Science.gov

Sample records for pattern identification technique

  1. Identification of unique repeated patterns, location of mutation in DNA finger printing using artificial intelligence technique.

    PubMed

    Mukunthan, B; Nagaveni, N

    2014-01-01

    In genetic engineering, conventional techniques and algorithms employed by forensic scientists to assist in identification of individuals on the basis of their respective DNA profiles involves more complex computational steps and mathematical formulae, also the identification of location of mutation in a genomic sequence in laboratories is still an exigent task. This novel approach provides ability to solve the problems that do not have an algorithmic solution and the available solutions are also too complex to be found. The perfect blend made of bioinformatics and neural networks technique results in efficient DNA pattern analysis algorithm with utmost prediction accuracy.

  2. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  3. Application of pattern recognition techniques to the identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuller, Chris R.; Obrien, Walter F.; Cabell, Randolph H.

    1988-01-01

    A pattern recognition system was developed that successfully recognizes simulated spectra of five different types of transportation noise sources. The system generates hyperplanes during a training stage to separate the classes and correctly classify unknown patterns in classification mode. A feature selector in the system reduces a large number of features to a smaller optimal set, maximizing performance and minimizing computation.

  4. Pattern Identification Exercise. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amundson, Norm

    Career exploration typically involves the investigation of personal factors: interests, aptitudes, values, and personal style. This digest outlines one counseling method, pattern identification exercise (PIE). PIE starts with past experiences and identifies personal patterns which are relevant to career decisions. A premise of PIE is that…

  5. Field theory of pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agu, Masahiro

    1988-06-01

    Based on the psychological experimental fact that images in mental space are transformed into other images for pattern identification, a field theory of pattern identification of geometrical patterns is developed with the use of gauge field theory in Euclidean space. Here, the ``image'' or state function ψ[χ] of the brain reacting to a geometrical pattern χ is made to correspond to the electron's wave function in Minkowski space. The pattern identification of the pattern χ with the modified pattern χ+Δχ is assumed to be such that their images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] in the brain are transformable with each other through suitable transformation groups such as parallel transformation, dilatation, or rotation. The transformation group is called the ``image potential'' which corresponds to the vector potential of the gauge field. An ``image field'' derived from the image potential is found to be induced in the brain when the two images ψ[χ] and ψ[χ+Δχ] are not transformable through suitable transformation groups or gauge transformations. It is also shown that, when the image field exists, the final state of the image ψ[χ] is expected to be different, depending on the paths of modifications of the pattern χ leading to a final pattern. The above fact is interpreted as a version of the Aharonov and Bohm effect of the electron's wave function [A. Aharonov and D. Bohm, Phys. Rev. 115, 485 (1959)]. An excitation equation of the image field is also derived by postulating that patterns are identified maximally for the purpose of minimizing the number of memorized standard patterns.

  6. Writer Identification Using Inexpensive Signal Processing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mokhov, Serguei A.; Song, Miao; Suen, Ching Y.

    We propose to use novel and classical audio and text signal-processing and otherwise techniques for “inexpensive” fast writer identification tasks of scanned hand-written documents “visually”. The “inexpensive” refers to the efficiency of the identification process in terms of CPU cycles while preserving decent accuracy for preliminary identification. This is a comparative study of multiple algorithm combinations in a pattern recognition pipeline implemented in Java around an open-source Modular Audio Recognition Framework (MARF) that can do a lot more beyond audio. We present our preliminary experimental findings in such an identification task. We simulate “visual” identification by “looking” at the hand-written document as a whole rather than trying to extract fine-grained features out of it prior classification.

  7. Techniques for Specifying Bug Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Quinlan, D J; Vuduc, R W; Misherghi, G

    2007-04-30

    We present our on-going work to develop techniques for specifying source code signatures of bug patterns. Specifically, we discuss two approaches. The first approach directly analyzes a program in the intermediate representation (IR) of the ROSE compiler infrastructure using ROSE's API. The second analyzes the program using the bddbddb system of Lam, Whaley, et al.. In this approach, we store the IR produced by ROSE as a relational database, express patterns as declarative inference rules on relations in the language Datalog, and bddbddb implements the Datalog programs using binary decision diagram (BDD) techniques. Both approaches readily apply to large-scale applications, since ROSE provides full type analysis, control flow, and other available analysis information. In this paper, we primarily consider bug patterns expressed with respect to the structure of the source code or the control flow, or both. More complex techniques to specify patterns that are functions of data flow properties may be addressed by either of the above approaches, but are not directly treated here. Our Datalog-based work includes explicit support for expressing patterns on the use of the Message Passing Interface (MPI) in parallel distributed memory programs. We show examples of this on-going work as well.

  8. Pattern recognition techniques in Polarimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariste, Arturo López

    2015-10-01

    Sparsity is a property of data by which it can be represented using a small number of patterns. It is the key concept behind an evergrowing list of mathematical techniques for handling data and recover from it signals or information in conditions previously thought impossible. The application of those techniques to spectropolarimetric data is relatively straightforward. We present three examples of such application: the use of Principal Component Analysis to invert the magnetic field in solar prominences from spectropolarimetry of the He D3 line, the removal of fringes from spectropolarimetric data with Relevance Vector Machines, and the retrieval of high resolution spectra from low resolution data with Compressed Sensing.

  9. Multivariant technique for multiclass pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Hester, C F; Casasent, D

    1980-06-01

    A technique for multiclass optical pattern recognition of different perspective views of an object is described. Each multiclass representation of an object is described as an orthonormal basis function expansion, and a single averaged matched spatial filter is then produced from a weighted linear combination of these functions. The technique is demonstrated for a terminal missile guidance application using IR tank imagery.

  10. Fingerprint pattern restoration by digital image processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Wen, Che-Yen; Yu, Chiu-Chung

    2003-09-01

    Fingerprint evidence plays an important role in solving criminal problems. However, defective (lacking information needed for completeness) or contaminated (undesirable information included) fingerprint patterns make identifying and recognizing processes difficult. Unfortunately. this is the usual case. In the recognizing process (enhancement of patterns, or elimination of "false alarms" so that a fingerprint pattern can be searched in the Automated Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS)), chemical and physical techniques have been proposed to improve pattern legibility. In the identifying process, a fingerprint examiner can enhance contaminated (but not defective) fingerprint patterns under guidelines provided by the Scientific Working Group on Friction Ridge Analysis, Study and Technology (SWGFAST), the Scientific Working Group on Imaging Technology (SWGIT), and an AFIS working group within the National Institute of Justice. Recently, the image processing techniques have been successfully applied in forensic science. For example, we have applied image enhancement methods to improve the legibility of digital images such as fingerprints and vehicle plate numbers. In this paper, we propose a novel digital image restoration technique based on the AM (amplitude modulation)-FM (frequency modulation) reaction-diffusion method to restore defective or contaminated fingerprint patterns. This method shows its potential application to fingerprint pattern enhancement in the recognizing process (but not for the identifying process). Synthetic and real images are used to show the capability of the proposed method. The results of enhancing fingerprint patterns by the manual process and our method are evaluated and compared. PMID:14535661

  11. Comparison of two dissimilar modal identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.; Schenk, Axel; Niedbal, Norbert; Klusowski, Erhard

    1992-01-01

    Recent laboratory results using a refined phase resonance method and the eigensystem realization algorithm on the same test structure are reported. These methods are dissimilar modal identification techniques suitable for future large spacecraft. The theory, application approach, and results obtained for each technique are summarized and compared. Although both methods worked well in this investigation, significant differences occurred in some identified mode shapes. Comparison of independently derived modal parameters provides the means for disclosing such discrepancies in flight projects.

  12. Decision Tree Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Quiller, Ryan

    2003-09-05

    Particle identification based on measurements such as the Cerenkov angle, momentum, and the rate of energy loss per unit distance (-dE/dx) is fundamental to the BaBar detector for particle physics experiments. It is particularly important to separate the charged forms of kaons and pions. Currently, the Neural Net, an algorithm based on mapping input variables to an output variable using hidden variables as intermediaries, is one of the primary tools used for identification. In this study, a decision tree classification technique implemented in the computer program, CART, was investigated and compared to the Neural Net over the range of momenta, 0.25 GeV/c to 5.0 GeV/c. For a given subinterval of momentum, three decision trees were made using different sets of input variables. The sensitivity and specificity were calculated for varying kaon acceptance thresholds. This data was used to plot Receiver Operating Characteristic curves (ROC curves) to compare the performance of the classification methods. Also, input variables used in constructing the decision trees were analyzed. It was found that the Neural Net was a significant contributor to decision trees using dE/dx and the Cerenkov angle as inputs. Furthermore, the Neural Net had poorer performance than the decision tree technique, but tended to improve decision tree performance when used as an input variable. These results suggest that the decision tree technique using Neural Net input may possibly increase accuracy of particle identification in BaBar.

  13. Patterning techniques for next generation IC's

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasinski, A.

    2007-12-01

    Reduction of linear critical dimensions (CDs) beyond 45 nm would require significant increase of the complexity of pattern definition process. In this work, we discuss the key successor methodology to the current optical lithography, the Double Patterning Technique (DPT). We compare the complexity of CAD solutions, fab equipment, and wafer processing with its competitors, such as the nanoimprint (NIL) and the extreme UV (EUV) techniques. We also look ahead to the market availability for the product families enabled using the novel patterning solutions. DPT is often recognized as the most viable next generation lithography as it utilizes the existing equipment and processes and is considered a stop-gap solution before the advanced NIL or EUV equipment is developed. Using design for manufacturability (DfM) rules, DPT can drive the k1 factor down to 0.13. However, it faces a variety of challenges, from new mask overlay strategies, to layout pattern split, novel OPC, increased CD tolerances, new etch techniques, as well as long processing time, all of which compromise its return on investment (RoI). In contrast, it can be claimed e.g., that the RoI is the highest for the NIL but this technology bears significant risk. For all novel patterning techniques, the key questions remain: when and how should they be introduced, what is their long-term potential, when should they be replaced, and by what successor technology. We summarize the unpublished results of several panel discussions on DPT at the recent SPIE/BACUS conferences.

  14. Bayesian Analysis of the Pattern Informatics Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, N.; Tiampo, K.; Klein, W.; Rundle, J.

    2007-12-01

    The pattern informatics (PI) [Rundle et al., 2000; Tiampo et al., 2002; Holliday et al., 2005] is a technique that uses phase dynamics in order to quantify temporal variations in seismicity patterns. This technique has shown interesting results for forecasting earthquakes with magnitude greater than or equal to 5 in southern California from 2000 to 2010 [Rundle et al., 2002]. In this work, a Bayesian approach is used to obtain a modified updated version of the PI called Bayesian pattern informatics (BPI). This alternative method uses the PI result as a prior probability and models such as ETAS [Ogata, 1988, 2004; Helmstetter and Sornette, 2002] or BASS [Turcotte et al., 2007] in order to obtain the likelihood. Its result is similar to the one obtained by the PI: the determination of regions, known as hotspots, that are most susceptible to the occurrence of events with M=5 and larger during the forecast period. As an initial test, retrospective forecasts for the southern California region from 1990 to 2000 were made with both the BPI and the PI techniques, and the results are discussed in this work.

  15. Rugoscopy: Human identification by computer-assisted photographic superimposition technique

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Rezwana Begum; Patil, Rajendra G.; Pammi, V. R.; Sandya, M. Pavana; Kalyan, Siva V.; Anitha, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Human identification has been studied since fourteenth century and it has gradually advanced for forensic purposes. Traditional methods such as dental, fingerprint, and DNA comparisons are probably the most common techniques used in this context, allowing fast and secure identification processes. But, in circumstances where identification of an individual by fingerprint or dental record comparison is difficult, palatal rugae may be considered as an alternative source of material. Aim: The present study was done to evaluate the individualistic nature and use of palatal rugae patterns for personal identification and also to test the efficiency of computerized software for forensic identification by photographic superimposition of palatal photographs obtained from casts. Materials and Methods: Two sets of Alginate impressions were made from the upper arches of 100 individuals (50 males and 50 females) with one month interval in between and the casts were poured. All the teeth except the incisors were removed to ensure that only the palate could be used in identification process. In one set of the casts, the palatal rugae were highlighted with a graphite pencil. All the 200 casts were randomly numbered, and then, they were photographed with a 10.1 Mega Pixel Kodak digital camera using standardized method. Using computerized software, the digital photographs of the models without highlighting the palatal rugae were overlapped over the images (transparent) of the palatal rugae with highlighted palatal rugae, in order to identify the pairs by superimposition technique. Incisors were remained and used as landmarks to determine the magnification required to bring the two set of photographs to the same size, in order to make perfect superimposition of images. Results: The result of the overlapping of the digital photographs of highlighted palatal rugae over normal set of models without highlighted palatal rugae resulted in 100% positive identification. Conclusion

  16. Topological Properties in Identification and Modeling Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Innocenti, Giacomo; Materassi, Donatello

    This contribution deals with the problem of finding models and dependencies within a large set of time series or processes. Nothing is assumed about their mutual influences and connections. The problem can not be tackled efficiently, starting from a classical system identification approach. Indeed, the general optimal solution would provide a large number of models, since it would consider every possible interdependence. Then a suboptimal approach will be developed. The proposed technique will present interesting modeling properties which can be interpreted in terms of graph theory. The application of this procedure will also be exploited as a tool to provide a clusterization of the time series. Finally, we will show that it turns out to be a dynamical generalization of other techniques described in literature.

  17. Patterning enhancement techniques by reactive ion etch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Masanobu; Yatsuda, Koichi

    2012-03-01

    The root causes of issues in state-of-the-arts resist mask are low plasma tolerance in etch and resolution limit in lithography. This paper introduces patterning enhancement techniques (PETs) by reactive ion etch (RIE) that solve the above root causes. Plasma tolerance of resist is determined by the chemical structure of resin. We investigated a hybrid direct current (DC) / radio frequency (RF) RIE to enhance the plasma tolerance with several gas chemistries. The DC/RF hybrid RIE is a capacitive coupled plasma etcher with a superimposed DC voltage, which generates a ballistic electron beam. We clarified the mechanism of resist modification, which resulted in higher plasma tolerance[1]. By applying an appropriate gas to DC superimposed (DCS) plasma, etch resistance and line width roughness (LWR) of resist were improved. On the other hand, RIE can patch resist mask. RIE does not only etch but also deposits polymer onto the sidewall with sedimentary type gases. In order to put the deposition technique by RIE in practical use, it is very important to select an appropriate gas chemistry, which can shrink CD and etch BARC. By applying this new technique, we successfully fabricated a 35-nm hole pattern with a minimum CD variation.

  18. Automatic seagrass pattern identification on sonar images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahnemoonfar, Maryam; Rahman, Abdullah

    2016-05-01

    Natural and human-induced disturbances are resulting in degradation and loss of seagrass. Freshwater flooding, severe meteorological events and invasive species are among the major natural disturbances. Human-induced disturbances are mainly due to boat propeller scars in the shallow seagrass meadows and anchor scars in the deeper areas. Therefore, there is a vital need to map seagrass ecosystems in order to determine worldwide abundance and distribution. Currently there is no established method for mapping the pothole or scars in seagrass. One of the most precise sensors to map the seagrass disturbance is side scan sonar. Here we propose an automatic method which detects seagrass potholes in sonar images. Side scan sonar images are notorious for having speckle noise and uneven illumination across the image. Moreover, disturbance presents complex patterns where most segmentation techniques will fail. In this paper, by applying mathematical morphology technique and calculating the local standard deviation of the image, the images were enhanced and the pothole patterns were identified. The proposed method was applied on sonar images taken from Laguna Madre in Texas. Experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  19. Automated Coronal Loop Identification Using Digital Image Processing Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Jong K.; Gary, G. Allen; Newman, Timothy S.

    2003-01-01

    The results of a master thesis project on a study of computer algorithms for automatic identification of optical-thin, 3-dimensional solar coronal loop centers from extreme ultraviolet and X-ray 2-dimensional images will be presented. These center splines are proxies of associated magnetic field lines. The project is pattern recognition problems in which there are no unique shapes or edges and in which photon and detector noise heavily influence the images. The study explores extraction techniques using: (1) linear feature recognition of local patterns (related to the inertia-tensor concept), (2) parametric space via the Hough transform, and (3) topological adaptive contours (snakes) that constrains curvature and continuity as possible candidates for digital loop detection schemes. We have developed synthesized images for the coronal loops to test the various loop identification algorithms. Since the topology of these solar features is dominated by the magnetic field structure, a first-order magnetic field approximation using multiple dipoles provides a priori information in the identification process. Results from both synthesized and solar images will be presented.

  20. Background Characterization Techniques For Pattern Recognition Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noah, Meg A.; Noah, Paul V.; Schroeder, John W.; Kessler, Bernard V.; Chernick, Julian A.

    1989-08-01

    The Department of Defense has a requirement to investigate technologies for the detection of air and ground vehicles in a clutter environment. The use of autonomous systems using infrared, visible, and millimeter wave detectors has the potential to meet DOD's needs. In general, however, the hard-ware technology (large detector arrays with high sensitivity) has outpaced the development of processing techniques and software. In a complex background scene the "problem" is as much one of clutter rejection as it is target detection. The work described in this paper has investigated a new, and innovative, methodology for background clutter characterization, target detection and target identification. The approach uses multivariate statistical analysis to evaluate a set of image metrics applied to infrared cloud imagery and terrain clutter scenes. The techniques are applied to two distinct problems: the characterization of atmospheric water vapor cloud scenes for the Navy's Infrared Search and Track (IRST) applications to support the Infrared Modeling Measurement and Analysis Program (IRAMMP); and the detection of ground vehicles for the Army's Autonomous Homing Munitions (AHM) problems. This work was sponsored under two separate Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) programs by the Naval Surface Warfare Center (NSWC), White Oak MD, and the Army Material Systems Analysis Activity at Aberdeen Proving Ground MD. The software described in this paper will be available from the respective contract technical representatives.

  1. Event Networks and the Identification of Crime Pattern Motifs

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the use of network analysis to characterise patterns of clustering in spatio-temporal events. Such clustering is of both theoretical and practical importance in the study of crime, and forms the basis for a number of preventative strategies. However, existing analytical methods show only that clustering is present in data, while offering little insight into the nature of the patterns present. Here, we show how the classification of pairs of events as close in space and time can be used to define a network, thereby generalising previous approaches. The application of graph-theoretic techniques to these networks can then offer significantly deeper insight into the structure of the data than previously possible. In particular, we focus on the identification of network motifs, which have clear interpretation in terms of spatio-temporal behaviour. Statistical analysis is complicated by the nature of the underlying data, and we provide a method by which appropriate randomised graphs can be generated. Two datasets are used as case studies: maritime piracy at the global scale, and residential burglary in an urban area. In both cases, the same significant 3-vertex motif is found; this result suggests that incidents tend to occur not just in pairs, but in fact in larger groups within a restricted spatio-temporal domain. In the 4-vertex case, different motifs are found to be significant in each case, suggesting that this technique is capable of discriminating between clustering patterns at a finer granularity than previously possible. PMID:26605544

  2. Normalized GNSS Interference Pattern Technique for Altimetry

    PubMed Central

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér–Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals. PMID:24922453

  3. Normalized GNSS interference pattern technique for altimetry.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-06-11

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals.

  4. Normalized GNSS interference pattern technique for altimetry.

    PubMed

    Ribot, Miguel Angel; Kucwaj, Jean-Christophe; Botteron, Cyril; Reboul, Serge; Stienne, Georges; Leclère, Jérôme; Choquel, Jean-Bernard; Farine, Pierre-André; Benjelloun, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that reflected signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) can be used for altimetry applications, such as monitoring of water levels and determining snow height. Due to the interference of these reflected signals and the motion of satellites in space, the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) measured at the receiver slowly oscillates. The oscillation rate is proportional to the change in the propagation path difference between the direct and reflected signals, which depends on the satellite elevation angle. Assuming a known receiver position, it is possible to compute the distance between the antenna and the surface of reflection from the measured oscillation rate. This technique is usually known as the interference pattern technique (IPT). In this paper, we propose to normalize the measurements in order to derive an alternative model of the SNR variations. From this model, we define a maximum likelihood estimate of the antenna height that reduces the estimation time to a fraction of one period of the SNR variation. We also derive the Cramér-Rao lower bound for the IPT and use it to assess the sensitivity of different parameters to the estimation of the antenna height. Finally, we propose an experimental framework, and we use it to assess our approach with real GPS L1 C/A signals. PMID:24922453

  5. The development of two-dimensional object identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebby, Gary; Sherrod, Earnest E.

    1989-01-01

    This report marks the end of the first year of an anticipated three year effort to study methods for numerically identifying objects according to shape in two dimensions. The method is based upon comparing the unit gradient of an observed object and the unit gradient of a standard object over a specified range of points. The manner in which the gradients are compared forms the basis of a shape recognition scheme, which is then applied to simple closed plane figures. The gradient based method is calibrated by using various distorted objects in comparison with a set of standard reference objects. The use of pattern recognition techniques for computer identification of two-dimensional figures will be investigated during the second and third years of this project.

  6. A novel online adaptive time delay identification technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayrak, Alper; Tatlicioglu, Enver

    2016-05-01

    Time delay is a phenomenon which is common in signal processing, communication, control applications, etc. The special feature of time delay that makes it attractive is that it is a commonly faced problem in many systems. A literature search on time-delay identification highlights the fact that most studies focused on numerical solutions. In this study, a novel online adaptive time-delay identification technique is proposed. This technique is based on an adaptive update law through a minimum-maximum strategy which is firstly applied to time-delay identification. In the design of the adaptive identification law, Lyapunov-based stability analysis techniques are utilised. Several numerical simulations were conducted with Matlab/Simulink to evaluate the performance of the proposed technique. It is numerically demonstrated that the proposed technique works efficiently in identifying both constant and disturbed time delays, and is also robust to measurement noise.

  7. THE IDENTIFICATION AND TESTING OF INTERACTION PATTERNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a method for identifying and assessing the significance of interaction patterns among various chemicals and chemical classes of importance to regulatory toxicologists. To this end, efforts were made to assemble and evaluate experimental data on toxicologically...

  8. Structural damage identification using mathematical optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Mo-How Herman

    1991-01-01

    An identification procedure is proposed to identify damage characteristics (location and size of the damage) from dynamic measurements. This procedure was based on minimization of the mean-square measure of difference between measurement data (natural frequencies and mode shapes) and the corresponding predictions obtained from the computational model. The procedure is tested for simulated damage in the form of stiffness changes in a simple fixed free spring mass system and symmetric cracks in a simply supported Bernoulli Euler beam. It is shown that when all the mode information is used in the identification procedure it is possible to uniquely determine the damage properties. Without knowing the complete set of modal information, a restricted region in the initial data space has been found for realistic and convergent solution from the identification process.

  9. The technique of partial identification: waking up to the world.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Lucy

    2009-04-01

    A capacity to make partial identification with others is a skill that brings group members out of the loneliness of narcissism and into the lively world of immediacy and progressive emotional communication. Partial identification, which requires empathy and intuition, involves both knowing what another is feeling and also what we feel toward that other. Developing partial identification will meet with different resistances in men and women. Using clinical examples, the author defines and demonstrates the concept of partial identification and discusses how the pathway to achieving the technique can differ along gender lines.

  10. Deconvolution/identification techniques for nonnegative signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.; Yu, D.R.

    1991-11-01

    Several methods for solving the nonparametric deconvolution/identification problem when the unknown is nonnegative are presented. First we consider the constrained least squares method and discuss three ways to estimate the regularization parameter: the discrepancy principle, Mallow`s C{sub L}, and generalized cross validation. Next we consider maximum entropy methods. Last, we present a new conjugate gradient algorithm. A preliminary comparison is presented; detailed Monte-Carlo experiments will be presented at the conference. 13 refs.

  11. Characterizing ultrasonic transducers using pattern recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Ekis, J.W.

    1992-04-01

    This project's goal was to develop an automated ultrasonic transducer characterization system. A computer-based test system collected the test data for each of the given transducers. This data set was then processed by a number of pattern recognition algorithms. The results from these classifications placed the transducers into groups of similar units. All the transducers in a group will have similar performance characteristics. Each group was isolated from the others. 49 refs.

  12. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  13. Unbalance identification using the least angle regression technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatzisavvas, Ioannis; Dohnal, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation proposes a robust procedure for unbalance identification using the equivalent load method based on sparse vibration measurements. The procedure is demonstrated and benchmarked on an example rotor at constant speed. Since the number of measuring positions is much smaller than the number of possible fault locations, performing unbalance identification leads to an ill-posed problem. This problem was tried to be overcome previously with modal expansion in the time domain and with several linear regressions in the frequency domain. However, since the solution to the problem is a sparse equivalent force vector, these methods cannot provide a robust identification procedure. A robust identification can only be achieved by providing a-priori information on the number of unbalances to be identified. The presently proposed procedure achieves more precise unbalance identification without the need of a-priori information by incorporating a regularization technique. A well-known technique for producing sparse solutions is the Least Absolute Shrinkage and Selection Operator (LASSO). The proposed procedure is based on the generalized technique Least Angle Regression (LAR) which finds all the solutions of LASSO. A comparison of the time-domain approach, the frequency-domain approach and the proposed technique is made and the superiority of the latter technique in identifying the number of possible fault locations is highlighted. The selection of the threshold of the convergence algorithm of LAR as well as the selection of the value of the Lagrangian multiplier is discussed in some detail.

  14. Aerosol pattern correlation techniques of wind measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eloranta, Edwin W.

    1985-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of lidar image correlation techniques of remote wind measurement. It also examines the potential use of satellite borne lidar global wind measurements using this approach. Lidar systems can easily detect spatial variations in the volume scattering cross section of naturally occurring aerosols. Lidar derived RHI, PPI and range-time displays of aerosol backscatter have been extensively employed in the study of atmospheric structure. Descriptions of this type of data can be obtained in many references including Kunkel et al. (1977), Kunkel et al. (1980), Boers et al. (1984), Uthe et al. (1980), Melfi et al. (1985) and Browell et al. (1983). It is likely that the first space-borne lidars for atmospheric studies will observe aerosol backscatter to measure parameters such as boundary layer depth and cloud height. This paper examines the potential application of these relatively simple aerosol backscatter lidars to global wind measurements.

  15. Serial identification of EEG patterns using adaptive wavelet-based analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazimov, A. I.; Pavlov, A. N.; Nazimova, A. A.; Grubov, V. V.; Koronovskii, A. A.; Sitnikova, E.; Hramov, A. E.

    2013-10-01

    A problem of recognition specific oscillatory patterns in the electroencephalograms with the continuous wavelet-transform is discussed. Aiming to improve abilities of the wavelet-based tools we propose a serial adaptive method for sequential identification of EEG patterns such as sleep spindles and spike-wave discharges. This method provides an optimal selection of parameters based on objective functions and enables to extract the most informative features of the recognized structures. Different ways of increasing the quality of patterns recognition within the proposed serial adaptive technique are considered.

  16. Biometric Identification Using Holographic Radar Imaging Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlan P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first “biometric” application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  17. Biometric identification using holographic radar imaging techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMakin, Douglas L.; Sheen, David M.; Hall, Thomas E.; Kennedy, Mike O.; Foote, Harlen P.

    2007-04-01

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory researchers have been at the forefront of developing innovative screening systems to enhance security and a novel imaging system to provide custom-fit clothing using holographic radar imaging techniques. First-of-a-kind cylindrical holographic imaging systems have been developed to screen people at security checkpoints for the detection of concealed, body worn, non-metallic threats such as plastic and liquid explosives, knifes and contraband. Another embodiment of this technology is capable of obtaining full sized body measurements in near real time without the person under surveillance removing their outer garments. Radar signals readily penetrate clothing and reflect off the water in skin. This full body measurement system is commercially available for best fitting ready to wear clothing, which was the first "biometric" application for this technology. One compelling feature of this technology for security biometric applications is that it can see effectively through disguises, appliances and body hair.

  18. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  19. Identification of apolipoprotein using feature selection technique

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hua; Zou, Ping; Zhang, Chunmei; Chen, Rong; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Apolipoprotein is a kind of protein which can transport the lipids through the lymphatic and circulatory systems. The abnormal expression level of apolipoprotein always causes angiocardiopathy. Thus, correct recognition of apolipoprotein from proteomic data is very crucial to the comprehension of cardiovascular system and drug design. This study is to develop a computational model to predict apolipoproteins. In the model, the apolipoproteins and non-apolipoproteins were collected to form benchmark dataset. On the basis of the dataset, we extracted the g-gap dipeptide composition information from residue sequences to formulate protein samples. To exclude redundant information or noise, the analysis of various (ANOVA)-based feature selection technique was proposed to find out the best feature subset. The support vector machine (SVM) was selected as discrimination algorithm. Results show that 96.2% of sensitivity and 99.3% of specificity were achieved in five-fold cross-validation. These findings open new perspectives to improve apolipoproteins prediction by considering the specific dipeptides. We expect that these findings will help to improve drug development in anti-angiocardiopathy disease. PMID:27443605

  20. Deconvolution/identification techniques for 1-D transient signals

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, D.M.

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses a variety of nonparametric deconvolution and identification techniques that we have developed for application to 1-D transient signal problems. These methods are time-domain techniques that use direct methods for matrix inversion. Therefore, they are not appropriate for large data'' problems. These techniques involve various regularization methods and permit the use of certain kinds of a priori information in estimating the unknown. These techniques have been implemented in a package using standard FORTRAN that should make the package readily transportable to most computers. This paper is also meant to be an instruction manual for the package. 25 refs., 17 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Maximum likelihood estimation of label imperfections and its use in the identification of mislabeled patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chittineni, C. B.

    1979-01-01

    The problem of estimating label imperfections and the use of the estimation in identifying mislabeled patterns is presented. Expressions for the maximum likelihood estimates of classification errors and a priori probabilities are derived from the classification of a set of labeled patterns. Expressions also are given for the asymptotic variances of probability of correct classification and proportions. Simple models are developed for imperfections in the labels and for classification errors and are used in the formulation of a maximum likelihood estimation scheme. Schemes are presented for the identification of mislabeled patterns in terms of threshold on the discriminant functions for both two-class and multiclass cases. Expressions are derived for the probability that the imperfect label identification scheme will result in a wrong decision and are used in computing thresholds. The results of practical applications of these techniques in the processing of remotely sensed multispectral data are presented.

  2. Development of evaluation method for software hazard identification techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, H. W.; Chen, M. H.; Shih, C.; Yih, S.; Kuo, C. T.; Wang, L. H.; Yu, Y. C.; Chen, C. W.

    2006-07-01

    This research evaluated the applicable software hazard identification techniques nowadays, such as, Preliminary Hazard Analysis (PHA), Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Fault Tree Analysis (FTA), Markov chain modeling, Dynamic Flow-graph Methodology (DFM), and simulation-based model analysis; and then determined indexes in view of their characteristics, which include dynamic capability, completeness, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio, complexity, and implementation cost. By this proposed method, the analysts can evaluate various software hazard identification combinations for specific purpose. According to the case study results, the traditional PHA + FMEA + FTA (with failure rate) + Markov chain modeling (with transfer rate) combination is not competitive due to the dilemma for obtaining acceptable software failure rates. However, the systematic architecture of FTA and Markov chain modeling is still valuable for realizing the software fault structure. The system centric techniques, such as DFM and simulation-based model-analysis, show the advantage on dynamic capability, achievability, detail, signal/noise ratio. However, their disadvantages are the completeness complexity and implementation cost. This evaluation method can be a platform to reach common consensus for the stakeholders. Following the evolution of software hazard identification techniques, the evaluation results could be changed. However, the insight of software hazard identification techniques is much more important than the numbers obtained by the evaluation. (authors)

  3. Detection, identification, and quantification techniques for spills of hazardous chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Washburn, J. F.; Sandness, G. A.

    1977-01-01

    The first 400 chemicals listed in the Coast Guard's Chemical Hazards Response Information System were evaluated with respect to their detectability, identifiability, and quantifiability by 12 generalized remote and in situ sensing techniques. Identification was also attempted for some key areas in water pollution sensing technology.

  4. Identification of human pathogens isolated from blood using microarray hybridisation and signal pattern recognition

    PubMed Central

    Wiesinger-Mayr, Herbert; Vierlinger, Klemens; Pichler, Rudolf; Kriegner, Albert; Hirschl, Alexander M; Presterl, Elisabeth; Bodrossy, Levente; Noehammer, Christa

    2007-01-01

    Background Pathogen identification in clinical routine is based on the cultivation of microbes with subsequent morphological and physiological characterisation lasting at least 24 hours. However, early and accurate identification is a crucial requisite for fast and optimally targeted antimicrobial treatment. Molecular biology based techniques allow fast identification, however discrimination of very closely related species remains still difficult. Results A molecular approach is presented for the rapid identification of pathogens combining PCR amplification with microarray detection. The DNA chip comprises oligonucleotide capture probes for 25 different pathogens including Gram positive cocci, the most frequently encountered genera of Enterobacteriaceae, non-fermenter and clinical relevant Candida species. The observed detection limits varied from 10 cells (e.g. E. coli) to 105 cells (S. aureus) per mL artificially spiked blood. Thus the current low sensitivity for some species still represents a barrier for clinical application. Successful discrimination of closely related species was achieved by a signal pattern recognition approach based on the k-nearest-neighbour method. A prototype software providing this statistical evaluation was developed, allowing correct identification in 100 % of the cases at the genus and in 96.7 % at the species level (n = 241). Conclusion The newly developed molecular assay can be carried out within 6 hours in a research laboratory from pathogen isolation to species identification. From our results we conclude that DNA microarrays can be a useful tool for rapid identification of closely related pathogens particularly when the protocols are adapted to the special clinical scenarios. PMID:17697354

  5. Patterns of Cognitive Strengths and Weaknesses: Identification Rates, Agreement, and Validity for Learning Disabilities Identification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.; Stuebing, Karla K.; Vaughn, Sharon; Tolar, Tammy D.

    2014-01-01

    Few empirical investigations have evaluated learning disabilities (LD) identification methods based on a pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses (PSW). This study investigated the reliability and validity of two proposed PSW methods: the concordance/discordance method (C/DM) and cross battery assessment (XBA) method. Cognitive assessment…

  6. Rapid identification of single microbes by various Raman spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rösch, Petra; Harz, Michaela; Schmitt, Michael; Peschke, Klaus-Dieter; Ronneberger, Olaf; Burkhardt, Hans; Motzkus, Hans-Walter; Lankers, Markus; Hofer, Stefan; Thiele, Hans; Popp, Jürgen

    2006-02-01

    A fast and unambiguous identification of microorganisms is necessary not only for medical purposes but also in technical processes such as the production of pharmaceuticals. Conventional microbiological identification methods are based on the morphology and the ability of microbes to grow under different conditions on various cultivation media depending on their biochemical properties. These methods require pure cultures which need cultivation of at least 6 h but normally much longer. Recently also additional methods to identify bacteria are established e.g. mass spectroscopy, polymerase chain reaction (PCR), flow cytometry or fluorescence spectroscopy. Alternative approaches for the identification of microorganisms are vibrational spectroscopic techniques. With Raman spectroscopy a spectroscopic fingerprint of the microorganisms can be achieved. Using UV-resonance Raman spectroscopy (UVRR) macromolecules like DNA/RNA and proteins are resonantly enhanced. With an excitation wavelength of e.g. 244 nm it is possible to determine the ratio of guanine/cytosine to all DNA bases which allows a genotypic identification of microorganisms. The application of UVRR requires a large amount of microorganisms (> 10 6 cells) e.g. at least a micro colony. For the analysis of single cells micro-Raman spectroscopy with an excitation wavelength of 532 nm can be used. Here, the obtained information is from all type of molecules inside the cells which lead to a chemotaxonomic identification. In this contribution we show how wavelength dependent Raman spectroscopy yields significant molecular information applicable for the identification of microorganisms on a single cell level.

  7. Pattern recognition for identification of lysozyme droplet solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gorr, Heather Meloy; Xiong, Ziye; Barnard, John A

    2014-03-01

    Pattern formation during evaporation of a colloidal sessile droplet is a phenomenon relevant to a wide variety of scientific disciplines. The patterns remaining on the substrate are indicative of the transport mechanisms and phase transitions occurring during evaporation and may reflect the solution chemistry of the fluid [1-18]. Pattern formation during evaporation of droplets of biofluids has also been examined and these complex patterns may reflect the health of the patient [23-31]. Automatic detection of variations in the fluid composition based on these deposit patterns could lead to rapid screening for diagnostic or quality control purposes. In this study, a pattern recognition algorithm is presented to differentiate between deposits containing various solution compositions. The deposits studied are from droplets of simplified, model biological fluids of aqueous lysozyme and NaCl solutions. For the solution concentrations examined here, the deposit patterns are dependent upon the initial solution composition. Deposit images are represented by extracting features using the Gabor wavelet, similar to the method used for iris recognition. Two popular pattern recognition algorithms are used to classify the deposits. The k-means clustering algorithm is used to test if incremental changes in solution concentration result in reproducible and statistically interpretable variations in the deposit patterns. The k-nearest neighbor algorithm is also used to classify the deposit images by solution concentration based on a set of training images for each class. Here, we demonstrate that the deposit patterns may act as a "fingerprint" for identification of solution chemistry. The results of this study are very promising, with classification accuracies of 90-97.5%. PMID:24342799

  8. Patterns of Cognitive Strengths and Weaknesses: Identification Rates, Agreement, and Validity for Learning Disabilities Identification

    PubMed Central

    Miciak, Jeremy; Fletcher, Jack M.; Stuebing, Karla; Vaughn, Sharon; Tolar, Tammy D.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few empirical investigations have evaluated LD identification methods based on a pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses (PSW). This study investigated the reliability and validity of two proposed PSW methods: the concordance/discordance method (C/DM) and cross battery assessment (XBA) method. Methods Cognitive assessment data for 139 adolescents demonstrating inadequate response to intervention was utilized to empirically classify participants as meeting or not meeting PSW LD identification criteria using the two approaches, permitting an analysis of: (1) LD identification rates; (2) agreement between methods; and (3) external validity. Results LD identification rates varied between the two methods depending upon the cut point for low achievement, with low agreement for LD identification decisions. Comparisons of groups that met and did not meet LD identification criteria on external academic variables were largely null, raising questions of external validity. Conclusions This study found low agreement and little evidence of validity for LD identification decisions based on PSW methods. An alternative may be to use multiple measures of academic achievement to guide intervention. PMID:24274155

  9. Machine-learned pattern identification in olfactory subtest results

    PubMed Central

    Lötsch, Jörn; Hummel, Thomas; Ultsch, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    The human sense of smell is often analyzed as being composed of three main components comprising olfactory threshold, odor discrimination and the ability to identify odors. A relevant distinction of the three components and their differential changes in distinct disorders remains a research focus. The present data-driven analysis aimed at establishing a cluster structure in the pattern of olfactory subtest results. Therefore, unsupervised machine-learning was applied onto olfactory subtest results acquired in 10,714 subjects with nine different olfactory pathologies. Using the U-matrix, Emergent Self-organizing feature maps (ESOM) identified three different clusters characterized by (i) low threshold and good discrimination and identification, (ii) very high threshold associated with absent to poor discrimination and identification ability, or (iii) medium threshold, i.e., in the mid-range of possible thresholds, associated with reduced discrimination and identification ability. Specific etiologies of olfactory (dys)function were unequally represented in the clusters (p < 2.2 · 10−16). Patients with congenital anosmia were overrepresented in the second cluster while subjects with postinfectious olfactory dysfunction belonged frequently to the third cluster. However, the clusters provided no clear separation between etiologies. Hence, the present verification of a distinct cluster structure encourages continued scientific efforts at olfactory test pattern recognition. PMID:27762302

  10. Accuracy of Using Visual Identification of White Sharks to Estimate Residency Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Delaney, David G.; Johnson, Ryan; Bester, Marthán N.; Gennari, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Determining the residency of an aquatic species is important but challenging and it remains unclear what is the best sampling methodology. Photo-identification has been used extensively to estimate patterns of animals' residency and is arguably the most common approach, but it may not be the most effective approach in marine environments. To examine this, in 2005, we deployed acoustic transmitters on 22 white sharks (Carcharodon carcharias) in Mossel Bay, South Africa to quantify the probability of detecting these tagged sharks by photo-identification and different deployment strategies of acoustic telemetry equipment. Using the data collected by the different sampling approaches (detections from an acoustic listening station deployed under a chumming vessel versus those from visual sightings and photo-identification), we quantified the methodologies' probability of detection and determined if the sampling approaches, also including an acoustic telemetry array, produce comparable results for patterns of residency. Photo-identification had the lowest probability of detection and underestimated residency. The underestimation is driven by various factors primarily that acoustic telemetry monitors a large area and this reduces the occurrence of false negatives. Therefore, we propose that researchers need to use acoustic telemetry and also continue to develop new sampling approaches as photo-identification techniques are inadequate to determine residency. Using the methods presented in this paper will allow researchers to further refine sampling approaches that enable them to collect more accurate data that will result in better research and more informed management efforts and policy decisions. PMID:22514662

  11. Acoustic source identification using a Generalized Weighted Inverse Beamforming technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Presezniak, Flavio; Zavala, Paulo A. G.; Steenackers, Gunther; Janssens, Karl; Arruda, Jose R. F.; Desmet, Wim; Guillaume, Patrick

    2012-10-01

    In the last years, acoustic source identification has gained special attention, mainly due to new environmental norms, urbanization problems and more demanding acoustic comfort expectation of consumers. From the current methods, beamforming techniques are of common use, since normally demands affordable data acquisition effort, while producing clear source identification in most of the applications. In order to improve the source identification quality, this work presents a method, based on the Generalized Inverse Beamforming, that uses a weighted pseudo-inverse approach and an optimization procedure, called Weighted Generalized Inverse Beamforming. To validate this method, a simple case of two compact sources in close vicinity in coherent radiation was investigated by numerical and experimental assessment. Weighted generalized inverse results are compared to the ones obtained by the conventional beamforming, MUltiple Signal Classification, and Generalized Inverse Beamforming. At the end, the advantages of the proposed method are outlined together with the computational effort increase compared to the Generalized Inverse Beamforming.

  12. The diversity of adult dental patterns in the United States and the implications for personal identification.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bradley J

    2003-05-01

    Few would argue about the individuality of dental radiographs for forensic identification, but when an antemortem/postmortem comparison is based strictly on dental treatment notes and/or charts it becomes less certain. In the past, attempts to validate the high diversity of dental patterns created by combinations of missing, filled, and unrestored teeth have been based on unfounded statistical assumptions. The goal of this research is to present a statistically valid method of assessing dental pattern diversity for the identification of missing individuals. Empirical observation of large reference datasets was found to be the best technique for assessing dental diversity. This technique is nearly identical to the procedure used for mitochondrial DNA casework. For the research presented in this paper, two large datasets were used, one composed of U.S. military personnel and one composed of U.S. civilians. Dental patterns were found to be very diverse on a scale that is comparable to mtDNA. In addition, it was found that the diversity values remain very consistent regardless of the level of detail present in the treatment records. Overall, combinations of missing, filled, and unrestored teeth were found to be very individualistic and an excellent source for forensic identification.

  13. Comparison of three advanced chromatographic techniques for cannabis identification.

    PubMed

    Debruyne, D; Albessard, F; Bigot, M C; Moulin, M

    1994-01-01

    The development of chromatography technology, with the increasing availability of easier-to-use mass spectrometers combined with gas chromatography (GC), the use of diode-array or programmable variable-wavelength ultraviolet absorption detectors in conjunction with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and the availability of scanners capable of reading thin-layer chromatography (TLC) plates in the ultraviolet and visible regions, has made for easier, quicker and more positive identification of cannabis samples that standard analytical laboratories are occasionally required to undertake in the effort to combat drug addiction. At laboratories that do not possess the technique of GC combined with mass spectrometry, which provides an irrefutable identification, the following procedure involving HPLC or TLC techniques may be used: identification of the chromatographic peaks corresponding to each of the three main cannabis constituents-cannabidiol (CBD), delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta-9-THC) and cannabinol (CBN)-by comparison with published data in conjunction with a specific absorption spectrum for each of those constituents obtained between 200 and 300 nm. The collection of the fractions corresponding to the three major cannabinoids at the HPLC system outlet and the cross-checking of their identity in the GC process with flame ionization detection can further corroborate the identification and minimize possible errors due to interference.

  14. Identification of cross-country skiing movement patterns using micro-sensors.

    PubMed

    Marsland, Finn; Lyons, Keith; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Macintosh, Colin; Chapman, Dale

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of micro-sensors for use in the identification of the main movement patterns used in cross-country skiing. Data were collected from four elite international and four Australian athletes in Europe and in Australia using a MinimaxX™ unit containing accelerometer, gyroscope and GPS sensors. Athletes performed four skating techniques and three classical techniques on snow at moderate velocity. Data from a single micro-sensor unit positioned in the centre of the upper back was sufficient to visually identify cyclical movement patterns for each technique. The general patterns for each technique were identified clearly across all athletes while at the same time distinctive characteristics for individual athletes were observed. Differences in speed, snow condition and gradient of terrain were not controlled in this study and these factors could have an effect on the data patterns. Development of algorithms to process the micro-sensor data into kinematic measurements would provide coaches and scientists with a valuable performance analysis tool. Further research is needed to develop such algorithms and to determine whether the patterns are consistent across a range of different speeds, snow conditions and terrain, and for skiers of differing ability.

  15. Identification of Cross-Country Skiing Movement Patterns Using Micro-Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Marsland, Finn; Lyons, Keith; Anson, Judith; Waddington, Gordon; Macintosh, Colin; Chapman, Dale

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the potential of micro-sensors for use in the identification of the main movement patterns used in cross-country skiing. Data were collected from four elite international and four Australian athletes in Europe and in Australia using a MinimaxX™ unit containing accelerometer, gyroscope and GPS sensors. Athletes performed four skating techniques and three classical techniques on snow at moderate velocity. Data from a single micro-sensor unit positioned in the centre of the upper back was sufficient to visually identify cyclical movement patterns for each technique. The general patterns for each technique were identified clearly across all athletes while at the same time distinctive characteristics for individual athletes were observed. Differences in speed, snow condition and gradient of terrain were not controlled in this study and these factors could have an effect on the data patterns. Development of algorithms to process the micro-sensor data into kinematic measurements would provide coaches and scientists with a valuable performance analysis tool. Further research is needed to develop such algorithms and to determine whether the patterns are consistent across a range of different speeds, snow conditions and terrain, and for skiers of differing ability. PMID:22666075

  16. HIV coreceptor tropism determination and mutational pattern identification

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui-Shuang; Yin, Jason; Leng, Fei; Teng, Rui-Fang; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the early stages of infection, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) generally selects CCR5 as the primary coreceptor for entering the host cell. As infection progresses, the virus evolves and may exhibit a coreceptor-switch to CXCR4. Accurate determination coreceptor usage and identification key mutational patterns associated tropism switch are essential for selection of appropriate therapies and understanding mechanism of coreceptor change. We developed a classifier composed of two coreceptor-specific weight matrices (CMs) based on a full-scale dataset. For this classifier, we found an AUC of 0.97, an accuracy of 95.21% and an MCC of 0.885 (sensitivity 92.92%; specificity 95.54%) in a ten-fold cross-validation, outperforming all other methods on an independent dataset (13% higher MCC value than geno2pheno and 15% higher MCC value than PSSM). A web server (http://spg.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/CM.html) based on our classifier was provided. Patterns of genetic mutations that occur along with coreceptor transitions were further identified based on the score of each sequence. Six pairs of one-AA mutational patterns and three pairs of two-AA mutational patterns were identified to associate with increasing propensity for X4 tropism. These mutational patterns offered new insights into the mechanism of coreceptor switch and aided in monitoring coreceptor switch. PMID:26883082

  17. HIV coreceptor tropism determination and mutational pattern identification.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui-Shuang; Yin, Jason; Leng, Fei; Teng, Rui-Fang; Xu, Chao; Xia, Xia-Yu; Pan, Xian-Ming

    2016-01-01

    In the early stages of infection, Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) generally selects CCR5 as the primary coreceptor for entering the host cell. As infection progresses, the virus evolves and may exhibit a coreceptor-switch to CXCR4. Accurate determination coreceptor usage and identification key mutational patterns associated tropism switch are essential for selection of appropriate therapies and understanding mechanism of coreceptor change. We developed a classifier composed of two coreceptor-specific weight matrices (CMs) based on a full-scale dataset. For this classifier, we found an AUC of 0.97, an accuracy of 95.21% and an MCC of 0.885 (sensitivity 92.92%; specificity 95.54%) in a ten-fold cross-validation, outperforming all other methods on an independent dataset (13% higher MCC value than geno2pheno and 15% higher MCC value than PSSM). A web server (http://spg.med.tsinghua.edu.cn/CM.html) based on our classifier was provided. Patterns of genetic mutations that occur along with coreceptor transitions were further identified based on the score of each sequence. Six pairs of one-AA mutational patterns and three pairs of two-AA mutational patterns were identified to associate with increasing propensity for X4 tropism. These mutational patterns offered new insights into the mechanism of coreceptor switch and aided in monitoring coreceptor switch. PMID:26883082

  18. Analytical techniques for direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cid, C.; Garcia-Descalzo, L.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Postigo, M.; Alcazar, A.; Baquero, F.

    2012-09-01

    Rover missions to potentially habitable ecosystems require portable instruments that use minimal power, require no sample preparation, and provide suitably diagnostic information to an Earth-based exploration team. In exploration of terrestrial analogue environments of potentially habitable ecosystems it is important to screen rapidly for the presence of biosignatures and microorganisms and especially to identify them accurately. In this study, several analytical techniques for the direct identification of biosignatures and microorganisms in different Earth analogues of habitable ecosystems are compared.

  19. A fluorescent antibody technique for identification of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonies.

    PubMed

    Schuller, W; Lehmkuhl, H D; Switzer, W P

    1976-04-01

    Fluorescent antibody staining of Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae colonies is difficult because the colonies wash from the agar. Airdrying of the colonies grown on solid medium-overlayed glass microscope slides fixed the colonies in place, so that fluorescent antibody stain could be readily accomplished. Apparent loss or alteration of antigenicity did not result from the air-drying process. The technique is useful for the identification of M hyopneumoniae isolates.

  20. A novel analytical technique suitable for the identification of plastics.

    PubMed

    Nečemer, Marijan; Kump, Peter; Sket, Primož; Plavec, Janez; Grdadolnik, Jože; Zvanut, Maja

    2013-01-01

    The enormous development and production of plastic materials in the last century resulted in increasing numbers of such kinds of objects. Development of a simple and fast technique to classify different types of plastics could be used in many activities dealing with plastic materials such as packaging of food, sorting of used plastic materials, and also, if technique would be non-destructive, for conservation of plastic artifacts in museum collections, a relatively new field of interest since 1990. In our previous paper we introduced a non-destructive technique for fast identification of unknown plastics based on EDXRF spectrometry,1 using as a case study some plastic artifacts archived in the Museum in order to show the advantages of the nondestructive identification of plastic material. In order to validate our technique it was necessary to apply for this purpose the comparison of analyses with some of the analytical techniques, which are more suitable and so far rather widely applied in identifying some most common sorts of plastic materials.

  1. Whisker spot patterns: a noninvasive method of individual identification of Australian sea lions (Neophoca cinerea)

    PubMed Central

    Osterrieder, Sylvia K.; Salgado Kent, Chandra; Anderson, Carlos J. R.; Parnum, Iain M.; Robinson, Randall W.

    2015-01-01

    Reliable methods for identification of individual animals are advantageous for ecological studies of population demographics and movement patterns. Photographic identification, based on distinguishable patterns, unique shapes, or scars, is an effective technique already used for many species. We tested whether photographs of whisker spot patterns could be used to discriminate among individual Australian sea lion (Neophoca cinerea). Based on images of 53 sea lions, we simulated 5,000 patterns before calculating the probability of duplication in a study population. A total of 99% (± 1.5 SD) of patterns were considered reliable for a population of 50, 98% (± 1.7 SD) for 100, 92% (± 4.7 SD) for 500, and 88% (± 5.7 SD) for 1,000. We tested a semiautomatic approach by matching 16 known individuals at 3 different angles (70°, 90°, and 110°), 2 distances (1 and 2 m), and 6 separate times over a 1-year period. A point-pattern matching algorithm for pairwise comparisons produced 90% correct matches of photographs taken on the same day at 90°. Images of individuals at 1 and 2 m resulted in 89% correct matches, those photographed at different angles and different times (at 90°) resulted in 48% and 73% correct matches, respectively. Our results show that the Chamfer distance transform can effectively be used for individual identification, but only if there is very little variation in photograph angle. This point-pattern recognition application may also work for other otariid species. PMID:26937048

  2. [Discordant pattern, visual identification of myocardial viability with PET].

    PubMed

    Alexánderson, E; Ricalde, A; Zerón, J; Talayero, J A; Cruz, P; Adame, G; Mendoza, G; Meave, A

    2006-01-01

    PET (positron emission tomography) as a non-invasive imaging method for studying cardiac perfusion and metabolism has turned into the gold standard for detecting myocardial viability. The utilization of 18 FDG as a tracer for its identification permits to spot the use of exogenous glucose by the myocardium segments. By studying and comparing viability and perfusion results, for which the latter uses tracers such as 13N-ammonia, three different patterns for myocardial viability evaluation arise:. transmural concordant pattern, non-transmural concordant pattern, and the discordant pattern; the last one exemplifies the hibernating myocardium and proves the presence of myocardial viability. The importance of its detection is fundamental for the study of an ischemic patient, since it permits the establishment of and exact diagnosis, prognosis, and the best treatment option. It also allows foreseeing functional recovery of the affected region as well as the ejection fraction rate after revascularization treatment if this is determined as necessary. All these elements regarding viability are determinant in order to reduce adverse events and help improving patients' prognosis. PMID:17315610

  3. Contextual effects in the identification of nonspeech auditory patterns

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Gerald; Richards, Virginia M.; Streeter, Timothy; Mason, Christine R.; Huang, Rong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the benefit of a priori cues in a masked nonspeech pattern identification experiment. Targets were narrowband sequences of tone bursts forming six easily identifiable frequency patterns selected randomly on each trial. The frequency band containing the target was randomized. Maskers were also narrowband sequences of tone bursts chosen randomly on every trial. Targets and maskers were presented monaurally in mutually exclusive frequency bands, producing large amounts of informational masking. Cuing the masker produced a significant improvement in performance, while holding the target frequency band constant provided no benefit. The cue providing the greatest benefit was a copy of the masker presented ipsilaterally before the target-plus-masker. The masker cue presented contralaterally, and a notched-noise cue produced smaller benefits. One possible mechanism underlying these findings is auditory “enhancement” in which the neural response to the target is increased relative to the masker by differential prior stimulation of the target and masker frequency regions. A second possible mechanism provides a benefit to performance by comparing the spectrotemporal correspondence of the cue and target-plus-masker and is effective for either ipsilateral or contralateral cue presentation. These effects improve identification performance by emphasizing spectral contrasts in sequences or streams of sounds. PMID:22225048

  4. Contextual effects in the identification of nonspeech auditory patterns.

    PubMed

    Kidd, Gerald; Richards, Virginia M; Streeter, Timothy; Mason, Christine R; Huang, Rong

    2011-12-01

    This study investigated the benefit of a priori cues in a masked nonspeech pattern identification experiment. Targets were narrowband sequences of tone bursts forming six easily identifiable frequency patterns selected randomly on each trial. The frequency band containing the target was randomized. Maskers were also narrowband sequences of tone bursts chosen randomly on every trial. Targets and maskers were presented monaurally in mutually exclusive frequency bands, producing large amounts of informational masking. Cuing the masker produced a significant improvement in performance, while holding the target frequency band constant provided no benefit. The cue providing the greatest benefit was a copy of the masker presented ipsilaterally before the target-plus-masker. The masker cue presented contralaterally, and a notched-noise cue produced smaller benefits. One possible mechanism underlying these findings is auditory "enhancement" in which the neural response to the target is increased relative to the masker by differential prior stimulation of the target and masker frequency regions. A second possible mechanism provides a benefit to performance by comparing the spectrotemporal correspondence of the cue and target-plus-masker and is effective for either ipsilateral or contralateral cue presentation. These effects improve identification performance by emphasizing spectral contrasts in sequences or streams of sounds. PMID:22225048

  5. Functional module identification in protein interaction networks by interaction patterns

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yijie; Qian, Xiaoning

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Identifying functional modules in protein–protein interaction (PPI) networks may shed light on cellular functional organization and thereafter underlying cellular mechanisms. Many existing module identification algorithms aim to detect densely connected groups of proteins as potential modules. However, based on this simple topological criterion of ‘higher than expected connectivity’, those algorithms may miss biologically meaningful modules of functional significance, in which proteins have similar interaction patterns to other proteins in networks but may not be densely connected to each other. A few blockmodel module identification algorithms have been proposed to address the problem but the lack of global optimum guarantee and the prohibitive computational complexity have been the bottleneck of their applications in real-world large-scale PPI networks. Results: In this article, we propose a novel optimization formulation LCP2 (low two-hop conductance sets) using the concept of Markov random walk on graphs, which enables simultaneous identification of both dense and sparse modules based on protein interaction patterns in given networks through searching for LCP2 by random walk. A spectral approximate algorithm SLCP2 is derived to identify non-overlapping functional modules. Based on a bottom-up greedy strategy, we further extend LCP2 to a new algorithm (greedy algorithm for LCP2) GLCP2 to identify overlapping functional modules. We compare SLCP2 and GLCP2 with a range of state-of-the-art algorithms on synthetic networks and real-world PPI networks. The performance evaluation based on several criteria with respect to protein complex prediction, high level Gene Ontology term prediction and especially sparse module detection, has demonstrated that our algorithms based on searching for LCP2 outperform all other compared algorithms. Availability and implementation: All data and code are available at http://www.cse.usf.edu/∼xqian/fmi/slcp2hop

  6. Advanced pattern-matching techniques for autonomous acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, P. M.; Westover, B. L.

    1981-01-01

    The key objective of this effort is the development of pattern-matching algorithms which can impart autonomous acquisition capability to precision-guided munitions such as Copperhead and Hellfire. Autonomous acquisition through pattern matching holds the promise of eliminating laser designation and enhancing fire power by multiple target prioritization. The pattern-matching approach being developed under this program is based on a symbolic pattern-matching framework, which is suited for the autonomous acquisition scenario. It is based on matching a symbolic representation derived from the two images, and it can accommodate the stringent pattern-matchine criteria established by the scenario: enormous differences in the scene perspective, aspect and range between the two sensors, differences in sensor characteristics and illumination, and scene changes such as target motion and obscuration from one view point ot the other. This report contains a description of an efficient branch-and-bound technique for symbolic pattern matching. Also presented are the results of applying a simulation of the algorithm to pairs of FLIR images of military vehicles in cluttered environments as well as pairs of images from different sensors (FLIR and silicon TV). The computational requirements are analyzed toward real-time implementation, and avenues of future work are recommended.

  7. Technique and Observation of Angular Gait Patterns in Running

    PubMed Central

    Sykes, K.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for the biomechanical analysis of running is described with specific reference to the angular displacement patterns of the lower limb. From high speed cine film recording profile views of the running gait, the Thigh, Knee and Ankle angles are measured during one complete cycle. Results are presented in the form of vector-space diagrams, namely Thigh-Knee angle and Knee-Ankle angle cyclograms. The diagrams are interpreted and some experimental observations are presented and discussed. The technique provides a useful research tool and a very good `teaching asset' for biomechanical studies of movement.

  8. Simulation-based data processing using repeated pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Youping

    2003-07-01

    In typical integrated circuits (IC) designs, the final layout generally contains a lot of repeated patterns. Many of these repetitions are captured by the layout hierarchy. That is, the layout contains many cells that are each repeatedly placed in many locations with different transformation. Effective use of such repetition information in the computation intensive operations such as model-based optical proximity correction (OPC), verification, or contour generation, can lead to significant performance improvement. However, in many other occasions, such repetition information is not directly available. For example, if the layout is flattened, then all the hierarchy that captures the repetition information is lost. Even in hierarchical layout, a cell can contain repeated geometries or patterns. In order for the application to take advantage of such property, a mechanism to efficiently capture such repetition information is necessary. In this paper, we consider the model-based applications that have a unique property, which allows us to find different geometrical patterns that are equivalent in principle for simulation purpose. We introduce a proximity-based pattern identification method which aims at recognizing the maximum amount of repetition in the layout. This method not only captures repeated or symmetric geometries that are present from either the flattening of the hierarchy or within a cell itself, but also finds symmetries within the geometries themselves. The method also finds partial repetitions of geometries that are not completely identical or symmetric. Ideally, these "equivalent" patterns will eventually carry the same processing results with miniscule variations small enough to be ignored for the application. For this reason, it is sufficient to run the computationally expensive model-based operations for one of the pattern and carry the result to the rest of the patterns of the same family. Doing so reduces the problem size as well as the amount of

  9. A smart pattern recognition system for the automatic identification of aerospace acoustic sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cabell, R. H.; Fuller, C. R.

    1989-01-01

    An intelligent air-noise recognition system is described that uses pattern recognition techniques to distinguish noise signatures of five different types of acoustic sources, including jet planes, propeller planes, a helicopter, train, and wind turbine. Information for classification is calculated using the power spectral density and autocorrelation taken from the output of a single microphone. Using this system, as many as 90 percent of test recordings were correctly identified, indicating that the linear discriminant functions developed can be used for aerospace source identification.

  10. Pattern of Smell Identification Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Velayudhan, Latha; Gasper, Amy; Pritchard, Megan; Baillon, Sarah; Messer, Charlotte; Proitsi, Petroula

    2015-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction in general, and impaired odor identification in particular, have been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD). Olfactory testing may be a useful diagnostic aid for AD, but the types of odor most commonly affected need to be identified. This study aimed to determine pattern and types of odor affected in AD with the goal of improving clinical applicability. 54 outpatients with mild to moderate AD and 40 age and gender-matched non-demented controls (NDC) were tested using British version of University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT; Sensonics, Inc., Haddon Heights, NJ) and data analyzed to identify an optimal subset of UPSIT to best differentiate AD patients from controls. AD subjects had significantly lower UPSIT total scores than NDC. Random Forest with backward elimination identified 12 UPSIT items which accurately differentiated AD patients compared to controls (sensitivity, 0.89 and specificity, 0.83, positive predictive value of 0.889, and negative predictive value of 0.833). The 12 smell items found to be most affected in AD subjects reflects important attributes such as safety and food, known to be affected in people with AD and that has the potential to impair activities of daily living. The 12 items of British UPSIT most affected in AD subjects provides a potential brief scale for early detection of AD in clinical settings. Independent replication is needed to validate these findings.

  11. Line identification studies using traditional techniques and wavelength coincidence statistics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowley, Charles R.; Adelman, Saul J.

    1990-01-01

    Traditional line identification techniques result in the assignment of individual lines to an atomic or ionic species. These methods may be supplemented by wavelength coincidence statistics (WCS). The strength and weakness of these methods are discussed using spectra of a number of normal and peculiar B and A stars that have been studied independently by both methods. The present results support the overall findings of some earlier studies. WCS would be most useful in a first survey, before traditional methods have been applied. WCS can quickly make a global search for all species and in this way may enable identifications of an unexpected spectrum that could easily be omitted entirely from a traditional study. This is illustrated by O I. WCS is a subject to well known weakness of any statistical technique, for example, a predictable number of spurious results are to be expected. The danger of small number statistics are illustrated. WCS is at its best relative to traditional methods in finding a line-rich atomic species that is only weakly present in a complicated stellar spectrum.

  12. Identification and interpretation of patterns in rocket engine data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lo, C. F.; Wu, K.; Whitehead, B. A.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype software system was constructed to detect anomalous Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) behavior in the early stages of fault development significantly earlier than the indication provided by either redline detection mechanism or human expert analysis. The major task of the research project is to analyze ground test data, to identify patterns associated with the anomalous engine behavior, and to develop a pattern identification and detection system on the basis of this analysis. A prototype expert system which was developed on both PC and Symbolics 3670 lisp machine for detecting anomalies in turbopump vibration data was checked with data from ground tests 902-473, 902-501, 902-519, and 904-097 of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The neural networks method was also applied to supplement the statistical method utilized in the prototype system to investigate the feasibility in detecting anomalies in turbopump vibration of SSME. In most cases the anomalies detected by the expert system agree with those reported by NASA. On the neural networks approach, the results are given the successful detection rate higher than 95 percent to identify either normal or abnormal running condition based on the experimental data as well as numerical simulation.

  13. Identification and interpretation of patterns in rocket engine data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. F.; Wu, K.; Whitehead, B. A.

    1993-10-01

    A prototype software system was constructed to detect anomalous Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) behavior in the early stages of fault development significantly earlier than the indication provided by either redline detection mechanism or human expert analysis. The major task of the research project is to analyze ground test data, to identify patterns associated with the anomalous engine behavior, and to develop a pattern identification and detection system on the basis of this analysis. A prototype expert system which was developed on both PC and Symbolics 3670 lisp machine for detecting anomalies in turbopump vibration data was checked with data from ground tests 902-473, 902-501, 902-519, and 904-097 of the Space Shuttle Main Engine. The neural networks method was also applied to supplement the statistical method utilized in the prototype system to investigate the feasibility in detecting anomalies in turbopump vibration of SSME. In most cases the anomalies detected by the expert system agree with those reported by NASA. On the neural networks approach, the results are given the successful detection rate higher than 95 percent to identify either normal or abnormal running condition based on the experimental data as well as numerical simulation.

