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Sample records for patterned subwavelength apertures

  1. Terahertz near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures and a quantum cascade laser source.

    PubMed

    Baragwanath, Adam J; Freeman, Joshua R; Gallant, Andrew J; Zeitler, J Axel; Beere, Harvey E; Ritchie, David A; Chamberlain, J Martyn

    2011-07-01

    The first demonstration, to our knowledge, of near-field imaging using subwavelength plasmonic apertures with a terahertz quantum cascade laser source is presented. "Bull's-eye" apertures, featuring subwavelength circular apertures flanked by periodic annular corrugations were created using a novel fabrication method. A fivefold increase in intensity was observed for plasmonic apertures over plain apertures of the same diameter. Detailed studies of the transmitted beam profiles were undertaken for apertures with both planarized and corrugated exit facets, with the former producing spatially uniform intensity profiles and subwavelength spatial resolution. Finally, a proof-of-concept imaging experiment is presented, where an inhomogeneous pharmaceutical drug coating is investigated.

  2. The physics of light transmission through subwavelength apertures and aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiner, J.

    2009-06-01

    The passage of light through apertures much smaller than the wavelength of the light has proved to be a surprisingly subtle phenomenon. This report describes how modern developments in nanofabrication, coherent light sources and numerical vector field simulations have led to the upending of early predictions from scalar diffraction theory and classical electrodynamics. Optical response of real materials to incident coherent radiation at petahertz frequencies leads to unexpected consequences for transmission and extinction of light through subwavelength aperture arrays. This paper is a report on progress in our understanding of this phenomenon over the past decade.

  3. Anomalous light absorption around subwavelength apertures in metal films.

    PubMed

    Lozan, O; Perrin, M; Ea-Kim, B; Rampnoux, J M; Dilhaire, S; Lalanne, P

    2014-05-16

    In this Letter, we study the heat dissipated at metal surfaces by the electromagnetic field scattered by isolated subwavelength apertures in metal screens. In contrast to the common belief that the intensity of waves created by local sources should decrease with the distance from the sources, we reveal that the dissipated heat at the surface remains constant over a broad spatial interval. This behavior that occurs for noble metals at near infrared wavelengths is observed with nonintrusive thermoreflectance measurements and is explained with an analytical model, which underlines the intricate role played by quasicylindrical waves in the phenomenon. Additionally, we show that, by monitoring the phase of the quasicylindrical waves, the total heat dissipated at the metal surface can be rendered substantially smaller than the heat dissipated by the launched plasmon. This interesting property offers an alternative to amplification for overcoming the loss issue in miniaturized plasmonic devices.

  4. Spectral light separator based on deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film

    SciTech Connect

    Büyükalp, Yasin; Catrysse, Peter B. Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui

    2014-07-07

    We propose to funnel, select, and collect light spectrally by exploiting the unique properties of deep-subwavelength resonant apertures in a metallic film. In our approach, each aperture has an electromagnetic cross section that is much larger than its physical size while the frequency of the collected light is controlled by its height through the Fabry-Pérot resonance mechanism. The electromagnetic crosstalk between apertures remains low despite physical separations in the deep-subwavelength range. The resulting device enables an extremely efficient, subwavelength way to decompose light into its spectral components without the loss of photons and spatial coregistration errors. As a specific example, we show a subwavelength-size structure with three deep-subwavelength slits in a metallic film designed to operate in the mid-wave infrared range between 3 and 5.5 μm.

  5. Molecular recognition with nanostructures fabricated by photopolymerization within metallic subwavelength apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urraca, J. L.; Barrios, C. A.; Canalejas-Tejero, V.; Orellana, G.; Moreno-Bondi, M. C.

    2014-07-01

    The first demonstration of fabrication of submicron lateral resolution molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) patterns by photoinduced local polymerization within metal subwavelength apertures is reported. The size of the photopolymerized MIP features is finely tuned by the dose of 532 nm radiation. Rhodamine 123 (R123) has been selected as a fluorescent model template to prove the recognition capability of the MIP nanostructures, which has been evaluated by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with single photon timing measurements. The binding selectivity provided by the imprinting effect has been confirmed in the presence of compounds structurally related to R123. These results pave the way to the development of nanomaterial architectures with biomimetic artificial recognition properties for environmental, clinical and food testing.The first demonstration of fabrication of submicron lateral resolution molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) patterns by photoinduced local polymerization within metal subwavelength apertures is reported. The size of the photopolymerized MIP features is finely tuned by the dose of 532 nm radiation. Rhodamine 123 (R123) has been selected as a fluorescent model template to prove the recognition capability of the MIP nanostructures, which has been evaluated by fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) with single photon timing measurements. The binding selectivity provided by the imprinting effect has been confirmed in the presence of compounds structurally related to R123. These results pave the way to the development of nanomaterial architectures with biomimetic artificial recognition properties for environmental, clinical and food testing. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Fig. SI.1: chemical structure and acronyms of the different fluorescent dyes; optimization of polymer composition; Table SI.1. Template recovery after polymerization; determination of the binding capacity by equilibrium rebinding

  6. Dual-band-enhanced Transmission through a Subwavelength Aperture by Coupled Metamaterial Resonators

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    In classical mechanics, it is well known that a system consisting of two identical pendulums connected by a spring will steadily oscillate with two modes: one at the fundamental frequency of a single pendulum and one in which the frequency increases with the stiffness of the spring. Inspired by this physical concept, we present an analogous approach that uses two metamaterial resonators to realize dual-band-enhanced transmission of microwaves through a subwavelength aperture. The metamaterial resonators are formed by the periodically varying and strongly localized fields that occur in the two metal split-ring resonators, which are placed gap-to-gap on either side of the aperture. The dual-band frequency separation is determined by the coupling strength between the two resonators. Measured transmission spectra, simulated field distributions, and theoretical analyses verify our approach. PMID:25634496

  7. Surface wave splitter based on metallic gratings with sub-wavelength aperture.

    PubMed

    Caglayan, Humeyra; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2008-11-10

    We investigated the splitting of surface electromagnetic waves trapped at the output surface of a one-dimensional metallic grating structure. The output gratings of the structure asymmetrically such that the output surfaces at the different sides of the subwavelength aperture can support surface waves at different frequencies. The transmission amplitude as measured at the left side is 1,000 times of that at the right side at 16 GHz. At 24 GHz, the transmission measured at the right side is 20 times that of the left side of the structure. Therefore, surface waves are guided into the different sides of the aperture at different frequencies via metallic gratings. The experimental results are in agreement with the theoretical results.

  8. Dual-band-enhanced Transmission through a Subwavelength Aperture by Coupled Metamaterial Resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yunsheng; Zhou, Ji

    2015-01-01

    In classical mechanics, it is well known that a system consisting of two identical pendulums connected by a spring will steadily oscillate with two modes: one at the fundamental frequency of a single pendulum and one in which the frequency increases with the stiffness of the spring. Inspired by this physical concept, we present an analogous approach that uses two metamaterial resonators to realize dual-band-enhanced transmission of microwaves through a subwavelength aperture. The metamaterial resonators are formed by the periodically varying and strongly localized fields that occur in the two metal split-ring resonators, which are placed gap-to-gap on either side of the aperture. The dual-band frequency separation is determined by the coupling strength between the two resonators. Measured transmission spectra, simulated field distributions, and theoretical analyses verify our approach.

  9. Hand aperture patterns in prehension.

    PubMed

    Bongers, Raoul M; Zaal, Frank T J M; Jeannerod, Marc

    2012-06-01

    Although variations in the standard prehensile pattern can be found in the literature, these alternative patterns have never been studied systematically. This was the goal of the current paper. Ten participants picked up objects with a pincer grip. Objects (3, 5, or 7cm in diameter) were placed at 30, 60, 90, or 120cm from the hands' starting location. Usually the hand was opened gradually to a maximum immediately followed by hand closing, called the standard hand opening pattern. In the alternative opening patterns the hand opening was bumpy, or the hand aperture stayed at a plateau before closing started. Two participants in particular delayed the start of grasping with respect to start of reaching, with the delay time increasing with object distance. For larger object distances and smaller object sizes, the bumpy and plateau hand opening patterns were used more often. We tentatively concluded that the alternative hand opening patterns extended the hand opening phase, to arrive at the appropriate hand aperture at the appropriate time to close the hand for grasping the object. Variations in hand opening patterns deserve attention because this might lead to new insights into the coordination of reaching and grasping.

  10. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-17

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  11. Super sub-wavelength patterns in photon coincidence detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ruifeng; Zhang, Pei; Zhou, Yu; Gao, Hong; Li, Fuli

    2014-02-01

    High-precision measurements implemented with light are desired in all fields of science. However, light acts as a wave, and the Rayleigh criterion in classical optics yields a diffraction limit that prevents obtaining a resolution smaller than the wavelength. Sub-wavelength interference has potential application in lithography because it beats the classical Rayleigh resolution limit. Here, we carefully study second-order correlation theory to establish the physics behind sub-wavelength interference in photon coincidence detection. A Young's double slit experiment with pseudo-thermal light is performed to test the second-order correlation pattern. The results show that when two point detectors are scanned in different ways, super sub-wavelength interference patterns can be obtained. We then provide a theoretical explanation for this surprising result, and demonstrate that this explanation is also suitable for the results found for entangled light. Furthermore, we discuss the limitations of these types of super sub-wavelength interference patterns in quantum lithography.

  12. Diffraction theory of high numerical aperture subwavelength circular binary phase Fresnel zone plate.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yaoju; An, Hongchang; Zhang, Dong; Cui, Guihua; Ruan, Xiukai

    2014-11-03

    An analytical model of vector formalism is proposed to investigate the diffraction of high numerical aperture subwavelength circular binary phase Fresnel zone plate (FZP). In the proposed model, the scattering on the FZP's surface, reflection and refraction within groove zones are considered and diffraction fields are calculated using the vector Rayleigh-Sommerfeld integral. The numerical results obtained by the proposed phase thick FZP (TFZP) model show a good agreement with those obtained by the finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method within the effective extent of etch depth. The optimal etch depths predicted by both methods are approximately equal. The analytical TFZP model is very useful for designing a phase and hybrid amplitude-phase FZP with high-NA and short focal length.

  13. Experimental realization for abnormal reflection caused by an acoustic metasurface with subwavelength apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xuanjun; Zeng, Xinwu; Gao, Dongbao; Shen, Weidong; Wang, Jianli; Wang, Shengchun

    2017-03-01

    The reflection characteristics of the unit cell, consisting of a subwavelength circular hole and a rigid wall, was discussed theoretically, and it was found that the phase shift of the reflected waves could cover almost 2π span by adjusting the hole radius when the acoustic waves normally impinge on it. Based on the analytical formulas, an acoustic metasurface (AMS) sample constructed by an array of unit cells with different radii was designed and fabricated. The sound pressure fields induced by the sample were then measured through the experimental setup and the reflected field pattern was derived after data processing. Experimental results and COMSOL simulations both demonstrated the fact that the designed AMS has the ability to reflect acoustic waves into an unusual yet controllable direction, verifying the correctness of the theory and design about the AMS in this paper. Simulations also show that the designed AMS has a narrow working bandwidth of 50 Hz around 800 Hz and its total thickness is about 1/8 of the incident wavelength, giving it the potential for the miniaturization and integration of acoustic devices.

  14. Second harmonic generation from patterned GaAs inside a subwavelength metallic hole array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Wenjun; Zhang, Shuang; Malloy, K. J.; Brueck, S. R. J.; Panoiu, N. C.; Osgood, R. M.

    2006-10-01

    By extending GaAs dielectric posts with a large second-order nonlinear susceptibility through the holes of a subwavelength metallic hole array coupled to the metal surface-plasma wave, strong second harmonic (SH) signal is observed. The SH signal is strengthened as a result of the enhanced electromagnetic fields inside the hole apertures.

  15. Sub-wavelength pattern generation by laser direct writing via repeated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Klein-Wiele, Jan-Hendrik; Simon, Peter

    2013-01-14

    A simple technique is presented allowing the fabrication of high density periodic patterns via direct laser ablation. Applying fluence control for reducing the ablated feature sizes combined with lateral translation of an interference pattern between two (or more) irradiation cycles, sub-wavelength period patterns (< 200 nm) are created. Variation of the amount and direction of translation and the applied intensities during subsequent irradiation steps leads to variable pattern design as demonstrated for polymeric and silicon samples.

  16. Propagation characteristics of silver and tungsten subwavelength annular aperture generated sub-micron non-diffraction beams.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Tsung-Dar; Lin, Ding-Zheng; Yeh, Jyi-Tyan; Liu, Jonq-Min; Yeh, Chau-Shioung; Lee, Chih-Kung

    2009-03-30

    We examined the optical properties such as propagation modes, focal length, side lobes, etc. of metallic subwavelength annular apertures (SAA) and used finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulation to compare our experimental findings. Using two different metals, silver and tungsten, we examined the different optical transmission properties of the two metallic SAA structures. The far-field propagation of the silver SAA structure was found to be a type of quasi-Bessel beam when compared with a quasi-Bessel beam generated by a perfect axicon. The propagation characteristics of these two beams were found to match qualitatively. The far-field transmitted light generated by the silver SAA structure was found to possess a 390 nm sub-micron focal spot with a 24 microm depth of focus, which was much smaller than the focal spot generated by a perfect axicon. We also found that a silver SAA structure can generate a sub-micron quasi- Bessel beam that has a much lower far-field side-lobe when compared to that of non-diffraction beams generated by a tungsten SAA structure.

  17. Fraunhofer Diffraction Patterns from Apertures Illuminated with Nonparallel Light.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingsporn, Paul E.

    1979-01-01

    Discusses several aspects of Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from apertures illuminated by diverging light. Develops a generalization to apertures of arbitrary shape which shows that the sizes of the pattern are related by a simple scale factor. Uses the Abbe theory of image formation by diffraction to discuss the intensity of illumination of the…

  18. Design of Resonant Sub-Wavelength Metallic Apertures to Enable Higher Resolution Sensor Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-29

    to calibrate the fabricated chip using a scanning based system that record the lensless diffraction pattern of each point on the structured surface...Biener, T. Su, A.F. Coskun, D. Tseng, A. Ozcan, “Lensfree Incoherent Microscopy on Nano-Structured Chips,” BMES Annual Meeting, October 6-9 2010, Austin

  19. Diffraction patterns from multiple tilted laser apertures: numerical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalev, Anton V.; Polyakov, Vadim M.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a Rayleigh-Sommerfeld based method for numerical calculation of multiple tilted apertures near and far field diffraction patterns. Method is based on iterative procedure of fast Fourier transform based circular convolution of the initial field complex amplitudes distribution and impulse response function modified in order to account aperture and observation planes mutual tilt. The method is computationally efficient and has good accordance with the results of experimental diffraction patterns and can be applied for analysis of spatial noises occurring in master oscillator power amplifier laser systems. The example of diffraction simulation for a Phobos-Ground laser rangefinder amplifier is demonstrated.

  20. Polarization-induced tunability of localized surface plasmon resonances in arrays of sub-wavelength cruciform apertures.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Paul G; Biris, Claudiu G; Osley, Edward J; Gaathon, Ophir; Osgood, Richard M; Panoiu, Nicolae C; Warburton, Paul A

    2011-12-05

    We demonstrate experimentally that by engineering the structural asymmetry of the primary unit cell of a symmetrically nanopatterned metallic film the optical transmission becomes strongly dependent on the polarization of the incident wave. By considering a specific plasmonic structure consisting of square arrays of nanoscale asymmetric cruciform apertures we show that the enhanced optical anisotropy is induced by the excitation inside the apertures of localized surface plasmon resonances. The measured transmission spectra of these plasmonic arrays show a transmission maximum whose spectral location can be tuned by almost 50% by simply varying the in-plane polarization of the incident photons. Comprehensive numerical simulations further prove that the maximum of the transmission spectra corresponds to polarization-dependent surface plasmon resonances tightly confined in the two arms of the cruciform aperture. Despite this, there are isosbestic points where the transmission, reflection, and absorption spectra are polarization-independent, regardless of the degree of asymmetry of the apertures.

  1. Transmittance enhancement of sapphires with antireflective subwavelength grating patterned UV polymer surface structures by soft lithography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Leem, Jung Woo; Yu, Jae Su

    2013-12-02

    We report the total and diffuse transmission enhancement of sapphires with the ultraviolet curable SU8 polymer surface structures consisting of conical subwavelength gratings (SWGs) at one- and both-side surfaces for different periods. The SWGs patterns on the silicon templates were transferred into the SU8 polymer film surface on sapphires by a simple and cost-effective soft lithography technique. For the fabricated samples, the surface morphologies, wetting behaviors, and optical characteristics were investigated. For theoretical optical analysis, a rigorous coupled-wave analysis method was used. At a period of 350 nm, the sample with SWGs on SU8 film/sapphire exhibited a hydrophobic surface and higher total transmittance compared to the bare sapphire over a wide wavelength of 450-1000 nm. As the period of SWGs was increased, the low total transmittance region of < 85% was shifted towards the longer wavelengths and became broader while the diffuse transmittance was increased (i.e., larger haze ratio). For the samples with SWGs at both-side surfaces, the total and diffuse transmittance spectra were further enhanced compared to the samples with SWGs at one-side surface. The theoretical optical calculation results showed a similar trend to the experimentally measured data.

  2. Fresnel diffraction and fractal patterns from polygonal apertures.

    PubMed

    Huang, J G; Christian, J M; McDonald, G S

    2006-11-01

    Two compact analytical descriptions of Fresnel diffraction patterns from polygonal apertures under uniform illumination are detailed. In particular, a simple expression for the diffracted field from constituent edges is derived. These results have fundamental importance as well as specific applications, and they promise new physical insights into diffraction-related phenomena. The usefulness of the formulations is illuminated in the context of a virtual source theory that accounts for two transverse dimensions. This application permits calculation of fractal unstable-resonator modes of arbitrary order and unprecedented accuracy.

  3. Ultrafast rotating dipole or propeller-shaped patterns: subwavelength shaping of a beam of light on a femtosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Khonina, Svetlana N; Golub, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    We report on a remarkable property of azimuthally (radially) polarized light beams containing a vortex or an orbital angular momentum: upon tight focusing of a first-order vortex beam, the subwavelength spot has a shape of an electric (magnetic) dipole rotating at an optical frequency. For beams with a vortex of order m, the generated pattern is propeller-shaped and rotates at a 1/m fraction of the optical frequency. The applications include petahertz control of electrical or optical conductance between two electrodes or waveguides of two-terminal junctions.

  4. Translation symmetry of the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern from a polygonal aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Vinogradov, I.R.; Tarlykov, V.A.

    1995-12-01

    The problem of observing the translation symmetry in the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern is treated. The objective of this study is to show that translation symmetry can be observed in the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern if the diffraction aperture can be represented in the form of a set of parallelogram apertures. It is shown that the diffraction field produced by such an aperture can be represented as a system of point sources modulated with an amplitude factor. 10 refs., 2 figs.

  5. Elliptical Bessel-like diffraction pattern produced by circular apertures with different radius

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrés-Zárate, Esteban; Angulo-Córdova, Quintiliano; Hernández-Nolasco, J. Adán.; Gutiérrez-Tepach, Gerardo; Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    We present the results of the amplitude diffraction pattern produced by two circular apertures. It was found that on the Fraunhofer plane there are is a diffraction pattern with an elliptical geometry with a Bessel-like spatial distribution modulated by Young fringes. The model was experimentally confirmed using circular apertures illuminated with a Helium-Neon laser and propagating to either the divergent Fresnel zone and the Fraunhofer plane using an achromatic cemented doublet as transforming lens.

  6. A Morphogenetic Model Accounting for Pollen Aperture Pattern in Flowering Plants.

    PubMed

    Ressayre; Godelle; Mignot; Gouyon

    1998-07-21

    Pollen grains are embeddded in an extremely resistant wall. Apertures are well defined places where the pollen wall is reduced or absent that permit pollen tube germination. Pollen grains are produced by meiosis and aperture number definition appears to be linked with the partition that follows meiosis and leads to the formation of a tetrad of four haploid microspores. In dicotyledonous plants, meiosis is simultaneous which means that cytokinesis occurs once the two nuclear divisions are completed. A syncitium with the four nuclei stemming from meiosis is formed and cytokinesis isolates simulataneously the four products of meiosis. We propose a theoretical morphogenetic model which takes into account part of the features of the ontogeny of the pollen grains. The nuclei are considered as attractors acting upon a morphogenetic substance distributed within the cytoplasm of the dividing cell. This leads to a partition of the volume of the cell in four domains that is similar to the observations of cytokinesis in the studied species. The most widespread pattern of aperture distribution in dicotyledonous plants (three apertures equidistributed on the pollen grain equator) can be explained by bipolar interactions between nuclei stemming from the second meiotic division, and observed variations on these patterns by disturbances of these interactions. In numerous plant species, several pollen grains differing in aperture number are produced by a single individual. The distribution of the different morphs within tetrads indicates that the four daughter cells can have different aperture number. The model provides an explanation for the duplication of one of the apertures of a three-aperture pollen grain leading to a four-aperture one and in parallel it gives an explanation for how heterogeneous tetrads can be formed.Copyright 1998 Academic Press

  7. An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-01-01

    An Algorithm to Calculate Phase-Center Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns by Patrick Debroux...Offset of Aperture Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns Patrick Debroux and Berenice Verdin Survivability/Lethality Analysis... Antennas when Measuring 2-Dimensional Radiation Patterns 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  8. Far-field diffraction patterns of circular sectors and related apertures.

