to form a density interface and low Prandtl number mixing with only temperature gradients [7]. The set of dimensionless parameters define conditions of numeric and small scale laboratory modeling of environmental flows. Fields of velocity, density and their gradients were computed and visualized [8, 9]. When convective heating and cooling takes place the combination of internal waves and buoyant turbulence is much more complicated if the Rayleigh and Reynolds numbers are high in order to study entrainment and mixing. The experiments described here investigate high Prandtl number mixing using salt or sugar solutions and

  8. Feedback of Erosional-Depositional Processes Generating Anabranching Patterns in a Mega-River the Case of the PARANÁ River, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latrubesse, E. M.; Pereira, M.; Ramonell, C. G.; Szupiany, R. N.

    2011-12-01

    A new category of "very large" rivers was recently proposed and defined as mega-rivers, which are those rivers with a Qmean of more than ~17,000m3/s. This category includes the nine largest rivers on Earth and the Parana River is one of the selected members of that peculiar group. The planform adjustment of mega-rivers is a variety of anabranching patterns characterized by the existence of alluvial islands. The processes and mechanisms involved in the generation of the different anabranching styles, however, are not well understood. The Paraná channel pattern has been classified as a low to moderate anabranching, low sinuosity with tendency to braided and having a meandering thalweg. We analyzed a reach of the middle Paraná in Argentina applying a combined multitemporal, hydraulic, sedimentologic and geomorphologic approach. Multitemporal geomorphologic maps, sedimentary descriptions of bars, islands and banks, volumetric calculations using multitemporal bathymetric charts, measurements with ADCP and bathymetric surveys with echosound, sediment transport estimations and the hydrological analysis of available data from gauge stations were some of the tools used in our research. The evolution of the reach was studied from 1908 to present. The reach is subdivided in two sub-reaches (named Chapeton and Curtiembre) which are comprised between nodal points. Chapeton has been in a more mature quasi-equilibrium state through the XX Century but the main channel in Curtiembre evolved from a single pattern to anabranching pattern since 1950s. We conclude that the generation of the anabranching pattern in the studied reach depends of a combination of factors such as the architecture of the floodplain and islands, the main role played by the morphodynamics and shifting of the thalweg, the availability and path of sandy sediments bedforms architecture and the temporal variability of the effective discharge among other secondary factors. A feedback system coupling erosional

  9. Differential involvement of NF-kappaB and MAP kinase pathways in the generation of inflammatory cytokines by human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Alexandre; Ear, Thornin; Blais-Charron, Emilie; Dubois, Claire M; McDonald, Patrick P

    2007-02-01

    The ability of human neutrophils to express a variety of genes encoding inflammatory mediators is well documented, and mounting evidence suggests that neutrophil-derived cytokines and chemokines contribute to the recruitment of discrete leukocyte populations at inflammatory sites. Despite this, our understanding of the signaling intermediates governing the generation of inflammatory cytokines by neutrophils remains fragmentary. Here, we report that inhibitors of the p38 MAPK and MEK pathways substantially diminish the release of (and in the case of p38 inhibitors, the gene expression of) several inflammatory cytokines in neutrophils stimulated with LPS or TNF. In addition, various NF-kappaB inhibitors were found to profoundly impede the inducible gene expression and release of inflammatory cytokines in these cells. The MAPK inhibitors did not affect NF-kappaB activation; instead, the transcriptional effects of the p38 MAPK inhibitor appear to involve transcriptional factor IID. Conversely, the NF-kappaB inhibitors failed to affect the activation of MAPKs. Finally, the MAPK inhibitors were found to prevent the activation a key component of the translational machinery, S6 ribosomal protein, in keeping with their post-transcriptional impact on cytokine generation. To our knowledge, this constitutes the first demonstration that in neutrophils, the inducible expression of proinflammatory cytokines by physiological stimuli largely reflects the ability of the latter to activate NF-kappaB and selected MAPK pathways. Our data also raise the possibility that NF-kappaB or MAPK inhibitors could be useful in the treatment of inflammatory disorders in which neutrophils predominate.

  10. Mixed Methods Case Study of Generational Patterns in Responses to Shame and Guilt

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ng, Tony

    2013-01-01

    Moral socialization and moral learning are antecedents of moral motivation. As many as 4 generations interact in workplace and education settings; hence, a deeper understanding of the moral motivation of members of those generations is needed. The purpose of this convergent mixed methods case study was to understand the moral motivation of 5…

  11. Fine mapping and characterization of linked quantitative trait loci involved in the transition of the maize apical meristem from vegetative to generative structures.

    PubMed Central

    Vlăduţu, C; McLaughlin, J; Phillips, R L

    1999-01-01

    Quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping has detected two linked QTL in the 8L chromosome arm segment introgressed from Gaspé Flint (a Northern Flint open-pollinated population) into the background of N28 (a Corn Belt Dent inbred line). Homozygous recombinant lines, with a variable length of the introgressed segment, confirmed the presence of the two previously identified, linked QTL. In the N28 background, Gaspé Flint QTL alleles at both loci induce a reduction in node number, height, and days to anthesis (pollen shed). Given the determinate growth pattern of maize, the phenotypic effects indicate that the two QTL are involved in the transition of the apical meristem from vegetative to generative structures. Relative to the effects of the two QTL in the background of N28, we distinguish two general developmental factors affecting the timing of pollen shed. The primary factor is the timing of the transition of the apical meristem. The second, derivative factor is the global extent of internode elongation. Having separated the two linked QTL, we have laid the foundation for the positional cloning of the QTL with a larger effect. PMID:10511573

  12. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  13. A flight study of tone radiation patterns generated by inlet rods in a small turbofan engine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preisser, J. S.; Silcox, R. J.; Eversman, W.; Parrett, A. V.

    1984-01-01

    This paper presents a flight study of tone radiation patterns from a small turbofan engine and compares results with similar static test stand data and a recently developed radiation theory. An interaction tone was produced by a circumferential array of inlet rods placed just upstream of the fan blades. Overhead and sideline flight directivity patterns showed cut-on of a dominant single mode occurred where predicted and the absence of any other significant circumferential or radial modes. In general, good agreement was found between measured flight and static data, with small differences being attributed to inlet geometry and/or forward speed effects. Good agreement was also obtained between flight data and theory for directivity pattern shape, however, the theory consistently predicted higher values for peak radiation angle over a wide range of frequency.

  14. Risk factors and patterns of lymph node involvement in primary gastric large B-cell lymphoma: implications for target definition

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ximei; Wang, Peiguo; Zhao, Lujun; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to identify the appropriate radiation volume for primary gastric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (PG-DLBCL). Methods We retrospectively analyzed the clinical and pathological findings of 68 patients treated with total gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Results There were 23, 14, and 29 patients with stage I, stage II, and stage IIE disease, respectively, and 30 patients had lymph node involvement. Primary tumor location, as well as the depth of invasion, was significantly associated with lymph node involvement. When the tumor was limited to the muscularis, the involved lymph nodes were found to be perigastric nodes. For tumors invading beyond the muscularis, regional lymph nodes were involved. Conclusion The optimal radiation volume for patients with PG-DLBCL is largely dependent on the primary location and depth of invasion. Larger series and longer follow-up are needed to further delineate the radiation volumes for PG-DLBCL. PMID:27536138

  15. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented. PMID:27516737

  16. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution.

    PubMed

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented.

  17. Design of Spiking Central Pattern Generators for Multiple Locomotion Gaits in Hexapod Robots by Christiansen Grammar Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Espinal, Andres; Rostro-Gonzalez, Horacio; Carpio, Martin; Guerra-Hernandez, Erick I.; Ornelas-Rodriguez, Manuel; Sotelo-Figueroa, Marco

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a method to design Spiking Central Pattern Generators (SCPGs) to achieve locomotion at different frequencies on legged robots. It is validated through embedding its designs into a Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) and implemented on a real hexapod robot. The SCPGs are automatically designed by means of a Christiansen Grammar Evolution (CGE)-based methodology. The CGE performs a solution for the configuration (synaptic weights and connections) for each neuron in the SCPG. This is carried out through the indirect representation of candidate solutions that evolve to replicate a specific spike train according to a locomotion pattern (gait) by measuring the similarity between the spike trains and the SPIKE distance to lead the search to a correct configuration. By using this evolutionary approach, several SCPG design specifications can be explicitly added into the SPIKE distance-based fitness function, such as looking for Spiking Neural Networks (SNNs) with minimal connectivity or a Central Pattern Generator (CPG) able to generate different locomotion gaits only by changing the initial input stimuli. The SCPG designs have been successfully implemented on a Spartan 6 FPGA board and a real time validation on a 12 Degrees Of Freedom (DOFs) hexapod robot is presented. PMID:27516737

  18. Generation of a reference radiation pattern of string instruments using automatic excitation and acoustic centering.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Behler, Gottfried; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Radiation patterns of musical instruments are important for the understanding of music perception in concert halls, and may be used to improve the plausibility of virtual acoustic systems. Many attempts have been performed to measure the spatial response of musical instruments using surrounding spherical microphone arrays with a limited number of microphones. This work presents a high-resolution spatial sampling of the radiation pattern of an electrically excited violin, and addresses technical problems that arise due to mechanical reasons of the excitation apparatus using acoustic centering.

  19. A simple model for polar cap convection patterns and generation of theta auroras

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyons, L. R.

    1985-01-01

    An addition of the uniform interplanetary magnetic field and the earth's dipole magnetic field is used to evaluate electric field convection patterns over the polar caps that result from solar wind flow across open geomagnetic field lines. The model also accounts for field-aligned patterns within, and auroral arcs across, the polar cap. The qualitative predictions derived from the model express the electric field magnitudes, aurora intensity, sunward and antisunward flow, and the dusk-side reversal of the convection field in terms of the x and y components of the interplanetary magnetic field.

  20. Generation of a reference radiation pattern of string instruments using automatic excitation and acoustic centering.

    PubMed

    Shabtai, Noam R; Behler, Gottfried; Vorländer, Michael

    2015-11-01

    Radiation patterns of musical instruments are important for the understanding of music perception in concert halls, and may be used to improve the plausibility of virtual acoustic systems. Many attempts have been performed to measure the spatial response of musical instruments using surrounding spherical microphone arrays with a limited number of microphones. This work presents a high-resolution spatial sampling of the radiation pattern of an electrically excited violin, and addresses technical problems that arise due to mechanical reasons of the excitation apparatus using acoustic centering. PMID:26627818

  1. Near-field to far-field characterization of speckle patterns generated by disordered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Parigi, Valentina; Perros, Elodie; Binard, Guillaume; Bourdillon, Céline; Maître, Agnès; Carminati, Rémi; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina; De Wilde, Yannick

    2016-04-01

    We study the intensity spatial correlation function of optical speckle patterns above a disordered dielectric medium in the multiple scattering regime. The intensity distributions are recorded by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) with sub-wavelength spatial resolution at variable distances from the surface in a range which spans continuously from the near-field (distance ≪ λ) to the far-field regime (distance ≫ λ). The non-universal behavior at sub-wavelength distances reveals the connection between the near-field speckle pattern and the internal structure of the medium. PMID:27136995

  2. Manipulation of micro-particles through optical interference patterns generated by integrated photonic devices.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Li-Chung; Chen, Te-Chang; Yang, Yao-Tsu; Huang, Chieh-Yang; Shen, Da-Wei; Chen, Ya-Tzu; Lee, Ming-Chang M

    2013-03-21

    Micro-particle transport and switch governed by guided-wave optical interference are presented. The optical interference, occurring in a directional coupler and a multi-mode interferometer made by inverted rib waveguides, results in a specific evanescent field dependent on wavelength. Through a detailed theoretical analysis, the field of induced optical force shows a correlative pattern associated with the evanescent field. Experimental results demonstrate that 10 μm polystyrene beads are propelled with a trajectory subject to the interference pattern accordingly. By launching different wavelengths, the polystyrene beads can be delivered to different output waveguide ports. Massive micro-particle manipulation is applicable.

  3. Generation of nano-scaled DNA patterns through electro-beam induced charge trapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Pei-Yin; Lin, Hung-Yi; Liu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2006-10-01

    In this study, distinct regions of trapped charges on glass substrates created by electron beam bombardment were utilized to attract and to immobilize DNA molecules. The negatively charged DNA molecules were attracted by the positive charge layer beneath the substrate surface resulting from escape of secondary electrons. With this mechanism, we demonstrated high-precision patterning of unmodified DNA molecules, independent of the length, sequence, and number of DNA strands, and with an attachment to the glass surface strong enough to withstand vigorous washing with water. DNA patterns with the line width of 50 nm were achieved.

  4. Cellular and genetic mechanisms involved in the generation of protective and pathogenic immune responses in human Chagas disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutra, Walderez Ornelas; Menezes, Cristiane Alves Silva; Villani, Fernanda Nobre Amaral; da Costa, Germano Carneiro; da Silveira, Alexandre Barcelos Morais; d’Ávila Reis, Débora; Gollob, Kenneth J

    2012-01-01

    Perhaps one of the most intriguing aspects of human Chagas disease is the complex network of events that underlie the generation of protective versus pathogenic immune responses during the chronic phase of the disease. While most individuals do not develop patent disease, a large percentage may develop severe forms that eventually lead to death. Although many efforts have been devoted to deciphering these mechanisms, there is still much to be learned before we can fully understand the pathogenesis of Chagas disease. It is clear that the host’s immune response is decisive in this process. While characteristics of the parasite influence the immune response, it is becoming evident that the host genetic background plays a fundamental role in the establishment of pathogenic versus protective responses. The involvement of three complex organisms, host, parasite and vector, is certainly one of the key aspects that calls for multidisciplinary approaches towards the understanding of Chagas disease. We believe that now, one hundred years after the discovery of Chagas disease, it is imperative to continue with highly interactive research in order to elucidate the immune response associated with disease evolution, which will be essential in designing prophylactic or therapeutic interventions. PMID:19753476

  5. Revisiting the mechanisms involved in Line Width Roughness smoothing of 193 nm photoresist patterns during HBr plasma treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Brihoum, M.; Ramos, R.; Menguelti, K.; Cunge, G.; Pargon, E.; Joubert, O.

    2013-01-07

    HBr plasma treatments are widely used in nanoscale lithographic technologies to increase the plasma etch resistance of 193 nm photoresist masks as well as to decrease their Line Width Roughness (LWR). VUV irradiation of the photoresist is known to play a major role in this process by inducing polymer chains rearrangement and finally LWR reduction. However, in the plasma environment (i.e., with radical and ion bombardment), the interaction layer formed at the resist surface perturbs this mechanism and a lower LWR reduction is achieved compared to VUV only treatment. So far the nature of the interaction layer, its formation mechanism and its relation with the resist pattern LWR were all unclear. In this paper, we show that a graphite-like layer is formed on the resist patterns by the redeposition of carbon-based species originating from the plasma dissociation of outgassed photo-etched resist moieties. We show that the presence of this layer inhibits the LWR minimization and causes an increase in the LWR when it becomes thick enough (i.e., a few nanometers). We present evidences that the difference in the mechanical properties of the graphite-like top layer which coats the resist patterns and the bulk of the resist patterns is correlated to the LWR after plasma treatment. We can conclude that the optimization of an HBr cure process relies on the minimization of the carbon redeposition while keeping a significant VUV light flux and we show that this can be achieved by using pulsed plasma processes.

  6. Analysis of RNA Interference Lines Identifies New Functions of Maternally-Expressed Genes Involved in Embryonic Patterning in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Liu, Niankun; Lasko, Paul

    2015-03-31

    Embryonic patterning in Drosophila melanogaster is initially established through the activity of a number of maternally expressed genes that are expressed during oogenesis. mRNAs from some of these genes accumulate in the posterior pole plasm of the oocyte and early embryo and localize further into RNA islands, which are transient ring-like structures that form around the nuclei of future primordial germ cells (pole cells) at stage 3 of embryogenesis. As mRNAs from several genes with known functions in anterior-posterior patterning and/or germ cell specification accumulate in RNA islands, we hypothesized that some other mRNAs that localize in this manner might also function in these developmental processes. To test this, we investigated the developmental functions of 51 genes whose mRNAs accumulate in RNA islands by abrogating their activity in the female germline using RNA interference. This analysis revealed requirements for ttk, pbl, Hip14, eIF5, eIF4G, and CG9977 for progression through early oogenesis. We observed dorsal appendage defects in a proportion of eggs produced by females expressing double-stranded RNA targeting Mkrn1 or jvl, implicating these two genes in dorsal-ventral patterning. In addition, posterior patterning defects and a reduction in pole cell number were seen in the progeny of Mkrn1 females. Because the mammalian ortholog of Mkrn1 acts as an E3 ubiquitin ligase, these results suggest an additional link between protein ubiquitination and pole plasm activity.

  7. [Pattern of replaceability of generations among inhabitants of Bejsce parish, Kielce voivodship (eighteenth to twentieth centuries)].

    PubMed

    Piasecki, E

    1983-01-01

    A review of population dynamics in the Polish parish of Bejsce, in Kielce voivodship, from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries is presented. The study is based on data from computerized parish records. Its focus is on changes in fertility and the pattern of human reproduction over time and on the factors affecting these changes. (summary in ENG)

  8. Information-generated Influence as a Function of Locus-of-Control Patterns in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolk, Stephen; Eliot, John

    1974-01-01

    Investigated the degree to which an individual disregards information about himself and his environment, as a function of his locus of control patterns, and hence is less responsive to or influenced by a given segment of information. Subjects were 341 fourth- and fifth-grade children. (SDH)

  9. Next-generation re-sequencing of genes involved in increased platelet reactivity in diabetic patients on acetylsalicylic acid.

    PubMed

    Postula, Marek; Janicki, Piotr K; Eyileten, Ceren; Rosiak, Marek; Kaplon-Cieslicka, Agnieszka; Sugino, Shigekazu; Wilimski, Radosław; Kosior, Dariusz A; Opolski, Grzegorz; Filipiak, Krzysztof J; Mirowska-Guzel, Dagmara

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether rare missense genetic variants in several genes related to platelet functions and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) response are associated with the platelet reactivity in patients with diabetes type 2 (T2D) on ASA therapy. Fifty eight exons and corresponding introns of eight selected genes, including PTGS1, PTGS2, TXBAS1, PTGIS, ADRA2A, ADRA2B, TXBA2R, and P2RY1 were re-sequenced in 230 DNA samples from T2D patients by using a pooled PCR amplification and next-generation sequencing by Illumina HiSeq2000. The observed non-synonymous variants were confirmed by individual genotyping of 384 DNA samples comprising of the individuals from the original discovery pools and additional verification cohort of 154 ASA-treated T2DM patients. The association between investigated phenotypes (ASA induced changes in platelets reactivity by PFA-100, VerifyNow and serum thromboxane B2 level [sTxB2]), and accumulation of rare missense variants (genetic burden) in investigated genes was tested using statistical collapsing tests. We identified a total of 35 exonic variants, including 3 common missense variants, 15 rare missense variants, and 17 synonymous variants in 8 investigated genes. The rare missense variants exhibited statistically significant difference in the accumulation pattern between a group of patients with increased and normal platelet reactivity based on PFA-100 assay. Our study suggests that genetic burden of the rare functional variants in eight genes may contribute to differences in the platelet reactivity measured with the PFA-100 assay in the T2DM patients treated with ASA. PMID:26599574

  10. Lesion patterns and etiology of ischemia in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery territory involvement: a clinical - diffusion weighted - MRI study.

    PubMed

    Kumral, E; Kisabay, A; Ataç, C

    2006-04-01

    The topography and mechanism of stroke in the anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) territory are delineated before, but the detailed clinical spectrum of lesions involving AICA territory was not studied by diffusion weighted imaging (DWI). We reviewed 1350 patients with posterior circulation ischemic stroke in our registry. We included patients if the diagnosis of AICA territory involvement was confirmed, and DWI, and magnetic resonance angiography were obtained in the 3 days of symptoms onset. The potential feeding arteries of the AICA territory were evaluated on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using a three-dimensional rotating cineoangiographic method. There were 23 consecutive patients with lesion involving AICA territory, six with isolated lesion in the AICA territory, six with posterior inferior cerebellar artery, 11 with multiple posterior circulation infarcts (MPCIs). The clinical feature of isolated AICA infarct was vertigo, tinnitus, dysmetria, ataxia, facial weakness, facial sensory deficits, lateral gaze palsy, and sensory-motor deficits in patients with pontine involvement. Patients with largest lesion extending to the anterior and inferolateral cerebellum showed mixed symptomatology of the lateral medullary (Wallenberg's syndrome) and AICA territory involvement. Patients with MPCIs presented various clinical pictures with consciousness disturbances and diverse clinical signs because of involvement of different anatomical structures. Large-artery atherosclerotic disease in the vertebrobasilar system was the main cause of stroke in 12 (52%) patients, cardioembolism (CE) in one (4%), and coexisting large-artery disease and a source of CE in four (17%). The main cause of stroke was atheromatous vertebrobasilar artery disease either in the distal vertebral or proximal basilar artery. The outcome was usually good except those with multiple lesions. The new MRI techniques and clinical correlations allow better definition of the diverse topographical

  11. Generation and use of observational data patterns in the evaluation of data quality for AmeriFlux and FLUXNET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastorello, G.; Agarwal, D.; Poindexter, C.; Papale, D.; Trotta, C.; Ribeca, A.; Canfora, E.; Faybishenko, B.; Gunter, D.; Chu, H.

    2015-12-01

    The fluxes-measuring sites that are part of AmeriFlux are operated and maintained in a fairly independent fashion, both in terms of scientific goals and operational practices. This is also the case for most sites from other networks in FLUXNET. This independence leads to a degree of heterogeneity in the data sets collected at the sites, which is also reflected in data quality levels. The generation of derived data products and data synthesis efforts, two of the main goals of these networks, are directly affected by the heterogeneity in data quality. In a collaborative effort between AmeriFlux and ICOS, a series of quality checks are being conducted for the data sets before any network-level data processing and product generation take place. From these checks, a set of common data issues were identified, and are being cataloged and classified into data quality patterns. These patterns are now being used as a basis for implementing automation for certain data quality checks, speeding up the process of applying the checks and evaluating the data. Currently, most data checks are performed individually in each data set, requiring visual inspection and inputs from a data curator. This manual process makes it difficult to scale the quality checks, creating a bottleneck for the data processing. One goal of the automated checks is to free up time of data curators so they can focus on new or less common issues. As new issues are identified, they can also be cataloged and classified, extending the coverage of existing patterns or potentially generating new patterns, helping both improve existing automated checks and create new ones. This approach is helping make data quality evaluation faster, more systematic, and reproducible. Furthermore, these patterns are also helping with documenting common causes and solutions for data problems. This can help tower teams with diagnosing problems in data collection and processing, and also in correcting historical data sets. In this

  12. Intergenerational Relationship Quality, Gender, and Grandparent Involvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Melissa A.; Scaramella, Laura V.; Neppl, Tricia K.; Ontai, Lenna; Conger, Rand D.

    2010-01-01

    This prospective, intergenerational study (N = 181) considered how parent (G1, Generation 1) and child (G2, Generation 2) relationship quality during adolescence and adulthood is associated with G1's level of involvement with their 3- to 4-year-old grandchildren (G3, Generation 3). Path model analyses indicated different patterns of results for…

  13. The Physiological Characterization of Connexin41.8 and Connexin39.4, Which Are Involved in the Striped Pattern Formation of Zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masakatsu; Sawada, Risa; Aramaki, Toshihiro; Skerrett, I Martha; Kondo, Shigeru

    2016-01-15

    The zebrafish has a striped skin pattern on its body, and Connexin41.8 (Cx41.8) and Cx39.4 are involved in striped pattern formation. Mutations in these connexins change the striped pattern to a spot or labyrinth pattern. In this study, we characterized Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 after expression in Xenopus oocytes. In addition, we analyzed Cx41.8 mutants Cx41.8I203F and Cx41.8M7, which caused spot or labyrinth skin patterns, respectively, in transgenic zebrafish. In the electrophysiological analysis, the gap junctions formed by Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 showed distinct sensitivity to transjunctional voltage. Analysis of non-junctional (hemichannel) currents revealed a large voltage-dependent current in Cx39.4-expressing oocytes that was absent in cells expressing Cx41.8. Junctional currents induced by both Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 were reduced by co-expression of Cx41.8I203F and abolished by co-expression of Cx41.8M7. In the transgenic experiment, Cx41.8I203F partially rescued the Cx41.8 null mutant phenotype, whereas Cx41.8M7 failed to rescue the null mutant, and it elicited a more severe phenotype than the Cx41.8 null mutant, as evidenced by a smaller spot pattern. Our results provide evidence that gap junctions formed by Cx41.8 play an important role in stripe/spot patterning and suggest that mutations in Cx41.8 can effect patterning by way of reduced function (I203F) and dominant negative effects (M7). Our results suggest that functional differences in Cx41.8 and Cx39.4 relate to spot or labyrinth mutant phenotypes and also provide evidence that these two connexins interact in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Dust generation and drought patterns in Africa from helium-4 in a modern Cape Verde coral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Kreycik, P.

    2008-10-01

    We show that helium-4 (4He) concentrations in a modern Porites coral from Cape Verde provides a robust reconstruction of mineral dust loading over the Eastern Tropical Atlantic from mid-1950's to mid-1990's. The 4He record demonstrates pronounced increases in dust emission from North Africa associated with the severe droughts in the Sahel. Our record provides direct evidence that dust emission rates in the 1950's, prior to the onset of the Sahel droughts, were a factor of nine lower than during 1980-84. This large change in dust emission rate indicates global aerosol contents would have increased by ~45% over this period, which may have contributed to a reduction in solar radiation reaching the Earth's surface. We find that dust emission from North Africa is most closely related to drought patterns, rather than to changes in atmospheric circulation patterns resulting from climate oscillations, such as North Atlantic Oscillations and El Nino/Southern Oscillation.

  15. Programming Surface Energy Driven Marangoni Convection in Polymer Thin Films to Generate Topographic Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chae Bin; Janes, Dustin; Arshad, Talha; Katzenstein, Joshua; Prisco, Nathan; McGuffin, Dana; Bonnecaze, Roger; Ellison, Christopher

    2015-03-01

    The Marangoni effect describes how fluid flows in response to gradients in surface energy. We recently developed a method for photochemically preprograming spatial surface energy patterns in glassy polystyrene (PS) thin films. UV irradiation through a mask selectively dehydrogenates the PS, thus increasing surface energy in the UV exposed regions compared to the unexposed regions. After heating the film to the liquid state, transport of polymer occurs from regions of low surface energy to regions of high surface energy. This method can be harnessed to rapidly manufacture polymer films possessing prescribed three-dimensional topographies reflective of the original light exposure pattern. To quantify and verify this phenomenon, a theoretical model that gives a more thorough understanding of the physics of this process, its limits and ways to apply it efficiently for various target metrics will also be presented along with comparisons between theoretical predictions and experimental observations. Finally, while PS dehydrogenation can be used to produce a variety of topographical patterns, judicious selection of the photosensitizing compounds in an otherwise transparent polymer expands the use of this method to more readily available light sources.