  14. Effective techniques for the identification and accommodation of disturbances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    The successful control of dynamic systems such as space stations, or launch vehicles, requires a controller design methodology that acknowledges and addresses the disruptive effects caused by external and internal disturbances that inevitably act on such systems. These disturbances, technically defined as uncontrollable inputs, typically vary with time in an uncertain manner and usually cannot be directly measured in real time. A relatively new non-statistical technique for modeling, and (on-line) identification, of those complex uncertain disturbances that are not as erratic and capricious as random noise is described. This technique applies to multi-input cases and to many of the practical disturbances associated with the control of space stations, or launch vehicles. Then, a collection of smart controller design techniques that allow controlled dynamic systems, with possible multi-input controls, to accommodate (cope with) such disturbances with extraordinary effectiveness are associated. These new smart controllers are designed by non-statistical techniques and typically turn out to be unconventional forms of dynamic linear controllers (compensators) with constant coefficients. The simplicity and reliability of linear, constant coefficient controllers is well-known in the aerospace field.

  15. Vocalisation sound pattern identification in young broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Fontana, I; Tullo, E; Scrase, A; Butterworth, A

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we describe the monitoring of young broiler chicken vocalisation, with sound recorded and assessed at regular intervals throughout the life of the birds from day 1 to day 38, with a focus on the first week of life. We assess whether there are recognisable, and even predictable, vocalisation patterns based on frequency and sound spectrum analysis, which can be observed in birds at different ages and stages of growth within the relatively short life of the birds in commercial broiler production cycles. The experimental trials were carried out in a farm where the broiler where reared indoor, and audio recording procedures carried out over 38 days. The recordings were made using two microphones connected to a digital recorder, and the sonic data was collected in situations without disturbance of the animals beyond that created by the routine activities of the farmer. Digital files of 1 h duration were cut into short files of 10 min duration, and these sound recordings were analysed and labelled using audio analysis software. Analysis of these short sound files showed that the key vocalisation frequency and patterns changed in relation to increasing age and the weight of the broilers. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation (P<0.001) between the frequency of vocalisation and the age of the birds. Based on the identification of specific frequencies of the sounds emitted, in relation to age and weight, it is proposed that there is potential for audio monitoring and comparison with 'anticipated' sound patterns to be used to evaluate the status of farmed broiler chicken. PMID:26227085

  16. Evaluation of the use of fiber optic sensors in identification of fresco fracturing patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Dobkin, David P.

    2015-04-01

    Ageing of materials and extreme events tend to damage structures, and ancient historical monuments are particularly vulnerable due to their age and long-term exposure to adverse events and influences. As an example, the wall paintings (frescoes) from the seventeenth century BCE found at the archaeological site of Akrotiri (Santorini, Greece) were recovered from volcanic ash in fragments with dimensions ranging from a few centimeters to a few decimeters. Identification of the fracturing patterns is helpful to the process of piecing together the fragments of frescos. Previous work has involved looking at fracturing patterns in frescos that have been reassembled. Recent work has looked at the process by which fractures develop. Current identification techniques involve experimental study of fracture development on plaster molds using a high-speed camera combined with sophisticated algorithms for pattern recognition. However, the use of a high-speed camera is challenging due to very demanding data processing and analysis and some inaccuracies in identification of fracture initialization generated by light conditions. This paper aims to evaluate whether or not short-gauge fiber optic sensors (FOS) based on Fiber Brag-Gratings (FBG), can be used to help identify the fracturing patterns of falling frescoes as a complement to high-speed cameras. In total four tests were performed using surface and embedded sensors on various plaster molds. The data taken by sensors installed on the surface of the mold were more complex to analyze and interpret than the data taken by embedded sensors, since the former reflected combined influence from fracture and bending. While their practicality is challenged by cost, moderately dense arrays of embedded FOS are found to be a plausible complement to the high speed-camera in the experiments.

  17. Fixed Pattern Noise Compensation Techniques For Staring Infrared Focal Planes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrison, C. L.; Foss, N. A.

    1980-10-01

    To utilize the full performance advantages of staring infrared imaging systems currently under development, it is necessary to compensate for the characteristic fixed pattern "noise" which is present at the output from these infrared focal planes. Since many of the applications for staring sensor systems require low power dissipation configurations, it is necessary to develop automatic nonuniformity compensation electronics which have much lower power dissipation requirements than conventional digital compensation techniques. This paper discusses the sources of the nonuniformities and describes the typical characteristics of elevated temperature staring arrays. An analysis is given which shows how detector/charge-coupled device electrical coupling techniques strongly influence the compensation implementation, and finally a review of circuit configurations for the compensation function will be given which shows that very low power dissipation circuitry can be developed which meets the performance power dissipation requirements.

  18. Chemical Detection and Identification Techniques for Exobiology Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Sheverev, Valery A.; Khromov, Nikolai A.

    2002-01-01

    Exobiology flight experiments require highly sensitive instrumentation for in situ analysis of the volatile chemical species that occur in the atmospheres and surfaces of various bodies within the solar system. The complex mixtures encountered place a heavy burden on the analytical Instrumentation to detect and identify all species present. The minimal resources available onboard for such missions mandate that the instruments provide maximum analytical capabilities with minimal requirements of volume, weight and consumables. Advances in technology may be achieved by increasing the amount of information acquired by a given technique with greater analytical capabilities and miniaturization of proven terrestrial technology. We describe here methods to develop analytical instruments for the detection and identification of a wide range of chemical species using Gas Chromatography. These efforts to expand the analytical capabilities of GC technology are focused on the development of detectors for the GC which provide sample identification independent of the GC retention time data. A novel new approach employs Penning Ionization Electron Spectroscopy (PIES).

  19. Identification of Reliable Sulcal Patterns of the Human Rolandic Region.

    PubMed

    Mellerio, Charles; Lapointe, Marie-Noël; Roca, Pauline; Charron, Sylvain; Legrand, Laurence; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine; Cachia, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of the human cortex is its huge morphological variability. Although a comprehensive literature about the sulco-gyral pattern of the central region is available from post-mortem data, a reliable and reproducible characterization from in vivo data is still lacking. The aim of this study is to test the reliability of morphological criteria of the central region sulci used in post-mortem data, when applied to in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Thirty right-handed healthy individuals were included in the study. Automated segmentation and three dimensional (3D) surface-based rendering were obtained from clinical 3D T1-weighted MRI. Two senior radiologists labeled the three sulci composing the central region (precentral [PreCS], central [CS] and postcentral [PostCS]) and analyzed their morphological variations using 47 standard criteria derived from Ono's atlas based on post-mortem data. For each criterion, inter-rater concordance and comparison with the occurrence frequency provided in Ono's atlas were estimated. Overall, the sulcal pattern criteria derived from MRI data were highly reproducible between the raters with a high mean inter-rater concordance in the three sulci (CS: κ = 0.92 in left hemisphere/κ = 0.91 in right hemisphere; PreCS: κ = 0.91/κ = 0.93; PostCS: κ = 0.84/0.79). Only a very limited number of sulcal criteria significantly differed between the in vivo and the post-mortem data (CS: 2 criteria in the left hemisphere/3 criteria in the right hemisphere; PreCS: 3 in the left and right hemispheres; PostCS: 3 in the left hemisphere and 5 in the right hemisphere). Our study provides a comprehensive description of qualitative sulcal patterns in the central region from in vivo clinical MRI with high agreement with previous post-mortem data. Such identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the central region visible with standard clinical MRI data paves the way for the detection of subtle variations of the central sulcation

  20. Identification of Reliable Sulcal Patterns of the Human Rolandic Region

    PubMed Central

    Mellerio, Charles; Lapointe, Marie-Noël; Roca, Pauline; Charron, Sylvain; Legrand, Laurence; Meder, Jean-François; Oppenheim, Catherine; Cachia, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A major feature of the human cortex is its huge morphological variability. Although a comprehensive literature about the sulco-gyral pattern of the central region is available from post-mortem data, a reliable and reproducible characterization from in vivo data is still lacking. The aim of this study is to test the reliability of morphological criteria of the central region sulci used in post-mortem data, when applied to in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data. Thirty right-handed healthy individuals were included in the study. Automated segmentation and three dimensional (3D) surface-based rendering were obtained from clinical 3D T1-weighted MRI. Two senior radiologists labeled the three sulci composing the central region (precentral [PreCS], central [CS] and postcentral [PostCS]) and analyzed their morphological variations using 47 standard criteria derived from Ono’s atlas based on post-mortem data. For each criterion, inter-rater concordance and comparison with the occurrence frequency provided in Ono’s atlas were estimated. Overall, the sulcal pattern criteria derived from MRI data were highly reproducible between the raters with a high mean inter-rater concordance in the three sulci (CS: κ = 0.92 in left hemisphere/κ = 0.91 in right hemisphere; PreCS: κ = 0.91/κ = 0.93; PostCS: κ = 0.84/0.79). Only a very limited number of sulcal criteria significantly differed between the in vivo and the post-mortem data (CS: 2 criteria in the left hemisphere/3 criteria in the right hemisphere; PreCS: 3 in the left and right hemispheres; PostCS: 3 in the left hemisphere and 5 in the right hemisphere). Our study provides a comprehensive description of qualitative sulcal patterns in the central region from in vivo clinical MRI with high agreement with previous post-mortem data. Such identification of reliable sulcal patterns of the central region visible with standard clinical MRI data paves the way for the detection of subtle variations of the central sulcation

  1. Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) Panel Meeting Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Holbrook

    2007-07-01

    Phenomena Identification and Ranking Technique (PIRT) is a systematic way of gathering information from experts on a specific subject and ranking the importance of the information. NRC, in collaboration with DOE and the working group, conducted the PIRT exercises to identify safety-relevant phenomena for NGNP, and to assess and rank the importance and knowledge base for each phenomenon. The overall objective was to provide NRC with an expert assessment of the safety-relevant NGNP phenomena, and an overall assessment of R and D needs for NGNP licensing. The PIRT process was applied to five major topical areas relevant to NGNP safety and licensing: (1) thermofluids and accident analysis (including neutronics), (2) fission product transport, (3) high temperature materials, (4) graphite, and (5) process heat for hydrogen cogeneration.

  2. Whole-pattern fitting technique in serial femtosecond nanocrystallography

    PubMed Central

    Dilanian, Ruben A.; Williams, Sophie R.; Martin, Andrew V.; Streltsov, Victor A.; Quiney, Harry M.

    2016-01-01

    Serial femtosecond X-ray crystallography (SFX) has created new opportunities in the field of structural analysis of protein nanocrystals. The intensity and timescale characteristics of the X-ray free-electron laser sources used in SFX experiments necessitate the analysis of a large collection of individual crystals of variable shape and quality to ultimately solve a single, average crystal structure. Ensembles of crystals are commonly encountered in powder diffraction, but serial crystallography is different because each crystal is measured individually and can be oriented via indexing and merged into a three-dimensional data set, as is done for conventional crystallography data. In this way, serial femtosecond crystallography data lie in between conventional crystallography data and powder diffraction data, sharing features of both. The extremely small sizes of nanocrystals, as well as the possible imperfections of their crystallite structure, significantly affect the diffraction pattern and raise the question of how best to extract accurate structure-factor moduli from serial crystallography data. Here it is demonstrated that whole-pattern fitting techniques established for one-dimensional powder diffraction analysis can be feasibly extended to higher dimensions for the analysis of merged SFX diffraction data. It is shown that for very small crystals, whole-pattern fitting methods are more accurate than Monte Carlo integration methods that are currently used. PMID:27006776

  3. System identification and model reduction using modulating function techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shen, Yan

    1993-01-01

    Weighted least squares (WLS) and adaptive weighted least squares (AWLS) algorithms are initiated for continuous-time system identification using Fourier type modulating function techniques. Two stochastic signal models are examined using the mean square properties of the stochastic calculus: an equation error signal model with white noise residuals, and a more realistic white measurement noise signal model. The covariance matrices in each model are shown to be banded and sparse, and a joint likelihood cost function is developed which links the real and imaginary parts of the modulated quantities. The superior performance of above algorithms is demonstrated by comparing them with the LS/MFT and popular predicting error method (PEM) through 200 Monte Carlo simulations. A model reduction problem is formulated with the AWLS/MFT algorithm, and comparisons are made via six examples with a variety of model reduction techniques, including the well-known balanced realization method. Here the AWLS/MFT algorithm manifests higher accuracy in almost all cases, and exhibits its unique flexibility and versatility. Armed with this model reduction, the AWLS/MFT algorithm is extended into MIMO transfer function system identification problems. The impact due to the discrepancy in bandwidths and gains among subsystem is explored through five examples. Finally, as a comprehensive application, the stability derivatives of the longitudinal and lateral dynamics of an F-18 aircraft are identified using physical flight data provided by NASA. A pole-constrained SIMO and MIMO AWLS/MFT algorithm is devised and analyzed. Monte Carlo simulations illustrate its high-noise rejecting properties. Utilizing the flight data, comparisons among different MFT algorithms are tabulated and the AWLS is found to be strongly favored in almost all facets.

  4. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF SPEECH SOUNDS USING CORTICAL ACTIVITY PATTERNS

    PubMed Central

    Centanni, T.M.; Sloan, A.M.; Reed, A.C.; Engineer, C.T.; Rennaker, R.; Kilgard, M.P.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a classifier capable of locating and identifying speech sounds using activity from rat auditory cortex with an accuracy equivalent to behavioral performance without the need to specify the onset time of the speech sounds. This classifier can identify speech sounds from a large speech set within 40 ms of stimulus presentation. To compare the temporal limits of the classifier to behavior, we developed a novel task that requires rats to identify individual consonant sounds from a stream of distracter consonants. The classifier successfully predicted the ability of rats to accurately identify speech sounds for syllable presentation rates up to 10 syllables per second (up to 17.9 ± 1.5 bits/sec), which is comparable to human performance. Our results demonstrate that the spatiotemporal patterns generated in primary auditory cortex can be used to quickly and accurately identify consonant sounds from a continuous speech stream without prior knowledge of the stimulus onset times. Improved understanding of the neural mechanisms that support robust speech processing in difficult listening conditions could improve the identification and treatment of a variety of speech processing disorders. PMID:24286757

  5. Behavioral pattern identification for structural health monitoring in complex systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Shalabh

    Estimation of structural damage and quantification of structural integrity are critical for safe and reliable operation of human-engineered complex systems, such as electromechanical, thermofluid, and petrochemical systems. Damage due to fatigue crack is one of the most commonly encountered sources of structural degradation in mechanical systems. Early detection of fatigue damage is essential because the resulting structural degradation could potentially cause catastrophic failures, leading to loss of expensive equipment and human life. Therefore, for reliable operation and enhanced availability, it is necessary to develop capabilities for prognosis and estimation of impending failures, such as the onset of wide-spread fatigue crack damage in mechanical structures. This dissertation presents information-based online sensing of fatigue damage using the analytical tools of symbolic time series analysis ( STSA). Anomaly detection using STSA is a pattern recognition method that has been recently developed based upon a fixed-structure, fixed-order Markov chain. The analysis procedure is built upon the principles of Symbolic Dynamics, Information Theory and Statistical Pattern Recognition. The dissertation demonstrates real-time fatigue damage monitoring based on time series data of ultrasonic signals. Statistical pattern changes are measured using STSA to monitor the evolution of fatigue damage. Real-time anomaly detection is presented as a solution to the forward (analysis) problem and the inverse (synthesis) problem. (1) the forward problem - The primary objective of the forward problem is identification of the statistical changes in the time series data of ultrasonic signals due to gradual evolution of fatigue damage. (2) the inverse problem - The objective of the inverse problem is to infer the anomalies from the observed time series data in real time based on the statistical information generated during the forward problem. A computer-controlled special

  6. Rapid identification of chromosomal rearrangements by PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Giradet, A.; Andreo, B.

    1994-09-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements contribute significantly to human reproductive failure, malformation/mental retardation syndromes and carcinogenesis. The variety of structural rearrangements is almost infinite and an identification by conventional cytogenetics is often labor intensive and may remain doubtful. Recent advances in molecular cytogenetics have provided new tools for detecting chromosomal abnormalities. The fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) procedure is actually the most employed technique and has led to numerous clinical applications. However, techniques required to produce suitable probes are time consuming and not accessible to all cytogenetics laboratories. The PRimed In Situ labeling (PRINS) method provides an alternate way for in situ chromosome screening. In this procedure, the chromosomal detection is performed by in situ annealing of a specific primer and subsequent primer extension by a Taq DNA polymerase in the presence of labeled nucleotides. Application of PRINS in clinical diagnosis is still limited. We have developed a semi-automatic PRINS protocol and used it to identify the origin of several chromosomal abnormalities. We report here the results of studies of three structural rearrangements: a translocation t(21;21), a supernumerary ring marker chromosome 18 and a complex chromosome 13 mosaicism involving a 13;13 Robertsonian translocation and a ring chromosome 13.

  7. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing

  8. Identification of sport fish consumption patterns in families of recreational anglers through factor analysis.

    PubMed

    Beehler, Gregory P; Weiner, John M; McCann, Susan E; Vena, John E; Sandberg, David E

    2002-05-01

    This paper reports on the identification of sport fish consumption patterns in angler families through the factor analysis technique. New York State recreational anglers and their spouses or partners were surveyed in 1991 about their consumption of Lake Ontario and Lake Erie sport fish. Respondents were surveyed again in 1997 to report the number of sport fish consumed by their children aged 5-10 years. Parental report revealed that 60% of children had consumed at least one sport fish meal over their lifetime. Anglers', partners', and children's variables were entered into three separate factor analysis models to assess consumption patterns. Factors for anglers and partners accounted for 65 and 59% of variance in consumption scores, respectively. Factors dealing with trout and salmon consumption accounted for the most variance. Children's factors accounted for 82% of variance in consumption scores, showing separation in relation to type of fish, body of water, and age at consumption. Children's factors were then used as dependent measures of separate multiple regression runs in which parental factors were entered stepwise as predictors. Significant associations between parental and children's factors were noted, suggesting that sport fish consumption patterns in parents are predictive of similar consumption patterns in children. Results suggest that sport fish consumption advisories do not fully prevent consumption of contaminated sport fish during childhood. Therefore, risk communicators may need to modify the current strategy of informing anglers and their families about sport fish consumption recommendations.

  9. Learning Pitch Patterns in Lexical Identification by Native English-Speaking Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Patrick C. M.; Perrachione, Tyler K.

    2007-01-01

    The current study investigates the learning of nonnative suprasegmental patterns for word identification. Native English-speaking adults learned to use suprasegmentals (pitch patterns) to identify a vocabulary of six English pseudosyllables superimposed with three pitch patterns (18 words). Successful learning of the vocabulary necessarily…

  10. Technique for the identification of dominant delayed neutron precursors.

    SciTech Connect

    Loaiza, D. J.; Haskin, E.

    2001-01-01

    A technique for the identification of delayed neutron precursors has been developed based on the product of cumulative yield and probability of neutron emission. The motivation behind this work is to fix the decay constants of delayed neutrons to those of the dominant delayed neutron precursors. The desirability of identifying a single set of decay constants that would apply to all fissionable isotopes and be independent of the neutron energy spectrum has been addressed by several authors. The main advantages of a fixed-decay constant representation are simplifying the analysis of epithemal and fast reactors with multiple fissioning isotopes, and improving the fit to experimental data while preserving the inferred positive reactivity scale associated with the original six-group representation. It is well known that 27 1 delayed neutron precursors exist, but only a select number of those precursors contribute significantly to the decay of delayed neutron. Using data compiled by England and Rider, which lists fission yield and probability of neutron emission values for the 27 1 known delayed neutron precursors in 32 fissioning systems, thirteen precursors were identified that are consistently dominant for alI fissioning systems.

  11. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object, such as an anatomical feature. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the anatomical feature; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  12. System and technique for retrieving depth information about a surface by projecting a composite image of modulated light patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hassebrook, Laurence G. (Inventor); Lau, Daniel L. (Inventor); Guan, Chun (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A technique, associated system and program code, for retrieving depth information about at least one surface of an object. Core features include: projecting a composite image comprising a plurality of modulated structured light patterns, at the object; capturing an image reflected from the surface; and recovering pattern information from the reflected image, for each of the modulated structured light patterns. Pattern information is preferably recovered for each modulated structured light pattern used to create the composite, by performing a demodulation of the reflected image. Reconstruction of the surface can be accomplished by using depth information from the recovered patterns to produce a depth map/mapping thereof. Each signal waveform used for the modulation of a respective structured light pattern, is distinct from each of the other signal waveforms used for the modulation of other structured light patterns of a composite image; these signal waveforms may be selected from suitable types in any combination of distinct signal waveforms, provided the waveforms used are uncorrelated with respect to each other. The depth map/mapping to be utilized in a host of applications, for example: displaying a 3-D view of the object; virtual reality user-interaction interface with a computerized device; face--or other animal feature or inanimate object--recognition and comparison techniques for security or identification purposes; and 3-D video teleconferencing/telecollaboration.

  13. Design space exploration for early identification of yield limiting patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Helen; Zou, Elain; Lee, Robben; Hong, Sid; Liu, Square; Wang, JinYan; Du, Chunshan; Zhang, Recco; Madkour, Kareem; Ali, Hussein; Hsu, Danny; Kabeel, Aliaa; ElManhawy, Wael; Kwan, Joe

    2016-03-01

    In order to resolve the causality dilemma of which comes first, accurate design rules or real designs, this paper presents a flow for exploration of the layout design space to early identify problematic patterns that will negatively affect the yield. A new random layout generating method called Layout Schema Generator (LSG) is reported in this paper, this method generates realistic design-like layouts without any design rule violation. Lithography simulation is then used on the generated layout to discover the potentially problematic patterns (hotspots). These hotspot patterns are further explored by randomly inducing feature and context variations to these identified hotspots through a flow called Hotspot variation Flow (HSV). Simulation is then performed on these expanded set of layout clips to further identify more problematic patterns. These patterns are then classified into design forbidden patterns that should be included in the design rule checker and legal patterns that need better handling in the RET recipes and processes.

  14. Quantitative Identification and Analysis of Sub-Seismic Extensional Structure System: Technique Schemes and Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, C.; Chen, W.

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative characterization of complex sub-seismic extensional structure system that essentially controls petroleum exploitation is difficult to implement in seismic profile interpretation. This research, based on a case study in block M of Myanmar, established a set of quantitative treatment schemes and technique processes for the identification of sub-seismic low-displacement (SSLD) extensional faults or fractures upon structural deformation restoration and geometric inversion. Firstly, the master-subsidiary inheritance relations and configuration characterization of the seismic-scale extensional fault systems are determined by analyzing the structural pattern. Besides, three-dimensional (3D) pattern and characteristics of the seismic-scale extensional structure have been illustrated by 3D structure model built upon seismic sections. Moreover, according to the dilatancy obtained from structural restoration on the basis of inclined shear method, as well as the fracture-flow index, potential SSLD extensional faults or fractures have been quantitatively identified. Application of the technique processes to the sub-seismic low-displacement extensional structures in block M in Myanmar is instructive to quantitatively interpret those SSLD extensional structure systems in practice. The work was supported by National Basic Research Program of China (2014CB239205) and the National Science and Technology Major Project of China (20011ZX05030-005-003).

  15. Quantitative identification and analysis of sub-seismic extensional structure system: technique schemes and processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenghua, Ou; Chen, Wei; Ma, Zhonggao

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative characterization of complex sub-seismic extensional structure system that essentially controls petroleum exploitation is difficult to implement in seismic profile interpretation. This research, based on a case study in block M of Myanmar, established a set of quantitative treatment schemes and technique processes for the identification of sub-seismic low-displacement (SSLD) extensional faults or fractures upon structural deformation restoration and geometric inversion. Firstly, the master-subsidiary inheritance relations and configuration of the seismic-scale extensional fault systems are determined by analyzing the structural pattern. Besides, three-dimensional (3D) pattern and characteristics of the seismic-scale extensional structure have been illustrated by a 3D structure model built upon seismic sections. Moreover, according to the dilatancy obtained from structural restoration on the basis of inclined shear method, as well as the fracture-flow index, potential SSLD extensional faults or fractures have been quantitatively identified. Application of the technique processes to the sub-seismic low-displacement extensional structures in block M in Myanmar is instructive to quantitatively interpret those SSLD extensional structure systems in practice.

  16. Identification of Potential Fishing Grounds Using Geospatial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Fishery resources surveys using actual sampling and data collection methods require extensive ship time and sampling time. Informative data from satellite plays a vital role in fisheries application. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to detect fish aggregation just like visual fish identification ultimately these techniques can be used to predict the potential fishing zones by measuring the parameters which affect the distribution of fishes. Remote sensing is a time saving technique to locate fishery resources along the coast. Pakistan has a continental shelf area of 50,270 km2 and coastline length of 1,120 km. The total maritime zone of Pakistan is over 30 percent of the land area. Fishery plays an important role in the national economy. The marine fisheries sector is the main component, contributing about 57 percent in terms of production. Fishery is the most important economic activity in the villages and towns along the coast, and in most of the coastal villages and settlements it is the sole source of employment and income generation. Fishing by fishermen is done on the sole basis of repeated experiments and collection of information from other fishermen. Often they are in doubt about the location of potential fishing zones. This leads to waste of time and money, adversely affecting fishermen incomes and over or under-exploitation of fishing zones. The main purpose of this study was to map potential fishing grounds by identifying various environmental parameters which impact fish aggregation along the Pakistan coastline. The primary reason of this study is the fact that the fishing communities of Pakistan's coastal regions are extremely poor and lack knowledge of the modern tools and techniques that may be incorporated to enhance their yield and thus, improve their livelihood. Using geospatial techniques in order to accurately map the potential fishing zones based on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll -a content, in conjunction with

  17. Identification of Potential Fishing Grounds Using Geospatial Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdullah, Muhammad

    2016-07-01

    Fishery resources surveys using actual sampling and data collection methods require extensive ship time and sampling time. Informative data from satellite plays a vital role in fisheries application. Satellite Remote Sensing techniques can be used to detect fish aggregation just like visual fish identification ultimately these techniques can be used to predict the potential fishing zones by measuring the parameters which affect the distribution of fishes. Remote sensing is a time saving technique to locate fishery resources along the coast. Pakistan has a continental shelf area of 50,270 km2 and coastline length of 1,120 km. The total maritime zone of Pakistan is over 30 percent of the land area. Fishery plays an important role in the national economy. The marine fisheries sector is the main component, contributing about 57 percent in terms of production. Fishery is the most important economic activity in the villages and towns along the coast, and in most of the coastal villages and settlements it is the sole source of employment and income generation. Fishing by fishermen is done on the sole basis of repeated experiments and collection of information from other fishermen. Often they are in doubt about the location of potential fishing zones. This leads to waste of time and money, adversely affecting fishermen incomes and over or under-exploitation of fishing zones. The main purpose of this study was to map potential fishing grounds by identifying various environmental parameters which impact fish aggregation along the Pakistan coastline. The primary reason of this study is the fact that the fishing communities of Pakistan's coastal regions are extremely poor and lack knowledge of the modern tools and techniques that may be incorporated to enhance their yield and thus, improve their livelihood. Using geospatial techniques in order to accurately map the potential fishing zones based on sea surface temperature (SST) and chlorophyll -a content, in conjunction with

  18. Connecting Self-Esteem and Achievement: Diversity in Academic Identification and Dis-Identification Patterns among Black College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hope, Elan C.; Chavous, Tabbye M.; Jagers, Robert J.; Sellers, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a person-oriented approach, we explored patterns of self-esteem and achievement among 324 Black college students across the freshman college year and identified four academic identification profiles. Multivariate analyses revealed profile differences in academic and psychological outcomes at beginning and end of freshman year (academic…

  19. The multi-spacer patterning technique: a non-lithographic technique for terascale integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerofolini, G. F.; Amato, P.; Romano, E.

    2008-07-01

    Since the pioneering paper of Aviram and Ratner it has become progressively clearer and clearer that molecules can perform electrical functions so sophisticated as to mimic the behavior of electronic devices, hence the idea of exploiting them for molecular electronics. The practical exploitation of the electronic properties of molecules for computing (i.e., the transformation of a collection of molecules into a device) is, however, a major problem not yet solved. In the last few years the expertise in molecular design and synthesis combined with (i) the identification of a new structure, the crossbar, able to replace those based on a planar arrangement of field effect transistors, and (ii) the development of sub-lithographic techniques for the definition of a random or ordered planar arrangement of nanometre-sized features, has nonetheless led to consider as realistic the hypothesis that molecular devices might replace silicon-based devices when the basic element of the integrated circuit, the metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor, will no longer admit further shrinking. This work is addressed to identify in which ways features (i) and (ii) can be exploited for application in molecular electronics.

  20. Identification of Polygonal Patterns on Venus Using Mathematical Morphology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moreels, P.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2001-01-01

    We develop a detection and recognition model to fully automatize the identification of polygonal faults present in many of the Magellan SAR images. Our segmentation model is based on a modified watershed algorithm. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  1. Lexical Patterns in L2 Textual Gist Identification Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yamada, Kyoko

    2009-01-01

    Gist identification or coherent situation model construction performance is an important criterion not only in L1 and L2 reading comprehension assessment but also in every aspect of discourse processing. Whereas most previous L2 research has investigated schematic knowledge of readers about relations within a text, more recent studies have used…

  2. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors.

    PubMed

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-07-07

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms.

  3. An Autonomous Star Identification Algorithm Based on One-Dimensional Vector Pattern for Star Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Liyan; Xu, Luping; Zhang, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In order to enhance the robustness and accelerate the recognition speed of star identification, an autonomous star identification algorithm for star sensors is proposed based on the one-dimensional vector pattern (one_DVP). In the proposed algorithm, the space geometry information of the observed stars is used to form the one-dimensional vector pattern of the observed star. The one-dimensional vector pattern of the same observed star remains unchanged when the stellar image rotates, so the problem of star identification is simplified as the comparison of the two feature vectors. The one-dimensional vector pattern is adopted to build the feature vector of the star pattern, which makes it possible to identify the observed stars robustly. The characteristics of the feature vector and the proposed search strategy for the matching pattern make it possible to achieve the recognition result as quickly as possible. The simulation results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm can effectively accelerate the star identification. Moreover, the recognition accuracy and robustness by the proposed algorithm are better than those by the pyramid algorithm, the modified grid algorithm, and the LPT algorithm. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm outperforms the other three star identification algorithms. PMID:26198233

  4. Advanced pattern-matching techniques for autonomous acquisition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narendra, P. M.; Grabau, J. J.

    1980-03-01

    The key objective of this effort is the development of pattern-matching algorithms which can impart autonomous acquisition capability to precision-guided munitions such as Copperhead and Hellfire. Autonomous acquisition through pattern matching holds the promise of eliminating laser designation and enhancing fire power by multiple target prioritization. The pattern-matching approach being developed under this program is based on a symbolic pattern-matching framework, which is suited for the autonomous acquisition scenario. It is based on matching a symbolic representation derived from the two images, and it can accommodate the stringent pattern-matching criteria established by the scenario: enormous differences in sensor characteristics and illumination, and scene changes such as target motion and obscuration from one view point to the other.

  5. Recurrence methods for the identification of morphogenetic patterns.

    PubMed

    Facchini, Angelo; Mocenni, Chiara

    2013-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of identifying the parameters involved in the formation of spatial patterns in nonlinear two dimensional systems. To this aim, we perform numerical experiments on a prototypical model generating morphogenetic Turing patterns, by changing both the spatial frequency and shape of the patterns. The features of the patterns and their relationship with the model parameters are characterized by means of the Generalized Recurrence Quantification measures. We show that the recurrence measures Determinism and Recurrence Entropy, as well as the distribution of the line lengths, allow for a full characterization of the patterns in terms of power law decay with respect to the parameters involved in the determination of their spatial frequency and shape. A comparison with the standard two dimensional Fourier transform is performed and the results show a better performance of the recurrence indicators in identifying a reliable connection with the spatial frequency of the patterns. Finally, in order to evaluate the robustness of the estimation of the power low decay, extensive simulations have been performed by adding different levels of noise to the patterns. PMID:24066062

  6. Identification of seismically susceptible areas in western Himalaya using pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mridula; Sinvhal, Amita; Wason, Hans Raj

    2016-06-01

    Seismicity in the western Himalayas is highly variable. Several historical and instrumentally recorded devastating earthquakes originated in the western Himalayas which are part of the Alpine-Himalayan belt. Earthquakes cause tremendous loss of life and to the built environment. The amount of loss in terms of life and infrastructure has been rising continuously due to significant increase in population and infrastructure. This study is an attempt to identify seismically susceptible areas in western Himalaya, using pattern recognition technique. An area between latitude 29∘-36∘N and longitude 73∘-80∘E was considered for this study. Pattern recognition starts with identification, selection and extraction of features from seismotectonic data. These features are then subjected to discriminant analysis and the study area was classified into three categories, viz., Area A: most susceptible area, Area B: moderately susceptible area, and Area C: least susceptible area. Results show that almost the entire states of Himachal Pradesh and Uttarakhand and a portion of Jammu & Kashmir are classified as Area A, while most of Jammu & Kashmir is classified as Area B and the Indo-Gangetic plains are classified as Area C.

  7. An exploratory statistical approach to depression pattern identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Qing Yi; Griffiths, Frances; Parsons, Nick; Gunn, Jane

    2013-02-01

    Depression is a complex phenomenon thought to be due to the interaction of biological, psychological and social factors. Currently depression assessment uses self-reported depressive symptoms but this is limited in the degree to which it can characterise the different expressions of depression emerging from the complex causal pathways that are thought to underlie depression. In this study, we aimed to represent the different patterns of depression with pattern values unique to each individual, where each value combines all the available information about an individual’s depression. We considered the depressed individual as a subsystem of an open complex system, proposed Generalized Information Entropy (GIE) to represent the general characteristics of information entropy of the system, and then implemented Maximum Entropy Estimates to derive equations for depression patterns. We also introduced a numerical simulation method to process the depression related data obtained by the Diamond Cohort Study which has been underway in Australia since 2005 involving 789 people. Unlike traditional assessment, we obtained a unique value for each depressed individual which gives an overall assessment of the depression pattern. Our work provides a novel way to visualise and quantitatively measure the depression pattern of the depressed individual which could be used for pattern categorisation. This may have potential for tailoring health interventions to depressed individuals to maximize health benefit.

  8. Yangon River Geomorphology Identification and its Enviromental Imapacts Analsysi by Optical and Radar Sensing Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lwin, A.; Khaing, M. M.

    2012-07-01

    The Yangon river, also known as the Rangoon river, is about 40 km long (25miles), and flows from southern Myanmar as an outlet of the Irrawaddy (Ayeyarwady) river into the Ayeyarwady delta. The Yangon river drains the Pegu Mountains; both the Yangon and the Pathein rivers enter the Ayeyarwady at the delta. Fluvial geomorphology is based primarily on rivers of manageable dimensions. The emphasis is on geomorphology, sedimentology of Yangon river and techniques for their identification and management. Present techniques such as remote sensing have made it easier to investigate and interpret in details analysis of river geomorphology. In this paper, attempt has been made the complicated issues of geomorphology, sedimentation patterns and management of river system and evolution studied. The analysis was carried out for the impact of land use/ land cover (LULC) changes on stream flow patterns. The hydrologic response to intense, flood producing rainfall events bears the signatures of the geomorphic structure of the channel network and of the characteristic slope lengths defining the drainage density of the basin. The interpretation of the hydrologic response as the travel time distribution of a water particle randomly injected in a distributed manner across the landscape inspired many geomorphic insights. In 2008, Cyclone Nargis was seriously damaged to mangrove area and its biodiversity system in and around of Yangon river terraces. A combination of digital image processing techniques was employed for enhancement and classification process. It is observed from the study that middle infra red band (0.77mm - 0.86mm) is highly suitable for mapping mangroves. Two major classes of mangroves, dense and open mangroves were delineated from the digital data.

  9. Ranking clinical indicators for stroke pattern identification according to clinical importance in traditional Korean medicine

    PubMed Central

    Park, Tae-Yong; Lee, Ju Ah; Kang, Byoung-Kab; Moon, Tae-Woong; Ko, Mi Mi; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2014-01-01

    Differences in the value that individual clinicians place on each clinical indicator, when performing pattern identification, can be a significant obstacle in achieving accurate and consistent pattern identification. In this study, we aimed to identify and rank the importance of clinical indicators that correspond to each pattern. During the fundamental study to standardize and objectify the identification of patterns in traditional Korean medicine (TKM) treatment for stroke (the SOPI-Stroke project), we developed the Third Standardization for Pattern Identification (K-SPI-Stroke-III), which includes 44 clinical indicators that belong to one of the four patterns (Dampness-Phlegm, Fire-Heat, Qi deficiency, and Yin deficiency). Between September 2006 and December 2010, a total of 105 TKM doctors from 11 hospitals performed four examinations on 4,012 subjects based on the clinical indicators in the K-SPI-Stroke-III, and they were asked to leave a special mark on the indicators they thought were important, regardless of the number of the indicators. A total of 1,018 patients were included in the study. Among the 44 clinical indicators of the K-SPI-Stroke-III, four indicators were highly significant in differentiating between patterns and the frequency within a pattern. In contrast, another seven indicators were almost useless. Meanwhile, six confounding indicators had outlying values for differentiating between patterns and the frequency within a pattern. In conclusion, the four significant indicators should be actively considered when identifying patterns for strokes in clinical practice. Regarding the six confounding indicators, a further study should be conducted to modify some parts of the current K-SPI-Stroke-III. PMID:25664017

  10. Microbial source tracking: a forensic technique for microbial source identification?

    PubMed

    Stapleton, Carl M; Wyer, Mark D; Kay, David; Crowther, John; McDonald, Adrian T; Walters, Martin; Gawler, Andrew; Hindle, Terry

    2007-05-01

    As the requirements of the Water Framework Directive (WFD) and the US Clean Water Act (USCWA) for the maintenance of microbiological water quality in 'protected areas' highlight, there is a growing recognition that integrated management of point and diffuse sources of microbial pollution is essential. New information on catchment microbial dynamics and, in particular, the sources of faecal indicator bacteria found in bathing and shellfish harvesting waters is a pre-requisite for the design of any 'programme of measures' at the drainage basin scale to secure and maintain compliance with existing and new health-based microbiological standards. This paper reports on a catchment-scale microbial source tracking (MST) study in the Leven Estuary drainage basin, northwest England, an area for which quantitative faecal indicator source apportionment empirical data and land use information were also collected. Since previous MST studies have been based on laboratory trials using 'manufactured' samples or analyses of spot environmental samples without the contextual microbial flux data (under high and low flow conditions) and source information, such background data are needed to evaluate the utility of MST in USCWA total maximum daily load (TMDL) assessments or WFD 'Programmes of Measures'. Thus, the operational utility of MST remains in some doubt. The results of this investigation, using genotyping of Bacteroidetes using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and male-specific ribonucleic acid coliphage (F + RNA coliphage) using hybridisation, suggest some discrimination is possible between livestock- and human-derived faecal indicator concentrations but, in inter-grade areas, the degree to which the tracer picture reflected the land use pattern and probable faecal indicator loading were less distinct. Interestingly, the MST data was more reliable on high flow samples when much of the faecal indicator flux from catchment systems occurs. Whilst a useful supplementary tool, the MST

  11. Palatal Rugae Patterns as a Bioindicator for Forensic Identification in Kodava and Tibetan Populations of India

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Deeksha Kiran; Mali, Sheetal; Divakar, Hegde Deepak; Amit, Patil; Dhairaysheel, Edake; Harsh, Unadkat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Palatal rugae are distinct to each individual and are highly specific to each individual as their fingerprints. Rugae pattern are specific to different racial groups making it convenient for population identification. Palatal rugae retain their shape throughout life and hence can be useful as an identification tool. The present study aimed at analyzing the differences in rugae pattern among Kodavas and Tibetan populations of Coorg, India and to examine if there was a difference in the rugae pattern between males and females within each group. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 30 participants between 18 and 30 years of age, equally distributed between genders from each group. Examination of maxillary cast after tracing the rugae patterns was carried out. Rugae pattern was classified as “straight,” “wavy,” “curved,” “circular” and “unification.” Statistical analysis was done using SPSS 16 software. Non-parametric Mann–Whitney test was used for pairwise comparison of two populations. Mann–Whitney two-tailed test was used to test the difference between males and females. Results: Results showed that wavy pattern was highest for both the groups. Circular rugae were totally absent in both the groups. There was a significant difference between Kodavas (mean = 1.000) and Tibetans (mean = 0.13) for unification pattern (P = 0.001). Conclusion: Palatal rugae patterns can be used as a bioindicator for human identification. PMID:26668483

  12. A system identification technique based on the random decrement signatures. Part 2: Experimental results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bedewi, Nabih E.; Yang, Jackson C. S.

    1987-01-01

    Identification of the system parameters of a randomly excited structure may be treated using a variety of statistical techniques. Of all these techniques, the Random Decrement is unique in that it provides the homogeneous component of the system response. Using this quality, a system identification technique was developed based on a least-squares fit of the signatures to estimate the mass, damping, and stiffness matrices of a linear randomly excited system. The results of an experiment conducted on an offshore platform scale model to verify the validity of the technique and to demonstrate its application in damage detection are presented.

  13. Phase plane based identification of fetal heart rate patterns

    PubMed Central

    Vairavan, Srinivasan; Sriram, Bhargavi; Wilson, James D.; Preissl, Hubert; Eswaran, Hari

    2012-01-01

    Using a phase plane analysis (PPA) of the spatial spread of trajectories of the fetal heart rate and its time-derivative we characterize the fetal heart rate patterns (fHRP) as defined by Nijhuis. For this purpose, we collect 22 fetal magnetocardiogram using a 151 SQUID system from 22 low-risk fetuses in gestational ages ranging from 30 to 37 weeks. Each study lasted for 30 minutes. After the attenuation of the maternal cardiac signals, we identify the R waves using an adaptive Hilbert transform approach and calculate the fetal heart rate. On these datasets, we apply the proposed approach and the traditionally used approaches such as standard deviation of the normal to normal intervals (SDNN) and root mean square of the successive difference (RMSSD). Heart rate patterns are scored by an expert using Nijhuis criteria and revealed A, B, and D patterns. A receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve is used to assess the performance of the metric to differentiate the different patterns. Results showed that only PPA was able to differentiate all pairs of fHRP with high performance. PMID:22254593

  14. The NLP Swish Pattern: An Innovative Visualizing Technique.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Masters, Betsy J.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Describes swish pattern, one of many innovative therapeutic interventions that developers of neurolinguistic programing (NLP) have contributed to counseling profession. Presents brief overview of NLP followed by an explanation of the basic theory and expected outcomes of the swish. Presents description of the intervention process and case studies…

  15. Development of Instrumental Techniques for Color Assessment of Camouflage Patterns

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fang, Gang

    2012-01-01

    Camouflage fabrics are produced on a large scale for use in the US military and other applications. One of the highest volume camouflage fabrics is known as the Universal Camouflage Pattern (UCP) which is produced for the US Department of Defense. At present, no standard measurement-based color quality control method exists for camouflage…

  16. A facial reconstruction and identification technique for seriously devastating head wounds.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Frišhons, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Many authors have focused on facial identification techniques, and facial reconstructions for cases when skulls have been found are especially well known. However, a standardized facial identification technique for an unknown body with seriously devastating head injuries has not yet been developed. A reconstruction and identification technique was used in 7 cases of accidents involving trains striking pedestrians. This identification technique is based on the removal of skull bone fragments, subsequent fixation of soft tissue onto a universal commercial polystyrene head model, precise suture of dermatomuscular flaps, and definitive adjustment using cosmetic treatments. After reconstruction, identifying marks such as scars, eyebrows, facial lines, facial hair and partly hairstyle become evident. It is then possible to present a modified picture of the reconstructed face to relatives. After comparing the results with photos of the person before death, this technique has proven to be very useful for identifying unknown bodies when other identification techniques are not available. This technique is useful for its being rather quick and especially for its results.

  17. A facial reconstruction and identification technique for seriously devastating head wounds.

    PubMed

    Joukal, Marek; Frišhons, Jan

    2015-07-01

    Many authors have focused on facial identification techniques, and facial reconstructions for cases when skulls have been found are especially well known. However, a standardized facial identification technique for an unknown body with seriously devastating head injuries has not yet been developed. A reconstruction and identification technique was used in 7 cases of accidents involving trains striking pedestrians. This identification technique is based on the removal of skull bone fragments, subsequent fixation of soft tissue onto a universal commercial polystyrene head model, precise suture of dermatomuscular flaps, and definitive adjustment using cosmetic treatments. After reconstruction, identifying marks such as scars, eyebrows, facial lines, facial hair and partly hairstyle become evident. It is then possible to present a modified picture of the reconstructed face to relatives. After comparing the results with photos of the person before death, this technique has proven to be very useful for identifying unknown bodies when other identification techniques are not available. This technique is useful for its being rather quick and especially for its results. PMID:25965304

  18. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  19. Identification Of Natural Dyes On Archaeological Textile Objects Using Laser Induced Fluorescent Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Abdel-Kareem, O.; Eltokhy, A.; Harith, M. A.

    2011-09-22

    This study aims to evaluate the use of Laser Fluorescent as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. In this study wool textile samples were dyed with 10 natural dyes such as cochineal, cutch, henna, indigo, Lac, madder, safflower, saffron, sumac and turmeric. These dyes common present on archaeological textile objects to be used as standard dyed textile samples. These selected natural dyes will be used as known references that can be used a guide to identify unknown archaeological dyes. The dyed textile samples were investigated with laser radiation in different wavelengths to detect the best wavelengths for identification each dye. This study confirms that Laser Florescent is very useful and a rapid technique can be used as a non-destructive technique for identification of natural dyes on archaeological textile objects. The results obtained with this study can be a guide for all conservators in identification of natural organic dyes on archaeological textile objects.

  20. Immobilization, stabilization and patterning techniques for enzyme based sensor systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Flounders, A.W.; Carichner, S.C.; Singh, A.K.; Volponi, J.V.; Schoeniger, J.S.; Wally, K.

    1997-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has recently opened the Chemical and Radiation Detection Laboratory (CRDL) in Livermore CA to address the detection needs of a variety of government agencies (e.g., Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of Agriculture) as well as provide a fertile environment for the cooperative development of new industrial technologies. This laboratory consolidates a variety of existing chemical and radiation detection efforts and enables Sandia to expand into the novel area of biochemically based sensors. One aspect of this biosensor effort is further development and optimization of enzyme modified field effect transistors (EnFETs). Recent work has focused upon covalent attachment of enzymes to silicon dioxide and silicon nitride surfaces for EnFET fabrication. They are also investigating methods to pattern immobilized proteins; a critical component for development of array-based sensor systems. Novel enzyme stabilization procedures are key to patterning immobilized enzyme layers while maintaining enzyme activity. Results related to maximized enzyme loading, optimized enzyme activity and fluorescent imaging of patterned surfaces will be presented.

  1. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2016-10-18

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  2. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G.; Ward, David C.; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2010-02-23

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  3. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOEpatents

    Mor, Gil G; Ward, David C; Bray-Ward, Patricia

    2015-03-10

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  4. Comparison of multivariate preprocessing techniques as applied to electronic tongue based pattern classification for black tea.

    PubMed

    Palit, Mousumi; Tudu, Bipan; Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Dutta, Ankur; Dutta, Pallab Kumar; Jana, Arun; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib; Chatterjee, Anutosh

    2010-08-18

    In an electronic tongue, preprocessing on raw data precedes pattern analysis and choice of the appropriate preprocessing technique is crucial for the performance of the pattern classifier. While attempting to classify different grades of black tea using a voltammetric electronic tongue, different preprocessing techniques have been explored and a comparison of their performances is presented in this paper. The preprocessing techniques are compared first by a quantitative measurement of separability followed by principle component analysis; and then two different supervised pattern recognition models based on neural networks are used to evaluate the performance of the preprocessing techniques.

  5. A new computer-assisted technique to aid personal identification.

    PubMed

    De Angelis, Danilo; Sala, Remo; Cantatore, Angela; Grandi, Marco; Cattaneo, Cristina

    2009-07-01

    The paper describes a procedure aimed at identification from two-dimensional (2D) images (video-surveillance tapes, for example) by comparison with a three-dimensional (3D) facial model of a suspect. The application is intended to provide a tool which can help in analyzing compatibility or incompatibility between a criminal and a suspect's facial traits. The authors apply the concept of "geometrically compatible images". The idea is to use a scanner to reconstruct a 3D facial model of a suspect and to compare it to a frame extracted from the video-surveillance sequence which shows the face of the perpetrator. Repositioning and reorientation of the 3D model according to subject's face framed in the crime scene photo are manually accomplished, after automatic resizing. Repositioning and reorientation are performed in correspondence of anthropometric landmarks, distinctive for that person and detected both on the 2D face and on the 3D model. In this way, the superimposition between the original two-dimensional facial image and the three-dimensional one is obtained and a judgment is formulated by an expert on the basis of the fit between the anatomical facial districts of the two subjects. The procedure reduces the influence of face orientation and may be a useful tool in identification.

  6. Coordinated Parameter Identification Technique for the Inertial Parameters of Non-Cooperative Target

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Xin; Zhang, Teng; Wu, Yaofa; Zhang, Pihui; Zhang, Jiawei; Li, Shuai; Yue, Xiaokui; Yuan, Jianping

    2016-01-01

    Space operations will be the main space missions in the future. This paper focuses on the precise operations for non-cooperative target, and researches of coordinated parameter identification (CPI) which allows the motion of multi-joints. The contents of this paper are organized: (1) Summarize the inertial parameters identification techniques which have been conducted now, and the technique based on momentum conservation is selected for reliability and realizability; (2) Elaborate the basic principles and primary algorithm of coordinated parameter identification, and analyze some special problems in calculation (3) Numerical simulation of coordinated identification technique by an case study on non-cooperative target of spacecraft mounting dual-arm with six joints is done. The results show that the coordinated parameter identification technique could get all the inertial parameters of the target in 3D by one-time identification, and does not need special configuration or driven joints, moreover the results are highly precise and save much more time than traditional ones. PMID:27116187

  7. Identification of Error Patterns in Terminal-Area ATC Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quinn, Cheryl; Walter, Kim E.; Rosekind, Mark R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Advancing air traffic management technologies have enabled a greater number of aircraft to use the same airspace more effectively. As aircraft separations are reduced and final approaches are more finely timed, there is less room for error. The present study examined 122 terminal-area, loss-of-separation and procedure violation incidents reported to the Aviation Safety Reporting System (ASRS) by air traffic controllers. Narrative description codes were used for the incidents for type of violation, contributing factors, recovery strategies, and consequences. Usually multiple errors occurred prior to the violation. Error sequences were analyzed and common patterns of errors were identified. In half of the incidents, errors were noticed in time to correct mistakes. Of these, almost 43% committed additional errors during the recovery attempt. This analysis shows that redundancies in the present air traffic control system may not be sufficient to support large increases in traffic density. Error prevention and design considerations for air traffic management systems are discussed.

  8. New techniques for clay mineral identification by remote sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Abrams, M.J.; Goetz, A.F.H.; Lang, H.

    1983-03-01

    In the past three years there have been major advancements in our ability to identify clay minerals by remote sensing. Multispectral scanners, including NASA's Thematic Mapper Simulator (analog for Landsat-D Thematic Mapper) have had several broad-band channels in the wavelength region of 1.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m. In particular, the wavelength region 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m contains diagnostic spectral-absorption features for most layered silicates. Computer processing of image data obtained with these scanners has allowed the identification of the presence of clay minerals, without, however, being able to identify specific mineralogies. Studies of areas with known hydrocarbon deposits and porphyry copper deposits have demonstrated the value of this information for rock-type discrimination and recognition of hydrothermal alteration zones. Non-imaging, narrow-band radiometers and spectrometers have been used in the field, from aircraft, and from space to identify individual mineralogical constituents. This can be done because of diagnostic spectral absorption features in the 2.0 to 2.5 ..mu..m region characteristic of different clay types. Preliminary analysis of SMIRR data over Egypt showed that kaolinite, carbonate rocks, and possibly montmorillonite, could be identified directly. Plans are currently under way for development of narrow-band imaging systems which will be capable of producing maps showing the surface distribution of individual clay types. This will represent a major step in remote sensing, by allowing unique identification of minerals rather than the current ability only to discriminate among materials. Applications of this technology will provide geologists with a powerful new tool for resource exploration and general geologic mapping problems.

  9. The Identification of Specific Methylation Patterns across Different Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Wei, Yanjun; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Dongwei; Liu, Tiefu; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal DNA methylation is known as playing an important role in the tumorgenesis. It is helpful for distinguishing the specificity of diagnosis and therapeutic targets for cancers based on characteristics of DNA methylation patterns across cancers. High throughput DNA methylation analysis provides the possibility to comprehensively filter the epigenetics diversity across various cancers. We integrated whole-genome methylation data detected in 798 samples from seven cancers. The hierarchical clustering revealed the existence of cancer-specific methylation pattern. Then we identified 331 differentially methylated genes across these cancers, most of which (266) were specifically differential methylation in unique cancer. A DNA methylation correlation network (DMCN) was built based on the methylation correlation between these genes. It was shown the hubs in the DMCN were inclined to cancer-specific genes in seven cancers. Further survival analysis using the part of genes in the DMCN revealed high-risk group and low-risk group were distinguished by seven biomarkers (PCDHB15, WBSCR17, IGF1, GYPC, CYGB, ACTG2, and PRRT1) in breast cancer and eight biomarkers (ZBTB32, OR51B4, CCL8, TMEFF2, SALL3, GPSM1, MAGEA8, and SALL1) in colon cancer, respectively. At last, a protein-protein interaction network was introduced to verify the biological function of differentially methylated genes. It was shown that MAP3K14, PTN, ACVR1 and HCK sharing different DNA methylation and gene expression across cancers were relatively high degree distribution in PPI network. The study suggested that not only the identified cancer-specific genes provided reference for individual treatment but also the relationship across cancers could be explained by differential DNA methylation. PMID:25774687

  10. The identification of specific methylation patterns across different cancers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunlong; Zhao, Hongyan; Li, Jie; Liu, Hongbo; Wang, Fang; Wei, Yanjun; Su, Jianzhong; Zhang, Dongwei; Liu, Tiefu; Zhang, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal DNA methylation is known as playing an important role in the tumorgenesis. It is helpful for distinguishing the specificity of diagnosis and therapeutic targets for cancers based on characteristics of DNA methylation patterns across cancers. High throughput DNA methylation analysis provides the possibility to comprehensively filter the epigenetics diversity across various cancers. We integrated whole-genome methylation data detected in 798 samples from seven cancers. The hierarchical clustering revealed the existence of cancer-specific methylation pattern. Then we identified 331 differentially methylated genes across these cancers, most of which (266) were specifically differential methylation in unique cancer. A DNA methylation correlation network (DMCN) was built based on the methylation correlation between these genes. It was shown the hubs in the DMCN were inclined to cancer-specific genes in seven cancers. Further survival analysis using the part of genes in the DMCN revealed high-risk group and low-risk group were distinguished by seven biomarkers (PCDHB15, WBSCR17, IGF1, GYPC, CYGB, ACTG2, and PRRT1) in breast cancer and eight biomarkers (ZBTB32, OR51B4, CCL8, TMEFF2, SALL3, GPSM1, MAGEA8, and SALL1) in colon cancer, respectively. At last, a protein-protein interaction network was introduced to verify the biological function of differentially methylated genes. It was shown that MAP3K14, PTN, ACVR1 and HCK sharing different DNA methylation and gene expression across cancers were relatively high degree distribution in PPI network. The study suggested that not only the identified cancer-specific genes provided reference for individual treatment but also the relationship across cancers could be explained by differential DNA methylation. PMID:25774687

  11. The diagnostic criteria of blood-stasis syndrome: considerations for standardization of pattern identification.

    PubMed

    Li, Si-ming; Xu, Hao; Chen, Ke-ji

    2014-07-01

    Pattern identification (PI), also called Bian Zheng ([symbols; see text]), syndrome differentiation, pattern diagnosis, or pattern classification, is the basic principle and the key concept of Chinese medicine (CM). The core of PI is CM syndrome, on which CM theory, therapeutic method, prescribing formula and the use of Chinese herbal medicine are basically based. PI, in fact, is another classification method anticipated to improve the clinical efficacy. How to make an exact PI seems to be very important for taking full advantage of PI in clinical practice. Therefore, the establishment of diagnostic criterion of pattern has been the prerequisite for the standardization of PI. In recent years, a lot of diagnostic criteria of different CM patterns have been formulated. Taking the diagnostic criteria for blood-stasis syndrome as a model, the methodologies and considerations in establishing a pattern diagnostic criterion were discussed in this paper, which might be of great reference value in future PI standardization research. PMID:24610412

  12. Nurses' Behaviors and Visual Scanning Patterns May Reduce Patient Identification Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marquard, Jenna L.; Henneman, Philip L.; He, Ze; Jo, Junghee; Fisher, Donald L.; Henneman, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Patient identification (ID) errors occurring during the medication administration process can be fatal. The aim of this study is to determine whether differences in nurses' behaviors and visual scanning patterns during the medication administration process influence their capacities to identify patient ID errors. Nurse participants (n = 20)…

  13. ArcAtlas in the Classroom: Pattern Identification, Description, and Explanation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMers, Michael N.; Vincent, Jeffrey S.

    2007-01-01

    The use of geographic information systems (GIS) in the classroom provides a robust and effective method of teaching the primary spatial skills of identification, description, and explanation of spatial pattern. A major handicap for the development of GIS-based learning experiences, especially for non-GIS specialist educators, is the availability…

  14. Laser-based techniques for living cell pattern formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hopp, Béla; Smausz, Tomi; Papdi, Bence; Bor, Zsolt; Szabó, András; Kolozsvári, Lajos; Fotakis, Costas; Nógrádi, Antal

    2008-10-01

    In the production of biosensors or artificial tissues a basic step is the immobilization of living cells along the required pattern. In this paper the ability of some promising laser-based methods to influence the interaction between cells and various surfaces is presented. In the first set of experiments laser-induced patterned photochemical modification of polymer foils was used to achieve guided adherence and growth of cells to the modified areas: (a) Polytetrafluoroethylene was irradiated with ArF excimer laser ( λ=193 nm, FWHM=20 ns, F=9 mJ/cm2) in presence of triethylene tetramine liquid photoreagent; (b) a thin carbon layer was produced by KrF excimer laser ( λ=248 nm, FWHM=30 ns, F=35 mJ/cm2) irradiation on polyimide surface to influence the cell adherence. It was found that the incorporation of amine groups in the PTFE polymer chain instead of the fluorine atoms can both promote and prevent the adherence of living cells (depending on the applied cell types) on the treated surfaces, while the laser generated carbon layer on polyimide surface did not effectively improve adherence. Our attempts to influence the cell adherence by morphological modifications created by ArF laser irradiation onto polyethylene terephtalate surface showed a surface roughness dependence. This method was effective only when the Ra roughness parameter of the developed structure did not exceed the 0.1 micrometer value. Pulsed laser deposition with femtosecond KrF excimer lasers ( F=2.2 J/cm2) was effectively used to deposit structured thin films from biomaterials (endothelial cell growth supplement and collagen embedded in starch matrix) to promote the adherence and growth of cells. These results present evidence that some surface can be successfully altered to induce guided cell growth.

  15. Comparison of Three Statistical Classification Techniques for Maser Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, Ellen M.; Holland, Barbara R.; Ellingsen, Simon P.; Breen, Shari L.; Chen, Xi; Humphries, Melissa

    2016-04-01

    We applied three statistical classification techniques-linear discriminant analysis (LDA), logistic regression, and random forests-to three astronomical datasets associated with searches for interstellar masers. We compared the performance of these methods in identifying whether specific mid-infrared or millimetre continuum sources are likely to have associated interstellar masers. We also discuss the interpretability of the results of each classification technique. Non-parametric methods have the potential to make accurate predictions when there are complex relationships between critical parameters. We found that for the small datasets the parametric methods logistic regression and LDA performed best, for the largest dataset the non-parametric method of random forests performed with comparable accuracy to parametric techniques, rather than any significant improvement. This suggests that at least for the specific examples investigated here accuracy of the predictions obtained is not being limited by the use of parametric models. We also found that for LDA, transformation of the data to match a normal distribution led to a significant improvement in accuracy. The different classification techniques had significant overlap in their predictions; further astronomical observations will enable the accuracy of these predictions to be tested.

  16. Single-Round Patterned DNA Library Microarray Aptamer Lead Identification

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Jennifer A.; Mirau, Peter A.; Chushak, Yaroslav; Chávez, Jorge L.; Naik, Rajesh R.; Hagen, Joshua A.; Kelley-Loughnane, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    A method for identifying an aptamer in a single round was developed using custom DNA microarrays containing computationally derived patterned libraries incorporating no information on the sequences of previously reported thrombin binding aptamers. The DNA library was specifically designed to increase the probability of binding by enhancing structural complexity in a sequence-space confined environment, much like generating lead compounds in a combinatorial drug screening library. The sequence demonstrating the highest fluorescence intensity upon target addition was confirmed to bind the target molecule thrombin with specificity by surface plasmon resonance, and a novel imino proton NMR/2D NOESY combination was used to screen the structure for G-quartet formation. We propose that the lack of G-quartet structure in microarray-derived aptamers may highlight differences in binding mechanisms between surface-immobilized and solution based strategies. This proof-of-principle study highlights the use of a computational driven methodology to create a DNA library rather than a SELEX based approach. This work is beneficial to the biosensor field where aptamers selected by solution based evolution have proven challenging to retain binding function when immobilized on a surface. PMID:26075138

  17. Identification of crossbred buffalo genotypes and their chromosome segregation patterns.

    PubMed

    Harisah, M; Azmi, T I; Hilmi, M; Vidyadaran, M K; Bongso, T A; Nava, Z M; Momongan, V; Basrur, P K

    1989-12-01

    Chromosome analysis on different breed types of water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) was undertaken to identify their karyotypes and to determine the pattern of chromosome segregation in crossbred water buffaloes. Altogether, 75 purebred and 198 crossbred buffaloes including 118 from Malaysia and 80 from the Philippines, were analyzed in this study. The diploid chromosome number of the swamp buffalo from both countries was 48 and that of the river buffalo was 50, while all F1 hybrids exhibited 49 chromosomes. The F2 hybrids consisted of three different karyotype categories (2n = 48, 2n = 49, and 2n = 50), whereas the backcrosses included two different karyotype categories each, with 2n = 48 and 2n = 49 in the three quarters swamp types and 2n = 49 and 2n = 50 in the three quarters river types. Chi-square tests on pooled data from Malaysia and the Philippines indicated that the distribution of different karyotype categories of F2 animals did not deviate significantly from the 1:2:1 ratio expected if only balanced gametes with 24 and 25 chromosomes were produced by the F1 hybrids. In the three quarters swamp and three quarters river types, the respective karyotypic categories were in ratios approximating 1:1. The distribution of chromosome categories among the F2 hybrids and backcrosses suggests that only genetically balanced gametes of the F1 hybrids are capable of producing viable F2 and backcross generations.

  18. Dynamic speckle pattern technique on measuring in-plane deformation of metal surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingzhen; Li, Shanxiang; Sun, Yiling; An, Henan

    2001-04-01

    In order to study the metal target surface in-place deformation induced by the laser beam or other ones effecting upon, three kinds of measuring dynamic in-plane deformation techniques by means of a laser speckle, which are the speckle field time sequence processing (that is the optical flow analysis of speckle pattern), the digital speckle pattern processing (in fact, it is a kind of pattern or picture enhancement technique), and the digital speckle pattern correlation metrology, have been studded and developed. The latter, the correlation metrology, has been made a big progress: better precision and higher processing speed.

  19. Documentation of procedures for textural/spatial pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haralick, R. M.; Bryant, W. F.

    1976-01-01

    A C-130 aircraft was flown over the Sam Houston National Forest on March 21, 1973 at 10,000 feet altitude to collect multispectral scanner (MSS) data. Existing textural and spatial automatic processing techniques were used to classify the MSS imagery into specified timber categories. Several classification experiments were performed on this data using features selected from the spectral bands and a textural transform band. The results indicate that (1) spatial post-processing a classified image can cut the classification error to 1/2 or 1/3 of its initial value, (2) spatial post-processing the classified image using combined spectral and textural features produces a resulting image with less error than post-processing a classified image using only spectral features and (3) classification without spatial post processing using the combined spectral textural features tends to produce about the same error rate as a classification without spatial post processing using only spectral features.

  20. Classification system of frontal sinus patterns by radiography. Its application to identification of unknown skeletal remains.

    PubMed

    Yoshino, M; Miyasaka, S; Sato, H; Seta, S

    1987-08-01

    Frontal sinuses of Japanese skulls were radiographically examined from the view point of identifying individuals. The system of classification of sinus was proposed, basing on the area size, the bilateral asymmetry, the superiority of side, the outline of upper borders, the partial septa and the supraorbital cells. Frontal sinus patterns could be divided into above 20,000 possible combinations by combining the class numbers in each classification item described above. The frontal sinus pattern of a given person was formulated as a code number which was determined by arranging the class numbers in each classification item as serial numbers. This identification system by the frontal sinus pattern should allow one to characterize each person. The application of this identification system to an actual criminal case was also described.

  1. A novel method to inject hyaluronic acid: the Fern Pattern Technique.

    PubMed

    van Eijk, Tom; Braun, Martin

    2007-08-01

    Nonanimal Stabilized Hyaluronic Acid (NASHA) has proven itself as one of the safest, most versatile dermal fillers with a high patient and physician satisfaction. The authors describe a novel technique to inject Restylane (NASHA) in the dermis for optimal correction of dynamic facial lines. Mobile facial folds represent a greater challenge for correction using standard injection techniques. The injection technique described is named the Fern Pattern Technique. The purpose of the Fern Pattern Technique is to use Restylane in such a way that it becomes a skin stiffening agent, rather than a simple filler in order to provide optimal correction for lines that deepen with expressive facial movements. The Fern Pattern Technique also uses less material to provide a correction that is not visible at rest or during dynamic movement for lines that deepen during a smile, as well as the dynamic lower nasolabial fold.