    PubMed

    Urcid, Gonzalo; Padilla, Alfonso

    2005-12-20

    In studies of scalar diffraction theory and experimental practice, the basic geometric shape of a circle is widely used as an aperture. Its Fraunhofer diffraction pattern has a simple mathematical expression easily determined by use of the Fourier-Bessel transform. However, it may require considerable mathematical effort to determine the far-field diffraction patterns of aperture shapes related to the circular geometry. From a computational point of view, the mathematical difficulties posed by other aperture geometries as well as more-general apertures with irregular shapes can be surpassed by means of optical setups or fast numerical algorithms. Unfortunately, no additional insight or information can be obtained from their exclusive application, as would be the case if mathematical formulas were available. The research presented here describes the far-field diffraction patterns of single-sector apertures as well as their extension to double symmetrical sectors and to sector wheels formed by interleaved transparent sectors of equal angular size; in each case, full or annular sectors are considered. The analytic solutions of their far-field amplitude distribution are given here in terms of a series of Bessel functions, some interesting properties are deduced from these solutions, and several examples are provided to illustrate graphically the results obtained from approximate numerical computations. Our results have been verified numerically with the fast-Fourier-transform algorithm and experimentally by means of a spherical wavefront-single-lens Fourier-transform architecture.

  9. A generalized method for determining radiation patterns of aperture antennas and its application to reflector antennas. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paknys, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The reflector antenna may be thought of as an aperture antenna. The classical solution for the radiation pattern of such an antenna is found by the aperture integration (AI) method. Success with this method depends on how accurately the aperture currents are known beforehand. In the past, geometrical optics (GO) has been employed to find the aperture currents. This approximation is suitable for calculating the main beam and possibly the first few sidelobes. A better approximation is to use aperture currents calculated from the geometrical theory of diffraction (GTD). Integration of the GTD currents over and extended aperture yields more accurate results for the radiation pattern. This approach is useful when conventional AI and GTD solutions have no common region of validity. This problem arises in reflector antennas. Two dimensional models of parabolic reflectors are studied; however, the techniques discussed can be applied to any aperture antenna.

  10. Fraunhofer diffraction patterns from uniformly illuminated square output apertures with noncentered square obscurations.

    PubMed

    Sutton, G W; Weiner, M M; Mani, S A

    1976-09-01

    Theoretical Fraunhofer diffraction patterns are presented for uniformly illuminated square apertures with noncentered square obscurations. The energy within a given subtended solid angle in the far field is calculated. It is shown that the cornered-off-axis obscuration provides much more far-field energy in a given spot size than the centered obscuration for the same clear aperture area and total energy, for example, 82% more far-field energy in the first Airy square for 50% obscuration, thus providing superior performance for practical systems.

  11. Formation and function of a new pollen aperture pattern in angiosperms: The proximal sulcus of Tillandsia leiboldiana (Bromeliaceae).

    PubMed

    Albert, Béatrice; Matamoro-Vidal, Alexis; Raquin, Christian; Nadot, Sophie

    2010-02-01

    Pollen grains are generally surrounded by an extremely resistant wall interrupted in places by apertures that play a key role in reproduction; pollen tube growth is initiated at these sites. The shift from a proximal to distal aperture location is a striking innovation in seed plant reproduction. Reversals to proximal aperture position have only very rarely been described in angiosperms. The genus Tillandsia belongs to the Bromeliaceae family, and its aperture pattern has been described as distal monosulcate, the most widespread aperture patterns recorded in monocots and basal angiosperms. Here we report developmental and functional elements to demonstrate that the sulcate aperture in Tillandsia leiboldiana is not distal as previously described but proximal. Postmeitotic tetrad observation indicates unambiguously the proximal position of the sulcus, and in vitro germination of pollen grains confirms that the aperture is functional. This is the first report of a sulcate proximal aperture with proximal germination. The observation of microsporogenesis reveals specific features in the patterns of callose thickenings in postmeiotic tetrads.

  12. Novel optical super-resolution pattern with upright edges diffracted by a tiny thin aperture.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiu Hui; Zhou, Kejiang

    2015-08-24

    In the past decade numerous efforts have been concentrated to achieve optical imaging resolution beyond the diffraction limit. In this letter a thin microcavity theory of near-field optics is proposed by using the power flow theorem firstly. According to this theory, the near-field optical diffraction from a tiny aperture whose diameter is less than one-tenth incident wavelength embedded in a thin conducting film is investigated by considering this tiny aperture as a thin nanocavity. It is very surprising that there exists a kind of novel super-resolution diffraction patterns showing resolution better than λ/80 (λ is the incident wavelength), which is revealed for the first time to our knowledge in this letter. The mechanism that has allowed the imaging with this kind of super-resolution patterns is due to the interaction between the incident wave and the thin nanocavity with a complex wavenumber. More precisely, these super-resolution patterns with discontinuous upright peaks are formed by one or three items of the integration series about the cylindrical waves according to our simulation results. This novel optical super-resolution with upright edges by using the thin microcavity theory presented in the study could have potential applications in the future semiconductor lithography process, nano-size laser-drilling technology, microscopy, optical storage, optical switch, and optical information processing.

  13. Realizable feed-element patterns and optimum aperture efficiency in multibeam antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yngvesson, K. S.; Rahmat-Samii, Y.; Johansson, J. F.; Kim, Y. S.

    1988-01-01

    The results of an earlier paper by Rahmat-Samii et al. (1981), regarding realizable patterns from feed elements that are part of an array that feeds a reflector antenna, are extended. The earlier paper used a cos exp q theta model for the element radiation pattern, whereas here a parametric study is performed, using a model that assumes a central beam of cos exp q theta shape, with a constant sidelobe level outside the central beam. Realizable q-values are constrained by the maximum directivity based on feed element area. The optimum aperture efficiency (excluding array feed network losses) in an array-reflector system is evaluated as a function of element spacing using this model as well as the model of the earlier paper. Experimental data for tapered slot antenna (TSA) arrays are in agreement with the conclusions based on the model.

  14. Terahertz probe for spectroscopy of sub-wavelength objects.

    PubMed

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Renaud, Cyril C; Seeds, Alwyn J

    2012-03-12

    A system of two probes is designed for terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy of sub-wavelength size objects. A twin-needle probe confines broadband THz pulses spatially by means of surface plasmon waves to a sub-wavelength spot smaller than 10 microns. The confined pulses are detected within the near-field zone of the twin-needle probe by a sub-wavelength aperture probe. The system allows THz spectroscopy to be applied to single micrometer-size objects in the 1-2.5THz region.

  15. Single photon transport by a moving atom through sub-wavelength hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasiev, A. E.; Melentiev, P. N.; Kuzin, A. A.; Kalatskiy, A. Yu.; Balykin, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    The results of investigation of photon transport through the subwavelength hole in the opaque screen by using single neutral atom are represented. The basis of the proposed and implemented method is the absorption of a photon by a neutral atom immediately before the subwavelength aperture, traveling of the atoms through the hole and emission of a photon on the other side of the screen. Realized method is the alternative approach to existing for photon transport through a subwavelength aperture: 1) self-sustained transmittance of a photon through the aperture according to the Bethe's model; 2) extra ordinary transmission because of surface-plasmon excitation.

  16. Synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART): improvement of breathing pattern reproducibility using respiratory coaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neicu, Toni; Berbeco, Ross; Wolfgang, John; Jiang, Steve B.

    2006-02-01

    Recently, at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) we proposed a new treatment technique called synchronized moving aperture radiation therapy (SMART) to account for tumour motion during radiotherapy. The basic idea of SMART is to synchronize the moving radiation beam aperture formed by a dynamic multileaf collimator with the tumour motion induced by respiration. The two key requirements for being able to successfully use SMART in clinical practice are the precise and fast detection of tumour position during the simulation/treatment and the good reproducibility of the tumour motion pattern. To fulfil the first requirement, an integrated radiotherapy imaging system is currently being developed at MGH. The results of a previous study show that breath coaching techniques are required to make SMART an efficient technique in general. In this study, we investigate volunteer and patient respiratory coaching using a commercial respiratory gating system as a respiration coaching tool. Five healthy volunteers, observed during six sessions, and 33 lung cancer patients, observed during one session when undergoing 4D CT scans, were investigated with audio and visual promptings, with free breathing as a control. For all five volunteers, breath coaching was well tolerated and the intra- and inter-session reproducibility of the breathing pattern was greatly improved. Out of 33 patients, six exhibited a regular breathing pattern and needed no coaching, four could not be coached at all due to the patient's medical condition or had difficulty following the instructions, 13 could only be coached with audio instructions and 10 could follow the instructions of and benefit from audio-video coaching. We found that, for all volunteers and for those patients who could be properly coached, breath coaching improves the duty cycle of SMART treatment. However, about half of the patients could not follow both audio and video instructions simultaneously, suggesting that the current coaching

  17. A relationship between the far field diffraction pattern and the axial pressure radiating from a two-dimensional aperture.

    PubMed

    Pees, Edward H

    2010-03-01

    The diffraction of an acoustic wave by a two-dimensional aperture produces a sound field that can generally be represented at any point in space as a superposition of a continuum of plane waves. The mathematical formulation that facilitates this representation is known as the angular spectrum of plane waves method. The spectrum, in this representation, is a wavenumber spectrum obtained from a two-dimensional Fourier transform of the acoustic pressure (or velocity) distribution over the surface of the aperture boundary; a quantity which is also known to characterize the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of the aperture. In this article, the angular spectrum method is used to formulate a mathematical relationship for two-dimensional apertures between the Fraunhofer diffraction pattern and a one-dimensional Fourier transform of the axial pressure. This relationship can be used to rapidly compute the axial pressure profile of the aperture if the boundary condition on the aperture is known and, in some cases, can be used as an inverse method. The approach is demonstrated for the cases of a flat circular piston and a flat rectangular piston undergoing harmonic motion in an infinite, rigid baffle. In the latter case, an analytical solution is also obtained.

  18. Subwavelength focusing of terahertz waves in silicon hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kannegulla, Akash; Cheng, Li-Jing

    2016-08-01

    We theoretically demonstrate the subwavelength focusing of terahertz (THz) waves in a hyperbolic metamaterial (HMM) based on a two-dimensional subwavelength silicon pillar array microstructure. The silicon microstructure with a doping concentration of at least 1017  cm-3 offers a hyperbolic dispersion at terahertz frequency range and promises the focusing of terahertz Gaussian beams. The results agree with the simulation based on effective medium theory. The focusing effect can be controlled by the doping concentration, which determines the real part of the out-of-plane permittivity and, therefore, the refraction angles in HMM. The focusing property in the HMM structure allows the propagation of terahertz wave through a subwavelength aperture. The silicon-based HMM structure can be realized using microfabrication technologies and has the potential to advance terahertz imaging with subwavelength resolution.

  19. Subwavelength nanopatterning of photochromic diarylethene films

    SciTech Connect

    Cantu, Precious; Brimhall, Nicole; Menon, Rajesh; Andrew, Trisha L.; Castagna, Rossella; Bertarelli, Chiara

    2012-04-30

    The resolution of optical patterning is constrained by the far-field diffraction limit. In this letter, we describe an approach that exploits the unique photo- and electro-chemistry of diarylethene photochromic molecules to overcome this diffraction limit and achieve sub-wavelength nanopatterning.

  20. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-01

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current - voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir's law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  1. Stopping potential and ion beamlet control for micro-resistive patterning through sub-Debye length plasma apertures

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Abhishek; Chatterjee, Sanghamitro; Dutta, Apurba; Bhattacharjee, Sudeep

    2014-12-15

    Focused multiple ion beamlets from a microwave plasma source is investigated for localized micron-scale modification of substrates in a patterned manner. Plasma electrodes (PE) with an array of through apertures having aperture diameters of the order of plasma Debye length are investigated for generating the beamlets. Extraction through sub-Debye length apertures becomes possible when the PE is kept at floating potential. It is found that the current – voltage characteristics of the extracted beamlets exhibits interesting features such as a space-charge-limited region that has a different behaviour than the conventional Child-Langmuir’s law and an extraction-voltage-limited region that does not undergo saturation but exhibits a Schottky-like behaviour similar to that of a vacuum diode. A switching technique to control the motion of individual beamlets is developed and the stopping potential determined. The beamlets are thereafter used to create localized micro-resistive patterns. The experimental results are compared with simulations and reasonably good agreement is obtained.

  2. Beaming Visible Light with a Plasmonic Aperture Antenna.

    PubMed

    Yi, Jue-Min; Cuche, Aurélien; Devaux, Eloïse; Genet, Cyriaque; Ebbesen, Thomas W

    2014-04-16

    We investigate experimentally the parameter space defining, in the visible range, the far-field diffraction properties of a single circular subwavelength aperture surrounded by periodic circular grooves milled on a metallic film. Diffraction patterns emerging from such an antenna are recorded under parallel- and perpendicular-polarized illumination at a given illumination wavelength. By monitoring the directivity and the gain of the antenna with respect to a single aperture, we point out the role played by the near-field surface plasmon excitations. The results can be analyzed through a Huygens-Fresnel model, accounting for the coherent interaction between the field radiated by the hole and the plasmonic field, propagating along the antenna surface and diffracted away in free space.

  3. Nonlocal effects in double fishnet metasurfaces nanostructured at deep subwavelength level as a path toward simultaneous sensing of multiple chemical analytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanasković, Dragan; Obradov, Marko; Jakšić, Olga; Jakšić, Zoran

    2016-01-01

    Nanoplasmonic devices are among the most sensitive chemical sensors, with sensitivities reaching the single-molecule level. An especially convenient class of such sensors is that based on metasurfaces with subwavelength nanoholes, examples being extraordinary optical transmission arrays and double fishnet structures. Such structures ensure operation both in transmission and reflection mode and ensure high sensitivities and excellent coupling with external readout. In this paper we consider the possibility to tailor the response of aperture-based sensor structures by modifying the geometry of nanoholes at the deep subwavelength level through ensuring controlled use of nonlocal effects. We investigate the case where nonlocality is achieved by modifying the basic metamaterial fishnet structure (a metal-dielectric-metal sandwich with rectangular openings) by superposing additional subwavelength patterns, ensuring the appearance of new optical modes. The obtained unit cell superstructure will have multiple tailorable spectral peaks that will increase the selectivity at different wavelengths. The finite elements method was used for simulations of the proposed structures. As an example, we applied our results to the case of a benzene sensor, showing that its spectral properties and selectivity can be tuned by modifying geometry at a deep subwavelength scale. The obtained custom-designed spectral selectivity is convenient for multianalyte chemical sensing using a single structure.

  4. Predicting dissolution patterns in variable aperture fractures: 1. Development and evaluation of an enhanced depth-averaged computational model

    SciTech Connect

    Detwiler, R L; Rajaram, H

    2006-04-21

    Water-rock interactions within variable-aperture fractures can lead to dissolution of fracture surfaces and local alteration of fracture apertures, potentially transforming the transport properties of the fracture over time. Because fractures often provide dominant pathways for subsurface flow and transport, developing models that effectively quantify the role of dissolution on changing transport properties over a range of scales is critical to understanding potential impacts of natural and anthropogenic processes. Dissolution of fracture surfaces is controlled by surface-reaction kinetics and transport of reactants and products to and from the fracture surfaces. We present development and evaluation of a depth-averaged model of fracture flow and reactive transport that explicitly calculates local dissolution-induced alterations in fracture apertures. The model incorporates an effective mass transfer relationship that implicitly represents the transition from reaction-limited dissolution to transport-limited dissolution. We evaluate the model through direct comparison to previously reported physical experiments in transparent analog fractures fabricated by mating an inert, transparent rough surface with a smooth single crystal of potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP), which allowed direct measurement of fracture aperture during dissolution experiments using well-established light transmission techniques [Detwiler, et al., 2003]. Comparison of experiments and simulations at different flow rates demonstrate the relative impact of the dimensionless Peclet and Damkohler numbers on fracture dissolution and the ability of the computational model to simulate dissolution. Despite some discrepancies in the small-scale details of dissolution patterns, the simulations predict the evolution of large-scale features quite well for the different experimental conditions. This suggests that our depth-averaged approach to simulating fracture dissolution provides a useful approach for

  5. Single fracture aperture patterns: Characterization by slit-island fractal analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, B.L.; Wang, J.S.Y.

    1993-01-01

    Single fracture measurements are difficult to obtain, but they are the only means we have to observe and study natural fracture morphology. The character of the fracture openings (apertures) is often one of the primary factors controlling fluid flow in the fracture. In particular, the shape, distribution, and connectivity of contact areas and flow channels can affect the relative permeability of wetting and non-wetting fluid phases in unsaturated systems. In this paper we use three methods of fractal analysis (the slit-island, the divider, and the variogram) as well as statistical and geostatistical analysis to characterize the geometry of measured fracture apertures obtained from two different fractured rock specimens from the field. One of these is a granitic fracture (crack) of homogeneous lithology and no displacement, the other is a fracture (fault) obtained from a highly altered fault zone, containing striations and slickensides. We discuss the fractal and geostatistical analysis of these two fractures in the context of what information is most helpful for making predictions about fluid flow in single fractures.

  6. Subwavelength transmission gratings for polarization separation in the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vayalamkuzhi, Pramitha; Sridharan, Gayathri M.; Bhattacharya, Shanti

    2016-04-01

    Subwavelength gratings exhibit attractive polarizing properties and have promising applications in communication, optical information processing, holography, and displays. The fabrication of subwavelength binary gratings for operation as polarizing beam splitters (PBS) at a wavelength of 1550 nm is presented. A simplified modal method was used for the design as well as to predict the efficiencies of the polarization components in each order. Electron beam lithography has been employed for patterning subwavelength grating structures on polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) resist. The fixed beam moving stage patterning mode is used for patterning gratings with a period of 936 nm and width of 374 nm. The exposure and developing parameters are optimized to realize the grating with the designed feature sizes on PMMA resist. Gratings patterned using the optimized exposure and development parameters match well with the design, except for the height. The performance of the fabricated PBS grating has been evaluated by optical testing. The experimental results match well with the predictions.

  7. Modeling of bottom-related surface patterns imaged by synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyzenga, D. R.; Shuchman, R. A.; Kasischke, E. S.; Meadows, G. A.

    1983-01-01

    A hydrodynamic electromagnetic model is developed in order to provide a qualitative and quantitative description of the relationship between Seasat synthetic aperture radar (SAR) signatures and the bottom topography of the ocean in the English Channel region of the North Sea. The model is based on environmental data for winds, currents, and depth changes, and the SAR parameters of frequency polarization, incidence angle, and resolution cell size. The data are used as inputs and SAR backscatter changes are predicted for individual topographic changes on the ocean floor. It is found that the model estimates of backscatter values are in good agreement with actual Seasat SAR-observed backscatter values. A comparison of the model and actual data shows agreement to be within 1.5 dB. The model is considered to be valid for only shallow water areas (less than 50 meters in depth). It is suggested that for bottom features to be visible on SAR imagery at greater depths, a moderate-to-high velocity current of at least 0.4 m/s and a moderate wind no more than 7.5 m/sec must be present.

  8. Airborne synthetic aperture radar observations of “spiral eddy” slick patterns in the Southern California Bight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmorino, George O.; Holt, Benjamin; Molemaker, M. Jeroen; Digiacomo, Paul M.; Sletten, Mark A.

    2010-05-01

    Repeat sampling on hourly time scales using an airborne synthetic aperture radar (SAR) is used to investigate the occurrence and evolving characteristics of spiral-shaped slick patterns, commonly presumed to be indicators of submesoscale ocean eddies, in the area around Santa Catalina Island, California (˜33.4°N, 118.4°W). Simultaneous SAR imagery and boat survey data are examined over two ˜5 h long periods spaced 3 days apart in April 2003. The SAR imagery reveals several spiral-like patterns, roughly 5 km in diameter, occurring downstream of the western end of Catalina. We believe that the most likely formation mechanism for these patterns is current-wake instability related to the flow of the Southern California Countercurrent along the north shore of Catalina. In one case, there is an observed cold-core eddy and vortex sheet attached to the tip of the island, similar to island-wake simulations done by Dong and McWilliams (2007). In another case, the SAR imagery shows a series of slick patterns that, at least initially, resemble spiral eddies, but the data show no clear evidence of actual ocean eddies being present either at depth or through a rotating surface expression. A speculation is that such features signify island-wake eddies that are relatively weak and dissipate quickly. An unexpected finding was how quickly a spiral slick pattern could deteriorate, suggesting a time scale for the surface feature of the order of only several hours. An implication of this result is that care is needed when interpreting a single satellite SAR imagery for evidence of active submesoscale eddies. Recommendations are made for future field studies.

  9. A new sparse Bayesian learning method for inverse synthetic aperture radar imaging via exploiting cluster patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jun; Zhang, Lizao; Duan, Huiping; Huang, Lei; Li, Hongbin

    2016-05-01

    The application of sparse representation to SAR/ISAR imaging has attracted much attention over the past few years. This new class of sparse representation based imaging methods present a number of unique advantages over conventional range-Doppler methods, the basic idea behind these works is to formulate SAR/ISAR imaging as a sparse signal recovery problem. In this paper, we propose a new two-dimensional pattern-coupled sparse Bayesian learning(SBL) method to capture the underlying cluster patterns of the ISAR target images. Based on this model, an expectation-maximization (EM) algorithm is developed to infer the maximum a posterior (MAP) estimate of the hyperparameters, along with the posterior distribution of the sparse signal. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method is able to achieve a substantial performance improvement over existing algorithms, including the conventional SBL method.

  10. Near-Field Spectroscopy and Imaging of Subwavelength Plasmonic Terahertz Resonators

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Khromova, Irina; Siday, Thomas; Thompson, Robert J.; Ponomarev, Andrey N.; Brener, Igal; Reno, John L.