  16. Factors involved in the distribution pattern of ciliates in the water column of a transparent alpine lake

    PubMed Central

    SONNTAG, BETTINA; SUMMERER, MONIKA; SOMMARUGA, RUBEN

    2011-01-01

    The recurrent depth preference of three ciliate species (two prostomatids and one haptorid) in a transparent alpine lake indicates the existence of niche partitioning among them involving potential factors such as avoidance of high ultraviolet radiation levels and zooplankton predation, as well as competition for food resources. PMID:21984852

  17. Myoepithelial differentiation in cribriform, tubular and solid pattern of adenoid cystic carcinoma: A potential involvement in histological grading and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Du, Fei; Zhou, Chuan-Xiang; Gao, Yan

    2016-06-01

    Adenoid cystic carcinoma (AdCC) is known as a biphasic tumor composed of ductal and myoepithelial cells. The present study aimed to evaluate the amount and distribution of the myoepithelial cells in cribriform, tubular and solid subtypes of AdCC and analyze their relationship with histological grading and prognosis. A panel of myoepithelial markers including CK5/6, p63, p40, D2-40, calponin, α-SMA, S-100, and vimentin, together with a luminal cell marker CK7, and Ki-67 were used for immunohistochemical study in 109 AdCCs that included 38 cribriform, 36 tubular and 35 solid subtypes. The myoepithelial cells were labeled and found lined cystic-like paces, located at the periphery of the cribriform arrangements, and presented at the nonluminal cells of the two-layered tubular structures, while absent or dispersed in the solid pattern. Meantime, the solid subtype presented a higher proliferation rate assessed by mitotic count and Ki-67 labeling index, followed by poorer overall survival and recurrent-free survival. Furthermore, CK7 expression was found higher in solid pattern than in cribriform-tubular subtype, which showed negative correlation with the myoepithelial markers including D2-40, Calponin, α-SMA, p63, p40 and vimentin. The solid pattern of AdCC showed gland differentiation but loss of myoepithelial differentiation with a higher proliferation and more aggressiveness as well as poorer prognosis compared with the cribriform-tubular subtypes, which implies that loss of MEC differentiation might contribute to the poor prognosis of the solid subtype of AdCC. However, further studies are required to clarify its exact role in AdCC progression.

  18. Expression Patterns of GmAP2/EREB-Like Transcription Factors Involved in Soybean Responses to Water Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Marcolino-Gomes, Juliana; Rodrigues, Fabiana Aparecida; Oliveira, Maria Cristina Neves; Farias, Jose Renato Bouças; Neumaier, Norman; Abdelnoor, Ricardo Vilela; Marcelino-Guimarães, Francismar Corrêa; Nepomuceno, Alexandre Lima

    2013-01-01

    Soybean farming has faced several losses in productivity due to drought events in the last few decades. However, plants have molecular mechanisms to prevent and protect against water deficit injuries, and transcription factors play an important role in triggering different defense mechanisms. Understanding the expression patterns of transcription factors in response to water deficit and to environmental diurnal changes is very important for unveiling water deficit stress tolerance mechanisms. Here, we analyzed the expression patterns of ten APETALA2/Ethylene Responsive Element Binding-like (AP2/EREB-like) transcription factors in two soybean genotypes (BR16: drought-sensitive; and Embrapa 48: drought-tolerant). According to phylogenetic and domain analyses, these genes can be included in the DREB and ERF subfamilies. We also analyzed a GmDRIP-like gene that encodes a DREB negative regulator. We detected the up-regulation of 9 GmAP2/EREB-like genes and identified transcriptional differences that were dependent on the levels of the stress applied and the tissue type analyzed (the expression of the GmDREB1F-like gene, for example, was four times higher in roots than in leaves). The GmDRIP-like gene was not induced by water deficit in BR16 during the longest periods of stress, but was significantly induced in Embrapa 48; this suggests a possible genetic/molecular difference between the responses of these cultivars to water deficit stress. Additionally, RNAseq gene expression analysis over a 24-h time course indicates that the expression patterns of several GmDREB-like genes are subject to oscillation over the course of the day, indicating a possible circadian regulation. PMID:23667465

  19. Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in México.

    PubMed

    Otoniel, Buenrostro Delgado; Liliana, Márquez-Benavides; Francelia, Pinette Gaona

    2008-01-01

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

  20. Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro

    2008-07-01

    Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

  1. Optical generation of a circular harmonic filter for rotation and translation invariant optical pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheng, Yeou-Yen

    1987-01-01

    A new method to generate a circular harmonic filter with both rotation and translation invariance is described, which is based on a phase-shifted double-exposure (PSDE) technique. An expression for the peak correlation intensity at the origin for the correlation plane as a function of target orientation for the PSDE filter is derived. Experimental results confirming the theoretical predictions are provided.

  2. Generation of continuous large granular lymphocyte lines by interleukin 2 from the spleen cells of mice infected with Moloney leukemia virus. Involvement of interleukin 3

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    Continuous cell lines could be reproducibly established by culturing spleen cells from adult mice injected with MLV-producer cells or directly infected with Mo-MLV with rIL-2, whereas the culture of normal splenic cells with rIL-2 induced only transient and limited proliferation resulting in no such lines. All of the lines showed morphological characteristics as LGL with Thy-1+,Lyt-1-,L3T4-,Lyt-2- ,AsGM1+,FcR gamma+ phenotype without exception, and most of them exhibited typical NK-patterned cytotoxicity. Analysis of reverse transcriptase activity of the culture supernatants as well as Southern hybridization of the DNA from the lines using an Mo-MLV-specific cDNA probe indicated no evidence of retroviral replication or proviral integration, suggesting that the generation of cell lines reflected a reactive process and viral infection was not directly responsible. It was subsequently revealed that Thy-1+,Lyt-1+,Lyt-2- spleen cells from mice infected with Mo-MLV in vivo spontaneously produced surprising amounts of IL-3 in vitro, leading to the possibility that IL-3 was responsible for the generation of lines. The possibility was directly supported by the observation that continuous lines with identical characteristics could be generated completely in vitro by sequential stimulation with rIL-3 and rIL-2 from normal spleen cells without any involvement of Mo-MLV. The C beta gene of TCR was shown to be rearranged in all the lines examined, indicating the LGL lines were all genetically committed to T cell lineage. Unlike the situation in normal splenic populations expanded by rIL-2, where the expression of IL-2-R was progressively lost, constitutive expression of high-affinity-IL-2-R was observed in all the lines and thus, this was considered to explain the unlimited proliferation of them in response to rIL-2 alone. These results suggested the probable role of IL-3 in the regulation of growth and differentiation of a set of LGL committed to T cell lineage. The possible

  3. Two-dimensional stick slip on a soft elastic polymer: pattern generation using atomic force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, J. A.; Brown, C. L.; Myhra, S.; Watson, G. S.

    2006-05-01

    It has been demonstrated that it is possible to create laterally differentiated frictional patterning and three-dimensional structures using an atomic force microscope (AFM) probe on the surface of a soft elastic polymer, poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS). The resulting effect of contact mode imaging at low loading forces (<100 nN), observed in the lateral force mode, revealed a homogeneous pattern on the PDMS surface exhibiting higher friction. With higher loading forces ({\\gg }100 nN) the effect is non-uniform, resulting in structures with depths on the nanometre scale. The topographic and frictional data revealed stick-slip responses in both the fast (orthogonal to the long axis of the lever) and slow (parallel to the long axis of the lever) directions of probe travel from scanning in a raster pattern. The stick-slip events are manifested in the form of a series of shallow channels spaced evenly apart on the polymer surface. Detailed friction loop analysis acquired during the manipulation process showed that the lateral force changed according to the strength of trapping of the tip with the polymer surface exhibiting significant in-plane deformation due to lateral forces being imposed. An incremental increase in the initial loading force resulted in an increase in in-plane displacement and a greater spacing between the stick lines/channels in the slow-scan direction. A decrease in channel length in the fast-scan direction is also observed as a result of an increase in static friction with normal force, resulting in greater surface deformation and shorter track length for sliding friction.

  4. Automated Learning of Subcellular Variation among Punctate Protein Patterns and a Generative Model of Their Relation to Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Gregory R.; Li, Jieyue; Shariff, Aabid; Rohde, Gustavo K.; Murphy, Robert F.

    2015-01-01

    Characterizing the spatial distribution of proteins directly from microscopy images is a difficult problem with numerous applications in cell biology (e.g. identifying motor-related proteins) and clinical research (e.g. identification of cancer biomarkers). Here we describe the design of a system that provides automated analysis of punctate protein patterns in microscope images, including quantification of their relationships to microtubules. We constructed the system using confocal immunofluorescence microscopy images from the Human Protein Atlas project for 11 punctate proteins in three cultured cell lines. These proteins have previously been characterized as being primarily located in punctate structures, but their images had all been annotated by visual examination as being simply “vesicular”. We were able to show that these patterns could be distinguished from each other with high accuracy, and we were able to assign to one of these subclasses hundreds of proteins whose subcellular localization had not previously been well defined. In addition to providing these novel annotations, we built a generative approach to modeling of punctate distributions that captures the essential characteristics of the distinct patterns. Such models are expected to be valuable for representing and summarizing each pattern and for constructing systems biology simulations of cell behaviors. PMID:26624011

  5. A general-purpose computer program for studying ultrasonic beam patterns generated with acoustic lenses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberti, Dino; Ludwig, Reinhold; Looft, Fred J.

    1988-01-01

    A 3-D computer model of a piston radiator with lenses for focusing and defocusing is presented. To achieve high-resolution imaging, the frequency of the transmitted and received ultrasound must be as high as 10 MHz. Current ultrasonic transducers produce an extremely narrow beam at these high frequencies and thus are not appropriate for imaging schemes such as synthetic-aperture focus techniques (SAFT). Consequently, a numerical analysis program has been developed to determine field intensity patterns that are radiated from ultrasonic transducers with lenses. Lens shapes are described and the field intensities are numerically predicted and compared with experimental results.

  6. Nicotiana tabacum actin-depolymerizing factor 2 is involved in actin-driven, auxin-dependent patterning.

    PubMed

    Durst, Steffen; Nick, Peter; Maisch, Jan

    2013-08-15

    Polar transport of auxin has been identified as a central element of pattern formation. To address the underlying cellular mechanisms, we use the tobacco cell line (Nicotiana tabacum L. cv. Bright Yellow 2; BY-2) as model. We showed previously that cell divisions within a cell file are synchronized by polar auxin flow, linked to the organization of actin filaments (AF) which, in turn, is modified via actin-binding proteins (ABPs). From a preparatory study for disturbed division synchrony in cell lines overexpressing different ABPs, we identified the actin depolymerizing factor 2 (ADF2). A cell line overexpressing GFP-NtADF2 was specifically affected in division synchrony. The cell division pattern could be rescued by addition of Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) or by phalloidin. These observations allow to draw first conclusions on the pathway linking auxin signalling via actin reorganization to synchronized cell division placing the regulation of cortical actin turnover by ADF2 into the focus. PMID:23545293

  7. First-generation black-hole-forming supernovae and the metal abundance pattern of a very iron-poor star.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Hideyuki; Nomoto, Ken'ichi

    2003-04-24

    It has been proposed theoretically that the first generation of stars in the Universe (population III) would be as massive as 100 solar masses (100 M(O)), because of inefficient cooling of the precursor gas clouds. Recently, the most iron-deficient (but still carbon-rich) low-mass star--HE0107-5240--was discovered. If this is a population III star that gained its metals (elements heavier than helium) after its formation, it would challenge the theoretical picture of the formation of the first stars. Here we report that the patterns of elemental abundance in HE0107-5240 (and other extremely metal-poor stars) are in good accord with the nucleosynthesis that occurs in stars with masses of 20-130 M(O) when they become supernovae if, during the explosions, the ejecta undergo substantial mixing and fallback to form massive black holes. Such supernovae have been observed. The abundance patterns are not, however, consistent with enrichment by supernovae from stars in the range 130-300 M(O). We accordingly infer that the first-generation supernovae came mostly from explosions of approximately 20-130 M(O) stars; some of these produced iron-poor but carbon- and oxygen-rich ejecta. Low-mass second-generation stars, like HE0107-5240, could form because the carbon and oxygen provided pathways for the gas to cool.

  8. The generation of biomolecular patterns in highly porous collagen-GAG scaffolds using direct photolithography.

    PubMed

    Martin, Teresa A; Caliari, Steven R; Williford, Paul D; Harley, Brendan A; Bailey, Ryan C

    2011-06-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a complex organization of structural proteins found within tissues and organs. Heterogeneous tissues with spatially and temporally modulated properties play an important role in organism physiology. Here we present a benzophenone (BP) based direct, photolithographic approach to spatially pattern solution phase biomolecules within collagen-GAG (CG) scaffolds and demonstrate creation of a wide range of patterns composed of multiple biomolecular species in a manner independent from scaffold fabrication steps. We demonstrate the ability to immobilize biomolecules at surface densities of up to 1000 ligands per square micron on the scaffold strut surface and to depths limited by the penetration depth of the excitation source into the scaffold structure. Importantly, while BP photopatterning does further crosslink the CG scaffold, evidenced by increased mechanical properties and collagen crystallinity, it does not affect scaffold microstructural or compositional properties or negatively influence cell adhesion, viability, or proliferation. We show that covalently photoimmobilized fibronectin within a CG scaffold significantly increases the speed of MC3T3-E1 cell attachment relative to the bare CG scaffold or non-specifically adsorbed fibronectin, suggesting that this approach can be used to improve scaffold bioactivity. Our findings, on the whole, establish the use of direct, BP photolithography as a methodology for covalently incorporating activity-improving biochemical cues within 3D collagen biomaterial scaffolds with spatial control over biomolecular deposition.

  9. Ecological coherence of diversity patterns derived from classical fingerprinting and Next Generation Sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Gobet, Angélique; Boetius, Antje; Ramette, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Changes in richness and bacterial community structure obtained via 454 Massively Parallel Tag Sequencing (MPTS) and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Analysis (ARISA) were systematically compared to determine whether and how the ecological knowledge obtained from both molecular techniques could be combined. We evaluated community changes over time and depth in marine coastal sands at different levels of taxonomic resolutions, sequence corrections and sequence abundances. Although richness over depth layers or sampling dates greatly varied [∼ 30% and 70-80% new operational taxonomic units (OTU) between two samples with ARISA and MPTS respectively], overall patterns of community variations were similar with both approaches. Alpha-diversity estimated by ARISA-derived OTU was most similar to that obtained from MPTS-derived OTU defined at the order level. Similar patterns of OTU replacement were also found with MPTS at the family level and with 20-25% rare types removed. Using ARISA or MPTS datasets with lower resolution, such as those containing only resident OTU, yielded a similar set of significant contextual variables explaining bacterial community changes. Hence, ARISA as a rapid and low-cost fingerprinting technique represents a valid starting point for more in-depth exploration of community composition when complemented by the detailed taxonomic description offered by MPTS.

  10. Exercise, music, and the brain: is there a central pattern generator?

    PubMed

    Schneider, Stefan; Askew, Christopher D; Abel, Thomas; Strüder, Heiko K

    2010-10-01

    The frequency for movements along the longitudinal axis during running peaks at approximately 3 Hz. Other physiological systems (e.g. heart rate and brain cortical activity) are known to show a dominant frequency of ~3 Hz connected to exercise. As recent studies have proposed a clear correlation between musical tempo, mood, and performance output, we wished to ascertain whether peak locomotion frequency of ~3 Hz during running is synchronized with different intrinsic and extrinsic frequencies. Eighteen healthy regular runners performed three outdoor running sessions at different intensities. Oscillations along the longitudinal axis were recorded using an accelerometer (ActiBelt). Electrocortical activity was recorded using electroencephalography before and after exercise and analysed in the delta frequency range (2-4 Hz). In addition, the frequency spectra of the participants' favourite musical pieces were analysed. Data revealed a peak frequency at around 2.7 to 2.8 Hz for the vertical acceleration during running. Similar oscillation patterns were found for heart rate and musical pieces. Electroencephalographic delta activity increased after running. Results of this study give reason to speculate that a strong relationship exists between intrinsic and extrinsic oscillation patterns during exercise. A frequency of approximately 3 Hz seems to be dominant in different physiological systems and seems to be rated as pleasurable when choosing the appropriate music for exercising. This is in line with previous research showing that an adequate choice of music during exercise enhances performance output and mood.

  11. Synaptic signal streams generated by ex vivo neuronal networks contain non-random, complex patterns.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangmook; Zemianek, Jill M; Shultz, Abraham; Vo, Anh; Maron, Ben Y; Therrien, Mikaela; Courtright, Christina; Guaraldi, Mary; Yanco, Holly A; Shea, Thomas B

    2014-11-01

    Cultured embryonic neurons develop functional networks that transmit synaptic signals over multiple sequentially connected neurons as revealed by multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) embedded within the culture dish. Signal streams of ex vivo networks contain spikes and bursts of varying amplitude and duration. Despite the random interactions inherent in dissociated cultures, neurons are capable of establishing functional ex vivo networks that transmit signals among synaptically connected neurons, undergo developmental maturation, and respond to exogenous stimulation by alterations in signal patterns. These characteristics indicate that a considerable degree of organization is an inherent property of neurons. We demonstrate herein that (1) certain signal types occur more frequently than others, (2) the predominant signal types change during and following maturation, (3) signal predominance is dependent upon inhibitory activity, and (4) certain signals preferentially follow others in a non-reciprocal manner. These findings indicate that the elaboration of complex signal streams comprised of a non-random distribution of signal patterns is an emergent property of ex vivo neuronal networks.

  12. Simple Process-Based Simulators for Generating Spatial Patterns of Habitat Loss and Fragmentation: A Review and Introduction to the G-RaFFe Model

    PubMed Central

    Pe'er, Guy; Zurita, Gustavo A.; Schober, Lucia; Bellocq, Maria I.; Strer, Maximilian; Müller, Michael; Pütz, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Landscape simulators are widely applied in landscape ecology for generating landscape patterns. These models can be divided into two categories: pattern-based models that generate spatial patterns irrespective of the processes that shape them, and process-based models that attempt to generate patterns based on the processes that shape them. The latter often tend toward complexity in an attempt to obtain high predictive precision, but are rarely used for generic or theoretical purposes. Here we show that a simple process-based simulator can generate a variety of spatial patterns including realistic ones, typifying landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic activities. The model “G-RaFFe” generates roads and fields to reproduce the processes in which forests are converted into arable lands. For a selected level of habitat cover, three factors dominate its outcomes: the number of roads (accessibility), maximum field size (accounting for land ownership patterns), and maximum field disconnection (which enables field to be detached from roads). We compared the performance of G-RaFFe to three other models: Simmap (neutral model), Qrule (fractal-based) and Dinamica EGO (with 4 model versions differing in complexity). A PCA-based analysis indicated G-RaFFe and Dinamica version 4 (most complex) to perform best in matching realistic spatial patterns, but an alternative analysis which considers model variability identified G-RaFFe and Qrule as performing best. We also found model performance to be affected by habitat cover and the actual land-uses, the latter reflecting on land ownership patterns. We suggest that simple process-based generators such as G-RaFFe can be used to generate spatial patterns as templates for theoretical analyses, as well as for gaining better understanding of the relation between spatial processes and patterns. We suggest caution in applying neutral or fractal-based approaches, since spatial patterns that typify anthropogenic landscapes are often non

  13. Simple process-based simulators for generating spatial patterns of habitat loss and fragmentation: a review and introduction to the G-RaFFe model.

    PubMed

    Pe'er, Guy; Zurita, Gustavo A; Schober, Lucia; Bellocq, Maria I; Strer, Maximilian; Müller, Michael; Pütz, Sandro

    2013-01-01

    Landscape simulators are widely applied in landscape ecology for generating landscape patterns. These models can be divided into two categories: pattern-based models that generate spatial patterns irrespective of the processes that shape them, and process-based models that attempt to generate patterns based on the processes that shape them. The latter often tend toward complexity in an attempt to obtain high predictive precision, but are rarely used for generic or theoretical purposes. Here we show that a simple process-based simulator can generate a variety of spatial patterns including realistic ones, typifying landscapes fragmented by anthropogenic activities. The model "G-RaFFe" generates roads and fields to reproduce the processes in which forests are converted into arable lands. For a selected level of habitat cover, three factors dominate its outcomes: the number of roads (accessibility), maximum field size (accounting for land ownership patterns), and maximum field disconnection (which enables field to be detached from roads). We compared the performance of G-RaFFe to three other models: Simmap (neutral model), Qrule (fractal-based) and Dinamica EGO (with 4 model versions differing in complexity). A PCA-based analysis indicated G-RaFFe and Dinamica version 4 (most complex) to perform best in matching realistic spatial patterns, but an alternative analysis which considers model variability identified G-RaFFe and Qrule as performing best. We also found model performance to be affected by habitat cover and the actual land-uses, the latter reflecting on land ownership patterns. We suggest that simple process-based generators such as G-RaFFe can be used to generate spatial patterns as templates for theoretical analyses, as well as for gaining better understanding of the relation between spatial processes and patterns. We suggest caution in applying neutral or fractal-based approaches, since spatial patterns that typify anthropogenic landscapes are often non

  14. Elucidating the role of topological pattern discovery and support vector machine in generating predictive models for Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattopadhyay, Manojit; Chattopadhyay, Surajit

    2016-10-01

    The present paper reports a study, where growing hierarchical self-organising map (GHSOM) has been applied to achieve a visual cluster analysis to the Indian rainfall dataset consisting of 142 years of Indian rainfall data so that the yearly rainfall can be segregated into small groups to visualise the pattern of clustering behaviour of yearly rainfall due to changes in monthly rainfall for each year. Also, through support vector machine (SVM), it has been observed that generation of clusters impacts positively on the prediction of the Indian summer monsoon rainfall. Results have been presented through statistical and graphical analyses.

  15. Microstructural Evolution and Creep-Rupture Behavior of Fusion Welds Involving Alloys for Advanced Ultrasupercritical Power Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechetti, Daniel H., Jr.

    Projections for large increases in the global demand for electric power produced by the burning of fossil fuels, in combination with growing environmental concerns surrounding these fuel sources, have sparked initiatives in the United States, Europe, and Asia aimed at developing a new generation of coal fired power plant, termed Advanced Ultrasupercritical (A-USC). These plants are slated to operate at higher steam temperatures and pressures than current generation plants, and in so doing will offer increased process cycle efficiency and reduced greenhouse gas emissions. Several gamma' precipitation strengthened Ni-based superalloys have been identified as candidates for the hottest sections of these plants, but the microstructural instability and poor creep behavior (compared to wrought products) of fusion welds involving these alloys present significant hurdles to their implementation and a gap in knowledge that must be addressed. In this work, creep testing and in-depth microstructural characterization have been used to provide insight into the long-term performance of these alloys. First, an investigation of the weld metal microstructural evolution as it relates to creep strength reductions in A-USC alloys INCONELRTM 740, NIMONICRTM 263 (INCONEL and NIMONIC are registered trademarks of Special Metals Corporation), and HaynesRTM 282RTM (Haynes and 282 are registered trademarks of Haynes International) was performed. gamma'-precipitate free zones were identified in two of these three alloys, and their development was linked to the evolution of phases that precipitate at the expense of gamma'. Alloy 282 was shown to avoid precipitate free zone formation because the precipitates that form during long term aging in this alloy are poor in the gamma'-forming elements. Next, the microstructural evolution of INCONELRTM 740H (a compositional variant of alloy 740) during creep was investigated. Gleeble-based interrupted creep and creep-rupture testing was used to

  16. The ERESE Project: Involving Teachers in the Online Generation and QA/QC of Enduring Teaching Resources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koppers, A. A.; Staudigel, H.; Keller, M.; Russell, J.; Helly, J.; Helly, M.; Miller, S.; Massell Symons, C.

    2005-12-01

    The ERESE project has as its main goal to create, archive and make available "Enduring Resources in Earth Science Education" through a collaboration between teachers, scientists, librarians and information technology (IT) professionals. Over the last two years of this National Science Digital Library (NSDL) project, we have developed such ERESE resources for middle and high school teachers for use in lesson plans with "plate tectonics" and "magnetics" as their main theme. An IT environment has been developed under http://earthref.org/ERESE where researchers, teachers and students can search for and download these resources from the EarthRef.org Digital Archive (ERDA) that now contains more than 600 objects. They do this by searching for researchable questions or by browsing a "Resource Matrix" where the objects (i.e. data files) are displayed based on content (image, data or text) and expert level (1 to 9). Good examples out of the 52 predefined resource matrices are the ones on "Seafloor Spreading", "The Earth's Magnetic Field" and "Hotspots and Absolute Plate Motion". Researchers, teachers and students are encouraged to upload their own contributions in the ERDA online archive, allowing them to share research and teaching materials with their peers and beyond. These uploads can be linked with one or more resource matrices and assigned an expert level. To streamline this uploading process, we have formed a core group of resource developers (students and teachers) that generate new ERESE objects which are subject to an extensive QA/QC (Quality Assessment and Quality Control) protocol by their peers (students and teachers) and by a team of researchers. The peer-to-peer reviews ensure equality and quality amongst the various ERESE resources, whereas the science reviews screen for content correctness and scientific scholarship. The overall goal of this protocol is to ensure digital longevity and scientific validity, while the involvement of teachers and students is

  17. A framework for prevention: changing health-damaging to health-generating life patterns.

    PubMed Central

    Milio, N

    1976-01-01

    A set of propositions is offered to provide a frame of reference for proposed strategies to improve healthful behavior by placing personal choice-making in the context of societal option-setting. The health status of populations at a given point in time is seen as a result of customary personal choice-making. These choices in turn are limited by both the perceived and actual options available to individuals, depending on their personal and their community's resources, from which to make choices. Most people, most of the time will make the easiest choices, i.e., will do the things, develop the patterns or life-styles, which seem to cost them less and/or from which they will gain more of what they value in tangible and/or intangible terms. PMID:1275116

  18. Time-resolved measurements with streaked diffraction patterns from electrons generated in laser plasma wakefield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhaohan; Nees, John; Hou, Bixue; Krushelnick, Karl; Thomas, Alec; Beaurepaire, Benoît; Malka, Victor; Faure, Jérôme

    2013-10-01

    Femtosecond bunches of electrons with relativistic to ultra-relativistic energies can be robustly produced in laser plasma wakefield accelerators (LWFA). Scaling the electron energy down to sub-relativistic and MeV level using a millijoule laser system will make such electron source a promising candidate for ultrafast electron diffraction (UED) applications due to the intrinsic short bunch duration and perfect synchronization with the optical pump. Recent results of electron diffraction from a single crystal gold foil, using LWFA electrons driven by 8-mJ, 35-fs laser pulses at 500 Hz, will be presented. The accelerated electrons were collimated with a solenoid magnetic lens. By applying a small-angle tilt to the magnetic lens, the diffraction pattern can be streaked such that the temporal evolution is separated spatially on the detector screen after propagation. The observable time window and achievable temporal resolution are studied in pump-probe measurements of photo-induced heating on the gold foil.

  19. An Experimental and Theoretical Study of Fracture Patterns and Particle Motion Generated by Underground Explosions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihaly, J. M.; Rosakis, A.; Sammis, C. G.; Bhat, H.

    2013-12-01

    Fracture patterns and local particle velocities produced by point explosions in very brittle 'candy glass' plates are compared to those numerically predicted using a dynamic micro-mechanical damage mechanics model, developed by Bhat, Rosakis and Sammis, J. Appl. Mech., 2012. Empirically measured material properties for candy glass facilitate direct comparison between the numerical simulation and experimental results. The evolution of fracture damage produced in experiments is observed using high-speed digital photography, which also images resultant wave fronts (for both P and S). Local particle velocities are also recorded at up to three points using laser vibrometers. Numerical results for the spatial extent of circumferential and radial cracking, in addition to the growth-rate of individual radial cracks, are representative of experimental observations. Wave reflections from the plate edges are observed in both experiment and numerical simulation to affect the expansion of radial cracks. Numerically predicted wave-forms and arrivals compare well with experimental results observed at select points.