  2. Modeling XV-15 tilt-rotor aircraft dynamics by frequency and time-domain identification techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tischler, Mark B.; Kaletka, Juergen

    1986-01-01

    Models of the open-loop hover dynamics of the XV-15 Tilt-Rotor Aircraft are extracted from flight data using two approaches: frequency-domain and time-domain identification. Both approaches are reviewed and the identification results are presented and compared in detail. The extracted models compare favorable, with the differences associated mostly with the inherent weighting of each technique. Step responses are used to show that the predictive capability of the models from both techniques is excellent. Based on the results of this study, the relative strengths and weaknesses of the frequency- and time-domain techniques are summarized, and a proposal for a coordinated parameter identification approach is presented.

  3. Intelligent technique to search for patterns within images in massive databases.

    PubMed

    Vega, J; Murari, A; Pereira, A; Portas, A; Castro, P

    2008-10-01

    An image retrieval system for JET has been developed. The image database contains the images of the JET high speed visible camera. The system input is a pattern selected inside an image and the output is the group of frames (defined by their discharge numbers and time slices) that show patterns similar to the selected one. This approach is based on morphological pattern recognition and it should be emphasized that the pattern is found independently of its location in the frame. The technique encodes images into characters and, therefore, it transforms the pattern search into a character-matching problem.

  4. Identification of Dominant Excitation Patterns and Sources of Atrial Fibrillation by Causality Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Climent, Andreu M; Liberos, Alejandro; Calvo, David; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Berenfeld, Omer; Atienza, Felipe; Guillem, Maria S

    2016-08-01

    Burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) can be reduced by ablation of sources of electrical impulses driving AF but driver identification is still challenging. This study presents a new methodology based on causality analysis that allows identifying the hierarchically dominant areas driving AF. Identification of dominant propagation patterns was achieved by computing causal relations between intracardiac multi-electrode catheter recordings of four paroxysmal AF patients during sinus rhythm, pacing and AF. In addition, realistic mathematical models of the atria during AF were used to validate the methodology both in the presence and absence of dominant frequency (DF) gradients. During electrical pacing, sources of propagation patterns detected by causality analysis were consistent with the location of the stimulating catheter. During AF, propagation patterns presented temporal variability, but a dominant direction accounted for significantly more propagations than other directions (49 ± 15% vs. 14 ± 13% or less, p < 0.01). Both in patients with a DF gradient and in mathematical models, causal maps allowed the identification of sites responsible for maintenance of AF. Causal maps allowed the identification of atrial dominant sites. In particular, causality analysis resulted in stable dominant cause-effect propagation directions during AF and could serve as a guide for performing ablation procedures in AF patients. PMID:26850022

  5. Identification of Dominant Excitation Patterns and Sources of Atrial Fibrillation by Causality Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rodrigo, Miguel; Climent, Andreu M; Liberos, Alejandro; Calvo, David; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco; Berenfeld, Omer; Atienza, Felipe; Guillem, Maria S

    2016-08-01

    Burden of atrial fibrillation (AF) can be reduced by ablation of sources of electrical impulses driving AF but driver identification is still challenging. This study presents a new methodology based on causality analysis that allows identifying the hierarchically dominant areas driving AF. Identification of dominant propagation patterns was achieved by computing causal relations between intracardiac multi-electrode catheter recordings of four paroxysmal AF patients during sinus rhythm, pacing and AF. In addition, realistic mathematical models of the atria during AF were used to validate the methodology both in the presence and absence of dominant frequency (DF) gradients. During electrical pacing, sources of propagation patterns detected by causality analysis were consistent with the location of the stimulating catheter. During AF, propagation patterns presented temporal variability, but a dominant direction accounted for significantly more propagations than other directions (49 ± 15% vs. 14 ± 13% or less, p < 0.01). Both in patients with a DF gradient and in mathematical models, causal maps allowed the identification of sites responsible for maintenance of AF. Causal maps allowed the identification of atrial dominant sites. In particular, causality analysis resulted in stable dominant cause-effect propagation directions during AF and could serve as a guide for performing ablation procedures in AF patients.

  6. Underwater DVI: Simple fingerprint technique for positive identification.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Lay See; Hasmi, Ahmad Hafizam; Mahmood, Mohd Shah; Vanezis, Peter

    2016-09-01

    An underwater disaster can be declared when a maritime accident occurred or when an aircraft is plunged into water area, be it ocean, sea or river. Nevertheless, handling of human remains in an underwater recovery operation is often a difficult and demanding task as working conditions may be challenging with poor to no visibility, location of remains at considerable depths and associated hazards from surrounding water. A case of the recent helicopter crash, into a famous river in Sarawak, domiciled by huge crocodiles, is discussed in this paper. Search and recovery team as well as the combat divers from the Special Elite Troop Commando, known as VAT 69, were deployed to the scene to perform the underwater recovery to search for all the victims on board involving five Malaysians with a pilot of Philippines nationality. This paper highlights the limitations and challenges faced during the underwater search and recovery. All the bodies recovered were in moderate decomposition stage with crushed injuries and mutilated face and body. A simple and conventional fingerprint technique were used to record the fingerprint. The prints impressions were later photographed using a smartphone and transferred back to the RMP headquarters in Kuala Lumpur for fingerprint match by using WhatsApp Messenger, a phone application. All the first five victims were identified within an average of 10min. The last victim recovered was the pilot. For foreign nationals, the Immigration Department of Malaysia will record the prints of both index fingers only. The lifting of the fingerprint of the last victim was the most challenging in which only one index finger left that can be used for comparison. A few techniques were attempted using the black printer's ink, glass and tape techniques for the last victim. Subsequently, images of the prints impression were taken using the same smartphone with additional macro lens attached to it to enhance the resolution. The images were transferred to the RMP

  7. Underwater DVI: Simple fingerprint technique for positive identification.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Lay See; Hasmi, Ahmad Hafizam; Mahmood, Mohd Shah; Vanezis, Peter

    2016-09-01

    An underwater disaster can be declared when a maritime accident occurred or when an aircraft is plunged into water area, be it ocean, sea or river. Nevertheless, handling of human remains in an underwater recovery operation is often a difficult and demanding task as working conditions may be challenging with poor to no visibility, location of remains at considerable depths and associated hazards from surrounding water. A case of the recent helicopter crash, into a famous river in Sarawak, domiciled by huge crocodiles, is discussed in this paper. Search and recovery team as well as the combat divers from the Special Elite Troop Commando, known as VAT 69, were deployed to the scene to perform the underwater recovery to search for all the victims on board involving five Malaysians with a pilot of Philippines nationality. This paper highlights the limitations and challenges faced during the underwater search and recovery. All the bodies recovered were in moderate decomposition stage with crushed injuries and mutilated face and body. A simple and conventional fingerprint technique were used to record the fingerprint. The prints impressions were later photographed using a smartphone and transferred back to the RMP headquarters in Kuala Lumpur for fingerprint match by using WhatsApp Messenger, a phone application. All the first five victims were identified within an average of 10min. The last victim recovered was the pilot. For foreign nationals, the Immigration Department of Malaysia will record the prints of both index fingers only. The lifting of the fingerprint of the last victim was the most challenging in which only one index finger left that can be used for comparison. A few techniques were attempted using the black printer's ink, glass and tape techniques for the last victim. Subsequently, images of the prints impression were taken using the same smartphone with additional macro lens attached to it to enhance the resolution. The images were transferred to the RMP

  8. Evaluation of concrete cover by surface wave technique: Identification procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piwakowski, Bogdan; Kaczmarek, Mariusz; Safinowski, Paweł

    2012-05-01

    Concrete cover degradation is induced by aggressive agents in ambiance, such as moisture, chemicals or temperature variations. Due to degradation usually a thin (a few millimeters thick) surface layer has porosity slightly higher than the deeper sound material. The non destructive evaluation of concrete cover is vital to monitor the integrity of concrete structures and prevent their irreversible damage. In this paper the methodology applied by the classical technique used for ground structure recovery called Multichanel Analysis of Surface Waves is discussed as the NDT tool in civil engineering domain to characterize the concrete cover. In order to obtain the velocity as a function of sample depth the dispersion of surface waves is used as an input for solving inverse problem. The paper describes the inversion procedure and provides the practical example of use of developed system.

  9. Phase demodulation from a single fringe pattern based on a correlation technique.

    PubMed

    Robin, Eric; Valle, Valéry

    2004-08-01

    We present a method for determining the demodulated phase from a single fringe pattern. This method, based on a correlation technique, searches in a zone of interest for the degree of similarity between a real fringe pattern and a mathematical model. This method, named modulated phase correlation, is tested with different examples. PMID:15298408

  10. Comparison of modal identification techniques using a hybrid-data approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pappa, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    Modal identification of seemingly simple structures, such as the generic truss is often surprisingly difficult in practice due to high modal density, nonlinearities, and other nonideal factors. Under these circumstances, different data analysis techniques can generate substantially different results. The initial application of a new hybrid-data method for studying the performance characteristics of various identification techniques with such data is summarized. This approach offers new pieces of information for the system identification researcher. First, it allows actual experimental data to be used in the studies, while maintaining the traditional advantage of using simulated data. That is, the identification technique under study is forced to cope with the complexities of real data, yet the performance can be measured unquestionably for the artificial modes because their true parameters are known. Secondly, the accuracy achieved for the true structural modes in the data can be estimated from the accuracy achieved for the artificial modes if the results show similar characteristics. This similarity occurred in the study, for example, for a weak structural mode near 56 Hz. It may even be possible--eventually--to use the error information from the artificial modes to improve the identification accuracy for the structural modes.

  11. Parameter identification of aggregated thermostatically controlled loads for smart grids using PDE techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moura, Scott; Bendtsen, Jan; Ruiz, Victor

    2014-07-01

    This paper develops methods for model identification of aggregated thermostatically controlled loads (TCLs) in smart grids, via partial differential equation (PDE) techniques. Control of aggregated TCLs provides a promising opportunity to mitigate the mismatch between power generation and demand, thus enhancing grid reliability and enabling renewable energy penetration. To this end, this paper focuses on developing parameter identification algorithms for a PDE-based model of aggregated TCLs. First, a two-state boundary-coupled hyperbolic PDE model for homogenous TCL populations is derived. This model is extended to heterogeneous populations by including a diffusive term, which provides an elegant control-oriented model. Next, a passive parameter identification scheme and a swapping-based identification scheme are derived for the PDE model structure. Simulation results demonstrate the efficacy of each method under various autonomous and non-autonomous scenarios. The proposed models can subsequently be employed to provide system critical information for power system monitoring and control.

  12. Improvement of sub-20nm pattern quality with dose modulation technique for NIL template production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagawa, Keisuke; Ugajin, Kunihiro; Suenaga, Machiko; Kanamitsu, Shingo; Motokawa, Takeharu; Hagihara, Kazuki; Arisawa, Yukiyasu; Kobayashi, Sachiko; Saito, Masato; Ito, Masamitsu

    2016-04-01

    Nanoimprint lithography (NIL) technology is in the spotlight as a next-generation semiconductor manufacturing technique for integrated circuits at 22 nm and beyond. NIL is the unmagnified lithography technique using template which is replicated from master templates. On the other hand, master templates are currently fabricated by electron-beam (EB) lithography[1]. In near future, finer patterns less than 15nm will be required on master template and EB data volume increases exponentially. So, we confront with a difficult challenge. A higher resolution EB mask writer and a high performance fabrication process will be required. In our previous study, we investigated a potential of photomask fabrication process for finer patterning and achieved 15.5nm line and space (L/S) pattern on template by using VSB (Variable Shaped Beam) type EB mask writer and chemically amplified resist. In contrast, we found that a contrast loss by backscattering decreases the performance of finer patterning. For semiconductor devices manufacturing, we must fabricate complicated patterns which includes high and low density simultaneously except for consecutive L/S pattern. Then it's quite important to develop a technique to make various size or coverage patterns all at once. In this study, a small feature pattern was experimentally formed on master template with dose modulation technique. This technique makes it possible to apply the appropriate exposure dose for each pattern size. As a result, we succeed to improve the performance of finer patterning in bright field area. These results show that the performance of current EB lithography process have a potential to fabricate NIL template.

  13. The application of a biometric identification technique for linking community and hospital data in rural Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Odei-Lartey, Eliezer Ofori; Boateng, Dennis; Danso, Samuel; Kwarteng, Anthony; Abokyi, Livesy; Amenga-Etego, Seeba; Gyaase, Stephaney; Asante, Kwaku Poku; Owusu-Agyei, Seth

    2016-01-01

    Background The reliability of counts for estimating population dynamics and disease burdens in communities depends on the availability of a common unique identifier for matching general population data with health facility data. Biometric data has been explored as a feasible common identifier between the health data and sociocultural data of resident members in rural communities within the Kintampo Health and Demographic Surveillance System located in the central part of Ghana. Objective Our goal was to assess the feasibility of using fingerprint identification to link community data and hospital data in a rural African setting. Design A combination of biometrics and other personal identification techniques were used to identify individual's resident within a surveillance population seeking care in two district hospitals. Visits from resident individuals were successfully recorded and categorized by the success of the techniques applied during identification. The successes of visits that involved identification by fingerprint were further examined by age. Results A total of 27,662 hospital visits were linked to resident individuals. Over 85% of those visits were successfully identified using at least one identification method. Over 65% were successfully identified and linked using their fingerprints. Supervisory support from the hospital administration was critical in integrating this identification system into its routine activities. No concerns were expressed by community members about the fingerprint registration and identification processes. Conclusions Fingerprint identification should be combined with other methods to be feasible in identifying community members in African rural settings. This can be enhanced in communities with some basic Demographic Surveillance System or census information. PMID:26993473

  14. EXPERIENCE USING PHENOMENA IDENTIFICATION AND RANKING TECHNIQUE (PIRT) FOR NUCLEAR ANALYSIS.

    SciTech Connect

    DIAMOND, DAVID J.

    2006-06-30

    THE PHENOMENA IDENTIFICATION AND RANKING TECHNIQUE (PIRT) IS A SYSTEMATIC WAY OF GATHERING INFORMATION FROM EXPERTS ON A SPECIFIC SUBJECT, AND RANKING THE IMPORTANCE OF THE INFORMATION, IN ORDER TO MEET SOME DECISION MAKING OBJECTIVE. IT HAS BEEN APPLIED TO MANY NUCLEAR TECHONLOGY ISSUES INCLUDING NUCLEAR ANALYSIS IN ORDER TO HELP GUIDE RESEARCH OR DEVELOP REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS.

  15. Gas-liquid two-phase flow pattern identification by ultrasonic echoes reflected from the inner wall of a pipe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Fachun; Zheng, Hongfeng; Yu, Hao; Sun, Yuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel ultrasonic pulse echo method is proposed for flow pattern identification in a horizontal pipe with gas-liquid two-phase flow. A trace of echoes reflected from the pipe’s internal wall rather than the gas-liquid interface is used for flow pattern identification. Experiments were conducted in a horizontal air-water two-phase flow loop. Two ultrasonic transducers with central frequency of 5 MHz were mounted at the top and bottom of the pipe respectively. The experimental results show that the ultrasonic reflection coefficient of the wall-gas interface is much larger than that of the wall-liquid interface due to the large difference in the acoustic impedance of gas and liquid. The stratified flow, annular flow and slug flow can be successfully recognized using the attenuation ratio of the echoes. Compared with the conventional ultrasonic echo measurement method, echoes reflected from the inner surface of a pipe wall are independent of gas-liquid interface fluctuation, sound speed, and gas and liquid superficial velocities, which makes the method presented a promising technique in field practice.

  16. Computer-Assisted Generation of Patterns and Virtual Reality Techniques for Fashion Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naud, Mickael; Richard, Paul; Chapeau-Blondeau, François

    2009-03-01

    We present a methodology for the design of aesthetic patterns and their visualization on virtual clothes. Generated patterns are directly mapped on the dress of a virtual mannequin. Furthermore, patterns sets may be interactively mapped on the virtual dress using a specific 3D interaction technique called Back-and-Forth. Pattern generation involves different mathematical approaches such as iterated function systems (IFS) and nonlinear trajectory models. Both model parameters and color space exploration is performed through a simple user interface. This work contributes to promote both computer assistance in the context of mass customization for fashion design.

  17. Nanoparticle chemisorption printing technique for conductive silver patterning with submicron resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Toshikazu; Fukuhara, Katsuo; Matsuoka, Ken; Minemawari, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Fukuda, Nobuko; Aoshima, Keisuke; Arai, Shunto; Makita, Yuichi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Enomoto, Takao; Togashi, Takanari; Kurihara, Masato; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Silver nanocolloid, a dense suspension of ligand-encapsulated silver nanoparticles, is an important material for printing-based device production technologies. However, printed conductive patterns of sufficiently high quality and resolution for industrial products have not yet been achieved, as the use of conventional printing techniques is severely limiting. Here we report a printing technique to manufacture ultrafine conductive patterns utilizing the exclusive chemisorption phenomenon of weakly encapsulated silver nanoparticles on a photoactivated surface. The process includes masked irradiation of vacuum ultraviolet light on an amorphous perfluorinated polymer layer to photoactivate the surface with pendant carboxylate groups, and subsequent coating of alkylamine-encapsulated silver nanocolloids, which causes amine-carboxylate conversion to trigger the spontaneous formation of a self-fused solid silver layer. The technique can produce silver patterns of submicron fineness adhered strongly to substrates, thus enabling manufacture of flexible transparent conductive sheets. This printing technique could replace conventional vacuum- and photolithography-based device processing.

  18. Nanoparticle chemisorption printing technique for conductive silver patterning with submicron resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Toshikazu; Fukuhara, Katsuo; Matsuoka, Ken; Minemawari, Hiromi; Tsutsumi, Jun'ya; Fukuda, Nobuko; Aoshima, Keisuke; Arai, Shunto; Makita, Yuichi; Kubo, Hitoshi; Enomoto, Takao; Togashi, Takanari; Kurihara, Masato; Hasegawa, Tatsuo

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanocolloid, a dense suspension of ligand-encapsulated silver nanoparticles, is an important material for printing-based device production technologies. However, printed conductive patterns of sufficiently high quality and resolution for industrial products have not yet been achieved, as the use of conventional printing techniques is severely limiting. Here we report a printing technique to manufacture ultrafine conductive patterns utilizing the exclusive chemisorption phenomenon of weakly encapsulated silver nanoparticles on a photoactivated surface. The process includes masked irradiation of vacuum ultraviolet light on an amorphous perfluorinated polymer layer to photoactivate the surface with pendant carboxylate groups, and subsequent coating of alkylamine-encapsulated silver nanocolloids, which causes amine–carboxylate conversion to trigger the spontaneous formation of a self-fused solid silver layer. The technique can produce silver patterns of submicron fineness adhered strongly to substrates, thus enabling manufacture of flexible transparent conductive sheets. This printing technique could replace conventional vacuum- and photolithography-based device processing. PMID:27091238

  19. Nanolithography and nanochemistry: probe-related patterning techniques and chemical modification for nanometer-sized devices.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Daan; Schubert, Ulrich S

    2004-05-01

    The size regime for devices produced by photolithographic techniques is limited. Therefore, other patterning techniques have been intensively studied to create smaller structures. Scanning-probe-based patterning techniques, such as dip-pen lithography, local force-induced patterning, and local-probe oxidation-based techniques are highly promising because of their relative ease and widespread availability. The latter of these is especially interesting because of the possibility of producing nanopatterns for a broad range of chemical and physical modification and functionalization processes; both the production of nanometer-sized electronic devices and the formation of devices involving (bio)molecular recognition and sensor applications is possible. This Review highlights the development of various scanning probe systems and the possibilities of local oxidation methods, as well as giving an overview of state-of-the-art nanometer-sized devices, and a view of future development.

  20. Multi technique amalgamation for enhanced information identification with content based image data.

    PubMed

    Das, Rik; Thepade, Sudeep; Ghosh, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Image data has emerged as a resourceful foundation for information with proliferation of image capturing devices and social media. Diverse applications of images in areas including biomedicine, military, commerce, education have resulted in huge image repositories. Semantically analogous images can be fruitfully recognized by means of content based image identification. However, the success of the technique has been largely dependent on extraction of robust feature vectors from the image content. The paper has introduced three different techniques of content based feature extraction based on image binarization, image transform and morphological operator respectively. The techniques were tested with four public datasets namely, Wang Dataset, Oliva Torralba (OT Scene) Dataset, Corel Dataset and Caltech Dataset. The multi technique feature extraction process was further integrated for decision fusion of image identification to boost up the recognition rate. Classification result with the proposed technique has shown an average increase of 14.5 % in Precision compared to the existing techniques and the retrieval result with the introduced technique has shown an average increase of 6.54 % in Precision over state-of-the art techniques. PMID:26798574

  1. Multi technique amalgamation for enhanced information identification with content based image data.

    PubMed

    Das, Rik; Thepade, Sudeep; Ghosh, Saurav

    2015-01-01

    Image data has emerged as a resourceful foundation for information with proliferation of image capturing devices and social media. Diverse applications of images in areas including biomedicine, military, commerce, education have resulted in huge image repositories. Semantically analogous images can be fruitfully recognized by means of content based image identification. However, the success of the technique has been largely dependent on extraction of robust feature vectors from the image content. The paper has introduced three different techniques of content based feature extraction based on image binarization, image transform and morphological operator respectively. The techniques were tested with four public datasets namely, Wang Dataset, Oliva Torralba (OT Scene) Dataset, Corel Dataset and Caltech Dataset. The multi technique feature extraction process was further integrated for decision fusion of image identification to boost up the recognition rate. Classification result with the proposed technique has shown an average increase of 14.5 % in Precision compared to the existing techniques and the retrieval result with the introduced technique has shown an average increase of 6.54 % in Precision over state-of-the art techniques.

  2. Applications of integrated human error identification techniques on the chemical cylinder change task.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ching-Min; Hwang, Sheue-Ling

    2015-03-01

    This paper outlines the human error identification (HEI) techniques that currently exist to assess latent human errors. Many formal error identification techniques have existed for years, but few have been validated to cover latent human error analysis in different domains. This study considers many possible error modes and influential factors, including external error modes, internal error modes, psychological error mechanisms, and performance shaping factors, and integrates several execution procedures and frameworks of HEI techniques. The case study in this research was the operational process of changing chemical cylinders in a factory. In addition, the integrated HEI method was used to assess the operational processes and the system's reliability. It was concluded that the integrated method is a valuable aid to develop much safer operational processes and can be used to predict human error rates on critical tasks in the plant.

  3. Evaluation of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 in water purifier efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Bechanko, Robin; Bestervelt, Lorelle L; Donofrio, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257, a representative of the coliform group, is commonly used as a challenge organism in water purifier efficacy testing. In addition to being time consuming, traditional culturing techniques and metabolic identification systems (including automated systems) also fail to accurately differentiate this organism from its closely related neighbors belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae group. Molecular-based techniques, such as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting, are preferred methods of detection because of their accuracy, reproducibility, specificity, and sensitivity, along with shorter turnaround time. ERIC-PCR performed with the 1R primer set demonstrated stable unique banding patterns (~800, ~300 bp) for R. terrigena ATCC 33257 different from patterns observed for R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica. The primer pair developed from gyraseA (gyrA) sequence of R. terrigena for the SYBR Green qPCR assay using the AlleleID(®) 7.0 primer probe design software was highly specific and sensitive for the target organism. The sensitivity of the assay was 10(1) colony forming units (CFU)/ml for whole cells and 4.7 fg with genomic DNA. The primer pair was successful in determining the concentration (5.5 ± 0.3 × 10(6) CFU/ml) of R. terrigena from water samples spiked with equal concentration of Escherichia coli and R. terrigena. Based on these results from the ERIC-PCR and the SYBR Green qPCR assay, these molecular techniques can be efficiently used for rapid identification and quantification of R. terrigena during water purifier testing. PMID:21132347

  4. Evaluation of molecular techniques for identification and enumeration of Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257 in water purifier efficacy testing.

    PubMed

    Saha, Ratul; Bechanko, Robin; Bestervelt, Lorelle L; Donofrio, Robert S

    2011-09-01

    Raoultella terrigena ATCC 33257, a representative of the coliform group, is commonly used as a challenge organism in water purifier efficacy testing. In addition to being time consuming, traditional culturing techniques and metabolic identification systems (including automated systems) also fail to accurately differentiate this organism from its closely related neighbors belonging to the Enterobacteriaceae group. Molecular-based techniques, such as real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC)-PCR fingerprinting, are preferred methods of detection because of their accuracy, reproducibility, specificity, and sensitivity, along with shorter turnaround time. ERIC-PCR performed with the 1R primer set demonstrated stable unique banding patterns (~800, ~300 bp) for R. terrigena ATCC 33257 different from patterns observed for R. planticola and R. ornithinolytica. The primer pair developed from gyraseA (gyrA) sequence of R. terrigena for the SYBR Green qPCR assay using the AlleleID(®) 7.0 primer probe design software was highly specific and sensitive for the target organism. The sensitivity of the assay was 10(1) colony forming units (CFU)/ml for whole cells and 4.7 fg with genomic DNA. The primer pair was successful in determining the concentration (5.5 ± 0.3 × 10(6) CFU/ml) of R. terrigena from water samples spiked with equal concentration of Escherichia coli and R. terrigena. Based on these results from the ERIC-PCR and the SYBR Green qPCR assay, these molecular techniques can be efficiently used for rapid identification and quantification of R. terrigena during water purifier testing.

  5. Advanced techniques for noise source identification on a large generator unit

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.G.D. ); Yang, S.J. )

    1993-03-01

    Power station acoustic noise assessment, which has experienced increased environmental awareness and subsequently more stringent legislation for a number of years, has received and added stimulus due to the recent advent of powerful measurement and analysis techniques including sound intensity and coherence. These experimental techniques are explained and results, for a generator unit, illustrate their value in providing a unique, correlated insight into noise problems. This includes noise quantification, full explanation of site sound pressure level in terms of the various influences and major noise source identification. These techniques are widely applicable and an invaluable aid to any industrial noise problem.

  6. Writing trace identification using ultraviolet Fourier-transform imaging spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hang; Liao, Ningfang; Wu, Wenmin; Li, Yasheng; Cao, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Conventional identification methods of writing traces commonly utilize imaging or spectroscopic techniques which work in visible to near infrared range or short-wave infrared range. Yet they cannot be applied in identifying the erased writing traces. In this study, we perform a research in identification of erased writing traces applying an ultraviolet Fouriertransform imaging spectrometer. Experiments of classifying the reflected ultraviolet spectra of erasable pens are made. The resulting hyperspectral images demonstrate that the erased writing traces on printing paper can be clearly identified by this ultraviolet imaging spectrometer.

  7. Remote sensing techniques for the detection of soil erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelletier, R. E.; Griffin, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The following paper is a summary of a number of techniques initiated under the AgRISTARS (Agriculture and Resources Inventory Surveys Through Aerospace Remote Sensing) project for the detection of soil degradation caused by water erosion and the identification of soil conservation practices for resource inventories. Discussed are methods to utilize a geographic information system to determine potential soil erosion through a USLE (Universal Soil Loss Equation) model; application of the Kauth-Thomas Transform to detect present erosional status; and the identification of conservation practices through visual interpretation and a variety of enhancement procedures applied to digital remotely sensed data.

  8. Evaluation of palatal rugae pattern in establishing identification and sex determination in Nalgonda children

    PubMed Central

    Thabitha, Rani S.; Reddy, Rajendra E.; Manjula, M.; Sreelakshmi, N.; Rajesh, A.; Kumar, Vinay L.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Establishing individual identification of a decedent only by dental means is a mammoth task in forensic odontology. Palatal rugae's uniqueness, its resistance to heat, and stability throughout life have been proved by its use as an alternative aid in individual identification where comparison of fingerprints and other records is difficult. Aims and Objectives: The aim of the present study was to analyze the role of palatal rugoscopy in personal identification and sex determination of Nalgonda pediatric population. Materials and Methods: The study group consisted of 100 children having mixed dentition within the age range of 8–11 years, residing in Nalgonda district. Palatal rugae pattern, shape of the incisive papillae, length of the median palatal raphae, and shape of the dental arches were analyzed using Chi-square and Mann-Whitney tests between males and females. Results: Wavy and curved patterns appeared to be most prevalent in both males and females but with no significant difference. The number of primary rugae in females and secondary rugae in males, on left side of the palate, was significantly more than their counterparts (P < 0.05). When rugae unification was observed, diverging type was significantly more in males than in females. Parabolic dental arch form, elliptical type of incisive papilla, and medium length of median palatal raphae was observed in majority of the subjects. Conclusion: The present study hypothesizes the uniqueness of the rugae in personal identification as no two palates showed similar type of rugae in either of the genders. The rugae pattern also contributes minimally towards sex determination as there was no significant difference observed between the two variables. PMID:26816465

  9. Multi-expert and hybrid connectionist approach for pattern recognition: speaker identification task.

    PubMed

    Bennani, Y

    1994-09-01

    This paper presents and evaluates a modular/hybrid connectionist system for speaker identification. Modularity has emerged as a powerful technique for reducing the complexity of connectionist systems, allowing a priori knowledge to be incorporated into their design. In problems where training data are scarce, such modular systems are likely to generalize significantly better than a monolithic connectionist system. In addition, modules are not restricted to be connectionist: hybrid systems, with e.g. Hidden Markov Models (HMMs), can be designed, combining the advantages of connectionist and non-connectionist approaches. Text independent speaker identification is an inherently complex task where the amount of training data is often limited. It thus provides an ideal domain to test the validity of the modular/hybrid connectionist approach. An architecture is developed in this paper which achieves this identification, based upon the cooperation of several connectionist modules, together with an HMM module. When tested on a population of 102 speakers extracted from the DARPA-TIMIT database, perfect identification was obtained. Overall, our recognition results are among the best for any text-independent speaker identification system handling this population size. In a specific comparison with a system based on multivariate auto-regressive models, the modular/hybrid connectionist approach was found to be significantly better in terms of both accuracy and speed. Our design also allows for easy incorporation of new speakers.

  10. A Novel Wideband Subarray Technique for Shaped Pattern Generation and Adaptively Interference Rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Q. Md.; Chakravarty, T.; Singh, G.; Sanyal, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    In this article, a simple and efficient technique for the wideband shaped beam and sector beam pattern generation with their adaptive interference rejection is proposed. A microcontroller controlled and time delay based beam forming network for simultaneously generating multiple beams, shaped beam and sector beam is conceptualized. The antenna patterns considered here is formed by linear array of isotropic elements grouped as subarray. The shaped and sector beam synthesis procedure is practically simplified by simultaneous adding the constituents beams from the subarrays, was theoretically established by Woodward and Lawson (Proc. IEE. 95(1):362 370, 1948). Apart from the shaped beam generation a technique for adaptive interference rejection in shaped patterns using combination of time delay and phase shifter is discussed. This topic promises good prospect for wideband pattern generation and interference rejection.

  11. A modified technique for fabricating a mirror image wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Gajdhar, Shaiq; Gajdhar, Sajda Khan; Salakalakonda, Srikanth Reddy; Vasthare, Abubakkar

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a technique for fabricating a wax pattern for an auricular prosthesis by tracing the shape of a sliced cast of the contralateral ear at an interval of 1-mm and transferring the shape of each 1-mm slice to a similar dimension modeling wax sheet. In this way, slices of modeling wax are obtained, which can be reversed and placed over the previous slice to produce a mirror image wax pattern of the contralateral ear. PMID:25277032

  12. [A pseudo-triangle technique for redshift identification of celestial spectra].

    PubMed

    Qiu, Bo; Hu, Zhan-yi; Zhao, Yong-heng

    2002-08-01

    In this paper, we present a novel technique for redshift identification. Redshift is a key parameter of celestial spectra. In the literature, there are few reports on redshift identification due to either no many people working on the problem or perhaps industrial confidentiality. Our technique is a pseudo-triangle technique. It consists of the following three major steps: in the first step, the three wavelengths corresponding to the three highest intensity values of an unknown spectrum are selected to construct a pseudo-triangle, and the largest angle of this triangle is calculated which is independent of redshift value. In the second step, the obtained angle is used as an index to retrieve the corresponding three model wavelengths via a pre-calculated look-up-table, which is composed of all the combinations of all the feature wavelengths of the model spectrum. And finally, based on the three corresponding wavelengths, the corresponding redshift value is derived. The main characteristic of our technique is its simplicity and efficiency, which is demonstrated by experiments on simulated data as well as on real celestial spectra. It is shown that the correct identification rate can reach as high as 86%. Taking into account the high noisy nature of celestial spectra, such a result is considered a good one.

  13. Analytical techniques for the detection and identification of chemical warfare materials from environmental samples

    SciTech Connect

    Beaudry, W.T.; Weimaster, J.F.

    1995-06-01

    The detection and identification of chemical warfare (CW) material in diverse and complex matrices has become increasingly important to support the environmental clean-up of military and industrial sites that were historically used in the research, production, use, storage and/or demilitarization of chemical weapons. Reliable and defensible identification of hazardous materials (HM) is necessary to comply with the increasingly stringent regulations imposed by local, state, and federal agencies which govern handling, treatment, storage, and disposal of HM. In addition, before sites can be reutilized, existing HM must be properly identified so that the proper methods of removal, treatment and disposal can be determined. An overview of sample preparation and analytical techniques for the detection and identification of CW materials is presented in this paper.

  14. A new coordination pattern classification to assess gait kinematics when utilising a modified vector coding technique.

    PubMed

    Needham, Robert A; Naemi, Roozbeh; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2015-09-18

    A modified vector coding (VC) technique was used to quantify lumbar-pelvic coordination during gait. The outcome measure from the modified VC technique is known as the coupling angle (CA) which can be classified into one of four coordination patterns. This study introduces a new classification for this coordination pattern that expands on a current data analysis technique by introducing the terms in-phase with proximal dominancy, in-phase with distal dominancy, anti-phase with proximal dominancy and anti-phase with distal dominancy. This proposed coordination pattern classification can offer an interpretation of the CA that provides either in-phase or anti-phase coordination information, along with an understanding of the direction of segmental rotations and the segment that is the dominant mover at each point in time. Classifying the CA against the new defined coordination patterns and presenting this information in a traditional time-series format in this study has offered an insight into segmental range of motion. A new illustration is also presented which details the distribution of the CA within each of the coordination patterns and allows for the quantification of segmental dominancy. The proposed illustration technique can have important implications in demonstrating gait coordination data in an easily comprehensible fashion by clinicians and scientists alike. PMID:26303167

  15. A new coordination pattern classification to assess gait kinematics when utilising a modified vector coding technique.

    PubMed

    Needham, Robert A; Naemi, Roozbeh; Chockalingam, Nachiappan

    2015-09-18

    A modified vector coding (VC) technique was used to quantify lumbar-pelvic coordination during gait. The outcome measure from the modified VC technique is known as the coupling angle (CA) which can be classified into one of four coordination patterns. This study introduces a new classification for this coordination pattern that expands on a current data analysis technique by introducing the terms in-phase with proximal dominancy, in-phase with distal dominancy, anti-phase with proximal dominancy and anti-phase with distal dominancy. This proposed coordination pattern classification can offer an interpretation of the CA that provides either in-phase or anti-phase coordination information, along with an understanding of the direction of segmental rotations and the segment that is the dominant mover at each point in time. Classifying the CA against the new defined coordination patterns and presenting this information in a traditional time-series format in this study has offered an insight into segmental range of motion. A new illustration is also presented which details the distribution of the CA within each of the coordination patterns and allows for the quantification of segmental dominancy. The proposed illustration technique can have important implications in demonstrating gait coordination data in an easily comprehensible fashion by clinicians and scientists alike.

  16. Techniques and applications of programmable spectral pattern coding in Texas Instruments DLP spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruett, Eric

    2015-03-01

    The architecture of a Texas Instruments DLP spectrometer allows techniques of spectrum measurement through programmable patterns previously not possible by conventional spectrometers. Handheld applications or factory settings measuring dynamic product flow may have constraints on sampling methods which vary the amount of illumination entering the spectrometer. Factory monitoring and other in situ applications may have a priori knowledge of expected substances or contaminants and have stringent sampling speed requirements. By defining custom scan patterns and decoding techniques to take advantage of this information, we show that classic time-domain challenges of time-multiplexed sensing systems can be overcome in a DLP spectrometer yielding high performance in challenging applications.

  17. Applicability of data mining algorithms in the identification of beach features/patterns on high-resolution satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teodoro, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    The available beach classification algorithms and sediment budget models are mainly based on in situ parameters, usually unavailable for several coastal areas. A morphological analysis using remotely sensed data is a valid alternative. This study focuses on the application of data mining techniques, particularly decision trees (DTs) and artificial neural networks (ANNs) to an IKONOS-2 image in order to identify beach features/patterns in a stretch of the northwest coast of Portugal. Based on knowledge of the coastal features, five classes were defined. In the identification of beach features/patterns, the ANN algorithm presented an overall accuracy of 98.6% and a kappa coefficient of 0.97. The best DTs algorithm (with pruning) presents an overall accuracy of 98.2% and a kappa coefficient of 0.97. The results obtained through the ANN and DTs were in agreement. However, the ANN presented a classification more sensitive to rip currents. The use of ANNs and DTs for beach classification from remotely sensed data resulted in an increased classification accuracy when compared with traditional classification methods. The association of remotely sensed high-spatial resolution data and data mining algorithms is an effective methodology with which to identify beach features/patterns.

  18. Uniqueness of radiographic patterns of the frontal sinus for personal identification

    PubMed Central

    Karjodkar, Freny R.; Sontakke, Subodh; Sansare, Kaustubh; Salvi, Rohini

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the uniqueness and reliability of the frontal sinuses by comparing various patterns of frontal sinus as observed on Waters' radiographs for individual identification. Materials and Methods Three Waters' radiographs of 100 individuals, taken on day one, after 6-8 months, and one radiograph with a slight variation in angulation, to mimic conditions out in the field or during autopsy. Three observers were randomly given radiographs from all there packets for comparisons and identification, by the method of superimposition and individual uniqueness. Results The comparative identification by superimposition of the frontal sinus was 100% positive. The size, shape, unilateral or bilateral presence, absence, and septa were observed to be unique in each case; neither had the measurements changed over a period of time. Conclusion The need to establish a reliable, low-cost, and easily reproducible method for human identification prompted the elaboration of technical, precise, and accessible parameters, such as the evaluation of the area, asymmetry, and shape of the frontal sinus. Comparison among each of the frontal sinuses of the 100 people in the sample revealed that no two sinuses are the same, that is, the sinus is unique to each individual. PMID:23301206

  19. Plasma microcontact patterning (PμCP): a technique for the precise control of surface patterning at small-scale.

    PubMed

    Picone, Remigio; Baum, Buzz; McKendry, Rachel

    2014-01-01

    Plasma microcontact patterning (PμCP) is a simple, efficient, and cost-effective method for the precise patterning of molecules on surfaces. It combines the use of low-pressure plasma with an elastomeric 3D mask to spatially control the removal of molecules, such as proteins, from a surface. The entire PμCP process is subdivided into three main steps: surface precoating, plasma micropatterning, and a surface postcoating step. Surfaces are first precoated with a molecular species and then placed in close contact with the 3D mask. This allows the formation of two distinct regions: an un-masked open-region which is accessible to the plasma, from which the surface layer is removed, and, a contact region which is physically protected from exposure to the plasma. In the final step, a second molecule is added to back-fill the pattern generated through plasma-treatment. The PμCP technique allows the patterning of virtually any organic molecules on different surface materials and geometries (e.g., flat, curved surfaces, and 3D microstructures). Moreover, it is a simple and robust procedure. The main advantages of this approach over traditional microcontact printing are twofold: The stability of molecule binding to plasma-treated surfaces, and the separation of the surface functionalization step from the actual micropatterning step, which enables the precise control of concentration and uniformity of patterned molecules. In conclusion, PμCP is a simple way to generate surface patterns that are highly reproducible, stable and uniform, making it a useful method for many applications. PMID:24439280

  20. Improving protein identification using complementary fragmentation techniques in fourier transform mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Michael L; Savitski, Mikhail M; Zubarev, Roman A

    2005-06-01

    Identification of proteins by MS/MS is performed by matching experimental mass spectra against calculated spectra of all possible peptides in a protein data base. The search engine assigns each spectrum a score indicating how well the experimental data complies with the expected one; a higher score means increased confidence in the identification. One problem is the false-positive identifications, which arise from incomplete data as well as from the presence of misleading ions in experimental mass spectra due to gas-phase reactions, stray ions, contaminants, and electronic noise. We employed a novel technique of reduction of false positives that is based on a combined use of orthogonal fragmentation techniques electron capture dissociation (ECD) and collisionally activated dissociation (CAD). Since ECD and CAD exhibit many complementary properties, their combined use greatly increased the analysis specificity, which was further strengthened by the high mass accuracy (approximately 1 ppm) afforded by Fourier transform mass spectrometry. The utility of this approach is demonstrated on a whole cell lysate from Escherichia coli. Analysis was made using the data-dependent acquisition mode. Extraction of complementary sequence information was performed prior to data base search using in-house written software. Only masses involved in complementary pairs in the MS/MS spectrum from the same or orthogonal fragmentation techniques were submitted to the data base search. ECD/CAD identified twice as many proteins at a fixed statistically significant confidence level with on average a 64% higher Mascot score. The confidence in protein identification was hereby increased by more than 1 order of magnitude. The combined ECD/CAD searches were on average 20% faster than CAD-only searches. A specially developed test with scrambled MS/MS data revealed that the amount of false-positive identifications was dramatically reduced by the combined use of CAD and ECD.

  1. Comparison of System Identification Techniques for the Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, A. Terry

    1996-01-01

    In this thesis linear, dynamic, multivariable state-space models for three joints of the ground-based Hydraulic Manipulator Test Bed (HMTB) are identified. HMTB, housed at the NASA Langley Research Center, is a ground-based version of the Dexterous Orbital Servicing System (DOSS), a representative space station manipulator. The dynamic models of the HMTB manipulator will first be estimated by applying nonparametric identification methods to determine each joint's response characteristics using various input excitations. These excitations include sum of sinusoids, pseudorandom binary sequences (PRBS), bipolar ramping pulses, and chirp input signals. Next, two different parametric system identification techniques will be applied to identify the best dynamical description of the joints. The manipulator is localized about a representative space station orbital replacement unit (ORU) task allowing the use of linear system identification methods. Comparisons, observations, and results of both parametric system identification techniques are discussed. The thesis concludes by proposing a model reference control system to aid in astronaut ground tests. This approach would allow the identified models to mimic on-orbit dynamic characteristics of the actual flight manipulator thus providing astronauts with realistic on-orbit responses to perform space station tasks in a ground-based environment.

  2. Application of a pattern recognition technique to the prediction of tire noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Jinn-Tong; Tu, Fu-Yuan

    2015-08-01

    Tire treads are one of the main sources of car noise. To meet the EU's tire noise regulation ECE-R117, a new method using a pattern recognition technique is adopted in this paper to predict noise from tire tread patterns, thus facilitating the design of low-noise tires. When tires come into contact with the road surface, air pumping may occur in the grooves of tire tread patterns. Using the image of a tread pattern, a matrix is constructed by setting the patterns of tire grooves and tread blocks. The length and width of the contact patch are multiplied by weight functions. The resulting sound pressure as a function of time is subjected to a Fourier transform to simulate a 1/3-octave-band sound pressure level. A particle swarm algorithm is adopted to optimize the weighting parameters for the sound pressure in the frequency domain so that simulated values approach the measured noise level. Two sets of optimal weighting parameters associated with the length and width of the contact patch are obtained. Finally, the weight function is used to predict the tread pattern noise of tires in the same series. A comparison of the prediction and experimental results reveals that, in the 1/3-octave band of frequency (800-2000 Hz), average errors in sound pressure are within 2.5 dB. The feasibility of the proposed application of the pattern recognition technique in predicting noise from tire treads is verified.

  3. Eliminating the interference pattern in near-infrared spectra used for identification of thin plastic foils.

    PubMed

    Jeszenszky, Eva; Kocsányi, Lászlo; Richter, Péter

    2004-06-01

    A Fourier type filtering method is proposed for the pretreatment of near-infrared (NIR) spectra of thin (<100 microm) transparent plastic foils before their identification by means of multivariate calibration methods. The interference of multiply reflected beams from the boundary surfaces of the foil causes a disturbing signal component in the spectrum and the identification becomes impossible. The purpose of the filtering is to eliminate the interference pattern from the spectrum. In the Fourier transformed NIR spectrum against the wavenumber there appears a discrete spectral component caused by the interference. This component can be recognized and cut off. After inverse Fourier transformation of such pretreated spectra, absorption peaks are free from interference modulation, so application of multivariate calibration methods is much more effective. With principal component analysis (PCA) on cluster plots, visual distinction between different plastics becomes possible. Correct class membership is provided by use of the Mahalanobis distance.

  4. Modelling and disentangling physiological mechanisms: linear and nonlinear identification techniques for analysis of cardiovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Batzel, Jerry; Baselli, Giuseppe; Mukkamala, Ramakrishna; Chon, Ki H

    2009-04-13

    Cardiovascular (CV) regulation is the result of a number of very complex control interactions. As computational power increases and new methods for collecting experimental data emerge, the potential for exploring these interactions through modelling increases as does the potential for clinical application of such models. Understanding these interactions requires the application of a diverse set of modelling techniques. Several recent mathematical modelling techniques will be described in this review paper. Starting from Granger's causality, the problem of closed-loop identification is recalled. The main aspects of linear identification and of grey-box modelling tailored to CV regulation analysis are summarized as well as basic concepts and trends for nonlinear extensions. Sensitivity analysis is presented and discussed as a potent tool for model validation and refinement. The integration of methods and models is fostered for a further physiological comprehension and for the development of more potent and robust diagnostic tools.

  5. Correlation techniques to determine model form in robust nonlinear system realization/identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stry, Greselda I.; Mook, D. Joseph

    1991-01-01

    The fundamental challenge in identification of nonlinear dynamic systems is determining the appropriate form of the model. A robust technique is presented which essentially eliminates this problem for many applications. The technique is based on the Minimum Model Error (MME) optimal estimation approach. A detailed literature review is included in which fundamental differences between the current approach and previous work is described. The most significant feature is the ability to identify nonlinear dynamic systems without prior assumption regarding the form of the nonlinearities, in contrast to existing nonlinear identification approaches which usually require detailed assumptions of the nonlinearities. Model form is determined via statistical correlation of the MME optimal state estimates with the MME optimal model error estimates. The example illustrations indicate that the method is robust with respect to prior ignorance of the model, and with respect to measurement noise, measurement frequency, and measurement record length.

  6. Ultrasonographic identification of the cricothyroid membrane: best evidence, techniques, and clinical impact.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, M S; Teoh, W H; Rudolph, S S

    2016-09-01

    Inability to identify the cricothyroid membrane by inspection and palpation contributes substantially to the high failure rate of cricothyrotomy. This narrative review summarizes the current evidence for application of airway ultrasonography for identification of the cricothyroid membrane compared with the clinical techniques. We identified the best-documented techniques for bedside use, their success rates, and the necessary training for airway-ultrasound-naïve clinicians. After a short but structured training, the cricothyroid membrane can be identified using ultrasound in difficult patients by previously airway-ultrasound naïve anaesthetists with double the success rate of palpation. Based on the literature, we recommend identifying the cricothyroid membrane before induction of anaesthesia in all patients. Although inspection and palpation may suffice in most patients, the remaining patients will need ultrasonographic identification; a service that we should aim at making available in all locations where anaesthesia is undertaken and where patients with difficult airways could be encountered. PMID:27432055

  7. Gender identification of Grasshopper Sparrows comparing behavioral, morphological, and molecular techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ammer, F.K.; Wood, P.B.; McPherson, R.J.

    2008-01-01

    Correct gender identification in monomorphic species is often difficult especially if males and females do not display obvious behavioral and breeding differences. We compared gender specific morphology and behavior with recently developed DNA techniques for gender identification in the monomorphic Grasshopper Sparrow (Ammodramus savannarum). Gender was ascertained with DNA in 213 individuals using the 2550F/2718R primer set and 3% agarose gel electrophoresis. Field observations using behavior and breeding characteristics to identify gender matched DNA analyses with 100% accuracy for adult males and females. Gender was identified with DNA for all captured juveniles that did not display gender specific traits or behaviors in the field. The molecular techniques used offered a high level of accuracy and may be useful in studies of dispersal mechanisms and winter assemblage composition in monomorphic species.

  8. Identification of a particular cheese production by trace analysis with nuclear techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salvini, A.; Stroppa, A.; Cagnazzo, M.; Pappalardo, P.; Borio, A.; Manera, S.

    2006-05-01

    The counterfeit of a product, in this case a type of cheese, is an economic damage for the trade-mark product. An identification of the product itself by quantification of trace elements could be done. Nuclear techniques are useful and give good results. Some elements are connected to the process so different productions could be identified. Thirty elements and 160 spectrums are analysed. The samples of the same kind of cheese come from different countries and different Italian producers (15 different productions).

  9. Reliability of System Identification Techniques to Assess Standing Balance in Healthy Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Maier, Andrea B.; Aarts, Ronald G. K. M.; van Gerven, Joop M. A.; Arendzen, J. Hans; Schouten, Alfred C.; Meskers, Carel G. M.; van der Kooij, Herman

    2016-01-01

    Objectives System identification techniques have the potential to assess the contribution of the underlying systems involved in standing balance by applying well-known disturbances. We investigated the reliability of standing balance parameters obtained with multivariate closed loop system identification techniques. Methods In twelve healthy elderly balance tests were performed twice a day during three days. Body sway was measured during two minutes of standing with eyes closed and the Balance test Room (BalRoom) was used to apply four disturbances simultaneously: two sensory disturbances, to the proprioceptive and the visual system, and two mechanical disturbances applied at the leg and trunk segment. Using system identification techniques, sensitivity functions of the sensory disturbances and the neuromuscular controller were estimated. Based on the generalizability theory (G theory), systematic errors and sources of variability were assessed using linear mixed models and reliability was assessed by computing indexes of dependability (ID), standard error of measurement (SEM) and minimal detectable change (MDC). Results A systematic error was found between the first and second trial in the sensitivity functions. No systematic error was found in the neuromuscular controller and body sway. The reliability of 15 of 25 parameters and body sway were moderate to excellent when the results of two trials on three days were averaged. To reach an excellent reliability on one day in 7 out of 25 parameters, it was predicted that at least seven trials must be averaged. Conclusion This study shows that system identification techniques are a promising method to assess the underlying systems involved in standing balance in elderly. However, most of the parameters do not appear to be reliable unless a large number of trials are collected across multiple days. To reach an excellent reliability in one third of the parameters, a training session for participants is needed and at

  10. Automatic Generation of English-Japanese Translation Pattern Utilizing Genetic Programming Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumura, Koki; Tamekuni, Yuji; Kimura, Shuhei

    There are a lot of constructional differences in an English-Japanese phrase template, and that often makes the act of translation difficult. Moreover, there exist various and tremendous phrase templates and sentence to be refered to. It is not easy to prepare the corpus that covers the all. Therefore, it is very significant to generate the translation pattern of the sentence pattern automatically from a viewpoint of the translation success rate and the capacity of the pattern dictionary. Then, for the purpose of realizing the automatic generation of the translation pattern, this paper proposed the new method for the generation of the translation pattern by using the genetic programming technique (GP). The technique tries to generate the translation pattern of various sentences which are not registered in the phrase template dictionary automatically by giving the genetic operation to the parsing tree of a basic pattern. The tree consists of the pair of the English-Japanese sentence generated as the first stage population. The analysis tree data base with 50,100,150,200 pairs was prepared as the first stage population. And this system was applied and executed for an English input of 1,555 sentences. As a result, the analysis tree increases from 200 to 517, and the accuracy rate of the translation pattern has improved from 42.57% to 70.10%. And, 86.71% of the generated translations was successfully done, whose meanings are enough acceptable and understandable. It seemed that this proposal technique became a clue to raise the translation success rate, and to find the possibility of the reduction of the analysis tree data base.

  11. Palm-Print Pattern Matching Based on Features Using Rabin-Karp for Person Identification

    PubMed Central

    Kanchana, S.; Balakrishnan, G.

    2015-01-01

    Palm-print based individual identification is regarded as an effectual method for identifying persons with high confidence. Palm-print with larger inner surface of hand contains many features such as principle lines, ridges, minutiae points, singular points, and textures. Feature based pattern matching has faced the challenge that the spatial positional variations occur between the training and test samples. To perform effective palm-print features matching, Rabin-Karp Palm-Print Pattern Matching (RPPM) method is proposed in this paper. With the objective of improving the accuracy of pattern matching, double hashing is employed in RPPM method. Multiple patterns of features are matched using the Aho-Corasick Multiple Feature matching procedure by locating the position of the features with finite set of bit values as an input text, improving the cumulative accuracy on hashing. Finally, a time efficient bit parallel ordering presents an efficient variation on matching the palm-print features of test and training samples with minimal time. Experiment is conducted on the factors such as pattern matching efficiency rate, time taken on multiple palm-print feature matching efficiency, and cumulative accuracy on hashing. PMID:26697529

  12. Palm-Print Pattern Matching Based on Features Using Rabin-Karp for Person Identification.

    PubMed

    Kanchana, S; Balakrishnan, G

    2015-01-01

    Palm-print based individual identification is regarded as an effectual method for identifying persons with high confidence. Palm-print with larger inner surface of hand contains many features such as principle lines, ridges, minutiae points, singular points, and textures. Feature based pattern matching has faced the challenge that the spatial positional variations occur between the training and test samples. To perform effective palm-print features matching, Rabin-Karp Palm-Print Pattern Matching (RPPM) method is proposed in this paper. With the objective of improving the accuracy of pattern matching, double hashing is employed in RPPM method. Multiple patterns of features are matched using the Aho-Corasick Multiple Feature matching procedure by locating the position of the features with finite set of bit values as an input text, improving the cumulative accuracy on hashing. Finally, a time efficient bit parallel ordering presents an efficient variation on matching the palm-print features of test and training samples with minimal time. Experiment is conducted on the factors such as pattern matching efficiency rate, time taken on multiple palm-print feature matching efficiency, and cumulative accuracy on hashing.

  13. Identification of microfluidic two-phase flow patterns in lab-on-chip devices.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhaochu; Dong, Tao; Halvorsen, Einar

    2014-01-01

    This work describes a capacitive sensor for identification of microfluidic two-phase flow in lab-on-chip devices. With interdigital electrodes and thin insulation layer utilized, this sensor is capable of being integrated with the microsystems easily. Transducing principle and design considerations are presented with respect to the microfluidic gas/liquid flow patterns. Numerical simulation results verify the operational principle. And the factors affecting the performance of the sensor are discussed. Besides, a feasible process flow for the fabrication is also proposed.

  14. Restriction fragment length polymorphism species-specific patterns in the identification of white truffles.

    PubMed

    Bertini, L; Potenza, L; Zambonelli, A; Amicucci, A; Stocchi, V

    1998-07-15

    A molecular method for the identification of ectomycorrhizae belonging to five species of white truffle is described. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and universal primers were used to amplify internal transcribed spacers and 5.8S rDNA, target sequences present in a high number of copies. The amplified products were digested with restriction enzymes in order to detect interspecific polymorphisms. Species-specific restriction fragment length polymorphism patterns were determined for all five species. The use of PCR in conjunction with restriction enzymes provides a sensitive and efficient tool for use in distinguishing ectomycorrhizal species and monitoring inoculated seedlings or field mycorrhizal populations. PMID:9682488

  15. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H; Mhmoud, Najwa A; de Hoog, G S

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification can therefore only be achieved with the application of molecular techniques. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are proposed as alternatives to phenotypic methods. Species-specific primers were developed to target the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of M. mycetomatis. Both isothermal amplification techniques showed high specificity and sufficient sensitivity to amplify fungal DNA and proved to be appropriate for detection of M. mycetomatis. Diagnostic performance of the techniques was assessed in comparison to conventional PCR using biopsy specimens from eumycetoma patients. RPA is reliable and easy to operate and has the potential to be implemented in areas where mycetoma is endemic. The techniques may be expanded to detect fungal DNA from environmental samples.

  16. Personality Patterns of Physicians in Person-Oriented and Technique-Oriented Specialties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borges, Nicole J.; Gibson, Denise D.

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated differences in personality patterns between person-oriented and technique-oriented physicians. It tested an integrative framework by converting the scores on the Personality Research Form (PRF) to the Big-Five factors and built a predictive model of group membership in clinical specialty area. PRF scores from 238 physicians…

  17. Reducing the size of a data base by using pattern-recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Clapp, N.E. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    An on-line surveillance system at a nuclear power plant samples data and calculates the power spectral density. A method of reducing the amount of stored data by screening the data using a pattern recognition technique was developed. The system stores only the spectra that differ from normal, plus the corresponding plant operating conditions. 7 figures.

  18. Novel On-wafer Radiation Pattern Measurement Technique for MEMS Actuator Based Reconfigurable Patch Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simons, Rainee N.

    2002-01-01

    The paper presents a novel on-wafer, antenna far field pattern measurement technique for microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) based reconfigurable patch antennas. The measurement technique significantly reduces the time and the cost associated with the characterization of printed antennas, fabricated on a semiconductor wafer or dielectric substrate. To measure the radiation patterns, the RF probe station is modified to accommodate an open-ended rectangular waveguide as the rotating linearly polarized sampling antenna. The open-ended waveguide is attached through a coaxial rotary joint to a Plexiglas(Trademark) arm and is driven along an arc by a stepper motor. Thus, the spinning open-ended waveguide can sample the relative field intensity of the patch as a function of the angle from bore sight. The experimental results include the measured linearly polarized and circularly polarized radiation patterns for MEMS-based frequency reconfigurable rectangular and polarization reconfigurable nearly square patch antennas, respectively.

  19. Standardization and future directions in pattern identification research: International brainstorming session.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jeeyoun; Park, Bongki; Lee, Ju Ah; You, Sooseong; Alraek, Terje; Bian, Zhao-Xiang; Birch, Stephen; Kim, Tae-Hun; Xu, Hao; Zaslawski, Chris; Kang, Byoung-Kab; Lee, Myeong Soo

    2016-09-01

    An international brainstorming session on standardizing pattern identification (PI) was held at the Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine on October 1, 2013 in Daejeon, South Korea. This brainstorming session was convened to gather insights from international traditional East Asian medicine specialists regarding PI standardization. With eight presentations and discussion sessions, the meeting allowed participants to discuss research methods and diagnostic systems used in traditional medicine for PI. One speaker presented a talk titled "The diagnostic criteria for blood stasis syndrome: implications for standardization of PI". Four speakers presented on future strategies and objective measurement tools that could be used in PI research. Later, participants shared information and methodology for accurate diagnosis and PI. They also discussed the necessity for standardizing PI and methods for international collaborations in pattern research.

  20. A novel jet-based nano-hydroxyapatite patterning technique for osteoblast guidance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Koller, Garrit; Huang, Jie; Di Silvio, Lucy; Renton, Tara; Esat, Minoo; Bonfield, William; Edirisinghe, Mohan

    2010-01-01

    Surface topography is well known to play a crucial role in influencing cellular responses to an implant material and is therefore important in bone tissue regeneration. A novel jet-based patterning technique, template-assisted electrohydrodynamic atomization spraying, was recently devised to control precisely the surface structure as well as its dimensions. In the present study, a detailed investigation of this patterning process was carried out. A range of nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) line-shaped patterns <20 µm in width were successfully deposited on a commercially pure Ti surface by controlling the flow of an nHA suspension in an electric field. In vitro studies showed that the nHA patterns generated are capable of regulating the human osteoblast cell attachment and orientation. PMID:19493897

  1. Robust complementary technique with multiple-patterning for sub-10 nm node device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oyama, Kenichi; Yamauchi, Shohei; Natori, Sakurako; Hara, Arisa; Yamato, Masatoshi; Yaegashi, Hidetami

    2014-03-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography is the leading candidate for sub-20nm half-pitch (hp) patterning solution, but the development of a high-output light source is still in progress thereby delaying the adoption of EUV for mass production. The evolution of 193nm immersion lithography-an exposure technology currently used in the mass production of all advanced devices-must therefore be extended, and to this end, self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) processes have come to be used to achieve further down scaling. To date, we have demonstrated the effectiveness of self-aligned double patterning (SADP) and self-aligned quadruple patterning (SAQP) as innovative processes and have reported on world-first scaling results at SPIE on several occasions. However, for critical layers in FinFET devices that presume a 1D cell design, there is also a need not just for the scaling of grating patterns but also for line-cutting techniques (grating and cutting). Under the theme of existing- technology extension to sub-10nm logic nodes, this paper presents the potential solutions of sub-10nm hp resolution by self-aligned octuple patterning (SAOP) and discusses the limits of shrink technology in cutting patterns.

  2. On the identification of damping from non-stationary free decay signals using modern signal processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramírez, Ricardo I.; Montejo, Luis A.

    2015-09-01

    A numerical implementation of system identification from non-linear and non-stationary signals is presented. The continuous wavelet transform (CWT) along with the complex Morlet wavelet skeleton curve extraction and Hilbert Transform (HT)-based methodologies are used for identification purposes. A comparison of the advantages of each technique in the analysis of non-stationary free decay systems is presented and improvements to the current methodologies are proposed. The HT approach offered good results in the estimation of the instantaneous amplitude in low damping and non-noisy signals. However, it is highly sensitive to impulses and irregularities in the signal, which affects the proper detection of frequency and amplitude parameters in real-life signals. The CWT exhibited better results for the analysis of noisy signals, from the resulting wavelet map the noise content can be distinguished from the actual system response. That is, the modes show a distinctive pattern in the map allowing proper modal extraction. However, for highly damped non-stationary decaying signals, the results are affected by the decay rate, round-up errors, and edge effects.

  3. Automatic identification of bird targets with radar via patterns produced by wing flapping.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Serge; Saporta, Gilbert; van Loon, Emiel; Schmaljohann, Heiko; Liechti, Felix

    2008-09-01

    Bird identification with radar is important for bird migration research, environmental impact assessments (e.g. wind farms), aircraft security and radar meteorology. In a study on bird migration, radar signals from birds, insects and ground clutter were recorded. Signals from birds show a typical pattern due to wing flapping. The data were labelled by experts into the four classes BIRD, INSECT, CLUTTER and UFO (unidentifiable signals). We present a classification algorithm aimed at automatic recognition of bird targets. Variables related to signal intensity and wing flapping pattern were extracted (via continuous wavelet transform). We used support vector classifiers to build predictive models. We estimated classification performance via cross validation on four datasets. When data from the same dataset were used for training and testing the classifier, the classification performance was extremely to moderately high. When data from one dataset were used for training and the three remaining datasets were used as test sets, the performance was lower but still extremely to moderately high. This shows that the method generalizes well across different locations or times. Our method provides a substantial gain of time when birds must be identified in large collections of radar signals and it represents the first substantial step in developing a real time bird identification radar system. We provide some guidelines and ideas for future research.

  4. Automatic identification of bird targets with radar via patterns produced by wing flapping.

    PubMed

    Zaugg, Serge; Saporta, Gilbert; van Loon, Emiel; Schmaljohann, Heiko; Liechti, Felix

    2008-09-01

    Bird identification with radar is important for bird migration research, environmental impact assessments (e.g. wind farms), aircraft security and radar meteorology. In a study on bird migration, radar signals from birds, insects and ground clutter were recorded. Signals from birds show a typical pattern due to wing flapping. The data were labelled by experts into the four classes BIRD, INSECT, CLUTTER and UFO (unidentifiable signals). We present a classification algorithm aimed at automatic recognition of bird targets. Variables related to signal intensity and wing flapping pattern were extracted (via continuous wavelet transform). We used support vector classifiers to build predictive models. We estimated classification performance via cross validation on four datasets. When data from the same dataset were used for training and testing the classifier, the classification performance was extremely to moderately high. When data from one dataset were used for training and the three remaining datasets were used as test sets, the performance was lower but still extremely to moderately high. This shows that the method generalizes well across different locations or times. Our method provides a substantial gain of time when birds must be identified in large collections of radar signals and it represents the first substantial step in developing a real time bird identification radar system. We provide some guidelines and ideas for future research. PMID:18331979

  5. New pattern recognition system in the e-nose for Chinese spirit identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, Zeng; Qiang, Li; Yu, Gu

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents a new pattern recognition system for Chinese spirit identification by using the polymer quartz piezoelectric crystal sensor based e-nose. The sensors are designed based on quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) principle, and they could capture different vibration frequency signal values for Chinese spirit identification. For each sensor in an 8-channel sensor array, seven characteristic values of the original vibration frequency signal values, i.e., average value (A), root-mean-square value (RMS), shape factor value (Sf), crest factor value (Cf), impulse factor value (If), clearance factor value (CLf), kurtosis factor value (Kv) are first extracted. Then the dimension of the characteristic values is reduced by the principle components analysis (PCA) method. Finally the back propagation (BP) neutral network algorithm is used to recognize Chinese spirits. The experimental results show that the recognition rate of six kinds of Chinese spirits is 93.33% and our proposed new pattern recognition system can identify Chinese spirits effectively. Project supported by the National High Technology Research and Development Program of China (Grant No. 2013AA030901) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. FRF-TP-14-120A2).

  6. A technique for fabricating patterns for removable partial denture frameworks using digitized casts and electronic surveying.

    PubMed

    Williams, R J; Bibb, Richard; Rafik, Tahseen

    2004-01-01

    Although computer-aided design and manufacture techniques have shown some promising applications in the fabrication of crowns, inlays, and maxillofacial and oral surgery, the field of removable prosthodontics has not embraced these technologies so far. This article describes the development and investigation of computer-aided techniques that may eventually enable prosthodontic procedures such as surveying and the production of sacrificial patterns to be performed digitally. A 3-dimensional computer model of a conventional cast from a patient was obtained using an optical surface capture device (a scanner). The shape of a number of components of a removable partial denture framework was modeled on the 3-dimensional scan electronically, using computer-aided design software. A physical plastic shape of the components was produced using a Rapid Prototyping machine and used as a sacrificial pattern. Techniques to allow digital cast surveying before the production of sacrificial patterns were also developed. The results show that digital dental surveying and machine-produced sacrificial patterns can be accomplished. This article forms a basis for further developments leading to a fully integrated approach to the computer-aided design and fabrication of removable partial denture frameworks.