    2016-04-22

    We describe the temporal evolution of the terahertz (THz) field leading to the excitation of plasmonic resonances in carbon microfibers. The field evolution is mapped in space and time for the 3/2 wavelength resonance using a subwavelength aperture THz near-field probe with an embedded THz photoconductive detector. The excitation of surface waves at the fiber tips leads to the formation of a standing wave along the fiber. Local THz time-domain spectroscopy at one of the standing wave crests shows a clear third-order resonance peak at 1.65 THz, well described by the Lorentz model. Lastly, this application of the subwavelength aperture THz near-field microscopy for mode mapping and local spectroscopy demonstrates the potential of near-field methods for studies of subwavelength plasmonic THz resonators.

  11. Patterns of irrigated rice growth and malaria vector breeding in Mali using multi-temporal ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar.

    PubMed

    Diuk-Wasser, M A; Dolo, G; Bagayoko, M; Sogoba, N; Toure, M B; Moghaddam, M; Manoukis, N; Rian, S; Traore, S F; Taylor, C E

    2006-02-01

    We explored the use of the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (ERS-2 SAR) to trace the development of rice plants in an irrigated area near Niono, Mali and relate that to the density of anopheline mosquitoes, especially An. gambiae. This is important because such mosquitoes are the major vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, and their development is often coupled to the cycle of rice development. We collected larval samples, mapped rice fields using GPS and recorded rice growth stages simultaneously with eight ERS-2 SAR acquisitions. We were able to discriminate among rice growth stages using ERS-2 SAR backscatter data, especially among the early stages of rice growth, which produce the largest numbers of larvae. We could also distinguish between basins that produced high and low numbers of anophelines within the stage of peak production. After the peak, larval numbers dropped as rice plants grew taller and thicker, reducing the amount of light reaching the water surface. ERS-2 SAR backscatter increased concomitantly. Our data support the belief that ERS-2 SAR data may be helpful for mapping the spatial patterns of rice growth, distinguishing different agricultural practices, and monitoring the abundance of vectors in nearby villages.

  12. Patterns of irrigated rice growth and malaria vector breeding in Mali using multi-temporal ERS-2 synthetic aperture radar

    PubMed Central

    Diuk-Wasser, M. A.; Dolo, G.; Bagayoko, M.; Sogoba, N.; Toure, M. B.; Moghaddam, M.; Manoukis, N.; Rian, S.; Traore, S. F.; Taylor, C. E.

    2007-01-01

    We explored the use of the European Remote Sensing Satellite 2 Synthetic Aperture Radar (ERS-2 SAR) to trace the development of rice plants in an irrigated area near Niono, Mali and relate that to the density of anopheline mosquitoes, especially An. gambiae. This is important because such mosquitoes are the major vectors of malaria in sub-Saharan Africa, and their development is often coupled to the cycle of rice development. We collected larval samples, mapped rice fields using GPS and recorded rice growth stages simultaneously with eight ERS-2 SAR acquisitions. We were able to discriminate among rice growth stages using ERS-2 SAR backscatter data, especially among the early stages of rice growth, which produce the largest numbers of larvae. We could also distinguish between basins that produced high and low numbers of anophelines within the stage of peak production. After the peak, larval numbers dropped as rice plants grew taller and thicker, reducing the amount of light reaching the water surface. ERS-2 SAR backscatter increased concomitantly. Our data support the belief that ERS-2 SAR data may be helpful for mapping the spatial patterns of rice growth, distinguishing different agricultural practices, and monitoring the abundance of vectors in nearby villages. PMID:17710188

  13. Acoustically tunable optical transmission through a subwavelength hole with a bubble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksymov, Ivan S.; Greentree, Andrew D.

    2017-03-01

    Efficient manipulation of light with sound in subwavelength-sized volumes is important for applications in photonics, phononics, and biophysics, but remains elusive. We theoretically demonstrate the control of light with MHz-range ultrasound in a subwavelength, 300-nm-wide water-filled hole with a 100-nm-radius air bubble. Ultrasound-driven pulsations of the bubble modulate the effective refractive index of the hole aperture, which gives rise to spectral tuning of light transmission through the hole. This control mechanism opens up novel opportunities for tunable acousto-optic and optomechanical metamaterials, and all-optical ultrasound transduction.

  14. Near-field terahertz probes with room-temperature nanodetectors for subwavelength resolution imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Viti, Leonardo; Dardanis, Enrico; Giordano, Maria Caterina; Ercolani, Daniele; Politano, Antonio; Sorba, Lucia; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-01-01

    Near-field imaging with terahertz (THz) waves is emerging as a powerful technique for fundamental research in photonics and across physical and life sciences. Spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved by collecting THz waves from an object through a small aperture placed in the near-field. However, light transmission through a sub-wavelength size aperture is fundamentally limited by the wave nature of light. Here, we conceive a novel architecture that exploits inherently strong evanescent THz field arising within the aperture to mitigate the problem of vanishing transmission. The sub-wavelength aperture is originally coupled to asymmetric electrodes, which activate the thermo-electric THz detection mechanism in a transistor channel made of flakes of black-phosphorus or InAs nanowires. The proposed novel THz near-field probes enable room-temperature sub-wavelength resolution coherent imaging with a 3.4 THz quantum cascade laser, paving the way to compact and versatile THz imaging systems and promising to bridge the gap in spatial resolution from the nanoscale to the diffraction limit. PMID:28287123

  15. Near-field terahertz probes with room-temperature nanodetectors for subwavelength resolution imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Viti, Leonardo; Dardanis, Enrico; Giordano, Maria Caterina; Ercolani, Daniele; Politano, Antonio; Sorba, Lucia; Vitiello, Miriam S.

    2017-03-01

    Near-field imaging with terahertz (THz) waves is emerging as a powerful technique for fundamental research in photonics and across physical and life sciences. Spatial resolution beyond the diffraction limit can be achieved by collecting THz waves from an object through a small aperture placed in the near-field. However, light transmission through a sub-wavelength size aperture is fundamentally limited by the wave nature of light. Here, we conceive a novel architecture that exploits inherently strong evanescent THz field arising within the aperture to mitigate the problem of vanishing transmission. The sub-wavelength aperture is originally coupled to asymmetric electrodes, which activate the thermo-electric THz detection mechanism in a transistor channel made of flakes of black-phosphorus or InAs nanowires. The proposed novel THz near-field probes enable room-temperature sub-wavelength resolution coherent imaging with a 3.4 THz quantum cascade laser, paving the way to compact and versatile THz imaging systems and promising to bridge the gap in spatial resolution from the nanoscale to the diffraction limit.

  16. Near-Field Spectroscopy and Imaging of Subwavelength Plasmonic Terahertz Resonators

    DOE PAGES

    Mitrofanov, Oleg; Khromova, Irina; Siday, Thomas; ...

    2016-04-22

    We describe the temporal evolution of the terahertz (THz) field leading to the excitation of plasmonic resonances in carbon microfibers. The field evolution is mapped in space and time for the 3/2 wavelength resonance using a subwavelength aperture THz near-field probe with an embedded THz photoconductive detector. The excitation of surface waves at the fiber tips leads to the formation of a standing wave along the fiber. Local THz time-domain spectroscopy at one of the standing wave crests shows a clear third-order resonance peak at 1.65 THz, well described by the Lorentz model. Lastly, this application of the subwavelength aperturemore » THz near-field microscopy for mode mapping and local spectroscopy demonstrates the potential of near-field methods for studies of subwavelength plasmonic THz resonators.« less

  17. Subwavelength slit acoustic metamaterial barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Constanza; Candelas, Pilar; Belmar, Francisco; Gomez-Lozano, Vicente; Uris, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    Reduction of noise in the transmission path is a very important environmental problem. The standard method to reduce this noise level is the use of acoustic barriers. In this paper, an acoustic metamaterial based on sound transmission through subwavelength slits, is tailored to be used as an acoustic barrier. This system consists of two rows of periodic repetition of vertical rigid pickets separated by a slit of subwavelength width, embedded in air. Here, both the experimental and the numerical analyses are presented. These analyses have facilitated the identification of the parameters that affect the insertion loss performance. The results demonstrated that the proposed barrier can be tuned to mitigate a band noise in a mechanical plant for buildings where openings for air flow are required as well as industrial noise, without excessive barrier thickness.

  18. Subwavelength Imaging Using Conducting Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monzon, Cesar

    2009-05-01

    Here we demonstrate that, paradoxically, subwavelength imaging can be produced by purely resistive means. Space acts like a low pass filter for highly evanescent field components, and if a sheet or thin layer of imperfectly conducting material is placed adjacent to a source, such that the layer overcomes the larger impedance of the spatial low pass filter, no relative attenuation of evanescent components is experienced at the location of the sheet. This results in near-field subwavelength imaging, which also holds for reactive sheets. The conducting layer enables us to trade definition for amplitude. Impedance sheets are commonplace in radio frequencies or microwaves, hence the phenomenon identified here is widespread, and can be extended into the IR or optical region, as well as to other areas of physics where wave motion exists.

  19. Lasing in subwavelength semiconductor nanopatches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakhani, Amit M.; Yu, Kyoungsik; Wu, Ming C.

    2011-01-01

    Subwavelength semiconductor nanopatch lasers were analyzed, fabricated and characterized. Lasing was achieved in cylindrical and rectangular metallodielectric nanopatch geometries. The two smallest moderate quality factor modes of cylindrical cavities, the 'electric-' and 'magnetic-' dipole-like modes, successfully lased with physical volumes as small as 0.75 (λ0/n)3. Polarization control in nanopatch geometries is successfully demonstrated in anisotropic rectangular nanopatch structures.

  20. Subwavelength Nanopatch Cavities for Semiconductor Plasmon Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manolatou, Christina; Rana, Farhan

    2008-05-01

    We propose and analyze a family of nanoscale cavities for electrically-pumped surface-emitting semiconductor lasers that use surface plasmons to provide optical mode confinement in cavities which have dimensions in the 100-300 nm range. The proposed laser cavities are in many ways nanoscale optical versions of micropatch antennas that are commonly used at microwave/RF frequencies. Surface plasmons are not only used for mode confinement but also for output beam shaping to realize single-lobe far-field radiation patterns with narrow beam waists from subwavelength size cavities. We identify the cavity modes with the largest quality factors and modal gain, and show that in the near-IR wavelength range (1.0-1.6 microns) cavity losses (including surface plasmon losses) can be compensated by the strong mode confinement in the gain region provided by the surface plasmons themselves and the required material threshold gain values can be smaller than 700 1/cm.

  1. Secrets of subwavelength imaging and lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemmer, Philip R.

    2011-08-01

    To understand the limits and tradeoffs of nearly all existing subwavelength imaging techniques it sufficient to understand magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and its generalizations. In many cases, subwavelength optical lithography can be viewed as the inverse problem to imaging and so the same principles apply. A simple review of MRI is given which shows how the most popular subwavelength imaging and lithography techniques naturally arise as special cases.

  2. MU radar spaced antenna observations with varying apertures: Scatterer and antenna contributions to the ground diffraction pattern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassenpflug, G.; Rao, P. B.; Yamamoto, M.; Fukao, S.

    2003-06-01

    The 46.5 MHz MU radar located at Shigaraki, Japan (34.85°N, 136.10°E), is used to investigate the consistency of refractive index scale measurements utilizing a method based on Full Correlation Analysis (FCA) which includes compensation for the scale effects of transmitting and receiving antenna apertures. Horizontal correlation lengths of refractive index irregularities within the troposphere are determined from spaced antenna (SA) observations using six configurations with differently sized transmitting and receiving antennas. Results show that the algorithm effectively compensates for transmitting and receiving antenna aperture sizes. Estimates of turbulence structure scatterer correlation lengths and turbulence intensity are compared to background wind and shear from Doppler beam swinging (DBS) data to show how enhanced turbulence decreases the size of scatterers.

  3. Mosaic of coded aperture arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.; Cannon, Thomas M.

    1980-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a mosaic of coded aperture arrays which is capable of imaging off-axis sources with minimum detector size. Mosaics of the basic array pattern create a circular on periodic correlation of the object on a section of the picture plane. This section consists of elements of the central basic pattern as well as elements from neighboring patterns and is a cyclic version of the basic pattern. Since all object points contribute a complete cyclic version of the basic pattern, a section of the picture, which is the size of the basic aperture pattern, contains all the information necessary to image the object with no artifacts.

  4. Subwavelength micropillar array terahertz lasers.

    PubMed

    Krall, Michael; Brandstetter, Martin; Deutsch, Christoph; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron Maxwell; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried; Unterrainer, Karl

    2014-01-13

    We report on micropillar-based terahertz lasers with active pillars that are much smaller than the emission wavelength. These micropillar array lasers correspond to scaled-down band-edge photonic crystal lasers forming an active photonic metamaterial. In contrast to photonic crystal lasers which use significantly larger pillar structures, lasing emission is not observed close to high-symmetry points in the photonic band diagram, but in the effective medium regime. We measure stimulated emission at 4 THz for micropillar array lasers with pillar diameters of 5 µm. Our results not only demonstrate the integration of active subwavelength optics in a terahertz laser, but are also an important step towards the realization of nanowire-based terahertz lasers.

  5. Low Dimensional Polariton Systems in Subwavelength-Grating Based Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo

    Semiconductor microcavity exciton-polaritons have recently emerged as a unique, open system for studying non-equilibrium quantum order. Macroscopic quantum phenomenon, Bose-Einstein condensation, has been realized and observed in two dimensional polariton systems utilizing the traditional distributed-Bragg-reflector based samples. Such foundational work on two-dimensional systems has inspired theoretical schemes for polariton-based quantum circuits, quantum light sources and novel quantum phases. Experimental implementation of these schemes requires the control, confinement and coupling of polariton systems, which still remain challenging in conventional microcavity structures. In this thesis, we use the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavities to demonstrate confinement and coupling for the polariton systems. We demonstrated a zero-dimensional polariton device in the sub-wavelength grating-based microcavity. Efficient confinement has been realized in such unconventional microcavity. These confinement features have also been observed in the spectroscopic characterization with discretized energy levels from the device. In addition, the polaritons are highly linear polarized, which is unique to the sub-wavelength grating based devices. The establishment of the polariton lasing/condensation was with non-linear increase of the emission intensity, line-width narrowing and continuous energy shift. Single-mode lasing of polaritons was also demonstrated for the first time. Following the work of single zero-dimensional polariton device, we demonstrated that the coupling among multiple zero-dimensional polariton quantum devices could be readily achieved, leading to de-coupled, coupled and quasi-one-dimensional polariton systems. These coupling effects were controlled and realized by design of the tethering patterns around the sub-wavelength grating based devices. Such devices enable advanced mode engineering and provide the building blocks for polariton-based quantum

  6. Dexterous acoustic trapping and patterning of particles assisted by phononic crystal plate

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Tian; Ke, Manzhu Xu, Shengjun; Feng, Junheng; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2015-04-20

    In this letter, we present experimental demonstration of multi-particles trapping and patterning by the artificially engineered acoustic field of phononic crystal plate. Polystyrene particles are precisely trapped and patterned in two dimensional arrays, for example, the square, triangular, or quasi-periodic arrays, depending on the structures of the phononic crystal plates with varying sub-wavelength holes array. Analysis shows that the enhanced acoustic radiation force, induced by the resonant transmission field highly localized near the sub-wavelength apertures, accounts for the particles self-organizing. It can be envisaged that this kind of simple design of phononic crystal plates would pave an alternative route for self-assembly of particles and may be utilized in the lab-on-a-chip devices.

  7. Subwavelength Lattice Optics by Evolutionary Design

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new class of structured optical materials—lattice opto-materials—that can manipulate the flow of visible light into a wide range of three-dimensional profiles using evolutionary design principles. Lattice opto-materials are based on the discretization of a surface into a two-dimensional (2D) subwavelength lattice whose individual lattice sites can be controlled to achieve a programmed optical response. To access a desired optical property, we designed a lattice evolutionary algorithm that includes and optimizes contributions from every element in the lattice. Lattice opto-materials can exhibit simple properties, such as on- and off-axis focusing, and can also concentrate light into multiple, discrete spots. We expanded the unit cell shapes of the lattice to achieve distinct, polarization-dependent optical responses from the same 2D patterned substrate. Finally, these lattice opto-materials can also be combined into architectures that resemble a new type of compound flat lens. PMID:25380062

  8. Enhanced terahertz transmission through a periodic array of tapered rectangular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Devi, Koijam Monika; Sarma, Amarendra K.; Kumar, Gagan

    2016-10-01

    We numerically analyze extraordinary terahertz transmission properties of an array of rectangular shaped apertures perforated periodically on a thin metal film. The apertures are tapered at different angles to achieve higher field concentration at the tapered end. The periodic sub-wavelength scale apertures ensure plasmonic behavior giving rise to the enhanced transmission of a specific frequency mode decided by the periodicity. We compare results of transmission with the rectangular shaped apertures of same parameters and observe a significant increase in the transmission. We have compared results of our numerical simulations with theory and have found them consistent.

  9. Metalenses at visible wavelengths: Diffraction-limited focusing and subwavelength resolution imaging.

    PubMed

    Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Chen, Wei Ting; Devlin, Robert C; Oh, Jaewon; Zhu, Alexander Y; Capasso, Federico

    2016-06-03

    Subwavelength resolution imaging requires high numerical aperture (NA) lenses, which are bulky and expensive. Metasurfaces allow the miniaturization of conventional refractive optics into planar structures. We show that high-aspect-ratio titanium dioxide metasurfaces can be fabricated and designed as metalenses with NA = 0.8. Diffraction-limited focusing is demonstrated at wavelengths of 405, 532, and 660 nm with corresponding efficiencies of 86, 73, and 66%. The metalenses can resolve nanoscale features separated by subwavelength distances and provide magnification as high as 170×, with image qualities comparable to a state-of-the-art commercial objective. Our results firmly establish that metalenses can have widespread applications in laser-based microscopy, imaging, and spectroscopy.

  10. Subwavelength surface plasmons based on novel structures and metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruoxi

    With the rapid development of nanofabrication technology and powerful computational tools over the last decade, nanophotonics has enjoyed tremendous innovation and found wide applications in ultrahigh-speed data transmission, sensitive optical detection, manipulation of ultra-small objects, and visualization of nanoscale patterns. Surface plasmon-based photonics (or plasmonics) merges electronics and photonics at the nanoscale, creating the ability to combine the superior technical advantages of photonics and electronics on the same chip. Plasmonics focuses on the innovation of photonic devices by exploiting the optical property of metals. In particular, the oscillation of free electrons, when properly driven by electromagnetic waves, would form plasmon-polaritons in the vicinity of a metal surface and potentially result in extreme light confinement, which may beat the diffraction limit faced by conventional photonic devices and enable greatly enhanced light-matter interactions at the deep subwavelength scale. The objective of this dissertation is to develop subwavelength or deep subwavelength plasmonic waveguides and explore their integration on conventional dielectric platforms for multiple applications. Three novel structures (or mechanisms) are employed to develop and integrate nanoplasmonic waveguides; each consists of one part of the dissertation. The first part of this dissertation covers the design, fabrication, and demonstration of two-dimensional and three-dimensional metal-insulator-metal plasmonic couplers for mode transformation between photonic and nanoplasmonic domains on the silicon-on-insulator platform. In particular, deep subwavelength plasmonic modes under 100-nm are achieved via end-fire coupling and adiabatic mode transformation at telecom wavelengths. The second part studies metallic gratings as spoof plasmonic waveguides hosting deep subwavelength surface propagation modes. Metallic gratings under different dielectric coatings are

  11. Routing of deep-subwavelength optical beams without reflection and diffraction using infinitely anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catrysse, Peter B.; Fan, Shanhui

    2015-03-01

    Media that are described by extreme electromagnetic parameters, such as very large/small permittivity/permeability, have generated significant fundamental and applied interest in recent years. Notable examples include epsilon-near-zero, ultra-low refractive-index, and ultra-high refractive-index materials. Many photonic structures, such as waveguides, lenses, and photonic band gap materials, benefit greatly from the large index contrast provided by such media. In this paper, I discuss our recent work on media with infinite anisotropy, i.e., infinite permittivity (permeability) in one direction and finite in the other directions. As an illustration of the unusual optical behaviors that result from infinite anisotropy, I describe efficient light transport in deep-subwavelength apertures filled with infinitely anisotropic media. I then point out some of the opportunities that exist for controlling light at the nano-scale using infinitely anisotropic media by themselves. First, I show that a single medium with infinite anisotropy enables diffraction-free propagation of deep-subwavelength beams. Next, I demonstrate interfaces between two infinitely anisotropic media that are impedancematched for complete deep-subwavelength beams and enable reflection-free routing with zero bend radius that is entirely free from diffraction effects even when deep-subwavelength information is encoded on the beams. These behaviors indicate an unprecedented possibility to use media with infinite anisotropy to manipulate beams with deepsubwavelength features, including complete images. To illustrate physical realizability, I demonstrate a metamaterial design using existing materials in a planar geometry, which can be implemented using well-established nanofabrication techniques. This approach provides a path to deep-subwavelength routing of information-carrying beams and far-field imaging unencumbered by diffraction and reflection.

  12. Discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength structures for generating radially polarized light in visible region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadyani, Z.; Dmitriev, S.; Lindlein, N.; Leuchs, G.; Rusina, O.; Harder, I.

    2011-08-01

    A discontinuous space variant sub-wavelength dielectric grating is designed and fabricated for generating radially polarized light in visible region (l = 632.8 nm). The design is based on sub-wavelength silicon nitride structures introducing a retardation of p/2 by form birefringence, with space variant orientation of the optical axis. The pattern is divided into concentric ring segments with constant structural parameters, therefore reducing electron-beam writing time significantly. The design avoids the technological challenges encountered in the generation of a continuous space variant grating while maintaining good quality of the resulting polarization mode.