  20. Expression patterns of genes involved in the defense and stress response of Spiroplasma citri infected Madagascar Periwinkle Catharanthus roseus.

    PubMed

    Nejat, Naghmeh; Vadamalai, Ganesan; Dickinson, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Madagascar periwinkle is an ornamental and a medicinal plant, and is also an indicator plant that is highly susceptible to phytoplasma and spiroplasma infections from different crops. Periwinkle lethal yellows, caused by Spiroplasma citri, is one of the most devastating diseases of periwinkle. The response of plants to S. citri infection is very little known at the transcriptome level. In this study, quantitative real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to investigate the expression levels of four selected genes involved in defense and stress responses in naturally and experimentally Spiroplasma citri infected periwinkles. Strictosidine β-glucosidase involved in terpenoid indole alkaloids (TIAs) biosynthesis pathway showed significant upregulation in experimentally and naturally infected periwinkles. The transcript level of extensin increased in leaves of periwinkles experimentally infected by S. citri in comparison to healthy ones. A similar level of heat shock protein 90 and metallothionein expression was observed in healthy, naturally and experimentally spiroplasma-diseased periwinkles. Overexpression of Strictosidine β-glucosidase demonstrates the potential utility of this gene as a host biomarker to increase the fidelity of S. citri detection and can also be used in breeding programs to develop stable disease-resistance varieties.

  1. Generation of butterfly wing eyespot patterns: a model for morphological determination of eyespot and parafocal element.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M

    2011-11-01

    The determination of color patterns of butterfly wing eyespots has been explained by the morphogen concentration gradient model. The induction model has been proposed recently as a more realistic alternative, in which the eyespot-specifying signal does not depend entirely on focal activity. However, this model requires further elaboration and supporting evidence to be validated. Here, I examined various color patterns of nymphalid butterflies to propose the mechanics of the induction model. Based on cases in which an eyespot light ring is identical to the background in color, I propose that eyespots are fundamentally composed of dark rings and non-dark "background" spaces between them. In the induction model, the dark-ring-inducing signal that is released from a prospective eyespot focus (the primary organizing center) as a slow-moving wave effects both selfenhancement and peripheral induction of the dark-ring-inhibitory signal at the secondary organizing centers, resulting in an eyespot that has alternate dark and light rings. Moreover, there are cases in which an unseen "imaginary light ring" surrounds an eyespot proper and in which PFEs are integrated into the eyespot. It appears that PFEs constitute a periodic continuum of eyespot dark rings; thus, a background space between the eyespot and a PFE is mechanistically equivalent to eyespot light rings. The eyespot dark-ring-inducing signals and PFE-inducing signal are likely to be identical in quality, but released at different times from the same organizing center. Computer simulations based on the reaction-diffusion system support the feasibility of the induction model. PMID:22035304

  2. Generation of butterfly wing eyespot patterns: a model for morphological determination of eyespot and parafocal element.

    PubMed

    Otaki, Joji M

    2011-11-01

    The determination of color patterns of butterfly wing eyespots has been explained by the morphogen concentration gradient model. The induction model has been proposed recently as a more realistic alternative, in which the eyespot-specifying signal does not depend entirely on focal activity. However, this model requires further elaboration and supporting evidence to be validated. Here, I examined various color patterns of nymphalid butterflies to propose the mechanics of the induction model. Based on cases in which an eyespot light ring is identical to the background in color, I propose that eyespots are fundamentally composed of dark rings and non-dark "background" spaces between them. In the induction model, the dark-ring-inducing signal that is released from a prospective eyespot focus (the primary organizing center) as a slow-moving wave effects both selfenhancement and peripheral induction of the dark-ring-inhibitory signal at the secondary organizing centers, resulting in an eyespot that has alternate dark and light rings. Moreover, there are cases in which an unseen "imaginary light ring" surrounds an eyespot proper and in which PFEs are integrated into the eyespot. It appears that PFEs constitute a periodic continuum of eyespot dark rings; thus, a background space between the eyespot and a PFE is mechanistically equivalent to eyespot light rings. The eyespot dark-ring-inducing signals and PFE-inducing signal are likely to be identical in quality, but released at different times from the same organizing center. Computer simulations based on the reaction-diffusion system support the feasibility of the induction model.

  3. Progress in updatable photorefractive polymer-based holographic displays via direct optical writing of computer-generated fringe patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jolly, Sundeep; Barabas, James; Smalley, Daniel; Bove, V. Michael

    2013-03-01

    We have previously introduced an architecture for updatable photorefractive holographic display based around direct fringe writing of computer-generated holographic fringe patterns. In contrast to interference-based stereogram techniques for hologram exposure in photorefractive polymer (PRP) materials, the direct fringe writing architecture simplifies system design, reduces system footprint and cost, and offers greater affordances over the types of holographic images that can be recorded. In this paper, motivations and goals for employing a direct fringe writing architecture for photorefractive holographic imagers are reviewed, new methods for PRP exposure by micro-optical fields generated via spatial light modulation and telecentric optics are described, and resulting holographic images are presented and discussed. Experimental results are reviewed in the context of theoretical indicators for system performance.

  4. Patterns of mortality in second generation Irish living in England and Wales: longitudinal study.

    PubMed Central

    Harding, S.; Balarajan, R.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To examine the mortality of second generation Irish living in England and Wales. DESIGN--Longitudinal study of 1% of the population of England and Wales (longitudinal study by the Office of Population Censuses and Surveys (now the Office for National Statistics)) followed up from 1971 to 1989. SUBJECTS--3075 men and 3233 women aged 15 and over in 1971. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Age and sex specific standardised mortality ratios for all causes, cancers, coronary heart disease, cerebrovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, and injuries and poisonings. Deaths were also analysed by socioeconomic indicators. RESULTS--786 deaths were traced to men and 762 to women. At working ages (men, aged 15-64; women, 15-59) the mortality of men (standardised mortality ratio 126) and women (129) was significantly higher than that of all men and all women. At ages 15-44, relative disadvantages were even greater both for men (145) and for women (164). Mortality was raised for most major causes of death. Significant excess mortality from cancers was seen for men of working age (132) and for women aged 60 and over (122). At working ages mortality of the second generation Irish in every social class and in the categories of car access and housing tenure was higher than that of all men and all women in the corresponding categories. Adjusting for these socioeconomic indicators did not explain the excess mortality. CONCLUSION--Mortality of second generation Irish men and women was higher than that of all men and all women and for most major causes of death. While socioeconomic factors remain important, cultural and lifestyle factors are likely to contribute to this adverse mortality. PMID:8646095

  5. Direct patterning of vortex generators on a fiber tip using a focused ion beam.

    PubMed

    Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Bhattacharya, Shanti; Eigenthaler, Ulrike; Keskinbora, Kahraman; Samlan, C T; Hirscher, Michael; Spatz, Joachim P; Viswanathan, Nirmal K

    2016-05-15

    The realization of spiral phase optical elements on the cleaved end of an optical fiber by focused ion beam milling is presented. A focused Ga+ ion beam with an acceleration voltage of 30 keV is used to etch continuous spiral phase plates and fork gratings directly on the tip of the fiber. The phase characteristics of the output beam generated by the fabricated structures measured via an interference experiment confirmed the presence of phase singularity in the output beam. The devices are expected to be promising candidates for all-fiber beam shaping and optical trapping applications.

  6. Involvement of the sonic hedgehog, patched 1 and bmp2 genes in patterning of the zebrafish dermal fin rays.

    PubMed

    Laforest, L; Brown, C W; Poleo, G; Géraudie, J; Tada, M; Ekker, M; Akimenko, M A

    1998-11-01

    The signaling molecule encoded by Sonic hedgehog (shh) participates in the patterning of several embryonic structures including limbs. During early fin development in zebrafish, a subset of cells in the posterior margin of pectoral fin buds express shh. We have shown that regulation of shh in pectoral fin buds is consistent with a role in mediating the activity of a structure analogous to the zone of polarizing activity (ZPA) (Akimenko and Ekker (1995) Dev. Biol. 170, 243-247). During growth of the bony rays of both paired and unpaired fins, and during fin regeneration, there does not seem to be a region equivalent to the ZPA and one would predict that shh would play a different role, if any, during these processes specific to fish fins. We have examined the expression of shh in the developing fins of 4-week old larvae and in regenerating fins of adults. A subset of cells in the basal layer of the epidermis in close proximity to the newly formed dermal bone structures of the fin rays, the lepidotrichia, express shh, and ptc1 which is thought to encode the receptor of the SHH signal. The expression domain of ptc1 is broader than that of shh and adjacent blastemal cells releasing the dermal bone matrix also express ptc1. Further observations indicate that the bmp2 gene, in addition to being expressed in the same cells of the basal layer of the epidermis as shh, is also expressed in a subset of the ptc1-expressing cells of the blastema. Amputations of caudal fins immediately after the first branching point of the lepidotrichia, and global administration of all-trans-retinoic acid, two procedures known to cause fusion of adjacent rays, result in a transient decrease in the expression of shh, ptc1 and bmp2. The effects of retinoic acid on shh expression occur within minutes after the onset of treatment suggesting direct regulation of shh by retinoic acid. These observations suggest a role for shh, ptc1 and bmp2 in patterning of the dermoskeleton of developing and

  7. Expression pattern in retinal photoreceptors of POMGnT1, a protein involved in muscle-eye-brain disease

    PubMed Central

    Uribe, Mary Luz; Haro, Carmen; Campello, Laura; Cruces, Jesús; Martín-Nieto, José

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The POMGNT1 gene, encoding protein O-linked-mannose β-1,2-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase 1, is associated with muscle-eye-brain disease (MEB) and other dystroglycanopathies. This gene’s lack of function or expression causes hypoglycosylation of α-dystroglycan (α-DG) in the muscle and the central nervous system, including the brain and the retina. The ocular symptoms of patients with MEB include retinal degeneration and detachment, glaucoma, and abnormal electroretinogram. Nevertheless, the POMGnT1 expression pattern in the healthy mammalian retina has not yet been investigated. In this work, we address the expression of the POMGNT1 gene in the healthy retina of a variety of mammals and characterize the distribution pattern of this gene in the adult mouse retina and the 661W photoreceptor cell line. Methods Using reverse transcription (RT)–PCR and immunoblotting, we studied POMGNT1 expression at the mRNA and protein levels in various mammalian species, from rodents to humans. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy analyses were performed to characterize the distribution profile of its protein product in mouse retinal sections and in 661W cultured cells. The intranuclear distribution of POMT1 and POMT2, the two enzymes preceding POMGnT1 in the α-DG O-mannosyl glycosylation pathway, was also analyzed. Results POMGNT1 mRNA and its encoded protein were expressed in the neural retina of all mammals studied. POMGnT1 was located in the cytoplasmic fraction in the mouse retina and concentrated in the myoid portion of the photoreceptor inner segments, where the protein colocalized with GM130, a Golgi complex marker. The presence of POMGnT1 in the Golgi complex was also evident in 661W cells. However, and in contrast to retinal tissue, POMGnT1 additionally accumulated in the nucleus of the 661W photoreceptors. Colocalization was found within this organelle between POMGnT1 and POMT1/2, the latter associated with euchromatic regions of the nucleus. Conclusions

  8. The weaver gene expression affects neuronal generation patterns depending on age and encephalic region.

    PubMed

    Martí, Joaquín; Carmen Santa-Cruz, M; Bayer, Shirley A; Hervás, José P

    2006-04-01

    Cell generation and survival are investigated in three different neuronal populations of weaver mice: Purkinje and fastigial neurons in the cerebellum, and dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. Tritiated thymidine was supplied to pregnant females at the time that these neurons were being produced. Autoradiography was then applied on brain sections obtained from the control and weaver offspring at postnatal (P) day 8 and 90. This makes it possible to assess the differential survival of neurons that were born at distinct embryonic times on the basis of the proportion of labeled cells at two postnatal ages. When labeling profiles were measured at P8, the inferred time of origin was similar between +/+ and wv/wv genotypes for each neuronal population considered. The same occurred at P90 for Purkinje or fastigial neurons, but the labeling profiles of midbrain neurons were different between wild type and weaver homozygotes. There is already a substantial reduction in the number of Purkinje and fastigial cells at P8, but loss of dopaminergic neurons was only detected in 90-day-old weavers and, therefore, vulnerability is built into this midbrain neural system during its late postnatal development. Our results show that depletion of Purkinje and fastigial cells is random with respect to the time of their birth, whereas the weaver gene seems to be specifically targeting the late-generated dopaminergic neurons.

  9. The Drosophila Retinoblastoma Binding Protein 6 Family Member Has Two Isoforms and Is Potentially Involved in Embryonic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Rodney; Oosthuysen, Brent; Cajee, Umar-Faruq; Mokgohloa, Lehlogonolo; Nweke, Ekene; Antunes, Ricardo Jorge; Coetzer, Theresa H. T.; Ntwasa, Monde

    2015-01-01

    The human retinoblastoma binding protein 6 (RBBP6) is implicated in esophageal, lung, hepatocellular and colon cancers. Furthermore, RBBP6 was identified as a strong marker for colon cancer prognosis and as a predisposing factor in familial myeloproliferative neoplasms. Functionally, the mammalian protein interacts with p53 and enhances the activity of Mdm2, the prototypical negative regulator of p53. However, since RBBP6 (known as PACT in mice) exists in multiple isoforms and pact−/− mice exhibit a more severe phenotype than mdm2−/− mutants, it must possess some Mdm2-independent functions. The function of the invertebrate homologue is poorly understood. This is complicated by the absence of the Mdm2 gene in both Drosophila and Caenorhabditis elegans. We have experimentally identified the promoter region of Snama, the Drosophila homologue, analyzed potential transcription factor binding sites and confirmed the existence of an additional isoform. Using band shift and co-immunoprecipitation assays combined with mass spectrometry, we found evidence that this gene may be regulated by, amongst others, DREF, which regulates hundreds of genes related to cell proliferation. The potential transcription factors for Snama fall into distinct functional groups, including anteroposterior embryonic patterning and nucleic acid metabolism. Significantly, previous work in mice shows that pact−/− induces an anteroposterior phenotype in embryos when rescued by simultaneous deletion of p53. Taken together, these observations indicate the significance of RBBP6 proteins in carcinogenesis and in developmental defects. PMID:25955646

  10. Experiments evaluating subsidence generated within a subaqueous deformable substrate due to varying differential sediment loading patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foreman, B.; Chatmas, E. S.; Abeyta, A.; Paola, C.

    2013-12-01

    The intraslope areas of many passive margins display a complex bathymetry of topographic depressions and crests that form series of minibasins. These minibasins are linked to the deformation of subsurface salt layers and act as localized sediment traps. Many mechanisms have been proposed for the initiation of minibasins, including tectonic forces (both extensional and contractional), regional gravitational sliding, density inversion between salt layers and overburden, and differential sediment loading. Regardless of initiation mechanism, it is widely recognized that synkinematic deposition plays a active role in determining subsidence patterns and sediment routing within and among the minibasins. We undertook a series of simplified 1-D and 2-D experiments 1) to evaluate the feasibility of developing a series of well-defined minibasins created exclusively by differential sediment loading and 2) to quantitatively determine the effects of substrate thickness, density contrast, and sedimentation rate on the resultant subsidence pattern. We also present an initial non-dimensionalized formulation of the problem that relates density contrasts, clinoform thickness, substrate thickness, progradation rate, and viscosity of the deformable substrate. Two sets of experiments were performed. The first set (1-D) vertically loaded a subaqueous corn syrup substrate (capturing the rheology of subsurface salt as a Newtonian fluid) with walnut sand. The second set (2-D) of experiments prograded a walnut sediment clinoform across a corn syrup substrate. We systematically varied sedimentation rate, substrate thickness, and, in the case of the prograding clinoform, base level. In no cases did we successfully reproduce a series of minibasins similar to those observed in natural settings. Instead the substrate was simply displaced laterally as sediment was deposited, forming a single depression. High sedimentation rates tended to produce wider zones of subsidence, however, if given

  11. Practical performance and enabling technologies in immersion scanners for the double patterning generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishikawa, Jun; Kohno, Hirotaka; Sato, Shinji; Kosugi, Junichi; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2011-04-01

    At SPIE2010, excellent performance of the cutting edge immersion lithography scanner, the NSR-S620D, which is based on the new "Streamlign" platform was demonstrated. Last year's work focused mainly on machine evaluation data[1]. Now, many S620Ds are employed at customers' sites and being used in device manufacturing. In this paper, the authors will introduce the latest factory data, as well as various techniques that enable superior yield and enhance productivity in IC manufacturing. It is well understood, that in order to achieve further device shrinks without using traditional techniques such as NA expansion or wavelength reduction, several practical issues must be overcome. Extremely tight overlay performance will be required for pitch splitting double patterning, for example. In addition, it is also necessary to control the image plane and the aberration of the optics much more carefully. Of course these improvements must also be achieved with sufficient productivity (throughput). In order to satisfy all of the requirements for mass production at customer factories, many variable factors must be dealt with. One of these variable factors is the characteristics of the processed wafers that include on-flatness, grid distortion, steep topology around the edge, or topography of the previous layers' patterns. These factors typically impact overlay and/or auto focus accuracy. Another variable is the difference in exposure conditions between layers, which include illumination conditions, dose, reticle transmittance, and the alignment marks. Exposure induced heating in particular is the key issue for today's enhanced throughput capabilities, with regards to achieving both optimal accuracy and productivity. In some IC production facilities, and often foundries, many different kinds of products are manufactured in parallel. However, in order to enhance performance and accuracy, it is sometimes necessary to optimize machine parameters for each product. Cleary this

  12. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-hung

    2016-01-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface. PMID:27034255

  13. Large-scale Generation of Patterned Bubble Arrays on Printed Bi-functional Boiling Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Chang-Ho; David, Michele; Gao, Zhongwei; Chang, Alvin; Allen, Marshall; Wang, Hailei; Chang, Chih-hung

    2016-01-01

    Bubble nucleation control, growth and departure dynamics is important in understanding boiling phenomena and enhancing nucleate boiling heat transfer performance. We report a novel bi-functional heterogeneous surface structure that is capable of tuning bubble nucleation, growth and departure dynamics. For the fabrication of the surface, hydrophobic polymer dot arrays are first printed on a substrate, followed by hydrophilic ZnO nanostructure deposition via microreactor-assisted nanomaterial deposition (MAND) processing. Wettability contrast between the hydrophobic polymer dot arrays and aqueous ZnO solution allows for the fabrication of heterogeneous surfaces with distinct wettability regions. Heterogeneous surfaces with various configurations were fabricated and their bubble dynamics were examined at elevated heat flux, revealing various nucleate boiling phenomena. In particular, aligned and patterned bubbles with a tunable departure frequency and diameter were demonstrated in a boiling experiment for the first time. Taking advantage of our fabrication method, a 6 inch wafer size heterogeneous surface was prepared. Pool boiling experiments were also performed to demonstrate a heat flux enhancement up to 3X at the same surface superheat using bi-functional surfaces, compared to a bare stainless steel surface. PMID:27034255

  14. A Sodium Leak Current Regulates Pacemaker Activity of Adult Central Pattern Generator Neurons in Lymnaea Stagnalis

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tom Z.; Feng, Zhong-Ping

    2011-01-01

    The resting membrane potential of the pacemaker neurons is one of the essential mechanisms underlying rhythm generation. In this study, we described the biophysical properties of an uncharacterized channel (U-type channel) and investigated the role of the channel in the rhythmic activity of a respiratory pacemaker neuron and the respiratory behaviour in adult freshwater snail Lymnaea stagnalis. Our results show that the channel conducts an inward leak current carried by Na+ (ILeak-Na). The ILeak-Na contributed to the resting membrane potential and was required for maintaining rhythmic action potential bursting activity of the identified pacemaker RPeD1 neurons. Partial knockdown of the U-type channel suppressed the aerial respiratory behaviour of the adult snail in vivo. These findings identified the Na+ leak conductance via the U-type channel, likely a NALCN-like channel, as one of the fundamental mechanisms regulating rhythm activity of pacemaker neurons and respiratory behaviour in adult animals. PMID:21526173

  15. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data - oblique electrostatic waves generated by the electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, D.A.; Cairns, I.H. )

    1992-11-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies of 0-30 kHz and at distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. Strong low-frequency (below 10 kHz) electric field noise was observed in the wideband data during two periods in which an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle. This noise shows clear evidence of interference patterns caused by the finite (3.89 m) antenna length. The low-frequency noise was the most dominant type of noise produced by the ejected electron beam. Analysis of antenna interference patterns generated by these waves permits a determination of the wavelength, the direction of propagation, and the location of the source region. The observed waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to that of ion acoustic waves. The waves are believed to be oblique ion acoustic or high-order ion cyclotron waves generated by a current of ambient electrons returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam. 31 refs.

  16. Separation of spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') by combined analysis of really measured and generated numerically vector time series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feigin, A. M.; Mukhin, D.; Volodin, E. M.; Gavrilov, A.; Loskutov, E. M.

    2013-12-01

    The new method of decomposition of the Earth's climate system into well separated spatial-temporal patterns ('climatic modes') is discussed. The method is based on: (i) generalization of the MSSA (Multichannel Singular Spectral Analysis) [1] for expanding vector (space-distributed) time series in basis of spatial-temporal empirical orthogonal functions (STEOF), which makes allowance delayed correlations of the processes recorded in spatially separated points; (ii) expanding both real SST data, and longer by several times SST data generated numerically, in STEOF basis; (iii) use of the numerically produced STEOF basis for exclusion of 'too slow' (and thus not represented correctly) processes from real data. The application of the method allows by means of vector time series generated numerically by the INM RAS Coupled Climate Model [2] to separate from real SST anomalies data [3] two climatic modes possessing by noticeably different time scales: 3-5 and 9-11 years. Relations of separated modes to ENSO and PDO are investigated. Possible applications of spatial-temporal climatic patterns concept to prognosis of climate system evolution is discussed. 1. Ghil, M., R. M. Allen, M. D. Dettinger, K. Ide, D. Kondrashov, et al. (2002) "Advanced spectral methods for climatic time series", Rev. Geophys. 40(1), 3.1-3.41. 2. http://83.149.207.89/GCM_DATA_PLOTTING/GCM_INM_DATA_XY_en.htm 3. http://iridl.ldeo.columbia.edu/SOURCES/.KAPLAN/.EXTENDED/.v2/.ssta/

  17. Interference patterns in the Spacelab 2 plasma wave data - Oblique electrostatic waves generated by the electron beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Wei; Gurnett, Donald A.; Cairns, Iver H.

    1992-01-01

    During the Spacelab 2 mission the University of Iowa's Plasma Diagnostics Package (PDP) explored the plasma environment around the shuttle. Wideband spectrograms of plasma waves were obtained from the PDP at frequencies of 0-30 kHz and at distances up to 400 m from the shuttle. Strong low-frequency (below 10 kHz) electric field noise was observed in the wideband data during two periods in which an electron beam was ejected from the shuttle. This noise shows clear evidence of interference patterns caused by the finite (3.89 m) antenna length. The low-frequency noise was the most dominant type of noise produced by the ejected electron beam. Analysis of antenna interference patterns generated by these waves permits a determination of the wavelength, the direction of propagation, and the location of the source region. The observed waves have a linear dispersion relation very similar to that of ion acoustic waves. The waves are believed to be oblique ion acoustic or high-order ion cyclotron waves generated by a current of ambient electrons returning to the shuttle in response to the ejected electron beam.

  18. The Growing Canvas of Biological Development: Multiscale Pattern Generation on an Expanding Lattice of Gene Regulatory Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doursat, René

    The spontaneous generation of an entire organism from a single cell is the epitome of a self-organizing, decentralized complex system. How do nonspatial gene interactions extend in 3-D space? In this work, I present a simple model that simulates some biological developmental principles using an expanding lattice of cells. Each cell contains a gene regulatory network (GRN), modeled as a feedforward hierarchy of switches that can settle in various on/off expression states. Local morphogen gradients provide positional information in input, which is integrated by each GRN to produce differential expression of identity genes in output. Similarly to striping in the Drosophila embryo, the lattice becomes segmented into spatial regions of homogeneous genetic expression that resemble stained-glass motifs. Meanwhile, it also expands by cell proliferation, creating new local gradients of positional information within former single-identity regions. Analogous to a "growing canvas" painting itself, the alternation of growth and patterning results in the creation of a form. This preliminary study attempts to reproduce pattern formation through a multiscale, recursive and modular process. It explores the elusive relationship between nonspatial GRN weights (genotype) and spatial patterns (phenotype). Abstracting from biology in the same spirit as neural networks or swarm optimization, I hope to be contributing to a novel engineering paradigm of system construction that could complement or replace omniscient architects with decentralized collectivities of agents.

  19. A Rich Morphological Diversity of Biosaline Drying Patterns Is Generated by Different Bacterial Species, Different Salts and Concentrations: Astrobiological Implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez Gómez, José María; Medina, Jesús; Rull, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Biosaline formations (BSFs) are complex self-organized biomineral patterns formed by "hibernating" bacteria as the biofilm that contains them dries out. They were initially described in drying biofilms of Escherichia coli cells + NaCl. Due to their intricate 3-D morphology and anhydrobiosis, these biomineralogical structures are of great interest in astrobiology. Here we report experimental data obtained with various alkali halide salts (NaF, NaCl, NaBr, LiCl, KCl, CsCl) on BSF formation with E. coli and Bacillus subtilis bacteria at two saline concentrations: 9 and 18 mg/mL. Our results indicate that, except for LiCl, which is inactive, all the salts assayed are active during BSF formation and capable of promoting the generation of distinctive drying patterns at each salt concentration. Remarkably, the BSFs produced by these two bacterial species produce characteristic architectural hallmarks as the BSF dries. The potential biogenicity of these biosaline drying patterns is studied, and the astrobiological implications of these findings are discussed.

  20. Resolution Improvement and Pattern Generator Development for theMaskless Micro-Ion-Beam Reduction Lithography System

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Ximan

    2006-05-18

    have been studied. The dependence of the throughput with the exposure field size and the speed of the mechanical stage has been investigated. In order to perform maskless lithography, different micro-fabricated pattern generators have been developed for the MMRL system. Ion beamlet switching has been successfully demonstrated on the MMRL system. A positive bias voltage around 10 volts is sufficient to switch off the ion current on the micro-fabricated pattern generators. Some unexpected problems, such as the high-energy secondary electron radiations, have been discovered during the experimental investigation. Thermal and structural analysis indicates that the aperture displacement error induced by thermal expansion can satisfy the 3δ CD requirement for lithography nodes down to 25 nm. The cross-talking effect near the surface and inside the apertures of the pattern generator has been simulated in a 3-D ray-tracing code. New pattern generator design has been proposed to reduce the cross-talking effect. In order to eliminate the surface charging effect caused by the secondary electrons, a new beam-switching scheme in which the switching electrodes are immersed in the plasma has been demonstrated on a mechanically fabricated pattern generator.

  1. Development of a diurnal rainfall pattern generator and assessment of climate change impact on flood risk in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minakawa, H.; Masumoto, T.