  7. Use of cluster counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout

    SciTech Connect

    Berdnikov, Vladimir V.; Somov, S. V.; Pentchev, Lubomir P.

    2015-07-01

    The possibility of using the clusters counting technique for particle identification in a drift chamber with the cathode strip readout is experimentally investigated. Results of counting of primary ionization clusters on a relativistic particle track, as well as results of computer simulation of pion, kaon, and proton identification in the momentum range of 1–8 GeV/c, are presented.

  8. Differentiation of opium and poppy straw using capillary electrophoresis and pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Reid, Raymond G; Durham, David G; Boyle, Susanne P; Low, Ann S; Wangboonskul, Jinda

    2007-12-12

    Opium samples from four different locations and poppy straw from different plant varieties have been assayed using micellar capillary electrophoresis incorporating a sweeping technique. Individual alkaloids (morphine, codeine, papaverine, noscapine, thebaine, oripavine, reticuline and narceine) were quantitatively determined in the different samples by a validated capillary electrophoresis method. Unsupervised pattern recognition of the opium samples and the poppy straw samples using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct clusters. Supervised pattern recognition using soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was performed to show individual groupings and allow unknown samples to be classified according to the models built using the CZE assay results.

  9. Differentiation of opium and poppy straw using capillary electrophoresis and pattern recognition techniques.

    PubMed

    Reid, Raymond G; Durham, David G; Boyle, Susanne P; Low, Ann S; Wangboonskul, Jinda

    2007-12-12

    Opium samples from four different locations and poppy straw from different plant varieties have been assayed using micellar capillary electrophoresis incorporating a sweeping technique. Individual alkaloids (morphine, codeine, papaverine, noscapine, thebaine, oripavine, reticuline and narceine) were quantitatively determined in the different samples by a validated capillary electrophoresis method. Unsupervised pattern recognition of the opium samples and the poppy straw samples using hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA), showed distinct clusters. Supervised pattern recognition using soft independent modelling of class analogy (SIMCA) was performed to show individual groupings and allow unknown samples to be classified according to the models built using the CZE assay results. PMID:18022406

  10. Pattern recognition and data mining techniques to identify factors in wafer processing and control determining overlay error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Auguste; Ypma, Alexander; Gatefait, Maxime; Deckers, David; Koopman, Arne; van Haren, Richard; Beltman, Jan

    2015-03-01

    On-product overlay can be improved through the use of context data from the fab and the scanner. Continuous improvements in lithography and processing performance over the past years have resulted in consequent overlay performance improvement for critical layers. Identification of the remaining factors causing systematic disturbances and inefficiencies will further reduce overlay. By building a context database, mappings between context, fingerprints and alignment & overlay metrology can be learned through techniques from pattern recognition and data mining. We relate structure (`patterns') in the metrology data to relevant contextual factors. Once understood, these factors could be moved to the known effects (e.g. the presence of systematic fingerprints from reticle writing error or lens and reticle heating). Hence, we build up a knowledge base of known effects based on data. Outcomes from such an integral (`holistic') approach to lithography data analysis may be exploited in a model-based predictive overlay controller that combines feedback and feedforward control [1]. Hence, the available measurements from scanner, fab and metrology equipment are combined to reveal opportunities for further overlay improvement which would otherwise go unnoticed.

  11. Low-power compensation technique for fixed pattern noise in infrared staring arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helfrich, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Nonscanned staring thermal imagers for portable applications have many advantages if the fixed-pattern noise caused by elemental nonuniformities can be compensated in a low-power configuration operating in real time. A novel approach to this problem has been developed using a multiple-loop fold-back technique. This technique corrects for both gain and level nonuniformities in real time and allows for either updating the stored correction data or for a permanent compensation approach. The total power consumption for this technique is less than 50 microwatts in a volume of less than 0.001 cubic inches per picture element. The modular approach makes this compensation technique applicable to arrays of all sizes in any application of staring infrared imagers.

  12. Physiological patterns during practice of the Transcendental Meditation technique compared with patterns while reading Sanskrit and a modern language.

    PubMed

    Travis, F; Olson, T; Egenes, T; Gupta, H K

    2001-07-01

    This study tested the prediction that reading Vedic Sanskrit texts, without knowledge of their meaning, produces a distinct physiological state. We measured EEG, breath rate, heart rate, and skin conductance during: (1) 15-min Transcendental Meditation (TM) practice; (2) 15-min reading verses of the Bhagavad Gita in Sanskrit; and (3) 15-min reading the same verses translated in German, Spanish, or French. The two reading conditions were randomly counterbalanced, and subjects filled out experience forms between each block to reduce carryover effects. Skin conductance levels significantly decreased during both reading Sanskrit and TM practice, and increased slightly during reading a modern language. Alpha power and coherence were significantly higher when reading Sanskrit and during TM practice, compared to reading modern languages. Similar physiological patterns when reading Sanskrit and during practice of the TM technique suggests that the state gained during TM practice may be integrated with active mental processes by reading Sanskrit.

  13. Neutron Detection With Ultra-Fast Digitizer and Pulse Identification Techniques on DIII-D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Y. B.; Heidbrink, W. W.; Piglowski, D. A.

    2013-10-01

    A prototype system for neutron detection with an ultra-fast digitizer and pulse identification techniques has been implemented on the DIII-D tokamak. The system consists of a cylindrical neutron fission chamber, a charge sensitive amplifier, and a GaGe Octopus 12-bit CompuScope digitizer card installed in a Linux computer. Digital pulse identification techniques have been successfully performed at maximum data acquisition rate of 50 MSPS with on-board memory of 2 GS. Compared to the traditional approach with fast nuclear electronics for pulse counting, this straightforward digital solution has many advantages, including reduced expense, improved accuracy, higher counting rate, and easier maintenance. The system also provides the capability of neutron-gamma pulse shape discrimination and pulse height analysis. Plans for the upgrade of the old DIII-D neutron counting system with these techniques will be presented. Work supported by the US Department of Energy under SC-G903402, and DE-FC02-04ER54698.

  14. The application of a DNA-based identification technique to over-the-counter herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Tazimuddin; Hussain, Nazreen; Bremner, Paul; Slater, Adrian; Howard, Caroline

    2013-06-01

    Reliable methods to identify medicinal plant material are becoming more important in an increasingly regulated market place. DNA-based methods have been recognised as a valuable tool in this area with benefits such as being unaffected by the age of the plant material, growth conditions and harvesting techniques. It is possible that the methods of production used for medicinal plant products will degrade or remove DNA. So how applicable are these techniques to processed medicinal plant products? A simple PCR-based identification technique has been developed for St. John's Wort, Hypericum perforatum L. Thirteen St. John's Wort products were purchased including capsules, tablets and tinctures. DNA was extracted from each product, and the species specific PCR test conducted. DNA was successfully extracted from all thirteen products, using a fast and efficient modified method for extracting DNA from tinctures. Only four products yielded the full length ITS region (850 bp) due to the quality of the DNA. All of the products tested positive for H. perforatum DNA. DNA-based identification methods can complement existing methods of authentication. This paper shows that these methods are applicable to a wide range of processed products, provided that they are designed to account for the possibility of DNA degradation. PMID:23500384

  15. Acoustic puncture assist device versus loss of resistance technique for epidural space identification

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Amit Kumar; Goel, Nitesh; Chowdhury, Itee; Shah, Shagun Bhatia; Singh, Brijesh Pratap; Jakhar, Pradeep

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: The conventional techniques of epidural space (EDS) identification based on loss of resistance (LOR) have a higher chance of complications, patchy analgesia and epidural failure, which can be minimised by objective confirmation of space before catheter placement. Acoustic puncture assist device (APAD) technique objectively confirms EDS, thus enhancing success, with lesser complications. This study was planned with the objective to evaluate the APAD technique and compare it to LOR technique for EDS identification and its correlation with ultrasound guided EDS depth. Methods: In this prospective study, the lumbar vertebral spaces were scanned by the ultrasound for measuring depth of the EDS and later correlated with procedural depth measured by either of the technique (APAD or LOR). The data were subjected to descriptive statistics; the concordance correlation coefficient and Bland-Altman analysis with 95% confidence limits. Results: Acoustic dip in pitch and descent in pressure tracing on EDS localisation was observed among the patients of APAD group. Analysis of concordance correlation between the ultrasonography (USG) depth and APAD or LOR depth was significant (r ≥ 0.97 in both groups). Bland-Altman analysis revealed a mean difference of 0.171cm in group APAD and 0.154 cm in group LOR. The 95% limits of agreement for the difference between the two measurements were − 0.569 and 0.226 cm in APAD and − 0.530 to 0.222 cm in LOR group. Conclusion: We found APAD to be a precise tool for objective localisation of the EDS, co-relating well with the pre-procedural USG depth of EDS. PMID:27212720

  16. Cutting pattern of nickel-titanium files using two preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Elliott, L M; Curtis, R V; Pitt Ford, T R

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the cutting patterns of recently introduced nickel-titanium endodontic files and compare them with similarly shaped stainless steel files using both balanced-force and stepback techniques. Simulated canals were constructed in resin blocks with 40 degrees curvature. Fifty blocks were prepared by a balanced-force technique: 25 with Nitiflex (Maillefer) and 25 with Flexofiles (Maillefer) to master apical file size 40. Fifty blocks were prepared by a stepback technique: 25 with Nitiflex and 25 with Flexofiles to a master apical file size 30. Composite prints were made of pre- and post-instrumentation canals using a computerized imaging system. The amount of material removed from the inner and outer canal curvatures was measured at eight levels in the apical 11 mm of the canal. The results were analysed by Kruskal-Wallis ANOVA. Using the balanced-force technique, Nitiflex files removed less material on the outer curve apically and less on the inner curve mid-canal (P < 0.05), while Flexofiles caused more apical transportation. In the stepback technique, the Nitiflex files removed more material from the outer curve apically (P < 0.05); the Flexofiles removed more material along the entire inner curve (P < 0.05), and maintained canal curvature better than Nitiflex files. It appeared preferable to use Nitiflex files in a balanced-force technique, and Flexofiles in a filing technique as stainless steel files can be precurved.

  17. X-Ray Diffraction Techniques for a Field Instrument: Patterns of Lithologic Provences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J.; Keaten, R.

    1999-09-01

    Future exploration of Mars will attempt to shed light on the mineralogy of surface materials. Instruments deployed from remote platforms should have the capability to conduct both intensive analyses as well as rapid, reconnaissance surveys while they function in the martian environment as surrogate geologists. In order to accommodate the reconnaissance mode of analysis and to compensate for analytical limitations imposed by the space-flight conditions, data analysis methods are being developed that will permit interpretation of data by recognition of signatures or "fingerprints". Specifically, we are developing a technique which will allow interpretation of diffraction patterns by recognition of characteristic signatures of different lithologic provences. This technique allows a remote vehicle to function in a rapid-scan mode using the lithologic signature to determine where a more thorough analysis is needed. An x-ray diffraction pattern is characterized by the angular positions of diffracted x-rays, x-ray intensity levels and background radiation levels. These elements may be used to identify a generalized x-ray signature. Lithologic signatures are being developed in two ways. A signature is composed using the ideal powder diffraction indices from the mineral assembledge common to a specific lithologic provence. This is then confirmed using a laboratory diffraction pattern of a whole rock powder. Preliminary results comparing the diffraction signatures of the major mineral assembledges common to basalt, carbonate, and evaporite basin deposits indicate that lithologies are differentiable as a "fingerprint". Statistical analyses are being performed to establish the confidence levels of this technique.

  18. X-Ray Diffraction Techniques for a Field Instrument: Patterns of Lithologic Provences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, J.; Keaten, R.

    1999-01-01

    Future exploration of Mars will attempt to shed light on the mineralogy of surface materials. Instruments deployed from remote platforms should have the capability to conduct both intensive analyses as well as rapid, reconnaissance surveys while they function in the martian environment as surrogate geologists. In order to accommodate the reconnaissance mode of analysis and to compensate for analytical limitations imposed by the space-flight conditions, data analysis methods are being developed that will permit interpretation of data by recognition of signatures or "fingerprints". Specifically, we are developing a technique which will allow interpretation of diffraction patterns by recognition of characteristic signatures of different lithologic provences. This technique allows a remote vehicle to function in a rapid-scan mode using the lithologic signature to determine where a more thorough analysis is needed. An x-ray diffraction pattern is characterized by the angular positions of diffracted x-rays, x-ray intensity levels and background radiation levels. These elements may be used to identify a generalized x-ray signature. Lithologic signatures are being developed in two ways. A signature is composed using the ideal powder diffraction indices from the mineral assembledge common to a specific lithologic provence. This is then confirmed using a laboratory diffraction pattern of a whole rock powder. Preliminary results comparing the diffraction signatures of the major mineral assembledges common to basalt, carbonate, and evaporite basin deposits indicate that lithologies are differentiable as a "fingerprint". Statistical analyses are being performed to establish the confidence levels of this technique.

  19. Vision-based system identification technique for building structures using a motion capture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Byung Kwan; Hwang, Jin Woo; Kim, Yousok; Cho, Tongjun; Park, Hyo Seon

    2015-11-01

    This paper presents a new vision-based system identification (SI) technique for building structures by using a motion capture system (MCS). The MCS with outstanding capabilities for dynamic response measurements can provide gage-free measurements of vibrations through the convenient installation of multiple markers. In this technique, from the dynamic displacement responses measured by MCS, the dynamic characteristics (natural frequency, mode shape, and damping ratio) of building structures are extracted after the processes of converting the displacement from MCS to acceleration and conducting SI by frequency domain decomposition. A free vibration experiment on a three-story shear frame was conducted to validate the proposed technique. The SI results from the conventional accelerometer-based method were compared with those from the proposed technique and showed good agreement, which confirms the validity and applicability of the proposed vision-based SI technique for building structures. Furthermore, SI directly employing MCS measured displacements to FDD was performed and showed identical results to those of conventional SI method.

  20. Identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in suspended particulate matter by synchronous fluorescence spectroscopic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Homdutt; Jain, V. K.; Khan, Zahid H.

    2007-09-01

    The synchronous fluorescence (SF) technique has been used in the identification of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) from air particulate sample in an urban environment of Delhi, Jawaharlal Nehru University. Suspended particulate matter samples of 24 h duration were collected on glass fiber filter papers. PAHs were extracted from the filter papers using dichloromethane (DCM) + hexane with ultrasonication method. Qualitative measurements of the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) were carried out using the SF technique at various wavelength intervals (Δ λ). Due to the difference in chemical structure, each PAH gives specific characteristic spectrum for each Δ λ. Following PAHs were detected in our measurement: benz(a)anthracene (BaA), pyrene (Pyr), chrysene (Chry), fluoranthene (Flan), phenanthrene (Phen), and benz(ghi)perylene (BghiP). This is in agreement with our earlier work for determination of these PAHs using gas chromatography (GC). The seasonal variation of the PAHs was found to be maximum in winter and minimum during the monsoon.

  1. Identification of Organic Binders in Ancient Chinese Paintings by Immunological Techniques.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wenjing; Zhang, Hui; Zhang, Bingjian

    2015-10-01

    The identification and localization of organic binders in artworks are big challenges in archaeology and conservation science. Immunological techniques, such as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunofluorescence microscopy (IFM) have the potential to become powerful tools for the analysis of organic materials in ancient samples. In this study, ELISA and IFM techniques were combined to identify chicken ovalbumin, glue from several mammalian species, bovine milk, and fish glue in ancient Chinese painting samples. As binders, egg ovalbumin was found in two painting samples and animal glue was found in three samples, which were dated from the 4th to 8th centuries. The results clearly demonstrate that ELISA and IFM can be used to validate results from ancient samples.

  2. Comparison of Olfactory Identification Patterns among Parkinson's Disease Patients from Different Countries.

    PubMed

    Millar Vernetti, Patricio; Rossi, Malco; Cerquetti, Daniel; Perez Lloret, Santiago; Merello, Marcelo

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory function assessment is an important screening tool and also may differentiate Parkinson's disease (PD) patients from other parkinsonisms, including nondegenerative ones, such as, normal pressure hydrocephalus, vascular, drug induced, or infectious parkinsonism. Several authors in different countries have reported various sets of odors that best differentiate between these conditions. It is debated if distinctive patterns of "restrictive" or "selective" hyposmia in PD may be affected by cultural aspects. To compare the olfactory identification function in PD across different countries, we analyzed Sniffin' Sticks identification task results between 112 PD patients from Argentina and previously reported data of PD patients from Brazil (106 patients), the Netherlands (400 patients), Germany (40 patients), China (110 patients), and Sri Lanka (89 patients). Categorical principal component analysis (CATPCA) was performed to find components reflecting groups of odors similarly perceived across subjects. CATPCA analysis found 2 components for each group which shared 10 out of 16 odors amongst each other. We found that only the shared items of component 2 (orange, mint, banana, garlic, coffee, cloves, and fish) showed uniform results across all of the included countries, whereas variations in component 1 (licorice, turpentine, and apple) were attributed mostly to differences across control groups. PMID:26512070

  3. Species Identification of Food Contaminating Beetles by Recognizing Patterns in Microscopic Images of Elytra Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Inn; Bisgin, Halil; Ding, Hongjian; Semey, Howard G.; Langley, Darryl A.; Tong, Weida

    2016-01-01

    A crucial step of food contamination inspection is identifying the species of beetle fragments found in the sample, since the presence of some storage beetles is a good indicator of insanitation or potential food safety hazards. The current pratice, visual examination by human analysts, is time consuming and requires several years of experience. Here we developed a species identification algorithm which utilizes images of microscopic elytra fragments. The elytra, or hardened forewings, occupy a large portion of the body, and contain distinctive patterns. In addition, elytra fragments are more commonly recovered from processed food products than other body parts due to their hardness. As a preliminary effort, we chose 15 storage product beetle species frequently detected in food inspection. The elytra were then separated from the specimens and imaged under a microscope. Both global and local characteristics were quantified and used as feature inputs to artificial neural networks for species classification. With leave-one-out cross validation, we achieved overall accuracy of 80% through the proposed global and local features, which indicates that our proposed features could differentiate these species. Through examining the overall and per species accuracies, we further demonstrated that the local features are better suited than the global features for species identification. Future work will include robust testing with more beetle species and algorithm refinement for a higher accuracy. PMID:27341524

  4. Identification of natural metabolites in mixture: a pattern recognition strategy based on (13)C NMR.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Jane; Nuzillard, Jean-Marc; Purson, Sylvain; Hamzaoui, Mahmoud; Borie, Nicolas; Reynaud, Romain; Renault, Jean-Hugues

    2014-03-18

    Because of their highly complex metabolite profile, the chemical characterization of bioactive natural extracts usually requires time-consuming multistep purification procedures to achieve the structural elucidation of pure individual metabolites. The aim of the present work was to develop a dereplication strategy for the identification of natural metabolites directly within mixtures. Exploiting the polarity range of metabolites, the principle was to rapidly fractionate a multigram quantity of a crude extract by centrifugal partition extraction (CPE). The obtained fractions of simplified chemical composition were subsequently analyzed by (13)C NMR. After automatic collection and alignment of (13)C signals across spectra, hierarchical clustering analysis (HCA) was performed for pattern recognition. As a result, strong correlations between (13)C signals of a single structure within the mixtures of the fraction series were visualized as chemical shift clusters. Each cluster was finally assigned to a molecular structure with the help of a locally built (13)C NMR chemical shift database. The proof of principle of this strategy was achieved on a simple model mixture of commercially available plant secondary metabolites and then applied to a bark extract of the African tree Anogeissus leiocarpus Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae). Starting from 5 g of this genuine extract, the fraction series was generated by CPE in only 95 min. (13)C NMR analyses of all fractions followed by pattern recognition of (13)C chemical shifts resulted in the unambiguous identification of seven major compounds, namely, sericoside, trachelosperogenin E, ellagic acid, an epimer mixture of (+)-gallocatechin and (-)-epigallocatechin, 3,3'-di-O-methylellagic acid 4'-O-xylopyranoside, and 3,4,3'-tri-O-methylflavellagic acid 4'-O-glucopyranoside. PMID:24555703

  5. Identification of scleractinian coral recruits using fluorescent censusing and DNA barcoding techniques.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm(2)) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  6. Identification of Scleractinian Coral Recruits Using Fluorescent Censusing and DNA Barcoding Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Chia-Min; de Palmas, Stéphane; Kuo, Chao-Yang; Denis, Vianney; Chen, Chaolun Allen

    2014-01-01

    The identification of coral recruits has been problematic due to a lack of definitive morphological characters being available for higher taxonomic resolution. In this study, we tested whether fluorescent detection of coral recruits used in combinations of different DNA-barcoding markers (cytochrome oxidase I gene [COI], open reading frame [ORF], and nuclear Pax-C intron [PaxC]) could be useful for increasing the resolution of coral spat identification in ecological studies. One hundred and fifty settlement plates were emplaced at nine sites on the fringing reefs of Kenting National Park in southern Taiwan between April 2011 and September 2012. A total of 248 living coral spats and juveniles (with basal areas ranging from 0.21 to 134.57 mm2) were detected on the plates with the aid of fluorescent light and collected for molecular analyses. Using the COI DNA barcoding technique, 90.3% (224/248) of coral spats were successfully identified into six genera, including Acropora, Isopora, Montipora, Pocillopora, Porites, and Pavona. PaxC further separated I. cuneata and I. palifera of Isopora from Acropora, and ORF successfully identified the species of Pocillopora (except P. meandrina and P. eydouxi). Moreover, other cnidarian species such as actinarians, zoanthids, and Millepora species were visually found using fluorescence and identified by COI DNA barcoding. This combination of existing approaches greatly improved the taxonomic resolution of early coral life stages, which to date has been mainly limited to the family level based on skeletal identification. Overall, this study suggests important improvements for the identification of coral recruits in ecological studies. PMID:25211345

  7. Transfer of microstructure pattern of CNTs onto flexible substrate using hot press technique for sensing applications

    SciTech Connect

    Mishra, Prabhash; Harsh

    2013-08-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Successfully transfer of microstructure patterned CNTs on PET substrate. • Demonstrate as resistor-based NH{sub 3} gas sensor in the sub-ppm range. • Excellent photodetector having instantaneous response and recovery characteristics. • An effective technique to grow and produce flexible electronic device. - Abstract: In this work, we report the successful and efficient transfer process of two- dimensional (2-D) vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto polyethylene terephthalate (PET) substrate by hot pressing method with an aim to develop flexible sensor devices. Carbon nanotubes are synthesized by cold wall thermal chemical vapor deposition using patterned SiO{sub 2} substrate under low pressure. The height of the pattern of CNTs is controlled by reaction time. The entire growth and transfer process is carried out within 30 min. Strong adhesion between the nanotube and polyethylene terephthalate substrate was observed in the post-transferred case. Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies are used to analyze the microstructure of carbon nanotube film before and after hot pressing. This technique shows great potential for the fabrication of flexible sensing devices. We report for the first time, the application of patterned microstructure developed by this technique in the development of gas sensor and optoelectronic device. Surface resistive mode is used for detection of ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas in the sub-ppm range. An impressive photoconducting response is also observed in the visible wavelength. The reproducibility of the sample was checked and the results indicate the possibility of use of carbon nanotube as gas sensor, photodetector, CCDs etc.

  8. Biochemical component identification by light scattering techniques in whispering gallery mode optical resonance based sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saetchnikov, Vladimir A.; Tcherniavskaia, Elina A.; Saetchnikov, Anton V.; Schweiger, Gustav; Ostendorf, Andreas

    2014-03-01

    Experimental data on detection and identification of variety of biochemical agents, such as proteins (albumin, interferon, C reactive protein), microelements (Na+, Ca+), antibiotic of different generations, in both single and multi component solutions under varied in wide range concentration are represented. Analysis has been performed on the light scattering parameters of whispering gallery mode (WGM) optical resonance based sensor with dielectric microspheres from glass and PMMA as sensitive elements fixed by spin - coating techniques in adhesive layer on the surface of substrate or directly on the coupling element. Sensitive layer was integrated into developed fluidic cell with a digital syringe. Light from tuneable laser strict focusing on and scattered by the single microsphere was detected by a CMOS camera. The image was filtered for noise reduction and integrated on two coordinates for evaluation of integrated energy of a measured signal. As the entrance data following signal parameters were used: relative (to a free spectral range) spectral shift of frequency of WGM optical resonance in microsphere and relative efficiency of WGM excitation obtained within a free spectral range which depended on both type and concentration of investigated agents. Multiplexing on parameters and components has been realized using spatial and spectral parameters of scattered by microsphere light with developed data processing. Biochemical component classification and identification of agents under investigation has been performed by network analysis techniques based on probabilistic network and multilayer perceptron. Developed approach is demonstrated to be applicable both for single agent and for multi component biochemical analysis.

  9. Low-velocity impact damage identification using a novel current injection thermographic technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grammatikos, S. A.; Kordatos, E. Z.; Matikas, T. E.; Paipetis, A. S.

    2012-04-01

    Composite materials are widely used especially in the aerospace structures and systems. Therefore, inexpensive and efficient damage identification is crucial for the safe use and function of these structures. In these structures low-velocity impact is frequently the cause of damage, as it may even be induced during scheduled repair. Flaws caused by lowvelocity impact are dangerous as they may further develop to extended delaminations. For that purpose an effective inspection of defects and delaminations is necessary during the service life of the aerospace structures. Within the scope of this work, an innovative technique is developed based on current stimulating thermography. Electric current is injected to Carbon Fiber Reinforced Composite and aluminium (Al) plates with concurrent thermographic monitoring. For reference, both damaged and undamaged plates are inspected. Low-velocity impact damaged composite laminates at different energy levels are interrogated employing the novel technique. Live and pulse phase infrared thermography is employed for the identification of low-velocity impact damage at various energy levels while the electric current induces the transient thermal field in the vicinity of the defect. In all cases conventional ultrasonics (C-scan) were performed for the validation and assessment of the results of the innovative thermographic method.

  10. Inferring Intra-Community Microbial Interaction Patterns from Metagenomic Datasets Using Associative Rule Mining Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Mande, Sharmila S.

    2016-01-01

    The nature of inter-microbial metabolic interactions defines the stability of microbial communities residing in any ecological niche. Deciphering these interaction patterns is crucial for understanding the mode/mechanism(s) through which an individual microbial community transitions from one state to another (e.g. from a healthy to a diseased state). Statistical correlation techniques have been traditionally employed for mining microbial interaction patterns from taxonomic abundance data corresponding to a given microbial community. In spite of their efficiency, these correlation techniques can capture only 'pair-wise interactions'. Moreover, their emphasis on statistical significance can potentially result in missing out on several interactions that are relevant from a biological standpoint. This study explores the applicability of one of the earliest association rule mining algorithm i.e. the 'Apriori algorithm' for deriving 'microbial association rules' from the taxonomic profile of given microbial community. The classical Apriori approach derives association rules by analysing patterns of co-occurrence/co-exclusion between various '(subsets of) features/items' across various samples. Using real-world microbiome data, the efficiency/utility of this rule mining approach in deciphering multiple (biologically meaningful) association patterns between 'subsets/subgroups' of microbes (constituting microbiome samples) is demonstrated. As an example, association rules derived from publicly available gut microbiome datasets indicate an association between a group of microbes (Faecalibacterium, Dorea, and Blautia) that are known to have mutualistic metabolic associations among themselves. Application of the rule mining approach on gut microbiomes (sourced from the Human Microbiome Project) further indicated similar microbial association patterns in gut microbiomes irrespective of the gender of the subjects. A Linux implementation of the Association Rule Mining (ARM

  11. Inferring Intra-Community Microbial Interaction Patterns from Metagenomic Datasets Using Associative Rule Mining Techniques.

    PubMed

    Tandon, Disha; Haque, Mohammed Monzoorul; Mande, Sharmila S

    2016-01-01

    The nature of inter-microbial metabolic interactions defines the stability of microbial communities residing in any ecological niche. Deciphering these interaction patterns is crucial for understanding the mode/mechanism(s) through which an individual microbial community transitions from one state to another (e.g. from a healthy to a diseased state). Statistical correlation techniques have been traditionally employed for mining microbial interaction patterns from taxonomic abundance data corresponding to a given microbial community. In spite of their efficiency, these correlation techniques can capture only 'pair-wise interactions'. Moreover, their emphasis on statistical significance can potentially result in missing out on several interactions that are relevant from a biological standpoint. This study explores the applicability of one of the earliest association rule mining algorithm i.e. the 'Apriori algorithm' for deriving 'microbial association rules' from the taxonomic profile of given microbial community. The classical Apriori approach derives association rules by analysing patterns of co-occurrence/co-exclusion between various '(subsets of) features/items' across various samples. Using real-world microbiome data, the efficiency/utility of this rule mining approach in deciphering multiple (biologically meaningful) association patterns between 'subsets/subgroups' of microbes (constituting microbiome samples) is demonstrated. As an example, association rules derived from publicly available gut microbiome datasets indicate an association between a group of microbes (Faecalibacterium, Dorea, and Blautia) that are known to have mutualistic metabolic associations among themselves. Application of the rule mining approach on gut microbiomes (sourced from the Human Microbiome Project) further indicated similar microbial association patterns in gut microbiomes irrespective of the gender of the subjects. A Linux implementation of the Association Rule Mining (ARM

  12. Femtosecond Laser Assisted Deep Anterior Lamellar Keratoplasty Outcomes and Healing Patterns Compared to Manual Technique

    PubMed Central

    Alio, Jorge L.; Abdelghany, Ahmed A.; Barraquer, Rafael; Hammouda, Laila M.; Sabry, Ahmed M.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to report the visual, refractive, and wound healing pattern outcomes of femtosecond assisted deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) compared to the conventional manual technique. DALK was performed on 50 eyes of 47 advanced keratoconus patients. The patients were divided into two groups, 25 eyes each, depending on whether femtosecond assisted or manual DALK technique was performed for the side cut of the procedure only. Patients were followed up at 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year for visual acuity, clinical refraction, corneal cylinder, date of suture removal, and side cut corneal healing pattern according to new grading classification of the side cut scar (Grade 0 = transparent scar, 1 = faint healing opacity, 2 = evident healing opacity, 3 = significant opacity with some cosmetic imbalance, and 4 = highly significant opacity with very significant cosmetic imbalance). Outcomes are reported at one year. In conclusion, femtosecond assisted and manual DALK show comparable visual and refractive outcomes but femtosecond assisted DALK shows more evident corneal wound healing patterns at the side cut. This observation may indicate that an activated cornea wound healing might allow earlier suture removal when femtosecond technology is used to perform the side cut for DALK. PMID:26557663

  13. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Sarah A.; van de Sande, Wendy W. J.; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H.; Mhmoud, Najwa A.

    2015-01-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification can therefore only be achieved with the application of molecular techniques. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are proposed as alternatives to phenotypic methods. Species-specific primers were developed to target the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of M. mycetomatis. Both isothermal amplification techniques showed high specificity and sufficient sensitivity to amplify fungal DNA and proved to be appropriate for detection of M. mycetomatis. Diagnostic performance of the techniques was assessed in comparison to conventional PCR using biopsy specimens from eumycetoma patients. RPA is reliable and easy to operate and has the potential to be implemented in areas where mycetoma is endemic. The techniques may be expanded to detect fungal DNA from environmental samples. PMID:26246484

  14. Application of Isothermal Amplification Techniques for Identification of Madurella mycetomatis, the Prevalent Agent of Human Mycetoma.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Sarah A; van de Sande, Wendy W J; Desnos-Ollivier, Marie; Fahal, Ahmed H; Mhmoud, Najwa A; de Hoog, G S

    2015-10-01

    Appropriate diagnosis and treatment of eumycetoma may vary significantly depending on the causative agent. To date, the most common fungus causing mycetoma worldwide is Madurella mycetomatis. This species fails to express any recognizable morphological characteristics, and reliable identification can therefore only be achieved with the application of molecular techniques. Recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) are proposed as alternatives to phenotypic methods. Species-specific primers were developed to target the ribosomal DNA (rDNA) internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of M. mycetomatis. Both isothermal amplification techniques showed high specificity and sufficient sensitivity to amplify fungal DNA and proved to be appropriate for detection of M. mycetomatis. Diagnostic performance of the techniques was assessed in comparison to conventional PCR using biopsy specimens from eumycetoma patients. RPA is reliable and easy to operate and has the potential to be implemented in areas where mycetoma is endemic. The techniques may be expanded to detect fungal DNA from environmental samples. PMID:26246484

  15. Identification and Separation of Geochemical Distribution Patterns using Fractal/Multifractal Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yue; Cheng, Qiuming

    2015-04-01

    Identification and separation of anomalies from background for mineral exploration or environmental assessment is a fundamental issue in the field of exploration geochemistry. Traditionally, geochemical data are usually considered to follow normal or lognormal distributions, this scenario might lead to the extreme values cannot be detected by ordinary statistic methods, because the data of interest cannot meet the prerequisites of some typical statistic methods, and usually it is hard to separate geochemical anomalies from background, especially when weak anomalies are hidden in high background or the difference between anomaly and background is feeble. Cheng (2000) demonstrated that background values of geochemical data typically followed normal or lognormal distributions, and and anomalous values usually followed fractal/multifractal distributions. West and Shlesinger (1990) investigated the relationships of normal/lognormal distributions with Pareto distributions, the results indicated that the natural system was gradually tend to complexity from normal distributions to lognormal distributions, and then to Pareto distributions. Pareto distributions describe the most complex natural system, showing stronger fractal/multifractal characteristics. From the perspective of ore-forming processes, ore formation is the result of complex physical and chemical processes, there are considerable overlaps between igneous and hydrothermal and between sedimentary and hydrothermal, as a result, complex ore-forming processes might result in fractal/multifractal pattern. In the present study, a case study of anomaly identification of REE mineralization- related La and Y concentration values from 1617 stream sediment samples in the Nanling belt, South China, is used to demonstrate the application of two fractal/multifractal methods, singularity analysis and concentration-area (C-A) fractal method. First, singularity analysis is used to identify weak anomalies hidden within

  16. Spatial and temporal air quality pattern recognition using environmetric techniques: a case study in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Syed Abdul Mutalib, Sharifah Norsukhairin; Juahir, Hafizan; Azid, Azman; Mohd Sharif, Sharifah; Latif, Mohd Talib; Aris, Ahmad Zaharin; Zain, Sharifuddin M; Dominick, Doreena

    2013-09-01

    The objective of this study is to identify spatial and temporal patterns in the air quality at three selected Malaysian air monitoring stations based on an eleven-year database (January 2000-December 2010). Four statistical methods, Discriminant Analysis (DA), Hierarchical Agglomerative Cluster Analysis (HACA), Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs), were selected to analyze the datasets of five air quality parameters, namely: SO2, NO2, O3, CO and particulate matter with a diameter size of below 10 μm (PM10). The three selected air monitoring stations share the characteristic of being located in highly urbanized areas and are surrounded by a number of industries. The DA results show that spatial characterizations allow successful discrimination between the three stations, while HACA shows the temporal pattern from the monthly and yearly factor analysis which correlates with severe haze episodes that have happened in this country at certain periods of time. The PCA results show that the major source of air pollution is mostly due to the combustion of fossil fuel in motor vehicles and industrial activities. The spatial pattern recognition (S-ANN) results show a better prediction performance in discriminating between the regions, with an excellent percentage of correct classification compared to DA. This study presents the necessity and usefulness of environmetric techniques for the interpretation of large datasets aiming to obtain better information about air quality patterns based on spatial and temporal characterizations at the selected air monitoring stations.

  17. A bridging technique to analyze the influence of boundary conditions on instability patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Heng; Damil, Noureddine; Potier-Ferry, Michel

    2011-05-10

    In this paper, we present a new numerical technique that permits to analyse the effect of boundary conditions on the appearance of instability patterns. Envelope equations of Landau-Ginzburg type are classically used to predict pattern formation, but it is not easy to associate boundary conditions for these macroscopic models. Indeed, envelope equations ignore boundary layers that can be important, for instance in cases where the instability starts first near the boundary. In this work, the full model is considered close to the boundary, an envelope equation in the core and they are bridged by the Arlequin method . Simulation results are presented for the problem of buckling of long beams lying on a non-linear elastic foundation.

  18. Pattern Transformation of Heat-Shrinkable Polymer by Three-Dimensional (3D) Printing Technique

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Quan; Yan, Dong; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Gengkai

    2015-01-01

    A significant challenge in conventional heat-shrinkable polymers is to produce controllable microstructures. Here we report that the polymer material fabricated by three-dimensional (3D) printing technique has a heat-shrinkable property, whose initial microstructure can undergo a spontaneous pattern transformation under heating. The underlying mechanism is revealed by evaluating internal strain of the printed polymer from its fabricating process. It is shown that a uniform internal strain is stored in the polymer during the printing process and can be released when heated above its glass transition temperature. Furthermore, the internal strain can be used to trigger the pattern transformation of the heat-shrinkable polymer in a controllable way. Our work provides insightful ideas to understand a novel mechanism on the heat-shrinkable effect of printed material, but also to present a simple approach to fabricate heat-shrinkable polymer with a controllable thermo-structural response. PMID:25757881

  19. Loss-pattern identification in near-real-time accounting systems

    SciTech Connect

    Argentesi, F.; Hafer, J.F.; Markin, J.T.; Shipley, J.P.

    1982-01-01

    To maximize the benefits from an advanced safeguards technique such as near-real-time accounting (NRTA), sophisticated methods of analyzing sequential materials accounting data are necessary. The methods must be capable of controlling the overall false-alarm rate while assuring good power of detection against all possible diversion scenarios. A method drawn from the field of pattern recognition and related to the alarm-sequence chart appears to be promising. Power curves based on Monte Carlo calculations illustrate the improvements over more conventional methods. 3 figures, 2 tables.

  20. Patterns in the Identification of and Outcomes for Children and Youth with Disabilities. Final Report. NCEE 2010-4005

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blackorby, Jose; Schiller, Ellen; Mallik, Sangeeta; Hebbeler, Kathleen; Huang, Tracy; Javitz, Harold; Marder, Camille; Nagle, Katherine; Shaver, Debra; Wagner, Mary; Williamson, Cyndi

    2010-01-01

    Reported here are the results of analyses to describe the patterns of identification and academic and developmental outcomes for children with disabilities, conducted as part of the 2004 National Assessment of the implementation of the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). This report provides background context for National…

  1. Three-dimensional electron diffraction as a complementary technique to powder X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution of powders.

    PubMed

    Yun, Yifeng; Zou, Xiaodong; Hovmöller, Sven; Wan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    Phase identification and structure determination are important and widely used techniques in chemistry, physics and materials science. Recently, two methods for automated three-dimensional electron diffraction (ED) data collection, namely automated diffraction tomography (ADT) and rotation electron diffraction (RED), have been developed. Compared with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and two-dimensional zonal ED, three-dimensional ED methods have many advantages in identifying phases and determining unknown structures. Almost complete three-dimensional ED data can be collected using the ADT and RED methods. Since each ED pattern is usually measured off the zone axes by three-dimensional ED methods, dynamic effects are much reduced compared with zonal ED patterns. Data collection is easy and fast, and can start at any arbitrary orientation of the crystal, which facilitates automation. Three-dimensional ED is a powerful technique for structure identification and structure solution from individual nano- or micron-sized particles, while powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD) provides information from all phases present in a sample. ED suffers from dynamic scattering, while PXRD data are kinematic. Three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD are complementary and their combinations are promising for studying multiphase samples and complicated crystal structures. Here, two three-dimensional ED methods, ADT and RED, are described. Examples are given of combinations of three-dimensional ED methods and PXRD for phase identification and structure determination over a large number of different materials, from Ni-Se-O-Cl crystals, zeolites, germanates, metal-organic frameworks and organic compounds to intermetallics with modulated structures. It is shown that three-dimensional ED is now as feasible as X-ray diffraction for phase identification and structure solution, but still needs further development in order to be as accurate as X-ray diffraction. It is expected that three-dimensional ED methods

  2. Detection and identification of microorganisms using a combined flow field-flow fractionation/spectroscopy technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Xiaojuan

    This doctoral project is focused on the implementation of a novel micron and sub-micron particle characterization technology for in-situ, continuous monitoring and detecting of microorganisms in water. The particle technology is based on simultaneous characterizing the joint particle property distribution (size, shape, and chemical composition) through the combined fractionation/separation and light scattering detection and interpretation techniques. Over more than a decade, field-flow fractionation (FFF) has shown to be well-suited for the separation and/or selection of bacteria (Giddings, 1993). As the most universal fractionation technique among the FFF family, flow field-flow fractionation (FFFF) has been chosen as the separation device in this research. The multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) photometer and the UV-vis/liquid core optical waveguide constitute the primary on-line light scattering detection system. The angular spectra obtained by the MALLS photometer provided information on the shape of microorganism; the multi-wavelength transmission spectra of microorganisms contain quantitative information on their size, number, shape, chemical composition and internal structure, which are essential for identification and classification of microorganisms. Both experimental results and the theoretical prediction have revealed that the particle size resolution capabilities of the FFFF fractionation system coupled with the sensitivity of the laser light scattering to particle shape, and the sensitivity of the UV-vis spectra to cell size, shape, cell orientation and chemical composition offer an integrated system for the identification and classification of microorganisms. The ability to discriminate between cell species was demonstrated by the light scattering and absorption interpretation model, which is based on light scattering theory (Rayleigh-Debye-Gans approximation), spectral deconvolution techniques, and on the approximation of the frequency

  3. Content based image retrieval using local binary pattern operator and data mining techniques.

    PubMed

    Vatamanu, Oana Astrid; Frandeş, Mirela; Lungeanu, Diana; Mihalaş, Gheorghe-Ioan

    2015-01-01

    Content based image retrieval (CBIR) concerns the retrieval of similar images from image databases, using feature vectors extracted from images. These feature vectors globally define the visual content present in an image, defined by e.g., texture, colour, shape, and spatial relations between vectors. Herein, we propose the definition of feature vectors using the Local Binary Pattern (LBP) operator. A study was performed in order to determine the optimum LBP variant for the general definition of image feature vectors. The chosen LBP variant is then subsequently used to build an ultrasound image database, and a database with images obtained from Wireless Capsule Endoscopy. The image indexing process is optimized using data clustering techniques for images belonging to the same class. Finally, the proposed indexing method is compared to the classical indexing technique, which is nowadays widely used.

  4. Decentralized Random Decrement Technique for Data Aggregation and System Identification in Wireless Smart Sensor Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sim, Sung-Han; Spencer, B. F.; Jo, Hongki; Carbonell-Márquez, Juan Francisco

    Smart sensors have been recognized as a promising technology with the potential to overcome many of the inherent difficulties and limitations associated with traditional wired structural health monitoring (SHM) systems. The unique features offered by smart sensors, including wireless communication, on-board computation, and cost effectiveness, enable deployment of the dense array of sensors that are needed for monitoring of large-scale civil infrastructure. Despite the many advances in smart sensor technologies, power consumption is still considered as one of the most important challenges that should be addressed for the smart sensors to be more widely adopted in SHM applications. Data communication, the most significant source of the power consumption, can be reduced by appropriately selecting data processing schemes and the related network topology. This paper presents a new decentralized data aggregation approach for system identification based on the Random Decrement Technique (RDT). Following a brief overview of RDT, which is an output-only system identification approach, a hierarchical approach is described and shown to be suitable for implementation in the intrinsically decentralized computing environment found in wireless smart sensor networks (WSSNs). RDT-based decentralized data aggregation is then implemented on the Imote2 smart sensor platform based on the Illinois Structural Health Monitoring Project (ISHMP) Services Toolsuite. Finally, the efficacy of the decentralized RDT method is demonstrated experimentally in terms of the required data communication and the accuracy of identified dynamic properties.

  5. Clones identification of Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. in Chile by using PCR-RAPDs technique*

    PubMed Central

    Toral Ibañez, Manuel; Caru, Margarita; Herrera, Miguel A.; Gonzalez, Luis; Martin, Luis M.; Miranda, Jorge; Navarro-Cerrillo, Rafael M.

    2009-01-01

    A protocol of polymerase chain reaction-random amplified polymorphic DNAs (PCR-RAPDs) was established to analyse the gene diversity and genotype identification for clones of Sequoia sempervirens (D. Don) Endl. in Chile. Ten (out of 34) clones from introduction trial located in Voipir-Villarrica, Chile, were studied. The PCR-RAPDs technique and a modified hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) protocol were used for genomic DNA extraction. The PCR tests were carried out employing 10-mer random primers. The amplification products were detected by electrophoresis in agarose gels. Forty nine polymorphic bands were obtained with the selected primers (BG04, BF07, BF12, BF13, and BF14) and were ordered according to their molecular size. The genetic similarity between samples was calculated by the Jaccard index and a dendrogram was constructed using a cluster analysis of unweighted pair group method using arithmetic averages (UPGMA). Of the primers tested, 5 (out of 60) RAPD primers were selected for their reproducibility and high polymorphism. A total of 49 polymorphic RAPD bands were detected out of 252 bands. The genetic similarity analysis demonstrates an extensive genetic variability between the tested clones and the dendrogram depicts the genetic relationships among the clones, suggesting a geographic relationship. The results indicate that the RAPD markers permitted the identification of the assayed clones, although they are derived from the same geographic origin. PMID:19235269

  6. Vibrio parahaemolyticus: a review on the pathogenesis, prevalence, and advance molecular identification techniques

    PubMed Central

    Letchumanan, Vengadesh; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a Gram-negative halophilic bacterium that is found in estuarine, marine and coastal environments. V. parahaemolyticus is the leading causal agent of human acute gastroenteritis following the consumption of raw, undercooked, or mishandled marine products. In rare cases, V. parahaemolyticus causes wound infection, ear infection or septicaemia in individuals with pre-existing medical conditions. V. parahaemolyticus has two hemolysins virulence factors that are thermostable direct hemolysin (tdh)-a pore-forming protein that contributes to the invasiveness of the bacterium in humans, and TDH-related hemolysin (trh), which plays a similar role as tdh in the disease pathogenesis. In addition, the bacterium is also encodes for adhesions and type III secretion systems (T3SS1 and T3SS2) to ensure its survival in the environment. This review aims at discussing the V. parahaemolyticus growth and characteristics, pathogenesis, prevalence and advances in molecular identification techniques. PMID:25566219

  7. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  8. Use of system identification techniques for improving airframe finite element models using test data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanagud, Sathya V.; Zhou, Weiyu; Craig, James I.; Weston, Neil J.

    1993-01-01

    A method for using system identification techniques to improve airframe finite element models using test data was developed and demonstrated. The method uses linear sensitivity matrices to relate changes in selected physical parameters to changes in the total system matrices. The values for these physical parameters were determined using constrained optimization with singular value decomposition. The method was confirmed using both simple and complex finite element models for which pseudo-experimental data was synthesized directly from the finite element model. The method was then applied to a real airframe model which incorporated all of the complexities and details of a large finite element model and for which extensive test data was available. The method was shown to work, and the differences between the identified model and the measured results were considered satisfactory.

  9. The structural identification of a methyl analog of methaqualone via 2-dimensional NMR techniques.

    PubMed

    Angelos, S A; Lankin, D C; Meyers, J A; Raney, J K

    1993-03-01

    A submission to the Drug Enforcement Administration North Central Laboratory of a substance believed to be a structural analog of methaqualone hydrochloride precipitated an interest in being able to obtain a rapid and positive identification of such compounds. Both mass spectrometry and proton NMR spectroscopy (1-dimensional) provided evidence to suggest that the structural analog possessed a second methyl group in the molecule, relative to methaqualone, and that the methyl group was attached to the existing methyl-substituted phenyl ring. By application of proton 2-dimensional (2-D) NMR techniques, specifically the homonuclear shift correlation spectroscopy (COSY) and 2-D NOE (NOESY), the precise location of the methyl group in this unknown methaqualone analog was established and shown to have the structure 2.

  10. Isolation, Identification, and Characterization of One Degradation Product in Ambroxol by HPLC-Hyphenated Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Thummala, Veera Raghava Raju; Ivaturi, Mrutyunjaya Rao; Nittala, Someswara Rao

    2014-01-01

    This study details the isolation, identification, and characterization of ambroxol’s unknown impurity. One unknown impurity of ambroxol was formed in the formulated drug under stress conditions [40°C /75% relative humidity (RH) for 6 months] with the relative retention time (RRT) 0.68 in RP-HPLC. The impurity was enriched by exposing it to heat and it was isolated by using preparative HPLC. The enriched impurity was purified and characterized using the following sophisticated techniques: 2D NMR (gDQ-COSY, gHSQC, and gHMBC), FTIR, and LC-MS/MS. On the basis of the spectral data, the impurity was characterized as trans-4-(6,8-dibromoquinazolin-3(4H)-yl)cyclohexanol. PMID:24959402

  11. Techniques for identification of left ventricular asynchrony for cardiac resynchronization therapy in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Peter; Faerestrand, Svein

    2005-01-01

    The most recent treatment option of medically refractory heart failure includes cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) by biventricular pacing in selected patients in NYHA functional class III or IV heart failure. The widely used marker to indicate left ventricular (LV) asynchrony has been the surface ECG, but seems not to be a sufficient marker of the mechanical events within the LV and prediction of clinical response. This review presents an overview of techniques for identification of left ventricular intra- and interventricular asynchrony. Both manuscripts for electrical and mechanical asynchrony are reviewed, partly predicting response to CRT. In summary there is still no gold standard for assessment of LV asynchrony for CRT, but both traditional and new echocardiographic methods have shown asynchronous LV contraction in heart failure patients, and resynchronized LV contraction during CRT and should be implemented as additional methods for selecting patients to CRT. PMID:16943866

  12. Identification of forensically important fly eggs using a potassium permanganate staining technique.

    PubMed

    Sukontason, Kom; Sukontason, Kabkaew L; Piangjai, Somsak; Boonchu, Noppawan; Kurahashi, Hiromu; Hope, Michelle; Olson, Jimmy K

    2004-01-01

    Fly eggs found in corpses can be utilized as entomological evidence in forensic investigations of deaths if the species of fly and the developmental rate at a temperature similar to the death scene are known. The species identification of fly eggs is particularly important, and previously, scanning electron microscope has been used for this purpose. Herein, we report a simple technique, using light microscopy, to identify forensically important eggs of Chrysomya rufifacies (Macquart), Chrysomya megacephala (Fabricius), Chrysomya pacifica Kurahashi, Chrysomya nigripes Aubertin, Aldrichina grahami (Aldrich), Lucilia cuprina (Wiedemann), Musca domestica L. and Megaselia scalaris (Loew). A 1% potassium permanganate solution was used to stain egg surfaces for 1 min, followed by dehydration in 15, 70, and 95%, absolute alcohol (each solution for 1 min) and the eggs were permanently mounted. The characteristics are based on the width of plastron, morphology of plastron area surrounding the micropyle and chorionic sculpturing, with the length of egg being used as supplemental feature.

  13. Development of advanced techniques for rotorcraft state estimation and parameter identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, W. E., Jr.; Bohn, J. G.; Vincent, J. H.

    1980-01-01

    An integrated methodology for rotorcraft system identification consists of rotorcraft mathematical modeling, three distinct data processing steps, and a technique for designing inputs to improve the identifiability of the data. These elements are as follows: (1) a Kalman filter smoother algorithm which estimates states and sensor errors from error corrupted data. Gust time histories and statistics may also be estimated; (2) a model structure estimation algorithm for isolating a model which adequately explains the data; (3) a maximum likelihood algorithm for estimating the parameters and estimates for the variance of these estimates; and (4) an input design algorithm, based on a maximum likelihood approach, which provides inputs to improve the accuracy of parameter estimates. Each step is discussed with examples to both flight and simulated data cases.

  14. In situ identification of bacterial species in marine microfouling films by using an immunofluorescence technique.

    PubMed Central

    Zambon, J J; Huber, P S; Meyer, A E; Slots, J; Fornalik, M S; Baier, R E

    1984-01-01

    An immunofluorescence technique was developed for the in situ identification of specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. Microorganisms adherent to glass plates after 30 days of immersion in a synthetic seawater system were cultured and classified by biochemical tests, flagellar arrangement, and the API 20E system. All isolates were gram-negative aerobic or facultative motile rods, predominantly Pseudomonas spp. Rabbit antisera to the five dominant organisms including Achromobacter spp., Comamonas terrigena, P. putrefaciens, a yellow-pigmented Pseudomonas sp., and Vibrio alginolyticus were prepared. These antisera were shown to be species specific in indirect immunofluorescence assays against a battery of 26 marine isolates from 14 bacterial species, with the exception of antisera to the Pseudomonas spp, which cross-reacted with each other but not with test bacteria of other genera. These immunofluorescent reagents enabled the in situ identification of all five bacterial species in microfouling films. Low-surface-energy test plates had smaller numbers of adherent bacteria in microfouling films than medium-surface-energy test plates, suggesting that the degree of microfouling may be influenced by the surface energy. In addition, the reagents could identify up to 39% of the attached bacteria in microfouling films spontaneously formed on steel plates in flow cells deployed in different areas of the Atlantic Ocean. The microbial composition of the ocean-formed films varied with the geographical area of their formation. The present results indicate that immunofluorescence techniques may provide a rapid and reliable means to identify, in situ, specific bacteria in marine microfouling films. PMID:6393875

  15. Identification of the neural sources of the pattern-reversal VEP.

    PubMed

    Di Russo, Francesco; Pitzalis, Sabrina; Spitoni, Grazia; Aprile, Teresa; Patria, Fabiana; Spinelli, Donatella; Hillyard, Steven A

    2005-02-01

    This study aimed to characterize the neural generators of the early components of the visual-evoked potential (VEP) to pattern-reversal gratings. Multichannel scalp recordings of VEPs and dipole modeling techniques were combined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and retinotopic mapping in order to estimate the locations of the cortical sources giving rise to VEP components in the first 200 ms poststimulus. Dipole locations were seeded to visual cortical areas in which fMRI activations were elicited by the same stimuli. The results provide strong evidence that the first major component of the VEP elicited by a pattern-reversal stimulus (N75/P85) arises from surface-negative activity in the primary visual cortex (area V1). Subsequent waveform components could be accounted for by dipoles that were in close proximity to fMRI activations in the following cortical areas: P95 (area MT/V5), P125/N135 (area V1), N150 (transverse parietal sulcus, TPS), N160 (ventral occipital areas VP, V4v, and V4/V8), and N180 (dorsal occipital areas V3A/V7). These results provide a detailed spatiotemporal profile of the cortical origins of the pattern-reversal VEP, which should enhance its utility in both clinical and basic studies of visual-perceptual processing.

  16. Ecological coherence of diversity patterns derived from classical fingerprinting and Next Generation Sequencing techniques.

    PubMed

    Gobet, Angélique; Boetius, Antje; Ramette, Alban

    2014-09-01

    Changes in richness and bacterial community structure obtained via 454 Massively Parallel Tag Sequencing (MPTS) and Automated Ribosomal Intergenic Analysis (ARISA) were systematically compared to determine whether and how the ecological knowledge obtained from both molecular techniques could be combined. We evaluated community changes over time and depth in marine coastal sands at different levels of taxonomic resolutions, sequence corrections and sequence abundances. Although richness over depth layers or sampling dates greatly varied [∼ 30% and 70-80% new operational taxonomic units (OTU) between two samples with ARISA and MPTS respectively], overall patterns of community variations were similar with both approaches. Alpha-diversity estimated by ARISA-derived OTU was most similar to that obtained from MPTS-derived OTU defined at the order level. Similar patterns of OTU replacement were also found with MPTS at the family level and with 20-25% rare types removed. Using ARISA or MPTS datasets with lower resolution, such as those containing only resident OTU, yielded a similar set of significant contextual variables explaining bacterial community changes. Hence, ARISA as a rapid and low-cost fingerprinting technique represents a valid starting point for more in-depth exploration of community composition when complemented by the detailed taxonomic description offered by MPTS.

  17. Voltage-Sensitive Dyes And Imaging Techniques Reveal New Patterns Of Electrical Activity In Heart Cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Guy

    1988-04-01

    Voltage-sensitive dyes bind to the plasms membrane of excitable cells (ie., muscle or nerve cells) and exhibit fluorescence and/or absorption changes that vary linearly with changes in transmembrane electrical potential. These potentiometric optical probes can be used to measure local changes in transmembrane potential by monitoring optical signals from dye molecules bound to the surface membrane. Consequently, when excitable cells are stained with such a dye and are stimulated to fire an electrical impulse (ie., an action potential (AP)), the changes in dye fluorescence have the characteristic shape and time course of APs recorded with an intracellular micro-electrode. Potentiometric dyes in conjuction with imaging techniques can now be used to visualize complex patterns and propagation of electrical activity. With photodiode arrays on video imaging techniques, patterns of biological electrical activity can be obtained with high temporal and spatial resolution which could not be obtained by conventional micro-electrodes. These methods reveal new details and offer powerful approaches to study fundamental problem in cardiac electrophysiology, communication in nerve networks, and the organization of cortical neurons.

  18. Print-to-print: a facile multi-object micro-patterning technique.

    PubMed

    Xing, Siyuan; Zhao, Siwei; Pan, Tingrui

    2013-04-01

    In recent years, micropatterning techniques have gained increasing popularity from a broad range of engineering and biology communities for the promise to establish highly quantitative investigations on miniature biological objects (e.g., cells and bacteria) with spatially defined microenvironments. However, majority of the existing techniques rely on cleanroom-based microfabrication and cannot be easily extended to a regular biological laboratory. In this paper, we present a simple versatile printing-based method, referred to as Print-to-Print (P2P), to form multi-object micropatterns for potential biological applications, along with our recent efforts to deliver out-of-cleanroom microfabrication solutions to the general public (Zhao et al. 2009), (Xing et al. 2011), (Wang et al. 2009), (Pan and Wang 2011), (Zhao et al. 2011). The P2P method employs only a commercially available solid-phase printer and custom-made superhydrophobic films. The entire patterning process does not involve any thermal or chemical treatment. Moreover, the non-contact nature of droplet transferring and printing steps can be highly advantageous for sensitive biological uses. Using the P2P process, a minimal feature resolution of 229 ± 17 μm has been successfully demonstrated. In addition, this approach has been applied to form biological micropatterning on various substrates as well as multi-object co-patterns on the commonly used surfaces. Finally, the reusability of superhydrophobic substrates has also been illustrated.

  19. A Technique to Transfer Metallic Nanoscale Patterns to Small and Non-Planar Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Smythe, Elizabeth J.; Dickey, Michael D.; Whitesides, George M.; Capasso, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Conventional lithographic methods (e.g. electron-beam writing, photolithography) are capable of producing high-resolution structures over large areas, but are generally limited to large (>1 cm2) planar substrates. Incorporation of these features on unconventional substrates (i.e., small (<1 mm2) and/or non-planar substrates) would open possibilities for many applications, including remote fiber-based sensing, nanoscale optical lithography, three-dimensional fabrication, and integration of compact optical elements on fiber and semiconductor lasers. Here we introduce a simple method in which a thin thiol-ene film strips arbitrary nanoscale metallic features from one substrate and is then transferred, along with the attached features, to a substrate that would be difficult or impossible to pattern with conventional lithographic techniques. An oxygen plasma removes the sacrificial film, leaving behind the metallic features. The transfer of dense and sparse patterns of isolated and connected gold features ranging from 30 nm to 1 μm, to both an optical fiber facet and a silica microsphere, demonstrates the versatility of the method. A distinguishing feature of this technique is the use of a thin, sacrificial film to strip and transfer metallic nanopatterns and its ability to directly transfer metallic structures produced by conventional lithography. PMID:19206249

  20. Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy Technique in Identification of Ancient Ceramics Bodies and Glazes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elsayed, Khaled; Imam, Hisham; Madkour, Fatma; Meheina, Galila; Gamal, Yosr

    2011-06-01

    In this paper we report a study on Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) as a promising non-destructive technique for the identification of the colored glazes, and clay's bodies of Fatimid ceramics ancient artifacts. The scientific examination of ceramics may be helpful in unraveling the history of ancient shards, particularly as the process of its production such as firing condition and temperatures. The analysis of pottery, ceramic bodies and glazed coatings is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece. Revealing the technical skills of ancient potters has been one of the most important issues for gaining a deep insight of bygone culture and also it is required in order to structure the conservation or restoration of a piece of art. LIBS measurements were carried out by focusing a Nd-YAG laser at 1064 nm with pulse width of 10 ns and 50 mJ pulse energy on the surface of the sample by a 100-mm focal length lens. The plasma emission was collected by telescopic system and transferred through a fiber to Echelle spectrometer attached to an ICCD camera. The focal spot diameter is found to be in the range of 100-150 μm. which is small enough to consider this technique as a non-destructive technique. LIBS technique clarified that each piece of archaeological objects has its own finger print. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis was carried out on these archaeological ceramic body samples to study raw materials such as clays, which allowed the investigation of the crystal structure and showed the changes in its structure through firing process. This provided information on the ceramic characteristic and composition of the ceramic bodies.

  1. Assessment of lip print patterns and its use for personal identification among the populations of Rajnandgaon, Chhattisgarh, India

    PubMed Central

    Multani, Suraj; Thombre, Vivek; Thombre, Aparna; Surana, Pratik

    2014-01-01

    Background: Personal identification plays an inevitable role in forensic investigation. Lip print is one of the evidences that can be left in the crime scene, which helps in identification purpose. Hence, the present study was undertaken to provide deeper inside view of use of cheiloscopy in personal identification, focusing on sex and age variability of lip print patterns in the population of Rajnandgaon city, Chhattisgarh, India. Materials and Methods: The cross-sectional study was conducted among 200 (100 males and 100 females) subjects of age 15-55 years, residing in different areas of Rajnandgaon city. The sex of the individual was determined as per the description given by Vahanwala et al. Frequency distribution and Chi-square test were used for data analysis by SPSS 16.0 V software. Results: The most common lip print pattern in entire population was Type I (27.5%). Very highly significant difference was found in the distribution of lip print patterns among males and females in the entire population, group I, and group III, respectively (P < 0.0001). The overall accuracy of cheiloscopy in sex determination was (high) 87.95%, 87.65%, 90.5%, and 80% in group 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. Conclusion: Thus, it can be concluded that lip prints can be used as one of the important forensic tools for personal identification on the basis of their age and gender variability among the populations. PMID:25374835

  2. Structural damage detection based on stochastic subspace identification and statistical pattern recognition: I. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, W. X.; Lin, Y. Q.; Fang, S. E.

    2011-11-01

    One of the key issues in vibration-based structural health monitoring is to extract the damage-sensitive but environment-insensitive features from sampled dynamic response measurements and to carry out the statistical analysis of these features for structural damage detection. A new damage feature is proposed in this paper by using the system matrices of the forward innovation model based on the covariance-driven stochastic subspace identification of a vibrating system. To overcome the variations of the system matrices, a non-singularity transposition matrix is introduced so that the system matrices are normalized to their standard forms. For reducing the effects of modeling errors, noise and environmental variations on measured structural responses, a statistical pattern recognition paradigm is incorporated into the proposed method. The Mahalanobis and Euclidean distance decision functions of the damage feature vector are adopted by defining a statistics-based damage index. The proposed structural damage detection method is verified against one numerical signal and two numerical beams. It is demonstrated that the proposed statistics-based damage index is sensitive to damage and shows some robustness to the noise and false estimation of the system ranks. The method is capable of locating damage of the beam structures under different types of excitations. The robustness of the proposed damage detection method to the variations in environmental temperature is further validated in a companion paper by a reinforced concrete beam tested in the laboratory and a full-scale arch bridge tested in the field.

  3. Bacteriophage lytic patterns for identification of salmonellae, shigellae, Escherichia coli, Citrobacter freundii, and Enterobacter cloacae.

    PubMed

    He, X Q; Pan, R N

    1992-03-01

    A series of bacteriophages specific for Escherichia coli (E-1, E-2, E-3, and E-4), Citrobacter freundii (phi I, phi II, and phi III), Enterobacter cloacae (Ent), and Shigella spp. (Sh) have been isolated from hospital sewage. These bacteriophages, in combination with Felix Salmonella phage O-I, were used as a diagnostic phage typing set which included seven phage preparations: O-I, C (phi I and phi III), Sh, E (E-1 and E-2), CE (phi II and E-3), E-4, and Ent. After 20,280 cultures of 27 species and 9 biogroups of 15 genera of the family Enterobacteriaceae and 276 cultures of 8 species of 6 genera outside the Enterobacteriaceae were tested, it was shown that most strains of salmonellae, E. coli, C. freundii, and E. cloacae can be identified accurately. The sensitivities of identification were 83.6% for E. cloacae, 88.8% for C. freundii, 90.3% for E. coli, and 95.76% for salmonellae. The specificities were 99.78% for salmonellae, 99.84% for E. cloacae, 99.89% for E. coli, and 99.97% for C. freundii. The results of bacteriophage lytic patterns were highly correlated with Shigella serotypes. Therefore, such a phage typing set may be used routinely in public hygiene and clinical laboratories.

  4. Incorporating pattern identification of Chinese medicine into precision medicine: An integrative model for individualized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-gen; Xu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    On 20 January, 2015, U.S. President Obama announced an ambitious plan called "Precision Medicine (PM) Initiative", aiming to deliver genetics-based medical treatments. PM has shown a promising prospect by tailoring disease treatments and preventions to individuals. However, a predominantly genetics-based method restricts its benefit and applicability in most chronic and complex diseases. Pattern identification (PI) is one of the representative characteristics of Chinese medicine implying the concept of holism and individualized treatment. It is another classification method taking environmental, psychosocial and other individual factors into account. Integrating PI with disease diagnosis of Western medicine will provide a strong complement to genetics-based PM, thus establish an integrative model for individualized medicine. PI provides new perspectives for PM, not only in clinical practice, but also in new drug development and clinical trial design. It is for sure that the integrative approach will ultimately lead to a safer, more convenient and effective patient-centered healthcare and most patients will benefit in the era of PM.