  13. Broadband chirality-coded meta-aperture for photon-spin resolving

    PubMed Central

    Du, Luping; Kou, Shan Shan; Balaur, Eugeniu; Cadusch, Jasper J.; Roberts, Ann; Abbey, Brian; Yuan, Xiao-Cong; Tang, Dingyuan; Lin, Jiao

    2015-01-01

    The behaviour of light transmitted through an individual subwavelength aperture becomes counterintuitive in the presence of surrounding ‘decoration', a phenomenon known as the extraordinary optical transmission. Despite being polarization-sensitive, such an individual nano-aperture, however, often cannot differentiate between the two distinct spin-states of photons because of the loss of photon information on light-aperture interaction. This creates a ‘blind-spot' for the aperture with respect to the helicity of chiral light. Here we report the development of a subwavelength aperture embedded with metasurfaces dubbed a ‘meta-aperture', which breaks this spin degeneracy. By exploiting the phase-shaping capabilities of metasurfaces, we are able to create specific meta-apertures in which the pair of circularly polarized light spin-states produces opposite transmission spectra over a broad spectral range. The concept incorporating metasurfaces with nano-apertures provides a venue for exploring new physics on spin-aperture interaction and potentially has a broad range of applications in spin-optoelectronics and chiral sensing. PMID:26628047

  14. Fredholm's equations for subwavelength focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Arcos, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Subwavelength focusing (SF) is a very useful tool that can be carried out with the use of left hand materials for optics that involve the range of the microwaves. Many recent works have described a successful alternative procedure using time reversal methods. The advantage is that we do not need devices which require the complicated manufacture of left-hand materials; nevertheless, the theoretical mathematical bases are far from complete because before now we lacked an adequate easy-to-apply frame. In this work we give, for a broad class of discrete systems, a solid support for the theory of electromagnetic SF that can be applied to communications and nanotechnology. The very central procedure is the development of vector-matrix formalism (VMF) based on exploiting both the inhomogeneous and homogeneous Fredholm's integral equations in cases where the last two kinds of integral equations are applied to some selected discrete systems. To this end, we first establish a generalized Newmann series for the Fourier transform of the Green's function in the inhomogeneous Fredholm's equation of the problem. Then we go from an integral operator equation to a vector-matrix algebraic one. In this way we explore the inhomogeneous case and later on also the very interesting one about the homogeneous equation. Thus, on the one hand we can relate in a simple manner the arriving electromagnetic signals with those at their sources and we can use them to perform a SF. On the other hand, we analyze the homogeneous version of the equations, finding resonant solutions that have analogous properties to their counterparts in quantum mechanical scattering, that can be used in a proposed very powerful way in communications. Also we recover quantum mechanical operator relations that are identical for classical electromagnetics. Finally, we prove two theorems that formalize the relation between the theory of Fredholm's integral equations and the VMF we present here.

  15. Subwavelength metal-optic semiconductor nanopatch lasers.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kyoungsik; Lakhani, Amit; Wu, Ming C

    2010-04-26

    We report on near infrared semiconductor nanopatch lasers with subwavelength-scale physical dimensions (0.019 cubic wavelengths) and effective mode volumes (0.0017 cubic wavelengths). We observe lasing in the two most fundamental optical modes which resemble oscillating electrical and magnetic dipoles. The ultra-small laser volume is achieved with the presence of nanoscale metal patches which suppress electromagnetic radiation into free-space and convert a leaky cavity into a highly-confined subwavelength optical resonator. Such ultra-small lasers with metallodielectric cavities will enable broad applications in data storage, biological sensing, and on-chip optical communication.

  16. Sub-wavelength focusing meta-lens.

    PubMed

    Roy, Tapashree; Rogers, Edward T F; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2013-03-25

    We show that a planar plasmonic metamaterial with spatially variable meta-atom parameters can focus transmitted light into sub-wavelength hot-spots located beyond the near-field of the metamaterial. By nano-structuring a gold film we created an array of meta-lenses generating foci of 160 nm (0.2λ) in diameter when illuminated by a wavelength of 800 nm. We attribute the occurrence of sub-wavelength hotspots beyond the near field to the phenomenon of superoscillation.

  17. Evaluation of GLOCK 9 mm Firing Pin Aperture Shear Mark Individuality Based On 1,632 Different Pistols by Traditional Pattern Matching and IBIS Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Hamby, James E; Norris, Stephen; Petraco, Nicholas D K

    2016-01-01

    Over a period of 21 years, a number of fired GLOCK cartridge cases have been evaluated. A total of 1632 GLOCK firearms were used to generate a sample of the same size. Our research hypothesis was that no cartridge cases fired from different 9-mm semiautomatic GLOCK pistols would be mistaken as coming from the same gun. Using optical comparison microscopy, two separate experiments were carried out to test this hypothesis. A subsample of 617 test-fired cases were subjected to algorithmic comparison by the Integrated Ballistics Identification System (IBIS). The second experiment subjected the full set of 1632 cases to manual comparisons using traditional pattern matching. None of the cartridge cases were "matched" by either of these two experiments. Using these empirical findings, an established Bayesian probability model was used to estimate the chance that a 9-mm cartridge case, fired from a GLOCK, could be mistaken as coming from the same firearm when in fact it did not (i.e., the random match probability).

  18. Subwavelength films for standoff radiation dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2015-05-01

    We present optical subwavelength nanostructure architecture suitable for standoff radiation dosimetry with remote optical readout in the visible or infrared spectral regions. To achieve this, films of subwavelength structures are fabricated over several square inches via the creation of a 2D non-close packed (NCP) array template of radiationsensitive polymeric nanoparticles, followed by magnetron sputtering of a metallic coating to form a 2D array of separated hemispherical nanoscale metallic shells. The nanoshells are highly reflective at resonance in the visible or infrared depending on design. These structures and their behavior are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant inductive-capacitive (LC) circuits, which display a resonance wavelength that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any modification of the nanostructure material properties due to radiation alters the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which in turn changes their optical properties resulting in a shift in the optical resonance. This shift in resonance may be remotely interrogated actively using either laser illumination or passively by hyperspectral or multispectral sensing with broadband illumination. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also offer polarization-sensitive interrogation. We present experimental measurements of a radiation induced shift in the optical resonance of a subwavelength film after exposure to an absorbed dose of gamma radiation from 2 Mrad up to 62 Mrad demonstrating the effect. Interestingly the resonance shift is non-monotonic for this material system and possible radiation damage mechanisms to the nanoparticles are discussed.

  19. Subwavelength films for standoff radiation dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Schemer-Kohrn, Alan L.; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2015-05-22

    We present optical subwavelength nanostructure architecture suitable for standoff radiation dosimetry with remote optical readout in the visible or infrared spectral regions. To achieve this, films of subwavelength structures are fabricated over several square inches via the creation of a 2D non-close packed (NCP) array template of radiation-sensitive polymeric nanoparticles, followed by magnetron sputtering of a metallic coating to form a 2D array of separated hemispherical nanoscale metallic shells. The nanoshells are highly reflective at resonance in the visible or infrared depending on design. These structures and their behavior are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant inductive-capacitive (LC) circuits, which display a resonance wavelength that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any modification of the nanostructure material properties due to radiation alters the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which in turn changes their optical properties resulting in a shift in the optical resonance. This shift in resonance may be remotely interrogated actively using either laser illumination or passively by hyperspectral or multispectral sensing with broadband illumination. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also offer polarization-sensitive interrogation. We present experimental measurements of a radiation induced shift in the optical resonance of a subwavelength film after exposure to an absorbed dose of gamma radiation from 2 Mrad up to 62 Mrad demonstrating the effect. Interestingly the resonance shift is non-monotonic for this material system and possible radiation damage mechanisms to the nanoparticles are discussed.

  20. Subwavelength optical microscopy in the far field

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Zubairy, M. Suhail; Al-Amri, M.; Scully, Marlan O.

    2011-06-15

    We present a procedure for subwavelength optical microscopy. The identical atoms are distributed on a plane and shined with a standing wave. We rotate the plane to different angles and record the resonant fluorescence spectra in the far field, from which we can obtain their distance and location information. This procedure also works for atomic separation above one wavelength and therefore provides a seamless microscopy.

  1. Subwavelength resonant nanostructured films for sensing

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bennett, Wendy D.; Edwards, Daniel L.; Mendoza, Albert

    2013-05-29

    We present a novel subwavelength nanostructure architecture that may be utilized for optical standoff sensing applications. The subwavelength structures are fabricated via a combination of nanoimprint lithography and metal sputtering to create metallic nanostructured films encased within a transparent media. The structures are based on the open ring resonator (ORR) architecture and have their analog in resonant LC circuits, which display a resonance frequency that is inversely proportional to the square root of the product of the inductance and capacitance. Therefore, any perturbation of the nanostructured films due to chemical or environmental effects can alter the inductive or capacitive behavior of the subwavelength features, which can shift the resonant frequency and provide an indication of the external stimulus. This shift in resonance can be interrogated remotely either actively using either laser illumination or passively using hyperspectral or multispectral sensing. These structures may be designed to be either anisotropic or isotropic, which can also provide polarization-sensitive interrogation. Due to the nanometer-scale of the structures, they can be tailored to be optically responsive in the visible or near infrared spectrum with a highly reflective resonant peak that is dependent solely on structural dimensions and material characteristics. We present experimental measurements of the optical response of these structures as a function of wavelength, polarization, and incident angle demonstrating the resonant effect in the near infrared region. Numerical modeling data showing the effect of different fabrication parameters such as structure parameters are also discussed.

  2. Tunable Terahertz Deep Subwavelength Imaging Based on a Graphene Monolayer

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Heng-He; Huang, Tie-Jun; Liu, Jiang-Yu; Tan, Yunhua; Liu, Pu-Kun

    2017-01-01

    The resolution of conventional terahertz (THz) imaging techniques is limited to about half wavelength, which is not fine enough for applications of biomedical sensing and nondestructive testing. To improve the resolution, a new superlens, constructed by a monolayer graphene sheet combining with a grating voltage gate, are proposed in this paper to achieve deep super-resolution imaging in the THz frequency range. The main idea is based on the Fabry-Perot resonance of graphene edge plasmon waves. By shaping the voltage gate into a radial pattern, magnified images of subwavelength targets can be obtained. With this approach, the finest resolution can achieve up to λ/150. Besides, the superlens can be conveniently tuned to work in a large frequency band ranging from 4.3 THz to 9 THz. The proposal could find potential applications in THz near-field imaging systems.

  3. Sub-wavelength terahertz beam profiling of a THz source via an all-optical knife-edge technique.

    PubMed

    Phing, Sze Ho; Mazhorova, Anna; Shalaby, Mostafa; Peccianti, Marco; Clerici, Matteo; Pasquazi, Alessia; Ozturk, Yavuz; Ali, Jalil; Morandotti, Roberto

    2015-02-25

    Terahertz technologies recently emerged as outstanding candidates for a variety of applications in such sectors as security, biomedical, pharmaceutical, aero spatial, etc. Imaging the terahertz field, however, still remains a challenge, particularly when sub-wavelength resolutions are involved. Here we demonstrate an all-optical technique for the terahertz near-field imaging directly at the source plane. A thin layer (<100 nm-thickness) of photo carriers is induced on the surface of the terahertz generation crystal, which acts as an all-optical, virtual blade for terahertz near-field imaging via a knife-edge technique. Remarkably, and in spite of the fact that the proposed approach does not require any mechanical probe, such as tips or apertures, we are able to demonstrate the imaging of a terahertz source with deeply sub-wavelength features (<30 μm) directly in its emission plane.

  4. Subwavelength coatings and methods for making and using same

    DOEpatents

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2017-02-28

    Methods are disclosed for forming subwavelength coatings for use in the UV, visible, or infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum. A first material and a second material are deposited onto a substrate. The first material may include dielectric spheres of subwavelength size that self-assemble on the substrate to form a template or scaffold with subwavelength size voids between the spheres into which the second material is deposited or filled. First and second materials are heated on the substrate at a preselected temperature to form the subwavelength coating.

  5. Calculate waveguide aperture susceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-K.; Ishii, T. K.

    1982-12-01

    A method is developed for calculating aperture susceptance which makes use of the distribution of an aperture's local fields. This method can be applied to the computation of the aperture susceptance of irises, as well as the calculation of the susceptances of waveguide filters, aperture antennas, waveguide cavity coupling, waveguide junctions, and heterogeneous boundaries such as inputs to ferrite or dielectric loaded waveguides. This method assumes a local field determined by transverse components of the incident wave in the local surface of the cross section in the discontinuity plane which lies at the aperture. The aperture susceptance is calculated by the use of the local fields, the law of energy conservation, and the principles of continuity of the fields. This method requires that the thickness of the aperture structure be zero, but this does not limit the practical usefulness of this local-field method.

  6. Grating-flanked plasmonic coaxial apertures for efficient fiber optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Amr A E; Sheikhoelislami, Sassan; Gastelum, Steven; Dionne, Jennifer A

    2016-09-05

    Subwavelength plasmonic apertures have been foundational for direct optical manipulation of nanoscale specimens including sub-100 nm polymeric beads, metallic nanoparticles and proteins. While most plasmonic traps result in two-dimensional localization, three-dimensional manipulation has been demonstrated by integrating a plasmonic aperture on an optical fiber tip. However, such 3D traps are usually inefficient since the optical mode of the fiber and the subwavelength aperture only weakly couple. In this paper we design more efficient optical-fiber-based plasmonic tweezers combining a coaxial plasmonic aperture with a plasmonic grating coupler at the fiber tip facet. Using full-field finite difference time domain analysis, we optimize the grating design for both gold and silver fiber-based coaxial tweezers such that the optical transmission through the apertures is maximized. With the optimized grating, we show that the maximum transmission efficiency increases from 2.5% to 19.6% and from 1.48% to 16.7% for the gold and silver structures respectively. To evaluate their performance as optical tweezers, we calculate the optical forces and the corresponding trapping potential on dielectric particles interacting with the apertures. We demonstrate that the enahncement in the transmission translates into an equivalent increase in the optical forces. Consequently, the optical power required to achieve stable optical trapping is significantly reduced allowing for efficient localization and 3D manipulation of sub-30 nm dielectric particles.

  7. Terahertz near-field probe incorporating a λ/100 aperture for time-domain spectroscopy and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfaden, Alexander J.; Reno, John L.; Brener, Igal; Mitrofanov, Oleg

    2013-12-01

    Achieving high spatial resolutions for imaging with terahertz (THz) waves requires near-field probes, such as a sub-wavelength aperture probe. Bethe's theory of transmission through a sub-wavelength aperture of size a predicts that the transmitted electric field scales as Eαa3. This strong dependence limits the size of apertures that can be employed and hence the spatial resolution. This dependence however changes for the evanescent field components in very close proximity (~1μm for THz waves) to the aperture, as shown by electromagnetic simulations. To exploit this effect in a THz near-field probe, we developed a photoconductive THz near-field detector structure, which incorporates a thinned photo-conductive detector region and a distributed Bragg reflector between the detector and the aperture plane. Near-field probes are manufactured with different aperture sizes to investigate transmission of THz pulses through apertures as small as 3μm. The experimental results confirm that the transmitted field amplitude, and therefore the sensitivity, increases by about one order of magnitude for the new probes. A 3μm aperture probe with a spatial resolution of λ/100 at 1THz is demonstrated.

  8. Subwavelength Terahertz Imaging of Graphene Photoconductivity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Using a spatially structured, optical pump pulse with a terahertz (THz) probe pulse, we are able to determine spatial variations of the ultrafast THz photoconductivity with subwavelength resolution (75 μm ≈ λ/5 at 0.8 THz) in a planar graphene sample. We compare our results to Raman spectroscopy and correlate the existence of the spatial inhomogeneities between the two measurements. We find a strong correlation with inhomogeneity in electron density. This demonstrates the importance of eliminating inhomogeneities in doping density during CVD growth and fabrication for photoconductive devices. PMID:27736073

  9. Coded aperture imaging for fluorescent x-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, A.; MacDowell, A. A.; Marchesini, S.; Parkinson, D. Y.

    2014-06-15

    We employ a coded aperture pattern in front of a pixilated charge couple device detector to image fluorescent x-rays (6–25 KeV) from samples irradiated with synchrotron radiation. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays, and given a known source plane, allow for a large numerical aperture x-ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop and fabricate the free standing No-Two-Holes-Touching aperture pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the recorded encoded pattern were developed by means of a ray tracing technique and confirmed by experiments on standard samples.

  10. Metal-film subwavelength-grating polarizer with low insertion losses and high extinction ratios in the terahertz region.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kazuo; Muraki, Kengo

    2015-06-29

    A metal-film subwavelength-grating polarizer with high performance in the terahertz region is presented. The polarizer was obtained by depositing a thin Au film on a resin grating with a triangular cross section duplicated from a metal mold by using the imprinting method. Microstructural parameters were investigated in detail. Measured insertion losses were less than 0.5 dB in the frequency range of 0.5-3 THz, while extinction ratios were 50 dB in the range of 0.5-2.3 THz. The proposed fabrication method is suited to mass production of large-aperture robust polarizers.

  11. Near-Field Terahertz Transmission Imaging at 0.210 Terahertz Using a Simple Aperture Technique

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    Image Showing Locations of Cross Sections in Figure 7 .................. 6 1 I. INTRODUCTION Terahertz radiation has recently gained attention for...its usefulness in nondestructive imaging [1]. Terahertz radiation is used to see through nonmetallic objects such as plastic, dry paper, and cloth...imaging resolution is mainly limited by the ability to machine subwavelength apertures that focus and transmit radiation in the form of an evanescent

  12. Parallel optical nanolithography using nanoscale bowtie apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppuluri, Sreemanth M. V.

    Over the past two decades various branches of science and engineering have developed techniques for producing nanoscopic light sources for different applications such as imaging, detection and fabrication. These areas include near-field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), surface-enhanced Raman scattering and detection (SERS), plasmonics and so on. In particular nanolithography techniques have been developed to produce feature sizes in the sub-100 nm length scales. These processes include variations of standard photolithography process to achieve high resolution, optical fiber-based near-field lithography, surface plasmon assisted nanolithography, interference optical lithography and so on. This work presents a study of the viability of using nanoscale bowtie apertures for nanolithography. Bowtie apertures exhibit a unique property of supporting a propagating TE10 mode at wavelengths of light in the visible and near-UV regimes. The energy of this mode is concentrated in the gap region of the aperture and thus these apertures have the potential to produce high intensity nanoscale light spots that can be used for nano-patterning applications. We demonstrate this capability of nanoscale bowtie apertures by patterning photoresist to obtain resolution less than 100 nm. Initially we present the results from static lithography experiments and show that the ridge apertures of different shapes -- C, H and bowtie produce holes in the photoresist of dimensions around 50-60 nm. Subsequently we address the issues involved in using these apertures for nano directwriting. We show that chromium thin-films offer a viable solution to produce high quality metal films of surface roughness less than 1 nm over an area of 25 mum2. This is indeed important to achieve intimate contact between the apertures and the photoresist surface. We also explain ways to decrease friction between the mask and photoresist surfaces during nano direct-writing. In addition, to decrease the contact force

  13. Variable-aperture screen

    DOEpatents

    Savage, George M.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function.

  14. Rotating Aperture System

    DOEpatents

    Rusnak, Brian; Hall, James M.; Shen, Stewart; Wood, Richard L.

    2005-01-18

    A rotating aperture system includes a low-pressure vacuum pumping stage with apertures for passage of a deuterium beam. A stator assembly includes holes for passage of the beam. The rotor assembly includes a shaft connected to a deuterium gas cell or a crossflow venturi that has a single aperture on each side that together align with holes every rotation. The rotating apertures are synchronized with the firing of the deuterium beam such that the beam fires through a clear aperture and passes into the Xe gas beam stop. Portions of the rotor are lapped into the stator to improve the sealing surfaces, to prevent rapid escape of the deuterium gas from the gas cell.

  15. Broadband graphene electro-optic modulators with sub-wavelength thickness.

    PubMed

    Lee, C-C; Suzuki, S; Xie, W; Schibli, T R

    2012-02-27

    Graphene's featureless optical absorption, ultrahigh carrier mobility, and variable optical absorption by an applied gate voltage enable a new breed of optical modulators with broad optical and electrical bandwidths. Here we report on an electro-optic modulator that integrates single-layer graphene in a sub-wavelength thick, reflective modulator structure. These modulators provide a large degree of design freedom, which allows tailoring of their optical properties to specific needs. Current devices feature an active aperture ~100 µm, and provide uniform modulation with flat frequency response from 1 Hz to >100 MHz. These novel, low insertion-loss graphene-based modulators offer solutions to a variety of high-speed amplitude modulation tasks that require optical amplitude modulation without phase distortions, a flat frequency response, or ultra-thin geometries, such as for controlling monolithic, high-repetition rate mode-locked lasers or active interferometers.

  16. Theory of light scattering in subwavelength metallic slot antenna array fabricated on subwavelength thin film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. B.; Park, D. J.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate an analytic model that describes the near-field electromagnetic field profile near a subwavelength-sized metallic slot antenna fabricated on a thin dielectric substrate having a subwavelength thickness reaching λ/1000 in the terahertz frequency region. We found two-dimensional light diffraction induced by the two-dimensional nature of the slot antenna, and back-reflected waves interfered with each other in a complicated manner, resulting in a coupling of the Fourierdecomposed field amplitudes between the diffraction orders along the x and the y directions. We applied these findings to our model by modifying a previously developed model [D. J. Park et al., J. Korean Phys. Soc. 65, 1390 (2014)], and we monitor the effect on far-field transmission. This coupling effect was found to contribute to removal of physically-meaningless spikes or divergences in the transmission spectra, especially for relatively thick substrates.