    2011-12-01

    An increase in flood risk, especially in low-lying areas, is predicted as a consequence of global climate change. Immediate measures are needed to minimize the damage caused by more-frequent flooding. The capacities of drainage systems in paddy areas are planned on the basis of design rainfall. For example, design rainfall may be represented by a 3-day rainfall event with a 10-year return period. However, design rainfall parameters used in Japan have not been reviewed for a few decades, and changes in rainfall patterns associated with recent climate change are not reflected in current drainage planning. The aim of this study was to develop a diurnal rainfall pattern generator and to use it to evaluate the effects of changing patterns of heavy rainfall due to climate change on flood risk in low-lying areas. Our study area was in the Kaga three-lagoon basin in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. There are two lagoons in the study area, and the low-lying paddy areas extend over about 4,000 ha in the lower reaches of the basin. First, we developed a drainage analysis model that incorporates kinematic and diffusive runoff models for upland and inundated areas, respectively. The model was adjusted in accordance with observed discharges and water levels for heavy rainfall events. Next, the rainfall data predicted by MIROC (a Global Climate Model developed by the Center for Climate Systems Research) were analyzed to determine the future trends of changes of heavy rainfall. Our analysis showed that probabilistic 3-day rainfall would increase in the future. In particular, 3-day rainfall events with a 10-year return period were calculated to increase from about 220 mm/3d at present to about 270 mm/3d in the future. These amounts of rainfall were used to represent the future trend of increases of heavy rainfall. Simultaneously, we developed a diurnal rainfall pattern generator based on a Monte Carlo simulation method. For this generator, the beta distribution was used to disaggregate

  2. Thin film passivation of laser generated 3D micro patterns in lithium manganese oxide cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pröll, J.; Kohler, R.; Bruns, M.; Oberst, V.; Weidler, P. G.; Heißler, S.; Kübel, C.; Scherer, T.; Prang, R.; Seifert, H. J.; Pfleging, W.

    2013-03-01

    The increasing need for long-life lithium-ion batteries requires the further development of electrode materials. Especially on the cathode side new materials or material composites are needed to increase the cycle lifetime. On the one hand, spinel-type lithium manganese oxide is a promising candidate to be used as cathode material due to its non-toxicity, low cost and good thermal stability. On the other hand, the spinel structure suffers from change in the oxidation state of manganese during cycling which is also accompanied by loss of active material into the liquid electrolyte. The general trend is to enhance the active surface area of the cathode in order to increase lithium-ion mobility through the electrode/electrolyte interface, while an enhanced surface area will also promote chemical degradation. In this work, laser microstructuring of lithium manganese oxide thin films was applied in a first step to increase the active surface area. This was done by using 248 nm excimer laser radiation and chromium/quartz mask imaging techniques. In a second step, high power diode laser-annealing operating at a wavelength of 940 nm was used for forming a cubic spinel-like battery phase. This was verified by means of Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetric measurements. In a last step, the laser patterned thin films were coated with indium tin oxide (ITO) layers with a thickness of 10 nm to 50 nm. The influence of the 3D surface topography as well as the ITO thickness on the electrochemical performance was studied by cyclic voltammetry. Post-mortem studies were carried out by using scanning electron microscopy and focused ion beam analysis.

  3. On the processes generating latitudinal richness gradients: identifying diagnostic patterns and predictions

    PubMed Central

    Hurlbert, Allen H.; Stegen, James C.

    2014-01-01

    We use a simulation model to examine four of the most common hypotheses for the latitudinal richness gradient and identify patterns that might be diagnostic of those four hypotheses. The hypotheses examined include (1) tropical niche conservatism, or the idea that the tropics are more diverse because a tropical clade origin has allowed more time for diversification in the tropics and has resulted in few species adapted to extra-tropical climates. (2) The ecological limits hypothesis suggests that species richness is limited by the amount of biologically available energy in a region. (3) The speciation rates hypothesis suggests that the latitudinal gradient arises from a gradient in speciation rates. (4) Finally, the tropical stability hypothesis argues that climatic fluctuations and glacial cycles in extratropical regions have led to greater extinction rates and less opportunity for specialization relative to the tropics. We found that tropical niche conservatism can be distinguished from the other three scenarios by phylogenies which are more balanced than expected, no relationship between mean root distance (MRD) and richness across regions, and a homogeneous rate of speciation across clades and through time. The energy gradient, speciation gradient, and disturbance gradient scenarios all produced phylogenies which were more imbalanced than expected, showed a negative relationship between MRD and richness, and diversity-dependence of speciation rate estimates through time. We found that the relationship between speciation rates and latitude could distinguish among these three scenarios, with no relation expected under the ecological limits hypothesis, a negative relationship expected under the speciation rates hypothesis, and a positive relationship expected under the tropical stability hypothesis. We emphasize the importance of considering multiple hypotheses and focusing on diagnostic predictions instead of predictions that are consistent with multiple

  4. Flow patterns generated by vibrations in weightlessness in binary mixture with Soret effect.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsova, Valentina; Melnikov, Denis; Gaponenko, Yuri; Lyubimova, Tatyana; Mialdun, Aliaksandr; Sechenyh, Vitaliy

    2012-07-01

    Vibrational convection refers to the specific flows that appear when a fluid with density gradient is subjected to external vibration. The density gradient may result from the inhomogeneity of temperature or composition. The study of vibrational impact on fluids has fundamental and applied importance. In weightlessness, vibrational convection is an additional way of transporting heat and matter similar to thermo- and solutocapillary convection. The response of the fluid to external forcing depends on the frequency of vibration. The case of small amplitude and high frequency vibration (when the period is much smaller than the characteristic viscous and heat (mass) diffusion times) is of special interest. In this case, the mean flow can be observed in the system, which describes the non-linear response of the fluid to a periodic excitation. The mean flow is most pronounced in the absence of other external forces (in particular, absence of static gravity). The experiment IVIDIL (Influence of Vibration on Diffusion in Liquids) has been conducted on the ISS during more than 3 months in 2009-2010. In the experimental liquids the density changes due to both the temperature and composition. 55 experimental runs of IVIDIL provided rich variety of valuable information about behavior of the liquid in weightlessness which is released with time, [1-3]. The current results provide experimental and numerical evidence of richness of flow patterns and their classification. References: 1. Shevtsova V., Mialdun A., Melnikov D., Ryzhkov I., Gaponenko Y., Saghir Z., Lyubimova T., Legros J.C., IVIDIL experiment onboard ISS: thermodiffusion in presence of controlled vibrations, Comptes Rendus Mecanique, 2011, 339, 310-317 2. Shevtsova V., Lyubimova T., Saghir Z. , Melnikov D., Gaponenko Y. , Sechenyh V. , Legros J.C. , Mialdun A., IVIDIL: on-board g-jitters and diffusion controlled phenomena; Journal of Physics: Conference Series, 2011, 327, 012031 3. Mazzoni S., Shevtsova V., Mialdun A

  5. On the processes generating latitudinal richness gradients: identifying diagnostic patterns and predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Hurlbert, Allen H.; Stegen, James C.

    2014-12-02

    Many processes have been put forward to explain the latitudinal gradient in species richness. Here, we use a simulation model to examine four of the most common hypotheses and identify patterns that might be diagnostic of those four hypotheses. The hypotheses examined include (1) tropical niche conservatism, or the idea that the tropics are more diverse because a tropical clade origin has allowed more time for diversification in the tropics and has resulted in few species adapted to extra-tropical climates. (2) The productivity, or energetic constraints, hypothesis suggests that species richness is limited by the amount of biologically available energy in a region. (3) The tropical stability hypothesis argues that major climatic fluctuations and glacial cycles in extratropical regions have led to greater extinction rates and less opportunity for specialization relative to the tropics. (4) Finally, the speciation rates hypothesis suggests that the latitudinal richness gradient arises from a parallel gradient in rates of speciation. We found that tropical niche conservatism can be distinguished from the other three scenarios by phylogenies which are more balanced than expected, no relationship between mean root distance and richness across regions, and a homogeneous rate of speciation across clades and through time. The energy gradient, speciation gradient, and disturbance gradient scenarios all exhibited phylogenies which were more imbalanced than expected, showed a negative relationship between mean root distance and richness, and diversity-dependence of speciation rate estimates through time. Using Bayesian Analysis of Macroevolutionary Mixtures on the simulated phylogenies, we found that the relationship between speciation rates and latitude could distinguish among these three scenarios. We emphasize the importance of considering multiple hypotheses and focusing on diagnostic predictions instead of predictions that are consistent with more than one hypothesis.

  6. Platelet activation via PAR4 is involved in the initiation of thrombin generation and in clot elasticity development.

    PubMed

    Vretenbrant, Karin; Ramström, Sofia; Bjerke, Maria; Lindahl, Tomas L

    2007-03-01

    Thrombin is a pivotal enzyme formed in the coagulation cascade and an important and potent platelet activator. The two protease-activated thrombin receptors on human platelets are denoted PAR1 and PAR4. The physiological relevance of PAR4 is still unclear, as both aggregation and secretion can be accomplished by PAR1 activation alone. In the present study we have investigated the role of PARs in platelet activation, blood coagulation, clot elasticity and fibrinolysis. Flow cytometry, free oscillation rheometry and thrombin generation measurements were used to analyze blood or platelet-rich plasma from healthy individuals. Maximum PAR1 activation with the peptide SFLLRN gave fewer fibrinogen-binding platelets with lower mean fluorescent intensity than maximum PAR4 activation with AYPGKF. Inhibition of any of the receptors prolonged clotting times. However, PAR1 is more important for fibrinolysis; inhibition of this receptor prolonged all the steps in the fibrinolytic process. Clot elasticity decreased significantly when the PAR4 receptor was inhibited. In the thrombin generation measurements, PAR4 inhibition delayed the thrombin generation start and peak, but did not affect the total amount of thrombin generated. PAR1 inhibition had no significant impact on thrombin generation. We found that PAR4 is most likely activated by low concentrations of thrombin during the initial phase of thrombin generation and is of importance to the clotting time. Furthermore, we suggest that the PAR4 receptor may have a physiological role in the stabilisation of the coagulum. PMID:17334509

  7. Hindbrain medulla catecholamine cell group involvement in lactate-sensitive hypoglycemia-associated patterns of hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine activity.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Tamrakar, P; Ibrahim, B A; Briski, K P

    2014-10-10

    Cell-type compartmentation of glucose metabolism in the brain involves trafficking of the oxidizable glycolytic end product, l-lactate, by astrocytes to fuel neuronal mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Lactate availability within the hindbrain medulla is a monitored function that regulates systemic glucostasis as insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) is exacerbated by lactate repletion of that brain region. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a plausible source of lactoprivic input to the neural gluco-regulatory circuit as caudal fourth ventricular (CV4) lactate infusion normalizes IIH-associated activation, e.g. phosphorylation of the high-sensitivity energy sensor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), in these cells. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that A2 neurons are unique among medullary catecholamine cells in directly screening lactate-derived energy. Adult male rats were injected with insulin or vehicle following initiation of continuous l-lactate infusion into the CV4. Two hours after injections, A1, C1, A2, and C2 neurons were collected by laser-microdissection for Western blot analysis of AMPKα1/2 and phosphoAMPKα1/2 proteins. Results show that AMPK is expressed in each cell group, but only a subset, e.g. A1, C1, and A2 neurons, exhibit increased sensor activity in response to IIH. Moreover, hindbrain lactate repletion reversed hypoglycemic augmentation of pAMPKα1/2 content in A2 and C1 but not A1 cells, and normalized hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine content in a site-specific manner. The present evidence for discriminative reactivity of AMPK-expressing medullary catecholamine neurons to the screened energy substrate lactate implies that that lactoprivation is selectively signaled to the hypothalamus by A2 noradrenergic and C1 adrenergic cells.

  8. Abdominal expiratory activity in the rat brainstem-spinal cord in situ: patterns, origins and implications for respiratory rhythm generation.

    PubMed

    Abdala, A P L; Rybak, I A; Smith, J C; Paton, J F R

    2009-07-15

    We studied respiratory neural activity generated during expiration. Motoneuronal activity was recorded simultaneously from abdominal (AbN), phrenic (PN), hypoglossal (HN) and central vagus nerves from neonatal and juvenile rats in situ. During eupnoeic activity, low-amplitude post-inspiratory (post-I) discharge was only present in AbN motor outflow. Expression of AbN late-expiratory (late-E) activity, preceding PN bursts, occurred during hypercapnia. Biphasic expiratory (biphasic-E) activity with pre-inspiratory (pre-I) and post-I discharges occurred only during eucapnic anoxia or hypercapnic anoxia. Late-E activity generated during hypercapnia (7-10% CO(2)) was abolished with pontine transections or chemical suppression of retrotrapezoid nucleus/ventrolateral parafacial (RTN/vlPF). AbN late-E activity during hypercapnia is coupled with augmented pre-I discharge in HN, truncated PN burst, and was quiescent during inspiration. Our data suggest that the pons provides a necessary excitatory drive to an additional neural oscillatory mechanism that is only activated under conditions of high respiratory drive to generate late-E activity destined for AbN motoneurones. This mechanism may arise from neurons located in the RTN/vlPF or the latter may relay late-E activity generated elsewhere. We hypothesize that this oscillatory mechanism is not a necessary component of the respiratory central pattern generator but constitutes a defensive mechanism activated under critical metabolic conditions to provide forced expiration and reduced upper airway resistance simultaneously. Possible interactions of this oscillator with components of the brainstem respiratory network are discussed.

  9. Characterization of a non-chemically amplified resist for photomask fabrication using a 257-nm optical pattern generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathsack, Benjamen M.; Tabery, Cyrus E.; Stachowiak, Timothy B.; Dallas, Tim E.; Xu, Cheng-Bai; Pochkowski, Mike; Willson, C. Grant

    1999-12-01

    I-line optical pattern generators using non-chemically amplified resists have become the workhorses for high throughput mask fabrication. The demand for smaller and more uniform features on photomasks has driven the development of a 257 nm optical pattern generator. A non-chemically amplified resist is being developed to maximize the performance of this new 257 nm mask tool. Resist characterization and lithography simulation are being used to formulate a non-chemically amplified resist for 257 nm optical pattern generators. Non- chemically amplified resists are advantageous for us in mask fabrication due to their storage and post-exposure stability. Chemically amplified resists may provide higher performance but they also require environmental mini-environments and a post-exposure bake equipment not commonly present in mask houses. Diazonaphthoquinone (DNQ)/novolak resists have not been used for DUV Integrated Circuit (IC) applications mainly due to the low sensitivity and the strong absorbance of the DNQ photoactive compound (PAC) at 248 nm. However, a 2,1,4 DNQ based resist has been characterized that bleaches at 257 nm and inhibits novolak. The photoproduct of the 2,1,4 DNQ PAC is much more transparent at 257 nm than 248 nm. Novolak resin is too strongly absorbing for use in formulating efficient 248 nm resists, but novolak has an absorbance minimum at 257 nm that provides transparency similar to poly (hydroxystyrene). Lithography simulation is being used to develop a non- chemically amplified resist to minimize the expensive iteration of manufacturing trials. An exposure system using a 257 nm frequency double Ar laser system has been constructed to study the resist photokinetics. Dill exposure parameters (A, B and C) have been extracted for a 2,1,4 DNQ/novolak based resist. Dissolution rate measurements have been made with a DRM developed at the University of Texas at Austin. Simulation is used to determine the optimal resist absorption, bleaching, dose and

  10. Do physical abuse, depression, and parental substance use influence patterns of substance use among child welfare involved youth? Substance use misuse.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Susan M; Smith, Rachel E

    2015-01-01

    To date studies have not explored patterns of substance use exclusively among youth in the child welfare system. Consequently, little is known about polysubstance use among child welfare-involved youth. This study aimed to explore whether physical abuse, parental substance use, depression, and demographic characteristics predict distinct patterns of substance use among child welfare-involved youth using latent class analysis (LCA). The sample included 822 11-17 year olds who participated in the National Survey of Child and Adolescent Well-being (NSCAW II) study between March 2008 and September 2009. We found the following three classes: (1) polysubstance use, (2) alcohol and marijuana use, and (3) low use. Older youth and youth who experienced physical abuse were at greater risk of being in the polysubstance use class, while living with a biological parent reduced the likelihood of polysubstance use class membership. Youth in the alcohol and marijuana use class were more likely to be older and depressed. Results from this study illuminate important targets for interventions.

  11. Involvement of a versatile pattern recognition receptor, apolipophorin-III in prophenoloxidase activation and antibacterial defense of the Chinese oak silkworm, Antheraea pernyi.

    PubMed

    Wen, Daihua; Wang, Xialu; Shang, Lei; Huang, Yu; Li, Tienan; Wu, Chunfu; Zhang, Rong; Zhang, Jinghai

    2016-12-01

    Apolipophorin-III (apoLp-III) is an exchangeable apolipoprotein found in many insect species and functions as a lipid transport vehicle. Recent studies have shown that apoLp-III is a multifunctional molecule involved in not only lipid transportation but also innate immune responses. In the present study, the pattern recognition properties of Antheraea pernyi apoLp-III were investigated. Recombinant Ap-apoLp-III was bound to different species of microbes and further study showed the rAp-apoLp-III is capable of interacting with pathogen associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) on the microbial cell surface. In addition, an Ap-apoLp-III/PAMP mixture stimulated the prophenoloxidase (PPO) activation of A. pernyi hemolymph in vitro, to a greater extent than PAMP alone while Ap-apoLp-III itself failed to activate the PPO system, indicating that Ap-apoLp-III up-regulates PPO activation by combining with PAMP. After pathogen invasion following an injection of Staphylococcus aureus, RNAi-mediated silencing of apoLp-III decreased the transcriptional abundance of three antimicrobial peptide genes. These data suggest that apoLp-III is a versatile pattern recognition receptor and may play important roles in the innate immune responses of Antheraea pernyi. PMID:27387151

  12. Integrating Information: An Analysis of the Processes Involved and the Products Generated in a Written Synthesis Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sole, Isabel; Miras, Mariana; Castells, Nuria; Espino, Sandra; Minguela, Marta

    2013-01-01

    The case study reported here explores the processes involved in producing a written synthesis of three history texts and their possible relation to the characteristics of the texts produced and the degree of comprehension achieved following the task. The processes carried out by 10 final-year compulsory education students (15 and 16 years old) to…

  13. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching.

    PubMed

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S Viswanadha

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching.

  14. Pattern search in multi-structure data: a framework for the next-generation evidence-based medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R.; Ainsworth, Keela C.

    2014-03-01

    With the impetus towards personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledgebase, etc.) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and answer the following questions: (i) How can we jointly analyze and explore measurement data in context with qualitative domain knowledge? (ii) How can we search and hypothesize patterns (not known apriori) from such multi-structure data? (iii) How can we build predictive models by integrating weakly-associated multi-relational multi-structure data? We propose a framework towards answering these questions. We describe a software solution that leverages hardware for scalable in-memory analytics and applies next-generation semantic query tools on medical data.

  15. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching.

    PubMed

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S Viswanadha

    2016-03-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  16. Next generation sequencing (NGS) database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    PubMed Central

    Someswara Rao, Chinta; Raju, S. Viswanadha

    2016-01-01

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB) for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats) in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching. PMID:26981434

  17. Catalytic therapy of cancer by ascorbic acid involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and generation of reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Hadi, S M; Ullah, M F; Shamim, U; Bhatt, S H; Azmi, A S

    2010-01-01

    Catalytic therapy is a cancer treatment modality based on the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) through administration of ascorbate/medicinal herbal extracts and copper. It is known that antioxidants such as ascorbate also exhibit prooxidant activity in the presence of transition metals such as copper. Based on our work and that in the literature, in this review we propose a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of ascorbate against cancer cells. It involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of ROS leading to oxidative DNA breakage. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and the Comet assay, we have shown that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative breakage in cellular DNA. Such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine (a Cu(I) sequestering agent) and scavengers of ROS indicating that the cellular DNA breakage involves the generation of Cu(I) and formation of ROS. Similar results are also obtained with plant polyphenol antioxidants that are important constituents of medicinal herbal extracts. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. It is well established that tissue, cellular and serum copper levels are considerably elevated in various malignancies. Therefore, cancer cells may be more subject to electron transfer between copper ions and ascorbate/plant polyphenols to generate ROS. In this review we cite evidence to indicate that in catalytic therapy cytotoxic action against cancer cells involves redox cycling of exogenous/endogenous copper ions.

  18. Stimulus- and response-locked neuronal generator patterns of auditory and visual word recognition memory in schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Jürgen; Tenke, Craig E.; Gil, Roberto B.; Bruder, Gerard E.

    2009-01-01

    Examining visual word recognition memory (WRM) with nose-referenced EEGs, we reported a preserved ERP ‘old-new effect’ (enhanced parietal positivity 300–800 ms to correctly-recognized repeated items) in schizophrenia (Kayser et al., 1999). However, patients showed reduced early negative potentials (N1, N2) and poorer WRM. Because group differences in neuronal generator patterns (i.e., sink-source orientation) may be masked by choice of EEG recording reference, the current study combined surface Laplacians and principal components analysis (PCA) to clarify ERP component topography and polarity and to disentangle stimulus- and response-related contributions. To investigate the impact of stimulus modality, 31-channel ERPs were recorded from 20 schizophrenic patients (15 male) and 20 age-, gender-, and handedness-matched healthy adults during parallel visual and auditory continuous WRM tasks. Stimulus- and response-locked reference-free current source densities (spherical splines) were submitted to unrestricted Varimax-PCA to identify and measure neuronal generator patterns underlying ERPs. Poorer (78.2±18.7% vs. 87.8±11.3% correct) and slower (958±226 vs. 773±206 ms) performance in patients was accompanied by reduced stimulus-related left parietal P3 sources (150 ms pre-response) and vertex N2 sinks (both overall and old/new effects) but modality-specific N1 sinks were not significantly reduced. A distinct mid-frontal sink 50-ms post-response was markedly attenuated in patients. Reductions were more robust for auditory stimuli. However, patients showed increased lateral-frontotemporal sinks (T7 maximum) concurrent with auditory P3 sources. Electrophysiologic correlates of WRM deficits in schizophrenia suggest functional impairments of posterior cortex (stimulus representation) and anterior cingulate (stimulus categorization, response monitoring), primarily affecting memory for spoken words. PMID:19275917

  19. Activation of the central pattern generators for locomotion by serotonin and excitatory amino acids in neonatal rat.

    PubMed Central

    Cazalets, J R; Sqalli-Houssaini, Y; Clarac, F

    1992-01-01

    1. The role of serotonin (5-HT) and excitatory amino-acids (EAAs) in the activation of the neural networks (i.e. the central pattern generators) that organize locomotion in mammals was investigated in an isolated brainstem-spinal cord preparation from the newborn rat. 2. The neuroactive substances were bath applied and the activity of fictive locomotion was recorded in the ventral roots. 3. Serotonin initiated an alternating pattern of right and left action potential bursts. The period of this rhythm was dose dependent, i.e. it decreased from around 10 s at 2 x 10(-5) M to 5 s at 10(-4) M. The effects of serotonin were blocked by a 5-HT1 antagonist (propranolol) and by 5-HT2 antagonists (ketanserin, cyproheptadine, mianserin). 5-HT3 antagonists were ineffective. The effects of methoxytryptamine, a non-selective 5-HT agonist, mimicked the 5-HT effects. 4. The endogenous EAAs, glutamate and aspartate, also triggered an alternating rhythmic pattern. Their effects were blocked by 2-amino-5-phosphonovaleric acid (AP-5; a N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor blocker) and 6,7-dinitro-quinoxaline-2,3-dione (a non-NMDA receptor blocker). 5. Several EAA agonists (N-methyl-D,L-aspartate (NMA) and kainate) initiated rhythmic activity. The period of the induced rhythm (from 3 to 1 s) was similar with both of these substances but in a range of concentrations which was ten times lower in the case of kainate (10(-6) to 5 x 10(-6) M) than in that of NMA (10(-5) to 4 x 10(-5) M). alpha-Amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionate and quisqualate occasionally triggered some episodes of fictive locomotion with a threshold at 6 x 10(-7) and 10(-5) M, respectively. PMID:1362441

  20. NON-NEUTRALIZED ELECTRIC CURRENT PATTERNS IN SOLAR ACTIVE REGIONS: ORIGIN OF THE SHEAR-GENERATING LORENTZ FORCE

    SciTech Connect

    Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Titov, Viacheslav S.; Mikic, Zoran

    2012-12-10

    Using solar vector magnetograms of the highest available spatial resolution and signal-to-noise ratio, we perform a detailed study of electric current patterns in two solar active regions (ARs): a flaring/eruptive and a flare-quiet one. We aim to determine whether ARs inject non-neutralized (net) electric currents in the solar atmosphere, responding to a debate initiated nearly two decades ago that remains inconclusive. We find that well-formed, intense magnetic polarity inversion lines (PILs) within ARs are the only photospheric magnetic structures that support significant net current. More intense PILs seem to imply stronger non-neutralized current patterns per polarity. This finding revises previous works that claim frequent injections of intense non-neutralized currents by most ARs appearing in the solar disk but also works that altogether rule out injection of non-neutralized currents. In agreement with previous studies, we also find that magnetically isolated ARs remain globally current-balanced. In addition, we confirm and quantify the preference of a given magnetic polarity to follow a given sense of electric currents, indicating a dominant sense of twist in ARs. This coherence effect is more pronounced in more compact ARs with stronger PILs and must be of sub-photospheric origin. Our results yield a natural explanation of the Lorentz force, invariably generating velocity and magnetic shear along strong PILs, thus setting a physical context for the observed pre-eruption evolution in solar ARs.

  1. Laser-induced generation of micrometer-sized luminescent patterns on rare-earth-doped amorphous films

    SciTech Connect

    Zanatta, A.R.; Ribeiro, C.T.M.

    2004-12-01

    Room-temperature photoluminescence has been achieved from rare-earth-doped amorphous (a-) GeN films. The samples were prepared by the radio-frequency-sputtering method, and light emission from the rare-earth (RE) centers was obtained after irradiating the films with a highly focused laser beam. As a result of this laser annealing procedure, almost circular holes with approximately 1-{mu}m diameter were produced on the surface of the a-GeN films. The area nearby these holes correspond to crystalline Ge and coincide with the regions, where relatively strong RE-related luminescence takes place. These laser-annealed areas can be easily and conveniently managed in order to generate different microscopic luminescent patterns. Depending on the RE ion employed, visible and near-infrared light emission were obtained from the patterns so produced. The development of these micrometer-sized luminescent centers, as well as their probable mechanisms of excitation-recombination, will be presented and discussed. The importance of the current experimental results to future technological applications such as microdevices, for example, will also be outlined.

  2. Extreme ultraviolet patterned mask inspection performance of advanced projection electron microscope system for 11nm half-pitch generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-03-01

    Novel projection electron microscope optics have been developed and integrated into a new inspection system named EBEYE-V30 ("Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) , and the resulting system shows promise for application to half-pitch (hp) 16-nm node extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) patterned mask inspection. To improve the system's inspection throughput for 11-nm hp generation defect detection, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and an image capture area deflector that operates simultaneously with the mask scanning motion have been developed. A learning system has been used for the mask inspection tool to meet the requirements of hp 11-nm node EUV patterned mask inspection. Defects are identified by the projection electron microscope system using the "defectivity" from the characteristics of the acquired image. The learning system has been developed to reduce the labor and costs associated with adjustment of the detection capability to cope with newly-defined mask defects. We describe the integration of the developed elements into the inspection tool and the verification of the designed specification. We have also verified the effectiveness of the learning system, which shows enhanced detection capability for the hp 11-nm node.