  5. DNA analysis of histocompatibility antigens: identification of new DQw specificities and of DPw patterns.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, A C; Kalil, J

    1989-01-01

    1. The HLA-D region of the major histocompatibility complex has several subregions, the most important of which are DR, DQ and DP. The genes coding for the beta chains of these proteins present most of the polymorphisms which result in the large variety of class II antigens observed. 2. We have studied the restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the DQ beta and DP beta genes in order to establish accurate typing patterns. 3. The data show that DQ typing based on RFLP permits the identification of the recently described DQw1 splits (new antigenic specificities), DQw5 and DQw6. The TA10-monoclonal antibody-positive split of DQw3, designated DQw7, is associated with specific DNA fragments after digestion with four different enzymes: Taq I, Hind III, Pvu II and Bgl II. Furthermore, the recently reported specificity DQw4 (formerly typed as a blank) is associated with a specific 2.4-kb fragment when the DNA is digested with EcoRV. 4. DP typing proved to be more difficult even though six enzymes were used, and only broad groups could be identified. PMID:2483530

  6. Incorporating pattern identification of Chinese medicine into precision medicine: An integrative model for individualized medicine.

    PubMed

    Li, Jin-gen; Xu, Hao

    2015-11-01

    On 20 January, 2015, U.S. President Obama announced an ambitious plan called "Precision Medicine (PM) Initiative", aiming to deliver genetics-based medical treatments. PM has shown a promising prospect by tailoring disease treatments and preventions to individuals. However, a predominantly genetics-based method restricts its benefit and applicability in most chronic and complex diseases. Pattern identification (PI) is one of the representative characteristics of Chinese medicine implying the concept of holism and individualized treatment. It is another classification method taking environmental, psychosocial and other individual factors into account. Integrating PI with disease diagnosis of Western medicine will provide a strong complement to genetics-based PM, thus establish an integrative model for individualized medicine. PI provides new perspectives for PM, not only in clinical practice, but also in new drug development and clinical trial design. It is for sure that the integrative approach will ultimately lead to a safer, more convenient and effective patient-centered healthcare and most patients will benefit in the era of PM. PMID:26519373

  7. Identification and characterization of related substances in pomalidomide by hyphenated LC-MS techniques.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ping; Wang, Lei; Song, Min; Hang, Tai-Jun

    2015-10-10

    The current study dealt with the separation, identification and characterization of related substances in pomalidomide by hyphenated techniques. Complete separation was obtained with an Inertsil ODS-SP column (250 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) by linear gradient elution using a mobile phase consisting of 0.1% formic acid solution and acetonitrile. They were characterized by hyphenated chromatographic techniques with the accurate mass determination using high resolution LC-TOF-MS methods as well as the product MS spectra determination and elucidation. The degradation behaviors of pomalidomide under ICH prescribed stress conditions were also conducted. Pomalidomide was found to be labile to degrade under acid, alkaline, oxidative and thermal stress conditions, while it was relatively stable to photolytic stress. 13 related substances were detected and identified to be 10 degradation products and three process related substances. The hyphenated LC-MS method with high resolution accurate mass determination facilitated the qualitative analysis of the unknown compounds than that of the conventional HPLC-UV. The related compounds identified are valuable for pomalidomide manufacturing process optimization and quality control.

  8. [A quantitation method for andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide by X-ray powder diffraction Fourier fingerprint pattern technique].

    PubMed

    Gong, Ning-Bo; Lü, Li-Juan; Liu, Chao; Ma, Lin; Chen, Ruo-Yun; Lü, Yang

    2010-05-01

    The powder X-ray diffraction Fourier fingerprint pattern technique was used to develop a new quantitation method for the analysis of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide. And the high performance liquid chromatography method was used to evaluate the quantity of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide. The relationship of diffraction peak intensity and content of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide was investigated. The powder X-ray diffraction Fourier fingerprint pattern analysis technique can be used to evaluate the quantity of andrographolide and dehydroandrographolide in the herb simultaneously.

  9. [Review of dual stable isotope technique for nitrate source identification in surface- and groundwater in China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Wen, Xue-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Water nitrate (NO3-) contamination is a world-wide environmental problem under the effects of intensive human activities. Sources identification of NO3- contamination in water is important for better management of water quality. Dual stable isotope data of nitrate nitrogen (delta15N) and nitrate oxygen (delta18O) combined with other stable isotopes and chemical analysis data have been frequently used to identify NO3- sources, differentiate percentage of the different NO3- sources and assess the nitrification/denitrification processes of surface water, groundwater and precipitation, respectively. This review summarized the analysis technique of nitrate delta15N and delta18O in domestic and abroad, assessed typical values of delta15N, delta18O from different NO3- sources and evaluated the progress in application of dual stable isotope of delta15N and delta18O technique to trace NO3- sources in surface- and ground-water. Both ion exchange-AgNO3 and bacteria denitrifying methods have been successfully used in tracing water nitrate sources nationwide. The comprehensive metadata analysis of nitrate sources showed that the delta15N values of sewage and manure, soil, precipitation, fertilizer ranged from 3 per thousand to 17 per thousand, 3 per thousand to 8 per thousand, - 9 per thousand to 9 per thousand, -2 per thousand to 4 per thousand, respectively. And the delta15N values of ammonium fertilizer ranged from - 4 per thousand to 2 per thousand. According to the stable isotope technique, sewage and manure were identified as the major nitrate sources of surface- and ground-water in China. This indicated that municipal sewage and aquaculture exerted serious influence on the nitrate pollution of surface water. In the future, long-term monitoring, dual stable isotope fingerprinting and hydro-chemical analysis should be applied together to quantitatively differentiate contribution of nitrate sources, and to assess seasonal dynamic of nitrate sources. It will provide useful

  10. Dual redundant sensor FDI techniques applied to the NASA F8C DFBW aircraft. [Failure Detection and Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, M. N.; Deckert, J. C.; Deyst, J. J.; Willsky, A. S.; Chow, E. Y.

    1976-01-01

    An onboard failure detection and identification (FDI) technique for dual redundant sensors on the NASA F8C digital fly-by-wire (DFBW) aircraft is presented. The failure of one of a pair of sensors of the same type is detected by a direct redundancy trigger which observes the difference between the outputs of these two sensors. Identification of the failed sensor is accomplished utilizing the analytic redundancy that exists as kinematic and functional relationships among the variables being measured by dissimilar instruments. In addition, identification of generic failures, common to both instruments of a given type, is accomplished by using a time trigger to periodically initiate analytic redundancy failure identification tests for individual sensors. The basic form of these tests is the comparison of the measurement of a variable using the suspect instrument with another measurement of the same variable obtained using other instrument types.

  11. Theta bursts: an EEG pattern in normal subjects practising the transcendental meditation technique.

    PubMed

    Hebert, R; Lehmann, D

    1977-03-01

    In a survey of the EEG characteristics of persons practising the Transcendental Meditation technique, 21 of 78 people demonstrated intermittent prominent bursts of frontally dominant theta activity. On the average across subjects, the theta bursts occurred about every 2 min, had an average duration of 1.8 sec, and an average maximal amplitude of 135 muV. Typically, the bursts were preceded and followed by alpha rhythm. Subject reports elicited during theta bursts indicated pleasant states with intact situational orientation and no subjective experiences related to sleep. Fifty-four non-meditating controls showed no theta bursts during relaxation and sleep onset. It is hypothesized that theta burst may be the manifestation of a state adjustment mechanism which comes into play during prolonged low-arousal states, and which may be related to EEG patterns of relaxation in certain behavioural conditions.

  12. Semi-Supervised Approach to Phase Identification from Combinatorial Sample Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Jonathan Kenneth; Hu, Jianjun; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.

    2016-08-01

    Manual attribution of crystallographic phases from high-throughput x-ray diffraction studies is an arduous task, and represents a rate-limiting step in high-throughput exploration of new materials. Here, we demonstrate a semi-supervised machine learning technique, SS-AutoPhase, which uses a two-step approach to identify automatically phases from diffraction data. First, clustering analysis is used to select a representative subset of samples automatically for human analysis. Second, an AdaBoost classifier uses the labeled samples to identify the presence of the different phases in diffraction data. SS-AutoPhase was used to identify the metallographic phases in 278 diffraction patterns from a FeGaPd composition spread sample. The accuracy of SS-AutoPhase was >82.6% for all phases when 15% of the diffraction patterns were used for training. The SS-AutoPhase predicted phase diagram showed excellent agreement with human expert analysis. Furthermore it was able to determine and identify correctly a previously unreported phase.

  13. Semi-Supervised Approach to Phase Identification from Combinatorial Sample Diffraction Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bunn, Jonathan Kenneth; Hu, Jianjun; Hattrick-Simpers, Jason R.

    2016-07-01

    Manual attribution of crystallographic phases from high-throughput x-ray diffraction studies is an arduous task, and represents a rate-limiting step in high-throughput exploration of new materials. Here, we demonstrate a semi-supervised machine learning technique, SS-AutoPhase, which uses a two-step approach to identify automatically phases from diffraction data. First, clustering analysis is used to select a representative subset of samples automatically for human analysis. Second, an AdaBoost classifier uses the labeled samples to identify the presence of the different phases in diffraction data. SS-AutoPhase was used to identify the metallographic phases in 278 diffraction patterns from a FeGaPd composition spread sample. The accuracy of SS-AutoPhase was >82.6% for all phases when 15% of the diffraction patterns were used for training. The SS-AutoPhase predicted phase diagram showed excellent agreement with human expert analysis. Furthermore it was able to determine and identify correctly a previously unreported phase.

  14. Combination of geophysical prospecting techniques into areas of high protection value: Identification of shallow volcanic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Ortiz, David; Montesinos, Fuensanta G.; Martín-Crespo, Tomás; Solla, Mercedes; Arnoso, José; Vélez, Emilio

    2014-10-01

    Timanfaya National Park is a volcanic area located in the southwest of Lanzarote Island (Canary Islands, Spain). Several lava tubes have been found in the lava flows but many others remain unknown. Its location and identification are important to mitigate collapse hazards in this touristic area. We present a new study about the location of recent lava tubes by the analysis and joint interpretation of ground penetrating radar (GPR), microgravity and electromagnetic induction (EMI) data along the same profile over an area not previously surveyed. GPR data display a complex pattern of reflections up to ~ 10 m depth. The strongest hyperbolic reflections can be grouped in four different areas. Visual inspections carried out in the field allow confirming the occurrence of lava tubes at two of them. These reflections have been interpreted as the effect of the roof and bottom interfaces of several lava tubes. The microgravity survey defines a wide gravity low with several over-imposed minor highs and lows. Using the GPR data, a 2.5D gravity model has been obtained revealing four lava tubes. EMI data have been used to obtain an inverted resistivity model that displays four high resistivity areas that closely match the locations of the lava tubes derived from the previous methods. This resistivity model exhibits the lower resolution although reaches a deeper investigation depth (~ 20 m). The comparison of the results has revealed that joint interpretation of GPR, microgravity and EMI methods provides reliable models useful for the detection of unknown shallow lava tubes.

  15. Analysis of deformation patterns through advanced DINSAR techniques in Istanbul megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balik Sanli, F.; Calò, F.; Abdikan, S.; Pepe, A.; Gorum, T.

    2014-09-01

    As result of the Turkey's economic growth and heavy migration processes from rural areas, Istanbul has experienced a high urbanization rate, with severe impacts on the environment in terms of natural resources pressure, land-cover changes and uncontrolled sprawl. As a consequence, the city became extremely vulnerable to natural and man-made hazards, inducing ground deformation phenomena that threaten buildings and infrastructures and often cause significant socio-economic losses. Therefore, the detection and monitoring of such deformation patterns is of primary importance for hazard and risk assessment as well as for the design and implementation of effective mitigation strategies. Aim of this work is to analyze the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of deformations affecting the Istanbul metropolitan area, by exploiting advanced Differential SAR Interferometry (DInSAR) techniques. In particular, we apply the Small BAseline Subset (SBAS) approach to a dataset of 43 TerraSAR-X images acquired, between November 2010 and June 2012, along descending orbits with an 11-day revisit time and a 3 m × 3 m spatial resolution. The SBAS processing allowed us to remotely detect and monitor subsidence patterns over all the urban area as well as to provide detailed information at the scale of the single building. Such SBAS measurements, effectively integrated with ground-based monitoring data and thematic maps, allows to explore the relationship between the detected deformation phenomena and urbanization, contributing to improve the urban planning and management.

  16. Differentiation of tea varieties using UV-Vis spectra and pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palacios-Morillo, Ana; Alcázar, Ángela.; de Pablos, Fernando; Jurado, José Marcos

    2013-02-01

    Tea, one of the most consumed beverages all over the world, is of great importance in the economies of a number of countries. Several methods have been developed to classify tea varieties or origins based in pattern recognition techniques applied to chemical data, such as metal profile, amino acids, catechins and volatile compounds. Some of these analytical methods become tedious and expensive to be applied in routine works. The use of UV-Vis spectral data as discriminant variables, highly influenced by the chemical composition, can be an alternative to these methods. UV-Vis spectra of methanol-water extracts of tea have been obtained in the interval 250-800 nm. Absorbances have been used as input variables. Principal component analysis was used to reduce the number of variables and several pattern recognition methods, such as linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines and artificial neural networks, have been applied in order to differentiate the most common tea varieties. A successful classification model was built by combining principal component analysis and multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks, allowing the differentiation between tea varieties. This rapid and simple methodology can be applied to solve classification problems in food industry saving economic resources.

  17. Pattern recognition techniques for horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flow measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arubi, Tesi I. M.; Yeung, Hoi

    2012-03-01

    The oil and gas industry need for high performing and low cost multiphase meters is ever more justified given the rapid depletion of conventional oil reserves that has led oil companies to develop smaller and marginal fields and reservoirs in remote locations and deep offshore, thereby placing great demands for compact and more cost effective solutions of on-line continuous multiphase flow measurement for well testing, production monitoring, production optimisation, process control and automation. The pattern recognition approach for clamp-on multiphase measurement employed in this study provides one means for meeting this need. High speed caesium-137 radioisotope-based densitometers were installed vertically at the top of a 50.8mm and 101.6mm riser as well as horizontally at the riser base in the Cranfield University multiphase flow test facility. A comprehensive experimental campaign comprising flow conditions typical of operating conditions found in the Petroleum Industry was conducted. The application of a single gamma densitometer unit, in conjunction with pattern recognition techniques to determine both the phase volume fractions and velocities to yield the individual phase flow rates of horizontal and vertically upward multiphase flows was investigated. The pattern recognition systems were trained to map the temporal fluctuations in the multiphase mixture density with the individual phase flow rates using statistical features extracted from the gamma counts signals as their inputs. Initial results yielded individual phase flow rate predictions to within ±5% relative error for the two phase airwater flows and ±10% for three phase air-oil-water flows data.

  18. Patterning of single-wall carbon nanotubes via a combined technique (chemical anchoring and photolithography) on patterned substrates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Myung-Sup; Jung, Sung-Ouk; Jung, Dae-Hwan; Ko, Young Koan; Jin, Yong Wan; Kim, Jongmin; Jung, Hee-Tae

    2005-06-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have been chemically attached with high density onto a patterned substrate. To form the SWNT pattern, the substrate was treated with acid-labile group protected amine, and an amine prepattern was formed using a photolithographic process with a novel polymeric photoacid generator (PAG). The polymeric PAG contains a triphenylsulfonium salt on its backbone and was synthesized to obtain a PAG with enhanced efficiency and ease of spin-coating onto the amine-modified glass substrate. The SWNT monolayer pattern was then formed through the amidation reaction between the carboxylic acid groups of carboxylated SWNTs (ca-SWNTs) and the prepatterned amino groups. A high-density multilayer was fabricated via further repeated reaction between the carboxylic acid groups of the ca-SWNTs and the amino groups of the linker with the aid of a condensation agent. The formation of covalent amide bonding was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. Scanning electron microscopy and UV-vis-near-IR results show that the patterned SWNT films have uniform coverage with high surface density. Unlike previously reported patterned SWNT arrays, this ca-SWNT patterned layer has high surface density and excellent surface adhesion due to its direct chemical bonding to the substrate.

  19. Informational Masking in Normal-Hearing and Hearing-Impaired Listeners Measured in a Nonspeech Pattern Identification Task

    PubMed Central

    Best, Virginia; Mason, Christine R.; Swaminathan, Jayaganesh; Kidd, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    Individuals with sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) often experience more difficulty with listening in multisource environments than do normal-hearing (NH) listeners. While the peripheral effects of sensorineural hearing loss certainly contribute to this difficulty, differences in central processing of auditory information may also contribute. To explore this issue, it is important to account for peripheral differences between NH and these hearing-impaired (HI) listeners so that central effects in multisource listening can be examined. In the present study, NH and HI listeners performed a tonal pattern identification task at two distant center frequencies (CFs), 850 and 3500 Hz. In an attempt to control for differences in the peripheral representations of the stimuli, the patterns were presented at the same sensation level (15 dB SL), and the frequency deviation of the tones comprising the patterns was adjusted to obtain equal quiet pattern identification performance across all listeners at both CFs. Tonal sequences were then presented at both CFs simultaneously (informational masking conditions), and listeners were asked either to selectively attend to a source (CF) or to divide attention between CFs and identify the pattern at a CF designated after each trial. There were large differences between groups in the frequency deviations necessary to perform the pattern identification task. After compensating for these differences, there were small differences between NH and HI listeners in the informational masking conditions. HI listeners showed slightly greater performance asymmetry between the low and high CFs than did NH listeners, possibly due to central differences in frequency weighting between groups. PMID:27059627

  20. Neurochemical and neuroanatomical identification of central pattern generator neuron homologues in Nudipleura molluscs.

    PubMed

    Lillvis, Joshua L; Gunaratne, Charuni A; Katz, Paul S

    2012-01-01

    Certain invertebrate neurons can be identified by their behavioral functions. However, evolutionary divergence can cause some species to not display particular behaviors, thereby making it impossible to use physiological characteristics related to those behaviors for identifying homologous neurons across species. Therefore, to understand the neural basis of species-specific behavior, it is necessary to identify homologues using characteristics that are independent of physiology. In the Nudipleura mollusc Tritonia diomedea, Cerebral Neuron 2 (C2) was first described as being a member of the swim central pattern generator (CPG). Here we demonstrate that neurochemical markers, in conjunction with previously known neuroanatomical characteristics, allow C2 to be uniquely identified without the aid of electrophysiological measures. Specifically, C2 had three characteristics that, taken together, identified the neuron: 1) a white cell on the dorsal surface of the cerebral ganglion, 2) an axon that projected to the contralateral pedal ganglion and through the pedal commissure, and 3) immunoreactivity for the peptides FMRFamide and Small Cardioactive Peptide B. These same anatomical and neurochemical characteristics also uniquely identified the C2 homologue in Pleurobranchaea californica (called A1), which was previously identified by its analogous role in the Pleurobranchaea swim CPG. Furthermore, these characteristics were used to identify C2 homologues in Melibe leonina, Hermissenda crassicornis, and Flabellina iodinea, species that are phylogenetically closer to Tritonia than Pleurobranchaea, but do not display the same swimming behavior as Tritonia or Pleurobranchaea. These identifications will allow future studies comparing and contrasting the physiological properties of C2 across species that can and cannot produce the type of swimming behavior exhibited by Tritonia.

  1. Eliminative behavior of captive numbats, Myrmecobius fasciatus (Mammalia; Marsupialia): pattern and identification of fecal deposits.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Lindsay A; Lisle, Allan T; Johnston, Stephen D

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the spatial defecation patterns of numbats within captivity and tested the efficacy of a food colorant as a fecal marker in this species. Rather than randomly distributing scats throughout their environment, the numbats aggregated their feces at specific sites forming latrines. It is unclear whether the strong inclination for latrine formation was due to this species' inherent behavior or is a direct result of captivity. Males were found to have a higher daily defecation rate, different defecation time, larger number of latrines, and greater number of scats per quadrant, as compared to females. In this study, the majority of scats were deposited along enclosure boundaries and for both sexes there was a higher probability of latrines being placed along enclosure fencing shared with a female neighbor. The high concentration of latrines along boundaries suggests that they may play a role in territorial defense. The results also indicated that captive numbats tend to choose defecation points away from food and refuge sites. Transit and total retention time of the marker through the GIT was ≤3 hr and between 24 and 27 hr, respectively. A marker dose of 3 gtts feed(-1)  × 2 feeds day(-1) was required to reach a steady and detectable state of marker output, which enabled accurate identification of individual samples during the breeding season. Reliable labeling was obtained using blue and red colored food dye, and there was no evidence that incorporation of the marker into the diet had any negative effects on food intake.

  2. Receiver Function Inversion Using Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) and Generalized Pattern Search (GPS) Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dugda, M. T.; Workineh, A. T.; Homaifar, A.; Kim, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    In order to determine crustal thickness (H) and Vp/Vs ratio (κ) parameters and associated weights from Hκ stacking of receiver functions, an effort has been made to develop a technique that combines Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) and Generalized Pattern Search (GPS) techniques by employing their strengths. The problem here involves global optimization for the inversion of receiver functions based on Hκ stacking. Generally, the objective function of the Hκ stacking algorithm displays multimodal surfaces with multiple local maxima. Niching mechanism permits standard Genetic Algorithms (GAs) to identify different subpopulations representing various peaks by maintaining population diversity and avoiding early convergence so as to enable adequate exploration of the search space for the GA to discover multiple optima. In multimodal optimization, fitness sharing has been commonly used to generate stable subpopulations of individuals around multiple optimum points in the search space. In this study newly developed Fitness Proportionate Niching (FPN) of Genetic Algorithms is implemented to identify the different local maxima regions (niches). The basis for FPN is the idea of limited resources where individuals in a given niche share the resource of that niche in proportion to the fitness strength. Among the FPN identified niches, the niche of correct phases is designated for a faster search using GPS approach. Application of GPS technique provides quick and optimal solutions for the different parameters under investigation - the crustal thickness (H), Vp/Vs ratio (κ), and the three associated weights (W1, W2, W3). The GPS technique is among the very few provably convergent, derivative-free search methods for linearly constrained optimization problems. One of the key features of GPS technique is the repeatability of the outcomes unlike some heuristic search approaches. The number of iterations as well as the number of objective function evaluations will remain the

  3. Petroleum-specific analytical and interpretive techniques for product identification and source allocation

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlen, D.T.; Uhler, A.D.; Sauer, T.C.; McCarthy, K.J.

    1995-12-31

    As a class, petroleum and refined petroleum products represent the single largest source of contamination to the terrestrial and aquatic environments. Petroleum products including crude oil and a wide spectrum of refined petroleum products are accidentally released by a variety of mechanisms including surface spills, tanker accidents, storage tank leaks, and pipeline ruptures. In many cases, the petroleum and other hydrocarbon products discovered in impacted environments usually cannot be readily linked to a source, because the products are often complex mixtures of various hydrocarbon-based components. The identification of hydrocarbon products in the environment is further confounded by complex physical, chemical, and biological mechanisms that alter the fresh hydrocarbons through processes known collectively as weathering. The dilution, mixing, transport, and weathering of these hydrocarbon materials in the environment renders them very different in composition and appearance from their original source materials. This paper describes the use of EPA methods of analysis that have been modified for measurement of a large suite of petrogenic organic compounds that can be used for sensitive measurement of fresh and degraded petroleum in environmental samples ranging from volatile products such as gasoline to heavy crude oils. Petroleum specific data is reduced using multivariate chemometric techniques including hierarchal cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis to evaluate linkage between the samples and likely petroleum source products. Combined with high quality, petroleum specific data, these analysis techniques offer unparalleled means of identifying materials, differentiating between similar products such as gasolines, and linking contaminated samples to sources. Examples of the use of the methods to deduce sources of gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel to terrestrial spills will be presented.

  4. In situ mineral identification - Raman technique in future robotic explorations on planetary surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, A.; Jolliff, B.L.; Haskin, L.A.

    1995-12-31

    Rover and lander missions are being continually planned for the characterization of planetary surface materials. With a series of simulated Raman measurements of lunar soils, rock chips and Martian analogues, we have demonstrated that mineral identification for the main phases in these planetary materials can be unambiguously achieved. We also obtained significant information on composition and structural features of important phases, such as the Mg/(Mg+Fe) ration in olivines, the dominant structural forms of pyroxenes, and the characteristics of hydrous components and cations in carbonates and sulfates, that are very important for Martian geology. Recent developments of Raman spectroscopic instrumentation make it possible to build a small, sensitive, and robust Raman system for rover and lander missions. Compared to other spectroscopic techniques (VIS-NIR, mid-IR and Moessbauer spectroscopy) that have been used or proposed for planetary application, Raman spectroscopy has many advantages, such as sharp, non-overlapping peaks in mineral spectra, no need for spectral deconvolution in order to identify the phases, and operation in visible spectral region. A rover Raman system could work nicely as a mineral indicator in future missions to Mars and Moon.

  5. Multiple techniques for mineral identification of terrestrial evaporites relevant to Mars exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stivaletta, N.; Dellisanti, F.; D'Elia, M.; Fonti, S.; Mancarella, F.

    2013-05-01

    Sulfates, commonly found in evaporite deposits, were observed on Mars surface during orbital remote sensing and surface exploration. In terrestrial environments, evaporite precipitation creates excellent microniches for microbial colonization, especially in desert areas. Deposits comprised of gypsum, calcite, quartz and silicate deposits (phyllosilicates, feldspars) from Sahara Desert in southern Tunisia contain endolithic colonies just below the rock surface. Previous optical observations verified the presence of microbial communities and, as described in this paper, spectral visible analyses have led to identification of chlorophylls belonging to photosynthetic bacteria. Spectral analyses in the infrared region have clearly detected the presence of gypsum and phyllosilicates (mainly illite and/or smectite), as well as traces of calcite, but not quartz. X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis has identified the dominant presence of gypsum as well as that of other secondary minerals such as quartz, feldspars and Mg-Al-rich phyllosilicates, such as chlorite, illite and smectite. The occurrence of a small quantity of calcite in all the samples was also highlighted by the loss of CO2 by thermal analysis (TG-DTA). A normative calculation using XRD, thermal data and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has permitted to obtain the mineralogical concentration of the minerals occurring in the samples. The combination of multiple techniques provides information about the mineralogy of rocks and hence indication of environments suitable for supporting microbial life on Mars surface.

  6. Optimal Sensor Placement for Modal Parameter Identification Using Signal Subspace Correlation Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherng, An-Pan

    2003-03-01

    Placing vibration sensors at appropriate locations plays an important role in experimental modal analysis. It is known that maximising the determinant of Fisher information matrix (FIM) can result in an optimal configuration of sensors from a set of candidate locations. Some methods have already been proposed in the literature, such as maximising the determinant of the diagonal elements of mode shape correlation matrix, ranking the sensor contributions by Hankel singular values (HSVs), and using perturbation theory to achieve minimum variance of estimation, etc. The objectives of this work were to systematically analyse existing methods and to propose methods that either improve their performance or accelerate the searching process for modal parameter identification. The approach used in this article is based on the analytical formulation of singular value decomposition (SVD) for a candidate-blocked Hankel matrix using signal subspace correlation (SSC) techniques developed earlier by the author. The SSC accounts for factors that contribute to the estimated results, such as mode shapes, damping ratios, sampling rate and matrix size (or number of data used). With the aid of SSC, it will be shown that using information of mode shapes and that of singular values are equivalent under certain conditions. The results of this work are not only consistent with those of existing methods, but also demonstrate a more general viewpoint to the optimisation problem. Consequently, the insight of the sensor placement problem is clearly interpreted. Finally, two modified methods that inherit the merits of existing methods are proposed, and their effectiveness is demonstrated by numerical examples.

  7. A highly sensitive in vivo footprinting technique for condition-dependent identification of cis elements.

    PubMed

    Gorsche, Rita; Jovanovic, Birgit; Gudynaite-Savitch, Loreta; Mach, Robert L; Mach-Aigner, Astrid R

    2014-01-01

    Knowing which regions of a gene are targeted by transcription factors during induction or repression is essential for understanding the mechanisms responsible for regulation. Therefore, we re-designed the traditional in vivo footprinting method to obtain a highly sensitive technique, which allows identification of the cis elements involved in condition-dependent gene regulation. Data obtained through DMS methylation, HCl DNA cleavage and optimized ligation-mediated PCR using fluorescent labelling followed by capillary gel electrophoresis are analysed by ivFAST. In this work we have developed this command line-based program, which is designed to ensure automated and fast data processing and visualization. The new method facilitates a quantitative, high-throughput approach because it enables the comparison of any number of in vivo footprinting results from different conditions (e.g. inducing, repressing, de-repressing) to one another by employing an internal standard. For validation of the method the well-studied upstream regulatory region of the Trichoderma reesei xyn1 (endoxylanase 1) gene was used. Applying the new method we could identify the motives involved in condition-dependent regulation of the cbh2 (cellobiohydrolase 2) and xyn2 (endoxylanase 2) genes.

  8. Airborne Fungi in Sahara Dust Aerosols Reaching the Eastern Caribbean: II. Species Identification Using Molecular Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de La Mota, A.; Betancourt, C.; Detres, Y.; Armstrong, R.

    2003-12-01

    Fungi samples from filters collected in Castle Bruce, Dominica from March through July 2002, were previously purified and identified to genus level using classic macroscopic and microscopic techniques. A total of 105 isolated colonies were cultured in liquid media and the mycelial mats used for DNA extraction. PCR was used to amplify the ITS region of the rDNA using the ITS1 and ITS4 primers. Both strands of the amplified products were sequenced and the final identification to species level was completed by a GenBank search. Fourteen different species and one fungal endophyte were identified from genders Aspergillus,Penicillium, Fusarium, Cladosporium, Curvularia and Phanerochaete. Some of these species such as A. fumigatus, A. japonicus, P. citrinum and C. cladosporoides are known to cause respiratory disorders in humans. A. fumigatus causes an aggressive pulmonary allergic response that might result in allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis. Other species such as F. equiseti and C. brachyspora are plant pathogens affecting economically important crops. Sahara dust is an important source of fungal spores of species that are not common in the Caribbean region.

  9. Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Szpakiewicz, M.

    1991-10-01

    This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  10. [The approbation of technique of mass spectrometry with matrix-activated laser desorption/ionization for identification of plague agent].

    PubMed

    Afanas'ev, M V; Ostiak, A S; Balakhonov, S V

    2014-08-01

    The study of sampling of strains of Y. pestis of main and altaic subspecies was implemented. The modern technique of identification of microorganisms was applied using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. The evaluation of biological safety of method of sampling preparation was implemented. To supplement the identification base "BioTyper" the spectrum of typical strains of Y. pestis were obtained. The enhanced identification base was used to evaluate possibilities of application of MALDI-TOF technology for identification and taxonomic differentiation of Y. pestis from other representatives of genus of Yersinia. In the process of study a complete concordance of results of mass spectrometry identification and classic cultural method was observed. On the basis of mass spectrometry characteristic of analyzed sampling the differentiation between strains of Y. pestis of subspecies pestis and strains of subspecies altaica was implemented. The study results testify the effectiveness of application of mass spectrometry analysis for reliable interspecies and intraspecific differentiation of plague agent. The simplicity and velocity of sampling preparation and implementation of analysis and low cost of active storage allow considering the MALDI-TOF technology of mass spectrometry identification as highly perspective method for laboratory diagnostic of plague agent.

  11. Patterning titania with the conventional and modified micromolding in capillaries technique from sol-gel and dispersion solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah Khan, Sajid; ten Elshof, Johan E.

    2012-04-01

    We report TiO2 patterns obtained by a soft-lithographic technique called 'micromolding in capillaries' using sol-gel and dispersion solutions. A comparison between patterning with a sol-gel and dispersion solutions has been performed. The patterns obtained from sol-gel solutions showed good adhesion to the substrate and uniform shapes, but large shrinkage, whereas those obtained from dispersion solution had high solid content, but exhibited poor adhesion and non-uniform shapes. A fabrication method of a layer-by-layer structured pattern is also demonstrated. This type of pattern may find application in sensors, waveguides and other photonics elements. The occurrence of an undesirable residue layer, which hinders the fabrication of isolated patterns, is highlighted and a method of prevention is suggested.

  12. Identification of a mixed microparticle by combined microspectroscopic techniques: a real forensic case study in the biopharmaceutical industry.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaolin; Masatani, Peter; Torraca, Gianpiero; Wen, Zai-Qing

    2010-08-01

    Identification of foreign microparticles in drug products is one of the first steps in evaluating the nature of particle contamination and its consequences for product quality. To characterize various foreign particles, we use spectral database search methods as well as a number of microscopic and microspectroscopic techniques. Here, we report a case study involving the identification and root-cause investigation of a microparticle consisting of four compounds. Foreign microparticles consisting of mixtures pose unique challenges for identification as their spectra are difficult to interpret and general database searches usually return unsatisfactory results. Moreover, sample separation through purification and other manipulations is time consuming and often difficult for these microparticles due to their small sizes and the limited quantities of the components. Here we demonstrate an applicable methodology that combines multiple microscopic and microspectroscopic techniques to identify a heterogeneous microparticle without the need for sample purification or chemical separation. This methodology primarily combines Raman, infrared, and energy dispersive X-ray microspectroscopic techniques to obtain complementary spectral information for the identification of heterogeneous particles. With this methodology, the mixed microparticle investigated in this study was determined to consist of polyisobutylene, hydrated magnesium silicate, titanium dioxide, and silica, likely originating from the vial stopper material.

  13. Time-of-flight technique for particle identification at energies from 2 to 400 keV/nucleon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gloeckler, G.; Hsieh, K. C.

    1979-01-01

    The time of flight technique for particle identification was extended to 2 keV/nucleon and the size of the start-time detector was reduced considerably by the use of carbon foils of few micrograms/cm square in thickness combined with microchannel plates for detecting secondary electrons. Time of flight telescopes incorporating this start-time device were used to measure the stopping power of a number of low energy heavy ions in thin carbon foils and the charge states of these ions emerging from such foils. Applications for the detection and identification of low energy interplanetary and magnetospheric particles are suggested.

  14. [Review of dual stable isotope technique for nitrate source identification in surface- and groundwater in China].

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Wei; Zhang, Xin-Yu; Yu, Gui-Rui; Sun, Xiao-Min; Wen, Xue-Fa

    2014-08-01

    Water nitrate (NO3-) contamination is a world-wide environmental problem under the effects of intensive human activities. Sources identification of NO3- contamination in water is important for better management of water quality. Dual stable isotope data of nitrate nitrogen (delta15N) and nitrate oxygen (delta18O) combined with other stable isotopes and chemical analysis data have been frequently used to identify NO3- sources, differentiate percentage of the different NO3- sources and assess the nitrification/denitrification processes of surface water, groundwater and precipitation, respectively. This review summarized the analysis technique of nitrate delta15N and delta18O in domestic and abroad, assessed typical values of delta15N, delta18O from different NO3- sources and evaluated the progress in application of dual stable isotope of delta15N and delta18O technique to trace NO3- sources in surface- and ground-water. Both ion exchange-AgNO3 and bacteria denitrifying methods have been successfully used in tracing water nitrate sources nationwide. The comprehensive metadata analysis of nitrate sources showed that the delta15N values of sewage and manure, soil, precipitation, fertilizer ranged from 3 per thousand to 17 per thousand, 3 per thousand to 8 per thousand, - 9 per thousand to 9 per thousand, -2 per thousand to 4 per thousand, respectively. And the delta15N values of ammonium fertilizer ranged from - 4 per thousand to 2 per thousand. According to the stable isotope technique, sewage and manure were identified as the major nitrate sources of surface- and ground-water in China. This indicated that municipal sewage and aquaculture exerted serious influence on the nitrate pollution of surface water. In the future, long-term monitoring, dual stable isotope fingerprinting and hydro-chemical analysis should be applied together to quantitatively differentiate contribution of nitrate sources, and to assess seasonal dynamic of nitrate sources. It will provide useful

  15. Use of the gas-filled-magnet technique for particle identification at low energies

    SciTech Connect

    Rehm, K.K.; Jiang, C.L.; Paul, M.

    1995-08-01

    Reaction studies of interest to astrophysics with radioactive ion beams will be done mainly in inverse reaction kinematics, i.e., heavy particles bombarding a hydrogen target. The low energy of the outgoing heavy reaction products makes particle identification with respect to mass and nuclear charge a major challenge. For the planned {sup 18}F(p,{alpha}) experiment one expects five different types of particles in the outgoing channels: {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O (from elastic scattering of {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O on {sup 12}C), {sup 15}O and {sup 15}N (from the {sup 18}F and {sup 18}O induced (p,{alpha}) reactions) and {sup 12}C recoils from the polypropylene target. While mass determination can be achieved easily by time-of-flight (TOF) measurements, a determination of the nuclear charge presents a challenge, especially if the energy of the particles is below 500 keV/u. We studied the gas-filled magnet technique for Z-identification of light ions between Z = 6-9. In a gas-filled magnet the particles move with an average charge state {bar q} which in one parameterization is given by {bar q} = Z ln(avZ{sup {alpha}})/ln(bZ{sup {beta}}) where Z is the nuclear charge of the ions and v their velocity. Introducing into the expression for the magnetic rigidity B{rho} = mv/{bar q} results in a Z dependence of B{rho} which is valid to very low velocities. As a magnet we used the Enge split-pole spectrograph which was filled with nitrogen gas at a pressure of 0.5 Torr. The particles were detected in the focal plane with a 50 x 10 cm{sup 2} parallel-grid-avalanche counter which measured TOF and magnetic rigidity. The mass and Z separation was tested with {sup 13}C and {sup 18}O beams at energies of about 600 keV/u and recoil particles ranging from {sup 12}C to {sup 19}F. The Z-separation obtained at these energies was {triangle}Z/Z = 0.28 which is sufficient to separate individual elements for Z < 10.

  16. Automatic Whole-Spectrum Matching Techniques for Identification of Pure and Mixed Minerals using Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyar, M. D.; Carey, C. J.; Breitenfeld, L.; Tague, T.; Wang, P.

    2015-12-01

    In situuse of Raman spectroscopy on Mars is planned for three different instruments in the next decade. Although implementations differ, they share the potential to identify surface minerals and organics and inform Martian geology and geochemistry. Their success depends on the availability of appropriate databases and software for phase identification. For this project, we have consolidated all known publicly-accessible Raman data on minerals for which independent confirmation of phase identity is available, and added hundreds of additional spectra acquired using varying instruments and laser energies. Using these data, we have developed software tools to improve mineral identification accuracy. For pure minerals, whole-spectrum matching algorithms far outperform existing tools based on diagnostic peaks in individual phases. Optimal matching accuracy does depend on subjective end-user choices for data processing (such as baseline removal, intensity normalization, and intensity squashing), as well as specific dataset characteristics. So, to make this tuning process amenable to automated optimization methods, we developed a machine learning-based generalization of these choices within a preprocessing and matching framework. Our novel method dramatically reduces the burden on the user and results in improved matching accuracy. Moving beyond identifying pure phases into quantification of relative abundances is a complex problem because relationships between peak intensity and mineral abundance are obscured by complicating factors: exciting laser frequency, the Raman cross section of the mineral, crystal orientation, and long-range chemical and structural ordering in the crystal lattices. Solving this un-mixing problem requires adaptation of our whole-spectrum algorithms and a large number of test spectra of minerals in known volume proportions, which we are creating for this project. Key to this effort is acquisition of spectra from mixtures of pure minerals paired

  17. Luminescence patterns in tropical coral skeletons revealed using a novel technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove, Craig; Nagtegaal, Roel; Scheufen, Tim; Koster, Bob; Zinke, Jens; Brummer, Geert-Jan

    2010-05-01

    Luminescence intensity changes observed in massive tropical coral skeletons are attributed to seasonal variations in river discharge. The nature and cause of luminescence still remains unresolved; however the incorporation of humic acids is widely accepted. Using a novel technique designed to measure the intensity of luminescence, we can extract the luminescent signal produced by humic acid concentrations from the luminescent aragonite skeleton using spectral ratios. Normalising the luminescence data against aragonite is comparible to geochemical proxies normalised against calcium e.g. Sr/Ca. Spectral luminescence ratios are a far more reliable proxy to reconstruct discharge patterns than intensities as problems associated with skeletal architecture, density and luminescent aragonite are removed. Correlations with the robust sediment runoff proxy Ba/Ca, obtained by Laser-Ablation ICP-MS, improve dramatically and long term trends are now apparent, which were previously masked by the decreasing density trend observed in corals. Using NE Madagascar as a case study, long term trends in luminescene spectral ratios are increasing, indicating increasing river runoff due to changes in rainfall and/or land use associated with deforestation. Short term exreme runoff events are revealed which are caused by major cyclones that affected NE Madagascar over the past 30 years.

  18. A Survey and Proposed Framework on the Soft Biometrics Technique for Human Identification in Intelligent Video Surveillance System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Gu; Moon, Hae-Min; Chung, Yongwha; Pan, Sung Bum

    2012-01-01

    Biometrics verification can be efficiently used for intrusion detection and intruder identification in video surveillance systems. Biometrics techniques can be largely divided into traditional and the so-called soft biometrics. Whereas traditional biometrics deals with physical characteristics such as face features, eye iris, and fingerprints, soft biometrics is concerned with such information as gender, national origin, and height. Traditional biometrics is versatile and highly accurate. But it is very difficult to get traditional biometric data from a distance and without personal cooperation. Soft biometrics, although featuring less accuracy, can be used much more freely though. Recently, many researchers have been made on human identification using soft biometrics data collected from a distance. In this paper, we use both traditional and soft biometrics for human identification and propose a framework for solving such problems as lighting, occlusion, and shadowing. PMID:22919273

  19. A survey and proposed framework on the soft biometrics technique for human identification in intelligent video surveillance system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Gu; Moon, Hae-Min; Chung, Yongwha; Pan, Sung Bum

    2012-01-01

    Biometrics verification can be efficiently used for intrusion detection and intruder identification in video surveillance systems. Biometrics techniques can be largely divided into traditional and the so-called soft biometrics. Whereas traditional biometrics deals with physical characteristics such as face features, eye iris, and fingerprints, soft biometrics is concerned with such information as gender, national origin, and height. Traditional biometrics is versatile and highly accurate. But it is very difficult to get traditional biometric data from a distance and without personal cooperation. Soft biometrics, although featuring less accuracy, can be used much more freely though. Recently, many researchers have been made on human identification using soft biometrics data collected from a distance. In this paper, we use both traditional and soft biometrics for human identification and propose a framework for solving such problems as lighting, occlusion, and shadowing.

  20. Use of pattern recognition techniques for early detection of morbidity in receiving feedlot cattle.

    PubMed

    Moya, D; Silasi, R; McAllister, T A; Genswein, B; Crowe, T; Marti, S; Schwartzkopf-Genswein, K S

    2015-07-01

    Two groups of cattle were used to develop (model data set: 384 heifers, 228 ± 22.7 kg BW, monitored over a 225-d feeding period) and to validate (naïve data set: 384 heifers, 322 ± 34.7 kg BW, monitored over a 142-d feeding period) the use of feeding behavior pattern recognition techniques to predict morbidity in newly arrived feedlot cattle. In the model data set, cattle were defined as morbid (MO) if they were removed from their pen to be treated due to visual observation of clinical signs of bovine respiratory disease and healthy (HL) if they remained within their pen and lacked lung lesions at slaughter. Individual feeding behavior parameters collected with a GrowSafe automated feeding behavior monitoring system were reduced via principal component analysis to 5 components that captured 99% of the variability in the data set. Combinations of clustering and cluster classification strategies applied to those components, along with pattern recognition techniques over different time windows, produced a total of 105 models from which precision, negative predictive value, sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy were calculated by comparing its predictions with the actual health status of individual cattle as determined by visual assessment. When the models with the best specificity (models 79 and 87), sensitivity (models 33 and 66), and accuracy (models 3 and 14) in the model data set were used in a naïve data set, models 79 and 87 were not able to predict any MO heifers (0%), with all animals (100%) being predicted as HL. Model 33 predicted 58.3% of the HL and 66.7% of the MO heifers, with MO heifers identified 3.1 ± 1.64 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 66 predicted 50.0% of the HL and 75.0% of the MO heifers, with MO heifers predicted 3.1 ± 1.76 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 3 predicted 100% of the HL and 50.0% of the MO cattle, with MO cattle predicted 1 d earlier than by visual observation. Model 14 predicted 83.3% of the HL and 58

  1. P300 component identification using source analysis techniques: reduced latency variability.

    PubMed

    Elting, J W; van Weerden, T W; van der Naalt, J; De Keyser, J H A; Maurits, N M

    2003-02-01

    P300 latency variability in normal subjects is a complicating factor in clinical event-related potential studies because it limits diagnostic applicability. The current study was conducted to determine whether identification of P300 (P3A and P3B) components using source analysis techniques can reduce variability in P300 parameters. Data were recorded with a 128-channel EEG system in 18 healthy subjects. The authors used a standard, auditory two-tone oddball paradigm with targets of 2000 Hz and standards of 1000 Hz. Two simple source analysis models with one or two rotating dipoles were applied to grand average data and individual data. Dipole time courses were combined with mapping results to extract P3A and P3B component latencies. Latencies obtained with conventional P300 analysis were compared with source analysis results. The source analysis method identified both P3A and P3B components in a substantially larger percentage of subjects (88% vs. 33%) than the conventional method. The source analysis method yielded a later mean P3B latency (357 msec vs. 323 msec, P < 0,001) with a smaller standard deviation (9 msec vs. 23 msec, P = 0,003) than the conventional P300 method. The relative contribution of the temporally separate P3A and P3B components to the P300 complex amplitude is highly variable. This explains the larger latency standard deviation in conventional P300 analysis. The source analysis method was able to identify P300 components in a large percentage of the cases. The result is a considerable reduction of P300 latency variability in normal subjects. This could have important consequences for clinical event-related potential research, because diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of P300 latency may improve with this method.

  2. Non-probabilistic information fusion technique for structural damage identification based on measured dynamic data with uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Yang, Chen; Qiu, Zhi-Ping

    2013-04-01

    Based on measured natural frequencies and acceleration responses, a non-probabilistic information fusion technique is proposed for the structural damage detection by adopting the set-membership identification (SMI) and two-step model updating procedure. Due to the insufficiency and uncertainty of information obtained from measurements, the uncertain problem of damage identification is addressed with interval variables in this paper. Based on the first-order Taylor series expansion, the interval bounds of the elemental stiffness parameters in undamaged and damaged models are estimated, respectively. The possibility of damage existence (PoDE) in elements is proposed as the quantitative measure of structural damage probability, which is more reasonable in the condition of insufficient measurement data. In comparison with the identification method based on a single kind of information, the SMI method will improve the accuracy in damage identification, which reflects the information fusion concept based on the non-probabilistic set. A numerical example is performed to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed technique.

  3. Fuel Injector Patternation Evaluation in Advanced Liquid-Fueled, High Pressure, Gas Turbine Combustors, Using Nonintrusive Optical Diagnostic Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locke, R. J.; Hicks, Y. R.; Anderson, R. C.; Zaller, M. M.

    1998-01-01

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) imaging and planar Mie scattering are used to examine the fuel distribution pattern (patternation) for advanced fuel injector concepts in kerosene burning, high pressure gas turbine combustors. Three diverse fuel injector concepts for aerospace applications were investigated under a broad range of operating conditions. Fuel PLIF patternation results are contrasted with those obtained by planar Mie scattering. Further comparison is also made for one injector with data obtained through phase Doppler measurements. Differences in spray patterns for diverse conditions and fuel injector configurations are readily discernible. An examination of the data has shown that a direct determination of the fuel spray angle at realistic conditions is also possible. The results obtained in this study demonstrate the applicability and usefulness of these nonintrusive optical techniques for investigating fuel spray patternation under actual combustor conditions.

  4. Monitoring soil moisture patterns in alpine meadows using ground sensor networks and remote sensing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoldi, Giacomo; Brenner, Johannes; Notarnicola, Claudia; Greifeneder, Felix; Nicolini, Irene; Della Chiesa, Stefano; Niedrist, Georg; Tappeiner, Ulrike

    2015-04-01

    Soil moisture content (SMC) is a key factor for numerous processes, including runoff generation, groundwater recharge, evapotranspiration, soil respiration, and biological productivity. Understanding the controls on the spatial and temporal variability of SMC in mountain catchments is an essential step towards improving quantitative predictions of catchment hydrological processes and related ecosystem services. The interacting influences of precipitation, soil properties, vegetation, and topography on SMC and the influence of SMC patterns on runoff generation processes have been extensively investigated (Vereecken et al., 2014). However, in mountain areas, obtaining reliable SMC estimations is still challenging, because of the high variability in topography, soil and vegetation properties. In the last few years, there has been an increasing interest in the estimation of surface SMC at local scales. On the one hand, low cost wireless sensor networks provide high-resolution SMC time series. On the other hand, active remote sensing microwave techniques, such as Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs), show promising results (Bertoldi et al. 2014). As these data provide continuous coverage of large spatial extents with high spatial resolution (10-20 m), they are particularly in demand for mountain areas. However, there are still limitations related to the fact that the SAR signal can penetrate only a few centimeters in the soil. Moreover, the signal is strongly influenced by vegetation, surface roughness and topography. In this contribution, we analyse the spatial and temporal dynamics of surface and root-zone SMC (2.5 - 5 - 25 cm depth) of alpine meadows and pastures in the Long Term Ecological Research (LTER) Area Mazia Valley (South Tyrol - Italy) with different techniques: (I) a network of 18 stations; (II) field campaigns with mobile ground sensors; (III) 20-m resolution RADARSAT2 SAR images; (IV) numerical simulations using the GEOtop hydrological model (Rigon et al

  5. Identification of seagrasses in the gut of a marine herbivorous fish using DNA barcoding and visual inspection techniques.

    PubMed

    Chelsky Budarf, A; Burfeind, D D; Loh, W K W; Tibbetts, I R

    2011-07-01

    Traditional visual diet analysis techniques were compared with DNA barcoding in juvenile herbivorous rabbitfish Siganus fuscescens collected in Moreton Bay, Australia, where at least six species of seagrass occur. The intergenic spacer trnH-psbA, suggested as the optimal gene for barcoding angiosperms, was used for the first time to identify the seagrass in fish guts. Four seagrass species and one alga were identified visually from gut contents; however, there was considerable uncertainty in visual identification with 38 of 40 fish having unidentifiable plant fragments in their gut. PCR and single-strand conformational polymorphism (SSCP) were able to discriminate three seagrass families from visually cryptic gut contents. While effective in identifying cryptic gut content to family level, this novel method is likely to be most efficient when paired with visual identification techniques.

  6. The analysis of polar clouds from AVHRR satellite data using pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, William L.; Ebert, Elizabeth

    1990-01-01

    The cloud cover in a set of summertime and wintertime AVHRR data from the Arctic and Antarctic regions was analyzed using a pattern recognition algorithm. The data were collected by the NOAA-7 satellite on 6 to 13 Jan. and 1 to 7 Jul. 1984 between 60 deg and 90 deg north and south latitude in 5 spectral channels, at the Global Area Coverage (GAC) resolution of approximately 4 km. This data embodied a Polar Cloud Pilot Data Set which was analyzed by a number of research groups as part of a polar cloud algorithm intercomparison study. This study was intended to determine whether the additional information contained in the AVHRR channels (beyond the standard visible and infrared bands on geostationary satellites) could be effectively utilized in cloud algorithms to resolve some of the cloud detection problems caused by low visible and thermal contrasts in the polar regions. The analysis described makes use of a pattern recognition algorithm which estimates the surface and cloud classification, cloud fraction, and surface and cloudy visible (channel 1) albedo and infrared (channel 4) brightness temperatures on a 2.5 x 2.5 deg latitude-longitude grid. In each grid box several spectral and textural features were computed from the calibrated pixel values in the multispectral imagery, then used to classify the region into one of eighteen surface and/or cloud types using the maximum likelihood decision rule. A slightly different version of the algorithm was used for each season and hemisphere because of differences in categories and because of the lack of visible imagery during winter. The classification of the scene is used to specify the optimal AVHRR channel for separating clear and cloudy pixels using a hybrid histogram-spatial coherence method. This method estimates values for cloud fraction, clear and cloudy albedos and brightness temperatures in each grid box. The choice of a class-dependent AVHRR channel allows for better separation of clear and cloudy pixels than

  7. Simple Image Processing Techniques For The Contrast Enhancement Of Real-Time Digital Speckle Pattern Interferometry Fringes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, A. R.; Kothiyal, M. P.; Sirohi, Rajpal S.

    1989-09-01

    Some simple image processing techniques are suggested that can be used for enhancing the contrast of real-time digital speckle pattern interferometry fringes. The techniques have been developed for the commercial Intellect 100 image processing system interfaced to a PDP-1 1 /23+ microcomputer, but they can be adapted to any commercial image processing system with slight modifications, if necessary, depending on the hardware configuration of the system.

  8. Evaluation of three techniques for classifying urban land cover patterns using LANDSAT MSS data. [New Orleans, Louisiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baumann, P. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    Three computer quantitative techniques for determining urban land cover patterns are evaluated. The techniques examined deal with the selection of training samples by an automated process, the overlaying of two scenes from different seasons of the year, and the use of individual pixels as training points. Evaluation is based on the number and type of land cover classes generated and the marks obtained from an accuracy test. New Orleans, Louisiana and its environs form the study area.

  9. [Identification, quantification and antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of probiotic bacteria added to common use food products in Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Manuela; Chaves, Carolina; Arias, María Laura

    2009-06-01

    In the last years, due to the high demand of food products supplemented with probiotics and the multiple nutritional and therapeutic benefits associated with them, research on these microorganisms has advanced considerably, including their selection and characterization. As a general recommendation, several entities as World Health Organization (WHO) and United Nations Organization for Agriculture and Food recommend that the specification of the alive species contained and their number shall appear in the label of the product. In the present study, six different commercially available products, supplemented with probiotics were analyzed, in order to evaluate the concentration of microorganisms through the shelf life of the product, identify the strains isolated and determine the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of these. Results demonstrated that the strains isolated kept acceptable concentrations during the 28 days of storage. Nevertheless, the identification of these strains variated from the one reported on the label on several of the products tested. This can be due to the commercial method used for the identifications, which is based in the carbohydrate fermentation pattern and not in genotypic trials. The antimicrobials' susceptibility patterns found show that further research shall be performed in order to establish the intrinsic or acquired nature of the resistance determinants, and if these are codified by transferable elements among bacteria.

  10. Mortality patterns in the Russian Federation: indirect technique using widowhood data.

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, Martin; Murphy, Michael; Pikhart, Hynek; Martikainen, Pekka; Rose, Richard; Marmot, Michael

    2002-01-01

    are nevertheless consistent with the mortality pattern observed in official mortality data. The indirect technique thus appears to be a useful tool to study the determinants of mortality in the Russian Federation and other populations, where reliable or sufficiently extensive data are not available. PMID:12481209

  11. [The express mode of identification of agents of bacteriemias using the technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry].

    PubMed

    Popov, D A; Ovseyenko, S T; Osipov, G A; Vostrikova, T Yu

    2013-05-01

    The comparative evaluation was carried out concerning the effectiveness of generic identification of hemocultures using the technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry by comparison with data of common cultural method. The content of vials with positive hemoculture was analyzed using both the common microbiologic methods and the technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with detection of markers of the most widespread agents of nosocomial bacteriemias: microorganisms of genus Staphylococcus, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Escherichia, Serratia, Pseudomonas, Acinetobacter, Stenotrophomonas, Candida. The possibility of applying the technique of gas chromatography-mass spectrometry for generic express-identification of agents of bacteriemias was established. The full concurrence of results obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with the results of common bacteriologic method was revealed. The time saving of analysis during generic identification of hemocultures using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry up to three and less hours against 1.5-2 days in case of common approach. The established information can input into earlier start of etiotropic therapy under severe infections.

  12. Denture marking for forensic identification using memory card: an innovative technique.

    PubMed

    Luthra, Reena; Arora, Saryu; Meshram, Suresh

    2012-12-01

    Identification of individuals in crime or mass disaster is a daunting task for the forensic experts. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the feasibility of using a memory card for the forensic identification of dentures. The memory card was programmed with all the relevant information regarding the patient identification and the photograph of the patient. A recess was made in the maxillary denture's polished surface on the palatal aspect. The card was wrapped in cellophane, placed in the recess and then covered with pink auto polymerizing acrylic resin. On retrieval of the card from the denture, the entire data could be read as before without any distortion. The identification cards did not pose any problems in function and speech and were esthetically acceptable by the patients.

  13. A NOVEL TECHNIQUE FOR THE RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF ALPHA EMITTERS RELEASED DURING A RADIOLOGICAL INCIDENT.

    EPA Science Inventory

    Currently there are no standard radioanalytical methods applicable to the initial phase of a radiological emergency, for the early identification and quantification of alpha emitting radionuclides. Of particular interest are determinations of the presence and concentration of is...

  14. Seismic Pattern Recognition Techniques to Predict Eruptions at the Popocatepetl, Mexico, Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Valdes-Gonzalez, C. M.

    2007-05-01

    Using pattern recognition techniques, we formulate a simple prediction rule for a retrospective prediction of the two last largest eruptions of the Popocatépetl (Popo), Mexico, volcano that occurred on 23 April-30 June 1997 (Eruption 1; VEI~2-3) and 11 December 2000-23 January 2001 (Eruption 2; VEI~3-4). Times of Increased Probability (TIP) were estimated from the seismicity recorded by the local seismic network from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2005. We consider a TIP as a cluster of seismic events which occurs in the Popo region in a temporal window several days (or weeks) prior to large volcanic activity providing sufficient time to organize an effective alert strategy. The best predictions are obtained when averaging seismicity rate over a 5-day window with a threshold value of 11 events and declaring an alarm for 45 days. A TIP was issued about one a half months before Eruption 1. Another TIP was detected about five days before Eruption 2. According to our objectives, in both cases, the observed TIPs would have allowed the development of an effective civil protection strategy. Thus, under our model considerations, the two eruptive events were successfully predicted. However, two "false alarm cases" were also issued by our algorithm. An analysis of the epicentral and depth distribution of the local seismicity used by our prediction rule reveals that successful TIPs were issued from microearthquakes that took place below and towards SE of the crater. On the contrary, the seismicity that issued the two observed "false alarms" occurred only below the summit of the volcano. We conclude that recording of precursory seismicity below and SE of the crater together with detection of TIPs as described here, are an important tool to predict future large eruptions at Popo.

  15. Use of PCR-Restriction Enzyme Pattern Analysis and Sequencing Database for hsp65 Gene-Based Identification of Nocardia Species

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Nava, Verónica; Couble, Andrée; Devulder, Gregory; Flandrois, Jean-Pierre; Boiron, Patrick; Laurent, Frédéric

    2006-01-01

    Nocardia identification required laborious and time-consuming phenotypic and chemotaxonomic methods until molecular methods were developed in the mid-1990s. Here we reassessed the capacity of PCR-restriction enzyme pattern analysis (PRA) of the hsp65 gene to differentiate Nocardia species, including 36 new species. Our results confirm that hsp65 PRA must no longer be used for Nocardia species identification, as many species have the same restriction pattern. We then compared sequencing-based strategies using an hsp65 database and a 16S rRNA database and found that the hsp65 region contained sufficient polymorphisms for comprehensive Nocardia species identification. PMID:16455910

  16. Portable Electronic Nose System for Identification of Synthesized Gasoline Using Metal Oxide Gas Sensor and Pattern Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Young Wung; Park, Hong Bae; Lee, In Soo; Cho, Jung Hwan

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a portable electronic nose (e-nose) system for use in the identification of synthesized gasoline, comprised of a single semiconductor type of gas sensor and pattern recognition neural networks. The designed e-nose system consists of a one-chip microcontroller, a pre-concentrator, and a gas sensor. Two different neural networks, a multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network and a fuzzy ARTMAP neural network were applied to discriminate synthesized gasoline from normal gasoline. The results of the classification showed 100% and 85% recognition rates for the training data set and testing data set, respectively.

  17. Examining Online Learning Patterns with Data Mining Techniques in Peer-Moderated and Teacher-Moderated Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hung, Jui-Long; Crooks, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    The student learning process is important in online learning environments. If instructors can "observe" online learning behaviors, they can provide adaptive feedback, adjust instructional strategies, and assist students in establishing patterns of successful learning activities. This study used data mining techniques to examine and compare…

  18. A Novel Technique for Micro-patterning Proteins and Cells on Polyacrylamide Gels

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xin; Ali, M. Yakut; Saif, M. Taher A.

    2012-01-01

    Spatial patterning of proteins (extracellular matrix, ECM) for living cells on polyacrylamide (PA) hydrogels has been technically challenging due to the compliant nature of the hydrogels and their aqueous environment. Traditional micro-fabrication process is not applicable. Here we report a simple, novel and general method to pattern a variety of commonly used cell adhesion molecules, i.e. Fibronectin (FN), Laminin (LN) and Collagen I (CN), etc. on PA gels. The pattern is first printed on a hydrophilic glass using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp and micro-contact printing (μCP). Pre-polymerization solution is applied on the patterned glass and is then sandwiched by a functionalized glass slide, which covalently binds to the gel. The hydrophilic glass slide is then peeled off from the gel when the protein patterns detach from the glass, but remain intact with the gel. The pattern is thus transferred to the gel. The mechanism of pattern transfer is studied in light of interfacial mechanics. It is found that hydrophilic glass offers strong enough adhesion with ECM proteins such that a pattern can be printed, but weak enough adhesion such that they can be completely peeled off by the polymerized gel. This balance is essential for successful pattern transfer. As a demonstration, lines of FN, LN and CN with widths varying from 5–400 μm are patterned on PA gels. Normal fibroblasts (MKF) are cultured on the gel surfaces. The cell attachment and proliferation are confined within these patterns. The method avoids the use of any toxic chemistry often used to pattern different proteins on gel surfaces. PMID:23002394

  19. Use of pattern-recognition techniques in analyzing downhole dynamometer cards

    SciTech Connect

    Dickinson, R.R. ); Jennings, J.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Four pattern-matching methods are presented to evaluate the downhole condition of sucker-rod-pumped wells. Comparing the generated pump dynagraph of a well being tested to various downhole dynagraphs characteristic of particular rod-pump problems allows the pattern-matching methods to diagnose a variety of different pump conditions. In the future, one of the pattern-matching methods could be incorporated into an automated system designed to monitor the performance of an oilfield's rod-pumped wells.

  20. Pattern classification of Myo-Electrical signal during different Maximum Voluntary Contractions: A study using BSS techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Ganesh R.; Kumar, Dinesh K.; Arjunan, Sridhar P.

    2010-01-01

    The presence of noise and cross-talk from closely located and simultaneously active muscles is exaggerated when the level of muscle contraction is very low. Due to this the current applications of surface electromyogram (sEMG) are infeasible and unreliable in pattern classification. This research reports a new technique of sEMG using Independent Component Analysis (ICA). The technique uses blind source separation (BSS) methods to classify the patterns of Myo-electrical signals during different Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVCs) at different low level finger movements. The results of the experiments indicate that patterns using ICA of sEMG is a reliable (p<0.001) measure of strength of muscle contraction even when muscle activity is only 20% MVC. The authors propose that ICA is a useful indicator of muscle properties and is a useful indicator of the level of muscle activity.

  1. Dynamical systems techniques reveal the sexual dimorphic nature of motor patterns in birdsong

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendez, J. M.; Alliende, J. A.; Amador, A.; Mindlin, G. B.

    2006-10-01

    In this work we analyze the pressure motor patterns used by canaries (Serinus canaria) during song, both in the cases of males and testosterone treated females. We found a qualitative difference between them which was not obvious from the acoustical features of the uttered songs. We also show the diversity of patterns, both for males and females, to be consistent with a recently proposed model for the dynamics of the oscine respiratory system. The model not only allows us to reproduce qualitative features of the different pressure patterns, but also to account for all the diversity of pressure patterns found in females.

  2. Ionospheric parameter analysis techniques and anomaly identification in periods of ionospheric perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandrikova, Oksana; Polozov, Yury; Fetisova Glushkova, Nadejda; Shevtsov, Boris

    In the present paper we suggest intellectual techniques intended for the analysis of ionospheric parameters. These techniques are directed at studying dynamic processes in the "magnetosphere-ionosphere" system during perturbations. Using the combination of the wavelet transform and neural networks, the authors have developed a technique of approximating the time variation of ionospheric parameters. This technique allows us to make data predictions and detect anomalies in the ionosphere. Multiscale component approximations of the critical frequency of the ionosphere layer F2 were constructed. These approximations can be presented in the following form: begin{center} c_{l,k+m} (t) = varphi_m(3) Bigl (sum_i omega(3_{mi}) varphi_i(2) Bigl (sum_j omega(2_{ij}) varphi_j(1) Bigl (sum_k omega(1_{jk}) c_{l,k} (t) Bigr ) Bigr ) Bigr ) , where c_{l,k} = bigl < f , Psi_{l,k} bigr > ; Psi_{l,k} (t) = 2(l/2) Psi (2(l) t - k) is the wavelet basis; omega(1_{jk}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron j of the network input layer; omega(2_{ij}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron i of the network hidden layer; omega(3_{mi}) are the weighting coefficients of the neuron m of the network output layer; varphi(1_j) (z) = varphi(2_i) (z) = (1)/(1+exp(-z))) ; varphi(3_m) (z) = x*z+y . The coefficients c_{l,k} can be found as a result of transforming the original function f into the space with the scale l . In order to obtain the approximations of the time variation of data, neural networks can be united in groups. In the paper we have suggested a multicomponent time variation model of ionospheric parameters, which makes it possible to perform the analysis of the ionospheric dynamic mode, receive predictions about parameter variations, and detect anomalies in periods of perturbations. The multicomponent model also allows us to fill missing values in critical frequency data taking into account diurnal and seasonal variations. Identification of the model is based on combining

  3. Specific Learning Disability Identification: What Constitutes a Pattern of Strengths and Weaknesses?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schultz, Edward Karl; Simpson, Cynthia G.; Lynch, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    The 2004 Individuals with Disabilities Education Improvement Act (IDEA) and subsequent regulations published in 2006 have significantly changed the identification process for students suspected of having specific learning disabilities. Rather than using a discrepancy model contrasting intellectual and achievement test results, assessment…

  4. Gender Identification, Interdependence, and Pseudonyms in CMC: Language Patterns in an Electronic Conference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaffe, J. Michael; Lee, Young-Eum; Huang, Li-Ning; Oshagan, Hayg

    1999-01-01

    Examines how pseudonymous identification in a computer-mediated communication (CMC) context might: (1) reflect a motivation for gender-based status parity and (2) mitigate supposed gender-based communication differences associated with social interdependence. Subjects were 114 undergraduate students who participated in computer-based…

  5. Personality Characteristic Adaptations: Multiracial Adolescents' Patterns of Racial Self-Identification Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Terry, Rodney L.; Winston, Cynthia E.