  17. Extraordinary terahertz transmission through a copper film perforated with circular and rectangular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Dan; Chen, Bing

    2015-11-01

    The extraordinary transmission (ET) due to localized surface plasmon (LSP) and propagating surface plasmon (PSP) resonances of terahertz wave through a copper film perforated with circular and rectangular apertures is investigated theoretically and experimentally. Considering that the field distributions of LSP and PSP resonances are determined by the shape and periods of the apertures on the film, the relations between extraordinary and the geometrical parameters of the apertures are investigated. The intensities of the ETs induced by the PSP resonances mode [1, 1] are much stronger than the fundamental ones [1, 0] and [0, 1]. Our finds provide another effective method to tailor the extraordinary THz transmission in sub-wavelength metallic aperture structures.

  18. Circuit-tunable sub-wavelength THz resonators: hybridizing optical cavities and loop antennas.

    PubMed

    Paulillo, B; Manceau, J M; Degiron, A; Zerounian, N; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; Colombelli, R

    2014-09-08

    We demonstrate subwavelength electromagnetic resonators operating in the THz spectral range, whose spectral properties and spatial/angular patterns can be engineered in a similar way to an electronic circuit. We discuss the device concept, and we experimentally study the tuning of the resonant frequency as a function of variable capacitances and inductances. We then elucidate the optical coupling properties. The radiation pattern, obtained by angle-resolved reflectance, reveals that the system mainly couples to the outside world via a magnetic dipolar interaction.

  19. Measuring subwavelength spatial coherence with plasmonic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morrill, Drew; Li, Dongfang; Pacifici, Domenico

    2016-10-01

    Optical interferometry has enabled quantification of the spatial and temporal correlations of electromagnetic fields, which laid the foundations for the theory of optical coherence. Despite significant advances in fundamental theories and applications, the measurement of nanoscale coherence lengths for highly incoherent optical fields has remained elusive. Here, we employ plasmonic interferometry (that is, optical interferometry with surface plasmons) to characterize the spatial degree of coherence of light beams down to subwavelength scales, with measured coherence lengths as low as ∼330 nm for an incident wavelength of 500 nm. Furthermore, we demonstrate a compact coherence meter that integrates this method with an image sensor. Precise determination of spatial coherence can advance high-resolution imaging and tomographic schemes, and provide an experimental platform for the development and testing of optical coherence theories at the nanoscale.

  20. Liquid crystal on subwavelength metal gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Palto, S. P.; Barnik, M. I.; Artemov, V. V.; Shtykov, N. M.; Geivandov, A. R.; Yudin, S. G.; Gorkunov, M. V.

    2015-06-14

    Optical and electrooptical properties of a system consisting of subwavelength metal gratings and nematic liquid crystal layer are studied. Aluminium gratings that also act as interdigitated electrodes are produced by focused ion beam lithography. It is found that a liquid crystal layer strongly influences both the resonance and light polarization properties characteristic of the gratings. Enhanced transmittance is observed not only for the TM-polarized light in the near infrared spectral range but also for the TE-polarized light in the visible range. Although the electrodes are separated by nanosized slits, and the electric field is strongly localized near the surface, a pronounced electrooptical effect is registered. The effect is explained in terms of local reorientation of liquid crystal molecules at the grating surface and propagation of the orientational deformation from the surface into the bulk of the liquid crystal layer.

  1. Canalization of subwavelength images by electromagnetic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Pavel A.; Simovski, Constantin R.; Ikonen, Pekka

    2005-05-01

    The original regime of operation for flat superlenses formed by electromagnetic crystals is proposed. This regime does not involve negative refraction and amplification of evanescent waves in contrast to the perfect lenses formed by left-handed media. The subwavelength spatial spectrum of a source is canalized by the eigenmodes of the crystal having the same longitudinal components of wave vector and group velocities directed across the slab. The regime is implemented at low frequencies with respect to the crystal period by using capacitively loaded wire media. The resolution of λ/6 is demonstrated. The thickness of the superlens is not related with the distance to the source and the lens can be made thick enough.

  2. Shaping a Subwavelength Needle with Ultra-long Focal Length by Focusing Azimuthally Polarized Light

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fei; Huang, Kun; Wu, Jianfeng; Jiao, Jiao; Luo, Xiangang; Qiu, Chengwei; Hong, Minghui

    2015-01-01

    Flat optics, which could planarize and miniaturize the traditional optical elements, possesses the features of extremely low profile and high integration for advanced manipulation of light. Here we proposed and experimentally demonstrated a planar metalens to realize an ultra-long focal length of ~240λ with a large depth of focus (DOF) of ~12λ, under the illumination of azimuthally polarized beam with vortical phase at 633 nm. Equally important is that such a flat lens could stably keep a lateral subwavelength width of 0.42λ to 0.49λ along the needle-like focal region. It exhibits one-order improvement in the focal length compared to the traditional focal lengths of 20~30λ of flat lens, under the criterion of having subwavelength focusing spot. The ultra-long focal length ensures sufficient space for subsequent characterization behind the lens in practical industry setups, while subwavelength cross section and large DOF enable high resolution in transverse imaging and nanolithography and high tolerance in axial positioning in the meantime. Such planar metalens with those simultaneous advantages is prepared by laser pattern generator rather than focused ion beam, which makes the mass production possible. PMID:25943500

  3. Sub-Aperture Interferometers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhao, Feng

    2010-01-01

    Sub-aperture interferometers -- also called wavefront-split interferometers -- have been developed for simultaneously measuring displacements of multiple targets. The terms "sub-aperture" and "wavefront-split" signify that the original measurement light beam in an interferometer is split into multiple sub-beams derived from non-overlapping portions of the original measurement-beam aperture. Each measurement sub-beam is aimed at a retroreflector mounted on one of the targets. The splitting of the measurement beam is accomplished by use of truncated mirrors and masks, as shown in the example below

  4. Distributed aperture synthesis.

    PubMed

    Rabb, David; Jameson, Douglas; Stokes, Andrew; Stafford, Jason

    2010-05-10

    Distributed aperture synthesis is an exciting technique for recovering high-resolution images from an array of small telescopes. Such a system requires optical field values measured at individual apertures to be phased together so that a single, high-resolution image can be synthesized. This paper describes the application of sharpness metrics to the process of phasing multiple coherent imaging systems into a single high-resolution system. Furthermore, this paper will discuss hardware and present the results of simulations and experiments which will illustrate how aperture synthesis is performed.

  5. Coded Aperture Imaging for Fluorescent X-rays-Biomedical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Haboub, Abdel; MacDowell, Alastair; Marchesini, Stefano; Parkinson, Dilworth

    2013-06-01

    Employing a coded aperture pattern in front of a charge couple device pixilated detector (CCD) allows for imaging of fluorescent x-rays (6-25KeV) being emitted from samples irradiated with x-rays. Coded apertures encode the angular direction of x-rays and allow for a large Numerical Aperture x- ray imaging system. The algorithm to develop the self-supported coded aperture pattern of the Non Two Holes Touching (NTHT) pattern was developed. The algorithms to reconstruct the x-ray image from the encoded pattern recorded were developed by means of modeling and confirmed by experiments. Samples were irradiated by monochromatic synchrotron x-ray radiation, and fluorescent x-rays from several different test metal samples were imaged through the newly developed coded aperture imaging system. By choice of the exciting energy the different metals were speciated.

  6. Bull’s-Eye Structure with a Sub-Wavelength Circular Aperture

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-30

    5]. Any metal has a variable penetration depth in different spectral regions. Therefore, the thickness of a metal film should be much larger than...eye structure at three different distances. .......................................................................... 22 Figure 12. Sub- wavelength ...its penetration depth in order to have negligible radiation transmission through the metal film compared to the radiation transmitted through a sub

  7. Sub-wavelength antenna enhanced bilayer graphene tunable photodetector

    DOEpatents

    Beechem, III, Thomas Edwin; Howell, Stephen W.; Peters, David W.; Davids, Paul; Ohta, Taisuke

    2016-03-22

    The integration of bilayer graphene with an absorption enhancing sub-wavelength antenna provides an infrared photodetector capable of real-time spectral tuning without filters at nanosecond timescales.

  8. Variable-aperture screen

    DOEpatents

    Savage, G.M.

    1991-10-29

    Apparatus is described for separating material into first and second portions according to size including a plurality of shafts, a plurality of spaced disks radiating outwardly from each of the shafts to define apertures and linkage interconnecting the shafts for moving the shafts toward or away from one another to vary the size of the apertures while the apparatus is performing the separating function. 10 figures.

  9. Active aperture phased arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenoy, R. P.

    1989-04-01

    Developments towards the realization of active aperture phased arrays are reviewed. The technology and cost aspects of the power amplifier and phase shifter subsystems are discussed. Consideration is given to research concerning T/R modules, MESFETs, side lobe control, beam steering, optical control techniques, and printed circuit antennas. Methods for configuring the array are examined, focusing on the tile and brick configurations. It is found that there is no technological impediment for introducing active aperture phased arrays.

  10. Fraunhofer diffraction of Laguerre-Gaussian beam caused by a dynamic superposed dual-triangular aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xinzhong; Tai, Yuping; Nie, Zhaogang; Wang, Hui; Li, Hehe; Wang, Jingge; Tang, Jie; Wang, Yishan

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the Fraunhofer diffraction of a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam incident on a dynamic superposed dual-triangular aperture. The evolution of the diffraction pattern from this aperture is analyzed experimentally and theoretically. A special aperture, called the hex-star triangular aperture, demonstrates interesting diffraction patterns. Further, the diffraction properties of integer, half-integer, and fractional orders of topological charges at the Fraunhofer zone are studied by using the hex-star triangular aperture. This study can provide additional information to enhance the understanding of the diffraction properties of the LG beam transmitted through a complex aperture.

  11. Graphene based metamaterials for terahertz cloaking and subwavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouzmand, Seyedali

    Graphene is a two-dimensional carbon crystal that became one of the most controversial topics of research in the last few years. The intense interest in graphene stems from recent demonstrations of their potentially revolutionary electromagnetic applications -- including negative refraction, subdiffraction imaging, and even invisibility -- which have suggested a wide range of new devices for communications, sensing, and biomedicine. In addition, it has been shown that graphene is amenable to unique patterning schemes such as cutting, bending, folding, and fusion that are predicted to lead to interesting properties. A recent proposed application of graphene is in engineering the scattering properties of objects, which may be leveraged in applications such as radar-cross-section management and stealth, where it may be required to make one object look like another object or render an object completely invisible. We present the analytical formulation for the analysis of electromagnetic interaction with a finite conducting wedge covered with a cylindrically shaped nanostructured graphene metasurface, resulting in the scattering cancellation of the dominant scattering mode for all the incident and all the observation angles. Following this idea, the cylindrical graphene metasurface is utilized for cloaking of several concentric finite conducting wedges. In addition, a wedge shaped metasurface is proposed as an alternative approach for cloaking of finite wedges. The resolution of the conventional imaging lenses is restricted by the natural diffraction limit. Artificially engineered metamaterials now offer the possibility of creating a superlens that overcomes this restriction. We demonstrate that a wire medium (WM) slab loaded with graphene sheets enables the enhancement of the near field for subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for WM with the additional boundary condition in the connection of

  12. Improved power conversion efficiency for dye-sensitized solar cells using a subwavelength-structured antireflective coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Chun-Chi; Tsao, Kuan-Yi; Wu, Chih-Chung; Yang, Hongta; Chen, Chih-Ming

    2015-02-01

    Large-scale, subwavelength-structured nanodome arrays were successfully fabricated using simple, scalable bottom-up colloidal (nanosphere) lithography on a glass substrate as an efficient antireflective photoanode for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). A self-assembled monolayer of close-packed colloidal crystals (silica) was used as a structural template to pattern the two-dimensional subwavelength-structured nanodome arrays, which function as an efficient antireflective coating due to the graded refractive index across the interface between the air and specific nanodome array structure. The light harvesting for a DSSC with a subwavelength-structured antireflective coating was enhanced due to the improved broadband antireflectivity. Adjusting the nanodome size yielded a short-circuit current density (JSC) of 15.88 mA/cm2 with a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 8.82%, which were both better than the reference cell without a subwavelength-structured antireflective coating (JSC = 15.26 mA/cm2 and PCE = 8.45%).

  13. Characterization of fracture aperture for groundwater flow and transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sawada, A.; Sato, H.; Tetsu, K.; Sakamoto, K.

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents experiments and numerical analyses of flow and transport carried out on natural fractures and transparent replica of fractures. The purpose of this study was to improve the understanding of the role of heterogeneous aperture patterns on channelization of groundwater flow and dispersion in solute transport. The research proceeded as follows: First, a precision plane grinder was applied perpendicular to the fracture plane to characterize the aperture distribution on a natural fracture with 1 mm of increment size. Although both time and labor were intensive, this approach provided a detailed, three dimensional picture of the pattern of fracture aperture. This information was analyzed to provide quantitative measures for the fracture aperture distribution, including JRC (Joint Roughness Coefficient) and fracture contact area ratio. These parameters were used to develop numerical models with corresponding synthetic aperture patterns. The transparent fracture replica and numerical models were then used to study how transport is affected by the aperture spatial pattern. In the transparent replica, transmitted light intensity measured by a CCD camera was used to image channeling and dispersion due to the fracture aperture spatial pattern. The CCD image data was analyzed to obtain the quantitative fracture aperture and tracer concentration data according to Lambert-Beer's law. The experimental results were analyzed using the numerical models. Comparison of the numerical models to the transparent replica provided information about the nature of channeling and dispersion due to aperture spatial patterns. These results support to develop a methodology for defining representative fracture aperture of a simplified parallel fracture model for flow and transport in heterogeneous fractures for contaminant transport analysis.

  14. Engineering subwavelength photonic meta structures and devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Xuanlai

    Meta-materials are novel photonic composites with artificial "atoms" and "molecules" that offer unparallel functionalities. For example, by structuring conductive elements we can manufacture a medium of negative permittivity and/or permeability in desired frequency ranging from microwave to infrared wavelength. Recent theory predicts that such a medium would promise "superlensing", that is, breaking the diffraction limit in conventional optical imaging. The intricate structure of these novel metamaterials and devices necessitate development of viable manufacturing technologies, especially 3D micro/nano-manufacturing techniques. To address this challenge, we developed a unique micro-rapid prototyping system with lateral definition down to 0.6mum. Our study further reveals that the photon-material interaction in the 3D volume leads to a strong correlation of the lateral and vertical dimensions. This unique manufacturing technology shows great potential in future advanced photonic metamaterials and devices. Using microfabrication methods, we realized for the first time the artificial magnetism in terahertz frequency, as well as artificial plasma. Furthermore, at optical wavelengths, I will demonstrate that superlensing can also be realized with a thin silver film. The simulation and experimental study of this intriguing property will be presented, and I will discuss its perspective to subwavelength nanolithography.

  15. Subwavelength resolution from multilayered structure (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Bo Han; Jen, Yi-Jun; Liu, Wei-Chih; Lin, Shan-wen; Lan, Yung-Chiang; Tsai, Din Ping

    2016-10-01

    Breaking optical diffraction limit is one of the most important issues needed to be overcome for the demand of high-density optoelectronic components. Here, a multilayered structure which consists of alternating semiconductor and dielectric layers for breaking optical diffraction limitation at THz frequency region are proposed and analyzed. We numerically demonstrate that such multilayered structure not only can act as a hyperbolic metamaterial but also a birefringence material via the control of the external temperature (or magnetic field). A practical approach is provided to control all the diffraction signals toward a specific direction by using transfer matrix method and effective medium theory. Numerical calculations and computer simulation (based on finite element method, FEM) are carried out, which agree well with each other. The temperature (or magnetic field) parameter can be tuned to create an effective material with nearly flat isofrequency feature to transfer (project) all the k-space signals excited from the object to be resolved to the image plane. Furthermore, this multilayered structure can resolve subwavelength structures at various incident THz light sources simultaneously. In addition, the resolution power for a fixed operating frequency also can be tuned by only changing the magnitude of external magnetic field. Such a device provides a practical route for multi-functional material, photolithography and real-time super-resolution image.

  16. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps.

    PubMed

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-14

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  17. Plasmon transmission through excitonic subwavelength gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukharev, Maxim; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-04-01

    We study the transfer of electromagnetic energy across a subwavelength gap separating two co-axial metal nanorods. In the absence of spacer in the gap separating the rods, the system exhibits strong coupling behavior between longitudinal plasmons in the two rods. The nature and magnitude of this coupling are studied by varying various geometrical parameters. As a function of frequency, the transmission is dominated by a split longitudinal plasmon peak. The two hybrid modes are the dipole-like "bonding" mode characterized by a peak intensity in the gap and a quadrupole-like "antibonding" mode whose amplitude vanishes at the gap center. When the length of one rod is varied, this mode spectrum exhibits the familiar anti-crossing behavior that depends on the coupling strength determined by the gap width. When off-resonant 2-level emitters are placed in the gap, almost no effect on the frequency dependent transmission is observed. In contrast, when the molecular system is resonant with the plasmonic line shape, the transmission is strongly modified, showing characteristics of strong exciton-plasmon coupling. Most strongly modified is the transmission near the lower frequency "bonding" plasmon mode. The presence of resonant molecules in the gap affects not only the molecule-field interaction but also the spatial distribution of the field intensity and the electromagnetic energy flux across the junction.

  18. Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    SciTech Connect

    Stappaerts, E A; Scharlemann, E

    2005-02-07

    We report a differential synthetic aperture ladar (DSAL) concept that relaxes platform and laser requirements compared to conventional SAL. Line-of-sight translation/vibration constraints are reduced by several orders of magnitude, while laser frequency stability is typically relaxed by an order of magnitude. The technique is most advantageous for shorter laser wavelengths, ultraviolet to mid-infrared. Analytical and modeling results, including the effect of speckle and atmospheric turbulence, are presented. Synthetic aperture ladars are of growing interest, and several theoretical and experimental papers have been published on the subject. Compared to RF synthetic aperture radar (SAR), platform/ladar motion and transmitter bandwidth constraints are especially demanding at optical wavelengths. For mid-IR and shorter wavelengths, deviations from a linear trajectory along the synthetic aperture length have to be submicron, or their magnitude must be measured to that precision for compensation. The laser coherence time has to be the synthetic aperture transit time, or transmitter phase has to be recorded and a correction applied on detection.

  19. Diffraction from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Roos, P.A.; Carlsten, J.L.; Kilper, D.C.; Lear, K.L.

    1999-08-01

    Direct measurement of scattered fields from oxide confinement apertures in vertical-cavity lasers is presented. Diffraction fringes associated with each transverse lasing mode are detected in the far field from devices with varying oxide aperture dimensions and with quantum efficiencies as high as 48{percent}. The diffracted pattern symmetries match the rectangular symmetry of the oxide apertures present in the devices and fringe locations are compared to Fraunhofer theory. The fraction of power diffracted from the lasing mode remains roughly constant as a function of relative pump rate, but is shown to depend on both transverse mode order and oxide aperture size. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  20. Young's experiment with a double slit of sub-wavelength dimensions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kanghee; Lim, Jongseok; Ahn, Jaewook

    2013-08-12

    We report that the interference pattern of Young's double-slit experiment changes as a function of polarization in the sub-wavelength diffraction regime. Experiments carried out with terahertz time-domain spectroscopy reveal that diffracted waves from sub-wavelength-scale slits exhibit either positive or negative phase shift with respect to Gouy phase depending on the polarization. Theoretical explanation based on the induction of electric current and magnetic dipole in the vicinity of the slits shows an excellent agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Pseudo-Rhombus-Shaped Subwavelength Crossed Gratings of GaAs for Broadband Antireflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xi; Fan, Zhong-Chao; Zhang, Jing; Song, Guo-Feng; Chen, Liang-Hui

    2010-12-01

    Holographic lithography coupled with the nonlinear response of photoresist to the exposure is adopted to fabricate porous photoresist (PR) mask. Conventional dot PR mask is also generated, and both patterns are transferred into a underlying GaAs substrate by the optimal dry etching process to obtain tapered subwavelength crossed gratings (SWCGs) to mimic the moth-eye structure. In comparison of the experiment and simulation, the closely-packed pseudo-rhombus-shaped GaAs SWCGs resulting from the porous mask outperforms the conical counterpart which comes from the dot mask, and achieves a reported lowest mean spectral reflectance of 1.1%.

  2. Graphene-based electrically reconfigurable deep-subwavelength metamaterials for active control of THz light propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arezoomandan, Sara; Yang, Kai; Sensale-Rodriguez, Berardi

    2014-08-01

    This work studies the terahertz light propagation through graphene-based reconfigurable metasurfaces where the unit cell dimensions are much smaller than the terahertz wavelength. The proposed devices, which poses deep-subwavelength unit cell and active region dimensions can operate as amplitude and/or phase modulators in certain specific frequency bands determined by the device geometry. Reconfigurability is attained via electrostatically tuning the optical conductivity of patterned graphene layers, which are strategically located in each unit cell. The ultra-small unit cell dimensions can be advantageous for beam shaping applications.

  3. Confocal coded aperture imaging

    DOEpatents

    Tobin, Jr., Kenneth William; Thomas, Jr., Clarence E.