  3. MRCK-1 Drives Apical Constriction in C. elegans by Linking Developmental Patterning to Force Generation.

    PubMed

    Marston, Daniel J; Higgins, Christopher D; Peters, Kimberly A; Cupp, Timothy D; Dickinson, Daniel J; Pani, Ariel M; Moore, Regan P; Cox, Amanda H; Kiehart, Daniel P; Goldstein, Bob

    2016-08-22

    Apical constriction is a change in cell shape that drives key morphogenetic events including gastrulation and neural tube formation. Apical force-producing actomyosin networks drive apical constriction by contracting while connected to cell-cell junctions. The mechanisms by which developmental patterning regulates these actomyosin networks and associated junctions with spatial precision are not fully understood. Here we identify a myosin light-chain kinase MRCK-1 as a key regulator of C. elegans gastrulation that integrates spatial and developmental patterning information. We show that MRCK-1 is required for activation of contractile actomyosin dynamics and elevated cortical tension in the apical cell cortex of endoderm precursor cells. MRCK-1 is apically localized by active Cdc42 at the external, cell-cell contact-free surfaces of apically constricting cells, downstream of cell fate determination mechanisms. We establish that the junctional components α-catenin, β-catenin, and cadherin become highly enriched at the apical junctions of apically constricting cells and that MRCK-1 and myosin activity are required in vivo for this enrichment. Taken together, our results define mechanisms that position a myosin activator to a specific cell surface where it both locally increases cortical tension and locally enriches junctional components to facilitate apical constriction. These results reveal crucial links that can tie spatial information to local force generation to drive morphogenesis. PMID:27451898

  4. Generations.

    PubMed

    Chambers, David W

    2005-01-01

    Groups naturally promote their strengths and prefer values and rules that give them an identity and an advantage. This shows up as generational tensions across cohorts who share common experiences, including common elders. Dramatic cultural events in America since 1925 can help create an understanding of the differing value structures of the Silents, the Boomers, Gen Xers, and the Millennials. Differences in how these generations see motivation and values, fundamental reality, relations with others, and work are presented, as are some applications of these differences to the dental profession. PMID:16623137

  5. Characterization of proteinases from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus involved in the generation of antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemoglobin is a rich source of biologically active peptides, some of which are potent antimicrobials (hemocidins). A few hemocidins have been purified from the midgut contents of ticks. Nonetheless, how antimicrobials are generated in the tick midgut and their role in immunity is still poorly understood. Here we report, for the first time, the contribution of two midgut proteinases to the generation of hemocidins. Results An aspartic proteinase, designated BmAP, was isolated from the midgut of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus using three chromatographic steps. Reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that BmAP is restricted to the midgut. The other enzyme is a previously characterized midgut cathepsin L-like cysteine proteinase designated BmCL1. Substrate specificities of native BmAP and recombinant BmCL1 were mapped using a synthetic combinatorial peptide library and bovine hemoglobin. BmCL1 preferred substrates containing non-polar residues at P2 subsite and polar residues at P1, whereas BmAP hydrolysed substrates containing non-polar amino acids at P1 and P1'. Conclusions BmAP and BmCL1 generate hemocidins from hemoglobin alpha and beta chains in vitro. We postulate that hemocidins may be important for the control of tick pathogens and midgut flora. PMID:20663211

  6. A Fast Response Mechanism for Insulin Storage in Crystals May Involve a Novel Mode of Kink Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vekilov, Peter

    2010-03-01

    Crystals, likely rhombohedral, of Zn-insulin hexamers form in the islets of Langerhans in the pancreases of many mammals. The suggested function of crystal formation is to protect the insulin from proteases and increase the degree of conversion of soluble proinsulin. To accomplish this, crystal growth should be fast and adaptable to rate fluctuations in the conversion reaction. Zn-insulin crystals grow layer-by-layer. Each layer spreads by the attachment of molecules to kinks located at the layers' edges, also called steps. The kinks are thought to be generated either by thermal fluctuations, as postulated by Gibbs, or by one-dimensional nucleation of new crystalline rows. The kink density determines the rate at which steps advance, and these two kink-generation mechanisms lead to weak near-linear responses of the growth rate to concentration variations. We demonstrate for the crystallization of Zn-insulin a novel mechanism of kink generation, whereby 2D clusters of several insulin molecules pre-formed on the terraces between steps associate to the steps. This mechanism results in several-fold higher kink density, faster rate of crystallization, and a high sensitivity of the kinetics to small increases of the solute concentration. If the found mechanism operates during insulin crystallization in vivo, it could be a part of the biological regulation of insulin production and function. For other crystallizing materials in biological and non-biological systems, this mechanism provides an understanding of the often seen non-linear acceleration of the kinetics.

  7. Idler-efficiency-enhanced long-wave infrared beam generation using aperiodic orientation-patterned GaAs gratings.

    PubMed

    Gürkan Figen, Ziya; Aytür, Orhan; Arıkan, Orhan

    2016-03-20

    In this paper, we design aperiodic gratings based on orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) for converting 2.1 μm pump laser radiation into long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) in an idler-efficiency-enhanced scheme. These single OP-GaAs gratings placed in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) or an optical parametric generator (OPG) can simultaneously phase match two optical parametric amplification (OPA) processes, OPA 1 and OPA 2. We use two design methods that allow simultaneous phase matching of two arbitrary χ(2) processes and also free adjustment of their relative strength. The first aperiodic grating design method (Method 1) relies on generating a grating structure that has domain walls located at the zeros of the summation of two cosine functions, each of which has a spatial frequency that equals one of the phase-mismatch terms of the two processes. Some of the domain walls are discarded considering the minimum domain length that is achievable in the production process. In this paper, we propose a second design method (Method 2) that relies on discretizing the crystal length with sample lengths that are much smaller than the minimum domain length and testing each sample's contribution in such a way that the sign of the nonlinearity maximizes the magnitude sum of the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform of the grating function at the relevant phase mismatches. Method 2 produces a similar performance as Method 1 in terms of the maximization of the height of either Fourier peak located at the relevant phase mismatch while allowing an adjustable relative height for the two peaks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that aperiodic OP-GaAs gratings have been proposed for efficient long-wave infrared beam generation based on simultaneous phase matching. PMID:27140581

  8. Idler-efficiency-enhanced long-wave infrared beam generation using aperiodic orientation-patterned GaAs gratings.

    PubMed

    Gürkan Figen, Ziya; Aytür, Orhan; Arıkan, Orhan

    2016-03-20

    In this paper, we design aperiodic gratings based on orientation-patterned gallium arsenide (OP-GaAs) for converting 2.1 μm pump laser radiation into long-wave infrared (8-12 μm) in an idler-efficiency-enhanced scheme. These single OP-GaAs gratings placed in an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) or an optical parametric generator (OPG) can simultaneously phase match two optical parametric amplification (OPA) processes, OPA 1 and OPA 2. We use two design methods that allow simultaneous phase matching of two arbitrary χ(2) processes and also free adjustment of their relative strength. The first aperiodic grating design method (Method 1) relies on generating a grating structure that has domain walls located at the zeros of the summation of two cosine functions, each of which has a spatial frequency that equals one of the phase-mismatch terms of the two processes. Some of the domain walls are discarded considering the minimum domain length that is achievable in the production process. In this paper, we propose a second design method (Method 2) that relies on discretizing the crystal length with sample lengths that are much smaller than the minimum domain length and testing each sample's contribution in such a way that the sign of the nonlinearity maximizes the magnitude sum of the real and imaginary parts of the Fourier transform of the grating function at the relevant phase mismatches. Method 2 produces a similar performance as Method 1 in terms of the maximization of the height of either Fourier peak located at the relevant phase mismatch while allowing an adjustable relative height for the two peaks. To our knowledge, this is the first time that aperiodic OP-GaAs gratings have been proposed for efficient long-wave infrared beam generation based on simultaneous phase matching.

  9. The importance of structured noise in the generation of self-organizing tissue patterns through contact-mediated cell–cell signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Michael; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2011-01-01

    Lateral inhibition provides the basis for a self-organizing patterning system in which distinct cell states emerge from an otherwise uniform field of cells. The development of the microchaete bristle pattern on the notum of the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster, has long served as a popular model of this process. We recently showed that this bristle pattern depends upon a population of dynamic, basal actin-based filopodia, which span multiple cell diameters. These protrusions establish transient signalling contacts between non-neighbouring cells, generating a type of structured noise that helps to yield a well-ordered and spaced pattern of bristles. Here, we develop a general model of protrusion-based patterning to analyse the role of noise in this process. Using a simple asynchronous cellular automata rule-based model we show that this type of structured noise drives the gradual refinement of lateral inhibition-mediated patterning, as the system moves towards a stable configuration in which cells expressing the inhibitory signal are near-optimally packed. By analysing the effects of introducing thresholds required for signal detection in this model of lateral inhibition, our study shows how filopodia-mediated cell–cell communication can generate complex patterns of spots and stripes, which, in the presence of signalling noise, align themselves across a patterning field. Thus, intermittent protrusion-based signalling has the potential to yield robust self-organizing tissue-wide patterns without the need to invoke diffusion-mediated signalling. PMID:21084342

  10. Calcium-dependent trichosanthin-induced generation of reactive oxygen species involved in apoptosis of human choriocarcinoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunyang; Ma, Hui; Chen, Die Yan

    2001-04-01

    The type-I ribosome-inactivating protein trichosanthin (TCS) has a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological activities, including abortifacient, anti-tumor and anti-HIV. We found for the first time that TCS induced production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in JAR cells by using fluorescent probe 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate with confocal laser scanning microscopy. TCS-induced ROS showed dependence on the increase in intracellular calcium and on the presence of extracellular calcium. The production of ROS increased rapidly after the application of TCS, which paralleled TCS-indued increase in intracellular calcium monitored using fluo 3-AM, suggesting that TCS-induced ROS might mediate by the increase in intracellular Ca2PLU concentration. Simultaneous observation of the nuclear morphological changes and production of ROS in JAR cells with two-photon laser scanning microscopy and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed that ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells, which was confirmed by that antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol prevented TCS-induced ROS formation and cell death. The finding that calcium-dependent TCS-induced ROS involved in the apoptosis of JAR cells might provide new insight into the anti-tumor and anti-HIV mechanism of TCS.

  11. Microarray analysis of gene expression patterns of high lycopene tomato generated from seeds after long-term space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Jinying; Ren, Chunxiao; Pan, Yi; Nechitailo, Galina S.; Liu, Min

    Lycopene content is a most vital trait of tomatoes due to the role of lycopene in reducing the risk of some kinds of cancers. In this experiment, we gained a high lycopene (hl) tomato (named HY-2), after seven generations of self-cross selection, from seeds Russian MNP-1 carried in Russia MIR space station for six years. HPLC result showed that the lycopene content was 1.6 times more than that in Russian MNP-1 (the wild type). Microarray analysis presented the general profile of differential expressed genes at the tomato developmental stage of 7DPB (days post breaker). One hundred and forty three differential expression genes were identified according to the following criterion: the average changes were no less than 1.5 folds with q-value (similar to FDR) less than 0.05 or changes were no less than 1.5 folds in all three biological replications. Most of the differential expressed genes were mainly involved in metabolism, response to stimulus, biosynthesis, development and regulation. Particularly, we discussed the genes involved in protein metabolism, response to unfolded protein, carotenoid biosynthesis and photosynthesis that might be related to the fruit development and the accumulation of lycopene. What's more, we conducted QRT-PCR validation of five key genes (Fps, CrtL-b, CrtR-b, Zep and Nxs) in the lycopene biosynthesis pathway through time courses and that provided the direct molecular evidence for the hl phenotype. Our results demonstrate that long-term space flight, as a rarely used tool, can positively cause some beneficial mutations in the seeds and thus to help to generate a high quality variety, combined with ground selections.

  12. Colistin-Induced Apoptosis of Neuroblastoma-2a Cells Involves the Generation of Reactive Oxygen Species, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Autophagy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Chongshan; Tang, Shusheng; Velkov, Tony; Xiao, Xilong

    2016-09-01

    Neurotoxicity remains a poorly characterized adverse effect associated with colistin therapy. The aim of the present study was to investigate the mechanism of colistin-induced neurotoxicity using the mouse neuroblastoma2a (N2a) cell line. Colistin treatment (0-200 μM) of N2a neuronal cells induced apoptotic cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity was associated with a significant increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels, with a concomitant decrease in the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and the glutathione (GSH) levels. Mitochondrial dysfunction was evident from the dissipation of membrane potential and the increase of Bax/Bcl-2, followed by the release of cytochrome c (CytC). Caspase-3/7, -8, and -9 activations were also detected. Colistin-induced neurotoxicity significantly increased the gene expression of p53 (1.6-fold), Bax (3.3-fold), and caspase-8 (2.2-fold) (all p < 0.01). The formation of autophagic vacuoles was evident with the significant increases (all p < 0.05 or 0.01) of both of Beclin 1 and LC3B following colistin treatment (50-200 μM). Furthermore, inhibition of autophagy by pretreatment with chloroquine diphosphate (CQ) enhanced colistin-induced apoptosis via caspase activation, which could be attenuated by co-treatment with the pan-caspase inhibitor Z-VAD-FMK. In summary, our study reveals that colistin-induced neuronal cell death involves ROS-mediated oxidative stress and mitochondrial dysfunction, followed by caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. A knowledge base of the neuronal signaling pathways involved in colistin-induced neurotoxicity will greatly facilitate the discovery of neuroprotective agents for use in combination with colistin to prevent this undesirable side effect. PMID:26316077

  13. Gut SCP is an immune-relevant molecule involved in the primary immunological memory or pattern recognition in the amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Zhen-Hong; Li, Hui; Yang, Jun-Ning; Liu, Xiang; Gao, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Qi-Fu; Wang, San-Ying; Peng, Xuan-Xian

    2011-02-01

    To understand the role of calcium-binding proteins of invertebrates in immunological response, amphioxus sarcoplasmic calcium-binding protein (SCP) was investigated in the present study. Following gene cloning, recombinant protein expression and purification and antibody preparation, the expression and alteration of SCP in the response to bacterial challenge were detected using Western blotting. SCP was not detected in the branchia, humoral fluid, gonad or in the gut of wounded animals, but it was abundant in muscle and appeared in the gut of healthy animals using Vibrio parahaemolyticus immunization and challenge. Furthermore, whether gut SCP possessed anamnestic response was investigated using cross-immune challenge between Gram-positive and -negative bacteria. Gut SCP showed stronger anamnestic activity or pattern-recognition in response to Gram-negative bacterium V. parahaemolyticus than Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus. The response was faster and more species-specific to V. parahaemolyticus, whereas it was slower and longer to S. aureus. The reason why the response showed significant difference between Gram-positive and -negative bacteria awaits investigation. These results indicate that gut SCP is an immune-relevant molecule involved in the primary immunological memory or pattern recognition in the amphioxus Branchiostoma belcheri.

  14. Diagnostic yield of the analysis of the pattern of electrical activity of muscle and of individual motor unit potentials in neurogenic involvement.

    PubMed Central

    Fuglsang-Frederiksen, A; Scheel, U; Buchthal, F

    1977-01-01

    The pattern of electrical activity and the properties of individual motor unit potentials were analysed in the flexor muscles of the forearm of 15 patients with motor neurone disease and 15 patients with a lesion of the brachial plexus. The best diagnostic yield from the pattern of electrical activity was obtained when the force was 30% of maximum: The number of spikes (turns/15 s) was diminished in 70% of the patients; none showed the increase in turns characteristic of myopathy. The decrease in the number of turns was often associated with an increased incidence of long time intervals between turns and with an increased amplitude between turns. The mean duration of individual motor unit potentials was prolonged in 78% of the patients; none showed the decrease in mean duration characteristic of myopathy. Prolongation of the mean duration of motor unit potentials produced by cooling of normal muscle, led to a decrease in the number of turns. This suggested that the diminished number of turns in neurogenic involvement was due mainly to the prolonged duration of motor unit potentials. PMID:903769

  15. I think therefore I am: Rest-related prefrontal cortex neural activity is involved in generating the sense of self.

    PubMed

    Gruberger, M; Levkovitz, Y; Hendler, T; Harel, E V; Harari, H; Ben Simon, E; Sharon, H; Zangen, A

    2015-05-01

    The sense of self has always been a major focus in the psychophysical debate. It has been argued that this complex ongoing internal sense cannot be explained by any physical measure and therefore substantiates a mind-body differentiation. Recently, however, neuro-imaging studies have associated self-referential spontaneous thought, a core-element of the ongoing sense of self, with synchronous neural activations during rest in the medial prefrontal cortex (PFC), as well as the medial and lateral parietal cortices. By applying deep transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) over human PFC before rest, we disrupted activity in this neural circuitry thereby inducing reports of lowered self-awareness and strong feelings of dissociation. This effect was not found with standard or sham TMS, or when stimulation was followed by a task instead of rest. These findings demonstrate for the first time a critical, causal role of intact rest-related PFC activity patterns in enabling integrated, enduring, self-referential mental processing. PMID:25778382

  16. Evidence for the involvement of cell wall peroxidase in the generation of hydroxyl radicals mediating extension growth.

    PubMed

    Liszkay, Anja; Kenk, Barbara; Schopfer, Peter

    2003-08-01

    Hydroxyl radicals (*OH), produced in the cell wall, are capable of cleaving wall polymers and can thus mediate cell wall loosening and extension growth. It has recently been proposed that the biochemical mechanism responsible for *OH generation in the cell walls of growing plant organs represents an enzymatic reaction catalyzed by apoplastic peroxidase (POD). This hypothesis was investigated by supplying cell walls of maize ( Zea mays L.) coleoptiles and sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) hypocotyls with external NADH, an artificial substrate known to cause *OH generation by POD in vitro. The effects of NADH on wall loosening, growth, and *OH production in vivo were determined. NADH mediates cell wall extension in vitro and in vivo in an H2O2-dependent reaction that shows the characteristic features of POD. NADH-mediated production of *OH in vivo was demonstrated in maize coleoptiles using electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy in combination with a specific spin-trapping reaction. Kinetic properties and inhibitor/activator sensitivities of the *OH-producing reaction in the cell walls of coleoptiles resembled the properties of horseradish POD. Apoplastic consumption of external NADH by living coleoptiles can be traced back to the superimposed action of two enzymatic reactions, a KCN-sensitive reaction mediated by POD operating in the *OH-forming mode, and a KCN-insensitive reaction with the kinetic properties of a superoxide-producing plasma-membrane NADH oxidase the activity of which can be promoted by auxin. Under natural conditions, i.e. in the absence of external NADH, this enzyme may provide superoxide (O2*-) (and H2O2 utilized by POD for) *OH production in the cell wall.

  17. The ArF laser for the next-generation multiple-patterning immersion lithography supporting green operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Keisuke; Ohta, Takeshi; Miyamoto, Hirotaka; Kumazaki, Takahito; Tsushima, Hiroaki; Kurosu, Akihiko; Matsunaga, Takashi; Mizoguchi, Hakaru

    2016-03-01

    Multiple patterning ArF immersion lithography has been expected as the promising technology to satisfy tighter leading edge device requirements. One of the most important features of the next generation lasers will be the ability to support green operations while further improving cost of ownership and performance. Especially, the dependence on rare gases, such as Neon and Helium, is becoming a critical issue for high volume manufacturing process. The new ArF excimer laser, GT64A has been developed to cope with the reduction of operational costs, the prevention against rare resource shortage and the improvement of device yield in multiple-patterning lithography. GT64A has advantages in efficiency and stability based on the field-proven injection-lock twin-chamber platform (GigaTwin platform). By the combination of GigaTwin platform and the advanced gas control algorithm, the consumption of rare gases such as Neon is reduced to a half. And newly designed Line Narrowing Module can realize completely Helium free operation. For the device yield improvement, spectral bandwidth stability is important to increase image contrast and contribute to the further reduction of CD variation. The new spectral bandwidth control algorithm and high response actuator has been developed to compensate the offset due to thermal change during the interval such as the period of wafer exchange operation. And REDeeM Cloud™, new monitoring system for managing light source performance and operations, is on-board and provides detailed light source information such as wavelength, energy, E95, etc.

  18. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-01-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys192 of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C192A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  19. A Golgi and tonoplast localized S-acyl transferase is involved in cell expansion, cell division, vascular patterning and fertility in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Qi, Baoxiu; Doughty, James; Hooley, Richard

    2013-10-01

    S-acylation of eukaryotic proteins is the reversible attachment of palmitic or stearic acid to cysteine residues, catalysed by protein S-acyl transferases that share an Asp-His-His-Cys (DHHC) motif. Previous evidence suggests that in Arabidopsis S-acylation is involved in the control of cell size, polarity and the growth of pollen tubes and root hairs. Using a combination of yeast genetics, biochemistry, cell biology and loss of function genetics the roles of a member of the protein S-acyl transferase PAT family, AtPAT10 (At3g51390), have been explored. In keeping with its role as a PAT, AtPAT10 auto-S-acylates, and partially complements the yeast akr1 PAT mutant, and this requires Cys(192) of the DHHC motif. In Arabidopsis AtPAT10 is localized in the Golgi stack, trans-Golgi network/early endosome and tonoplast. Loss-of-function mutants have a pleiotropic phenotype involving cell expansion and division, vascular patterning, and fertility that is rescued by wild-type AtPAT10 but not by catalytically inactive AtPAT10C(192) A. This supports the hypothesis that AtPAT10 is functionally independent of the other Arabidopsis PATs. Our findings demonstrate a growing importance of protein S-acylation in plants, and reveal a Golgi and tonoplast located S-acylation mechanism that affects a range of events during growth and development in Arabidopsis. PMID:23795888

  20. Automated pattern recognition to support geological mapping and exploration target generation - A case study from southern Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberle, Detlef; Hutchins, David; Das, Sonali; Majumdar, Anandamayee; Paasche, Hendrik

    2015-06-01

    to the result obtained from unsupervised fuzzy clustering. Furthermore, a comparison of the aposterior probability of class assignment with the trustworthiness values provided by fuzzy clustering also indicates only slight differences. These observed differences can be explained by the exponential class probability term which tends to deliver either fairly high or low probability values. The methodology and results presented here demonstrate that automated objective pattern recognition can essentially contribute to geological mapping of large study areas and mineral exploration target generation. This methodology is considered well suited to a number of African countries whose large territories have recently been covered by high resolution airborne geophysical data, but where existing geological mapping is poor, incomplete or outdated.

  1. Generation of tectonic over-pressure inside subducting oceanic lithosphere involving phase-loop of olivine-wadsleyite transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, Byung-Dal; Yuen, David A.

    2015-03-01

    We conducted a two-dimensional numerical model to analyze the generation of tectonic over-pressure, which is a positive deviation from lithostatic pressure, for deep slabs which are anchored at the 660 km phase boundary. The formation of the ductile shear zone under a compressional tectonic setting induces tectonic over-pressure. We first propose that an apparent shear zone originated from an elastic heterogeneity in the phase loop, which is the two-phase (i.e., olivine and wadsleyite) coexistence interval around the 410 km boundary within subducting oceanic lithospheres, can cause tectonic over-pressure with a range from 0.3 to 1.5 GPa. This over-pressure significantly impacts the formation of the olivine-wadsleyite phase transition. The flattening of the olivine-wadsleyite interface by over-pressure is well-resolved. Therefore, we argue that the over-pressure should be applied when analyzing the phase boundary within the subducting lithosphere. Our results provide a new insight on the interplay among the phase transition, shear zone formation and tectonic over-pressure.

  2. Generation of Tectonic Over-pressure inside Subducting Slab Involving Phase-Loop of Olivine-Spinel Transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    So, B. D.; Yuen, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    We conducted a two-dimensional numerical model to analyze the generation of tectonic over-pressure, which is a positive deviation from lithostatic pressure, for deep slabs which are anchored at the 660 km phase boundary. The formation of the ductile shear zone under a compressional tectonic setting induces tectonic over-pressure. We first propose that an apparent shear zone originated from an elastic heterogeneity in the phase loop, which is the two-phase (i.e., olivine and spinel) coexistence interval around the 410 km boundary within subducting slabs, can cause tectonic over-pressure with a range from 0.3 to 1.5 GPa. This over-pressure significantly impacts the formation of the olivine-spinel phase transition. The flattening of the olivine-spinel interface by over-pressures are well-resolved. Therefore, we argue that the over-pressure should be applied when analyzing the phase boundary within the subducting slab. Our results provide a new insight on the interplay among the phase transition, shear zone formation and tectonic over-pressure. * The draft including the abstract above was submitted on 3rd Aug, 2014 with slight modification.

  3. A method to integrate patterned electrospun fibers with microfluidic systems to generate complex microenvironments for cell culture applications

    PubMed Central

    Wallin, Patric; Zandén, Carl; Carlberg, Björn; Hellström Erkenstam, Nina; Liu, Johan; Gold, Julie

    2012-01-01

    The properties of a cell’s microenvironment are one of the main driving forces in cellular fate processes and phenotype expression invivo. The ability to create controlled cell microenvironments invitro becomes increasingly important for studying or controlling phenotype expression in tissue engineering and drug discovery applications. This includes the capability to modify material surface properties within well-defined liquid environments in cell culture systems. One successful approach to mimic extra cellular matrix is with porous electrospun polymer fiber scaffolds, while microfluidic networks have been shown to efficiently generate spatially and temporally defined liquid microenvironments. Here, a method to integrate electrospun fibers with microfluidic networks was developed in order to form complex cell microenvironments with the capability to vary relevant parameters. Spatially defined regions of electrospun fibers of both aligned and random orientation were patterned on glass substrates that were irreversibly bonded to microfluidic networks produced in poly-dimethyl-siloxane. Concentration gradients obtained in the fiber containing channels were characterized experimentally and compared with values obtained by computational fluid dynamic simulations. Velocity and shear stress profiles, as well as vortex formation, were calculated to evaluate the influence of fiber pads on fluidic properties. The suitability of the system to support cell attachment and growth was demonstrated with a fibroblast cell line. The potential of the platform was further verified by a functional investigation of neural stem cell alignment in response to orientation of electrospun fibers versus a microfluidic generated chemoattractant gradient of stromal cell-derived factor 1 alpha. The described method is a competitive strategy to create complex microenvironments invitro that allow detailed studies on the interplay of topography, substrate surface properties, and soluble

  4. Transcriptional Profiling of Newly Generated Dentate Granule Cells Using TU Tagging Reveals Pattern Shifts in Gene Expression during Circuit Integration1,2

    PubMed Central

    Chatzi, Christina; Shen, Rongkun; Goodman, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Despite representing only a small fraction of hippocampal granule cells, adult-generated newborn granule cells have been implicated in learning and memory (Aimone et al., 2011). Newborn granule cells undergo functional maturation and circuit integration over a period of weeks. However, it is difficult to assess the accompanying gene expression profiles in vivo with high spatial and temporal resolution using traditional methods. Here we used a novel method [“thiouracil (TU) tagging”] to map the profiles of nascent mRNAs in mouse immature newborn granule cells compared with mature granule cells. We targeted a nonmammalian uracil salvage enzyme, uracil phosphoribosyltransferase, to newborn neurons and mature granule cells using retroviral and lentiviral constructs, respectively. Subsequent injection of 4-TU tagged nascent RNAs for analysis by RNA sequencing. Several hundred genes were significantly enhanced in the retroviral dataset compared with the lentiviral dataset. We compared a selection of the enriched genes with steady-state levels of mRNAs using quantitative PCR. Ontology analysis revealed distinct patterns of nascent mRNA expression, with newly generated immature neurons showing enhanced expression for genes involved in synaptic function, and neural differentiation and development, as well as genes not previously associated with granule cell maturation. Surprisingly, the nascent mRNAs enriched in mature cells were related to energy homeostasis and metabolism, presumably indicative of the increased energy demands of synaptic transmission and their complex dendritic architecture. The high spatial and temporal resolution of our modified TU-tagging method provides a foundation for comparison with steady-state RNA analyses by traditional transcriptomic approaches in defining the functional roles of newborn neurons. PMID:27011954

  5. Experimental low-grade alteration of biogenic magnetite indicates microbial involvement in generation of banded iron formations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yi-Liang; Konhauser, Kurt O.; Kappler, Andreas; Hao, Xi-Luo

    2013-01-01

    During the deposition of banded iron formation (BIF), the downward flux of ferric oxyhydroxides and phytoplankton biomass should have facilitated Fe(III) reduction during burial, with the end product being ferrous iron-containing minerals including magnetite. Although earlier studies have attempted to quantify the significance of this pathway based on models of the ancient Fe cycle, the only direct evidences of a biological role in magnetite formation in BIF are their iron isotope compositions and unique crystallography which are reminiscent of biologically-generated magnetite. However, the biogenesis hypothesis lacks an explanation as to why modern biogenic magnetite crystals are generally a few hundred nm or smaller in size, yet the magnetite crystals in BIF are mostly tens of micrometers or larger in size. In this study, we demonstrate that biogenic magnetite crystals can grow in size upon reaction between oxyhydroxide and microbial biomass after compression and heating to 1 kbar and 150 °C, respectively. The magnetite crystals previously produced by Thermoanaerobacter spp. TOR39 reach sizes in excess of 700 nm after the P-T experiments, while new magnetite grains >400 nm formed from the superparamagnetic magnetite-dominated end product of Shewanella sp. culture. This study indicates that the large magnetite crystals observed in BIF can be derived through a three-stage sequence, beginning with dissimilatory iron reduction of an initial ferric iron-rich sediment coupled to the oxidation of dead phytoplankton biomass, followed by magnetite crystal aging, and ultimately pressure-temperature induced abiotic alteration of the biogenic magnetite during metamorphism.