    2010-01-01

    For multiracial adolescents, forming a sense of self and identity can be complicated, even at the level of classifying themselves in terms of racial group membership. Using a Race Self Complexity (Winston et al., 2004) theoretical framework, this study used an open-ended question to examine the racial self-identification fluidity of 66 adolescents…

  6. Young Listeners' Music Style Preferences: Patterns Related to Cultural Identification and Language Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brittin, Ruth V.

    2014-01-01

    Listeners ("N" = 543) in grades 4, 5, and 6 rated their preference for 10 instrumental and vocal selections from various styles, including four popular music selections with versions performed in English, Spanish, or an Asian language. Participants estimated their identification with Spanish/Hispanic/Latino and Asian cultures, the number…

  7. State-Issued Identification Cards Reveal Patterns in Adult Weight Status

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Daniel S.; Main, Eric C.; Harris, Jenine K.; Moland, Abraham; Cude, Curtis

    2015-01-01

    Background: State-issued identification cards are a promising data source for neighborhood-level obesity estimates. Methods: We used information from three million Oregon state-issued identification cards to compute age-adjusted estimates of average adult body mass index (BMI) for each census tract in the state. We used multivariate linear regression to identify associations between weight status and population characteristics, food access, commuting behavior, and geography. Results: Together, home values, education, race, ethnicity, car commuting, and rural-urban commuting area (RUCA) explained 86% of the variation in BMI among tracts. BMI was lower in areas with higher home values and greater educational attainment, and higher in areas with more workers commuting by car. Discussion: Our findings are consistent with other research on socioeconomic disparities in obesity. This demonstrates state-issued identification cards are a promising data source for BMI surveillance and may offer new insight into the association between weight status and economic and environmental factors. Public health agencies should explore options for developing their own obesity estimates from identification card data. PMID:26062036

  8. Techniques for analysing pattern formation in populations of stem cells and their progeny

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background To investigate how patterns of cell differentiation are related to underlying intra- and inter-cellular signalling pathways, we use a stochastic individual-based model to simulate pattern formation when stem cells and their progeny are cultured as a monolayer. We assume that the fate of an individual cell is regulated by the signals it receives from neighbouring cells via either diffusive or juxtacrine signalling. We analyse simulated patterns using two different spatial statistical measures that are suited to planar multicellular systems: pair correlation functions (PCFs) and quadrat histograms (QHs). Results With a diffusive signalling mechanism, pattern size (revealed by PCFs) is determined by both morphogen decay rate and a sensitivity parameter that determines the degree to which morphogen biases differentiation; high sensitivity and slow decay give rise to large-scale patterns. In contrast, with juxtacrine signalling, high sensitivity produces well-defined patterns over shorter lengthscales. QHs are simpler to compute than PCFs and allow us to distinguish between random differentiation at low sensitivities and patterned states generated at higher sensitivities. Conclusions PCFs and QHs together provide an effective means of characterising emergent patterns of differentiation in planar multicellular aggregates. PMID:21991994

  9. Large modal survey testing using the Ibrahim time domain /ITD/ identification technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ibrahim, S. R.; Pappa, R. S.

    1981-01-01

    The ability of the ITD identification algorithm in identifying a complete set of structural modal parameters using a large number of free-response time histories simultaneously in one analysis, assuming a math model with a high number of degrees-of-freedom, has been studied. Identification results using simulated free responses of a uniform rectangular plate, with 225 measurement stations, and experimental responses from a ground vibration test of the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Space Shuttle payload, with 142 measurement stations, are presented. As many as 300 degrees-of-freedom were allowed in analyzing these data. In general, the use of a significantly oversized math model in the identification process was found to maintain or increase identification accuracy and to identify modes of low response level that are not identified with smaller math model sizes. The concept of a Mode Shape Correlation Constant is introduced for use when more than one identification analysis of the same structure are conducted. This constant quantifies the degree of correlation between any two sets of complex mode shapes identified using different excitation conditions, different user-selectable algorithm constants, or overlapping sets of measurements.

  10. Seismic pattern recognition techniques to predict large eruptions at the Popocatépetl, Mexico, volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novelo-Casanova, D. A.; Valdés-González, C.

    2008-10-01

    Using pattern recognition techniques, we formulate a simple prediction rule for a retrospective prediction of the three last largest eruptions of the Popocatépetl, Mexico, volcano that occurred on 23 April-30 June 1997 (Eruption 1; VEI ~ 2-3); 11 December 2000-23 January 2001 (Eruption 2; VEI ~ 3-4) and 7 June-4 September 2002 (Eruption 3; explosive dome extrusion and destruction phase). Times of Increased Probability (TIP) were estimated from the seismicity recorded by the local seismic network from 1 January 1995 to 31 December 2005. A TIP is issued when a cluster of seismic events occurs under our algorithm considerations in a temporal window several days (or weeks) prior to large volcanic activity providing sufficient time to organize an effective alert strategy. The best predictions of the three analyzed eruptions were obtained when averaging seismicity rate over a 5-day window with a threshold value of 12 events and declaring an alarm for 45 days. A TIP was issued about six weeks before Eruption 1. TIPs were detected about one and four weeks before Eruptions 2 and 3, respectively. According to our objectives, in all cases, the observed TIPs would have allowed the development of an effective civil protection strategy. Although, under our model considerations the three eruptive events were successfully predicted, one false alarm was also issued by our algorithm. An analysis of the epicentral and depth distribution of the local seismicity used by our prediction rule reveals that successful TIPs were issued from microearthquakes that took place below and towards SE of the crater. On the contrary, the seismicity that issued the observed false alarm was concentrated below the summit of the volcano. We conclude that recording of precursory seismicity below and SE of the crater together with detection of TIPs as described here, could become an important tool to predict future large eruptions at Popocatépetl. Although our model worked well for events that occurred

  11. The Effect of Achievement Test Selection on Identification of Learning Disabilities within a Patterns of Strengths and Weaknesses Framework

    PubMed Central

    Miciak, Jeremy; Taylor, Pat; Denton, Carolyn A.; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Few empirical investigations have evaluated learning disabilities (LD) identification methods based on a pattern of cognitive strengths and weaknesses (PSW). This study investigated the reliability of LD classification decisions of the concordance/discordance method (C/DM) across different psychoeducational assessment batteries. Methods C/DM criteria were applied to assessment data from 177 second grade students based on two psychoeducational assessment batteries. The achievement tests were different, but were highly correlated and measured the same latent construct. Resulting LD identifications were then evaluated for agreement across batteries on LD status and the academic domain of eligibility. Results The two batteries identified a similar number of participants as having LD (80 and 74). However, indices of agreement for classification decisions were low (kappa = .29), especially for percent positive agreement (62%). The two batteries demonstrated agreement on the academic domain of eligibility for only 25 participants. Conclusions Cognitive discrepancy frameworks for LD identification are inherently unstable because of imperfect reliability and validity at the observed level. Methods premised on identifying a PSW profile may never achieve high reliability because of these underlying psychometric factors. An alternative is to directly assess academic skills to identify students in need of intervention. PMID:25243467

  12. Identification of shallow volcanic structures in Timanfaya National Park (Lanzarote, Canary Islands) through combined geophysical prospecting techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomez-Ortiz, David; Montesinos, Fuensanta G.; Martin-Crespo, Tomas; Solla, Mercedes; Arnoso, Jose; Velez, Emilio

    2014-05-01

    The Timanfaya National Park is a volcanic area, which occupies a surface area of about 51 sq. km in the southwest of Lanzarote Island (Canary Archipelago, Spain). The 1730-1736 eruption gave rise to this volcanic landscape with more than 30 volcanic cones formed in different phases of basaltic type eruptions. It was one of the most important volcanic events occurred in the Canary Archipelago over the last 500 years. Several canyons ("jameos") are crossing this landscape in all directions, being created while the surface of the lava cooled off, and broke into pieces, falling down into the several tubes. Its location and identification is important to prevent hazards or to achieve a good exploitation from a visitor viewpoint in a restricted touristic area as the Timanfaya National Park. The use of prospective techniques to investigate the near subsurface structure of the park is very complicated, and only some regional study through gravity, magnetism and seismicity have been undertaken to attempt to model the deeper crustal structure of Lanzarote Island. This work presents a new study about the location of recent lava tubes at the volcanic area of Timanfaya National Park by the analysis and joint interpretation of high-resolution gravity, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and electromagnetic induction (EMI) data obtained over areas which had not been surveyed up to date. The studied lava flows are located at the Calderas Quemadas zone. The processed GPR radargram displays a complex pattern of reflections along the whole profile up to ~9 m depth. The strongest reflections can be grouped in four different areas defined by several hyperbolic reflections. Direct visual inspections carried out in the field allow confirming the occurrence of lava tubes at two of the locations where hyperbolic reflections are defined. Then, the strong reflections observed have been interpreted as the effect of the roof and bottom interfaces of several lava tubes. A microgravity survey along

  13. Identification of abnormal motor cortex activation patterns in children with cerebral palsy by functional near-infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Bilal; Tian, Fenghua; Behbehani, Khosrow; Romero, Mario I.; Delgado, Mauricio R.; Clegg, Nancy J.; Smith, Linsley; Reid, Dahlia; Liu, Hanli; Alexandrakis, George

    2010-05-01

    We demonstrate the utility of functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) as a tool for physicians to study cortical plasticity in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Motor cortex activation patterns were studied in five healthy children and five children with CP (8.4+/-2.3 years old in both groups) performing a finger-tapping protocol. Spatial (distance from center and area difference) and temporal (duration and time-to-peak) image metrics are proposed as potential biomarkers for differentiating abnormal cortical activation in children with CP from healthy pediatric controls. In addition, a similarity image-analysis concept is presented that unveils areas that have similar activation patterns as that of the maximum activation area, but are not discernible by visual inspection of standard activation images. Metrics derived from the images presenting areas of similarity are shown to be sensitive identifiers of abnormal activation patterns in children with CP. Importantly, the proposed similarity concept and related metrics may be applicable to other studies for the identification of cortical activation patterns by fNIRS.

  14. The Identification of Discriminating Patterns from 16S rRNA Gene to Generate Signature for Bacillus Genus.

    PubMed

    More, Ravi P; Purohit, Hemant J

    2016-08-01

    The 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) gene has been widely used for the taxonomic classification of bacteria. A molecular signature is a set of nucleotide patterns, which constitute a regular expression that is specific to each particular taxon. Our main goal was to identify discriminating nucleotide patterns in 16S rRNA gene and then to generate signatures for taxonomic classification. To demonstrate our approach, we used the phylum Firmicutes as a model using representative taxa Bacilli (class), Bacillales (order), Bacillaceae (family), and Bacillus (genus), according to their dominance at each hierarchical taxonomic level. We applied combined composite vector and multiple sequence alignment approaches to generate gene-specific signatures. Further, we mapped all the patterns into the different hypervariable regions of 16S rRNA gene and confirmed the most appropriate distinguishing region as V3-V4 for targeted taxa. We also examined the evolution in discriminating patterns of signatures across taxonomic levels. We assessed the comparative classification accuracy of signatures with other methods (i.e., RDP Classifier, KNN, and SINA). Results revealed that the signatures for taxa Bacilli, Bacillales, Bacillaceae, and Bacillus could correctly classify isolate sequences with sensitivity of 0.99, 0.97, 0.94, and 0.89, respectively, and specificity close to 0.99. We developed signature-based software DNA Barcode Identification (DNA BarID) for taxonomic classification that is available at website http://www.neeri.res.in/DNA_BarID.htm . This pattern-based study provides a deeper understanding of taxon-specific discriminating patterns in 16S rRNA gene with respect to taxonomic classification.

  15. A novel hybrid patterning technique for micro and nanochannel fabrication by integrating hot embossing and inverse UV photolithography.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhifu; Cheng, E; Zou, Helin

    2014-05-01

    Nanofluidic devices with micro and nanostructures are becoming increasingly important for biological and chemical applications. However, the majority of the present fabrication methods suffer from a low pattern transfer quality during the simultaneous embossing of the microscale and nanoscale patterns into a thermoplastic polymer due to insufficient polymer flow. In this work, a novel hybrid patterning technique, integrating hot embossing and inverse ultraviolet (UV) photolithography, is developed to fabricate micro and nanochannels with a high replication precision of the SU-8 layer. The influence of embossing temperature and time on the replication precision was investigated. The effect of UV lithography parameters on the micro and nanochannel pattern was analyzed. To improve the SU-8 bonding strength, the influence of the O2 plasma treatment parameters on the water contact angles of the exposed and unexposed SU-8 layer were studied. A complete SU-8 nanofluidic chip with 130 nm wide and 150 nm deep nanochannels was successfully fabricated with a replication precision of 99.5%. Compared with most of the current processing methods, this fabrication technique has great potential due to its low cost and high pattern transfer quality of the SU-8 micro and nanochannels.

  16. Basalt identification by interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging measurements using fuzzy technique (case study from southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Abdul Ghani, B; Ahmad, Z

    2015-11-01

    Fuzzy analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear and electrical well logging data, which include natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, while the electrical well logging include long and short normal. The main objective of this work is to describe, characterize and establish the lithology of the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging measurements have been used and interpreted for testing and applying the proposed technique. The established lithological cross section shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt, which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The fuzzy analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data, and can be therefore utilized as a powerful tool for interpreting huge well logging data with higher number of variables required for lithological estimations.

  17. Basalt identification by interpreting nuclear and electrical well logging measurements using fuzzy technique (case study from southern Syria).

    PubMed

    Asfahani, J; Abdul Ghani, B; Ahmad, Z

    2015-11-01

    Fuzzy analysis technique is proposed in this research for interpreting the combination of nuclear and electrical well logging data, which include natural gamma ray, density and neutron-porosity, while the electrical well logging include long and short normal. The main objective of this work is to describe, characterize and establish the lithology of the large extended basaltic areas in southern Syria. Kodana well logging measurements have been used and interpreted for testing and applying the proposed technique. The established lithological cross section shows the distribution and the identification of four kinds of basalt, which are hard massive basalt, hard basalt, pyroclastic basalt and the alteration basalt products, clay. The fuzzy analysis technique is successfully applied on the Kodana well logging data, and can be therefore utilized as a powerful tool for interpreting huge well logging data with higher number of variables required for lithological estimations. PMID:26275816

  18. Analysis of chemical signals in red fire ants by gas chromatography and pattern recognition techniques

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The combination of gas chromatography and pattern recognition (GC/PR) analysis is a powerful tool for investigating complicated biological problems. Clustering, mapping, discriminant development, etc. are necessary to analyze realistically large chromatographic data sets and to seek meaningful relat...

  19. Method and Apparatus for Reading Two Dimensional Identification Symbols Using Radar Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F., Jr. (Inventor); Roxby, Donald L. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for sensing two-dimensional identification marks provided on a substrate or embedded within a substrate below a surface of the substrate. Micropower impulse radar is used to transmit a high risetime, short duration pulse to a focussed radar target area of the substrate having the two dimensional identification marks. The method further includes the steps of listening for radar echoes returned from the identification marks during a short listening period window occurring a predetermined time after transmission of the radar pulse. If radar echoes are detected, an image processing step is carried out. If no radar echoes are detected, the method further includes sequentially transmitting further high risetime, short duration pulses, and listening for radar echoes from each of said further pulses after different elapsed times for each of the further pulses until radar echoes are detected. When radar echoes are detected, data based on the detected echoes is processed to produce an image of the identification marks.

  20. Dietary Assessment on a Mobile Phone Using Image Processing and Pattern Recognition Techniques: Algorithm Design and System Prototyping

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Yasmine; Nguyen, Duc Thanh; Tran, Minh Khoi; Li, Wanqing

    2015-01-01

    Dietary assessment, while traditionally based on pen-and-paper, is rapidly moving towards automatic approaches. This study describes an Australian automatic food record method and its prototype for dietary assessment via the use of a mobile phone and techniques of image processing and pattern recognition. Common visual features including scale invariant feature transformation (SIFT), local binary patterns (LBP), and colour are used for describing food images. The popular bag-of-words (BoW) model is employed for recognizing the images taken by a mobile phone for dietary assessment. Technical details are provided together with discussions on the issues and future work. PMID:26225994

  1. Multiple techniques for mineral identification on Mars:. a study of hydrothermal rocks as potential analogues for astrobiology sites on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Murad, Enver; Lane, Melissa D.; Mancinelli, Rocco L.

    2004-06-01

    Spectroscopic studies of Mars analog materials combining multiple spectral ranges and techniques are necessary in order to obtain ground truth information for interpretation of rocks and soils on Mars. Two hydrothermal rocks from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, were characterized here because they contain minerals requiring water for formation and they provide a possible niche for some of the earliest organisms on Earth. If related rocks formed in hydrothermal sites on Mars, identification of these would be important for understanding the geology of the planet and potential habitability for life. XRD, thermal properties, VNIR, mid-IR, and Raman spectroscopy were employed to identify the mineralogy of the samples in this study. The rocks studied here include a travertine from Mammoth Formation that contains primarily calcite with some aragonite and gypsum and a siliceous sinter from Octopus Spring that contains a variety of poorly crystalline to amorphous silicate minerals. Calcite was detected readily in the travertine rock using any one of the techniques studied. The small amount of gypsum was uniquely identified using XRD, VNIR, and mid-IR, while the aragonite was uniquely identified using XRD and Raman. The siliceous sinter sample was more difficult to characterize using each of these techniques and a combination of all techniques was more useful than any single technique. Although XRD is the historical standard for mineral identification, it presents some challenges for remote investigations. Thermal properties are most useful for minerals with discrete thermal transitions. Raman spectroscopy is most effective for detecting polarized species such as CO 3, OH, and CH, and exhibits sharp bands for most highly crystalline minerals when abundant. Mid-IR spectroscopy is most useful in characterizing Si-O (and metal-O) bonds and also has the advantage that remote information about sample texture (e.g., particle size) can be determined. Mid-IR spectroscopy is also

  2. Therapeutic identification of depression in young people: lessons fromthe introduction of a new technique in general practice

    PubMed Central

    Iliffe, Steve; Gallant, Ceri; Kramer, Tami; Gledhill, Julia; Bye, Amanda; Fernandez, Victoria; Vila, Mar; Miller, Lisa; Garralda, M Elena

    2012-01-01

    Background Mild-to-moderate depression in young people is associated with impaired social functioning and high rates of affective disorder in adult life. Earlier recognition of depression in young people has the potential to reduce the burden of depression in adulthood. However, depression in teenagers is underdiagnosed and undertreated. Aim To assess the usability and usefulness of a cognitive-behavioural-therapy-based technique for Therapeutic Identification of Depression in Young people (TIDY). Design and setting A qualitative study of four group practices in northwest London. Method Face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with practitioners who had been trained in the use of the TIDY technique. Results Twenty-five GPs and six nurses were interviewed. The key themes that emerged from the interviews were: practitioners were ‘making sense of teenage depression’ when interpreting signs and symptoms; the training in the technique was variable in its impact on practitioners' attitudes and practice; and time factors constrained practitioners in the application of the technique. Conclusion The TIDY technique is usable in routine practice, but only if practitioners are allowed to use it selectively. This need for selectivity arises partly from concerns about time management, and partly to avoid medicalisation of psychological distress in young people. The perceived usefulness of the TIDY technique depends on the practitioner's prior knowledge, experience, and awareness. PMID:22429434

  3. Exploring patterns in resource utilization prior to the formal identification of homelessness in recently returned veterans.

    PubMed

    Gundlapalli, Adi V; Redd, Andrew; Carter, Marjorie E; Palmer, Miland; Peterson, Rachel; Samore, Matthew H

    2014-01-01

    There are limited data on resources utilized by US Veterans prior to their identification as being homeless. We performed visual analytics on longitudinal medical encounter data prior to the official recognition of homelessness in a large cohort of OEF/OIF Veterans. A statistically significant increase in numbers of several categories of visits in the immediate 30 days prior to the recognition of homelessness was noted as compared to an earlier period. This finding has the potential to inform prediction algorithms based on structured data with a view to intervention and mitigation of homelessness among Veterans.

  4. An Astronomical Pattern-Matching Algorithm for Automated Identification of Whale Sharks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arzoumanian, Z.; Holmberg, J.; Norman, B.

    2005-01-01

    The largest shark species alive today, whale sharks (Rhincodon typus) are rare and poorly studied. Directed fisheries, high value in international trade, a highly migratory nature, and generally low abundance make this species vulnerable to exploitation. Mark- and-recapture studies have provided our current understanding of whale shark demographics and life history, but conventional tagging has met with limited success. To aid in conservation and management efforts, and to further our knowledge of whale shark biology, an identification technology that maximizes the scientific value of individual sighting is needed.

  5. A novel technique for the production of electrospun scaffolds with tailored three-dimensional micro-patterns employing additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Catherine M; Morris, Gavin E; Gould, Toby W A; Bail, Robert; Toumpaniari, Sotiria; Harrington, Helen; Dixon, James E; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Segal, Joel; Rose, Felicity R A J

    2014-09-01

    Electrospinning is a common technique used to fabricate fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. There is now growing interest in assessing the ability of collector plate design to influence the patterning of the fibres during the electrospinning process. In this study, we investigate a novel method to generate hybrid electrospun scaffolds consisting of both random fibres and a defined three-dimensional (3D) micro-topography at the surface, using patterned resin formers produced by rapid prototyping (RP). Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) was electrospun onto the engineered RP surfaces and the ability of these formers to influence microfibre patterning in the resulting scaffolds visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun scaffolds with patterns mirroring the microstructures of the formers were successfully fabricated. The effect of the resulting fibre patterns and 3D geometries on mammalian cell adhesion and proliferation was investigated by seeding enhanced green fluorescent protein labelled 3T3 fibroblasts onto the scaffolds. Following 24 h and four days of culture, the seeded scaffolds were visually assessed by confocal macro- and microscopy. The patterning of the fibres guided initial cell adhesion to the scaffold with subsequent proliferation over the geometry resulting in the cells being held in a 3D micro-topography. Such patterning could be designed to replicate a specific in vivo structure; we use the dermal papillae as an exemplar here. In conclusion, a novel, versatile and scalable method to produce hybrid electrospun scaffolds has been developed. The 3D directional cues of the patterned fibres have been shown to influence cell behaviour and could be used to culture cells within a similar 3D micro-topography as experienced in vivo.

  6. A novel technique for the production of electrospun scaffolds with tailored three-dimensional micro-patterns employing additive manufacturing.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Catherine M; Morris, Gavin E; Gould, Toby W A; Bail, Robert; Toumpaniari, Sotiria; Harrington, Helen; Dixon, James E; Shakesheff, Kevin M; Segal, Joel; Rose, Felicity R A J

    2014-09-01

    Electrospinning is a common technique used to fabricate fibrous scaffolds for tissue engineering applications. There is now growing interest in assessing the ability of collector plate design to influence the patterning of the fibres during the electrospinning process. In this study, we investigate a novel method to generate hybrid electrospun scaffolds consisting of both random fibres and a defined three-dimensional (3D) micro-topography at the surface, using patterned resin formers produced by rapid prototyping (RP). Poly(D,L-lactide-co-glycolide) was electrospun onto the engineered RP surfaces and the ability of these formers to influence microfibre patterning in the resulting scaffolds visualized by scanning electron microscopy. Electrospun scaffolds with patterns mirroring the microstructures of the formers were successfully fabricated. The effect of the resulting fibre patterns and 3D geometries on mammalian cell adhesion and proliferation was investigated by seeding enhanced green fluorescent protein labelled 3T3 fibroblasts onto the scaffolds. Following 24 h and four days of culture, the seeded scaffolds were visually assessed by confocal macro- and microscopy. The patterning of the fibres guided initial cell adhesion to the scaffold with subsequent proliferation over the geometry resulting in the cells being held in a 3D micro-topography. Such patterning could be designed to replicate a specific in vivo structure; we use the dermal papillae as an exemplar here. In conclusion, a novel, versatile and scalable method to produce hybrid electrospun scaffolds has been developed. The 3D directional cues of the patterned fibres have been shown to influence cell behaviour and could be used to culture cells within a similar 3D micro-topography as experienced in vivo. PMID:24722371

  7. Damage Source Identification of Reinforced Concrete Structure Using Acoustic Emission Technique

    PubMed Central

    Panjsetooni, Alireza; Bunnori, Norazura Muhamad; Vakili, Amir Hossein

    2013-01-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) technique is one of the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques that have been considered as the prime candidate for structural health and damage monitoring in loaded structures. This technique was employed for investigation process of damage in reinforced concrete (RC) frame specimens. A number of reinforced concrete RC frames were tested under loading cycle and were simultaneously monitored using AE. The AE test data were analyzed using the AE source location analysis method. The results showed that AE technique is suitable to identify the sources location of damage in RC structures. PMID:23997681

  8. Identification of the Plant for Upright Stance in Humans: Multiple Movement Patterns From a Single Neural Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Kiemel, Tim; Elahi, Alexander J.; Jeka, John J.

    2008-01-01

    We determined properties of the plant during human upright stance using a closed-loop system identification method originally applied to human postural control by another group. To identify the plant, which was operationally defined as the mapping from muscle activation (rectified EMG signals) to body segment angles, we rotated the visual scene about the axis through the subject's ankles using a sum-of-sines stimulus signal. Because EMG signals from ankle muscles and from hip and lower trunk muscles showed similar responses to the visual perturbation across frequency, we combined EMG signals from all recorded muscles into a single plant input. Body kinematics were described by the trunk and leg angles in the sagittal plane. The phase responses of both angles to visual scene angle were similar at low frequencies and approached a difference of ∼150° at higher frequencies. Therefore we considered leg and trunk angles as separate plant outputs. We modeled the plant with a two-joint (ankle and hip) model of the body, a second-order low-pass filter from EMG activity to active joint torques, and intrinsic stiffness and damping at both joints. The results indicated that the in-phase (ankle) pattern was neurally generated, whereas the out-of-phase pattern was caused by plant dynamics. Thus a single neural strategy leads to multiple kinematic patterns. Moreover, estimated intrinsic stiffness in the model was insufficient to stabilize the plant. PMID:18829854

  9. System identification of the nonlinear dynamics in the thalamocortical circuit in response to patterned thalamic microstimulation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Millard, Daniel C.; Wang, Qi; Gollnick, Clare A.; Stanley, Garrett B.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. Nonlinear system identification approaches were used to develop a dynamical model of the network level response to patterns of microstimulation in vivo. Approach. The thalamocortical circuit of the rodent vibrissa pathway was the model system, with voltage sensitive dye imaging capturing the cortical response to patterns of stimulation delivered from a single electrode in the ventral posteromedial thalamus. The results of simple paired stimulus experiments formed the basis for the development of a phenomenological model explicitly containing nonlinear elements observed experimentally. The phenomenological model was fit using datasets obtained with impulse train inputs, Poisson-distributed in time and uniformly varying in amplitude. Main results. The phenomenological model explained 58% of the variance in the cortical response to out of sample patterns of thalamic microstimulation. Furthermore, while fit on trial-averaged data, the phenomenological model reproduced single trial response properties when simulated with noise added into the system during stimulus presentation. The simulations indicate that the single trial response properties were dependent on the relative sensitivity of the static nonlinearities in the two stages of the model, and ultimately suggest that electrical stimulation activates local circuitry through linear recruitment, but that this activity propagates in a highly nonlinear fashion to downstream targets. Significance. The development of nonlinear dynamical models of neural circuitry will guide information delivery for sensory prosthesis applications, and more generally reveal properties of population coding within neural circuits.

  10. Identification of direct targets of plant transcription factors using the GR fusion technique.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Nobutoshi; Winter, Cara M; Wellmer, Frank; Wagner, Doris

    2015-01-01

    The glucocorticoid receptor-dependent activation of plant transcription factors has proven to be a powerful tool for the identification of their direct target genes. In the absence of the synthetic steroid hormone dexamethasone (dex), transcription factors fused to the hormone-binding domain of the glucocorticoid receptor (TF-GR) are held in an inactive state, due to their cytoplasmic localization. This requires physical interaction with the heat shock protein 90 (HSP90) complex. Hormone binding leads to disruption of the interaction between GR and HSP90 and allows TF-GR fusion proteins to enter the nucleus. Once inside the nucleus, they bind to specific DNA sequences and immediately activate or repress expression of their targets. This system is well suited for the identification of direct target genes of transcription factors in plants, as (A) there is little basal protein activity in the absence of dex, (B) steroid application leads to rapid transcription factor activation, (C) no side effects of dex treatment are observed on the physiology of the plant, and (D) secondary effects of transcription factor activity can be eliminated by simultaneous application of an inhibitor of protein biosynthesis, cycloheximide (cyc). In this chapter, we describe detailed protocols for the preparation of plant material, for dex and cyc treatment, for RNA extraction, and for the PCR-based or genome-wide identification of direct targets of transcription factors fused to GR.

  11. Neural Networks and other Techniques for Fault Identification and Isolation of Aircraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Innocenti, M.; Napolitano, M.

    2003-01-01

    Fault identification, isolation, and accomodation have become critical issues in the overall performance of advanced aircraft systems. Neural Networks have shown to be a very attractive alternative to classic adaptation methods for identification and control of non-linear dynamic systems. The purpose of this paper is to show the improvements in neural network applications achievable through the use of learning algorithms more efficient than the classic Back-Propagation, and through the implementation of the neural schemes in parallel hardware. The results of the analysis of a scheme for Sensor Failure, Detection, Identification and Accommodation (SFDIA) using experimental flight data of a research aircraft model are presented. Conventional approaches to the problem are based on observers and Kalman Filters while more recent methods are based on neural approximators. The work described in this paper is based on the use of neural networks (NNs) as on-line learning non-linear approximators. The performances of two different neural architectures were compared. The first architecture is based on a Multi Layer Perceptron (MLP) NN trained with the Extended Back Propagation algorithm (EBPA). The second architecture is based on a Radial Basis Function (RBF) NN trained with the Extended-MRAN (EMRAN) algorithms. In addition, alternative methods for communications links fault detection and accomodation are presented, relative to multiple unmanned aircraft applications.

  12. Identification of early cancerous lesion of esophagus with endoscopic images by hyperspectral image technique (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Shih-Wei; Chen, Shih-Hua; Chen, Weichung; Wu, I.-Chen; Wu, Ming Tsang; Kuo, Chie-Tong; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2016-03-01

    This study presents a method to identify early esophageal cancer within endoscope using hyperspectral imaging technology. The research samples are three kinds of endoscopic images including white light endoscopic, chromoendoscopic, and narrow-band endoscopic images with different stages of pathological changes (normal, dysplasia, dysplasia - esophageal cancer, and esophageal cancer). Research is divided into two parts: first, we analysis the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images with different stages to know the spectral responses by pathological changes. Second, we identified early cancerous lesion of esophagus by principal component analysis (PCA) of the reflectance spectra of endoscopic images. The results of this study show that the identification of early cancerous lesion is possible achieve from three kinds of images. In which the spectral characteristics of NBI endoscopy images of a gray area than those without the existence of the problem the first two, and the trend is very clear. Therefore, if simply to reflect differences in the degree of spectral identification, chromoendoscopic images are suitable samples. The best identification of early esophageal cancer is using the NBI endoscopic images. Based on the results, the use of hyperspectral imaging technology in the early endoscopic esophageal cancer lesion image recognition helps clinicians quickly diagnose. We hope for the future to have a relatively large amount of endoscopic image by establishing a hyperspectral imaging database system developed in this study, so the clinician can take this repository more efficiently preliminary diagnosis.

  13. A comparative study of self-aligned quadruple and sextuple patterning techniques for sub-15nm IC scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yijian; Kang, Weiling; Zhang, Pan

    2013-04-01

    Self-aligned multiple patterning (SAMP) techniques can potentially scale integrated circuits down to half-pitch 7nm. In this paper, we present a comparative analysis of self-aligned quadruple (SAQP) and sextuple (SASP) techniques by investigating their technological merits and limitations, process complexity and cost structures, strategy of layout decomposition/synthesis, and yield impacts. It is shown that SASP process complexity is comparable to that of SAQP process, while it offers 50% gain in feature density and may be extended for one more node. The overlay yield of cut process is identified to be a challenge when the minimum device feature is scaled to half-pitch 7nm. The mask design issues for various applications using each technique are discussed, and the corresponding layout decomposition/synthesis strategy for complex 2D patterning is proposed. Although the high-dose EUV single-cut process can save significant costs when applied to replace the 193i multiple-cut process to form fin/gate structures, our cost modeling results show that SADP+EUV approach is still not cost effective for patterning other critical layers that generally require the same mask number (and lithographic steps) as the non-EUV schemes.

  14. Identification of aqueous pollen extracts using surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and pattern recognition methods.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stephan; Merk, Virginia; Kneipp, Janina

    2016-01-01

    Aqueous pollen extracts of varying taxonomic relations were analyzed with surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) by using gold nanoparticles in aqueous suspensions as SERS substrate. This enables a selective vibrational characterization of the pollen water soluble fraction (mostly cellular components) devoid of the spectral contributions from the insoluble sporopollenin outer layer. The spectra of the pollen extracts are species-specific, and the chemical fingerprints can be exploited to achieve a classification that can distinguish between different species of the same genus. In the simple experimental procedure, several thousands of spectra per species are generated. Using an artificial neural network (ANN), it is demonstrated that analysis of the intrinsic biochemical information of the pollen cells in the SERS data enables the identification of pollen from different plant species at high accuracy. The ANN extracts the taxonomically-relevant information from the data in spite of high intra-species spectral variation caused by signal fluctuations and preparation specifics. The results show that SERS can be used for the reliable characterization and identification of pollen samples. They have implications for improved investigation of pollen physiology and for allergy warning.

  15. Identification of statistically independent climatic pattern in GRACE and hydrological model data over West-Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusche, J.; Forootan, E.; Eicker, A.; Hoffmann-Dobrev, H.

    2012-04-01

    West-African countries have been exposed to changes in rainfall patterns over the last decades, including a significant negative trend. This causes adverse effects on water resources, for instance reduced freshwater availability, and changes in the frequency, duration and magnitude of droughts and floods. Extracting the main patterns of water storage change in West Africa from remote sensing and linking them to climate variability, is therefore an essential step to understand the hydrological aspects of the region. In this study, the higher order statistical method of Independent Component Analysis (ICA) is employed to extract statistically independent water storage patterns from monthly Gravity Recovery And Climate Experiment (GRACE), from the WaterGAP Global Hydrology Model (WGHM) and from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products over West Africa, for the period 2002-2012. Then, to reveal the influences of climatic teleconnections on the individual patterns, these results were correlated to the El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) indices. To study the predictability of water storage changes, advanced statistical methods were applied on the main independent Sea Surface Temperature (SST) patterns over the Atlantic and Indian Oceans for the period 2002-2012 and the ICA results. Our results show a water storage decrease over the coastal regions of West Africa (including Sierra Leone, Liberia, Togo and Nigeria), associated with rainfall decrease. The comparison between GRACE estimations and WGHM results indicates some inconsistencies that underline the importance of forcing data for hydrological modeling of West Africa. Keywords: West Africa; GRACE-derived water storage; ICA; ENSO; IOD

  16. Advanced electron microscopic techniques applied to the characterization of irradiation effects and fission product identification of irradiated TRISO coated particles from the AGR-1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Rooyen, I.J. van; Lillo, T.M.; Trowbridge, T.L.; Madden, J.M.; Wu, Y.Q.; Goran, D.

    2013-07-01

    Preliminary electron microscopy of coated fuel particles from the AGR-1 experiment was conducted using characterization techniques such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). Microscopic quantification of fission-product precipitates was performed. Although numerous micro- and nano-sized precipitates observed in the coating layers during initial SEM characterization of the cross-sections, and in subsequent TEM diffraction patterns, were indexed as UPd{sub 2}Si{sub 2}, no Ag was conclusively found. Additionally, characterization of these precipitates highlighted the difficulty of measuring low concentrations of Ag in precipitates in the presence of significantly higher concentrations of Pd and U. The electron microscopy team followed a multi-directional and phased approach in the identification of fission products in irradiated TRISO fuel. The advanced electron microscopy techniques discussed in this paper, not only demonstrate the usefulness of the equipment (methods) as relevant research tools, but also provide relevant scientific results which increase the knowledge about TRISO fuel particles microstructure and fission products transport.

  17. A method for automatic identification of water and fat images from a symmetrically-sampled dual-echo Dixon technique

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Moiz; Liu, Yinan; Slavens, Zachary W.; Low, Russell; Merkle, Elmar; Hwang, Ken-Pin; Vu, Anthony; Ma, Jingfei

    2016-01-01

    Sampling water and fat signals symmetrically (i.e., at 0 and 180° relative phase angles) in a dual-echo Dixon technique offers high intrinsic tolerance to phase fluctuations in postprocessing and maximum SNR performance for the separated water and fat images. However, identification of which image is water and which image is fat after their separation is not possible based on the phase information alone. In this work, we proposed a semi-empirical automatic image identification method that is based on the intrinsic asymmetry between the water and fat chemical shift spectra. Specifically, the approximately bi-modal feature of the fat spectra and the observation that most in vivo tissues are either predominantly water or predominantly fat are used to construct a spectrum-based algorithm. Additional refinement is accomplished by considering the spatial distribution of the tissues that may have a coexistence of water and fat. The final improved algorithm was tested on a total of 131 three-dimensional patient datasets collected from different scanners and found to yield correct water and fat identification in all datasets. PMID:20061107

  18. A least-squares inversion technique for identification of a point release: Application to Fusion Field Trials 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Sarvesh Kumar; Rani, Raj

    2014-08-01

    Identification of a point release is a parametric estimation problem associated with the estimation of its parameters namely, location and strength. A least-squares inversion algorithm, free from initial guess of release parameters, is utilized here for the source identification in eleven trials of single continuous point releases conducted during Fusion Field Trials 2007. The source locations are retrieved within an average error of 23 m from their true locations. The maximum and minimum errors in the retrieval of the source location are obtained as 57.3 m and 3 m respectively. The source strength is retrieved within a factor of 1.6 in all the trials. The sensitivity of the source estimation is analysed with respect to (i) variation of grid sizes in discretized space, (ii) inclusion of zero measurements and (iii) addition of new measurements. Posterior uncertainty is mentioned in terms of variance of the source parameters, approximated by using the Hessian of the cost function. In addition, an attempt is made to obtain the minimum number of measurements for a successful source inversion. The study explores the future applicability of this least-squares inversion technique for point source identification.

  19. Effects of Modeling and Tempo Patterns as Practice Techniques on the Performance of High School Instrumentalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henley, Paul T.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the effect of modeling conditions and tempo patterns on high school instrumentalists' performance. Focuses on high school students (n=60) who play wind instruments. Reports that the with-model condition was superior in rhythm and tempo percentage gain when compared to the no-model condition. Includes references. (CMK)

  20. Step selection techniques uncover the environmental predictors of space use patterns in flocks of Amazonian birds

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Jonathan R; Mokross, Karl; Stouffer, Philip C; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the behavioral decisions behind animal movement and space use patterns is a key challenge for behavioral ecology. Tools to quantify these patterns from movement and animal–habitat interactions are vital for transforming ecology into a predictive science. This is particularly important in environments undergoing rapid anthropogenic changes, such as the Amazon rainforest, where animals face novel landscapes. Insectivorous bird flocks are key elements of avian biodiversity in the Amazonian ecosystem. Therefore, disentangling and quantifying the drivers behind their movement and space use patterns is of great importance for Amazonian conservation. We use a step selection function (SSF) approach to uncover environmental drivers behind movement choices. This is used to construct a mechanistic model, from which we derive predicted utilization distributions (home ranges) of flocks. We show that movement decisions are significantly influenced by canopy height and topography, but depletion and renewal of resources do not appear to affect movement significantly. We quantify the magnitude of these effects and demonstrate that they are helpful for understanding various heterogeneous aspects of space use. We compare our results to recent analytic derivations of space use, demonstrating that the analytic approximation is only accurate when assuming that there is no persistence in the animals' movement. Our model can be translated into other environments or hypothetical scenarios, such as those given by proposed future anthropogenic actions, to make predictions of spatial patterns in bird flocks. Furthermore, our approach is quite general, so could potentially be used to understand the drivers of movement and spatial patterns for a wide variety of animal communities. PMID:25558353

  1. Step selection techniques uncover the environmental predictors of space use patterns in flocks of Amazonian birds.

    PubMed

    Potts, Jonathan R; Mokross, Karl; Stouffer, Philip C; Lewis, Mark A

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the behavioral decisions behind animal movement and space use patterns is a key challenge for behavioral ecology. Tools to quantify these patterns from movement and animal-habitat interactions are vital for transforming ecology into a predictive science. This is particularly important in environments undergoing rapid anthropogenic changes, such as the Amazon rainforest, where animals face novel landscapes. Insectivorous bird flocks are key elements of avian biodiversity in the Amazonian ecosystem. Therefore, disentangling and quantifying the drivers behind their movement and space use patterns is of great importance for Amazonian conservation. We use a step selection function (SSF) approach to uncover environmental drivers behind movement choices. This is used to construct a mechanistic model, from which we derive predicted utilization distributions (home ranges) of flocks. We show that movement decisions are significantly influenced by canopy height and topography, but depletion and renewal of resources do not appear to affect movement significantly. We quantify the magnitude of these effects and demonstrate that they are helpful for understanding various heterogeneous aspects of space use. We compare our results to recent analytic derivations of space use, demonstrating that the analytic approximation is only accurate when assuming that there is no persistence in the animals' movement. Our model can be translated into other environments or hypothetical scenarios, such as those given by proposed future anthropogenic actions, to make predictions of spatial patterns in bird flocks. Furthermore, our approach is quite general, so could potentially be used to understand the drivers of movement and spatial patterns for a wide variety of animal communities.

  2. Flexible microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices using a low-cost wax patterning technique.

    PubMed

    Nilghaz, Azadeh; Wicaksono, Dedy H B; Gustiono, Dwi; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Supriyanto, Eko; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a simple wax patterning method on cotton cloth for performing colorimetric bioassays. Commercial cotton cloth fabric is proposed as a new inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible platform for fabricating two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic systems. We demonstrated that the wicking property of the cotton microfluidic channel can be improved by scouring in soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)) solution which will remove the natural surface wax and expose the underlying texture of the cellulose fiber. After this treatment, we fabricated narrow hydrophilic channels with hydrophobic barriers made from patterned wax to define the 2D microfluidic devices. The designed pattern is carved on wax-impregnated paper, and subsequently transferred to attached cotton cloth by heat treatment. To further obtain 3D microfluidic devices having multiple layers of pattern, a single layer of wax patterned cloth can be folded along a predefined folding line and subsequently pressed using mechanical force. All the fabrication steps are simple and low cost since no special equipment is required. Diagnostic application of cloth-based devices is shown by the development of simple devices that wick and distribute microvolumes of simulated body fluids along the hydrophilic channels into reaction zones to react with analytical reagents. Colorimetric detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in artificial urine is carried out by direct visual observation of bromophenol blue (BPB) colour change in the reaction zones. Finally, we show the flexibility of the novel microfluidic platform by conducting a similar reaction in a bent pinned μCAD.

  3. Flexible microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices using a low-cost wax patterning technique.

    PubMed

    Nilghaz, Azadeh; Wicaksono, Dedy H B; Gustiono, Dwi; Abdul Majid, Fadzilah Adibah; Supriyanto, Eko; Abdul Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication of microfluidic cloth-based analytical devices (μCADs) using a simple wax patterning method on cotton cloth for performing colorimetric bioassays. Commercial cotton cloth fabric is proposed as a new inexpensive, lightweight, and flexible platform for fabricating two- (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) microfluidic systems. We demonstrated that the wicking property of the cotton microfluidic channel can be improved by scouring in soda ash (Na(2)CO(3)) solution which will remove the natural surface wax and expose the underlying texture of the cellulose fiber. After this treatment, we fabricated narrow hydrophilic channels with hydrophobic barriers made from patterned wax to define the 2D microfluidic devices. The designed pattern is carved on wax-impregnated paper, and subsequently transferred to attached cotton cloth by heat treatment. To further obtain 3D microfluidic devices having multiple layers of pattern, a single layer of wax patterned cloth can be folded along a predefined folding line and subsequently pressed using mechanical force. All the fabrication steps are simple and low cost since no special equipment is required. Diagnostic application of cloth-based devices is shown by the development of simple devices that wick and distribute microvolumes of simulated body fluids along the hydrophilic channels into reaction zones to react with analytical reagents. Colorimetric detection of bovine serum albumin (BSA) in artificial urine is carried out by direct visual observation of bromophenol blue (BPB) colour change in the reaction zones. Finally, we show the flexibility of the novel microfluidic platform by conducting a similar reaction in a bent pinned μCAD. PMID:22089026

  4. NEW 3D TECHNIQUES FOR RANKING AND PRIORITIZATION OF CHEMICAL INVENTORIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    New three-dimensional quantitative structure activity (3-D QSAR) techniques for prioritizing chemical inventories for endocrine activity will be presented. The Common Reactivity Pattern (COREPA) approach permits identification of common steric and/or electronic patterns associate...

  5. [Different wavelengths selection methods for identification of early blight on tomato leaves by using hyperspectral imaging technique].

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Xi; Xie, Chuan-Qi; Wang, Qiao-Nan; He, Yong; Shao, Yong-Ni

    2014-05-01

    Identification of early blight on tomato leaves by using hyperspectral imaging technique based on different effective wavelengths selection methods (successive projections algorithm, SPA; x-loading weights, x-LW; gram-schmidt orthogonaliza-tion, GSO) was studied in the present paper. Hyperspectral images of seventy healthy and seventy infected tomato leaves were obtained by hyperspectral imaging system across the wavelength range of 380-1023 nm. Reflectance of all pixels in region of interest (ROI) was extracted by ENVI 4. 7 software. Least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM) model was established based on the full spectral wavelengths. It obtained an excellent result with the highest identification accuracy (100%) in both calibration and prediction sets. Then, EW-LS-SVM and EW-LDA models were established based on the selected wavelengths suggested by SPA, x-LW and GSO, respectively. The results showed that all of the EW-LS-SVM and EW-LDA models performed well with the identification accuracy of 100% in EW-LS-SVM model and 100%, 100% and 97. 83% in EW-LDA model, respectively. Moreover, the number of input wavelengths of SPA-LS-SVM, x-LW-LS-SVM and GSO-LS-SVM models were four (492, 550, 633 and 680 nm), three (631, 719 and 747 nm) and two (533 and 657 nm), respectively. Fewer input variables were beneficial for the development of identification instrument. It demonstrated that it is feasible to identify early blight on tomato leaves by using hyperspectral imaging, and SPA, x-LW and GSO were effective wavelengths selection methods.

  6. QPSO-MD: A Quantum Behaved Particle Swarm Optimization for Consensus Pattern Identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meshoul, Souham; Al-Owaisheq, Tasneem

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has been successfully applied to a wide range of fields. The recent introduction of quantum mechanics principles into PSO has given rise to a Quantum behaviour PSO (QPSO) algorithm. This paper investigates its application into motif discovery, a challenging task in bioinformatics and molecular biology. Given a set of input DNA sequences, the proposed framework acts as a search process where a population of particles is depicted by a quantum behavior. Each particle represents a set of regulatory patterns from which a consensus pattern or motif model is derived. The corresponding fitness function is related to the total number of pairwise matches between nucleotides in the input sequences. Experiment results on synthetic and real data are very promising and prove the effectiveness of the proposed framework.

  7. Retina identification based on the pattern of blood vessels using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barkhoda, Wafa; Akhlaqian, Fardin; Amiri, Mehran Deljavan; Nouroozzadeh, Mohammad Sadeq

    2011-12-01

    This article proposed a novel human identification method based on retinal images. The proposed system composed of two main parts, feature extraction component and decision-making component. In feature extraction component, first blood vessels extracted and then they have been thinned by a morphological algorithm. Then, two feature vectors are constructed for each image, by utilizing angular and radial partitioning. In previous studies, Manhattan distance has been used as similarity measure between images. In this article, a fuzzy system with Manhattan distances of two feature vectors as input and similarity measure as output has been added to decision-making component. Simulations show that this system is about 99.75% accurate which make it superior to a great extent versus previous studies. In addition to high accuracy rate, rotation invariance and low computational overhead are other advantages of the proposed systems that make it ideal for real-time systems.

  8. Evidence-based reduction of obesity: identification of a subculture's least fattening eating patterns.

    PubMed

    Booth, D A

    1999-02-01

    Public health nutritional interventions, like clinical treatments in medicine or psychology, should be based on direct evidence of their efficacy relative to prior existing modalities. Yet the contribution of applied human nutrition and the psychology of eating to research into ways of slowing the rise of obesity has been limited to the intake of energy nutrients and investigator-prejudged questions about appetite and food choices. In contrast, it is feasible to get members of the public to describe their patterns of eating in their own words. Self-assessed current frequency of each common potentially less or more fattening eating pattern can then be used to associate weight change with changes in habit frequency. This design has been used to identify the long-term least fattening eating patterns retrospectively and prospectively in several studies in England and Germany. Without using assessments of usual nutrient intake, these studies demonstrate that the least fattening patterns over 1-2 or more years are drinks between meals with no energy intake, cutting back on fat in all foods and replacing as much sitting and riding as feasible each day with walking or cycling. An hypothesis to be tested by this method is that the only known automatic mechanism for eating less dessert is the learnt effect of boosting the readily digested carbohydrate content of high-energy main courses. Such evidence-based advice as well as self-therapy for emotional eating and body-shape distress should be the front line of defence against unhealthy weight gain and re-gain. PMID:9989917

  9. Individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s disease show differential patterns of ERP brain activation during odor identification

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that older adults at risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease may show olfactory processing deficits before other signs of dementia appear. Methods We studied 60 healthy non-demented individuals, half of whom were positive for the genetic risk factor the Apolipoprotein E ɛ4 allele, in three different age groups. Event-related potentials to visual and olfactory identification tasks were recorded and analyzed for latency and amplitude differences, and plotted via topographical maps. Results Varying patterns of brain activation were observed over the post-stimulus epoch for ɛ4- versus ɛ4+ individuals on topographical maps. Individuals with the ɛ4 allele demonstrated different ERP peak latencies during identification of olfactory but not visual stimuli. High correct ApoE classification rates were obtained utilizing the olfactory ERP. Conclusions Olfactory ERPs demonstrate functional decline in individuals at risk for Alzheimer’s disease at much earlier ages than previously observed, suggesting the potential for pre-clinical detection of AD at very early stages. PMID:22849610

  10. Identification of successive flowering phases highlights a new genetic control of the flowering pattern in strawberry

    PubMed Central

    Perrotte, Justine; Guédon, Yann; Gaston, Amèlia; Denoyes, Béatrice

    2016-01-01

    The genetic control of the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering has been deciphered in various perennial species. However, little is known about the genetic control of the dynamics of perpetual flowering, which changes abruptly at well-defined time instants during the growing season. Here, we characterize the perpetual flowering pattern and identify new genetic controls of this pattern in the cultivated strawberry. Twenty-one perpetual flowering strawberry genotypes were phenotyped at the macroscopic scale for their course of emergence of inflorescences and stolons during the growing season. A longitudinal analysis based on the segmentation of flowering rate profiles using multiple change-point models was conducted. The flowering pattern of perpetual flowering genotypes takes the form of three or four successive phases: an autumn-initiated flowering phase, a flowering pause, and a single stationary perpetual flowering phase or two perpetual flowering phases, the second one being more intense. The genetic control of flowering was analysed by quantitative trait locus mapping of flowering traits based on these flowering phases. We showed that the occurrence of a fourth phase of intense flowering is controlled by a newly identified locus, different from the locus FaPFRU, controlling the switch between seasonal and perpetual flowering behaviour. The role of this locus was validated by the analysis of data obtained previously during six consecutive years. PMID:27664957

  11. SplitPocket: identification of protein functional surfaces and characterization of their spatial patterns.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Yan Yuan; Dupree, Craig; Chen, Z Jeffrey; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2009-07-01

    SplitPocket (http://pocket.uchicago.edu/) is a web server to identify functional surfaces of protein from structure coordinates. Using the Alpha Shape Theory, we previously developed an analytical approach to identify protein functional surfaces by the geometric concept of a split pocket, which is a pocket split by a binding ligand. Our geometric approach extracts site-specific spatial information from coordinates of structures. To reduce the search space, probe radii are designed according to the physicochemical textures of molecules. The method uses the weighted Delaunay triangulation and the discrete flow algorithm to obtain geometric measurements and spatial patterns for each predicted pocket. It can also measure the hydrophobicity on a surface patch. Furthermore, we quantify the evolutionary conservation of surface patches by an index derived from the entropy scores in HSSP (homology-derived secondary structure of proteins). We have used the method to examine approximately 1.16 million potential pockets and identified the split pockets in >26,000 structures in the Protein Data Bank. This integrated web server of functional surfaces provides a source of spatial patterns to serve as templates for predicting the functional surfaces of unbound structures involved in binding activities. These spatial patterns should also be useful for protein functional inference, structural evolution and drug design.

  12. Development of a Robust star identification technique for use in attitude determination of the ACE spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woodard, Mark; Rohrbaugh, Dave

    1995-01-01

    The Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) spacecraft is designed to fly in a spin-stabilized attitude. The spacecraft will carry two attitude sensors - a digital fine Sun sensor and a charge coupled device (CCD) star tracker - to allow ground-based determination of the spacecraft attitude and spin rate. Part of the processing that must be performed on the CCD star tracker data is the star identification. Star data received from the spacecraft must be matched with star information in the SKYMAP catalog to determine exactly which stars the sensor is tracking. This information, along with the Sun vector measured by the Sun sensor, is used to determine the spacecraft attitude. Several existing star identification (star ID) systems were examined to determine whether they could be modified for use on the ACE mission. Star ID systems which exist for three-axis stabilized spacecraft tend to be complex in nature and many require fairly good knowledge of the spacecraft attitude, making their use for ACE excessive. Star ID systems used for spinners carrying traditional slit star sensors would have to be modified to model the CCD star tracker. The ACE star ID algorithm must also be robust, in that it will be able to correctly identify stars even though the attitude is not known to a high degree of accuracy, and must be very efficient to allow real-time star identification. The paper presents the star ID algorithm that was developed for ACE. Results from prototype testing are also presented to demonstrate the efficiency, accuracy, and robustness of the algorithm.

  13. Semi-automated identification of white blood cell using active contour technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzuki, Nurhanis Izzati Binti Che; Mahmood, Nasrul Humaimi Bin; Razak, Mohd Azhar Bin Abdul

    2015-05-01

    Manual and automated diagnosis can be used to identify the morphology of blood cells. However, the manual diagnosis of the blood cells is time consuming and need hematologist and pathologist experts in order to diagnose diseases. Recently, the automated diagnosis which is require image processing technique are often been used in this area. This paper focuses on image processing technique to do segmentation on the nucleus of white blood cells (WBC). To identify the nucleus region, there are several image processing techniques applied besides the active contour method. The results obtained show that the detection on the edge of the nucleus is almost same as the original image of the nucleus.

  14. Progress towards an unassisted element identification from Laser Induced Breakdown Spectra with automatic ranking techniques inspired by text retrieval

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, G.; Cristoforetti, G.; Legnaioli, S.; Lorenzetti, G.; Palleschi, V.; Sorrentino, F.; Tognoni, E.

    2010-08-01

    In this communication, we will illustrate an algorithm for automatic element identification in LIBS spectra which takes inspiration from the vector space model applied to text retrieval techniques. The vector space model prescribes that text documents and text queries are represented as vectors of weighted terms (words). Document ranking, with respect to relevance to a query, is obtained by comparing the vectors representing the documents with the vector representing the query. In our case, we represent elements and samples as vectors of weighted peaks, obtained from their spectra. The likelihood of the presence of an element in a sample is computed by comparing the corresponding vectors of weighted peaks. The weight of a peak is proportional to its intensity and to the inverse of the number of peaks, in the database, in its wavelength neighboring. We suppose to have a database containing the peaks of all elements we want to recognize, where each peak is represented by a wavelength and it is associated with its expected relative intensity and the corresponding element. Detection of elements in a sample is obtained by ranking the elements according to the distance of the associated vectors from the vector representing the sample. The application of this approach to elements identification using LIBS spectra obtained from several kinds of metallic alloys will be also illustrated. The possible extension of this technique towards an algorithm for fully automated LIBS analysis will be discussed.

  15. Rapid Identification and Characterization of Francisella by Molecular Biology and Other Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Xin-He; Zhao, Long-Fei; Chen, Xiao-Ming; Ren, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is the causative pathogen of tularemia and a Tier 1 bioterror agent on the CDC list. Considering the fact that some subpopulation of the F. tularensis strains is more virulent, more significantly associated with mortality, and therefore poses more threat to humans, rapid identification and characterization of this subpopulation strains is of invaluable importance. This review summarizes the up-to-date developments of assays for mainly detecting and characterizing F. tularensis and a touch of caveats of some of the assays. PMID:27335619

  16. Recognition of surface lithologic and topographic patterns in southwest Colorado with ADP techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melhorn, W. N.; Sinnock, S.

    1973-01-01

    Analysis of ERTS-1 multispectral data by automatic pattern recognition procedures is applicable toward grappling with current and future resource stresses by providing a means for refining existing geologic maps. The procedures used in the current analysis already yield encouraging results toward the eventual machine recognition of extensive surface lithologic and topographic patterns. Automatic mapping of a series of hogbacks, strike valleys, and alluvial surfaces along the northwest flank of the San Juan Basin in Colorado can be obtained by minimal man-machine interaction. The determination of causes for separable spectral signatures is dependent upon extensive correlation of micro- and macro field based ground truth observations and aircraft underflight data with the satellite data.

  17. Cross-cultural patterns in emotion recognition: highlighting design and analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Elfenbein, Hillary Anger; Mandal, Manas K; Ambady, Nalini; Harizuka, Susumu; Kumar, Surender

    2002-03-01

    This article highlights a range of design and analytical tools for studying the cross-cultural communication of emotion using forced-choice experimental designs. American, Indian, and Japanese participants judged facial expressions from all 3 cultures. A factorial experimental design is used, balanced n x n across cultures, to separate "absolute" cultural differences from "relational" effects characterizing the relationship between the emotion expressor and perceiver. Use of a response bias correction is illustrated for the tendency to endorse particular multiple-choice categories more often than others. Treating response bias also as an opportunity to gain insight into attributional style, the authors examined similarities and differences in response patterns across cultural groups. Finally, the authors examined patterns in the errors or confusions that participants make during emotion recognition and documented strong similarity across cultures.

  18. Nano-patterning of gold thin film by thermal annealing combined with laser interference techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do, Minh Thanh; Tong, Quang Cong; Lidiak, Alexander; Luong, Mai Hoang; Ledoux-Rak, Isabelle; Lai, Ngoc Diep

    2016-04-01

    We present an efficient method for fabrication of desired periodic metallic structures. By using the magnetron sputtering technique, the gold nano-layer was isotropically deposited onto a photoresist template, which had been previously fabricated by an interference technique. During a subsequent thermal annealing process, the gold coating layer melted and split allowing the photoresist core-template to evaporate and consequently leave a desired metal structure on the substrate surface. The proposed method exhibits advantages such as simplicity and low cost, which allows one to realize large-area plasmonic structures that are very promising for numerous applications, especially plasmonic-based photonic devices.

  19. Graphing evolutionary pattern and process: a history of techniques in archaeology and paleobiology.

    PubMed

    Lyman, R Lee

    2009-02-01

    Graphs displaying evolutionary patterns are common in paleontology and in United States archaeology. Both disciplines subscribed to a transformational theory of evolution and graphed evolution as a sequence of archetypes in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. U.S. archaeologists in the second decade of the twentieth century, and paleontologists shortly thereafter, developed distinct graphic styles that reflected the Darwinian variational model of evolution. Paleobiologists adopted the view of a species as a set of phenotypically variant individuals and graphed those variations either as central tendencies or as histograms of frequencies of variants. Archaeologists presumed their artifact types reflected cultural norms of prehistoric artisans and the frequency of specimens in each type reflected human choice and type popularity. They graphed cultural evolution as shifts in frequencies of specimens representing each of several artifact types. Confusion of pattern and process is exemplified by a paleobiologist misinterpreting the process illustrated by an archaeological graph, and an archaeologist misinterpreting the process illustrated by a paleobiological graph. Each style of graph displays particular evolutionary patterns and implies particular evolutionary processes. Graphs of a multistratum collection of prehistoric mammal remains and a multistratum collection of artifacts demonstrate that many graph styles can be used for both kinds of collections.

  20. On the use of neural network techniques for the identification of ship stability parameters at sea

    SciTech Connect

    Haddara, M.R.

    1995-12-31

    In this work, neural network techniques are used to identify the stability parameters for a ship sailing in a random sea. The random decrement is calculated from the random roll response. This equation has been shown to resemble the differential equation describing the free rolling motion. The nonlinearities in the free role equation in addition to the linear damping term are lumped in one nonlinear function, F({phi},{dot {phi}}), in the role angle, {phi}, and velocity, {dot {phi}}. A feedforward network with a single hidden layer is then used to identify this general function. The function, F({phi},{dot {phi}}) can be used to identify the parameters in the righting moment using regression techniques. An example for applying this technique using model experiments for a series 60 block 60 model is presented. The agreement between curves predicted using neural network techniques and the actual curves is excellent.

  1. Application of remote sensing techniques for identification of irrigated crop lands in Arizona

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Billings, H. A.

    1981-01-01

    Satellite imagery was used in a project developed to demonstrate remote sensing methods of determining irrigated acreage in Arizona. The Maricopa water district, west of Phoenix, was chosen as the test area. Band rationing and unsupervised categorization were used to perform the inventory. For both techniques the irrigation district boundaries and section lines were digitized and calculated and displayed by section. Both estimation techniques were quite accurate in estimating irrigated acreage in the 1979 growing season.

  2. Whale Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    R:BASE for DOS, a computer program developed under NASA contract, has been adapted by the National Marine Mammal Laboratory and the College of the Atlantic to provide and advanced computerized photo matching technique for identification of humpback whales. The program compares photos with stored digitized descriptions, enabling researchers to track and determine distribution and migration patterns. R:BASE is a spinoff of RIM (Relational Information Manager), which was used to store data for analyzing heat shielding tiles on the Space Shuttle Orbiter. It is now the world's second largest selling line of microcomputer database management software.

  3. Powerful GC-TOF-MS Techniques for Screening, Identification and Quantification of Halogenated Natural Products

    PubMed Central

    S. Haglund, Peter; Löfstrand, Karin; Siek, Kevin; Asplund, Lillemor

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC×GC TOFMS) and gas chromatography/high-resolution time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-HRT) were used to detect and identify halogenated natural products (HNPs) in tissue homogenate, in this case brominated analytes present in a marine snail. Two classes of brominated anthropogenic compounds, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and brominated dibenzofurans, were analyzed for comparison. Following conventional preparation, the sample was analyzed using GC×GC-TOF-MS. Isotope ratio scripts were used to compile a list of putatively brominated analytes from amongst the thousands of features resolved in the two-dimensional chromatogram. The structured nature of the chromatogram was exploited to propose identifications for several classes of brominated compounds, and include additional candidates that fell marginally outside the script tolerances. The sample was subsequently analyzed by GC-HRT. The high-resolution mass spectral data confirmed many formula assignments, facilitated confident assignment of an alternate formula when an original proposal did not hold, and enabled unknown identification. Identified HNPs include hydroxylated and methoxylated PBDE analogs, polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs) and hydroxyl-PBDDs, permitting the environmental occurrence and fate of such compounds to be studied. PMID:24349937

  4. Active control of a flexible smart beam using a system identification technique based on ARMAX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Xiongzhu; Ye, Lin; Su, Zhongqing; Wang, Chunhui

    2003-10-01

    A study on active vibration suppression for a flexible structural beam via a system identification approach was experimentally performed. The beam, incorporating a pair of piezoceramic transducers as actuators and a set of surface-bonded strain gauges as sensors, was evaluated. The relationship between the input control voltage applied on the actuators and the consequently induced strain, measured by the sensor, was then derived. An active control system, considering both the actuators and sensor, was configured using the ARMAX (auto-regressive moving average exogenous) model. A continuous signal with step waveform was selected as the input excitation. A digital-signal-processor-based real-time adaptive vibration control algorithm, supported by Agilent® E1415A, SCPs 1511 and SCPs 1532, was developed, and an algorithm was established using a pole placement control method, so as to achieve the desired closed-loop control. The effectiveness of the ARMAX model was examined by comparing it with the ARX (auto-regression with extra inputs) model. The results show good performance of the ARMAX model for system identification purposes and excellent effectiveness for active structural vibration control.