    2001-01-01

    A method for imaging a target volume comprises the steps of: radiating a small bandwidth of energy toward the target volume; focusing the small bandwidth of energy into a beam; moving the target volume through a plurality of positions within the focused beam; collecting a beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a non-diffractive confocal coded aperture; generating a shadow image of said aperture from every point source of radiation in the target volume; and, reconstructing the shadow image into a 3-dimensional image of the every point source by mathematically correlating the shadow image with a digital or analog version of the coded aperture. The method can comprise the step of collecting the beam of energy scattered from the target volume with a Fresnel zone plate.

  4. Dynamic metamaterial aperture for microwave imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Sleasman, Timothy; Imani, Mohammadreza F.; Gollub, Jonah N.; Smith, David R.

    2015-11-16

    We present a dynamic metamaterial aperture for use in computational imaging schemes at microwave frequencies. The aperture consists of an array of complementary, resonant metamaterial elements patterned into the upper conductor of a microstrip line. Each metamaterial element contains two diodes connected to an external control circuit such that the resonance of the metamaterial element can be damped by application of a bias voltage. Through applying different voltages to the control circuit, select subsets of the elements can be switched on to create unique radiation patterns that illuminate the scene. Spatial information of an imaging domain can thus be encoded onto this set of radiation patterns, or measurements, which can be processed to reconstruct the targets in the scene using compressive sensing algorithms. We discuss the design and operation of a metamaterial imaging system and demonstrate reconstructed images with a 10:1 compression ratio. Dynamic metamaterial apertures can potentially be of benefit in microwave or millimeter wave systems such as those used in security screening and through-wall imaging. In addition, feature-specific or adaptive imaging can be facilitated through the use of the dynamic aperture.

  5. Apodizer aperture for lasers

    DOEpatents

    Jorna, Siebe; Siebert, Larry D.; Brueckner, Keith A.

    1976-11-09

    An aperture attenuator for use with high power lasers which includes glass windows shaped and assembled to form an annulus chamber which is filled with a dye solution. The annulus chamber is shaped such that the section in alignment with the axis of the incident beam follows a curve which is represented by the equation y = (r - r.sub.o).sup.n.

  6. Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, P. A.; Hensley, S.; Joughin, I. R.; Li, F.; Madsen, S. N.; Rodriguez, E.; Goldstein, R. M.

    1998-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar interferometry is an imaging technique for measuring the topography of a surface, its changes over time, and other changes in the detailed characteristics of the surface. This paper reviews the techniques of interferometry, systems and limitations, and applications in a rapidly growing area of science and engineering.

  7. Temporal Aperture Modulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proctor, R. J.

    1981-01-01

    The two types of modulation techniques useful to X-ray imaging are reviewed. The use of optimum coded temporal aperature modulation is shown, in certain cases, to offer an advantage over a spatial aperture modulator. Example applications of a diffuse anisotropic X-ray background experiment and a wide field of view hard X-ray imager are discussed.

  8. Optimizing the subwavelength grating of L-band annular groove phase masks for high coronagraphic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vargas Catalán, E.; Huby, E.; Forsberg, P.; Jolivet, A.; Baudoz, P.; Carlomagno, B.; Delacroix, C.; Habraken, S.; Mawet, D.; Surdej, J.; Absil, O.; Karlsson, M.

    2016-11-01

    Context. The annular groove phase mask (AGPM) is one possible implementation of the vector vortex coronagraph, where the helical phase ramp is produced by a concentric subwavelength grating. For several years, we have been manufacturing AGPMs by etching gratings into synthetic diamond substrates using inductively coupled plasma etching. Aims: We aim to design, fabricate, optimize, and evaluate new L-band AGPMs that reach the highest possible coronagraphic performance, for applications in current and forthcoming infrared high-contrast imagers. Methods: Rigorous coupled wave analysis (RCWA) is used for designing the subwavelength grating of the phase mask. Coronagraphic performance evaluation is performed on a dedicated optical test bench. The experimental results of the performance evaluation are then used to accurately determine the actual profile of the fabricated gratings, based on RCWA modeling. Results: The AGPM coronagraphic performance is very sensitive to small errors in etch depth and grating profile. Most of the fabricated components therefore show moderate performance in terms of starlight rejection (a few 100:1 in the best cases). Here we present new processes for re-etching the fabricated components in order to optimize the parameters of the grating and hence significantly increase their coronagraphic performance. Starlight rejection up to 1000:1 is demonstrated in a broadband L filter on the coronagraphic test bench, which corresponds to a raw contrast of about 10-5 at two resolution elements from the star for a perfect input wave front on a circular, unobstructed aperture. Conclusions: Thanks to their exquisite performance, our latest L-band AGPMs are good candidates for installation in state of the art and future high-contrast thermal infrared imagers, such as METIS for the E-ELT.

  9. Subwavelength optical lattices induced by position-dependent dark states

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Qingqing; Evers, Joerg; Kiffner, Martin; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2011-05-15

    A method for the generation of subwavelength optical lattices based on multilevel dark states is proposed. The dark state is formed by a suitable combination of standing wave light fields, leading to position-dependent populations of the ground states. An additional field coupling dispersively to one of the ground states translates this position dependence into a subwavelength optical potential. We provide two semiclassical approaches to understand the involved physics, and demonstrate that they lead to identical results in a certain meaningful limit. Then we apply a Monte Carlo simulation technique to study the full quantum dynamics of the subwavelength trapping. Finally, we discuss the relevant time scales for the trapping, optimum conditions, and possible implementations.

  10. Extreme stiffness hyperbolic elastic metamaterial for total transmission subwavelength imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyuk; Oh, Joo Hwan; Seung, Hong Min; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-04-01

    Subwavelength imaging by metamaterials and extended work to pursue total transmission has been successfully demonstrated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves very recently. However, no elastic counterpart has been reported because earlier attempts suffer from considerable loss. Here, for the first time, we realize an elastic hyperbolic metamaterial lens and experimentally show total transmission subwavelength imaging with measured wave field inside the metamaterial lens. The main idea is to compensate for the decreased impedance in the perforated elastic metamaterial by utilizing extreme stiffness, which has not been independently actualized in a continuum elastic medium so far. The fabricated elastic lens is capable of directly transferring subwavelength information from the input to the output boundary. In the experiment, this intriguing phenomenon is confirmed by scanning the elastic structures inside the lens with laser scanning vibrometer. The proposed elastic metamaterial lens will bring forth significant guidelines for ultrasonic imaging techniques.

  11. Extreme stiffness hyperbolic elastic metamaterial for total transmission subwavelength imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyuk; Oh, Joo Hwan; Seung, Hong Min; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-04-04

    Subwavelength imaging by metamaterials and extended work to pursue total transmission has been successfully demonstrated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves very recently. However, no elastic counterpart has been reported because earlier attempts suffer from considerable loss. Here, for the first time, we realize an elastic hyperbolic metamaterial lens and experimentally show total transmission subwavelength imaging with measured wave field inside the metamaterial lens. The main idea is to compensate for the decreased impedance in the perforated elastic metamaterial by utilizing extreme stiffness, which has not been independently actualized in a continuum elastic medium so far. The fabricated elastic lens is capable of directly transferring subwavelength information from the input to the output boundary. In the experiment, this intriguing phenomenon is confirmed by scanning the elastic structures inside the lens with laser scanning vibrometer. The proposed elastic metamaterial lens will bring forth significant guidelines for ultrasonic imaging techniques.

  12. Extreme stiffness hyperbolic elastic metamaterial for total transmission subwavelength imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyuk; Oh, Joo Hwan; Seung, Hong Min; Cho, Seung Hyun; Kim, Yoon Young

    2016-01-01

    Subwavelength imaging by metamaterials and extended work to pursue total transmission has been successfully demonstrated with electromagnetic and acoustic waves very recently. However, no elastic counterpart has been reported because earlier attempts suffer from considerable loss. Here, for the first time, we realize an elastic hyperbolic metamaterial lens and experimentally show total transmission subwavelength imaging with measured wave field inside the metamaterial lens. The main idea is to compensate for the decreased impedance in the perforated elastic metamaterial by utilizing extreme stiffness, which has not been independently actualized in a continuum elastic medium so far. The fabricated elastic lens is capable of directly transferring subwavelength information from the input to the output boundary. In the experiment, this intriguing phenomenon is confirmed by scanning the elastic structures inside the lens with laser scanning vibrometer. The proposed elastic metamaterial lens will bring forth significant guidelines for ultrasonic imaging techniques. PMID:27040762

  13. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-03-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  14. RF verification tasks underway at the Harris Corporation for multiple aperture reflector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutwein, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Mesh effects on gain and patterns and adjacent aperture coupling effects for "pie" and circular apertures are discussed. Wire effects for Harris model with Langley scale model results included for assessing D/lamda effects, and wire effects with adjacent aperture coupling were determined. Reflector surface distortion effects (pillows and manufacturing roughness) were studied.

  15. Magnification of subwavelength field distributions at microwave frequencies using a wire medium slab operating in the canalization regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikonen, Pekka; Simovski, Constantin; Tretyakov, Sergei; Belov, Pavel; Hao, Yang

    2007-09-01

    Authors demonstrate numerically the magnification of subwavelength field pattern using a wire medium slab operating in the canalization regime. The magnifying slab is implemented by radially enlarging the distance between adjacent wires, and the operational frequency is tuned to coincide with the Fabry-Pérot resonance condition. The near-field pattern of a complex-shaped source is canalized over an electrical distance corresponding roughly to three wavelengths (3λ), and the pattern details are magnified by a factor of 3. The performance is also studied at several frequencies deviating from the one of the Fabry-Pérot resonance.

  16. Metallic subwavelength structures for a broadband infrared absorption control.

    PubMed

    Biener, Gabriel; Niv, Avi; Kleiner, Vladimir; Hasman, Erez

    2007-04-15

    We present a method to control the absorption of a resonator by using a subwavelength structure consisting of thin metallic plates that behaves as a metamaterial film. We demonstrate the ability to tailor the conductivity of such a metallic subwavelength structure to achieve a resonator with the desired impedance matching for the mid-infrared range. This approach provides for broadband, as well as broad-angle, enhanced absorption. Theoretical analyses, as well as experimental results of the optical properties of a metallic NiCr structure at 8-12 microm spectral range are introduced.

  17. Acoustic subwavelength imaging of subsurface objects with acoustic resonant metalens

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ying; Liu, XiaoJun; Zhou, Chen; Wei, Qi; Wu, DaJian

    2013-11-25

    Early research into acoustic metamaterials has shown the possibility of achieving subwavelength near-field acoustic imaging. However, a major restriction of acoustic metamaterials is that the imaging objects must be placed in close vicinity of the devices. Here, we present an approach for acoustic imaging of subsurface objects far below the diffraction limit. An acoustic metalens made of holey-structured metamaterials is used to magnify evanescent waves, which can rebuild an image at the central plane. Without changing the physical structure of the metalens, our proposed approach can image objects located at certain distances from the input surface, which provides subsurface signatures of the objects with subwavelength spatial resolution.

  18. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Vassigh, Kenny; Bendek, Selman; Young, Zion W; Lynch, Dana H.

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide strawman mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible andor UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST.

  19. Configurable Aperture Space Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    In December 2014, we were awarded Center Innovation Fund to evaluate an optical and mechanical concept for a novel implementation of a segmented telescope based on modular, interconnected small sats (satlets). The concept is called CAST, a Configurable Aperture Space Telescope. With a current TRL is 2 we will aim to reach TLR 3 in Sept 2015 by demonstrating a 2x2 mirror system to validate our optical model and error budget, provide straw man mechanical architecture and structural damping analyses, and derive future satlet-based observatory performance requirements. CAST provides an alternative access to visible and/or UV wavelength space telescope with 1-meter or larger aperture for NASA SMD Astrophysics and Planetary Science community after the retirement of HST

  20. Aperture center energy showcase

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, J. J.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia and Forest City have established a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA), and the partnership provides a unique opportunity to take technology research and development from demonstration to application in a sustainable community. A project under that CRADA, Aperture Center Energy Showcase, offers a means to develop exhibits and demonstrations that present feedback to community members, Sandia customers, and visitors. The technologies included in the showcase focus on renewable energy and its efficiency, and resilience. These technologies are generally scalable, and provide secure, efficient solutions to energy production, delivery, and usage. In addition to establishing an Energy Showcase, support offices and conference capabilities that facilitate research, collaboration, and demonstration were created. The Aperture Center project focuses on establishing a location that provides outreach, awareness, and demonstration of research findings, emerging technologies, and project developments to Sandia customers, visitors, and Mesa del Sol community members.

  1. Integrated electrochromic aperture diaphragm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deutschmann, T.; Oesterschulze, E.

    2014-05-01

    In the last years, the triumphal march of handheld electronics with integrated cameras has opened amazing fields for small high performing optical systems. For this purpose miniaturized iris apertures are of practical importance because they are essential to control both the dynamic range of the imaging system and the depth of focus. Therefore, we invented a micro optical iris based on an electrochromic (EC) material. This material changes its absorption in response to an applied voltage. A coaxial arrangement of annular rings of the EC material is used to establish an iris aperture without need of any mechanical moving parts. The advantages of this device do not only arise from the space-saving design with a thickness of the device layer of 50μm. But it also benefits from low power consumption. In fact, its transmission state is stable in an open circuit, phrased memory effect. Only changes of the absorption require a voltage of up to 2 V. In contrast to mechanical iris apertures the absorption may be controlled on an analog scale offering the opportunity for apodization. These properties make our device the ideal candidate for battery powered and space-saving systems. We present optical measurements concerning control of the transmitted intensity and depth of focus, and studies dealing with switching times, light scattering, and stability. While the EC polymer used in this study still has limitations concerning color and contrast, the presented device features all functions of an iris aperture. In contrast to conventional devices it offers some special features. Owing to the variable chemistry of the EC material, its spectral response may be adjusted to certain applications like color filtering in different spectral regimes (UV, optical range, infrared). Furthermore, all segments may be switched individually to establish functions like spatial Fourier filtering or lateral tunable intensity filters.

  2. Adaptive aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, A. M.; Zhang, S.; Mudassar, A.; Love, G. D.; Greenaway, A. H.

    2005-12-01

    High-resolution imaging can be achieved by optical aperture synthesis (OAS). Such an imaging process is subject to aberrations introduced by instrumental defects and/or turbulent media. Redundant spacings calibration (RSC) is a snapshot calibration technique that can be used to calibrate OAS arrays without use of assumptions about the object being imaged. Here we investigate the analogies between RSC and adaptive optics in passive imaging applications.

  3. Theoretical analysis of subwavelength high contrast grating reflectors.

    PubMed

    Karagodsky, Vadim; Sedgwick, Forrest G; Chang-Hasnain, Connie J

    2010-08-02

    A simple analytic analysis of the ultra-high reflectivity feature of subwavelength dielectric gratings is developed. The phenomenon of ultra high reflectivity is explained to be a destructive interference effect between the two grating modes. Based on this phenomenon, a design algorithm for broadband grating mirrors is suggested.

  4. Stimulating surface plasmon polaritons over patterned aluminum film by terahertz radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yaping; Li, Weijun; Luo, Jun; Yuan, Ying; Lei, Yu; Tong, Qing; Zhang, Xinyu; Xie, Changsheng

    2015-10-01

    In order to investigate the key properties of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), a new kind of device based on sub-wavelength aluminum structures (SWASs) have been designed and fabricated with respect to incident radiation in terahertz (THz) range. The device is composed of two layered micro-nano-structures and the utilized substrates are silicon materials in current stage. One silicon substrate is sputtered directly by a thin aluminum film, which is further patterned to shape functioned micro-nano-structures. The THz transmission performances of the devices have been measured according to common optical approaches. The experimental results show that some extraordinary transmission peaks are clearly presented in terahertz transmittance spectrum, which is inconsistent with the classical aperture theory of Bethe. The effects of the developed SPPs are discussed carefully according to the discovered phenomena about the extraordinary optical transmission (EOT).

  5. Electric and magnetic response in dielectric dark states for low loss subwavelength optical meta atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, Aditya; Moitra, Parikshit; Koschny, Thomas; Valentine, Jason; Soukoulis, Costas M.

    2015-07-14

    Artificially created surfaces or metasurfaces, composed of appropriately shaped subwavelength structures, namely, meta-atoms, control light at subwavelength scales. Historically, metasurfaces have used radiating metallic resonators as subwavelength inclusions. However, while resonant optical metasurfaces made from metal have been sufficiently subwavelength in the propagation direction, they are too lossy for many applications. Metasurfaces made out of radiating dielectric resonators have been proposed to solve the loss problem, but are marginally subwavelength at optical frequencies. We designed subwavelength resonators made out of nonradiating dielectrics. The resonators are decorated with appropriately placed scatterers, resulting in a meta-atom with an engineered electromagnetic response. A metasurface that yields an electric response is fabricated, experimentally characterized, and a method to obtain a magnetic response at optical frequencies is theoretically demonstrated. In conclusion, this design methodology paves the way for metasurfaces that are simultaneously subwavelength and low loss.

  6. Electric and magnetic response in dielectric dark states for low loss subwavelength optical meta atoms

    DOE PAGES

    Jain, Aditya; Moitra, Parikshit; Koschny, Thomas; ...

    2015-07-14

    Artificially created surfaces or metasurfaces, composed of appropriately shaped subwavelength structures, namely, meta-atoms, control light at subwavelength scales. Historically, metasurfaces have used radiating metallic resonators as subwavelength inclusions. However, while resonant optical metasurfaces made from metal have been sufficiently subwavelength in the propagation direction, they are too lossy for many applications. Metasurfaces made out of radiating dielectric resonators have been proposed to solve the loss problem, but are marginally subwavelength at optical frequencies. We designed subwavelength resonators made out of nonradiating dielectrics. The resonators are decorated with appropriately placed scatterers, resulting in a meta-atom with an engineered electromagnetic response. Amore » metasurface that yields an electric response is fabricated, experimentally characterized, and a method to obtain a magnetic response at optical frequencies is theoretically demonstrated. In conclusion, this design methodology paves the way for metasurfaces that are simultaneously subwavelength and low loss.« less

  7. Ultra-broadband and efficient surface plasmon polariton launching through metallic nanoslits of subwavelength period

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guangyuan; Zhang, Jiasen

    2014-01-01

    Ultra-broadband, efficient and unidirectional surface plasmon polariton (SPP) launching is of great concern in plasmonic devices and circuits. To address this challenge, a novel method adopting deep-subwavelength slits of subwavelength period (λSPP/4 ~ λSPP/3) in a thick metal film and under backside illumination is proposed. A new band pattern featuring broadband and wide angular characteristics, which is due to the coupling of the zeroth-order SPP resonance at the superstrate–metal interface and the first-order SPP resonance at the metal–substrate interface, is observed for the first time in the dispersion diagram. Unidirectional SPP launching efficiency of ~50%, ultra-broad bandwidth of up to 780 nm, covering the entire optical fiber communication bands, and relatively wide angular range of 7° are achieved. This remarkable efficient, ultra-broadband and wide angular performance is demonstrated by carefully designed experiments in the near infrared regime, showing good agreement with numerical results. PMID:25081812

  8. Directive metamaterial-based subwavelength resonant cavity antennas - Applications for beam steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourir, Abdelwaheb; Burokur, Shah Nawaz; Yahiaoui, Riad; de Lustrac, André

    2009-06-01

    This article presents the use of composite resonant metamaterials for the design of highly directive subwavelength cavity antennas. These metamaterials, composed of planar metallic patterns periodically organized on dielectric substrates, exhibit frequency dispersive phase characteristics. Different models of metamaterial-based surfaces (metasurfaces), introducing a zero degree reflection phase shift to incident waves, are firstly studied where the bandwidth and operation frequency are predicted. These surfaces are then applied in a resonant Fabry-Perot type cavity and a ray optics analysis is used to design different models of ultra-compact high-gain microstrip printed antennas. Another surface presenting a variable reflection phase by the use of a non-periodic metamaterial-based metallic strips array is designed for a passive low-profile steering beam antenna application. Finally, the incorporation of active electronic components on the metasurfaces, allowing an electronic control of the phase responses, is applied to an operation frequency reconfigurable cavity and a beam steering cavity. All these cavity antennas operate on subwavelength modes, the smallest cavity thickness being of the order of λ/60. To cite this article: A. Ourir et al., C. R. Physique 10 (2009).

  9. Optical filter including a sub-wavelength periodic structure and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Kaushik, Sumanth; Stallard, Brian R.

    1998-01-01

    An optical filter includes a dielectric layer formed within a resonant optical cavity, with the dielectric layer having formed therein a sub-wavelength periodic structure to define, at least in part, a wavelength for transmission of light through the resonant optical cavity. The sub-wavelength periodic structure can be formed either by removing material from the dielectric layer (e.g. by etching through an electron-beam defined mask), or by altering the composition of the layer (e.g. by ion implantation). Different portions of the dielectric layer can be patterned to form one or more optical interference filter elements having different light transmission wavelengths so that the optical filter can filter incident light according to wavelength and/or polarization. For some embodiments, the optical filter can include a detector element in optical alignment with each optical interference filter element to quantify or measure the filtered light for analysis thereof. The optical filter has applications to spectrometry, colorimetry, and chemical sensing.

  10. Aperture synthesis in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faucherre, Michel; Greenaway, A. H.; Merkle, F.; Noordam, J. E.; Perryman, M. A. C.

    1989-09-01

    The principles of optical aperture synthesis (OAS), which can yield images of much higher resolution than current ground observations, are essentially those of radio astronomy, and may be used in either space- or ground-based studies of the stellar envelopes around Be stars, the internal dynamics of active galaxies, etc. An account is presently given of possible OAS instrument configurations; it is shown that a large field of view can be achieved, so that the instrument may be calibrated on bright stars during the observation of faint sources. Mission concepts for a 'monostructure' OAS instrument of about 30-m size are examined.