  6. A targeted next-generation sequencing assay for the molecular diagnosis of genetic disorders with orodental involvement

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Megana K; Geoffroy, Véronique; Vicaire, Serge; Jost, Bernard; Dumas, Michael; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Switala, Marzena; Gasse, Barbara; Laugel-Haushalter, Virginie; Paschaki, Marie; Leheup, Bruno; Droz, Dominique; Dalstein, Amelie; Loing, Adeline; Grollemund, Bruno; Muller-Bolla, Michèle; Lopez-Cazaux, Séréna; Minoux, Maryline; Jung, Sophie; Obry, Frédéric; Vogt, Vincent; Davideau, Jean-Luc; Davit-Beal, Tiphaine; Kaiser, Anne-Sophie; Moog, Ute; Richard, Béatrice; Morrier, Jean-Jacques; Duprez, Jean-Pierre; Odent, Sylvie; Bailleul-Forestier, Isabelle; Rousset, Monique Marie; Merametdijan, Laure; Toutain, Annick; Joseph, Clara; Giuliano, Fabienne; Dahlet, Jean-Christophe; Courval, Aymeric; El Alloussi, Mustapha; Laouina, Samir; Soskin, Sylvie; Guffon, Nathalie; Dieux, Anne; Doray, Bérénice; Feierabend, Stephanie; Ginglinger, Emmanuelle; Fournier, Benjamin; de la Dure Molla, Muriel; Alembik, Yves; Tardieu, Corinne; Clauss, François; Berdal, Ariane; Stoetzel, Corinne; Manière, Marie Cécile; Dollfus, Hélène; Bloch-Zupan, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Background Orodental diseases include several clinically and genetically heterogeneous disorders that can present in isolation or as part of a genetic syndrome. Due to the vast number of genes implicated in these disorders, establishing a molecular diagnosis can be challenging. We aimed to develop a targeted next-generation sequencing (NGS) assay to diagnose mutations and potentially identify novel genes mutated in this group of disorders. Methods We designed an NGS gene panel that targets 585 known and candidate genes in orodental disease. We screened a cohort of 101 unrelated patients without a molecular diagnosis referred to the Reference Centre for Oro-Dental Manifestations of Rare Diseases, Strasbourg, France, for a variety of orodental disorders including isolated and syndromic amelogenesis imperfecta (AI), isolated and syndromic selective tooth agenesis (STHAG), isolated and syndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta, isolated dentin dysplasia, otodental dysplasia and primary failure of tooth eruption. Results We discovered 21 novel pathogenic variants and identified the causative mutation in 39 unrelated patients in known genes (overall diagnostic rate: 39%). Among the largest subcohorts of patients with isolated AI (50 unrelated patients) and isolated STHAG (21 unrelated patients), we had a definitive diagnosis in 14 (27%) and 15 cases (71%), respectively. Surprisingly, COL17A1 mutations accounted for the majority of autosomal-dominant AI cases. Conclusions We have developed a novel targeted NGS assay for the efficient molecular diagnosis of a wide variety of orodental diseases. Furthermore, our panel will contribute to better understanding the contribution of these genes to orodental disease. Trial registration numbers NCT01746121 and NCT02397824. PMID:26502894

  7. New role for Kruppel-like factor 14 as a transcriptional activator involved in the generation of signaling lipids.

    PubMed

    de Assuncao, Thiago M; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A; Huebert, Robert C; Urrutia, Raul A; Shah, Vijay H

    2014-05-30

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  8. New Role for Kruppel-like Factor 14 as a Transcriptional Activator Involved in the Generation of Signaling Lipids*

    PubMed Central

    de Assuncao, Thiago M.; Lomberk, Gwen; Cao, Sheng; Yaqoob, Usman; Mathison, Angela; Simonetto, Douglas A.; Huebert, Robert C.; Urrutia, Raul A.; Shah, Vijay H.

    2014-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SK1) is an FGF-inducible gene responsible for generation of sphingosine-1-phosphate, a critical lipid signaling molecule implicated in diverse endothelial cell functions. In this study, we identified SK1 as a target of the canonical FGF2/FGF receptor 1 activation pathway in endothelial cells and sought to identify novel transcriptional pathways that mediate lipid signaling. Studies using the 1.9-kb SK1 promoter and deletion mutants revealed that basal and FGF2-stimulated promoter activity occurred through two GC-rich regions located within 633 bp of the transcription start site. Screening for GC-rich binding transcription factors that could activate this site demonstrated that KLF14, a gene implicated in obesity and the metabolic syndrome, binds to this region. Congruently, overexpression of KLF14 increased basal and FGF2-stimulated SK1 promoter activity by 3-fold, and this effect was abrogated after mutation of the GC-rich sites. In addition, KLF14 siRNA transfection decreased SK1 mRNA and protein levels by 3-fold. Congruently, SK1 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in livers from KLF14 knock-out mice. Combined, luciferase, gel shift, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that KLF14 couples to p300 to increase the levels of histone marks associated with transcriptional activation (H4K8ac and H3K14ac), while decreasing repressive marks (H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). Collectively, the results demonstrate a novel mechanism whereby SK1 lipid signaling is regulated by epigenetic modifications conferred by KLF14 and p300. Thus, this is the first description of the activity and mechanisms underlying the function of KLF14 as an activator protein and novel regulator of lipid signaling. PMID:24759103

  9. Analysis of APC types involved in CD4 tolerance and regulatory T cell generation using reaggregated thymic organ cultures.

    PubMed

    Guerri, Lucia; Peguillet, Isabelle; Geraldo, Yvette; Nabti, Sabrina; Premel, Virginie; Lantz, Olivier

    2013-03-01

    Tolerance to self-Ags is generated in the thymus. Both epithelial and hematopoietic thymic stromal cells play an active and essential role in this process. However, the role of each of the various stromal cell types remains unresolved. To our knowledge, we describe the first comparative analysis of several types of thymic hematopoietic stromal cells (THSCs) for their ability to induce CD4 tolerance to self, in parallel with the thymic epithelium. The THSCs--two types of conventional dendritic cells (cDCs), plasmacytoid dendritic cells, macrophages (MΦs), B lymphocytes, and eosinophils--were first characterized and quantified in adult mouse thymus. They were then examined in reaggregated thymic organ cultures containing mixtures of monoclonal and polyclonal thymocytes. This thymocyte mixture allows for the analysis of Ag-specific events while avoiding the extreme skewing frequently seen in purely monoclonal systems. Our data indicate that thymic epithelium alone is capable of promoting self-tolerance by eliminating autoreactive CD4 single-positive thymocytes and by supporting regulatory T cell (Treg) development. We also show that both non-Treg CD4 single-positive thymocytes and Tregs are efficiently deleted by the two populations of cDCs present in the thymus, as well as to a lesser extent by MΦs. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells, B lymphocytes, and eosinophils were not able to do so. Finally, cDCs were also the most efficient THSCs at supporting Treg development in the thymus, suggesting that although they may share some characteristics required for negative selection with MΦs, they do not share those required for the support of Treg development, making cDCs a unique cell subset in the thymus. PMID:23365074

  10. Patterns of thyroid hormone receptor expression in zebrafish and generation of a novel model of resistance to thyroid hormone action.

    PubMed

    Marelli, Federica; Carra, Silvia; Agostini, Maura; Cotelli, Franco; Peeters, Robin; Chatterjee, Krishna; Persani, Luca

    2016-03-15

    Resistance to thyroid hormone can be due to heterozygous, dominant negative (DN) THRA (RTHα) or THRB (RTHβ) mutations, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we delineate the spatiotemporal expression of TH receptors (TRs) in zebrafish and generated morphants expressing equivalent amounts of wild-type and DN TRαs (thraa_MOs) and TRβs (thrb_MOs) in vivo. Both morphants show severe developmental abnormalities. The phenotype of thraa_MOs includes brain and cardiac defects, but normal thyroid volume and tshba expression. A combined modification of dio2 and dio3 expression can explain the high T3/T4 ratio seen in thraa_MOs, as in RTHα. Thrb_MOs show abnormal eyes and otoliths, with a typical RTHβ pattern of thyroid axis. The coexpression of wild-type, but not mutant, human TRs can rescue the phenotype in both morphants. High T3 doses can partially revert the dominant negative action of mutant TRs in morphant fish. Therefore, our morphants recapitulate the RTHα and RTHβ key manifestations representing new models in which the functional consequences of human TR mutations can be rapidly and faithfully evaluated. PMID:26802880

  11. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives.

    PubMed

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a "reshaping" function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal "reshaping" functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good "reshaping" function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion. PMID:25324773

  12. [Central pattern generators in the spinal cord of the cat and their relevance in rehabilitation after spinal lesion].

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, A; Schulze, S; Martens, H; Schmidt, M J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the spinal cord to recover after partial or complete transection, and even reinitiate motor function, was investigated in several studies in cats. It has been shown that even after a complete spinalisation at the level of T12/T13, the possibility of restoration of hind-limb function is good. Central pattern generators (CPGs), located in the spinal cord, play an important role in this situation. Although CPGs alone are unable to restore function, the combination of CPGs with targeted and consistent mobility training and, in some cases, hind-limb sensory stimulation is essential to improve function. These result in a reorganisation of the CPGs and neuronal networks in the spinal cord. The age of the animal at the time of injury and the extent and localisation of lesions, play a crucial role in recovery. A new focus of research is the influence of neurotransmitters/neuromodulators on spinal-cord regeneration. How and to what extent these factors support locomotor training remains for further clinical investigation. PMID:26530110

  13. [Central pattern generators in the spinal cord of the cat and their relevance in rehabilitation after spinal lesion].

    PubMed

    Dillenseger, A; Schulze, S; Martens, H; Schmidt, M J

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the spinal cord to recover after partial or complete transection, and even reinitiate motor function, was investigated in several studies in cats. It has been shown that even after a complete spinalisation at the level of T12/T13, the possibility of restoration of hind-limb function is good. Central pattern generators (CPGs), located in the spinal cord, play an important role in this situation. Although CPGs alone are unable to restore function, the combination of CPGs with targeted and consistent mobility training and, in some cases, hind-limb sensory stimulation is essential to improve function. These result in a reorganisation of the CPGs and neuronal networks in the spinal cord. The age of the animal at the time of injury and the extent and localisation of lesions, play a crucial role in recovery. A new focus of research is the influence of neurotransmitters/neuromodulators on spinal-cord regeneration. How and to what extent these factors support locomotor training remains for further clinical investigation.

  14. Massively parallel E-beam inspection: enabling next-generation patterned defect inspection for wafer and mask manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malloy, Matt; Thiel, Brad; Bunday, Benjamin D.; Wurm, Stefan; Mukhtar, Maseeh; Quoi, Kathy; Kemen, Thomas; Zeidler, Dirk; Eberle, Anna Lena; Garbowski, Tomasz; Dellemann, Gregor; Peters, Jan Hendrik

    2015-03-01

    SEMATECH aims to identify and enable disruptive technologies to meet the ever-increasing demands of semiconductor high volume manufacturing (HVM). As such, a program was initiated in 2012 focused on high-speed e-beam defect inspection as a complement, and eventual successor, to bright field optical patterned defect inspection [1]. The primary goal is to enable a new technology to overcome the key gaps that are limiting modern day inspection in the fab; primarily, throughput and sensitivity to detect ultra-small critical defects. The program specifically targets revolutionary solutions based on massively parallel e-beam technologies, as opposed to incremental improvements to existing e-beam and optical inspection platforms. Wafer inspection is the primary target, but attention is also being paid to next generation mask inspection. During the first phase of the multi-year program multiple technologies were reviewed, a down-selection was made to the top candidates, and evaluations began on proof of concept systems. A champion technology has been selected and as of late 2014 the program has begun to move into the core technology maturation phase in order to enable eventual commercialization of an HVM system. Performance data from early proof of concept systems will be shown along with roadmaps to achieving HVM performance. SEMATECH's vision for moving from early-stage development to commercialization will be shown, including plans for development with industry leading technology providers.

  15. A novel approach to locomotion learning: Actor-Critic architecture using central pattern generators and dynamic motor primitives

    PubMed Central

    Li, Cai; Lowe, Robert; Ziemke, Tom

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we propose an architecture of a bio-inspired controller that addresses the problem of learning different locomotion gaits for different robot morphologies. The modeling objective is split into two: baseline motion modeling and dynamics adaptation. Baseline motion modeling aims to achieve fundamental functions of a certain type of locomotion and dynamics adaptation provides a “reshaping” function for adapting the baseline motion to desired motion. Based on this assumption, a three-layer architecture is developed using central pattern generators (CPGs, a bio-inspired locomotor center for the baseline motion) and dynamic motor primitives (DMPs, a model with universal “reshaping” functions). In this article, we use this architecture with the actor-critic algorithms for finding a good “reshaping” function. In order to demonstrate the learning power of the actor-critic based architecture, we tested it on two experiments: (1) learning to crawl on a humanoid and, (2) learning to gallop on a puppy robot. Two types of actor-critic algorithms (policy search and policy gradient) are compared in order to evaluate the advantages and disadvantages of different actor-critic based learning algorithms for different morphologies. Finally, based on the analysis of the experimental results, a generic view/architecture for locomotion learning is discussed in the conclusion. PMID:25324773

  16. Neuroethological approach to frontolimbic epileptic seizures and parasomnias: The same central pattern generators for the same behaviours.

    PubMed

    Tassinari, C A; Cantalupo, G; Högl, B; Cortelli, P; Tassi, L; Francione, S; Nobili, L; Meletti, S; Rubboli, G; Gardella, E

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this report is not to make a differential diagnosis between epileptic nocturnal seizures and non-epileptic sleep-related movement disorders, or parasomnias. On the contrary, our goal is to emphasize the commonly shared semiological features of some epileptic seizures and parasomnias. Such similar features might be explained by the activation of the same neuronal networks (so-called 'central pattern generators' or CPG). These produce the stereotypical rhythmic motor sequences - in other words, behaviours - that are adaptive and species-specific (such as eating/alimentary, attractive/aversive, locomotor and nesting habits). CPG are located at the subcortical level (mainly in the brain stem and spinal cord) and, in humans, are under the control of the phylogenetically more recent neomammalian neocortical structures, according to a simplified Jacksonian model. Based on video-polygraphic recordings of sleep-related epileptic seizures and non-epileptic events (parasomnias), we have documented how a transient "neomammalian brain" dysfunction - whether epileptic or not - can 'release' (disinhibition?) the CPG responsible for involuntary motor behaviours. Thus, in both epileptic seizures and parasomnias, we can observe: (a) oroalimentary automatisms, bruxism and biting; (b) ambulatory behaviours, ranging from the classical bimanual-bipedal activity of 'frontal' hypermotor seizures, epileptic and non-epileptic wanderings, and somnambulism to periodic leg movements (PLM), alternating leg muscle activation (ALMA) and restless legs syndrome (RLS); and (c) various sleep-related events such as ictal fear, sleep terrors, nightmares and violent behaviour. PMID:19733874

  17. Neuropeptide Y-induced potentiation of noradrenergic vasoconstriction in the human saphenous vein: involvement of endothelium generated thromboxane.

    PubMed

    Fabi, F; Argiolas, L; Ruvolo, G; del Basso, P

    1998-05-01

    1. We investigated the potentiating effect of low concentrations of neuropeptide Y (NPY) on the vasoconstriction induced by transmural nerve stimulation (TNS) and noradrenaline (NA) in human saphenous veins. The effects of (i) endothelium removal; (ii) the addition of the NO pathway precursor L-arginine; (iii) the ET(A)/ET(B) endothelin receptor antagonist Ro 47-0203; (iv) the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin; (v) the selective thromboxane A2 (TxA2) receptor antagonists Bay u3405 and ifetroban, and (vi) the TxA2 synthase inhibitor, UK 38485, were studied in order to gain information about the mechanisms of NPY-induced potentiation. 2. Contractile response curves for TNS (0.5-8 Hz) and for exogenously administered NA (0.1-3 microM) were obtained in superfused saphenous vein rings. The contractions induced by both TNS and NA at all tested frequencies and concentrations, respectively, were significantly potentiated by 50 nM NPY in endothelium intact veins. Conversely, in endothelium-denuded vessel rings the contractile-response curves to TNS and NA overlapped both in the absence and presence of NPY, thus suggesting that a release of vasoactive substances from endothelial cells could account for the noradrenergic NPY-induced potentiation. 3. In vessels with intact endothelium, the potentiating action of NPY on TNS and NA was unaffected by the presence of high concentrations of the NO precursor L-arginine (3-10 mM) or the non-selective ET(A)/ET(B) endothelin receptor antagonist, Ro 47-0203 (10 microM). These data indicate that the NPY-induced effect does not involve either the endothelium-derived vasodilator nitric oxide or the vasoconstrictor endothelin. Conversely, in the presence of the cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, indomethacin (30 microM), NPY failed to potentiate the vasoconstrictions produced by either nerve stimulation or by exogenous NA, thus providing evidence that arachidonic acid metabolites through the cyclo-oxygenase pathway are mainly responsible for

  18. Identification and expression patterns of extracellular matrix-associated genes fibropellin-ia and tenascin involved in regeneration of sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    PubMed

    Ba, Huazhong; Yao, Feng; Yang, Lei; Qin, Tong; Luan, Hong; Li, Zhengmin; Zou, Xiangyang; Hou, Lin

    2015-07-01

    Sea cucumbers have a strong regenerative capacity. Many important genes involved in the molecular mechanism of regeneration and associated with intercellular signaling pathways of regeneration have been identified. The product of the fibropellin-ia gene forms a layer known as the apical lamina that surrounds the sea cucumber embryo throughout development. Meanwhile, the tenascin gene displays highly restricted and dynamic patterns of expression in the embryo and is expressed in the adult during normal processes such as wound healing, nerve regeneration and tissue involution. In this study, we cloned for the first time full-length cDNAs of fibropellin-ia (1390 bp, encoding a 199 amino acid protein) and tenascin (1366 bp, encoding a 179 amino acid protein) from Apostichopus japonicus (designated Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin, respectively) using rapid amplification of cDNA ends. The structures and characteristics of these two genes were analyzed bioinformatically, and their expression patterns associated with extracellular matrix remodeling in regeneration of A. japonicus were investigated by real-time PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH). Expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin in the regeneration tissues were higher than those in normal tissues. The highest expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin were shown in the intestine and respiratory tree on the 15th and 20th days after sea cucumbers were eviscerated. In the body wall, the highest expression levels of Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin occurred at 35 and 45 min during early regeneration and then emerged between 5 and 7 days again during late regeneration after the body wall was injured. ISH analysis revealed expression of these genes in the body wall, longitudinal muscle, intestine and respiratory tree. These findings suggest that Aj-fnia and Aj-tenascin are crucial genes that play important roles in the regeneration of the sea cucumber.

  19. Adaptive expansion of the maize maternally expressed gene (Meg) family involves changes in expression patterns and protein secondary structures of its members

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The Maternally expressed gene (Meg) family is a locally-duplicated gene family of maize which encodes cysteine-rich proteins (CRPs). The founding member of the family, Meg1, is required for normal development of the basal endosperm transfer cell layer (BETL) and is involved in the allocation of maternal nutrients to growing seeds. Despite the important roles of Meg1 in maize seed development, the evolutionary history of the Meg cluster and the activities of the duplicate genes are not understood. Results In maize, the Meg gene cluster resides in a 2.3 Mb-long genomic region that exhibits many features of non-centromeric heterochromatin. Using phylogenetic reconstruction and syntenic alignments, we identified the pedigree of the Meg family, in which 11 of its 13 members arose in maize after allotetraploidization ~4.8 mya. Phylogenetic and population-genetic analyses identified possible signatures suggesting recent positive selection in Meg homologs. Structural analyses of the Meg proteins indicated potentially adaptive changes in secondary structure from α-helix to β-strand during the expansion. Transcriptomic analysis of the maize endosperm indicated that 6 Meg genes are selectively activated in the BETL, and younger Meg genes are more active than older ones. In endosperms from B73 by Mo17 reciprocal crosses, most Meg genes did not display parent-specific expression patterns. Conclusions Recently-duplicated Meg genes have different protein secondary structures, and their expressions in the BETL dominate over those of older members. Together with the signs of positive selections in the young Meg genes, these results suggest that the expansion of the Meg family involves potentially adaptive transitions in which new members with novel functions prevailed over older members. PMID:25084677

  20. Disturbance of endogenous hydrogen sulfide generation and endoplasmic reticulum stress in hippocampus are involved in homocysteine-induced defect in learning and memory of rats.

    PubMed

    Li, Man-Hong; Tang, Ji-Ping; Zhang, Ping; Li, Xiang; Wang, Chun-Yan; Wei, Hai-Jun; Yang, Xue-Feng; Zou, Wei; Tang, Xiao-Qing

    2014-04-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) is a risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) acts as an endogenous neuromodulator and neuroprotectant. It has been shown that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress is involved in the pathological mechanisms of the learning and memory dysfunctions and that H2S exerts its neuroprotective role via suppressing ER stress. In the present work, we explored the effects of intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy on the formation of learning and memory, the generation of endogenous H2S, and the expression of ER stress in the hippocampus of rats. We found that intracerebroventricular injection of Hcy in rats leads to learning and memory dysfunctions in the Morris water maze and novel of object recognition test and decreases in the expression of cystathionine-β-synthase, the major enzyme responsible for endogenous H2S generation, and the generation of endogenous H2S in the hippocampus of rats. We also showed that exposure of Hcy could up-regulate the expressions of glucose-regulated protein 78 (GRP78), CHOP, and cleaved caspase-12, which are the major mark proteins of ER stress, in the hippocampus of rats. Taken together, these results suggest that the disturbance of hippocampal endogenous H2S generation and the increase in ER stress in the hippocampus are related to Hcy-induced defect in learning and memory.

  1. Spike Pattern Structure Influences Synaptic Efficacy Variability under STDP and Synaptic Homeostasis. I: Spike Generating Models on Converging Motifs

    PubMed Central

    Bi, Zedong; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    In neural systems, synaptic plasticity is usually driven by spike trains. Due to the inherent noises of neurons and synapses as well as the randomness of connection details, spike trains typically exhibit variability such as spatial randomness and temporal stochasticity, resulting in variability of synaptic changes under plasticity, which we call efficacy variability. How the variability of spike trains influences the efficacy variability of synapses remains unclear. In this paper, we try to understand this influence under pair-wise additive spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) when the mean strength of plastic synapses into a neuron is bounded (synaptic homeostasis). Specifically, we systematically study, analytically and numerically, how four aspects of statistical features, i.e., synchronous firing, burstiness/regularity, heterogeneity of rates and heterogeneity of cross-correlations, as well as their interactions influence the efficacy variability in converging motifs (simple networks in which one neuron receives from many other neurons). Neurons (including the post-synaptic neuron) in a converging motif generate spikes according to statistical models with tunable parameters. In this way, we can explicitly control the statistics of the spike patterns, and investigate their influence onto the efficacy variability, without worrying about the feedback from synaptic changes onto the dynamics of the post-synaptic neuron. We separate efficacy variability into two parts: the drift part (DriftV) induced by the heterogeneity of change rates of different synapses, and the diffusion part (DiffV) induced by weight diffusion caused by stochasticity of spike trains. Our main findings are: (1) synchronous firing and burstiness tend to increase DiffV, (2) heterogeneity of rates induces DriftV when potentiation and depression in STDP are not balanced, and (3) heterogeneity of cross-correlations induces DriftV together with heterogeneity of rates. We anticipate our work

  2. In vivo modulation of interacting central pattern generators in lobster stomatogastric ganglion: influence of feeding and partial pressure of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Clemens, S; Massabuau, J C; Legeay, A; Meyrand, P; Simmers, J

    1998-04-01

    The stomatogastric ganglion (STG) of the European lobster Homarus gammarus contains two rhythm-generating networks (the gastric and pyloric circuits) that in resting, unfed animals produce two distinct, yet strongly interacting, motor patterns. By using simultaneous EMG recordings from the gastric and pyloric muscles in vivo, we found that after feeding, the gastropyloric interaction disappears as the two networks express accelerated motor rhythms. The return to control levels of network activity occurs progressively over the following 1-2 d and is associated with a gradual reappearance of the gastropyloric interaction. In parallel with this change in network activity is an alteration of oxygen levels in the blood. In resting, unfed animals, arterial partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) is most often between 1 and 2 kPa and then doubles within 1 hr after feeding, before returning to control values some 24 hr later. In vivo, experimental prevention of the arterial PO2 increase after feeding leads to a slowing of pyloric rhythmicity toward control values and a reappearance of the gastropyloric interaction, without apparent effect on gastric network operation. Using in vitro preparations of the stomatogastric nervous system and by changing oxygen levels uniquely at the level of the STG within the range observed in the intact animal, we were able to mimic most of the effects observed in vivo. Our data indicate that the gastropyloric interaction appears only during a "free run" mode of foregut activity and that the coordinated operation of multiple neural networks may be modulated by local changes in oxygenation. PMID:9502835

  3. Extracellular matrix molecules exhibit unique expression pattern in the climbing fiber-generating precerebellar nucleus, the inferior olive.