  5. Identification of 4-deoxythreonic acid present in human urine by combining HPLC and NMR techniques

    PubMed Central

    Appiah-Amponsah, Emmanuel; Shanaiah, Narasimhamurthy; Nagana Gowda, G. A.; Owusu-Sarfo, Kwadwo; Ye, Tao; Raftery, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 1H NMR spectrum of urine exhibits a large number of detectable and quantifiable metabolites and hence urine metabolite profiling is potentially useful for the study of systems biology and the discovery of biomarkers for drug development or clinical applications. While a number of metabolites (50–100) are readily detectable in urine by NMR, a much larger number is potentially available if lower concentration species can be detected unambiguously. Lower concentration metabolites are thought to be more specific to certain disease states and thus it is important to detect these metabolites with certainty. We report the identification of 4-deoxythreonic acid, a relatively low concentration endogenous metabolite that has not been previously identified in the 1H NMR spectrum of human urine. The complimentary use of HPLC and NMR spectroscopy facilitated the unequivocal and non-invasive identification of the molecule in urine which is complicated by extensive peak overlap and multiple, similar resonances from other metabolites such as 3-hydroxybutanoic acid. High-resolution detection and good sensitivity were achieved by the combination of multiple chromatographic fraction collection, sample pre-concentration, and the use of a cryogenically cooled NMR probe. PMID:19615840

  6. A fault identification technique for FBG sensors embedded in composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cazzulani, Gabriele; Cinquemani, Simone; Ronchi, Marco

    2016-05-01

    The paper proposes a method for the identification of sensor faults, that can be applied in those vibration control applications where large arrays of sensors are used. Indeed, distributed measurement proves to be very effective in recognizing and suppressing the contribution of different modes to structure vibrations, but its efficiency is dramatically reduced if one or more sensors do not work correctly. This is the case, for example, of fiber Bragg grating sensor chains. For this reason, a sensor fault identification algorithm is introduced. This method, based on the analysis of the residuals of the measurement estimation, allows to identify different typologies of sensor fault or malfunctioning, such as complete fault or additive and multiplicative measurement errors. Once identified, these sensors can be excluded from the feedback loop of the control algorithm in order to avoid unwanted behaviors or instabilities. Numerical and experimental tests have been carried out on a carbon fiber structure considering different fault conditions. Results show that it is possible to identify the faulty sensors and thus improve the signals used in the feedback loop.

  7. Utilizing Solution Planning Techniques in Science To Enhance Success Patterns in Early Adolescents, Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilbreth, Harold E., Jr.

    Studied were attitude changes as results of instructional procedures for success in problem solving by 350 eighth grade students in two school systems during the 1968-69 school year. Mimeographed instructional materials and techniques incorporating five levels of problem solving difficulty were developed. Procedures for student success…

  8. Social Learning Network Analysis Model to Identify Learning Patterns Using Ontology Clustering Techniques and Meaningful Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firdausiah Mansur, Andi Besse; Yusof, Norazah

    2013-01-01

    Clustering on Social Learning Network still not explored widely, especially when the network focuses on e-learning system. Any conventional methods are not really suitable for the e-learning data. SNA requires content analysis, which involves human intervention and need to be carried out manually. Some of the previous clustering techniques need…

  9. Species identification of Oetzi's clothing with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry based on peptide pattern similarities of hair digests.

    PubMed

    Hollemeyer, Klaus; Altmeyer, Wolfgang; Heinzle, Elmar; Pitra, Christian

    2008-09-01

    Identification of ancient biological samples from the 1991-discovered and more than 5300-year-old Tyrolean mummy, also called iceman or Oetzi, is very difficult. The species of origins of four animal-hair-bearing samples of the accoutrement of the mummy not yet diagnosed were identified by a special proteomics method. Ha 43/91/130 and Ha 6/91, two samples from his coat, and Ha 5/91, a sample from his leggings, were assigned to sheep. The upper leather of his moccasins, Ha 2/91, was made from cattle. Despite the enormous age of these samples with partial (bio)chemical alterations, reliable identification was possible using a recently developed matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometric ((MALDI-TOF MS)-based analytical method. The method is exclusively based on the analysis of proteins and uses minute amounts of peptides directly derived from tryptic hair digests without any separation or enrichment steps. Unknown species are identified by comparison of their peptide ion patterns with known spectra stored in existing databases. Hereby, the correlation distance, a form of Euclidean distance, and deduced parameters are used to measure similarities. If more than one potential hit remains, specific diagnostic peptide ions are used to stepwise exclude incorrect matches. These ions are specific for orders, families, subfamilies/genera and/or even species. Peptide mass fingerprinting data combined with those from collision-induced dissociation spectra (combined MS & MS/MS) were used for interpretation with the MASCOT search engine and the NCBI database to find the potential parentage of hair proteins. For this technique, selected precursor ions were identified as specific diagnostic peptide ions.

  10. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed. PMID:20101970

  11. [Application of Raman spectroscopic technique to the identification and investigation of Chinese ancient jades and jade artifacts].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hong-Xia; Gan, Fu-Xi

    2009-11-01

    Laser Raman spectroscopic technique is one of the essential methods in scientific archaeological research, which belongs to the nondestructive analysis. As a very good nondestructive analysis approach, it has not been widely applied in the research of the Chinese ancient jade artifacts. First of all in the present paper the fundamentals of laser Raman spectroscopic technique and the new research progress in this field were reviewed. Secondly, the Raman spectra of five familiar jades including nephrite (mainly composed of tremolite), Xiuyan Jade (mainly composed of serpentine), Dushan Jade (mainly composed of anorthite and Zoisite), turquoise and lapis lazuli were summarized respectively. As for an example, the Raman spectra of the four Chinese ancient jade artifacts excavated from Liangzhu Site of Zhejiang Province and Yinxu Site of Anyang in Henan Province were compared with that of the nephrite sample in Hetian of Xinjiang Province. It was shown that the Raman spectroscopic technique is a good nondestructive approach to the identification and investigation of the structures and mineral composition of Chinese ancient jade artifacts. Finally, the limitations and the foreground of this technique were discussed.

  12. First occurrence of Beroe forskalii (Ctenophora) in South American Atlantic coastal waters, with notes on the use of macrociliary patterns for beroid identification.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Otto M P; Migotto, Alvaro E

    2014-01-01

    Beroe forskalii Milne Edwards, 1841 is an oceanic ctenophore with a global distribution. The present study provides the first record of Beroe forskalii for the South American Atlantic coast, including a redescription of the species and a discussion on the utility of macrociliary patterns for the correct identification of at least some beroid species, exemplified by a comparison of the macrociliary patterns of Beroe forskalii and Beroe ovata (Chamisso & Eysenhardt, 1821). PMID:24871741

  13. First occurrence of Beroe forskalii (Ctenophora) in South American Atlantic coastal waters, with notes on the use of macrociliary patterns for beroid identification.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Otto M P; Migotto, Alvaro E

    2014-03-18

    Beroe forskalii Milne Edwards, 1841 is an oceanic ctenophore with a global distribution. The present study provides the first record of Beroe forskalii for the South American Atlantic coast, including a redescription of the species and a discussion on the utility of macrociliary patterns for the correct identification of at least some beroid species, exemplified by a comparison of the macrociliary patterns of Beroe forskalii and Beroe ovata (Chamisso & Eysenhardt, 1821).

  14. Spectral pattern classification in lidar data for rock identification in outcrops.

    PubMed

    Campos Inocencio, Leonardo; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Wohnrath Tognoli, Francisco Manoel; de Souza, Marcelo Kehl; da Silva, Reginaldo Macedônio; Jr, Luiz Gonzaga; Blum Silveira, César Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop and implement a method for detection and classification of spectral signatures in point clouds obtained from terrestrial laser scanner in order to identify the presence of different rocks in outcrops and to generate a digital outcrop model. To achieve this objective, a software based on cluster analysis was created, named K-Clouds. This software was developed through a partnership between UNISINOS and the company V3D. This tool was designed to begin with an analysis and interpretation of a histogram from a point cloud of the outcrop and subsequently indication of a number of classes provided by the user, to process the intensity return values. This classified information can then be interpreted by geologists, to provide a better understanding and identification from the existing rocks in the outcrop. Beyond the detection of different rocks, this work was able to detect small changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the rocks, as they were caused by weathering or compositional changes.

  15. Spectral Pattern Classification in Lidar Data for Rock Identification in Outcrops

    PubMed Central

    Campos Inocencio, Leonardo; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Wohnrath Tognoli, Francisco Manoel; de Souza, Marcelo Kehl; da Silva, Reginaldo Macedônio; Jr, Luiz Gonzaga; Blum Silveira, César Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop and implement a method for detection and classification of spectral signatures in point clouds obtained from terrestrial laser scanner in order to identify the presence of different rocks in outcrops and to generate a digital outcrop model. To achieve this objective, a software based on cluster analysis was created, named K-Clouds. This software was developed through a partnership between UNISINOS and the company V3D. This tool was designed to begin with an analysis and interpretation of a histogram from a point cloud of the outcrop and subsequently indication of a number of classes provided by the user, to process the intensity return values. This classified information can then be interpreted by geologists, to provide a better understanding and identification from the existing rocks in the outcrop. Beyond the detection of different rocks, this work was able to detect small changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the rocks, as they were caused by weathering or compositional changes. PMID:24701176

  16. Spectral pattern classification in lidar data for rock identification in outcrops.

    PubMed

    Campos Inocencio, Leonardo; Veronez, Mauricio Roberto; Wohnrath Tognoli, Francisco Manoel; de Souza, Marcelo Kehl; da Silva, Reginaldo Macedônio; Jr, Luiz Gonzaga; Blum Silveira, César Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop and implement a method for detection and classification of spectral signatures in point clouds obtained from terrestrial laser scanner in order to identify the presence of different rocks in outcrops and to generate a digital outcrop model. To achieve this objective, a software based on cluster analysis was created, named K-Clouds. This software was developed through a partnership between UNISINOS and the company V3D. This tool was designed to begin with an analysis and interpretation of a histogram from a point cloud of the outcrop and subsequently indication of a number of classes provided by the user, to process the intensity return values. This classified information can then be interpreted by geologists, to provide a better understanding and identification from the existing rocks in the outcrop. Beyond the detection of different rocks, this work was able to detect small changes in the physical-chemical characteristics of the rocks, as they were caused by weathering or compositional changes. PMID:24701176

  17. Fusing modeling techniques to support domain analysis for reuse opportunities identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Susan Main; Mcguire, Eileen

    1993-01-01

    Functional modeling techniques or object-oriented graphical representations, which are more useful to someone trying to understand the general design or high level requirements of a system? For a recent domain analysis effort, the answer was a fusion of popular modeling techniques of both types. By using both functional and object-oriented techniques, the analysts involved were able to lean on their experience in function oriented software development, while taking advantage of the descriptive power available in object oriented models. In addition, a base of familiar modeling methods permitted the group of mostly new domain analysts to learn the details of the domain analysis process while producing a quality product. This paper describes the background of this project and then provides a high level definition of domain analysis. The majority of this paper focuses on the modeling method developed and utilized during this analysis effort.

  18. Pattern matching techniques for correcting low-confidence OCR words in a known context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ford, Glenn; Hauser, Susan E.; Le, Daniel X.; Thoma, George R.

    2000-12-01

    A commercial OCR system is a key component of a system developed at the National Library of Medicine for the automated extraction of bibliographic fields from biomedical journals. This 5-engine OCR system, while exhibiting high performance overall, does not reliably convert very small characters, especially those that are in italics. As a result, the 'affiliations' field that typically contains such characters in most journals, is not captured accurately, and requires a disproportionately high manual input. To correct this problem, dictionaries have been created from words occurring in this field (e.g., university, department, street addresses, names of cities, etc.) from 230,000 articles already processed. The OCR output corresponding to the affiliation field is then matched against these dictionary entries by approximate string-matching techniques, and the ranked matches are presented to operators for verification. This paper outlines the techniques employed and the results of a comparative evaluation.

  19. Spatial patterns of historical temperature variability: Global correlations using spectral and wavelet techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Park, J.

    1995-12-31

    In order to assess man`s impact on global climate, we need to understand natural climate variability more fully. Using 100 years of global temperature data, we have developed time-series methods that identify coherent spatio-temporal {open_quotes}modes{close_quotes} of temperature variability e.g., El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) cycles. Methods based on multiple-taper spectral analysis estimate the correlated temperature variability within narrow frequency bands. Methods based on a multiple wavelet analysis identify short-term global temperature {open_quotes}events{close_quotes} on a range of time scales. We assess the statistical significance of narrow-band and event correlations from Monte Carlo confidence limits, which are derived from stochastic variations of uncorrelated white-noise time series. Significant patterns of variability with 2.8 to 5.7 year duration exhibit the characteristic ENSO pattern: warming in the tropics, followed by temperature excursions in middle latitudes. An interdecadal mode (15-18 years) appears to represent long-term ENSO variability, an interpretation supported by the persistence of warm Pacific Ocean surface water in the decade after the large 1982-3 El Nino episode. The interdecadal mode appears to explain much of the anomalous global warmth of the 1980s. North Atlantic variability dominates quasi-biennial (2.2 years) and decadal (7-12 years) modes.

  20. Capillary zone electrophoresis: an additional technique for the identification of hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Lin, C; Cotton, F; Fontaine, B; Gulbis, B; Janssens, J; Vertongen, F

    1999-05-01

    Two capillary zone electrophoresis kits (Hb A2 and Hb A1c) were tested for confirmation and identification of hemoglobin variants. The capillary zone electrophoresis experiments were performed at pH 4.7 (Hb A1c kit) and 8.7 (Hb A2 kit) in a 24 cm uncoated fused silica capillary tube (25 microm I.D.). Normal hemoglobins and common hemoglobin variants, including Hbs S, D-Punjab, C, E, O-Arab, and G-Philadelphia, were successfully separated by both methods within a few minutes. Both systems provided completely different elution profiles of normal and abnormal hemoglobin fractions tested and were complementary. The inter-assay coefficient of variations of the migration times of hemoglobin variants were less than 1.0 and 1.3% by the Hb A2 and Hb A1c, respectively. This permits a higher resolution of some hemoglobin variants in low concentrations, like Hb S in newborns, compared with conventional electrophoresis methods. The present capillary zone electrophoresis methods are sensitive, rapid, not labor intensive, and highly selective for the separation of hemoglobin variants. Combination of both methods with some conventional methods, such as isoelectrofocusing, allows identification of Hbs C, E, O-Arab, S, and D-Punjab, as well as their quantification. We have demonstrated that the conventional electrophoresis methods (electrophoresis at pH 6.5 in citrate agar gel and electrophoresis at pH 8.6 on cellulose acetate) can be advantageously replaced by the present capillary zone electrophoresis methods in a clinical laboratory practice for the detection and quantification of hemoglobin variants. PMID:10335978

  1. Identification of sources of tar balls deposited along the Southwest Caspian Coast, Iran using fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Shirneshan, Golshan; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Memariani, Mahmoud

    2016-10-15

    In 2012, a significant number of tar balls occurred along the Southwest coasts of the Caspian Sea (Iran). Several oil fields of Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan and Iran might be sources of oil spills and lead to the formation of these tar balls. For source identification, 6 tar ball samples were collected from the Southwest beaches of the Caspian Sea and subjected to fingerprint analysis based on the distribution of the source-specific biomarkers of pentacyclic tri-terpanes and steranes. Comparing the diagenic ratios revealed that the tar balls were chemically similar and originated from the same source. Results of double ratio plots (e.g., C29/C30 versus ∑C31-C35/C30 and C28 αββ/(C27 αββ+C29 αββ) versus C29 αββ/(C27 αββ+C28 αββ)) in the tar balls and oils from Iran, Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan indicated that the tar balls might be the result of spills from Turkmenistan oil. Moreover, principle component analysis (PCA) using biomarker ratios on the tar balls and 20 crude oil samples from different wells of Azerbaijan, Iran and Turkmenistan oils showed that the tar balls collected at the Southwest beaches are highly similar to the Turkmenistan oil but one of the Azerbaijan oils (from Bahar field oils) was found to be also slightly close to the tar balls. The weathering characterizations based on the presence of UCM (unresolved complex mixture) and low/high molecular weight ratios (L/H) of alkanes and PAHs indicated the tar ball samples have been significantly influenced by natural weathering processes such as evaporation, photo-degradation and biodegradation. This is the first study of its kind in Iran to use fingerprinting for source identification of tar balls.

  2. Identification of sources of tar balls deposited along the Southwest Caspian Coast, Iran using fingerprinting techniques.

    PubMed

    Shirneshan, Golshan; Bakhtiari, Alireza Riyahi; Memariani, Mahmoud

    2016-10-15

    In 2012, a significant number of tar balls occurred along the Southwest coasts of the Caspian Sea (Iran). Several oil fields of Turkmenistan, Azerbaijan and Iran might be sources of oil spills and lead to the formation of these tar balls. For source identification, 6 tar ball samples were collected from the Southwest beaches of the Caspian Sea and subjected to fingerprint analysis based on the distribution of the source-specific biomarkers of pentacyclic tri-terpanes and steranes. Comparing the diagenic ratios revealed that the tar balls were chemically similar and originated from the same source. Results of double ratio plots (e.g., C29/C30 versus ∑C31-C35/C30 and C28 αββ/(C27 αββ+C29 αββ) versus C29 αββ/(C27 αββ+C28 αββ)) in the tar balls and oils from Iran, Turkmenistan and Azerbaijan indicated that the tar balls might be the result of spills from Turkmenistan oil. Moreover, principle component analysis (PCA) using biomarker ratios on the tar balls and 20 crude oil samples from different wells of Azerbaijan, Iran and Turkmenistan oils showed that the tar balls collected at the Southwest beaches are highly similar to the Turkmenistan oil but one of the Azerbaijan oils (from Bahar field oils) was found to be also slightly close to the tar balls. The weathering characterizations based on the presence of UCM (unresolved complex mixture) and low/high molecular weight ratios (L/H) of alkanes and PAHs indicated the tar ball samples have been significantly influenced by natural weathering processes such as evaporation, photo-degradation and biodegradation. This is the first study of its kind in Iran to use fingerprinting for source identification of tar balls. PMID:27369093

  3. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Tbeodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modem three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  4. Identification of Linear and Nonlinear Aerodynamic Impulse Responses Using Digital Filter Techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silva, Walter A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper discusses the mathematical existence and the numerically-correct identification of linear and nonlinear aerodynamic impulse response functions. Differences between continuous-time and discrete-time system theories, which permit the identification and efficient use of these functions, will be detailed. Important input/output definitions and the concept of linear and nonlinear systems with memory will also be discussed. It will be shown that indicial (step or steady) responses (such as Wagner's function), forced harmonic responses (such as Theodorsen's function or those from doublet lattice theory), and responses to random inputs (such as gusts) can all be obtained from an aerodynamic impulse response function. This paper establishes the aerodynamic impulse response function as the most fundamental, and, therefore, the most computationally efficient, aerodynamic function that can be extracted from any given discrete-time, aerodynamic system. The results presented in this paper help to unify the understanding of classical two-dimensional continuous-time theories with modern three-dimensional, discrete-time theories. First, the method is applied to the nonlinear viscous Burger's equation as an example. Next the method is applied to a three-dimensional aeroelastic model using the CAP-TSD (Computational Aeroelasticity Program - Transonic Small Disturbance) code and then to a two-dimensional model using the CFL3D Navier-Stokes code. Comparisons of accuracy and computational cost savings are presented. Because of its mathematical generality, an important attribute of this methodology is that it is applicable to a wide range of nonlinear, discrete-time problems.

  5. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation.

  6. Comparison of restriction enzyme pattern analysis and full gene sequencing of 16S rRNA gene for Nocardia species identification, the first report of Nocardia transvalensis isolated of sputum from Iran, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fatahi-Bafghi, Mehdi; Heidarieh, Parvin; Rasouli-Nasab, Masoumeh; Habibnia, Shadi; Hashemi-Shahraki, Abdorazagh; Eshraghi, Seyyed Saeed

    2016-10-01

    Nocardial infections occur in different organs of the body and are common in immune disorder diseases of individuals. The aim of this study was to assess Nocardia species identification by phenotypic tests and molecular techniques applied to nocardiosis in Iranian patients. In the current study, various clinical samples were collected and cultured on conventional media and using the paraffin baiting method. Various phenotypic tests were performed. For accurate identification at the species level, restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLP) in the hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes and full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene were used. Twenty-seven Nocardia spp. were isolated and analysis of phenotypic tests results showed Nocardia asteroides complex, Nocardia otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia nova, and Nocardia spp. New RFLP patterns of Nocardia strains with hsp65 and partial 16S rRNA genes were obtained. Full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene identified Nocardia cyriacigeorgica, N. otitidiscaviarum, Nocardia farcinica, Nocardia transvalensis, and N. nova. Nocardia infections are rarely reported and this genus is the cause of various illnesses. Accurate identification of Nocardia spp. is important for epidemiology studies and treatment. It should also be noted that some species may have similar RFLP patterns; therefore, full gene sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is necessary for confirmation. PMID:27613736

  7. Most Frequent Errors in Judo Uki Goshi Technique and the Existing Relations among Them Analysed through T-Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, Alfonso; Prieto, Iván; Cancela, José M.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to provide a tool, based on the knowledge of technical errors, which helps to improve the teaching and learning process of the Uki Goshi technique. With this aim, we set out to determine the most frequent errors made by 44 students when performing this technique and how these mistakes relate. In order to do so, an observational analysis was carried out using the OSJUDO-UKG instrument and the data were registered using Match Vision Studio (Castellano, Perea, Alday and Hernández, 2008). The results, analyzed through descriptive statistics, show that the absence of a correct initial unbalancing movement (45,5%), the lack of proper right-arm pull (56,8%), not blocking the faller’s body (Uke) against the thrower’s hip -Tori- (54,5%) and throwing the Uke through the Tori’s side are the most usual mistakes (72,7%). Through the sequencial analysis of T-Patterns obtained with the THÈME program (Magnusson, 1996, 2000) we have concluded that not blocking the body with the Tori’s hip provokes the Uke’s throw through the Tori’s side during the final phase of the technique (95,8%), and positioning the right arm on the dorsal region of the Uke’s back during the Tsukuri entails the absence of a subsequent pull of the Uke’s body (73,3%). Key Points In this study, the most frequent errors in the performance of the Uki Goshi technique have been determined and the existing relations among these mistakes have been shown through T-Patterns. The SOBJUDO-UKG is an observation instrument for detecting mistakes in the aforementioned technique. The results show that those mistakes related to the initial imbalancing movement and the main driving action of the technique are the most frequent. The use of T-Patterns turns out to be effective in order to obtain the most important relations among the observed errors. PMID:24474885

  8. Computer identification of musical instruments using pattern recognition with cepstral coefficients as features.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C

    1999-03-01

    Cepstral coefficients based on a constant Q transform have been calculated for 28 short (1-2 s) oboe sounds and 52 short saxophone sounds. These were used as features in a pattern analysis to determine for each of these sounds comprising the test set whether it belongs to the oboe or to the sax class. The training set consisted of longer sounds of 1 min or more for each of the instruments. A k-means algorithm was used to calculate clusters for the training data, and Gaussian probability density functions were formed from the mean and variance of each of the clusters. Each member of the test set was then analyzed to determine the probability that it belonged to each of the two classes; and a Bayes decision rule was invoked to assign it to one of the classes. Results have been extremely good and are compared to a human perception experiment identifying a subset of these same sounds.

  9. Computer identification of musical instruments using pattern recognition with cepstral coefficients as features.

    PubMed

    Brown, J C

    1999-03-01

    Cepstral coefficients based on a constant Q transform have been calculated for 28 short (1-2 s) oboe sounds and 52 short saxophone sounds. These were used as features in a pattern analysis to determine for each of these sounds comprising the test set whether it belongs to the oboe or to the sax class. The training set consisted of longer sounds of 1 min or more for each of the instruments. A k-means algorithm was used to calculate clusters for the training data, and Gaussian probability density functions were formed from the mean and variance of each of the clusters. Each member of the test set was then analyzed to determine the probability that it belonged to each of the two classes; and a Bayes decision rule was invoked to assign it to one of the classes. Results have been extremely good and are compared to a human perception experiment identifying a subset of these same sounds. PMID:10089614

  10. Analyzing ChIP-seq data: preprocessing, normalization, differential identification, and binding pattern characterization.

    PubMed

    Taslim, Cenny; Huang, Kun; Huang, Tim; Lin, Shili

    2012-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by sequencing (ChIP-seq) is a high-throughput antibody-based method to study genome-wide protein-DNA binding interactions. ChIP-seq technology allows scientist to obtain more accurate data providing genome-wide coverage with less starting material and in shorter time compared to older ChIP-chip experiments. Herein we describe a step-by-step guideline in analyzing ChIP-seq data including data preprocessing, nonlinear normalization to enable comparison between different samples and experiments, statistical-based method to identify differential binding sites using mixture modeling and local false discovery rates (fdrs), and binding pattern characterization. In addition, we provide a sample analysis of ChIP-seq data using the steps provided in the guideline.

  11. Identification of genes from pattern formation, tyrosine kinase, and potassium channel families by DNA amplification

    SciTech Connect

    Kamb, A.; Weir, M.; Rudy, B.; Varmus, H.; Kenyon, C. )

    1989-06-01

    The study of gene family members has been aided by the isolation of related genes on the basis of DNA homology. The authors have adapted the polymerase chain reaction to screen animal genomes very rapidly and reliably for likely gene family members. Using conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers, they have shown that the genome of the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans contains sequences homologous to many Drosophila genes involved in pattern formation, including the segment polarity gene wingless (vertebrate int-1), and homeobox sequences characteristic of the Antennapedia, engrailed, and paired families. In addition, they have used this method to show that C. elegans contains at least five different sequences homologous to genes in the tyrosine kinase family. Lastly, they have isolated six potassium channel sequences from humans, a result that validates the utility of the method with large genomes and suggests that human potassium channel gene diversity may be extensive.

  12. Identification of flow patterns by neutron noise analysis during actual coolant boiling in thin rectangular channels

    SciTech Connect

    Kozma, R.; van Dam, H.; Hoogenboom, J.E. )

    1992-10-01

    The primary objective of this paper is to introduce results of coolant boiling experiments in a simulated materials test reactor-type fuel assembly with plate fuel in an actual reactor environment. The experiments have been performed in the Hoger Onderwijs Reactor (HOR) research reactor at the Interfaculty Reactor Institute, Delft, The Netherlands. In the analysis, noise signals of self-powered neutron detectors located in the neighborhood of the boiling region and thermocouple in the channel wall and in the coolant are used. Flow patterns in the boiling coolant have been identified by means of analysis of probability density functions and power spectral densities of neutron noise. It is shown that boiling has an oscillating character due to partial channel blockage caused by steam slugs generated periodically between the plates. The observed phenomenon can serve as a basis for a boiling detection method in reactors with plate-type fuels.

  13. Identification and quantification of stress concentrations in ferroelectrics using Kikuchi pattern indexing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacLaren, I.; Schmitt, L. A.; Fuess, H.; Kungl, H.; Hoffmann, M. J.

    2006-02-01

    Transmission electron microscopy has been used to investigate the junction between two lamellar bands in a tetragonal lead zirconate titanate (PZT) ceramic. It is found that significant bending occurs in the area due to the matching of different domains on <101> planes. Analysis of CBED patterns shows that the orientation relationships between the long boundaries between lamellae is much as expected and allows quantification of local c/a ratios. The short boundaries at the band junction, however, are highly stressed and deviate significantly from ideal misorientation values. This reveals that the areas between the 4- domain junctions in the band junction are highly stressed with peak stresses in the GPa range, which are highly likely to function as the source of microcracks under the additional strains found in device application.

  14. Identification of tumor evolution patterns by means of inductive logic programming.

    PubMed

    Bevilacqua, Vitoantonio; Chiarappa, Patrizia; Mastronardi, Giuseppe; Menolascina, Filippo; Paradiso, Angelo; Tommasi, Stefania

    2008-06-01

    In considering key events of genomic disorders in the development and progression of cancer, the correlation between genomic instability and carcinogenesis is currently under investigation. In this work, we propose an inductive logic programming approach to the problem of modeling evolution patterns for breast cancer. Using this approach, it is possible to extract fingerprints of stages of the disease that can be used in order to develop and deliver the most adequate therapies to patients. Furthermore, such a model can help physicians and biologists in the elucidation of molecular dynamics underlying the aberrations-waterfall model behind carcinogenesis. By showing results obtained on a real-world dataset, we try to give some hints about further approach to the knowledge-driven validations of such hypotheses.

  15. Identification of lncRNA-associated competing triplets reveals global patterns and prognostic markers for cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Ning, Shangwei; Zhang, Yunpeng; Li, Ronghong; Ye, Jingrun; Zhao, Zuxianglan; Zhi, Hui; Wang, Tingting; Guo, Zheng; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) can interact with microRNAs (miRNAs) and indirectly regulate miRNA targets though competing interactions. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these interactions are still largely unknown. In this study, these lncRNA–miRNA–gene interactions were defined as lncRNA-associated competing triplets (LncACTs), and an integrated pipeline was developed to identify lncACTs that are active in cancer. Competing lncRNAs had sponge features distinct from non-competing lncRNAs. In the lncACT cross-talk network, disease-associated lncRNAs, miRNAs and coding-genes showed specific topological patterns indicative of their competence and control of communication within the network. The construction of global competing activity profiles revealed that lncACTs had high activity specific to cancers. Analyses of clustered lncACTs revealed that they were enriched in various cancer-related biological processes. Based on the global cross-talk network and cluster analyses, nine cancer-specific sub-networks were constructed. H19- and BRCA1/2-associated lncACTs were able to discriminate between two groups of patients with different clinical outcomes. Disease-associated lncACTs also showed variable competing patterns across normal and cancer patient samples. In summary, this study uncovered and systematically characterized global properties of human lncACTs that may have prognostic value for predicting clinical outcome in cancer patients. PMID:25800746

  16. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants. PMID:27625661

  17. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants.

  18. Evolutionary characterization of Tembusu virus infection through identification of codon usage patterns.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hao; Yan, Bing; Chen, Shun; Wang, Mingshu; Jia, Renyong; Cheng, Anchun

    2015-10-01

    Tembusu virus (TMUV) is a single-stranded, positive-sense RNA virus. As reported, TMUV infection has resulted in significant poultry losses, and the virus may also pose a threat to public health. To characterize TMUV evolutionarily and to understand the factors accounting for codon usage properties, we performed, for the first time, a comprehensive analysis of codon usage bias for the genomes of 60 TMUV strains. The most recently published TMUV strains were found to be widely distributed in coastal cities of southeastern China. Codon preference among TMUV genomes exhibits a low bias (effective number of codons (ENC)=53.287) and is maintained at a stable level. ENC-GC3 plots and the high correlation between composition constraints and principal component factor analysis of codon usage demonstrated that mutation pressure dominates over natural selection pressure in shaping the TMUV coding sequence composition. The high correlation between the major components of the codon usage pattern and hydrophobicity (Gravy) or aromaticity (Aromo) was obvious, indicating that properties of viral proteins also account for the observed variation in TMUV codon usage. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that CQW1 isolated from Chongqing may have evolved from GX2013H or GX2013G isolated from Guangxi, thus indicating that TMUV likely disseminated from southeastern China to the mainland. Moreover, the preferred codons encoding eight amino acids were consistent with the optimal codons for human cells, indicating that TMUV may pose a threat to public health due to possible cross-species transmission (birds to birds or birds to humans). The results of this study not only have theoretical value for uncovering the characteristics of synonymous codon usage patterns in TMUV genomes but also have significant meaning with regard to the molecular evolutionary tendencies of TMUV. PMID:26205688

  19. The SOD Gene Family in Tomato: Identification, Phylogenetic Relationships, and Expression Patterns.

    PubMed

    Feng, Kun; Yu, Jiahong; Cheng, Yuan; Ruan, Meiying; Wang, Rongqing; Ye, Qingjing; Zhou, Guozhi; Li, Zhimiao; Yao, Zhuping; Yang, Yuejian; Zheng, Qingsong; Wan, Hongjian

    2016-01-01

    Superoxide dismutases (SODs) are critical antioxidant enzymes that protect organisms from reactive oxygen species (ROS) caused by adverse conditions, and have been widely found in the cytoplasm, chloroplasts, and mitochondria of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) is an important economic crop and is cultivated worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stresses severely hinder growth and development of the plant, which affects the production and quality of the crop. To reveal the potential roles of SOD genes under various stresses, we performed a systematic analysis of the tomato SOD gene family and analyzed the expression patterns of SlSOD genes in response to abiotic stresses at the whole-genome level. The characteristics of the SlSOD gene family were determined by analyzing gene structure, conserved motifs, chromosomal distribution, phylogenetic relationships, and expression patterns. We determined that there are at least nine SOD genes in tomato, including four Cu/ZnSODs, three FeSODs, and one MnSOD, and they are unevenly distributed on 12 chromosomes. Phylogenetic analyses of SOD genes from tomato and other plant species were separated into two groups with a high bootstrap value, indicating that these SOD genes were present before the monocot-dicot split. Additionally, many cis-elements that respond to different stresses were found in the promoters of nine SlSOD genes. Gene expression analysis based on RNA-seq data showed that most genes were expressed in all tested tissues, with the exception of SlSOD6 and SlSOD8, which were only expressed in young fruits. Microarray data analysis showed that most members of the SlSOD gene family were altered under salt- and drought-stress conditions. This genome-wide analysis of SlSOD genes helps to clarify the function of SlSOD genes under different stress conditions and provides information to aid in further understanding the evolutionary relationships of SOD genes in plants. PMID:27625661

  20. IDENTIFICATION OF SOURCES OF GROUND-WATER SALINIZA- TION USING GEOCHEMICAL TECHNIQUES

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report deals with salt-water sources that commonly mix and deteriorate fresh ground water. It reviews characteristics of salt-water sources and geochemical techniques that can be used to identify these sources after mixing has occurred. The report is designed to assist inves...

  1. Rapid Screening and Species Identification of E. Coli, Listeria, and Salmonella by SERS Technique

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Techniques for routine and rapid screening of the presence of foodborne bacteria are needed, and this study reports the feasibility of citrate-reduced silver colloidal SERS for identifying E. coli, Listeria, and Salmonella. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal susp...

  2. Modal shape identification of large structure exposed to wind excitation by operational modal analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vivo, A.; Brutti, C.; Leofanti, J. L.

    2013-08-01

    Research efforts during recent decades qualify Operational Modal Analysis (OMA) as an interesting tool that is able to identify the modal characteristic parameters of structures excited randomly by environmental loads, eliminating the problem of measuring the external exciting forces. In this paper, an existing OMA technique, the Natural Excitation Technique (NExT) was studied and implemented in order to achieve, from the wind force, the modal parameters of Vega Launcher, the new European launcher vehicle for small and medium satellites. Following a brief summary of the fundamental equations of the method, the modal parameters of Vega are calculated using the OMA technique; the results are then compared with those achieved using a traditional Experimental Modal Analysis under excitation induced by shakers. The comparison shows there is a very good agreement between the results obtained by the two different methods, OMA and the traditional experimental analysis, proving that OMA is a reliable tool to analyse the dynamic behaviour of large structures. Finally, this approach can be used for any type of large structure in civil and mechanical fields and the technique appears to be very promising for further applications.

  3. Diagnostic use of 3 techniques for identification of microsporidian spores among AIDS patients in Portugal.

    PubMed

    Matos, Olga; Lobo, Maria L; Gonçalves, Luzia; Antunes, Francisco

    2002-01-01

    The calcofluor stain (CF), the monoclonal antibody (MAb) 3B6 indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) and the modified trichrome blue stain (MT) were compared in terms of their reproducibility in a routine laboratory and in order to evaluate the percentage of cases of microsporidiosis in Portuguese HIV patients. A total of 166 faeces samples, 71 pulmonary specimens and 43 urine samples were studied using the 3 techniques. CF had a high sensitivity and a moderate specificity when applied to faeces samples. The sensitivity was lower with pulmonary specimens. The method is easy and quick to perform but readings take a long time to obtain. The MAb 3B6 IFA had a good to excellent sensitivity when applied to faeces and urine samples, but moderate sensitivity in pulmonary specimens. Readings were quick and easy to obtain, but the assay took longer to perform than the other 2 techniques. There was a greater correlation between the results obtained with the MT and MAb 3B6 IFA techniques than between those obtained with the MT and CF techniques. In conclusion, the MT performed better than the MAb 3B6 IFA and CF and continues to have an important place in a routine laboratory for the diagnosis of microsporidiosis. This work also confirms the existence of a relatively high proportion (30%) of cases of infection with Microsporidia, especially intestinal microsporidiosis, in HIV patients in Portugal.

  4. Pattern recognition using versatile hybrid joint transform correlators: some techniques for improving the performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, G. S.; Singh, Kehar

    1999-04-01

    This paper reports the outcome of research studies carried out by us in the area of Optical Pattern Recognition. A hybrid JTC architecture has been used to evaluate correlation performance of four different types of JTCs in a non-cooperative situation. A non-zero order JTC has been proposed based on the principle of differential processing of joint power spectrum and its sensitivity to illumination variation has been investigated. A hybrid wavelet transform based JTC has been proposed and demonstrated to achieve high image discrimination. Hartley transform has been introduced in joint-transform correlation. Chirp modulation in HJTC has been demonstrated to extract information on object correlation and absolute object position from correlation output. A discrimination sensitive rotation-invariant JTC has been proposed based on gradient preprocessing and circular harmonic decomposition.

  5. Processing of surface EMG through pattern recognition techniques aimed at classifying shoulder joint movements.

    PubMed

    Rivela, Diletta; Scannella, Alessia; Pavan, Esteban E; Frigo, Carlo A; Belluco, Paolo; Gini, Giuseppina

    2015-01-01

    Artificial arms for shoulder disarticulation need a high number of degrees of freedom to be controlled. In order to control a prosthetic shoulder joint, an intention detection system based on surface electromyography (sEMG) pattern recognition methods was proposed and experimentally investigated. Signals from eight trunk muscles that are generally preserved after shoulder disarticulation were recorded from a group of eight normal subjects in nine shoulder positions. After data segmentation, four different features were extracted (sample entropy, cepstral coefficients of the 4th order, root mean square and waveform length) and classified by means of linear discriminant analysis. The classification accuracy was 92.1% and this performance reached 97.9% after reducing the positions considered to five classes. To reduce the computational cost, the two channels with the least discriminating information were neglected yielding to a classification accuracy diminished by just 4.08%. PMID:26736704

  6. Pattern recognition techniques for automatic detection of suspicious-looking anomalies in mammograms.

    PubMed

    Arodź, Tomasz; Kurdziel, Marcin; Sevre, Erik O D; Yuen, David A

    2005-08-01

    We have employed two pattern recognition methods used commonly for face recognition in order to analyse digital mammograms. The methods are based on novel classification schemes, the AdaBoost and the support vector machines (SVM). A number of tests have been carried out to evaluate the accuracy of these two algorithms under different circumstances. Results for the AdaBoost classifier method are promising, especially for classifying mass-type lesions. In the best case the algorithm achieved accuracy of 76% for all lesion types and 90% for masses only. The SVM based algorithm did not perform as well. In order to achieve a higher accuracy for this method, we should choose image features that are better suited for analysing digital mammograms than the currently used ones. PMID:15925425

  7. Developing a complex independent component analysis technique to extract non-stationary patterns from geophysical time-series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forootan, Ehsan; Kusche, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Geodetic/geophysical observations, such as the time series of global terrestrial water storage change or sea level and temperature change, represent samples of physical processes and therefore contain information about complex physical interactionswith many inherent time scales. Extracting relevant information from these samples, for example quantifying the seasonality of a physical process or its variability due to large-scale ocean-atmosphere interactions, is not possible by rendering simple time series approaches. In the last decades, decomposition techniques have found increasing interest for extracting patterns from geophysical observations. Traditionally, principal component analysis (PCA) and more recently independent component analysis (ICA) are common techniques to extract statistical orthogonal (uncorrelated) and independent modes that represent the maximum variance of observations, respectively. PCA and ICA can be classified as stationary signal decomposition techniques since they are based on decomposing the auto-covariance matrix or diagonalizing higher (than two)-order statistical tensors from centered time series. However, the stationary assumption is obviously not justifiable for many geophysical and climate variables even after removing cyclic components e.g., the seasonal cycles. In this paper, we present a new decomposition method, the complex independent component analysis (CICA, Forootan, PhD-2014), which can be applied to extract to non-stationary (changing in space and time) patterns from geophysical time series. Here, CICA is derived as an extension of real-valued ICA (Forootan and Kusche, JoG-2012), where we (i) define a new complex data set using a Hilbert transformation. The complex time series contain the observed values in their real part, and the temporal rate of variability in their imaginary part. (ii) An ICA algorithm based on diagonalization of fourth-order cumulants is then applied to decompose the new complex data set in (i

  8. Fast discrimination of traditional Chinese medicine according to geographical origins with FTIR spectroscopy and advanced pattern recognition techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ning; Wang, Yan; Xu, Kexin

    2006-08-01

    Combined with Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and three kinds of pattern recognition techniques, 53 traditional Chinese medicine danshen samples were rapidly discriminated according to geographical origins. The results showed that it was feasible to discriminate using FTIR spectroscopy ascertained by principal component analysis (PCA). An effective model was built by employing the Soft Independent Modeling of Class Analogy (SIMCA) and PCA, and 82% of the samples were discriminated correctly. Through use of the artificial neural network (ANN)-based back propagation (BP) network, the origins of danshen were completely classified.

  9. Investigation of gunshot residue patterns using milli-XRF-techniques: first experiences in casework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumacher, Rüdiger; Barth, Martin; Neimke, Dieter; Niewöhner, Ludwig

    2010-06-01

    The investigation of gunshot residue (GSR) patterns for shooting range estimation is usually based on visualizing the lead, copper, or nitrocellulose distributions on targets like fabric or adhesive tape by chemographic color tests. The method usually provides good results but has its drawbacks when it comes to the examination of ammunition containing lead-free primers or bloody clothing. A milli-X-ray fluorescence (m-XRF) spectrometer with a large motorized stage can help to circumvent these problems allowing the acquisition of XRF mappings of relatively large areas (up to 20 x 20 cm) in millimeter resolution within reasonable time (2-10 hours) for almost all elements. First experiences in GSR casework at the Forensic Science Institute of the Bundeskriminalamt (BKA) have shown, that m-XRF is a useful supplementation for conventional methods in shooting ranges estimation, which helps if there are problems in transferring a GSR pattern to secondary targets (e.g. bloody or stained garments) or if there is no suitable color test available for the element of interest. The resulting elemental distributions are a good estimate for the shooting range and can be evaluated by calculating radial distributions or integrated count rates of irregular shaped regions like pieces of human skin which are too small to be investigated with a conventional WD-XRF spectrometer. Beside a mapping mode the milli-XRF offers also point and line scan modes which can also be utilized in gunshot crime investigations as a quick survey tool to identify bullet holes based on the elements present in the wipe ring.

  10. Multidetection Of Anabolic Androgenic Steroids Using Immunoarrays and Pattern Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Calvo, D.; Salvador, J. P.; Tort, N.; Centi, F.; Marco, M. P.; Marco, S.

    2009-05-01

    A first step towards the multidetection of anabolic androgenic steroids by Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) has been performed in this study. This proposal combines an array of classical ELISA assays with different selectivities and multivariate data analysis techniques. Data has been analyzed by principal component analysis in conjunction with a k-nearest line classifier has been used. This proposal allows to detect simultaneously four different compounds in the range of concentration from 10-1.5 to 103 mM with a total rate of 90.6% of correct detection.

  11. Technique for measuring cooling patterns in ion source grids by infrared scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Grisham, L.R.; Eubank, H.P.; Kugel, H.W.

    1980-02-01

    Many plasma sources designed for neutral beam injection heating of plasmas now employ copper beam acceleration grids which are water-cooled by small capillary tubes fed from one or more headers. To prevent thermally-induced warpage of these grids it is essential that one be able to detect inhomogeneities in the cooling. Due to the very strong thermal coupling between adjacent cooling lines and the concomitant rapid equilibration times, it is not practical to make such measurements in a direct manner with a contact thermometer. We have developed a technique whereby we send a burst of hot water through an initially cool grid, followed by a burst of cool water, and record the transient thermal behavior usng an infrared television camera. This technique, which would be useful for any system with cooling paths that are strongly coupled thermally, has been applied to a number of sources built for the PLT and PDX tokamaks, and has proven highly effective in locating cooling deficiencies and blocked capillary tubes.

  12. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes. PMID:26216133

  13. A Historical Perspective on the Identification of Cell Types in Pancreatic Islets of Langerhans by Staining and Histochemical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Baskin, Denis G

    2015-08-01

    Before the middle of the previous century, cell types of the pancreatic islets of Langerhans were identified primarily on the basis of their color reactions with histological dyes. At that time, the chemical basis for the staining properties of islet cells in relation to the identity, chemistry and structure of their hormones was not fully understood. Nevertheless, the definitive islet cell types that secrete glucagon, insulin, and somatostatin (A, B, and D cells, respectively) could reliably be differentiated from each other with staining protocols that involved variations of one or more tinctorial techniques, such as the Mallory-Heidenhain azan trichrome, chromium hematoxylin and phloxine, aldehyde fuchsin, and silver impregnation methods, which were popularly used until supplanted by immunohistochemical techniques. Before antibody-based staining methods, the most bona fide histochemical techniques for the identification of islet B cells were based on the detection of sulfhydryl and disulfide groups of insulin. The application of the classical islet tinctorial staining methods for pathophysiological studies and physiological experiments was fundamental to our understanding of islet architecture and the physiological roles of A and B cells in glucose regulation and diabetes.

  14. Empirical analysis of the efficient use of geometric error identification in a machine tool by tracking measurement techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguado, S.; Santolaria, J.; Samper, D.; Velazquez, J.; Aguilar, J. J.

    2016-03-01

    Volumetric verification is becoming increasingly accepted as a suitable technique with which to improve machine tool accuracy. In the same way, the use of laser trackers to obtain machine error information using the new Active Target motorised retro-reflector allows the verification of all types of machine tool throughout their workspaces. Non-linear optimisation methods and machine tool kinematic models are the mainstays of this technique. Whereas the latter provide the relationship between the nominal coordinates, the geometric errors of the machine and laser tracker measurement, the former reduces the combined influence of geometric errors by obtaining their approximation functions. However, within these two procedures, several factors affect the scope of the produced verification results. The present paper focuses on the analysis of the adequacy of commercial measurement techniques using laser trackers and the new motorised retro-reflector in a real milling machine. An examination is also made regarding the influence of the optimisation sequence defined by the identification strategy, as well as the impact of the number of measured points in relation to the employed regression functions.

  15. A spectrum-driven damage identification technique: Application and validation through the numerical simulation of the Z24 Bridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masciotta, Maria-Giovanna; Ramos, Luís F.; Lourenço, Paulo B.; Vasta, Marcello; De Roeck, Guido

    2016-03-01

    The present paper focuses on a damage identification method based on the use of the second order spectral properties of the nodal response processes. The explicit dependence on the frequency content of the outputs power spectral densities makes them suitable for damage detection and localization. The well-known case study of the Z24 Bridge in Switzerland is chosen to apply and further investigate this technique with the aim of validating its reliability. Numerical simulations of the dynamic response of the structure subjected to different types of excitation are carried out to assess the variability of the spectrum-driven method with respect to both type and position of the excitation sources. The simulated data obtained from random vibrations, impulse, ramp and shaking forces, allowed to build the power spectrum matrix from which the main eigenparameters of reference and damage scenarios are extracted. Afterwards, complex eigenvectors and real eigenvalues are properly weighed and combined and a damage index based on the difference between spectral modes is computed to pinpoint the damage. Finally, a group of vibration-based damage identification methods are selected from the literature to compare the results obtained and to evaluate the performance of the spectral index.

  16. Environmental Hazard Identification Technique Developing of Territorial Administrations Strategy as Exemplified in Siberian Federal District

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timofeeva, S. S.; Garmishev, V. V.; Lugovtsova, N. Yu

    2016-04-01

    This work, on the example of the Siberian Federal District of the Russian Federation, presents a method for determining mass airbursts of combustion gaseous eco-toxicants, as a technique for assessing the contributory environmental load on the atmosphere. Potential environmental hazards are analyzed by mass of contaminated airbursts. A comparison of specific gross toxicants’ emissions in territorial entities of the Russian Federation is made.

  17. Analytical techniques for identification and study of organic matter in returned lunar samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burlingame, A. L.

    1974-01-01

    The results of geochemical research are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on the contribution of mass spectrometric data to the solution of specific structural problems. Information on the mass spectrometric behavior of compounds of geochemical interest is reviewed and currently available techniques of particular importance to geochemistry, such as gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer coupling, modern sample introduction methods, and computer application in high resolution mass spectrometry, receive particular attention.

  18. Thermal characterization and tomography of carbon fiber reinforced plastics using individual identification technique

    SciTech Connect

    Vavilov, V.P.; Grinzato, E.; Bison, P.G.; Marinetti, S.; Bressan, C.

    1996-05-01

    A method for thermal characterization of defect depth and thickness using individual inversion functions is described. Experimental results are obtained with standard carbon fiber reinforced plastic specimens which contained Teflon inserts and impact damage. Accuracy in determining defect dimensions was about 10 percent for defect depth and 33 percent for defect thickness. A technique to synthesize images of defect parameters is proposed. Thermal tomography advantages in analyzing defect in-depth propagation are illustrated.

  19. Bolt-loosening identification of bolt connections by vision image-based technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Tuan-Cuong; Huynh, Thanh-Canh; Ryu, Joo-Young; Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Tae

    2016-04-01

    In this study, an algorithm using image processing techniques is proposed to identify bolt-loosening in bolted connections of steel structures. Its basic concept is to identify rotation angles of nuts from a pictured image, and is mainly consisted of the following 3 steps: (1) taking a picture for a bolt joint, (2) segmenting the images for each nut by image processing techniques, and (3) identifying rotation angle of each nut and detecting bolt-loosening. By using the concept, an algorithm is designed for continuous monitoring and inspection of the bolt connections. As a key imageprocessing technique, Hough transform is used to identify rotation angles of nuts, and then bolt-loosening is detected by comparing the angles before and after bolt-loosening. Then the applicability of the proposed algorithm is evaluated by experimental tests for two lab-scaled models. A bolted joint model which consists of a splice plate and 8 sets of bolts and nuts with 2×4 array is used to simulate inspection of bridge connections, and a model which is consisted of a ring flange and 32 sets of bolt and nut is used to simulate continuous monitoring of bolted connections in wind turbine towers.

  20. Species identification of mixed algal bloom in the Northern Arabian Sea using remote sensing techniques.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, R; Rafeeq, M; Smitha, B R; Padmakumar, K B; Thomas, Lathika Cicily; Sanjeevan, V N; Prakash, Prince; Raman, Mini

    2015-02-01

    Oceanic waters of the Northern Arabian Sea experience massive algal blooms during winter-spring (mid Feb-end Mar), which prevail for at least for 3 months covering the entire northern half of the basin from east to west. Ship cruises were conducted during winter-spring of 2001-2012 covering different stages of the bloom to study the biogeochemistry of the region. Phytoplankton analysis indicated the presence of green tides of dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans (=N. miliaris), in the oceanic waters. Our observations indicated that diatoms are coupled and often co-exist with N. scintillans, making it a mixed-species ecosystem. In this paper, we describe an approach for detection of bloom-forming algae N. scintillans and its discrimination from diatoms using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data in a mixed-species environment. In situ remote sensing reflectance spectra were generated using Satlantic™ hyperspectral radiometer for the bloom and non-bloom waters. Spectral shapes of the reflectance spectra for different water types were distinct, and the same were used for species identification. Scatter of points representing different phytoplankton classes on a derivative plot revealed four diverse clusters, viz. N. scintillans, diatoms, non-bloom oceanic, and non-bloom coastal waters. The criteria developed for species discrimination were implemented on MODIS data and validated using inputs from a recent ship cruise conducted in March 2013.

  1. Species identification of mixed algal bloom in the Northern Arabian Sea using remote sensing techniques.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, R; Rafeeq, M; Smitha, B R; Padmakumar, K B; Thomas, Lathika Cicily; Sanjeevan, V N; Prakash, Prince; Raman, Mini

    2015-02-01

    Oceanic waters of the Northern Arabian Sea experience massive algal blooms during winter-spring (mid Feb-end Mar), which prevail for at least for 3 months covering the entire northern half of the basin from east to west. Ship cruises were conducted during winter-spring of 2001-2012 covering different stages of the bloom to study the biogeochemistry of the region. Phytoplankton analysis indicated the presence of green tides of dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans (=N. miliaris), in the oceanic waters. Our observations indicated that diatoms are coupled and often co-exist with N. scintillans, making it a mixed-species ecosystem. In this paper, we describe an approach for detection of bloom-forming algae N. scintillans and its discrimination from diatoms using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS)-Aqua data in a mixed-species environment. In situ remote sensing reflectance spectra were generated using Satlantic™ hyperspectral radiometer for the bloom and non-bloom waters. Spectral shapes of the reflectance spectra for different water types were distinct, and the same were used for species identification. Scatter of points representing different phytoplankton classes on a derivative plot revealed four diverse clusters, viz. N. scintillans, diatoms, non-bloom oceanic, and non-bloom coastal waters. The criteria developed for species discrimination were implemented on MODIS data and validated using inputs from a recent ship cruise conducted in March 2013. PMID:25638059

  2. A new technique for selective identification and mapping of enhancers within long genomic sequences.

    PubMed

    Chernov, Igor; Stukacheva, Elena; Akopov, Sergey; Didych, Dmitry; Nikolaev, Lev; Sverdlov, Eugene

    2008-05-01

    We report a new experimental method of direct selection, identification, and mapping of potential enhancer sequences within extended stretches of genomic DNA. The method allows simultaneous cloning of a quantity of sequences instead of tedious screening of the separate ones, thus providing a robust and high-throughput approach to the mapping of enhancers. The selection procedure is based on the ability of such sequences to activate a minimal promoter that drives expression of a selective gene. To this end a mixture of short DNA fragments derived from the segment of interest was cloned in a retroviral vector containing the neomycin phosphotransferase II gene under control of a cytomegalovirus (CMV) minimal promoter. The pool of retroviruses obtained was used to infect HeLa cells and then to select neomycin-resistant colonies containing constructs with enhancer-like sequences. The pool of the genomic fragments was rescued by PCR and cloned, forming a library of the potential enhancers. Fifteen enhancer-like fragments were selected from 1-Mb human genome locus, and enhancer activity of 13 of them was verified in a transient transfection reporter gene assay. The sequences selected were found to be predominantly located near 5' regions of genes or within gene introns. PMID:18476831

  3. Identification of active root zone by data assimilation techniques: monitoring and modelling of irrigation experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busato, Laura; Vanella, Daniela; Boaga, Jacopo; Manoli, Gabriele; Marani, Marco; Putti, Mario; Consoli, Simona; Binley, Andrew M.; Cassiani, Giorgio

    2015-04-01

    The identification of active root distribution and the quantification of relevant water fluxes (root water uptake-RWU) are key elements in understanding the exchanges of mass and energy in soil-plant-atmosphere systems. In this contribution we present the assimilation of 3D time-lapse Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) data, acquired around an orange tree during irrigation experiments, in a soil-plant model that accounts for soil moisture dynamics and root water uptake (RWU), whole plant transpiration, and leaf-level photosynthesis. The model is based on a numerical solution to the 3D Richards equation modified to account for a 3D RWU, trunk xylem, and stomatal conductances. The data assimilation procedure, assisted also by independent information concerning the soil properties, aims specifically at identifying the distribution and strength of active roots modelled as sinks in the unsaturated flow model. In addition the flow model is enhanced by a forward electrical current model in order to predict the electrical response measured by ERT in dependence of the soil water content distribution. Strengths and weaknesses of the proposed approach are discussed.

  4. Identification of Intellectual Disability Genes in Female Patients with a Skewed X-Inactivation Pattern.

    PubMed

    Fieremans, Nathalie; Van Esch, Hilde; Holvoet, Maureen; Van Goethem, Gert; Devriendt, Koenraad; Rosello, Monica; Mayo, Sonia; Martinez, Francisco; Jhangiani, Shalini; Muzny, Donna M; Gibbs, Richard A; Lupski, James R; Vermeesch, Joris R; Marynen, Peter; Froyen, Guy

    2016-08-01

    Intellectual disability (ID) is a heterogeneous disorder with an unknown molecular etiology in many cases. Previously, X-linked ID (XLID) studies focused on males because of the hemizygous state of their X chromosome. Carrier females are generally unaffected because of the presence of a second normal allele, or inactivation of the mutant X chromosome in most of their cells (skewing). However, in female ID patients, we hypothesized that the presence of skewing of X-inactivation would be an indicator for an X chromosomal ID cause. We analyzed the X-inactivation patterns of 288 females with ID, and found that 22 (7.6%) had extreme skewing (>90%), which is significantly higher than observed in the general population (3.6%; P = 0.029). Whole-exome sequencing of 19 females with extreme skewing revealed causal variants in six females in the XLID genes DDX3X, NHS, WDR45, MECP2, and SMC1A. Interestingly, variants in genes escaping X-inactivation presumably cause both XLID and skewing of X-inactivation in three of these patients. Moreover, variants likely accounting for skewing only were detected in MED12, HDAC8, and TAF9B. All tested candidate causative variants were de novo events. Hence, extreme skewing is a good indicator for the presence of X-linked variants in female patients.

  5. Identification of a β-glucosidase from the Mucor circinelloides genome by peptide pattern recognition.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuhong; Busk, Peter Kamp; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Zhao, Hai; Lange, Lene

    2014-12-01

    Mucor circinelloides produces plant cell wall degrading enzymes that allow it to grow on complex polysaccharides. Although the genome of M. circinelloides has been sequenced, only few plant cell wall degrading enzymes are annotated in this species. We applied peptide pattern recognition, which is a non-alignment based method for sequence analysis to map conserved sequences in glycoside hydrolase families. The conserved sequences were used to identify similar genes in the M. circinelloides genome. We found 12 different novel genes encoding members of the GH3, GH5, GH9, GH16, GH38, GH47 and GH125 families in M. circinelloides. One of the two GH3-encoding genes was predicted to encode a β-glucosidase (EC 3.2.1.21). We expressed this gene in Pichia pastoris KM71H and found that the purified recombinant protein had relative high β-glucosidase activity (1.73U/mg) at pH5 and 50°C. The Km and Vmax with p-nitrophenyl-β-d-glucopyranoside as substrate was 0.20mM and 2.41U/mg, respectively. The enzyme was not inhibited by glucose and retained 84% activity at glucose concentrations up to 140mM. Although zygomycetes are not considered to be important degraders of lignocellulosic biomass in nature, the present finding of an active β-glucosidase in M. circinelloides demonstrates that enzymes from this group of fungi have a potential for cellulose degradation.

  6. Automatic identification of Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP) sequences based on the Teager Energy Operator.

    PubMed

    Machado, Fátima; Sales, Francisco; Bento, Conceição; Dourado, António; Teixeira, César

    2015-01-01

    The Cyclic Alternating Pattern (CAP) is a periodic cerebral activity prevalent during Non-Rapid Eye Movement (NREM) sleep-stages. The CAP is composed by A-phases that are related to a change in amplitude, frequency or both from the background activity epochs, called B-phases. Depending on the type of increase the A-phase could be classified as A1, A2 or A3 subtype. This paper proposes the usage of the Teager Energy Operator (TEO) to analyze the amplitude changes in the different frequency-bands to detect A-phases subtypes. The TEO classification performance is compared with the performance of a state-of-the art EEG feature, applied previously for CAP scoring and referred as the macro-micro structure descriptor (MMSD). In general, the TEO is the best feature and the improved results were obtained in the delta band for the A1 and A2 sub-types. More precisely, a sensitivity and specificity of 80.31% and 82.93% were obtained for the A1 subtype, respectively. A2 phases were detected with 76.96% of sensitivity and 73.22% of specificity. The two features detected A3 subtype with approximately the same sensitivity (approx. 70%) and specificity (approx. 75%), however the results were improved by considering the highest frequency band. These results are consistent with the frequency content of the different sub-phases. PMID:26737517

  7. Cellular identification of water gustatory receptor neurons and their central projection pattern in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Inoshita, Tsuyoshi; Tanimura, Teiichi

    2006-01-24

    Water perception is important for insects, because they are particularly vulnerable to water loss because their body size is small. In Drosophila, gustatory receptor neurons are located at the base of the taste sensilla on the labellum, tarsi, and wing margins. One of the gustatory receptor neurons in typical sensilla is known to respond to water. To reveal the neural mechanisms of water perception in Drosophila, it is necessary to identify water receptor neurons and their projection patterns. We used a Gal4 enhancer trap strain in which GAL4 is expressed in a single gustatory receptor neuron in each sensillum on the labellum. We investigated the function of these neurons by expressing the upstream activating sequence transgenes, shibire(ts1), tetanus toxin light chain, or diphtheria toxin A chain. Results from the proboscis extension reflex test and electrophysiological recordings indicated that the GAL4-expressing neurons respond to water. We show here that the water receptor neurons project to a specific region in the subesophageal ganglion, thus revealing the water taste sensory map in Drosophila. PMID:16415164

  8. MOLECULAR IDENTIFICATION AND ANTIMICROBIAL RESISTANCE PATTERN OF SEVEN CLINICAL ISOLATES OF Nocardia spp. IN BRAZIL.

    PubMed

    Condas, Larissa Anuska Zeni; Ribeiro, Márcio Garcia; Muro, Marisol Domingues; de Vargas, Agueda Palmira Castagna; Matsuzawa, Tetsuhiro; Yazawa, Katsukiyo; Siqueira, Amanda Keller; Salerno, Tatiana; Lara, Gustavo Henrique Batista; Risseti, Rafaela Mastrangelo; Ferreira, Karen Spadari; Gonoi, Tohru

    2015-01-01

    Nocardia is a ubiquitous microorganism related to pyogranulomatous infection, which is difficult to treat in humans and animals. The occurrence of the disease is on the rise in many countries due to an increase in immunosuppressive diseases and treatments. This report of cases from Brazil presents the genotypic characterization and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern using the disk-diffusion method and inhibitory minimal concentration with E-test® strips. In summary, this report focuses on infections in young adult men, of which three cases were cutaneous, two pulmonary, one neurological and one systemic. The pulmonary, neurological and systemic cases were attributed to immunosuppressive diseases or treatments. Sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA segments (1491 bp) identified four isolates of Nocardia farcinica, two isolates of Nocardia nova and one isolate of Nocardia asiatica. N. farcinica was involved in two cutaneous, one systemic and other pulmonary cases; N. nova was involved in one neurological and one pulmonary case; and Nocardia asiatica in one cutaneous case. The disk-diffusion antimicrobial susceptibility test showed that the most effective antimicrobials were amikacin (100%), amoxicillin/clavulanate (100%), cephalexin (100%) and ceftiofur (100%), while isolates had presented most resistance to gentamicin (43%), sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim (43%) and ampicillin (29%). However, on the inhibitory minimal concentration test (MIC test), only one of the four isolates of Nocardia farcinica was resistant to sulfamethoxazole/trimethoprim. PMID:26200967

  9. Beyond radio-displacement techniques for Identification of CB1 Ligands: The First Application of a Fluorescence-quenching Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, Agostino; Lembo, Francesca; Novellino, Ettore; Stornaiuolo, Mariano; Marinelli, Luciana

    2014-01-01

    Cannabinoid type 1 Receptor (CB1) belongs to the GPCR family and it has been targeted, so far, for the discovery of drugs aimed at the treatment of neuropathic pain, nausea, vomit, and food intake disorders. Here, we present the development of the first fluorescent assay enabling the measurement of kinetic binding constants for CB1orthosteric ligands. The assay is based on the use of T1117, a fluorescent analogue of AM251. We prove that T1117 binds endogenous and recombinant CB1 receptors with nanomolar affinity. Moreover, T1117 binding to CB1 is sensitive to the allosteric ligand ORG27569 and thus it is applicable to the discovery of new allosteric drugs. The herein presented assay constitutes a sustainable valid alternative to the expensive and environmental impacting radiodisplacement techniques and paves the way for an easy, fast and cheap high-throughput drug screening toward CB1 for identification of new orthosteric and allosteric modulators. PMID:24441508

  10. Cerebral blood flow studied by /sup 133/Xe inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of /sup 133/Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid /sup 133/Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group.

  11. Cerebral blood flow studied by Xenon-133 inhalation technique in parkinsonism: loss of hyperfrontal pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, A.; Gueell, A.; Fabre, N.; Dupui, P.; Victor, G.; Geraud, G.

    1983-03-01

    Cerebral blood flow (grey matter flow) in parkinsonism requires further investigation. The noninvasive method of /sup 133/Xe inhalation permits study of larger numbers of subjects than previously used invasive techniques such as the intracarotid /sup 133/Xe injection method. Measurements were made in this laboratory in 30 subjects having Parkinson's disease. Mean hemispheric blood flow (F1) values were 70.4 +/- 9.3 ml/100 g/min, compared to 76.3 for a group of age-matched normal subjects, which is a decrease of -7.8%. The most striking difference was the loss of the hyperfrontal distribution in parkinsonism. The prefrontal F1 values were only 1.8% greater than the hemisphere grey matter flow, compared with 8.5% in controls of a similar age group.

  12. Influence of Radiotherapy Technique and Dose on Patterns of Failure for Mesothelioma Patients After Extrapleural Pneumonectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, Aaron M. . E-mail: aallen@lroc.harvard.edu; Den, Robert; Wong, Julia S.; Zurakowski, David; Soto, Ricardo; Jaenne, Pasi A.; Zellos, Lambros; Bueno, Raphael; Sugarbaker, David J.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2007-08-01

    Purpose: Extrapleural pneumonectomy (EPP) is an effective treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. We compared the outcomes after moderate-dose hemithoracic radiotherapy (MDRT) and high-dose hemithoracic RT (HDRT) after EPP for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Methods and Materials: Between July 1994 and April 2004, 39 patients underwent EPP and adjuvant RT at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital. Between 1994 and 2002, MDRT, including 30 Gy to the hemithorax, 40 Gy to the mediastinum, and boosts to positive margins or nodes to 54 Gy, was given, generally with concurrent chemotherapy. In 2003, HDRT to 54 Gy with a matched photon/electron technique was given, with sequential chemotherapy. Results: A total of 39 patients underwent RT after EPP. The median age was 59 years (range, 44-77). The histologic type was epithelial in 25 patients (64%) and mixed or sarcomatoid in 14 patients (36%). Of the 39 patients, 24 underwent MDRT and 15 (39%) HDRT. The median follow-up was 23 months (range, 6-71). The median overall survival was 19 months (95% confidence interval, 14-24). The median time to distant failure (DF) and local failure (LF) was 20 months (95% confidence interval, 14-26) and 26 months (95% confidence interval, 16-36), respectively. On univariate and multivariate analyses, only a mixed histologic type was predictive of inferior DF (p <0.006) and overall survival (p <0.004). The RT technique was not predictive of LF, DF, or overall survival. The LF rate was 50% (12 of 24) after MDRT and 27% (4 of 15) after HDRT (p = NS). Four patients who had undergone HDRT were alive and without evidence of disease at the last follow-up. Conclusions: High-dose hemithoracic RT appears to limit in-field LF compared with MDRT. However, DF remains a significant challenge, with one-half of our patients experiencing DF.