  11. Diffraction contrast imaging using virtual apertures.

    PubMed

    Gammer, Christoph; Burak Ozdol, V; Liebscher, Christian H; Minor, Andrew M

    2015-08-01

    Two methods on how to obtain the full diffraction information from a sample region and the associated reconstruction of images or diffraction patterns using virtual apertures are demonstrated. In a STEM-based approach, diffraction patterns are recorded for each beam position using a small probe convergence angle. Similarly, a tilt series of TEM dark-field images is acquired. The resulting datasets allow the reconstruction of either electron diffraction patterns, or bright-, dark- or annular dark-field images using virtual apertures. The experimental procedures of both methods are presented in the paper and are applied to a precipitation strengthened and creep deformed ferritic alloy with a complex microstructure. The reconstructed virtual images are compared with conventional TEM images. The major advantage is that arbitrarily shaped virtual apertures generated with image processing software can be designed without facing any physical limitations. In addition, any virtual detector that is specifically designed according to the underlying crystal structure can be created to optimize image contrast.

  12. Differential Optical Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DOEpatents

    Stappaerts, Eddy A.

    2005-04-12

    A new differential technique for forming optical images using a synthetic aperture is introduced. This differential technique utilizes a single aperture to obtain unique (N) phases that can be processed to produce a synthetic aperture image at points along a trajectory. This is accomplished by dividing the aperture into two equal "subapertures", each having a width that is less than the actual aperture, along the direction of flight. As the platform flies along a given trajectory, a source illuminates objects and the two subapertures are configured to collect return signals. The techniques of the invention is designed to cancel common-mode errors, trajectory deviations from a straight line, and laser phase noise to provide the set of resultant (N) phases that can produce an image having a spatial resolution corresponding to a synthetic aperture.

  13. Real-time and Sub-wavelength Ultrafast Coherent Diffraction Imaging in the Extreme Ultraviolet

    PubMed Central

    Zürch, M.; Rothhardt, J.; Hädrich, S.; Demmler, S.; Krebs, M.; Limpert, J.; Tünnermann, A.; Guggenmos, A.; Kleineberg, U.; Spielmann, C.

    2014-01-01

    Coherent Diffraction Imaging is a technique to study matter with nanometer-scale spatial resolution based on coherent illumination of the sample with hard X-ray, soft X-ray or extreme ultraviolet light delivered from synchrotrons or more recently X-ray Free-Electron Lasers. This robust technique simultaneously allows quantitative amplitude and phase contrast imaging. Laser-driven high harmonic generation XUV-sources allow table-top realizations. However, the low conversion efficiency of lab-based sources imposes either a large scale laser system or long exposure times, preventing many applications. Here we present a lensless imaging experiment combining a high numerical aperture (NA = 0.8) setup with a high average power fibre laser driven high harmonic source. The high flux and narrow-band harmonic line at 33.2 nm enables either sub-wavelength spatial resolution close to the Abbe limit (Δr = 0.8λ) for long exposure time, or sub-70 nm imaging in less than one second. The unprecedented high spatial resolution, compactness of the setup together with the real-time capability paves the way for a plethora of applications in fundamental and life sciences. PMID:25483626

  14. Real-time and sub-wavelength ultrafast coherent diffraction imaging in the extreme ultraviolet.

    PubMed

    Zürch, M; Rothhardt, J; Hädrich, S; Demmler, S; Krebs, M; Limpert, J; Tünnermann, A; Guggenmos, A; Kleineberg, U; Spielmann, C

    2014-12-08

    Coherent Diffraction Imaging is a technique to study matter with nanometer-scale spatial resolution based on coherent illumination of the sample with hard X-ray, soft X-ray or extreme ultraviolet light delivered from synchrotrons or more recently X-ray Free-Electron Lasers. This robust technique simultaneously allows quantitative amplitude and phase contrast imaging. Laser-driven high harmonic generation XUV-sources allow table-top realizations. However, the low conversion efficiency of lab-based sources imposes either a large scale laser system or long exposure times, preventing many applications. Here we present a lensless imaging experiment combining a high numerical aperture (NA = 0.8) setup with a high average power fibre laser driven high harmonic source. The high flux and narrow-band harmonic line at 33.2 nm enables either sub-wavelength spatial resolution close to the Abbe limit (Δr = 0.8λ) for long exposure time, or sub-70 nm imaging in less than one second. The unprecedented high spatial resolution, compactness of the setup together with the real-time capability paves the way for a plethora of applications in fundamental and life sciences.

  15. Optical forces on cylinders near subwavelength slits illuminated by a photonic nanojet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdivia-Valero, F. J.; Nieto-Vesperinas, M.

    2013-05-01

    We discuss optical forces exerted on particles, either dielectric or metallic, near a subwavelength slit illuminated by a photonic nanojet. We compare those cases in which the Mie resonances are or are not excited. The configurations on study are 2D, hence those particles are infinite cylinders and, in order to obtain extraordinary transmission, the illuminating beam is p-polarized. We show the different effects of these particle resonances on the optical forces: while whispering gallery modes under those illumination conditions weaken the force strength, this latter is enhanced by localized plasmon excitation. Also, illuminating the slit with a nanojet enhances the optical forces on the particle at the exit of the aperture by a factor between 3 and 10 compared with illumination of the slit with a Gaussian beam. In addition, the pulling force that such a small resonant metallic particle suffers on direct illumination by a nanojet can change by the presence of the slit, so that it may become repulsive at certain lateral positions of the particle.

  16. Experimental demonstration of tri-aperture Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Zhilong; Huang, Jianyu; Wu, Shudong; Wang, Kunpeng; Bai, Tao; Dai, Ze; Kong, Xinyi; Wu, Jin

    2017-04-01

    A tri-aperture Differential Synthetic Aperture Ladar (DSAL) is demonstrated in laboratory, which is configured by using one common aperture to transmit the illuminating laser and another two along-track receiving apertures to collect back-scattered laser signal for optical heterodyne detection. The image formation theory on this tri-aperture DSAL shows that there are two possible methods to reconstruct the azimuth Phase History Data (PHD) for aperture synthesis by following standard DSAL principle, either method resulting in a different matched filter as well as an azimuth image resolution. The experimental setup of the tri-aperture DSAL adopts a frequency chirped laser of about 40 mW in 1550 nm wavelength range as the illuminating source and an optical isolator composed of a polarizing beam-splitter and a quarter wave plate to virtually line the three apertures in the along-track direction. Various DSAL images up to target distance of 12.9 m are demonstrated using both PHD reconstructing methods.

  17. Deep-subwavelength imaging of the modal dispersion of light.

    PubMed

    Sapienza, R; Coenen, T; Renger, J; Kuttge, M; van Hulst, N F; Polman, A

    2012-09-01

    Numerous optical technologies and quantum optical devices rely on the controlled coupling of a local emitter to its photonic environment, which is governed by the local density of optical states (LDOS). Although precise knowledge of the LDOS is crucial, classical optical techniques fail to measure it in all of its frequency and spatial components. Here, we use a scanning electron beam as a point source to probe the LDOS. Through angular and spectral detection of the electron-induced light emission, we spatially and spectrally resolve the light wave vector and determine the LDOS of Bloch modes in a photonic crystal membrane at an unprecedented deep-subwavelength resolution (30-40 nm) over a large spectral range. We present a first look inside photonic crystal cavities revealing subwavelength details of the resonant modes. Our results provide direct guidelines for the optimum location of emitters to control their emission, and key fundamental insights into light-matter coupling at the nanoscale.

  18. Sub-wavelength resolution of cracks in metallic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amireddy, Kiran Kumar; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan

    2017-02-01

    In recent years, various types of acoustic metamaterials have been proposed with capabilities for overcoming the diffraction limit. However, typically such developments only consider the acoustic regime or imaging in liquid media. In this paper we show the application of a holey structured metamaterial lens for sub-wavelength imaging of defects in a metallic sample, in the ultrasonic regime. Finite Element (FE) simulations are used to study longitudinal wave interaction with ideal cracks in isotropic elastic materials. Holey-structured meta-lenses are then used to transmit the scattered waves. We present a super resolution of λ/7 with a subwavelength crack in an aluminium sample, which to the best of our knowledge this is the highest resolution achieved in the ultrasonic regime.

  19. Subwavelength confined terahertz waves on planar waveguides using metallic gratings.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-Yu; Chang, Wei-Lun; Yu, Chin-Ping; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long

    2013-03-11

    A terahertz plasmonic waveguide is experimentally demonstrated using a plastic ribbon waveguide integrated with a diffraction metal grating to approach subwavelength-scaled confinement and long-distance delivery. Appropriately adjusting the metal-thickness and the periodical slit width of a grating greatly improves both guiding ability and field confinement in the hybrid waveguide structure. The measured lateral decay length of the bound terahertz surface waves on the hybrid waveguide can be reduced to less than λ/4 after propagating a waveguide of around 50mm-long in length. The subwavelength-confined field is potentially advantageous to biomolecular sensing or membrane detection because of the long interaction length between the THz field and analytes.

  20. Transmission resonances of metallic compound gratings with subwavelength slits.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2005-11-18

    Transmission metallic gratings with subwavelength slits are known to produce enhanced transmitted intensity for certain resonant wavelengths. One of the mechanisms that produce these resonances is the excitation of waveguide modes inside the slits. We show that by adding slits to the period, the transmission maxima are widened and, simultaneously, this generates phase resonances that appear as sharp dips in the transmission response. These resonances are characterized by a significant enhancement of the interior field.

  1. Light scattering by subwavelength Cu2O particles.

    PubMed

    Ullah, Kaleem; Liu, Xuefeng; Yadav, N P; Habib, Muhammad; Song, Li; García-Cámara, Braulio

    2017-03-01

    Novel metamaterials with new capabilities to manipulate light may be used by considering basic building blocks with new optical properties. This is the case with resonant magneto-dielectric particles. In this work, the resonant response of a high-dielectric Cu2O subwavelength particle is analyzed, both analytically and experimentally. The emergence of electric and magnetic resonances and their interferential effects, producing directional behaviors, can be used in a new generation of metamaterials, as well as new integrated optical devices.

  2. Deeply subwavelength electromagnetic Tamm states in graphene metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnova, Daria; Buslaev, Pavel; Iorsh, Ivan; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Belov, Pavel A.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-06-01

    We study localized modes at a surface of a multilayer structure made of graphene layers separated by dielectric layers. We demonstrate the existence of deeply subwavelength surface modes that can be associated with the electromagnetic Tamm states, with the frequencies in the THz frequency range the negative group velocities. We suggest that the dispersion properties of these Tamm surface modes can be tuned by varying the thickness of a dielectric cap layer.

  3. Light scattering by subwavelength Cu2O particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ullah, Kaleem; Liu, Xuefeng; Yadav, N. P.; Habib, Muhammad; Song, Li; García-Cámara, Braulio

    2017-03-01

    Novel metamaterials with new capabilities to manipulate light may be used by considering basic building blocks with new optical properties. This is the case with resonant magneto-dielectric particles. In this work, the resonant response of a high-dielectric Cu2O subwavelength particle is analyzed, both analytically and experimentally. The emergence of electric and magnetic resonances and their interferential effects, producing directional behaviors, can be used in a new generation of metamaterials, as well as new integrated optical devices.

  4. Fast-neutron, coded-aperture imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woolf, Richard S.; Phlips, Bernard F.; Hutcheson, Anthony L.; Wulf, Eric A.

    2015-06-01

    This work discusses a large-scale, coded-aperture imager for fast neutrons, building off a proof-of concept instrument developed at the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). The Space Science Division at the NRL has a heritage of developing large-scale, mobile systems, using coded-aperture imaging, for long-range γ-ray detection and localization. The fast-neutron, coded-aperture imaging instrument, designed for a mobile unit (20 ft. ISO container), consists of a 32-element array of 15 cm×15 cm×15 cm liquid scintillation detectors (EJ-309) mounted behind a 12×12 pseudorandom coded aperture. The elements of the aperture are composed of 15 cm×15 cm×10 cm blocks of high-density polyethylene (HDPE). The arrangement of the aperture elements produces a shadow pattern on the detector array behind the mask. By measuring of the number of neutron counts per masked and unmasked detector, and with knowledge of the mask pattern, a source image can be deconvolved to obtain a 2-d location. The number of neutrons per detector was obtained by processing the fast signal from each PMT in flash digitizing electronics. Digital pulse shape discrimination (PSD) was performed to filter out the fast-neutron signal from the γ background. The prototype instrument was tested at an indoor facility at the NRL with a 1.8-μCi and 13-μCi 252Cf neutron/γ source at three standoff distances of 9, 15 and 26 m (maximum allowed in the facility) over a 15-min integration time. The imaging and detection capabilities of the instrument were tested by moving the source in half- and one-pixel increments across the image plane. We show a representative sample of the results obtained at one-pixel increments for a standoff distance of 9 m. The 1.8-μCi source was not detected at the 26-m standoff. In order to increase the sensitivity of the instrument, we reduced the fastneutron background by shielding the top, sides and back of the detector array with 10-cm-thick HDPE. This shielding configuration led

  5. Holographically Correcting Synthetic Aperture Aberrations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    Malacara (20:105-148). The synthetic aperture was aligned in accordance with the synthetic-aperture alignment technique of Gill (8:61-64). The...1987. 20. Malacara , Daniel, ed. Optical Shop Testing. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1978. 21. Marciniak, Capt Michael. Tutorial Presentation of mV

  6. Optica aperture synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Avoort, Casper

    2006-05-01

    Optical long baseline stellar interferometry is an observational technique in astronomy that already exists for over a century, but is truly blooming during the last decades. The undoubted value of stellar interferometry as a technique to measure stellar parameters beyond the classical resolution limit is more and more spreading to the regime of synthesis imaging. With optical aperture synthesis imaging, the measurement of parameters is extended to the reconstruction of high resolution stellar images. A number of optical telescope arrays for synthesis imaging are operational on Earth, while space-based telescope arrays are being designed. For all imaging arrays, the combination of the light collected by the telescopes in the array can be performed in a number of ways. In this thesis, methods are introduced to model these methods of beam combination and compare their effectiveness in the generation of data to be used to reconstruct the image of a stellar object. One of these methods of beam combination is to be applied in a future space telescope. The European Space Agency is developing a mission that can valuably be extended with an imaging beam combiner. This mission is labeled Darwin, as its main goal is to provide information on the origin of life. The primary objective is the detection of planets around nearby stars - called exoplanets- and more precisely, Earth-like exoplanets. This detection is based on a signal, rather than an image. With an imaging mode, designed as described in this thesis, Darwin can make images of, for example, the planetary system to which the detected exoplanet belongs or, as another example, of the dust disk around a star out of which planets form. Such images will greatly contribute to the understanding of the formation of our own planetary system and of how and when life became possible on Earth. The comparison of beam combination methods for interferometric imaging occupies most of the pages of this thesis. Additional chapters will

  7. Fabrication of GaAs subwavelength structure (SWS) for solar cell applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Kim, Jihyun

    2011-05-09

    We developed a novel GaAs subwavelength structure (SWS) as an antireflective layer for solar cell applications. The GaAs SWS patterns were fabricated by a combination of nanosphere lithography (NSL) and reactive ion etching (RIE). The shape and height of the GaAs SWS were controlled by the diameter of the SiO2 nanospheres and the etching time. Various GaAs SWS were characterized by the reflectance spectra. The average reflectance of the polished GaAs substrate from 200nm to 800nm was 35.1%. However, the average reflectance of the tapered GaAs SWS was reduced to 0.6% due to scattering and moth-eye effects.

  8. Mode tailoring in subwavelength-dimensional semiconductor micro/nanowaveguides by coupling optical microfibers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fuxing; Cui, Hongbin; Liao, Feng; Lin, Xing; Wang, Haifeng; Zeng, Heping

    2016-10-03

    Benefitted from large fraction of evanescent wave and high endface reflectivity, we have realized mode tailoring in subwavelength-dimensional semiconductor micro/nanowaveguides (MN-WGs) by coupling optical silica microfibers. By investigating the reflection spectra, it was found that the microfiber tips could offer effective reflection and can been used to continuously and reversibly tune the interference wavelengths by changing the contact points with the MN-WGs. The measured extinction ratio in the interference patterns was as high as ~10 dB. In addition, tunable free spectral range of photoluminescence emissions and humidity sensing were also demonstrated. Its advantages of non-destructively tuning, simple fabrication, easy interrogation, and remote monitoring, offer great possible prospects for developing miniature tunable lasers, sensors, and biological endoscopy.

  9. Refractive index engineering with subwavelength gratings for efficient microphotonic couplers and planar waveguide multiplexers.

    PubMed

    Cheben, Pavel; Bock, Przemek J; Schmid, Jens H; Lapointe, Jean; Janz, Siegfried; Xu, Dan-Xia; Densmore, Adam; Delâge, André; Lamontagne, Boris; Hall, Trevor J

    2010-08-01

    We use subwavelength gratings (SWGs) to engineer the refractive index in microphotonic waveguides, including practical components such as input couplers and multiplexer circuits. This technique allows for direct control of the mode confinement by changing the refractive index of a waveguide core over a range as broad as 1.6-3.5 by lithographic patterning. We demonstrate two experimental examples of refractive index engineering, namely, a microphotonic fiber-chip coupler with a coupling loss as small as -0.9dB and minimal wavelength dependence and a planar waveguide multiplexer with SWG nanostructure, which acts as a slab waveguide for light diffracted by the grating, while at the same time acting as a lateral cladding for the strip waveguide. This yields an operation bandwidth of 170nm for a device size of only approximately 160microm x100microm.

  10. Three-dimensional deep sub-wavelength defect detection using λ = 193 nm optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Bryan M; Sohn, Martin Y; Goasmat, Francois; Zhou, Hui; Vladár, András E; Silver, Richard M; Arceo, Abraham

    2013-11-04

    Optical microscopy is sensitive both to arrays of nanoscale features and to their imperfections. Optimizing scattered electromagnetic field intensities from deep sub-wavelength nanometer scale structures represents an important element of optical metrology. Current, well-established optical methods used to identify defects in semiconductor patterning are in jeopardy by upcoming sub-20 nm device dimensions. A novel volumetric analysis for processing focus-resolved images of defects is presented using simulated and experimental examples. This new method allows defects as narrow as (16 ± 2) nm (k = 1) to be revealed using 193 nm light with focus and illumination conditions optimized for three-dimensional data analysis. Quantitative metrics to compare two-dimensional and three-dimensional imaging indicate possible fourfold improvements in sensitivity using these methods.

  11. Vortex phase transmission function as a factor to reduce the focal spot of high-aperture focusing system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khonina, S. N.; Kazanskiy, N. L.; Volotovsky, S. G.

    2011-05-01

    An analysis was performed into the possibility of reducing the lateral size and increasing the longitudinal size of a high-aperture focal system focus using a vortex phase transmission function for different types of input polarisation (including the general vortex polarisation). We have shown both analytically and numerically that subwavelength localisation for individual components of the vector field is possible at any polarisation type. This fact can be important when considering the interaction between laser radiation and materials that are selectively sensitive to different components of an electromagnetic field. In order to form substantially subwavelength details in total intensity, specific polarisation types and additional apodisation of pupil function, such as masking by a narrow annular slit, are necessary. The optimal selection of the slit radius allows balance of the trade-off between focus depth and focal spot size.

  12. Material Measurements Using Groundplane Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Komisarek, K.; Dominek, A.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    A technique for material parameter determination using an aperture in a groundplane is studied. The material parameters are found by relating the measured reflected field in the aperture to a numerical model. Two apertures are studied which can have a variety of different material configurations covering the aperture. The aperture cross-sections studied are rectangular and coaxial. The material configurations involved combinations of single layer and dual layers with or without a resistive exterior resistive sheet. The resistivity of the resistive sheet can be specified to simulate a perfect electric conductor (PEC) backing (0 Ohms/square) to a free space backing (infinity Ohms/square). Numerical parameter studies and measurements were performed to assess the feasibility of the technique.

  13. Eyeglass: A Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R; Dixit, S; Weisberg, A; Rushford, M

    2002-07-29

    Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100 meter) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope's large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently fieldable (lightweight and flat, hence packagable and deployable) and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight, surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope's eyepiece. The Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band, multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. Broadband diffractive telescopes have been built at LLNL and have demonstrated diffraction-limited performance over a 40% spectral bandwidth (0.48-0.72 {micro}m). As one approach to package a large aperture for launch, a foldable lens has been built and demonstrated. A 75 cm aperture diffractive lens was constructed from 6 panels of 1 m thick silica; it achieved diffraction-limited performance both before and after folding. This multiple panel, folding lens, approach is currently being scaled-up at LLNL. We are building a 5 meter aperture foldable lens, involving 72 panels of 700 {micro}m thick glass sheets, diffractively patterned to operate as coherent f/50 lens.

  14. Fracture-aperture alteration induced by calcite precipitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, T.; Detwiler, R. L.

    2013-12-01

    within variable-aperture fields will investigate the dependency of growth patterns on heterogeneous aperture distributions. (a) Aperture strain (Δb/bi) after 14 days. Precipitation is concentrated near the inlet and decreases in the flow direction. (b) Width-averaged profiles of the initial and final aperture field show changes in aperture and smoothing that results from calcite precipitation between the initial discrete crystals.

  15. An Adaptive Homomorphic Aperture Photometry Algorithm for Merging Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J. C.; Hwang, C. Y.