    PubMed

    Kecskes, S; Gaál, B; Rácz, É; Birinyi, A; Hunyadi, A; Matesz, C

    2015-01-22

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulates around different neuronal compartments of the central nervous system (CNS) or appears in diffuse reticular form throughout the neuropil. In the adult CNS, the perineuronal net (PNN) surrounds the perikarya and dendrites of various neuron types, whereas the axonal coats are aggregations of ECM around the individual synapses, and the nodal ECM is localized at the nodes of Ranvier. Previous studies in our laboratory demonstrated on rats that the heterogeneous distribution and molecular composition of ECM is associated with the variable cytoarchitecture and hodological organization of the vestibular nuclei and may also be related to their specific functions in gaze and posture control as well as in the compensatory mechanisms following vestibular lesion. Here, we investigated the ECM expression pattern in the climbing fiber-generating inferior olive (IO), which is functionally related to the vestibular nuclei. By using histochemical and immunohistochemical methods, the most characteristic finding was the lack of PNNs, presumably due to the absence of synapses on the perikarya and proximal dendrites of IO neurons. On the other hand, the darkly stained dots or ring-like structures in the neuropil might represent the periaxonal coats around the axon terminals of olivary synaptic glomeruli. We have observed positive ECM reaction for the hyaluronan, tenascin-R, hyaluronan and proteoglycan link protein 1 (HAPLN1) and various chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans. The staining intensity and distribution of ECM molecules revealed a number of differences between the functionally different subnuclei of IO. We hypothesized that the different molecular composition and intensity differences of ECM reaction is associated with different control mechanisms of gaze and posture control executed by the visuomotor-vestibular, somatosensory and integrative subnuclei of the IO.

  4. xCyp26c Induced by Inhibition of BMP Signaling Is Involved in Anterior-Posterior Neural Patterning of Xenopus laevis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Saet-Byeol; Umair, Zobia; Kumar, Shiv; Lee, Unjoo; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Jong-Il; Kim, SungChan; Park, Jae-Bong; Lee, Jae-Yong; Kim, Jaebong

    2016-01-01

    Vertebrate neurogenesis requires inhibition of endogenous bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signals in the ectoderm. Blocking of BMPs in animal cap explants causes the formation of anterior neural tissues as a default fate. To identify genes involved in the anterior neural specification, we analyzed gene expression profiles using a Xenopus Affymetrix Gene Chip after BMP-4 inhibition in animal cap explants. We found that the xCyp26c gene, encoding a retinoic acid (RA) degradation enzyme, was upregulated following inhibition of BMP signaling in early neuroectodermal cells. Whole-mount in situ hybridization analysis showed that xCyp26c expression started in the anterior region during the early neurula stage. Overexpression of xCyp26c weakly induced neural genes in animal cap explants. xCyp26c abolished the expression of all trans-/cis-RA-induced posterior genes, but not basic FGF-induced posterior genes. Depletion of xCyp26c by morpholino-oligonucleotides suppressed the normal formation of the axis and head, indicating that xCyp26c plays a critical role in the specification of anterior neural tissue in whole embryos. In animal cap explants, however, xCyp26c morpholinos did not alter anterior-to-posterior neural tissue formation. Together, these results suggest that xCyp26c plays a specific role in anterior-posterior (A-P) neural patterning of Xenopus embryos. PMID:26923193

  5. Generation of slow-wave-type action potentials in canine colon smooth muscle involves a non-L-type Ca2+ conductance.

    PubMed Central

    Huizinga, J D; Farraway, L; Den Hertog, A

    1991-01-01

    1. The hypothesis was addressed that a non-L-type calcium conductance is involved in the generation of the initial part of the slow-wave-type action potential in the canine colon. 2. In the absence of a sodium and chloride gradient (NaCl replaced by glucamine), and in the presence of nitrendipine (in 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution), a major portion of the upstroke potential of the slow wave persists at unchanged frequency. 3. In 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution, the rate of rise and amplitude of the upstroke potential is reduced by removal of extracellular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. 4. The rate of rise and the amplitude of the upstroke potential is in a concentration-dependent manner reduced by Ni2+ greater than Cd2+ greater than Co2+ greater than Mg2+. 5. In 'glucamine-nitrendipine' Krebs solution, Ba2+ cannot replace Ca2+ in the generation of the upstroke potential. 6. Positive evidence was obtained for the hypothesis that a non-L-type calcium conductance is involved in the initiation of the slow-wave-type action potential in colonic smooth muscle. PMID:1724671

  6. Evidence for catalytic intermediates involved in generating the chromopyrrolic acid scaffold of rebeccamycin by RebO and RebD.

    PubMed

    Spolitak, Tatyana; Ballou, David P

    2015-05-01

    We provide the first experimental evidence for intermediates being involved in catalysis by RebD in generating the chromopyrrolic acid (CPA) scaffold of rebeccamycin. In the presence of its substrates (indole pyruvate imine - IPAI - and H2O2 both produced by the flavoprotein oxidase RebO that oxidizes tryptophan), RebD reacts as a peroxidase forming two IPAI radicals that recombine as a C-C bond in the CPA. When catalase is included to remove H2O2, CPA can still be formed because the IPAI rapidly reduces RebD, which reacts with O2, utilizing oxidase-peroxidase chemistry to produce CPA. Reduced RebD can also react with H2O2 forming Cpd II directly, which can oxidize IPAI. Stopped-flow spectrophotometric studies demonstrated that during the reaction of RebO and RebD with Trp and oxygen, a species with a red-shifted Soret band at 424.5 nm appeared. This species can react with either guaiacol or ABTS to form ferric RebD, suggesting that it is Cpd II of RebD involved in the formation of CPA. In summary, the studies reveal new and unusual aspects peroxidase and peroxygenase chemistry used by RebD in catalyzing carbon-carbon oxidative coupling reactions that are involved in biosynthesis of indolocarbazoles. PMID:25837855

  7. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased.

  8. The generation of CD8+ T-cell population specific for vaccinia virus epitope involved in the antiviral protection against ectromelia virus challenge.

    PubMed

    Gierynska, Malgorzata; Szulc-Dabrowska, Lidia; Dzieciatkowski, Tomasz; Golke, Anna; Schollenberger, Ada

    2015-12-01

    Eradication of smallpox has led to cessation of vaccination programs. This has rendered the human population increasingly susceptible not only to variola virus infection but also to infections with other representatives of Poxviridae family that cause zoonotic variola-like diseases. Thus, new approaches for designing improved vaccine against smallpox are required. Discovering that orthopoxviruses, e.g. variola virus, vaccinia virus, ectromelia virus, share common immunodominant antigen, may result in the development of such a vaccine. In our study, the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells in mice during the acute and memory phase of the immune response was induced using the vaccinia virus immunodominant TSYKFESV epitope and CpG oligodeoxynucleotides as adjuvants. The role of the generated TSYKFESV-specific CD8(+) T cells was evaluated in mice during ectromelia virus infection using systemic and mucosal model. Moreover, the involvement of dendritic cells subsets in the adaptive immune response stimulation was assessed. Our results indicate that the TSYKFESV epitope/TLR9 agonist approach, delivered systemically or mucosally, generated strong CD8(+) T-cell response when measured 10 days after immunization. Furthermore, the TSYKFESV-specific cell population remained functionally active 2 months post-immunization, and gave cross-protection in virally challenged mice, even though the numbers of detectable antigen-specific T cells decreased. PMID:26474845

  9. Long-term expression of two interacting motor pattern-generating networks in the stomatogastric system of freely behaving lobster.

    PubMed

    Clemens, S; Combes, D; Meyrand, P; Simmers, J

    1998-03-01

    Rhythmic movements of the gastric mill and pyloric regions of the crustacean foregut are controlled by two stomatogastric neuronal networks that have been intensively studied in vitro. By using electromyographic recordings from the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, we have monitored simultaneously the motor activity of pyloric and gastric mill muscles for pattern seen in vitro but at considerably slower cycle periods (2. 5-3.5 s instead of 1-1.5 s). Gastric mill activity occurs at mean cycle periods of 20-50 s compared with 5-10 s in vitro but may suddenly stop for up to tens of minutes, then restart without any apparent behavioral reason. When conjointly active, the two networks express a strict coupling that involves certain but not all motor neurons of the pyloric network. The posterior pyloric constrictor muscles, innervated by a total of 8 pyloric (PY) motor neurons, are influenced by the onset of each gastric mill medial gastric/lateral gastric(MG/LG) neuron powerstroke burst, and for one cycle, PY neuron bursts may attain >300% of their mean duration. However, the duration of activity in the lateral pyloric constrictor muscle, innervated by the unique lateral pyloric (LP) motor neuron, remains unaffected by this perturbation. During this period after gastric perturbation, LP neuron and PY neurons thus express opposite burst-to-period relationships in that LP neuron burst duration is independent of the ongoing cycle period, whereas PY neuron burst duration changes with period length. In vitro the same type of gastro-pyloric interaction is observed, indicating that it is not dependent on sensory inputs. Moreover, this interaction is intrinsic to the stomatogastric ganglion itself because

  10. Savannah River Site Public and Regulatory Involvement in the Cercla Low-Level Waste (LLW) Program and Their Effect on Decisions to Dispose of LLW Generated by Cercla

    SciTech Connect

    Belencan, H.

    2008-07-01

    The key to successful public involvement at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been and continues to be vigorous, up-front involvement of the public, federal and state regulators with technical experts. The SRS Waste Management Program includes all forms of radioactive waste. All of the decisions associated with the management of these wastes are of interest to the public and successful program implementation would be impossible without including the public up-front in the program formulation. Serious problems can result if program decisions are made without public involvement, and if the public is informed after key decisions are made. This paper will describe the regulatory and public involvement program and their effects on the decisions concerning the disposal at the Savannah River Site (SRS) of LLW generated from CERCLA Removal and Remedial Actions. At SRS the Deactivation and Decommissioning (D and D) project has generated large amounts of LLW from the removal of buildings and processing facilities. The D and D project is expected to generate even larger amounts of LLW in the future. The most cost effective disposal alternated is to use the onsite LLW disposal facility in E-Area. The E-Area LLW Facility is owned and operated by the Department of Energy (DOE) under its authority granted by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, as amended. Since the disposal of CERCLA generated waste is also governed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) CERCLA regulations, it is important that EPA, DOE, and the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) work together to resolve any conflicts in implementation of the D and D project so that all regulations are followed and the project can be continued successfully. An issue of particular significance will be described in this paper that, were it not resolved successfully, would have jeopardized the completion of one project and resulted in higher overall project costs. The EPA determined in review of

  11. Regulation of the respiratory central pattern generator by chloride-dependent inhibition during development in the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana).

    PubMed

    Broch, Lise; Morales, Rey D; Sandoval, Anthony V; Hedrick, Michael S

    2002-04-01

    Isolated brainstem preparations from larval (tadpole) and adult Rana catesbeiana were used to examine inhibitory mechanisms for developmental regulation of the respiratory central pattern generator (CPG). Preparations were superfused at 20-22 degrees C with Cl(-)-free artificial cerebrospinal fluid (aCSF) or with aCSF containing agonists/antagonists of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glycine receptors. Respiratory motor output from the CPG, measured as neural activity from cranial nerve roots, was associated with fictive gill ventilation and lung ventilation in tadpoles and with fictive lung ventilation in adults. In tadpoles, fictive lung burst frequency was 0.8+/-0.2 min(-1) and did not change significantly with Cl(-)-free aCSF superfusion; however, lung burst amplitude increased by nearly 400 % (P<0.01). Fictive gill ventilation averaged 41.6+/-3.3 min(-1) and was reversibly abolished by Cl(-)-free aCSF. Superfusion with Cl(-)-free aCSF abolished lung bursts in two of seven adult preparations, and overall lung burst frequency decreased from 3.1+/-0.7 to 0.4+/-0.03 min(-1) (P<0.01), but burst amplitude was unchanged. Low concentrations of GABA (0.5 mmol l(-1)) produced a significant increase in lung burst frequency followed by almost complete inhibition at 5.0 mmol l(-1), accompanied by the abolition of gill ventilation at 2.5-5.0 mmol l(-1). By contrast, fictive lung ventilation in adults was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by glycine and GABA, and inhibition occurred at approximately 10-fold lower concentrations compared with tadpoles. The glycine receptor antagonist strychnine (2.5-25.0 micromol l(-1)) and the GABA(A) receptor antagonist bicuculline (1-10 micromol l(-1)) inhibited fictive gill ventilation and increased fictive lung ventilation in tadpoles. However, bicuculline and strychnine inhibited fictive lung ventilation in adults. These results suggest that lung ventilation in the tadpole brainstem may be driven by a pacemaker-like mechanism since

  12. Gene expression patterns in response to pathogen challenge and interaction with hemolin suggest that the Yippee protein of Antheraea pernyi is involved in the innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yu; Dai, Lishang; Sun, Yuxuan; Wang, Lei; Qian, Cen; Wei, Guoqing; Zhu, Bao-Jian; Liu, Chao-Liang

    2016-07-01

    Yippee was first identified as a protein that physically interacts with the Hemolin protein of Hyalophora cecropia. In this study, we identified a gene with a 366bp open reading frame (ORF) that encodes a 121 amino acid protein containing a conserved Yippee domain. We named this gene Ap-Yippee (Yippee gene from Antheraea pernyi), and investigated the role of the protein in the host immune response. A recombinant Ap-Yippee protein was expressed in Escherichia coli cells, and polyclonal antibodies were produced against the recombinant protein. Real-time PCR and a Western blot analysis revealed that Ap-Yippee is expressed in the hemocytes, Malpighian tubules, midgut, silk gland, epidermis, and fat bodies of A. pernyi, with the highest expression level observed in Malpighian tubules. The fifth instar larvae of A. pernyi were challenged by injecting them with nucleopolyhedrovirus (AP-NPV), the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, the Gram-positive bacterium Micrococcus luteus, or the entomopathogenic fungus, Beauveria bassiana. These challenges with diverse pathogens resulted in differential expression patterns of the protein. A knockdown of the Ap-Yippee gene by small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection had a significant influence on the expression of the hemolin in the pupae which was confirmed by qRT-PCR and Western blot. Furthermore, a possible protein-protein interaction between Ap-Yippee and Hemolin was explored by Far-Western blotting. Therefore, our data suggest that the Ap-Yippee protein is involved in a pathway that regulates the immune response of insects. PMID:27261060

  13. Tuning and playing a motor rhythm: how metabotropic glutamate receptors orchestrate generation of motor patterns in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Nistri, Andrea; Ostroumov, Konstantin; Sharifullina, Elina; Taccola, Giuliano

    2006-01-01

    Repeated motor activities like locomotion, mastication and respiration need rhythmic discharges of functionally connected neurons termed central pattern generators (CPGs) that cyclically activate motoneurons even in the absence of descending commands from higher centres. For motor pattern generation, CPGs require integration of multiple processes including activation of ion channels and transmitter receptors at strategic locations within motor networks. One emerging mechanism is activation of glutamate metabotropic receptors (mGluRs) belonging to group I, while group II and III mGluRs appear to play an inhibitory function on sensory inputs. Group I mGluRs generate neuronal membrane depolarization with input resistance increase and rapid fluctuations in intracellular Ca2+, leading to enhanced excitability and rhythmicity. While synchronicity is probably due to modulation of inhibitory synaptic transmission, these oscillations occurring in coincidence with strong afferent stimuli or application of excitatory agents can trigger locomotor-like patterns. Hence, mGluR-sensitive spinal oscillators play a role in accessory networks for locomotor CPG activation. In brainstem networks supplying tongue muscle motoneurons, group I receptors facilitate excitatory synaptic inputs and evoke synchronous oscillations which stabilize motoneuron firing at regular, low frequency necessary for rhythmic tongue contractions. In this case, synchronicity depends on the strong electrical coupling amongst motoneurons rather than inhibitory transmission, while cyclic activation of KATP conductances sets its periodicity. Activation of mGluRs is therefore a powerful strategy to trigger and recruit patterned discharges of motoneurons. PMID:16469790

  14. In vitro analysis suggests that difference in cell movement during direct interaction can generate various pigment patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Hiroaki; Kondo, Shigeru

    2014-02-01

    Pigment patterns of organisms have invoked strong interest from not only biologists but also, scientists in many other fields. Zebrafish is a useful model animal for studying the mechanism of pigment pattern formation. The zebrafish stripe pattern is primarily two types of pigment cells: melanophores and xanthophores. Previous studies have reported that interactions among these pigment cells are important for pattern formation. In the recent report, we found that the direct contact by xanthophores induces the membrane depolarization of melanophores. From analysis of jaguar mutants, it is suggested that the depolarization affects the movements of melanophores. To analyze the cell movement in detail, we established a unique in vitro system. It allowed us to find that WT xanthophores induced repulsive movement of melanophores through direct contact. The xanthophores also chased the melanophores. As a result, they showed run-and-chase movements. We also analyzed the cell movement of pigment cells from jaguar and leopard mutants, which have fuzzy stripes and spot patterns, respectively. jaguar cells showed inhibited run-and-chase movements, and leopard melanophores scarcely showed repulsive response. Furthermore, we paired mutant and WT cells and showed which of the melanophores and xanthophores have responsibility for the altered cell movements. These results suggested that there is a correspondence relationship between the cell movements and pigment patterns. The correspondence relationship highlighted the importance of the cell movements in the pattern formation and showed that our system is a quite useful system for future study in this field.

  15. Artocarpol A stimulation of superoxide anion generation in neutrophils involved the activation of PLC, PKC and p38 mitogen-activated PK signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Kuan, Yu-Hsiang; Lin, Ruey-Hseng; Tsao, Lo-Ti; Lin, Chun-Nan; Wang, Jih-Pyang

    2005-06-01

    1 Artocarpol A (ART), a natural phenolic compound isolated from Artocarpus rigida, stimulated a slow onset and long-lasting superoxide anion generation in rat neutrophils, whereas only slightly activated the NADPH oxidase in a cell-free system. 2 Pretreatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin (1 microg ml(-1)), 50 microM 2'-amino-3'-methoxyflavone (PD 98059), or 1 microM 1,4-diamino-2,3-dicyano-1,4-bis(2-aminophenylthio)butadiene (U0126) had no effect on ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation. ART (30 microM) did not induce extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation. 3 4-(4-Fluorophenyl)-2-(4-methylsulfinylphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)-1H-imidazole (SB 203580) markedly attenuated the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 4.3+/-0.3 microM). Moreover, ART induced p38 mitogen-activated PK (MAPK) phosphorylation and activation. 4 The superoxide anion generation in response to ART was also substantially inhibited in a Ca2+-free medium, and by pretreatment with 1 microM 1-[6-((17beta-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl)amino)hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) and 100 microM 2-aminoethyldiphenyl borate (2-APB). ART (30 microM) stimulated the [Ca2+]i elevation in the presence or absence of external Ca2+, and also increased the D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate formation. 5 2-[1-(3-Dimethylaminopropyl)-1H-indol-3-yl]-3-(1H-indol-3-yl)-maleimide (GF 109203X) greatly inhibited the ART-stimulated superoxide anion generation (IC50 value of 7.8+/-1.0 nM). ART increased the recruitment of PKC-alpha, -betaI, and -betaII to the plasma membrane of neutrophils, and stimulated Ca2+-dependent PKC activation in the cytosol preparation. 6 ART induced the phosphorylation of p47phox, which was attenuated by GF 109203X. Moreover, ART evoked the membrane association of p47(phox), which was inhibited by GF 109203X and SB 203580. 7 These results indicate that the ART stimulation of superoxide anion generation involved the activation of p38 MAPK, PLC/Ca2

  16. Recent results from extreme ultraviolet lithography patterned mask inspection for 11 nm half-pitch generation using projection electron microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirano, Ryoichi; Iida, Susumu; Amano, Tsuyoshi; Watanabe, Hidehiro; Hatakeyama, Masahiro; Murakami, Takeshi; Suematsu, Kenichi; Terao, Kenji

    2016-05-01

    Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is a promising technique for 1X nm half-pitch (hp) generation lithography. The inspection of patterned EUVL masks is one of the main issues that must be addressed during mask fabrication for manufacture of devices with 11 nm hp feature sizes. We have already designed projection electron microscope (PEM) optics that have been integrated into a new inspection system called Model EBEYE-V30 (where "Model EBEYE" is an EBARA's model code) and this system seems quite promising for 16 nm hp generation EUVL patterned mask inspection. The defect inspection sensitivity of this system was evaluated via capture of an electron image that was generated at the mask by focusing the image through the projection optics onto a time-delay integration (TDI) image sensor. For increased throughput and higher defect detection sensitivity, a new electron-sensitive area image sensor with a high-speed data processing unit, a bright and stable electron source, and a simultaneous deflector for the image capture area that follows the mask scanning motion have been developed. Using a combination of synchronous deflection and mask scanning, the image can be integrated into both the fixed area image sensor and the TDI image sensor. We describe our experimental results for EUV patterned mask inspection using the above system. Elements have been developed for inspection tool integration and the designed specification has been verified. The system performance demonstrates the defect detectability required for 11 nm hp generation EUVL masks.

  17. Measurement of the local displacement field generated by a microindentation using digital speckle pattern interferometry and its application to investigate coating adhesion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolinko, Andrés E.; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a technique to investigate the adhesion of thin coatings which combines digital speckle pattern interferometry and an indentation test. The proposed approach is based on the measurement of the local displacement field produced by a microindentation introduced on the coated surface of a specimen. It is experimentally demonstrated that the buckling of the coating generated by the microindentation depends on its adhesion to the substrate. Experiments carried out in specimens with different conditions in the coating-substrate interface show that digital speckle pattern interferometry can be used to determine the size of the buckled region and to give a measurement of the coating adhesion strength.

  18. Motor neuron disease with pyramidal tract dysfunction involves the cortical generators of the early somatosensory evoked potential to tibial nerve stimulation.

    PubMed

    Zanette, G; Tinazzi, M; Polo, A; Rizzuto, N

    1996-10-01

    We evaluated somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) to tibial nerve stimulation in 39 patients with sporadic motor neuron disease using multiple scalp derivations (earlobe reference). SEPs were altered in 22 of 29 amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients, whereas they were unaffected in 10 progressive muscular atrophy (PMA) patients. The main changes involved the amplitude and the field distribution of the early P40 and N37 cortical potentials with different modalities varying from a selective loss of the P40 potential (33% of tested sides) to absence of all early cortical SEPs (22% of tested sides). The later components following N50 were generally spared. The commonly used Cz-Fz montage was inadequate for detecting these alterations. Central afferent conduction was slightly affected. The selective loss of cortical SEPs and their close correlation with clinicoelectrophysiologic evidence of central motor system involvement strongly support a cortical origin of the SEP alterations in ALS. We suggest that neuronal loss in the somatosensory cortex may selectively affect the generator sites of the cortical SEPs to lower limb stimulation. PMID:8857722

  19. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  20. Mapping Breakpoints of Complex Chromosome Rearrangements Involving a Partial Trisomy 15q23.1-q26.2 Revealed by Next Generation Sequencing and Conventional Techniques.

    PubMed

    Pan, Qiong; Hu, Hao; Han, Liangrong; Jing, Xin; Liu, Hailiang; Yang, Chuanchun; Zhang, Fengting; Hu, Yue; Yue, Hongni; Ning, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Complex chromosome rearrangements (CCRs), which are rather rare in the whole population, may be associated with aberrant phenotypes. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) and conventional techniques, could be used to reveal specific CCRs for better genetic counseling. We report the CCRs of a girl and her mother, which were identified using a combination of NGS and conventional techniques including G-banding, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and PCR. The girl demonstrated CCRs involving chromosomes 3 and 8, while the CCRs of her mother involved chromosomes 3, 5, 8, 11 and 15. HumanCytoSNP-12 Chip analysis identified a 35.4 Mb duplication on chromosome 15q21.3-q26.2 in the proband and a 1.6 Mb microdeletion at chromosome 15q21.3 in her mother. The proband inherited the rearranged chromosomes 3 and 8 from her mother, and the duplicated region on chromosome 15 of the proband was inherited from the mother. Approximately one hundred genes were identified in the 15q21.3-q26.2 duplicated region of the proband. In particular, TPM1, SMAD6, SMAD3, and HCN4 may be associated with her heart defects, and HEXA, KIF7, and IDH2 are responsible for her developmental and mental retardation. In addition, we suggest that a microdeletion on the 15q21.3 region of the mother, which involved TCF2, TCF12, ADMA10 and AQP9, might be associated with mental retardation. We delineate the precise structures of the derivative chromosomes, chromosome duplication origin and possible molecular mechanisms for aberrant phenotypes by combining NGS data with conventional techniques. PMID:27218255

  1. A new process for converting SO2 to sulfur without generating secondary pollutants through reactions involving CaS and CaSO4.