  13. Pattern recognition techniques for failure trend detection in SSME ground tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudry, A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) is a complex power plant. To evaluate its performance 1200 hot-wire ground tests have been conducted, varying in duration from 0 to 500 secs. During the test some 500 sensors are sampled every 20 ms. The sensors are generally bounded by red lines so that an excursion beyond could lead to premature shutdown. In 27 tests it was not possible to effect an orderly premature shutdown, resulting in major incidents with serious damage to the SSME and test stand. The application of pattern recognition are investigated to detect SSME performance trends that may lead to major incidents. Based on the sensor data a set of (n) features is defined. At any time during the test, the state of the SSME is given by a point in the n-dimensional feature space. The history of a test can now be represented as a trajectory in the n-dimensional feature space. Portions of the normal trajectories and failed test trajectories would lie in different regions of the n-dimensional feature space. The latter can now be partitioned into regions of normal and failed tests. Thus, it is possible to examine the trajectory of a test in progress and predict if it is going into the normal or failure region.

  14. Extending applicability of cluster based pattern recognition with efficient approximation techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, R.F.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1997-03-01

    The fundamental goal of this research has been to improve computational efficiency of the Visually Empirical Region of Influence (VERI) based clustering and pattern recognition (PR) algorithms we developed in previous work. The original clustering algorithm, when applied to data sets with N points, ran in time proportional to N{sup 3} (denoted with the notation O (N{sup 3})), which limited the size of data sets it could find solutions for. Results generated from our original clustering algorithm were superior to commercial clustering packages. These results warranted our efforts to improve the runtimes of our algorithms. This report describes the new algorithms, advances and obstacles met in their development. The report gives qualitative and quantitative analysis of the improved algorithms performances. With the information in this report, an interested user can determine which algorithm is best for a given problem in clustering (2-D) or PR (K-D), and can estimate how long it will run using the runtime plots of the algorithms before using any software.

  15. Pattern recognition techniques for visualizing the biotropic waveform of air temperature and pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ozheredov, V. A.

    2012-12-01

    It is known that long periods of adverse weather have a negative effect on the human cardiovascular system. A number of studies have set a lower limit of around 5 days for the duration of these periods. However, the specific features of the negative dynamics of the main weather characteristics—air temperature and atmospheric pressure—remained open. To address this problem, the present paper proposes a conjunctive method of the theory of pattern recognition. It is shown that this method approaches a globally optimal (in the sense of recognition errors) Neumann critical region and can be used to solve various problems in heliobiology. To illustrate the efficiency of this method, we show that some quickly relaxing short sequences of temperature and pressure time series (the so-called temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes) increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases and can lead to serious organic lesions (particularly myocardial infarction). It is established that the temperature waves and waves of atmospheric pressure changes increase the average morbidity rate of myocardial infarction by 90% and 110%, respectively. Atmospheric pressure turned out to be a more biotropic factor than air temperature.

  16. Specific identification of fibrin polymers, fibrinogen degradation products, and crosslinked fibrin degradation products in plasma and serum with a new sensitive technique.

    PubMed

    Connaghan, D G; Francis, C W; Lane, D A; Marder, V J

    1985-03-01

    A new method is described for identifying low concentrations of circulating derivatives of fibrinogen and fibrin, even when present in heterogeneous mixtures. This technique is applicable to plasma and serum and uses electrophoresis in 2% agarose in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) followed by immunological identification of separated derivatives, using radiolabeled antifibrinogen antiserum and autoradiography. Unique electrophoretic patterns distinguish plasmic derivatives of crosslinked fibrin from those of fibrinogen and also identify crosslinked fibrin polymers produced by the combined action of thrombin and factor XIII on fibrinogen. The assay is sensitive to a concentration of 0.1 micrograms/mL of fibrinogen in serum or plasma. Fibrin polymers, plasmic degradation products of fibrinogen, and plasmic degradation products of crosslinked fibrin were detected in the plasma or serum of a patient with disseminated intravascular coagulation. Plasmic derivatives of both fibrinogen and crosslinked fibrin appeared in serum in the course of fibrinolytic therapy for pulmonary embolism, whereas during acute myocardial infarction a marked increase in the proportion of fibrin polymers in plasma was found in comparison with normal controls. Thus, the procedure can distinguish between the simultaneous processes of fibrin polymer formation, fibrinogenolysis, and fibrinolysis, and is sufficiently sensitive to detect relevant quantities of derivatives in pathologic conditions.

  17. [Identification and expression pattern of cathepsin family in silkworm (Bombyx mori)].

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Zhou, Xiaoying; Li, Zhilang; Li, Jianwei; Chen, Shida; Guo, Chao; Hou, Yong; Zhao, Ping

    2015-12-01

    Silkworm is a holometabolous insect of Lepidoptera. During metamorphosis, significant morphological changes happen including the dissociation of old tissues and remodeling of new tissues. It has been reported that cathepsins are involved in these processes. Cathepsin is a kind of intracellular proteinase that exists in many species. It includes some subfamilies like cathepsin B, H and L. The studies on cathepsin are useful for clarifying the details of silkworm metamorphosis process. In total, 13 cathepsins were identified by screening the silkworm genome database. The basic information and the expression patterns about these genes were analyzed. Interestingly, an ovary-specific cathepsin L gene (Gene ID: BGIBMGAOO4622) was investigated by the data of silkworm microarray and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). The full-length cDNA is 1,209 bp, encoding a protein with 402 amino acids. Sequences alignment revealed that it has a high sequence similarity with cathepsin L of other species, and it is highly conserved in the active-site of the enzyme. The phylogenetic analysis showed that ovary-specific cathepsin L is clustered with other lepidopterous insects. Furthermore, this gene was cloned and prokaryotic expressed. Recombinant protein was present in inclusion body. Importantly, the qPCR result showed that the expression level of this gene is increasing during the early stage of pupal development and reaches the highest value at the 3rd day of pupal stage, which suggests that this gene may be involved in the process of development of the ovary and oocyte.

  18. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics. PMID:26976580

  19. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J.; Wasserfall, Clive H.; Schatz, Desmond A.; Greenbaum, Carla J.; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K.; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A.; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A. M. James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-01-01

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics. PMID:26976580

  20. Identification of tissue-specific cell death using methylation patterns of circulating DNA.

    PubMed

    Lehmann-Werman, Roni; Neiman, Daniel; Zemmour, Hai; Moss, Joshua; Magenheim, Judith; Vaknin-Dembinsky, Adi; Rubertsson, Sten; Nellgård, Bengt; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Spalding, Kirsty; Haller, Michael J; Wasserfall, Clive H; Schatz, Desmond A; Greenbaum, Carla J; Dorrell, Craig; Grompe, Markus; Zick, Aviad; Hubert, Ayala; Maoz, Myriam; Fendrich, Volker; Bartsch, Detlef K; Golan, Talia; Ben Sasson, Shmuel A; Zamir, Gideon; Razin, Aharon; Cedar, Howard; Shapiro, A M James; Glaser, Benjamin; Shemer, Ruth; Dor, Yuval

    2016-03-29

    Minimally invasive detection of cell death could prove an invaluable resource in many physiologic and pathologic situations. Cell-free circulating DNA (cfDNA) released from dying cells is emerging as a diagnostic tool for monitoring cancer dynamics and graft failure. However, existing methods rely on differences in DNA sequences in source tissues, so that cell death cannot be identified in tissues with a normal genome. We developed a method of detecting tissue-specific cell death in humans based on tissue-specific methylation patterns in cfDNA. We interrogated tissue-specific methylome databases to identify cell type-specific DNA methylation signatures and developed a method to detect these signatures in mixed DNA samples. We isolated cfDNA from plasma or serum of donors, treated the cfDNA with bisulfite, PCR-amplified the cfDNA, and sequenced it to quantify cfDNA carrying the methylation markers of the cell type of interest. Pancreatic β-cell DNA was identified in the circulation of patients with recently diagnosed type-1 diabetes and islet-graft recipients; oligodendrocyte DNA was identified in patients with relapsing multiple sclerosis; neuronal/glial DNA was identified in patients after traumatic brain injury or cardiac arrest; and exocrine pancreas DNA was identified in patients with pancreatic cancer or pancreatitis. This proof-of-concept study demonstrates that the tissue origins of cfDNA and thus the rate of death of specific cell types can be determined in humans. The approach can be adapted to identify cfDNA derived from any cell type in the body, offering a minimally invasive window for diagnosing and monitoring a broad spectrum of human pathologies as well as providing a better understanding of normal tissue dynamics.

  1. Identification of a dietary pattern associated with greater cardiometabolic risk in adolescence

    PubMed Central

    Appannah, G.; Pot, G.K.; Huang, R.C.; Oddy, W.H.; Beilin, L.J.; Mori, T.A.; Jebb, S.A.; Ambrosini, G.L.

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Energy dense, high fat, low fibre diets may contribute to obesity in young people, however their relationships with other cardiometabolic risk factors are unclear. We examined associations between an ‘energy-dense, high-fat and low-fibre’ dietary pattern (DP) and cardiometabolic risk factors, and the tracking of this DP in adolescence. Methods and results Data was sourced from participants in the Western Australian Pregnancy (Raine) Cohort Study. At 14 and 17 y, dietary intake, anthropometric and biochemical data were measured and z-scores for an ‘energy dense, high fat and low fibre’ DP were estimated using reduced rank regression (RRR). Associations between DP z-scores and cardiometabolic risk factors were examined using regression models. Tracking of DP z-scores was assessed using Pearson's correlation coefficient. A 1 SD unit increase in DP z-score between 14 and 17 y was associated with a 20% greater odds of high metabolic risk (95% CI: 1.01, 1.41) and a 0.04 mmol/L higher fasting glucose in boys (95% CI: 0.01, 0.08); a 28% greater odds of a high-waist circumference (95% CI: 1.00, 1.63) in girls. An increase of 3% and 4% was observed for insulin and HOMA (95% CI: 1%, 7%), respectively, in boys and girls, for every 1 SD increase in DP z-score and independently of BMI. The DP showed moderate tracking between 14 and 17 y of age (r = 0.51 for boys, r = 0.45 for girls). Conclusion An ‘energy dense, high fat, low fibre’ DP is positively associated with cardiometabolic risk factors and tends to persist throughout adolescence. PMID:26026208

  2. Identification of airborne radioactive spatial patterns in Europe - Feasibility study using Beryllium-7.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceballos, M A; Cinelli, G; Tollefsen, T; Marín-Ferrer, M

    2016-05-01

    The present study proposes a methodology to identify spatial patterns in airborne radioactive particles in Europe. The methodology is based on transforming the activity concentrations in the set of stations for each month (monthly index), due to the tightly spaced sampling intervals (daily to monthly), in combination with hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering approaches, due to the lack of a priori knowledge of the number of clusters to be created. Three different hierarchical cluster methodologies are explored to set the optimal number of clusters necessary to initialize the non-hierarchical one (k-means). To evaluate this methodology, cosmogenic beryllium-7 ((7)Be) data, collected between 2007 and 2010 at 19 sampling stations in European Union (EU) countries and stored in the Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring (REM) database, are used. This methodology yields a solution with three distinguishable clusters (south, central and north), each with a different evolution of the (7)Be monthly index. Clear differences between monthly indices are shown in both intensity and time trends, following a latitudinal distribution of the sampling stations. This cluster result is evaluated performing ANOVA analysis, considering the original (7)Be activity concentrations grouped in each cluster. The statistical results (among clusters and sampling stations within clusters) confirm the spatial distribution of (7)Be in Europe, and, hence, reinforce the use of this methodology. Finally, the impact of tropopause height on this grouping is successfully tested, suggesting its influence on the spatial distribution of (7)Be in Europe. For airborne radioactive particles the analysis gave valuable results that improve knowledge of these atmospheric compounds in Europe. Hence, this work addresses a methodology to a grouping of airborne sampling stations, 1) allowing a better understanding of the distribution of (7)Be activity concentrations in the EU, and 2) serving as a basis for

  3. Identification of airborne radioactive spatial patterns in Europe - Feasibility study using Beryllium-7.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Ceballos, M A; Cinelli, G; Tollefsen, T; Marín-Ferrer, M

    2016-05-01

    The present study proposes a methodology to identify spatial patterns in airborne radioactive particles in Europe. The methodology is based on transforming the activity concentrations in the set of stations for each month (monthly index), due to the tightly spaced sampling intervals (daily to monthly), in combination with hierarchical and non-hierarchical clustering approaches, due to the lack of a priori knowledge of the number of clusters to be created. Three different hierarchical cluster methodologies are explored to set the optimal number of clusters necessary to initialize the non-hierarchical one (k-means). To evaluate this methodology, cosmogenic beryllium-7 ((7)Be) data, collected between 2007 and 2010 at 19 sampling stations in European Union (EU) countries and stored in the Radioactivity Environmental Monitoring (REM) database, are used. This methodology yields a solution with three distinguishable clusters (south, central and north), each with a different evolution of the (7)Be monthly index. Clear differences between monthly indices are shown in both intensity and time trends, following a latitudinal distribution of the sampling stations. This cluster result is evaluated performing ANOVA analysis, considering the original (7)Be activity concentrations grouped in each cluster. The statistical results (among clusters and sampling stations within clusters) confirm the spatial distribution of (7)Be in Europe, and, hence, reinforce the use of this methodology. Finally, the impact of tropopause height on this grouping is successfully tested, suggesting its influence on the spatial distribution of (7)Be in Europe. For airborne radioactive particles the analysis gave valuable results that improve knowledge of these atmospheric compounds in Europe. Hence, this work addresses a methodology to a grouping of airborne sampling stations, 1) allowing a better understanding of the distribution of (7)Be activity concentrations in the EU, and 2) serving as a basis for

  4. Hyperspectral Imaging Techniques for Rapid Identification of Arabidopsis Mutants with Altered Leaf Pigment Status

    PubMed Central

    Matsuda, Osamu; Tanaka, Ayako; Fujita, Takao; Iba, Koh

    2012-01-01

    The spectral reflectance signature of living organisms provides information that closely reflects their physiological status. Because of its high potential for the estimation of geomorphic biological parameters, particularly of gross photosynthesis of plants, two-dimensional spectroscopy, via the use of hyperspectral instruments, has been widely used in remote sensing applications. In genetics research, in contrast, the reflectance phenotype has rarely been the subject of quantitative analysis; its potential for illuminating the pathway leading from the gene to phenotype remains largely unexplored. In this study, we employed hyperspectral imaging techniques to identify Arabidopsis mutants with altered leaf pigment status. The techniques are comprised of two modes; the first is referred to as the ‘targeted mode’ and the second as the ‘non-targeted mode’. The ‘targeted’ mode is aimed at visualizing individual concentrations and compositional parameters of leaf pigments based on reflectance indices (RIs) developed for Chls a and b, carotenoids and anthocyanins. The ‘non-targeted’ mode highlights differences in reflectance spectra of leaf samples relative to reference spectra from the wild-type leaves. Through the latter approach, three mutant lines with weak irregular reflectance phenotypes, that are hardly identifiable by simple observation, were isolated. Analysis of these and other mutants revealed that the RI-based targeted pigment estimation was robust at least against changes in trichome density, but was confounded by genetic defects in chloroplast photorelocation movement. Notwithstanding such a limitation, the techniques presented here provide rapid and high-sensitive means to identify genetic mechanisms that coordinate leaf pigment status with developmental stages and/or environmental stress conditions. PMID:22470059

  5. Characterization and source identification of hydrocarbons in water samples using multiple analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Li, K; Fingas, M; Sigouin, L; Ménard, L

    2002-09-20

    This paper describes a case study in which multiple analytical techniques were used to identify and characterize trace petroleum-related hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples collected in a bedrock aquifer exploited for drinking water purposes. The objective of the study was to confirm the presence of gasoline and other petroleum products or other volatile organic pollutants in those samples in order to assess the respective implication of each of the potentially responsible parties to the contamination of the aquifer. In addition, the degree of contamination at different depths in the aquifer was also of interest. The analytical techniques used for analyses of water samples included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary GC with flame-ionization detection, solid-phase microextraction and headspace GC-MS techniques. Chemical characterization results revealed the following: (1) The hydrocarbons in sample A (near-surface groundwater, 0-5 m) were clearly of two types, one being gasoline and the other a heavy petroleum product. The significant distribution of five target petroleum-characteristic alkylkated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon homologues and biomarkers confirmed the presence of another heavy petroleum product. The concentrations of the TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons) and BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-, m-, and o-xylenes) were determined to be 1070 and 155 microg/kg of water for sample A, respectively. (2) The deepest groundwater (sample B, collected at a depth ranging between 15 and 60 m) was also contaminated, but to a much lesser degree. The concentrations of the TPH and BTEX were determined to be only 130 and 2.6 microg/kg of water for sample B, respectively. (3) The presence of a variety of volatile chlorinated compounds to the groundwater was also clearly identified. PMID:12350112

  6. Characterization and source identification of hydrocarbons in water samples using multiple analytical techniques.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhendi; Li, K; Fingas, M; Sigouin, L; Ménard, L

    2002-09-20

    This paper describes a case study in which multiple analytical techniques were used to identify and characterize trace petroleum-related hydrocarbons and other volatile organic compounds in groundwater samples collected in a bedrock aquifer exploited for drinking water purposes. The objective of the study was to confirm the presence of gasoline and other petroleum products or other volatile organic pollutants in those samples in order to assess the respective implication of each of the potentially responsible parties to the contamination of the aquifer. In addition, the degree of contamination at different depths in the aquifer was also of interest. The analytical techniques used for analyses of water samples included gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary GC with flame-ionization detection, solid-phase microextraction and headspace GC-MS techniques. Chemical characterization results revealed the following: (1) The hydrocarbons in sample A (near-surface groundwater, 0-5 m) were clearly of two types, one being gasoline and the other a heavy petroleum product. The significant distribution of five target petroleum-characteristic alkylkated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon homologues and biomarkers confirmed the presence of another heavy petroleum product. The concentrations of the TPHs (total petroleum hydrocarbons) and BTEX (collective name of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and p-, m-, and o-xylenes) were determined to be 1070 and 155 microg/kg of water for sample A, respectively. (2) The deepest groundwater (sample B, collected at a depth ranging between 15 and 60 m) was also contaminated, but to a much lesser degree. The concentrations of the TPH and BTEX were determined to be only 130 and 2.6 microg/kg of water for sample B, respectively. (3) The presence of a variety of volatile chlorinated compounds to the groundwater was also clearly identified.

  7. Identification of degradation products of thiram in water, soil and plants using LC-MS technique.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Bina; Rani, Manviri; Kumar, Rahul; Dureja, Prem

    2012-09-01

    In order to evaluate the deleterious effects of exposure to pesticides on a target population, a comprehensive study on their degradation in the various segments of ecosystem under varying environmental conditions is needed. In view of this, a study has been carried out on the metabolic pathways of thiram, a dithiocarbamate fungicide, in a variety of matrices namely water and soil under controlled conditions and plants in field conditions. The identification of degradation products was carried out in samples collected at various time points using LC-MS. The degradation products identified can be rationalized as originating by a variety of processes like hydrolysis, oxidation, N-dealkylation and cyclization. As a result of these processes the presence of some metabolites like dimethyl dithiocarbamate, bis(dimethyl carbamoyl) disulphide, bis(dimethyl dithiocarbamoyl) trisulphide and N-methyl-amino-dithiocarbamoyl sulphide was observed in all the cases. However, some different metabolites were observed with the change in the matrix or its characteristics such as cyclised products 2(N, N-dimethyl amino)thiazoline carboxylic acid and 2-thioxo-4-thiazolidine were observed only in plants. The investigations reflect that degradation initiates with hydrolysis, subsequently oxidation/dealkylation, followed by different types of reactions. The pathways seem to be complex and dependent on the matrices. Dimethyl dithiocarbamate and oxon metabolites, which are more toxic than parent compound, seem to persist for a longer time. Results indicate persistence vis-a-vis toxicity of pesticide and its metabolites and also provide a data bank of metabolites for forensic and epidemiological investigations.

  8. An empirical comparison of stock identification techniques applied to striped bass

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waldman, John R.; Richards, R. Anne; Schill, W. Bane; Wirgin, Isaac; Fabrizio, Mary C.

    1997-01-01

    Managers of migratory striped bass stocks that mix along the Atlantic coast of the USA require periodic estimates of the relative contributions of the individual stocks to coastal mixed- stock fisheries; however, to date, a standard approach has not been adopted. We compared the performances of alternative stock identification approaches, using samples taken from the same sets of fish. Reference (known) samples were collected from three Atlantic coast spawning systems: the Hudson River, Chesapeake Bay, and the Roanoke River. Striped bass of mixed-stock origin were collected from eastern Long Island, New York, and were used as test (unknown) samples. The approaches applied were discriminant analysis of morphometric data and of meristic data, logistic regression analysis of combined meristic and morphometric data, discriminant analysis of scale-shape features, discriminant analysis of immunoassay data, and mixed-stock analysis of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) data. Overall correct classification rates of reference samples ranged from 94% to 66% when just the Hudson and Chesapeake stocks were considered and were comparable when the Chesapeake and Roanoke stocks were grouped as the ''southern'' stock. When all three stocks were treated independently, correct classification rates ranged from 82% to 49%. Despite the moderate range in correct classification rates, bias due to misallocation was relatively low for all methods, suggesting that resulting stock composition estimates should be fairly accurate. However, relative contribution estimates for the mixed-stock sample varied widely (e.g., from 81% to 47% for the Hudson River stock, when only the Hudson River and Chesapeake Bay stocks were considered). Discrepancies may be related to the reliance by all of these approaches (except mtDNA) on phenotypic features. Our results support future use of either a morphometrics-based approach (among the phenotypic methods) or a genotypic approach based on mtDNA analysis. We further

  9. A Combination of Receptor-Based Pharmacophore Modeling & QM Techniques for Identification of Human Chymase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Arooj, Mahreen; Sakkiah, Sugunadevi; Kim, Songmi; Arulalapperumal, Venkatesh; Lee, Keun Woo

    2013-01-01

    Inhibition of chymase is likely to divulge therapeutic ways for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases, and fibrotic disorders. To find novel and potent chymase inhibitors and to provide a new idea for drug design, we used both ligand-based and structure-based methods to perform the virtual screening(VS) of commercially available databases. Different pharmacophore models generated from various crystal structures of enzyme may depict diverse inhibitor binding modes. Therefore, multiple pharmacophore-based approach is applied in this study. X-ray crystallographic data of chymase in complex with different inhibitors were used to generate four structure–based pharmacophore models. One ligand–based pharmacophore model was also developed from experimentally known inhibitors. After successful validation, all pharmacophore models were employed in database screening to retrieve hits with novel chemical scaffolds. Drug-like hit compounds were subjected to molecular docking using GOLD and AutoDock. Finally four structurally diverse compounds with high GOLD score and binding affinity for several crystal structures of chymase were selected as final hits. Identification of final hits by three different pharmacophore models necessitates the use of multiple pharmacophore-based approach in VS process. Quantum mechanical calculation is also conducted for analysis of electrostatic characteristics of compounds which illustrates their significant role in driving the inhibitor to adopt a suitable bioactive conformation oriented in the active site of enzyme. In general, this study is used as example to illustrate how multiple pharmacophore approach can be useful in identifying structurally diverse hits which may bind to all possible bioactive conformations available in the active site of enzyme. The strategy used in the current study could be appropriate to design drugs for other enzymes as well. PMID:23658661

  10. Identification of Plant Growth-Promoting Bacteria Using Titanium Dioxide Photocatalysis-Assisted Photoacoustic Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordillo-Delgado, F.; Marín, E.; Calderón, A.

    2013-09-01

    The effect of titanium dioxide photocatalysis against bacteria that are dangerous for human health has been investigated in the past, suggesting the possibility of using a specific behavior for each microorganism during this process for its discrimination. In this study, the behavior of some plants’ growth promoting bacteria ( Burkholderia unamae (Strain MTI 641), Acetobacter diazotrophicus (Strain PAl 5T), A. diazotrophicus (Strain CFN-Cf 52), and B. unamae (Strain TATl-371)) interacting with light and bactericidal titanium dioxide films have been analyzed using the photoacoustic technique. The monitoring of these interactions shows particular characteristics that could serve for identifying these species.

  11. Identification of Strategies to Facilitate Organ Donation among African Americans using the Nominal Group Technique

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Haiyan; Shewchuk, Richard; Mannon, Roslyn B.; Gaston, Robert; Segev, Dorry L.; Mannon, Elinor C.; Martin, Michelle Y.

    2015-01-01

    Background and objectives African Americans are disproportionately affected by ESRD, but few receive a living donor kidney transplant. Surveys assessing attitudes toward donation have shown that African Americans are less likely to express a willingness to donate their own organs. Studies aimed at understanding factors that may facilitate the willingness of African Americans to become organ donors are needed. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A novel formative research method was used (the nominal group technique) to identify and prioritize strategies for facilitating increases in organ donation among church-attending African Americans. Four nominal group technique panel interviews were convened (three community and one clergy). Each community panel represented a distinct local church; the clergy panel represented five distinct faith-based denominations. Before nominal group technique interviews, participants completed a questionnaire that assessed willingness to become a donor; 28 African-American adults (≥19 years old) participated in the study. Results In total, 66.7% of participants identified knowledge- or education-related strategies as most important strategies in facilitating willingness to become an organ donor, a view that was even more pronounced among clergy. Three of four nominal group technique panels rated a knowledge-based strategy as the most important and included strategies, such as information on donor involvement and donation-related risks; 29.6% of participants indicated that they disagreed with deceased donation, and 37% of participants disagreed with living donation. Community participants’ reservations about becoming an organ donor were similar for living (38.1%) and deceased (33.4%) donation; in contrast, clergy participants were more likely to express reservations about living donation (33.3% versus 16.7%). Conclusions These data indicate a greater opposition to living donation compared with donation after one’s death

  12. Identification and interpretation of patterns in rocket engine data: Artificial intelligence and neural network approaches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ali, Moonis; Whitehead, Bruce; Gupta, Uday K.; Ferber, Harry

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an expert system which is designed to perform automatic data analysis, identify anomalous events, and determine the characteristic features of these events. We have employed both artificial intelligence and neural net approaches in the design of this expert system. The artificial intelligence approach is useful because it provides (1) the use of human experts' knowledge of sensor behavior and faulty engine conditions in interpreting data; (2) the use of engine design knowledge and physical sensor locations in establishing relationships among the events of multiple sensors; (3) the use of stored analysis of past data of faulty engine conditions; and (4) the use of knowledge-based reasoning in distinguishing sensor failure from actual faults. The neural network approach appears promising because neural nets (1) can be trained on extremely noisy data and produce classifications which are more robust under noisy conditions than other classification techniques; (2) avoid the necessity of noise removal by digital filtering and therefore avoid the need to make assumptions about frequency bands or other signal characteristics of anomalous behavior; (3) can, in effect, generate their own feature detectors based on the characteristics of the sensor data used in training; and (4) are inherently parallel and therefore are potentially implementable in special-purpose parallel hardware.

  13. Intelligent feature selection techniques for pattern classification of Lamb wave signals

    SciTech Connect

    Hinders, Mark K.; Miller, Corey A.

    2014-02-18

    Lamb wave interaction with flaws is a complex, three-dimensional phenomenon, which often frustrates signal interpretation schemes based on mode arrival time shifts predicted by dispersion curves. As the flaw severity increases, scattering and mode conversion effects will often dominate the time-domain signals, obscuring available information about flaws because multiple modes may arrive on top of each other. Even for idealized flaw geometries the scattering and mode conversion behavior of Lamb waves is very complex. Here, multi-mode Lamb waves in a metal plate are propagated across a rectangular flat-bottom hole in a sequence of pitch-catch measurements corresponding to the double crosshole tomography geometry. The flaw is sequentially deepened, with the Lamb wave measurements repeated at each flaw depth. Lamb wave tomography reconstructions are used to identify which waveforms have interacted with the flaw and thereby carry information about its depth. Multiple features are extracted from each of the Lamb wave signals using wavelets, which are then fed to statistical pattern classification algorithms that identify flaw severity. In order to achieve the highest classification accuracy, an optimal feature space is required but it’s never known a priori which features are going to be best. For structural health monitoring we make use of the fact that physical flaws, such as corrosion, will only increase over time. This allows us to identify feature vectors which are topologically well-behaved by requiring that sequential classes “line up” in feature vector space. An intelligent feature selection routine is illustrated that identifies favorable class distributions in multi-dimensional feature spaces using computational homology theory. Betti numbers and formal classification accuracies are calculated for each feature space subset to establish a correlation between the topology of the class distribution and the corresponding classification accuracy.

  14. Intelligent feature selection techniques for pattern classification of Lamb wave signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinders, Mark K.; Miller, Corey A.

    2014-02-01

    Lamb wave interaction with flaws is a complex, three-dimensional phenomenon, which often frustrates signal interpretation schemes based on mode arrival time shifts predicted by dispersion curves. As the flaw severity increases, scattering and mode conversion effects will often dominate the time-domain signals, obscuring available information about flaws because multiple modes may arrive on top of each other. Even for idealized flaw geometries the scattering and mode conversion behavior of Lamb waves is very complex. Here, multi-mode Lamb waves in a metal plate are propagated across a rectangular flat-bottom hole in a sequence of pitch-catch measurements corresponding to the double crosshole tomography geometry. The flaw is sequentially deepened, with the Lamb wave measurements repeated at each flaw depth. Lamb wave tomography reconstructions are used to identify which waveforms have interacted with the flaw and thereby carry information about its depth. Multiple features are extracted from each of the Lamb wave signals using wavelets, which are then fed to statistical pattern classification algorithms that identify flaw severity. In order to achieve the highest classification accuracy, an optimal feature space is required but it's never known a priori which features are going to be best. For structural health monitoring we make use of the fact that physical flaws, such as corrosion, will only increase over time. This allows us to identify feature vectors which are topologically well-behaved by requiring that sequential classes "line up" in feature vector space. An intelligent feature selection routine is illustrated that identifies favorable class distributions in multi-dimensional feature spaces using computational homology theory. Betti numbers and formal classification accuracies are calculated for each feature space subset to establish a correlation between the topology of the class distribution and the corresponding classification accuracy.

  15. Evaluation of traditional medicines I: identification of PHELA using different chromatographic techniques.

    PubMed

    Lekhooa, Makhotso; Walubo, Andrew; Du Plessis, Jan J B; Matsabisa, Motlalepula C; Molefe, Duduzile

    2012-01-01

    PHELA is a herbal mixture of four African traditional medicinal plants that has been used for decades in wasting conditions and is now being developed by the Medical Research Council (MRC) as an immune booster for patients with compromised immune system. A chromatographic fingerprint of PHELA was needed for quality control purposes. Here, a comprehensive method for fingerprinting of PHELA using different chromatographic techniques is described. It involved extraction of the PHELA by either acidic or a simple 'salting-out' method, followed by Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) analysis and/or preparative Column Chromatography (CC). The products were thereafter analyzed by High Performance Liquid Chromatography with UV-detector (HPLC-UV), HPLC with fluorescence-detector (HPLC-FL) and Gas-Chromatography with a Mass Selective Detector spectrometer (GC-MSD). The fingerprints were successfully used to differentiate PHELA from another common herbal product made from Hypericum perforatum (St. John's Wort), thereby illustrating its high potential for use in fingerprinting of PHELA and in differentiating it from other herbal medicines. By validating the different chromatographic techniques on the standardized extraction methods, this approach will enable wide application in quality control of PHELA using acceptable procedures, thereby promoting effective monitoring of the finished product in all countries where it will be used.

  16. Identification of distinct movement patterns in Pacific leatherback turtle populations influenced by ocean conditions.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen; Benson, Scott R; Shillinger, George L; Bograd, Steven J; Dutton, Peter H; Eckert, Scott A; Morreale, Stephen J; Paladino, Frank V; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Foley, David G; Block, Barbara A; Piedra, Rotney; Hitipeuw, Creusa; Tapilatu, Ricardo F; Spotila, James R

    2012-04-01

    Interactions with fisheries are believed to be a major cause of mortality for adult leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea), which is of particular concern in the Pacific Ocean, where they have been rapidly declining. In order to identify where these interactions are occurring and how they may be reduced, it is essential first to understand the movements and behavior of leatherback turtles. There are two regional nesting populations in the East Pacific (EP) and West Pacific (WP), comprising multiple nesting sites. We synthesized tracking data from the two populations and compared their movement patterns. A switching state-space model was applied to 135 Argos satellite tracks to account for observation error, and to distinguish between migratory and area-restricted search behaviors. The tracking data, from the largest leatherback data set ever assembled, indicated that there was a high degree of spatial segregation between EP and WP leatherbacks. Area-restricted search behavior mainly occurred in the southeast Pacific for the EP leatherbacks, whereas the WP leatherbacks had several different search areas in the California Current, central North Pacific, South China Sea, off eastern Indonesia, and off southeastern Australia. We also extracted remotely sensed oceanographic data and applied a generalized linear mixed model to determine if leatherbacks exhibited different behavior in relation to environmental variables. For the WP population, the probability of area-restricted search behavior was positively correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. This response was less strong in the EP population, but these turtles had a higher probability of search behavior where there was greater Ekman upwelling, which may increase the transport of nutrients and consequently prey availability. These divergent responses to oceanographic conditions have implications for leatherback vulnerability to fisheries interactions and to the effects of climate change. The occurrence of

  17. Identification of distinct movement patterns in Pacific leatherback turtle populations influenced by ocean conditions.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Helen; Benson, Scott R; Shillinger, George L; Bograd, Steven J; Dutton, Peter H; Eckert, Scott A; Morreale, Stephen J; Paladino, Frank V; Eguchi, Tomoharu; Foley, David G; Block, Barbara A; Piedra, Rotney; Hitipeuw, Creusa; Tapilatu, Ricardo F; Spotila, James R

    2012-04-01

    Interactions with fisheries are believed to be a major cause of mortality for adult leatherback turtles (Dermochelys coriacea), which is of particular concern in the Pacific Ocean, where they have been rapidly declining. In order to identify where these interactions are occurring and how they may be reduced, it is essential first to understand the movements and behavior of leatherback turtles. There are two regional nesting populations in the East Pacific (EP) and West Pacific (WP), comprising multiple nesting sites. We synthesized tracking data from the two populations and compared their movement patterns. A switching state-space model was applied to 135 Argos satellite tracks to account for observation error, and to distinguish between migratory and area-restricted search behaviors. The tracking data, from the largest leatherback data set ever assembled, indicated that there was a high degree of spatial segregation between EP and WP leatherbacks. Area-restricted search behavior mainly occurred in the southeast Pacific for the EP leatherbacks, whereas the WP leatherbacks had several different search areas in the California Current, central North Pacific, South China Sea, off eastern Indonesia, and off southeastern Australia. We also extracted remotely sensed oceanographic data and applied a generalized linear mixed model to determine if leatherbacks exhibited different behavior in relation to environmental variables. For the WP population, the probability of area-restricted search behavior was positively correlated with chlorophyll-a concentration. This response was less strong in the EP population, but these turtles had a higher probability of search behavior where there was greater Ekman upwelling, which may increase the transport of nutrients and consequently prey availability. These divergent responses to oceanographic conditions have implications for leatherback vulnerability to fisheries interactions and to the effects of climate change. The occurrence of

  18. Drug delivery patterns for different stenting techniques in coronary bifurcations: a comparative computational study.

    PubMed

    Cutrì, Elena; Zunino, Paolo; Morlacchi, Stefano; Chiastra, Claudio; Migliavacca, Francesco

    2013-08-01

    The treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions represents a challenge for the interventional cardiologists due to the lower rate of procedural success and the higher risk of restenosis. The advent of drug-eluting stents (DES) has dramatically reduced restenosis and consequently the request for re-intervention. The aim of the present work is to provide further insight about the effectiveness of DES by means of a computational study that combines virtual stent implantation, fluid dynamics and drug release for different stenting protocols currently used in the treatment of a coronary artery bifurcation. An explicit dynamic finite element model is developed in order to obtain realistic configurations of the implanted devices used to perform fluid dynamics analysis by means of a previously developed finite element method coupling the blood flow and the intramural plasma filtration in rigid arteries. To efficiently model the drug release, a multiscale strategy is adopted, ranging from lumped parameter model accounting for drug release to fully 3-D models for drug transport to the artery. Differences in drug delivery to the artery are evaluated with respect to local drug dosage. This model allowed to compare alternative stenting configurations (namely the Provisional Side Branch, the Culotte and the Inverted Culotte techniques), thus suggesting guidelines in the treatment of coronary bifurcation lesions and addressing clinical issues such as the effectiveness of drug delivery to lesions in the side branch, as well as the influence of incomplete strut apposition and overlapping stents.

  19. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Identification in Tegumentary Lesions of Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis and Different Patterns of NETs Generation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Della Coletta, Amanda Manoel; Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; de Quaglia e Silva, Juliana Carvalho; Soares, Ângela Maria Victoriano de Campos; De Faveri, Julio; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis, endemic in most Latin American countries, especially in Brazil. It is caused by the thermo-dimorphic fungus of the genus Paracoccidioides (Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii). Innate immune response plays a crucial role in host defense against fungal infections, and neutrophils (PMNs) are able to combat microorganisms with three different mechanisms: phagocytosis, secretion of granular proteins, which have antimicrobial properties, and the most recent described mechanism called NETosis. This new process is characterized by the release of net-like structures called Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), which is composed of nuclear (decondensed DNA and histones) and granular material such as elastase. Several microorganisms have the ability of inducing NETs formation, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, viruses and some fungi. We proposed to identify NETs in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM and to analyze the interaction between two strains of P. brasiliensis and human PMNs by NETs formation in vitro. In this context, the presence of NETs in vivo was evidenced in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM by confocal spectrum analyzer. Furthermore, we showed that the high virulent P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18) and the lower virulent strain Pb265 are able to induce different patterns of NETs formation in vitro. The quantification of extracellular DNA corroborates the idea of the ability of P. brasiliensis in inducing NETs release. In conclusion, our data show for the first time the identification of NETs in lesions of patients with PCM and demonstrate distinct patterns of NETs in cultures challenged with fungi in vitro. The presence of NETs components both in vivo and in vitro open new possibilities for the detailed investigation of immunity in PCM. PMID:26327485

  20. Neutrophil Extracellular Traps Identification in Tegumentary Lesions of Patients with Paracoccidioidomycosis and Different Patterns of NETs Generation In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Della Coletta, Amanda Manoel; Bachiega, Tatiana Fernanda; de Quaglia e Silva, Juliana Carvalho; Soares, Ângela Maria Victoriano de Campos; De Faveri, Julio; Marques, Silvio Alencar; Marques, Mariângela Esther Alencar; Ximenes, Valdecir Farias; Dias-Melicio, Luciane Alarcão

    2015-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) is a systemic mycosis, endemic in most Latin American countries, especially in Brazil. It is caused by the thermo-dimorphic fungus of the genus Paracoccidioides (Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and Paracoccidioides lutzii). Innate immune response plays a crucial role in host defense against fungal infections, and neutrophils (PMNs) are able to combat microorganisms with three different mechanisms: phagocytosis, secretion of granular proteins, which have antimicrobial properties, and the most recent described mechanism called NETosis. This new process is characterized by the release of net-like structures called Neutrophil Extracellular Traps (NETs), which is composed of nuclear (decondensed DNA and histones) and granular material such as elastase. Several microorganisms have the ability of inducing NETs formation, including gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, viruses and some fungi. We proposed to identify NETs in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM and to analyze the interaction between two strains of P. brasiliensis and human PMNs by NETs formation in vitro. In this context, the presence of NETs in vivo was evidenced in tegumentary lesions of patients with PCM by confocal spectrum analyzer. Furthermore, we showed that the high virulent P. brasiliensis strain 18 (Pb18) and the lower virulent strain Pb265 are able to induce different patterns of NETs formation in vitro. The quantification of extracellular DNA corroborates the idea of the ability of P. brasiliensis in inducing NETs release. In conclusion, our data show for the first time the identification of NETs in lesions of patients with PCM and demonstrate distinct patterns of NETs in cultures challenged with fungi in vitro. The presence of NETs components both in vivo and in vitro open new possibilities for the detailed investigation of immunity in PCM. PMID:26327485

  1. Classification-based data mining for identification of risk patterns associated with hypertension in Middle Eastern population

    PubMed Central

    Ramezankhani, Azra; Kabir, Ali; Pournik, Omid; Azizi, Fereidoun; Hadaegh, Farzad

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hypertension is a critical public health concern worldwide. Identification of risk factors using traditional multivariable models has been a field of active research. The present study was undertaken to identify risk patterns associated with hypertension incidence using data mining methods in a cohort of Iranian adult population. Data on 6205 participants (44% men) age > 20 years, free from hypertension at baseline with no history of cardiovascular disease, were used to develop a series of prediction models by 3 types of decision tree (DT) algorithms. The performances of all classifiers were evaluated on the testing data set. The Quick Unbiased Efficient Statistical Tree algorithm among men and women and Classification and Regression Tree among the total population had the best performance. The C-statistic and sensitivity for the prediction models were (0.70 and 71%) in men, (0.79 and 71%) in women, and (0.78 and 72%) in total population, respectively. In DT models, systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure, age, and waist circumference significantly contributed to the risk of incident hypertension in both genders and total population, wrist circumference and 2-h postchallenge plasma glucose among women and fasting plasma glucose among men. In men, the highest hypertension risk was seen in those with SBP > 115 mm Hg and age > 30 years. In women those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 33 years had the highest risk for hypertension. For the total population, higher risk was observed in those with SBP > 114 mm Hg and age > 38 years. Our study emphasizes the utility of DTs for prediction of hypertension and exploring interaction between predictors. DT models used the easily available variables to identify homogeneous subgroups with different risk pattern for the hypertension. PMID:27583845

  2. An interlaboratory comparison of nanosilver characterisation and hazard identification: Harmonising techniques for high quality data.

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Kahru, Anne; Potthoff, Annegret; Drobne, Damjana; Heinlaan, Margit; Böhme, Steffi; Geppert, Mark; Novak, Sara; Schirmer, Kristin; Rekulapally, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Juganson, Katre; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kühnel, Dana

    2016-02-01

    metal ions species in each toxicity test medium at a range of concentrations, and (ii) including soluble metal salt control both in toxicity testing as well as in Ag(+)-species measurements. The present study is among the first nanomaterial interlaboratory comparison studies with the aim to improve the hazard identification testing protocols.

  3. An interlaboratory comparison of nanosilver characterisation and hazard identification: Harmonising techniques for high quality data.

    PubMed

    Jemec, Anita; Kahru, Anne; Potthoff, Annegret; Drobne, Damjana; Heinlaan, Margit; Böhme, Steffi; Geppert, Mark; Novak, Sara; Schirmer, Kristin; Rekulapally, Rohit; Singh, Shashi; Aruoja, Villem; Sihtmäe, Mariliis; Juganson, Katre; Käkinen, Aleksandr; Kühnel, Dana

    2016-02-01

    metal ions species in each toxicity test medium at a range of concentrations, and (ii) including soluble metal salt control both in toxicity testing as well as in Ag(+)-species measurements. The present study is among the first nanomaterial interlaboratory comparison studies with the aim to improve the hazard identification testing protocols. PMID:26638016

  4. Identification and quantification of cooling water biofilms using fluorescent staining and ATP monitoring techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Chalut, J.; Cairns, J.; Korkorian, N.

    1994-12-31

    Biofilm formation can create corrosion problems in industrial water systems. Control of biofilms is achieved most effectively when the mechanism of formation is understood. The use of traditional microbiological analyses such as plate counts and dipslides to analyze deposits provides insufficient information about viable cell content and their role in deposit formation. The ATP assay, a newer technology, is more useful but only measures total living biomass. In order to assess the potential for biofouling in cooling water systems, novel staining and monitoring techniques have been developed. Staining technology allows characterization and assessment of biofilm composition. This staining methodology is used to complement ATP analysis of field samples. Case histories are used to illustrate the benefits of this approach. Case histories included a textile manufacturing plant, an oil refinery, and a pulp and paper mill.

  5. Identification of damage in a suspension component using narrowband and broadband nonlinear signal processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haroon, Muhammad; Adams, Douglas E.

    2007-04-01

    Fatigue tests on a stabilizer bar link of an automotive suspension system are used to initiate a crack and grow the crack size. During these tests, slow sine sweeps are used to extract narrowband restoring forces across the stabilizer bar link. The restoring forces are shown to characterize the nonlinear changes in component internal forces due to crack growth. Broadband frequency response domain techniques are used to analyze the durability response data. Nonlinear frequency domain models of the dynamic transmissibility across the cracked region are shown to change as a function of crack growth. Higher order spectra are used to show the increase in nonlinear coupling of response frequency components with the appearance and growth of the crack. It is shown that crack growth can be detected and characterized by the changes in nonlinear indicators.

  6. Identification techniques for highly boosted W bosons that decay into hadrons

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-12-02

    In searches for new physics in the energy regime of the LHC, it is becoming increasingly important to distinguish single-jet objects that originate from the merging of the decay products of W bosons produced with high transverse momenta from jets initiated by single partons. Algorithms are defined to identify such W jets for different signals of interest, using techniques that are also applicable to other decays of bosons to hadrons that result in a single jet, such as those from highly boosted Z and Higgs bosons. The efficiency for tagging W jets is measured in data collected with the CMSmore » detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The performance of W tagging in data is compared with predictions from several Monte Carlo simulators.« less

  7. Identification techniques for highly boosted W bosons that decay into hadrons

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-12-02

    In searches for new physics in the energy regime of the LHC, it is becoming increasingly important to distinguish single-jet objects that originate from the merging of the decay products of W bosons produced with high transverse momenta from jets initiated by single partons. Algorithms are defined to identify such W jets for different signals of interest, using techniques that are also applicable to other decays of bosons to hadrons that result in a single jet, such as those from highly boosted Z and Higgs bosons. The efficiency for tagging W jets is measured in data collected with the CMS detector at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The performance of W tagging in data is compared with predictions from several Monte Carlo simulators.

  8. Identification of legal highs--ergot alkaloid patterns in two Argyreia nervosa products.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Kremer, Christian; Wunder, Cora; Wurglics, Mario; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays psychoactive plants marketed as "legal highs" or "herbal highs" increase in popularity. One popular "legal high" are the seeds of the Hawaiian baby woodrose Argyreia nervosa (Synonym: Argyreia speciosa, Convolvolus speciosus). At present there exists no study on A. nervosa seeds or products, which are used by consumers. The quality of commercial available A. nervosa seeds or products is completely unknown. In the present study, a commercial available seed collection (five seeds labeled "flash of inspiration", FOI) was analyzed for ergot alkaloids together with an A. nervosa product (two preparations in capsule form, "druids fantasy", DF). For this purpose high performance liquid chromatography high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS/MS) technique was employed. Besides the major ingredients such as lysergic acid amide (LSA) and ergometrine the well known A. nervosa compounds lysergol/elymoclavine/setoclavine, chanoclavine and the respective stereoisomers were detected in DF, while only LSA and ergometrine could be found in FOI. In addition, in DF lysergic acid was found, which has not been reported yet as ingredient of A. nervosa. In both products, DF as well as in FOI, LSA/LSA-isomers were dominant with 83-84% followed by ergometrine/ergometrinine with 10-17%. Therefore, LSA, followed by ergometrine/ergometrinine, could be confirmed to be the main ergot alkaloids present in A. nervosa seeds/products whereas the other ergot alkaloids seemed to be of minor importance (less than 6.1% in DF). The total ergot alkaloid amounts varied considerably between DF and FOI by a factor of 8.6 as well as the LSA concentration ranging from 3 μg (lowest amount in one FOI seed) to approximately 34 μg (highest amount in one DF capsule). Among the FOI seeds, the LSA concentration varied from approximately 3-15 μg per seed. Thus, the quality/potency of seeds/preparations depends on the amount of ergot alkaloids and the intensity of an expected trip is totally

  9. Identification of legal highs--ergot alkaloid patterns in two Argyreia nervosa products.

    PubMed

    Paulke, Alexander; Kremer, Christian; Wunder, Cora; Wurglics, Mario; Schubert-Zsilavecz, Manfred; Toennes, Stefan W

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays psychoactive plants marketed as "legal highs" or "herbal highs" increase in popularity. One popular "legal high" are the seeds of the Hawaiian baby woodrose Argyreia nervosa (Synonym: Argyreia speciosa, Convolvolus speciosus). At present there exists no study on A. nervosa seeds or products, which are used by consumers. The quality of commercial available A. nervosa seeds or products is completely unknown. In the present study, a commercial available seed collection (five seeds labeled "flash of inspiration", FOI) was analyzed for ergot alkaloids together with an A. nervosa product (two preparations in capsule form, "druids fantasy", DF). For this purpose high performance liquid chromatography high resolution tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-HRMS/MS) technique was employed. Besides the major ingredients such as lysergic acid amide (LSA) and ergometrine the well known A. nervosa compounds lysergol/elymoclavine/setoclavine, chanoclavine and the respective stereoisomers were detected in DF, while only LSA and ergometrine could be found in FOI. In addition, in DF lysergic acid was found, which has not been reported yet as ingredient of A. nervosa. In both products, DF as well as in FOI, LSA/LSA-isomers were dominant with 83-84% followed by ergometrine/ergometrinine with 10-17%. Therefore, LSA, followed by ergometrine/ergometrinine, could be confirmed to be the main ergot alkaloids present in A. nervosa seeds/products whereas the other ergot alkaloids seemed to be of minor importance (less than 6.1% in DF). The total ergot alkaloid amounts varied considerably between DF and FOI by a factor of 8.6 as well as the LSA concentration ranging from 3 μg (lowest amount in one FOI seed) to approximately 34 μg (highest amount in one DF capsule). Among the FOI seeds, the LSA concentration varied from approximately 3-15 μg per seed. Thus, the quality/potency of seeds/preparations depends on the amount of ergot alkaloids and the intensity of an expected trip is totally

  10. Identification criteria of the rare multi-flagellate Lophomonas blattarum: comparison of different staining techniques.

    PubMed

    Alam-Eldin, Yosra Hussein; Abdulaziz, Amany Mamdouh

    2015-09-01

    Bronchopulmonary lophomoniasis (BPL) is an emerging disease of potential importance. BPL is presented by non-specific clinical picture and is usually accompanied by immunosuppression. Culture of Lophomonas blattarum is difficult and its molecular diagnosis has not yet been developed. Therefore, microscopic examination of respiratory samples, e.g., bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) or sputum, is the mainstay of BPL diagnosis. Creola bodies and ciliocytophthoria are two forms of bronchial cells which occur in chest diseases with non-specific clinical picture like that of BPL. Both forms could be misrecognized as multi-flagellates because of their motile cilia in the wet mounts and due to shape variability of L. blattarum in stained smears. The aim of the study is to compare different staining techniques for visualizing L. blattarum to improve the recognition and diagnosis of BPL, to distinguish respiratory epithelial cells from L. blattarum and to decide which stain is recommended in suspected cases of BPL. BAL samples from patients which contain L. blattarum, creola bodies, and ciliocytophthoria were collected then wet mounts were examined. The BAL samples were also stained by Papanicolaou (PAP), Giemsa, hematoxylin and eosin (H & E), trichrome, Gram, and Diff-Quik (DQ) stains. The different staining techniques were compared regarding the stain quality. In wet mounts, the ciliary movement was coordinate and synchronous while the flagellar movement was wavy and leaded to active swimming of L. blattarum. In stained slides, bronchial cells were characterized by the presence of basal nucleus and the terminal bar from which the cilia arise. Trichrome was the best stain in demonstration of cellular details of L. blattarum. H & E, PAP, and Giemsa stains showed good quality of stains. Gram and DQ stains showed only pale hues of L. blattarum. We recommended adding Wheatley's trichrome staining to the differential diagnosis workup of cases of non-specific chest infections

  11. A new material identification pattern for the fractional Kelvin-Zener model describing biomaterials and human tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spasic, Dragan T.; Kovincic, Nemanja I.; Dankuc, Dragan V.

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this study is to describe several biomaterials and tissues using a simple material identification pattern applied to the fractional Kelvin-Zener model of viscoelastic body and standard mechanical tests. Each of the descriptions comprises the order of fractional derivative of stress and strain, modulus of elasticity, and stress and strain relaxation constants that obey restrictions imposed by the Clausius-Duhem inequality. These four parameters are obtained by use of the Laplace transform, Post's inversion formula and Newton's method. The suggested approach can serve as an alternative to quasilinear viscoelasticity providing a physically uniform quantitative measure for biomaterials/tissues comparison and can be applied to real data. It works for nonsmooth inputs too. Regarding biomaterials the comparison between an etched poly lactic-co-glycolic acid membrane and the corresponding composite scaffold was made. With respect to human tissues the tympanic membrane, the stapedial tendon, and the stapedial annular ligament were described. The obtained mechanical response for examined cases is in agreement with the experimentally recorded one.

  12. A new method for the identification and quantification of magnetite-maghemite mixture using conventional X-ray diffraction technique.

    PubMed

    Kim, Wonbaek; Suh, Chang-Yul; Cho, Sung-Wook; Roh, Ki-Min; Kwon, Hanjung; Song, Kyungsun; Shon, In-Jin

    2012-05-30

    The electrical explosion of Fe wire in air produced nanoparticles containing the binary mixture of magnetite (Fe(3)O(4)) and maghemite (γ-Fe(2)O(3)). The phase identification of magnetite and maghemite by the conventional X-ray diffraction method is not a simple matter because both have the same cubic structure and their lattice parameters are almost identical. Here, we propose a convenient method to assess the presence of magnetite-maghemite mixture and to further quantify its phase composition using the conventional peak deconvolution technique. A careful step scan around the high-angle peaks as (511) and (440) revealed the clear doublets indicative of the mixture phases. The quantitative analysis of the mixture phase was carried out by constructing a calibration curve using the pure magnetite and maghemite powders commercially available. The correlation coefficients, R(2), for magnetite-maghemite mixture was 0.9941. According to the method, the iron oxide nanoparticles prepared by the wire explosion in this study was calculated to contain 55.8 wt.% maghemite and 44.2 wt.% magnetite. We believe that the proposed method would be a convenient tool for the study of the magnetite-maghemite mixture which otherwise requires highly sophisticated equipments and techniques.

  13. Electronic speckle pattern interferometry technique for the measurement of complex mechanical structures for aero-spatial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restrepo, René; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Garranzo, Daniel; Pintado, José M.; Frovel, Malte; Belenguer, Tomás

    2010-09-01

    Using the electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) technique in the in-plane arrangement, the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of a composite material that will be used in a passive focusing mechanism of an aerospace mission was measured. This measurement with ESPI was compared with another interferometric method (Differential Interferometer), whose principal characteristic is its high accuracy, but the measurement is only local. As a final step, the results have been used to provide feedback with the finite element analysis (FEA). Before the composite material measurements, a quality assessment of the technique was carried out measuring the CTE of Aluminum 6061-T6. Both techniques were compared with the datasheet delivered by the supplier. A review of the basic concepts was done, especially with regards to ESPI, and the considerations to predict the quality in the fringes formation were explained. Also, a review of the basic concepts for the mechanical calculation in composite materials was done. The CTE of the composite material found was 4.69X10-6 +/- 3X10-6K-1. The most important advantage between ESPI and differential interferometry is that ESPI provides more information due to its intrinsic extended area, surface deformation reconstruction, in comparison with the strictly local measurement of differential interferometry

  14. Analysis of Culture-Dependent versus Culture-Independent Techniques for Identification of Bacteria in Clinically Obtained Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Dickson, Robert P.; Erb-Downward, John R.; Prescott, Hallie C.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Curtis, Jeffrey L.; Lama, Vibha N.

    2014-01-01

    The diagnosis and management of pneumonia are limited by the use of culture-based techniques of microbial identification, which may fail to identify unculturable, fastidious, and metabolically active viable but unculturable bacteria. Novel high-throughput culture-independent techniques hold promise but have not been systematically compared to conventional culture. We analyzed 46 clinically obtained bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from symptomatic and asymptomatic lung transplant recipients both by culture (using a clinical microbiology laboratory protocol) and by bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Bacteria were identified in 44 of 46 (95.7%) BAL fluid specimens by culture-independent sequencing, significantly more than the number of specimens in which bacteria were detected (37 of 46, 80.4%, P ≤ 0.05) or “pathogen” species reported (18 of 46, 39.1%, P ≤ 0.0001) via culture. Identification of bacteria by culture was positively associated with culture-independent indices of infection (total bacterial DNA burden and low bacterial community diversity) (P ≤ 0.01). In BAL fluid specimens with no culture growth, the amount of bacterial DNA was greater than that in reagent and rinse controls, and communities were markedly dominated by select Gammaproteobacteria, notably Escherichia species and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Culture growth above the threshold of 104 CFU/ml was correlated with increased bacterial DNA burden (P < 0.01), decreased community diversity (P < 0.05), and increased relative abundance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.001). We present two case studies in which culture-independent techniques identified a respiratory pathogen missed by culture and clarified whether a cultured “oral flora” species represented a state of acute infection. In summary, we found that bacterial culture of BAL fluid is largely effective in discriminating acute infection from its absence and identified some specific limitations of BAL fluid culture in

  15. Analysis of culture-dependent versus culture-independent techniques for identification of bacteria in clinically obtained bronchoalveolar lavage fluid.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Robert P; Erb-Downward, John R; Prescott, Hallie C; Martinez, Fernando J; Curtis, Jeffrey L; Lama, Vibha N; Huffnagle, Gary B

    2014-10-01

    The diagnosis and management of pneumonia are limited by the use of culture-based techniques of microbial identification, which may fail to identify unculturable, fastidious, and metabolically active viable but unculturable bacteria. Novel high-throughput culture-independent techniques hold promise but have not been systematically compared to conventional culture. We analyzed 46 clinically obtained bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from symptomatic and asymptomatic lung transplant recipients both by culture (using a clinical microbiology laboratory protocol) and by bacterial 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Bacteria were identified in 44 of 46 (95.7%) BAL fluid specimens by culture-independent sequencing, significantly more than the number of specimens in which bacteria were detected (37 of 46, 80.4%, P ≤ 0.05) or "pathogen" species reported (18 of 46, 39.1%, P ≤ 0.0001) via culture. Identification of bacteria by culture was positively associated with culture-independent indices of infection (total bacterial DNA burden and low bacterial community diversity) (P ≤ 0.01). In BAL fluid specimens with no culture growth, the amount of bacterial DNA was greater than that in reagent and rinse controls, and communities were markedly dominated by select Gammaproteobacteria, notably Escherichia species and Pseudomonas fluorescens. Culture growth above the threshold of 10(4) CFU/ml was correlated with increased bacterial DNA burden (P < 0.01), decreased community diversity (P < 0.05), and increased relative abundance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P < 0.001). We present two case studies in which culture-independent techniques identified a respiratory pathogen missed by culture and clarified whether a cultured "oral flora" species represented a state of acute infection. In summary, we found that bacterial culture of BAL fluid is largely effective in discriminating acute infection from its absence and identified some specific limitations of BAL fluid culture in the

  16. Identification of possible factors influencing temperatures elevation during implant site preparation with piezoelectric technique

    PubMed Central

    Lamazza, Luca; Laurito, Domenica; Lollobrigida, Marco; Brugnoletti, Orlando; Garreffa, Girolamo; De Biase, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Overheating during implant site preparation negatively affects the osseointegration process as well the final outcome of implant rehabilitations. Piezoelectric techniques seem to provide to a gentle implant preparation although few scientific reports have investigated the heat generation and its underlying factors. Purpose To investigate, through a proper methodological approach, the main factors influencing temperature rise during piezoelectric implant site preparation. Materials and methods Different piezoelectric tips (IM1s, IM2, P2-3, IM3, Mectron Medical Technology, Carasco, Italy) have been tested. The experimental set-up consisted in a mechanical positioning device equipped with a load cell and a fluoroptic thermometer. Results The first tip of the sequence (IM1s) generated the highest temperature increasing (ΔT). The diamond tips (IM1s and P2-3) determined higher ΔT values than the smooth tips (IM2 and IM3). Further tests with IM1s suggested that the temperature elevation during the first thirty seconds may be predictive of the maximal temperature as well as of the overall thermal impact. Conclusions Working load, working movements management and bone features resulted to be the main factors influencing temperature rise during piezoelectric implant site preparation. Irrigant temperature and clogging effect may also synergically contribute to the heat generation. PMID:25774245

  17. Identification of nuclear proteins in soybean under flooding stress using proteomic technique.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong Won; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-05-01

    Flooding stress restricts soybean growth, it results in decrease the production. In this report, to understand how nuclear proteins in soybean affected by flooding, abundance changes of those proteins was analyzed. Nuclear proteins were extracted from the root tips of soybean treated with or without flooding stress. The extracted proteins were analyzed using a label-free quantitative proteomic technique. Of a total of 94 nuclear proteins that were found to be responsive to flooding, the 19 and 75 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively. The identified flooding-responsive proteins were functionally classified, revealing that 8 increased proteins changed in protein synthesis, posttranslational modification, and protein degradation, while 34 decreased proteins were involved in transcription, RNA processing, DNA synthesis, and chromatin structure maintenance. Among these proteins, those whose levels changed more than 10 fold included two poly ADP-ribose polymerases and a novel G-domain-containing protein that might be involved in RNA binding. The mRNA expression levels of these three proteins indicated a similar tendency to their protein abundance changes. These results suggest that acceleration of protein poly-ADP-ribosylation and suppression of RNA metabolism may be involved in root tip of soybean under flooding stress.

  18. Fault identification using multidisciplinary techniques at the Mars/Uranus Station antenna sites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Santo, D. S.; Schluter, M. B.; Shlemon, R. J.

    1992-01-01

    A fault investigation was performed at the Mars and Uranus antenna sites at the Goldstone Deep Space Communications Complex in the Mojave desert. The Mars/Uranus Station consists of two large-diameter reflector antennas used for communication and control of deep-space probes and other missions. The investigation included interpretation of Landsat thematic mapper scenes, side-looking airborne radar transparencies, and both color-infrared and black-and-white aerial photography. Four photolineaments suggestive of previously undocumented faults were identified. Three generally discrete morphostratigraphic alluvial-fan deposits were also recognized and dated using geomorphic and soil stratigraphic techniques. Fourteen trenches were excavated across the four lineaments; the trenches show that three of the photolineaments coincide with faults. The last displacement of two of the faults occurred between about 12,000 and 35,000 years ago. The third fault was judged to be older than 12,000 years before present (ybp), although uncertainty remains. None of the surface traces of the three faults crosses under existing antennas or structures; however, their potential activity necessitates appropriate seismic retrofit designs and loss-prevention measures to mitigate potential earthquake damage to facilities and structures.

  19. Modeling the tagged-neutron UXO identification technique using the Geant4 toolkit

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Y.; Mitra S.; Zhu X.; Wang Y.

    2011-10-16

    It is proposed to use 14 MeV neutrons tagged by the associated particle neutron time-of-flight technique (APnTOF) to identify the fillers of unexploded ordnances (UXO) by characterizing their carbon, nitrogen and oxygen contents. To facilitate the design and construction of a prototype system, a preliminary simulation model was developed, using the Geant4 toolkit. This work established the toolkit environment for (a) generating tagged neutrons, (b) their transport and interactions within a sample to induce emission and detection of characteristic gamma-rays, and (c) 2D and 3D-image reconstruction of the interrogated object using the neutron and gamma-ray time-of-flight information. Using the modeling, this article demonstrates the novelty of the tagged-neutron approach for extracting useful signals with high signal-to-background discrimination of an object-of-interest from that of its environment. Simulations indicated that an UXO filled with the RDX explosive, hexogen (C{sub 3}H{sub 6}O{sub 6}N{sub 6}), can be identified to a depth of 20 cm when buried in soil.

  20. Identification of the finishing technique of an early eighteenth century musical instrument using FTIR spectromicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Loïc; Robinet, Laurianne; Cohen, Serge X; Sandt, Christophe; Le Hô, Anne-Solenn; Soulier, Balthazar; Lattuati-Derieux, Agnès; Echard, Jean-Philippe

    2011-03-01

    The study of varnishes from musical instruments presents the difficulty of analysing very thin layers of heterogeneous materials on samples most of which are generally brittle and difficult to prepare. Such study is crucial to the understanding of historical musical instrument varnishing practices since written sources before 1800 are very rare and not precise. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and imaging methods were applied to identify the major chemical components within the build-up of the varnish layers on a cello made by one of the most prominent French violin-makers of the eighteenth century (Jacques Boquay, ca. 1680-1730). Two types of FTIR imaging methods were used: scanning with a synchrotron-based microscope and full-field imaging using a 2D imager with a conventional source. An interpretation of the results obtained from these studies on the Boquay cello is that the maker first applied a proteinaceous layer, probably gelatine-based animal glue. He later applied a second layer based on a mixture of a drying oil and diterpenic resin from Pinaceae sp. From an historical perspective, the results complement previous studies by describing a second technique used for musical instrument finishes at the beginning of the eighteenth century in Europe. PMID:20963401