    PubMed

    Sohn, H Y; Kim, Byung-Su

    2002-07-01

    Nonferrous smelters and coal gasification processes generate environmentally harmful sulfur dioxide streams, most of which are treated to produce sulfuric acid with the accompanying problems of market shortage and transportation difficulties. Some sulfur dioxide streams are scrubbed with an alkali solution or a solid substance such as limestone or dolomite, which in turn generates wastes that pose other pollution problems. While the conversion of sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur has many environmental advantages, no processes exist that are environmentally acceptable and economically viable. A new method for converting sulfur dioxide to elemental sulfur by a cyclic process involving calcium sulfide and calcium sulfate without generating solid wastes has been developed. In this process, calcium sulfate pellets as the starting raw material are reduced by a suitable reducing agent such as hydrogen to produce calcium sulfide pellets, which are used to reduce sulfur dioxide producing elemental sulfur vapor and calcium sulfate. The latter is then reduced to regenerate calcium sulfide. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental results indicated that the CaS-SO2 reaction produces mainly sulfur vapor and solid calcium sulfate and that the gaseous product from the CaSO4-H2 reaction is mainly water vapor. The rates of the two reactions are reasonably rapid in the temperature range 1000-1100 K, and, importantly, the physical strengths and reactivities of the pellets are maintained largely unchanged up to the tenth cycle, the last cycle tested in this work. Sulfur dioxide-containing streams from certain sources, such as the regenerator off-gas from an integrated gasification combined cycle desulfurization unit and new sulfide smelting plants, contain much higher partial pressures of SO2. In these cases, the rate of the first reaction is expected to be proportionally higher than in the test conditions reported in this paper. PMID:12144280

  2. High Throughput Sequencing of Small RNAs in the Two Cucurbita Germplasm with Different Sodium Accumulation Patterns Identifies Novel MicroRNAs Involved in Salt Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Junjun; Lei, Bo; Niu, Mengliang; Huang, Yuan; Kong, Qiusheng; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, recognize their mRNA targets based on perfect sequence complementarity. MiRNAs lead to broader changes in gene expression after plants are exposed to stress. High-throughput sequencing is an effective method to identify and profile small RNA populations in non-model plants under salt stresses, significantly improving our knowledge regarding miRNA functions in salt tolerance. Cucurbits are sensitive to soil salinity, and the Cucurbita genus is used as the rootstock of other cucurbits to enhance salt tolerance. Several cucurbit crops have been used for miRNA sequencing but salt stress-related miRNAs in cucurbit species have not been reported. In this study, we subjected two Cucurbita germplasm, namely, N12 (Cucurbita. maxima Duch.) and N15 (Cucurbita. moschata Duch.), with different sodium accumulation patterns, to Illumina sequencing to determine small RNA populations in root tissues after 4 h of salt treatment and control. A total of 21,548,326 and 19,394,108 reads were generated from the control and salt-treated N12 root tissues, respectively. By contrast, 19,108,240 and 20,546,052 reads were obtained from the control and salt-treated N15 root tissues, respectively. Fifty-eight conserved miRNA families and 33 novel miRNAs were identified in the two Cucurbita germplasm. Seven miRNAs (six conserved miRNAs and one novel miRNAs) were up-regulated in salt-treated N12 and N15 samples. Most target genes of differentially expressed novel miRNAs were transcription factors and salt stress-responsive proteins, including dehydration-induced protein, cation/H+ antiporter 18, and CBL-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase. The differential expression of miRNAs between the two Cucurbita germplasm under salt stress conditions and their target genes demonstrated that novel miRNAs play an important role in the response of the two Cucurbita germplasm to salt stress. The present study initially explored small RNAs in the

  3. High Throughput Sequencing of Small RNAs in the Two Cucurbita Germplasm with Different Sodium Accumulation Patterns Identifies Novel MicroRNAs Involved in Salt Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Xie, Junjun; Lei, Bo; Niu, Mengliang; Huang, Yuan; Kong, Qiusheng; Bie, Zhilong

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs), a class of small non-coding RNAs, recognize their mRNA targets based on perfect sequence complementarity. MiRNAs lead to broader changes in gene expression after plants are exposed to stress. High-throughput sequencing is an effective method to identify and profile small RNA populations in non-model plants under salt stresses, significantly improving our knowledge regarding miRNA functions in salt tolerance. Cucurbits are sensitive to soil salinity, and the Cucurbita genus is used as the rootstock of other cucurbits to enhance salt tolerance. Several cucurbit crops have been used for miRNA sequencing but salt stress-related miRNAs in cucurbit species have not been reported. In this study, we subjected two Cucurbita germplasm, namely, N12 (Cucurbita. maxima Duch.) and N15 (Cucurbita. moschata Duch.), with different sodium accumulation patterns, to Illumina sequencing to determine small RNA populations in root tissues after 4 h of salt treatment and control. A total of 21,548,326 and 19,394,108 reads were generated from the control and salt-treated N12 root tissues, respectively. By contrast, 19,108,240 and 20,546,052 reads were obtained from the control and salt-treated N15 root tissues, respectively. Fifty-eight conserved miRNA families and 33 novel miRNAs were identified in the two Cucurbita germplasm. Seven miRNAs (six conserved miRNAs and one novel miRNAs) were up-regulated in salt-treated N12 and N15 samples. Most target genes of differentially expressed novel miRNAs were transcription factors and salt stress-responsive proteins, including dehydration-induced protein, cation/H+ antiporter 18, and CBL-interacting serine/threonine-protein kinase. The differential expression of miRNAs between the two Cucurbita germplasm under salt stress conditions and their target genes demonstrated that novel miRNAs play an important role in the response of the two Cucurbita germplasm to salt stress. The present study initially explored small RNAs in the

  4. Walk-Off-Induced Modulation Instability, Temporal Pattern Formation, and Frequency Comb Generation in Cavity-Enhanced Second-Harmonic Generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leo, F.; Hansson, T.; Ricciardi, I.; De Rosa, M.; Coen, S.; Wabnitz, S.; Erkintalo, M.

    2016-01-01

    We derive a time-domain mean-field equation to model the full temporal and spectral dynamics of light in singly resonant cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We show that the temporal walk-off between the fundamental and the second-harmonic fields plays a decisive role under realistic conditions, giving rise to rich, previously unidentified nonlinear behavior. Through linear stability analysis and numerical simulations, we discover a new kind of quadratic modulation instability which leads to the formation of optical frequency combs and associated time-domain dissipative structures. Our numerical simulations show excellent agreement with recent experimental observations of frequency combs in quadratic nonlinear media [Phys. Rev. A 91, 063839 (2015)]. Thus, in addition to unveiling a new, experimentally accessible regime of nonlinear dynamics, our work enables predictive modeling of frequency comb generation in cavity-enhanced second-harmonic generation systems. We expect our findings to have wide impact on the study of temporal and spectral dynamics in a diverse range of dispersive, quadratically nonlinear resonators.

  5. Patterns of Broken Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Field, R. W.; Park, G. B.; Changala, P. B.; Baraban, J. H.; Stanton, J. F.; Merer, A. J.

    2013-06-01

    Spectroscopy - it is all about patterns. Some patterns look so indescribably complicated that, unlike pornography, you do not know one when you see one. It is tempting to say that, at high vibrational excitation, interactions among normal mode basis states are so strong and widespread that all patterns are obliterated. But this is not true. When normal mode frequencies are in near integer multiple ratios, polyads emerge. A polyad is a robust pattern often comprising many vibrational eigenstates. Each such pattern might span many hundreds of cm^{-1}, and it is inevitable that several unrelated polyad patterns overlap. When polyads overlap, it might seem impossible to disentangle them. However, the key to disentanglement is that polyads come in families in which successive generations are related by harmonic oscillator matrix element selection and scaling rules. Families of polyads are described by families of scaling-based effective Hamiltonian matrices, {H}^{{eff}}. No matter how complex and overlapped, the polyad {H}^{{eff}} serves as a magic decoder for picking out the polyad pattern. Sometimes the polyad patterns are systematically broken (a meta-pattern), owing to proximity to an isomerization barrier, as occurs in highly excited bending levels of the S_{1} state of HCCH, which encode the trans-cis minimum energy isomerization path. Quantum Chemists often dismiss {H}^{{eff}} models, precisely because they are models that do not express the full dimensionality of the complete Hamiltonian. But an {H}^{{eff}} explains rather than describes. Shunning {H}^{{eff}}s is like throwing out the baby with the bath water. Don't do it!

  6. Environmentalism as a context for expressing identity and generativity: patterns among activists and uninvolved youth and midlife adults.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, M Kyle; Pratt, Michael W; Norris, Joan E; Mohle, Erika; Alisat, Susan; McAdams, Dan P

    2012-08-01

    Previous qualitative studies have identified themes of generativity and identity development in the interviews of environmental activists (Chan, 2009; Horwitz, 1996), suggesting their importance as motives for environmental behavior. The purpose of our study was to extend this work by identifying positive relationships between identity maturity, generativity, and environmentalism using quantitative methodologies. To explore these relationships, we designed quasi-experimental and correlational studies. We recruited 54 environmental activists and 56 comparison individuals, half of whom were youth (mean age = 22 years) and the other half midlife adults (mean age = 43 years). Sixty-three percent of our sample was female. Participants completed several environmental, generativity, and identity questionnaires. We found that activists and comparison individuals differed on the identity maturity, generativity, and environmental measures overall. Further, greater identity maturity and generativity were associated with higher environmental engagement. And generativity was found to mediate the relation between identity maturity and environmentalism. Our findings suggest that engaging in generative behaviors may be an important part of the process in forming an environmental identity and engaging in environmental actions. PMID:22224847

  7. Environmentalism as a context for expressing identity and generativity: patterns among activists and uninvolved youth and midlife adults.

    PubMed

    Matsuba, M Kyle; Pratt, Michael W; Norris, Joan E; Mohle, Erika; Alisat, Susan; McAdams, Dan P

    2012-08-01

    Previous qualitative studies have identified themes of generativity and identity development in the interviews of environmental activists (Chan, 2009; Horwitz, 1996), suggesting their importance as motives for environmental behavior. The purpose of our study was to extend this work by identifying positive relationships between identity maturity, generativity, and environmentalism using quantitative methodologies. To explore these relationships, we designed quasi-experimental and correlational studies. We recruited 54 environmental activists and 56 comparison individuals, half of whom were youth (mean age = 22 years) and the other half midlife adults (mean age = 43 years). Sixty-three percent of our sample was female. Participants completed several environmental, generativity, and identity questionnaires. We found that activists and comparison individuals differed on the identity maturity, generativity, and environmental measures overall. Further, greater identity maturity and generativity were associated with higher environmental engagement. And generativity was found to mediate the relation between identity maturity and environmentalism. Our findings suggest that engaging in generative behaviors may be an important part of the process in forming an environmental identity and engaging in environmental actions.

  8. Bud structure, position and fate generate various branching patterns along shoots of closely related Rosaceae species: a review

    PubMed Central

    Costes, Evelyne; Crespel, Laurent; Denoyes, Béatrice; Morel, Philippe; Demene, Marie-Noëlle; Lauri, Pierre-Eric; Wenden, Bénédicte

    2014-01-01

    Branching in temperate plants is closely linked to bud fates, either floral or vegetative. Here, we review how the fate of meristematic tissues contained in buds and their position along a shoot imprint specific branching patterns which differ among species. Through examples chosen in closely related species in different genera of the Rosaceae family, a panorama of patterns is apparent. Patterns depend on whether vegetative and floral buds are borne individually or together in mixed buds, develop as the shoot grows or after a rest period, and are located in axillary or terminal positions along the parent shoot. The resulting branching patterns are conserved among varieties in a given species but progressively change with the parent shoot length during plant ontogeny. They can also be modulated by agronomic and environmental conditions. The existence of various organizations in the topology and fate of meristematic tissues and their appendages in closely related species questions the between-species conservation of physiological and molecular mechanisms leading to bud outgrowth vs. quiescence and to floral induction vs. vegetative development. PMID:25520729

  9. Using a model to assess the role of the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibitory input and intrasegmental electrical coupling in the intersegmental and side-to-side coordination of motor neurons by the leech heartbeat central pattern generator.

    PubMed

    García, Paul S; Wright, Terrence M; Cunningham, Ian R; Calabrese, Ronald L

    2008-09-01

    Previously we presented a quantitative description of the spatiotemporal pattern of inhibitory synaptic input from the heartbeat central pattern generator (CPG) to segmental motor neurons that drive heartbeat in the medicinal leech and the resultant coordination of CPG interneurons and motor neurons. To begin elucidating the mechanisms of coordination, we explore intersegmental and side-to-side coordination in an ensemble model of all heart motor neurons and their known synaptic inputs and electrical coupling. Model motor neuron intrinsic properties were kept simple, enabling us to determine the extent to which input and electrical coupling acting together can account for observed coordination in the living system in the absence of a substantive contribution from the motor neurons themselves. The living system produces an asymmetric motor pattern: motor neurons on one side fire nearly in synchrony (synchronous), whereas on the other they fire in a rear-to-front progression (peristaltic). The model reproduces the general trends of intersegmental and side-to-side phase relations among motor neurons, but the match with the living system is not quantitatively accurate. Thus realistic (experimentally determined) inputs do not produce similarly realistic output in our model, suggesting that motor neuron intrinsic properties may contribute to their coordination. By varying parameters that determine electrical coupling, conduction delays, intraburst synaptic plasticity, and motor neuron excitability, we show that the most important determinant of intersegmental and side-to-side phase relations in the model was the spatiotemporal pattern of synaptic inputs, although phasing was influenced significantly by electrical coupling. PMID:18579654

  10. Use of adaptive network burst detection methods for multielectrode array data and the generation of artificial spike patterns for method evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendis, G. D. C.; Morrisroe, E.; Petrou, S.; Halgamuge, S. K.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. Multielectrode arrays are an informative extracellular recording technology that enables the analysis of cultured neuronal networks and network bursts (NBs) are a dominant feature observed in these recordings. This paper focuses on the validation of NB detection methods on different network activity patterns and developing a detection method that performs robustly across a wide variety of activity patterns. Approach. A firing rate based approach was used to generate artificial spike timestamps where NBs were introduced as episodes where the probability of spiking increases. Variations in firing and bursting characteristics were also included. In addition, an improved methodology of detecting NBs is proposed, based on time-binned average firing rates and time overlaps of single channel bursts. The robustness of the proposed method was compared against three existing algorithms using simulated, publicly available and newly acquired data. Main results. A range of activity patterns were generated by changing simulation variables that correspond to NB duration (40-2200 ms), intervals (0.3-16 s), firing rates (0.1-1 spikes s-1), local burst percentage (0%-90%), number of channels in local bursts (20-40) as well as the number of tonic and frequently-bursting channels. By extracting simulation parameters directly from real data, we generated synthetic data that closely resemble activity of mouse and rat cortical cultures at native and chemically perturbed states. In 50 simulated data sets with randomly selected parameter values, the improved NB detection method performed better (ascertained by the f-measure) than three existing methods (p < 0.005). The improved method was also able to detect clustered, long-tailed and short-frequent NBs on real data. Significance. This work presents an objective method of assessing the applicability of NB detection methods for different neuronal activity patterns. Furthermore, it proposes an improved NB detection method that can

  11. A MyoD-generated feed-forward circuit temporally patterns gene expression during skeletal muscle differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Penn, Bennett H.; Bergstrom, Donald A.; Dilworth, F. Jeffrey; Bengal, Eyal; Tapscott, Stephen J.

    2004-01-01

    The development and differentiation of distinct cell types is achieved through the sequential expression of subsets of genes; yet, the molecular mechanisms that temporally pattern gene expression remain largely unknown. In skeletal myogenesis, gene expression is initiated by MyoD and includes the expression of specific Mef2 isoforms and activation of the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway. Here, we show that p38 activity facilitates MyoD and Mef2 binding at a subset of late-activated promoters, and the binding of Mef2D recruits Pol II. Most importantly, expression of late-activated genes can be shifted to the early stages of differentiation by precocious activation of p38 and expression of Mef2D, demonstrating that a MyoD-mediated feed-forward circuit temporally patterns gene expression. PMID:15466486

  12. An Impact Velocity Device Design for Blood Spatter Pattern Generation with Considerations for High-Speed Video Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    A mechanical device that uses gravitational and spring compression forces to create spatter patterns of known impact velocities is presented and discussed. The custom-made device uses either two or four springs (k1 = 267.8 N/m, k2 = 535.5 N/m) in parallel to create seventeen reproducible impact velocities between 2.1 and 4.0 m/s. The impactor is held at several known spring extensions using an electromagnet. Trigger inputs to the high-speed video camera allow the user to control the magnet's release while capturing video footage simultaneously. A polycarbonate base is used to allow for simultaneous monitoring of the side and bottom views of the impact event. Twenty-four patterns were created across the impact velocity range and analyzed using HemoSpat. Area of origin estimations fell within an acceptable range (ΔXav = -5.5 ± 1.9 cm, ΔYav = -2.6 ± 2.8 cm, ΔZav = +5.5 ± 3.8 cm), supporting distribution analysis for the use in research or bloodstain pattern training. This work provides a framework for those interested in developing a robust impact device.

  13. An Impact Velocity Device Design for Blood Spatter Pattern Generation with Considerations for High-Speed Video Analysis.

    PubMed

    Stotesbury, Theresa; Illes, Mike; Vreugdenhil, Andrew J

    2016-03-01

    A mechanical device that uses gravitational and spring compression forces to create spatter patterns of known impact velocities is presented and discussed. The custom-made device uses either two or four springs (k1 = 267.8 N/m, k2 = 535.5 N/m) in parallel to create seventeen reproducible impact velocities between 2.1 and 4.0 m/s. The impactor is held at several known spring extensions using an electromagnet. Trigger inputs to the high-speed video camera allow the user to control the magnet's release while capturing video footage simultaneously. A polycarbonate base is used to allow for simultaneous monitoring of the side and bottom views of the impact event. Twenty-four patterns were created across the impact velocity range and analyzed using HemoSpat. Area of origin estimations fell within an acceptable range (ΔXav = -5.5 ± 1.9 cm, ΔYav = -2.6 ± 2.8 cm, ΔZav = +5.5 ± 3.8 cm), supporting distribution analysis for the use in research or bloodstain pattern training. This work provides a framework for those interested in developing a robust impact device. PMID:27404625

  14. Central muscarinic cholinergic involvement in serial pattern learning: Atropine impairs acquisition and retention in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task in rats.

    PubMed

    Chenoweth, Amber M; Fountain, Stephen B

    2015-09-01

    Atropine sulfate is a muscarinic cholinergic antagonist which impairs acquisition and retention performance on a variety of cognitive tasks. The present study examined the effects of atropine on acquisition and retention of a highly-structured serial pattern in a serial multiple choice (SMC) task. Rats were given daily intraperitoneal injections of either saline or atropine sulfate (50mg/kg) and trained in an octagonal operant chamber equipped with a lever on each wall. They learned to press the levers in a particular order (the serial pattern) for brain-stimulation reward in a discrete-trial procedure with correction. The two groups learned a pattern composed of eight 3-element chunks ending with a violation element: 123-234-345-456-567-678-781-818 where the digits represent the clock-wise positions of levers in the chamber, dashes indicate 3-s pauses, and other intertrial intervals were 1s. Central muscarinic cholinergic blockade by atropine caused profound impairments during acquisition, specifically in the encoding of chunk-boundary elements (the first element of chunks) and the violation element of the pattern, but had a significant but negligible effect on the encoding of within-chunk elements relative to saline-injected rats. These effects persisted when atropine was removed, and similar impairments were also observed in retention performance. The results indicate that intact central muscarinic cholinergic systems are necessary for learning and producing appropriate responses at places in sequences where pattern structure changes. The results also provide further evidence that multiple cognitive systems are recruited to learn and perform within-chunk, chunk-boundary, and violation elements of a serial pattern.

  15. Student-generated questions during chemistry lectures: Patterns, self-appraisals, and relations with motivational beliefs and achievement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergey, Bradley W.

    Self-generated questions are a central mechanism for learning, yet students' questions are often infrequent during classroom instruction. As a result, little is known about the nature of student questioning during typical instructional contexts such as listening to a lecture, including the extent and nature of student-generated questions, how students evaluate their questions, and the relations among questions, motivations, and achievement. This study examined the questions undergraduate students (N = 103) generated during 8 lectures in an introductory chemistry course. Students recorded and appraised their question in daily question logs and reported lecture-specific self-efficacy beliefs. Self-efficacy, personal interest, goal orientations, and other motivational self-beliefs were measured before and after the unit. Primary analyses included testing path models, multiple regressions, and latent class analyses. Overall, results indicated that several characteristics of student questioning during lectures were significantly related to various motivations and achievement. Higher end-of-class self-efficacy was associated with fewer procedural questions and more questions that reflected smaller knowledge deficits. Lower exam scores were associated with questions reflecting broader knowledge deficits and students' appraisals that their questions had less value for others than for themselves. Individual goal orientations collectively and positively predicted question appraisals. The questions students generated and their relations with motivational variables and achievement are discussed in light of the learning task and academic context.

  16. Bio-inspired silicification on patterned surfaces generated by microcontact printing and layer-by-layer self-assembly.

    PubMed

    Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S

    2009-03-01

    Micropatterns of silica were generated under biocompatible conditions by a combination of microcontact printing (muCP), layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly, and biomimetic silicification. Quaternary amine-containing poly(diallyl dimethyl ammonium chloride) induced polycondensation of silicic acid, resulting in spatioselective formation of silica micropatterns. Scale bar: 10 microm.

  17. Academic Generations and Academic Work: Patterns of Attitudes, Behaviors, and Research Productivity of Polish Academics after 1989

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kwiek, Marek

    2015-01-01

    This paper focuses on a generational change taking place in the Polish academic profession: a change in behaviors and attitudes between two groups of academics. One was socialized to academia under the communist regime (1945-1989) and the other entered the profession in the post-1989 transition period. Academics of all age groups are beginning to…

  18. Two interconnected kernels of reciprocally inhibitory interneurons underlie alternating left-right swim motor pattern generation in the mollusk Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2014-09-15

    The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying the rhythmic swimming behavior of the nudibranch Melibe leonina (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Heterobranchia) has been described as a simple half-center oscillator consisting of two reciprocally inhibitory pairs of interneurons called swim interneuron 1 (Si1) and swim interneuron 2 (Si2). In this study, we identified two additional pairs of interneurons that are part of the swim CPG: swim interneuron 3 (Si3) and swim interneuron 4 (Si4). The somata of Si3 and Si4 were both located in the pedal ganglion, near that of Si2, and both had axons that projected through the pedal commissure to the contralateral pedal ganglion. These neurons fulfilled the criteria for inclusion as members of the swim CPG: 1) they fired at a fixed phase in relation to Si1 and Si2, 2) brief changes in their activity reset the motor pattern, 3) prolonged changes in their activity altered the periodicity of the motor pattern, 4) they had monosynaptic connections with each other and with Si1 and Si2, and 5) their synaptic actions helped explain the phasing of the motor pattern. The results of this study show that the motor pattern has more complex internal dynamics than a simple left/right alternation of firing; the CPG circuit appears to be composed of two kernels of reciprocally inhibitory neurons, one consisting of Si1, Si2, and the contralateral Si4 and the other consisting of Si3. These two kernels interact with each other to produce a stable rhythmic motor pattern. PMID:24920032

  19. Two interconnected kernels of reciprocally inhibitory interneurons underlie alternating left-right swim motor pattern generation in the mollusk Melibe leonina.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Akira; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2014-09-15

    The central pattern generator (CPG) underlying the rhythmic swimming behavior of the nudibranch Melibe leonina (Mollusca, Gastropoda, Heterobranchia) has been described as a simple half-center oscillator consisting of two reciprocally inhibitory pairs of interneurons called swim interneuron 1 (Si1) and swim interneuron 2 (Si2). In this study, we identified two additional pairs of interneurons that are part of the swim CPG: swim interneuron 3 (Si3) and swim interneuron 4 (Si4). The somata of Si3 and Si4 were both located in the pedal ganglion, near that of Si2, and both had axons that projected through the pedal commissure to the contralateral pedal ganglion. These neurons fulfilled the criteria for inclusion as members of the swim CPG: 1) they fired at a fixed phase in relation to Si1 and Si2, 2) brief changes in their activity reset the motor pattern, 3) prolonged changes in their activity altered the periodicity of the motor pattern, 4) they had monosynaptic connections with each other and with Si1 and Si2, and 5) their synaptic actions helped explain the phasing of the motor pattern. The results of this study show that the motor pattern has more complex internal dynamics than a simple left/right alternation of firing; the CPG circuit appears to be composed of two kernels of reciprocally inhibitory neurons, one consisting of Si1, Si2, and the contralateral Si4 and the other consisting of Si3. These two kernels interact with each other to produce a stable rhythmic motor pattern.

  20. Pattern Search in Multi-structure Data: A Framework for the Next-Generation Evidence-based Medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sukumar, Sreenivas R; Ainsworth, Keela C

    2014-01-01

    With the advent of personalized and evidence-based medicine, the need for a framework to analyze/interpret quantitative measurements (blood work, toxicology, etc.) with qualitative descriptions (specialist reports after reading images, bio-medical knowledge-bases) to predict diagnostic risks is fast emerging. Addressing this need, we pose and address the following questions (i) How can we jointly analyze both qualitative and quantitative data ? (ii) Is the fusion of multi-structure data expected to provide better insights than either of them individually ? We present experiments on two bio-medical data sets - mammography and traumatic brain studies to demonstrate architectures and tools for evidence-pattern search.

  1. Multidimensional religious involvement and tobacco smoking patterns over 9-10 years: A prospective study of middle-aged adults in the United States.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Zinzi D; Slopen, Natalie; Albert, Michelle; Williams, David R

    2015-08-01

    This study examined the relationship between multiple dimensions of religious involvement and transitions of tobacco smoking abstinence, persistence, cessation and relapse over 9-10 years of follow-up in a national sample of adults in the United States. Using data provided at baseline and follow-up, participants were categorized as non-smokers, persistent smokers, ex-smokers, and relapsed smokers. Religious involvement over the two time points were categorized into combinations of "high" and "low" involvement within the domains of (a) religious attendance, (b) religious importance, (c) spiritual importance, (d) religious/spiritual comfort seeking, and (e) religious/spiritual decision-making. High levels of religious involvement across five dimensions (religious attendance, religious importance, spiritual importance, religious/spiritual comfort-seeking, and religious/spiritual decision-making) were associated with lower odds of being a persistent smoker or ex-smoker. Religious involvement was not associated with smoking cessation among smokers at baseline. Interventions to increase smoking abstinence may be more effective if they draw on ties to religious and spiritual organizations and beliefs. Meanwhile, religious involvement is unlikely to affect smoking cessation effectiveness.

  2. Different sources involved in generation of continental arc volcanism: The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shuan-Hong; Zhao, Yue; Liu, Jian-Min; Hu, Zhao-Chu

    2016-01-01

    New zircon U-Pb dating results on the Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks in the northern margin of the North China block (NCB) indicate their eruption during the Early Carboniferous to Late Permian from 347 ± 3 Ma to 258 ± 1 Ma and a slight decrease of the upper limits of the volcanic sequences from west to east. They have a main rock association of basalt, basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite, rhyolite, tuff, and tufaceous sandstone. Most of them have calc-alkaline compositions and exhibit variable SiO2 contents from 48.2 wt.% to 77.1 wt.%. There is no significant gap between the mafic and felsic volcanic rocks in major and trace element classification diagrams, indicating that they are not bimodal in composition. The Carboniferous-Permian volcanic rocks exhibit subduction-related geochemical features such as negative Nb and Ta anomalies of mafic to intermediate rocks on primitive mantle-normalized diagrams, indicating they were formed in an Andean-type continental arc during southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian oceanic plate beneath the northern NCB. However, their wide range of whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic compositions indicate that their source areas are very complex and different sources were involved in generation of these volcanic rocks. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic results show that the basalt and some andesite were produced by fractional crystallization of mafic magma derived from partial melting of mantle wedge and subducted oceanic crust; however, most of the intermediate to felsic volcanic rocks were derived from partial melting of lower continental crust. There is an increasing input of crustal materials from the Carboniferous to Permian as indicated by increasing volumes of felsic volcanic rocks in the volcanic sequences. The results show that origin of the continental arc volcanism is very complex and both materials from the subducted oceanic crust and sediments, mantle wedge and arc continental crust could be involved in their

  3. Mechanisms involved in the modulation of astroglial resistance to oxidative stress induced by activated microglia: antioxidative systems, peroxide elimination, radical generation, lipid peroxidation.

    PubMed

    Röhl, Claudia; Armbrust, Elisabeth; Herbst, Eva; Jess, Anne; Gülden, Michael; Maser, Edmund; Rimbach, Gerald; Bösch-Saadatmandi, Christine

    2010-05-01

    Microglia and astrocytes are the cellular key players in many neurological disorders associated with oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. Previously, we have shown that microglia activated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS) induce the expression of antioxidative enzymes in astrocytes and render them more resistant to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). In this study, we examined the mechanisms involved with respect to the cellular action of different peroxides, the ability to detoxify peroxides, and the status of further antioxidative systems. Astrocytes were treated for 3 days with medium conditioned by purified quiescent (microglia-conditioned medium, MCM[-]) or LPS-activated (MCM[+]) microglia. MCM[+] reduced the cytotoxicity of the organic cumene hydroperoxide in addition to that of H2O2. Increased peroxide resistance was not accompanied by an improved ability of astrocytes to remove H2O2 or an increased expression/activity of peroxide eliminating antioxidative enzymes. Neither peroxide-induced radical generation nor lipid peroxidation were selectively affected in MCM[+] treated astrocytes. The glutathione content of peroxide resistant astrocytes, however, was increa