    2017-03-01

    We present a novel automatic adaptive aperture photometry algorithm for measuring the total magnitudes of merging galaxies with irregular shapes. First, we use a morphological pattern recognition routine for identifying the shape of an irregular source in a background-subtracted image. Then, we extend the shape of the source by using the Dilation image operation to obtain an aperture that is quasi-homomorphic to the shape of the irregular source. The magnitude measured from the homomorphic aperture would thus have minimal contamination from the nearby background. As a test of our algorithm, we applied our technique to the merging galaxies observed by the Sloan Digital Sky Survey and the Canada–France–Hawaii Telescope. Our results suggest that the adaptive homomorphic aperture algorithm can be very useful for investigating extended sources with irregular shapes and sources in crowded regions.

  16. Highly uniform parallel microfabrication using a large numerical aperture system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zi-Yu; Zhang, Chen-Chu; Hu, Yan-Lei; Wang, Chao-Wei; Li, Jia-Wen; Su, Ya-Hui; Chu, Jia-Ru; Wu, Dong

    2016-07-01

    In this letter, we report an improved algorithm to produce accurate phase patterns for generating highly uniform diffraction-limited multifocal arrays in a large numerical aperture objective system. It is shown that based on the original diffraction integral, the uniformity of the diffraction-limited focal arrays can be improved from ˜75% to >97%, owing to the critical consideration of the aperture function and apodization effect associated with a large numerical aperture objective. The experimental results, e.g., 3 × 3 arrays of square and triangle, seven microlens arrays with high uniformity, further verify the advantage of the improved algorithm. This algorithm enables the laser parallel processing technology to realize uniform microstructures and functional devices in the microfabrication system with a large numerical aperture objective.

  17. Synthetic aperture hitchhiker imaging.

    PubMed

    Yarman, Can Evren; Yazici, Birsen

    2008-11-01

    We introduce a novel synthetic-aperture imaging method for radar systems that rely on sources of opportunity. We consider receivers that fly along arbitrary, but known, flight trajectories and develop a spatio-temporal correlation-based filtered-backprojection-type image reconstruction method. The method involves first correlating the measurements from two different receiver locations. This leads to a forward model where the radiance of the target scene is projected onto the intersection of certain hyperboloids with the surface topography. We next use microlocal techniques to develop a filtered-backprojection-type inversion method to recover the scene radiance. The method is applicable to both stationary and mobile, and cooperative and noncooperative sources of opportunity. Additionally, it is applicable to nonideal imaging scenarios such as those involving arbitrary flight trajectories, and has the desirable property of preserving the visible edges of the scene radiance. We present an analysis of the computational complexity of the image reconstruction method and demonstrate its performance in numerical simulations for single and multiple transmitters of opportunity.

  18. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, Joseph P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part thereof, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases the utility thereof. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing.

  19. Sparse aperture endoscope

    DOEpatents

    Fitch, J.P.

    1999-07-06

    An endoscope is disclosed which reduces the volume needed by the imaging part, maintains resolution of a wide diameter optical system, while increasing tool access, and allows stereographic or interferometric processing for depth and perspective information/visualization. Because the endoscope decreases the volume consumed by imaging optics such allows a larger fraction of the volume to be used for non-imaging tools, which allows smaller incisions in surgical and diagnostic medical applications thus produces less trauma to the patient or allows access to smaller volumes than is possible with larger instruments. The endoscope utilizes fiber optic light pipes in an outer layer for illumination, a multi-pupil imaging system in an inner annulus, and an access channel for other tools in the center. The endoscope is amenable to implementation as a flexible scope, and thus increases it's utility. Because the endoscope uses a multi-aperture pupil, it can also be utilized as an optical array, allowing stereographic and interferometric processing. 7 figs.

  20. Aperture masking interferometry research simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haitao; Luo, Qiufeng; Fan, Weijun; Zhang, Xian Ling; Tao, Chunkan; Zhu, Yongtian; Zhou, Bifang; Chen, Hanliang

    2004-10-01

    Aperture Masking Interferometry (AMI) is one of the high-resolution astronomical image observation technologies. It is also an important research way to the Optical Aperture Synthesis (OAS). The theory of OAS is simply introduced and AMI simulation method is raised. The mathematics model is built and the interferogram fringes are got. The aperture mask u-v coverage is discussed and one image reconstruction method is done. The reconstructed image result is got with CLEAN method. Shortcoming of this work is also referred and the future research work is mentioned at last.

  1. Design of a hybrid double-sideband/single-sideband (schlieren) objective aperture suitable for electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Buijsse, Bart; van Laarhoven, Frank; Schmid, Andreas K.; Cambie, Rossana; Cabrini, Stefano; Jin, Jian; Glaeser, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    A novel design is described for an aperture that blocks a half-plane of the electron diffraction pattern out to a desired scattering angle, and then – except for a narrow support beam – transmits all of the scattered electrons beyond that angle. Our proposed tulip-shaped design is thus a hybrid between the single-sideband (ssb) aperture, which blocks a full half-plane of the diffraction pattern, and the conventional (i.e. fully open) double-sideband (dsb) aperture. The benefits of this hybrid design include the fact that such an aperture allows one to obtain high-contrast images of weak-phase objects with the objective lens set to Scherzer defocus. We further demonstrate that such apertures can be fabricated from thin-foil materials by milling with a focused ion beam (FIB), and that such apertures are fully compatible with the requirements of imaging out to a resolution of at least 0.34 nm. As is known from earlier work with single-sideband apertures, however, the edge of such an aperture can introduce unwanted, electrostatic phase shifts due to charging. The principal requirement for using such an aperture in a routine data-collection mode is thus to discover appropriate materials, protocols for fabrication and processing, and conditions of use such that the hybrid aperture remains free of charging over long periods of time. PMID:22088443

  2. Bistatic synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yates, Gillian

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) allows all-weather, day and night, surface surveillance and has the ability to detect, classify and geolocate objects at long stand-off ranges. Bistatic SAR, where the transmitter and the receiver are on separate platforms, is seen as a potential means of countering the vulnerability of conventional monostatic SAR to electronic countermeasures, particularly directional jamming, and avoiding physical attack of the imaging platform. As the receiving platform can be totally passive, it does not advertise its position by RF emissions. The transmitter is not susceptible to jamming and can, for example, operate at long stand-off ranges to reduce its vulnerability to physical attack. This thesis examines some of the complications involved in producing high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery. The effect of bistatic operation on resolution is examined from a theoretical viewpoint and analytical expressions for resolution are developed. These expressions are verified by simulation work using a simple 'point by point' processor. This work is extended to look at using modern practical processing engines for bistatic geometries. Adaptations of the polar format algorithm and range migration algorithm are considered. The principal achievement of this work is a fully airborne demonstration of bistatic SAR. The route taken in reaching this is given, along with some results. The bistatic SAR imagery is analysed and compared to the monostatic imagery collected at the same time. Demonstrating high-resolution bistatic SAR imagery using two airborne platforms represents what I believe to be a European first and is likely to be the first time that this has been achieved outside the US (the UK has very little insight into US work on this topic). Bistatic target characteristics are examined through the use of simulations. This also compares bistatic imagery with monostatic and gives further insight into the utility of bistatic SAR.

  3. Optically resonant subwavelength films for tamper-indicating tags and seals

    SciTech Connect

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2015-05-23

    We present the design, modeling and performance of a proof-of-concept tamper indicating approach that exploits newly-developed subwavelength-patterned films. These films have a nanostructure-dependent resonant optical reflection that is wavelength, angle, and polarization dependent. As such, they can be tailored to fabricate overlay transparent films for tamper indication and authentication of sensitive or controlled materials not possible with currently-known technologies. An additional advantage is that the unique optical signature is dictated by the geometry and fabrication process of the nanostructures in the film, rather than on the material used. The essential structure unit in the subwavelength resonant coating is a nanoscale Open-Ring Resonator (ORR). This building block is fabricated by coating a dielectric nanoscale template with metal to form a hemispherical shell-like structure. This curved metallic shell structure has a cross-section with an intrinsic capacitance and inductance and is thus the optical equivalent to the well-known “LC” circuit where the capacitance and inductance are determined by the nanoshell dimensions. For structures with sub 100 nm scale, this resonance occurs in the visible electromagnetic spectrum, and in the IR for larger shells. Tampering of the film would be visible though misalignment of the angular dependence of the features in the film. It is additionally possible to add in intrinsic oxidation and strain sensitive matrix materials to further complicate tamper repair and counterfeiting. Cursory standoff readout would be relatively simple using a combination of a near-infrared (or visible) LED flashlight and polarizer or passively using room lighting illumination and a dispersive detector.

  4. Optically resonant subwavelength films for tamper-indicating tags and seals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvine, Kyle J.; Suter, Jonathan D.; Bernacki, Bruce E.; Bennett, Wendy D.

    2015-05-01

    We present the design, modeling and performance of a proof-of-concept tamper indicating approach that exploits newlydeveloped subwavelength-patterned films. These films have a nanostructure-dependent resonant optical reflection that is wavelength, angle, and polarization dependent. As such, they can be tailored to fabricate overlay transparent films for tamper indication and authentication of sensitive or controlled materials not possible with currently-known technologies. An additional advantage is that the unique optical signature is dictated by the geometry and fabrication process of the nanostructures in the film, rather than on the material used. The essential structure unit in the subwavelength resonant coating is a nanoscale Open-Ring Resonator (ORR). This building block is fabricated by coating a dielectric nanoscale template with metal to form a hemispherical shell-like structure. This curved metallic shell structure has a cross-section with an intrinsic capacitance and inductance and is thus the optical equivalent to the well-known "LC" circuit where the capacitance and inductance are determined by the nanoshell dimensions. For structures with sub 100 nm scale, this resonance occurs in the visible electromagnetic spectrum, and in the IR for larger shells. Tampering of the film would be visible though misalignment of the angle-sensitive features in the film. It is additionally possible to add in intrinsic oxidation and strain sensitive matrix materials to further complicate tamper repair and counterfeiting. Cursory standoff readout would be relatively simple using a combination of a near-infrared (or visible) LED flashlight and polarizer or passively using room lighting illumination and a dispersive detector.

  5. Metadevice for intensity modulation with sub-wavelength spatial resolution

    PubMed Central

    Cencillo-Abad, Pablo; Zheludev, Nikolay I.; Plum, Eric

    2016-01-01

    Effectively continuous control over propagation of a beam of light requires light modulation with pixelation that is smaller than the optical wavelength. Here we propose a spatial intensity modulator with sub-wavelength resolution in one dimension. The metadevice combines recent advances in reconfigurable nanomembrane metamaterials and coherent all-optical control of metasurfaces. It uses nanomechanical actuation of metasurface absorber strips placed near a mirror in order to control their interaction with light from perfect absorption to negligible loss, promising a path towards dynamic diffraction and focusing of light as well as holography without unwanted diffraction artefacts. PMID:27857221

  6. Subwavelength far-field ultrasound drug-delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hingot, Vincent; Bézagu, Marine; Errico, Claudia; Desailly, Yann; Bocheux, Romain; Tanter, Mickael; Couture, Olivier

    2016-11-01

    The theoretical diffraction-limit of resolution for ultrasound imaging has recently been bypassed in-vitro and in-vivo. However, in the context of ultrasound therapy, the precision of therapeutic beams remains bound to the half-wavelength limit. By combining acoustic vaporization of composite droplets and rapid ultrasound monitoring, we demonstrate that the ultrasound drug-delivery can be restricted to a subwavelength zone. Moreover, two release zones closer than the wavelength/4 can be distinguished both optically and through ultrafast ultrasound localization microscopy. This proof-of-concept let us envision the possibility to treat specific tissues more precisely without compromising on the penetration depth of the ultrasound wave.

  7. Optical singularities in plasmonic fields near single subwavelength holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Hoogh, A.; Rotenberg, N.; Kuipers, L.

    2014-11-01

    We identify phase and polarization singularities in near-field measurements and theoretical modeling of the electric near-field distributions that result from the scattering of surface plasmon polaritons from single subwavelength holes in optically thick gold films. We discuss properties of the singularities, such as their topological charge or the field amplitudes at their locations. We show that it is possible to tune the in-plane field amplitude at the positions of the polarization singularities by three orders of magnitude simply by varying the hole or incident plasmon beam size.

  8. Imaging of sub-wavelength structures radiating coherently near microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    Maslov, Alexey V.; Astratov, Vasily N.

    2016-02-01

    Using a two-dimensional model, we show that the optical images of a sub-wavelength object depend strongly on the excitation of its electromagnetic modes. There exist modes that enable the resolution of the object features smaller than the classical diffraction limit, in particular, due to the destructive interference. We propose to use such modes for super-resolution of resonant structures such as coupled cavities, metal dimers, or bowties. A dielectric microsphere in contact with the object forms its magnified image in a wide range of the virtual image plane positions. It is also suggested that the resonances may significantly affect the resolution quantification in recent experimental studies.

  9. Optically pumped subwavelength-scale metallodielectric nanopatch resonators

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Kyungmok; You, Jong-bum; Shim, Jaeho; Jung, Youngho; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-01-01

    We discuss subwavelength-scale semiconductor metal-optic resonators placed on the metal substrate with various top metal plate sizes. Albeit with large optical losses, addition of metal layers converts a leaky semiconductor nano-block into a highly-confined optical cavity. Optically pumped lasing action is observed with the extended top metal layer that can significantly suppress the radiation losses. Careful investigation of self-heating effects during the optical carrier injection process shows the importance of temperature-dependent material properties in the laser rate equation model and the overall laser performances. PMID:27549640

  10. Optically pumped subwavelength-scale metallodielectric nanopatch resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Kyungmok; You, Jong-Bum; Shim, Jaeho; Jung, Youngho; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-08-01

    We discuss subwavelength-scale semiconductor metal-optic resonators placed on the metal substrate with various top metal plate sizes. Albeit with large optical losses, addition of metal layers converts a leaky semiconductor nano-block into a highly-confined optical cavity. Optically pumped lasing action is observed with the extended top metal layer that can significantly suppress the radiation losses. Careful investigation of self-heating effects during the optical carrier injection process shows the importance of temperature-dependent material properties in the laser rate equation model and the overall laser performances.

  11. Optically pumped subwavelength-scale metallodielectric nanopatch resonators.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Kyungmok; You, Jong-Bum; Shim, Jaeho; Jung, Youngho; Yu, Kyoungsik

    2016-08-23

    We discuss subwavelength-scale semiconductor metal-optic resonators placed on the metal substrate with various top metal plate sizes. Albeit with large optical losses, addition of metal layers converts a leaky semiconductor nano-block into a highly-confined optical cavity. Optically pumped lasing action is observed with the extended top metal layer that can significantly suppress the radiation losses. Careful investigation of self-heating effects during the optical carrier injection process shows the importance of temperature-dependent material properties in the laser rate equation model and the overall laser performances.

  12. Extremely sub-wavelength THz metal-dielectric wire microcavities.

    PubMed

    Feuillet-Palma, Cheryl; Todorov, Yanko; Steed, Robert; Vasanelli, Angela; Biasiol, Giorgio; Sorba, Lucia; Sirtori, Carlo

    2012-12-17

    We demonstrate minimal volume wire THz metal-dielectric micro-cavities, in which all but one dimension have been reduced to highly sub-wavelength values. The smallest cavity features an effective volume of 0.4 µm(3), which is ~5.10(-7) times the volume defined by the resonant vacuum wavelength (λ = 94 µm) to the cube. When combined with a doped multi-quantum well structure, such micro-cavities enter the ultra-strong light matter coupling regime, even if the total number of electrons participating to the coupling is only in the order of 10(4), thus much less than in previous studies.

  13. Frequency-dependent optical steering from subwavelength plasmonic structures.

    PubMed

    Djalalian-Assl, A; Gómez, D E; Roberts, A; Davis, T J

    2012-10-15

    We show theoretically and with numerical simulations that the direction of the in-plane scattering from a subwavelength optical antenna system can be controlled by the frequency of the incident light. This optical steering effect does not rely on propagation phase shifts or diffraction but arises from phase shifts in the localized surface plasmon modes of the antenna. An analytical model is developed to optimize the parameters for the configuration, showing good agreement with a rigorous numerical simulation. The simulation predicts a 25° angular shift in the direction of the light scattered from two gold nanorods for a wavelength change of 12 nm.

  14. Subwavelength optical imaging with an array of silver nanorods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Atiqur; Kosulnikov, Sergey Yu.; Hao, Yang; Parini, Clive; Belov, Pavel A.

    2011-01-01

    Tailoring the parameters of a silver nanorod array for subwavelength imaging of arbitrary coherent sources is of recent interest. We evaluated the operational bandwidth of this type of superlens, and also the impact of source-offset in order to understand the level of tolerance offered by the superlens with regard to source location. The performance of the device was analyzed numerically both through analysis of transmission and reflection coefficients and by full-wave simulation for a particular sample source arrangement. We observed that such a device exhibited better imaging performances with the sources spread wider, offering a bandwidth of around 13.5%.

  15. Microelectrofluidic iris for variable aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Jong-hyeon; Jung, Kyu-Dong; Lee, Eunsung; Choi, Minseog; Lee, Seungwan

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents a variable aperture design based on the microelectrofluidic technology which integrates electrowetting and microfluidics. The proposed microelectrofluidic iris (MEFI) consists of two immiscible fluids and two connected surface channels formed by three transparent plates and two spacers between them. In the initial state, the confined aqueous ring makes two fluidic interfaces, on which the Laplace pressure is same, in the hydrophobic surface channels. When a certain voltage is applied between the dielectric-coated control electrode beneath the three-phase contact line (TCL) and the reference electrode for grounding the aqueous, the contact angle changes on the activated control electrode. At high voltage over the threshold, the induced positive pressure difference makes the TCLs on the 1st channel advance to the center and the aperture narrow. If there is no potential difference between the control and reference electrodes, the pressure difference becomes negative. It makes the TCLs on the 1st channel recede and the aperture widen to the initial state. It is expected that the proposed MEFI is able to be widely used because of its fast response, circular aperture, digital operation, high aperture ratio, and possibility to be miniaturized for variable aperture.

  16. Antenna aperture and imaging resolution of synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liren

    2009-08-01

    In this paper, the azimuth imaging resolutions of synthetic aperture imaging ladar (SAIL) using the antenna telescopes with a circular aperture for reception and a circular plan or a Gaussian beam for transmitting and with a rectangular aperture for reception and a rectangular plane or an elliptic Gaussian beam for transmitting are investigated. The analytic expressions of impulse response for imaging are achieved. The ideal azimuth spot of resolution and its degradation due to the target deviation from the footprint center, the mismatch from the quadratic phase matched filtering, the finite sampling rate and width are discussed. And the range resolution is also studied. Mathematical criteria are all given. As a conclusion, the telescope of rectangular aperture can provide a rectangular footprint more suitable for the SAIL scanning format, and an optimal design of aperture is thus possible for both a high resolution and a wide scan strip. Moreover, an explanation to the resulted azimuth resolution from our laboratory-scaled SAIL is given to verify the developed theory.

  17. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P S; Eleftheriades, George V

    2016-01-21

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators.

  18. Cavity-excited Huygens' metasurface antennas for near-unity aperture illumination efficiency from arbitrarily large apertures

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Ariel; Wong, Joseph P. S.; Eleftheriades, George V.

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing problems in antenna engineering is the realization of highly directive beams using low-profile devices. In this paper, we provide a solution to this problem by means of Huygens' metasurfaces (HMSs), based on the equivalence principle. This principle states that a given excitation can be transformed to a desirable aperture field by inducing suitable electric and (equivalent) magnetic surface currents. Building on this concept, we propose and demonstrate cavity-excited HMS antennas, where the single-source-fed cavity is designed to optimize aperture illumination, while the HMS facilitates the current distribution that ensures phase purity of aperture fields. The HMS breaks the coupling between the excitation and radiation spectra typical to standard partially reflecting surfaces, allowing tailoring of the aperture properties to produce a desirable radiation pattern, without incurring edge-taper losses. The proposed low-profile design yields near-unity aperture illumination efficiencies from arbitrarily large apertures, offering new capabilities for microwave, terahertz and optical radiators. PMID:26790605

  19. A super-oscillatory lens optical microscope for subwavelength imaging.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Edward T F; Lindberg, Jari; Roy, Tapashree; Savo, Salvatore; Chad, John E; Dennis, Mark R; Zheludev, Nikolay I

    2012-03-25

    The past decade has seen an intensive effort to achieve optical imaging resolution beyond the diffraction limit. Apart from the Pendry-Veselago negative index superlens, implementation of which in optics faces challenges of losses and as yet unattainable fabrication finesse, other super-resolution approaches necessitate the lens either to be in the near proximity of the object or manufactured on it, or work only for a narrow class of samples, such as intensely luminescent or sparse objects. Here we report a new super-resolution microscope for optical imaging that beats the diffraction limit of conventional instruments and the recently demonstrated near-field optical superlens and hyperlens. This non-invasive subwavelength imaging paradigm uses a binary amplitude mask for direct focusing of laser light into a subwavelength spot in the post-evanescent field by precisely tailoring the interference of a large number of beams diffracted from a nanostructured mask. The new technology, which--in principle--has no physical limits on resolution, could be universally used for imaging at any wavelength and does not depend on the luminescence of the object, which can be tens of micrometres away from the mask. It has been implemented as a straightforward modification of a conventional microscope showing resolution better than λ/6.

  20. Terahertz spectroscopy of two-dimensional subwavelength plasmonic structures

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul K; Chen, Houtong; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John F; Han, Jiaguang; Lu, Xinchao; Zhang, Weili

    2009-01-01

    The fascinating properties of plasmonic structures have had significant impact on the development of next generation ultracompact photonic and optoelectronic components. We study two-dimensional plasmonic structures functioning at terahertz frequencies. Resonant terahertz response due to surface plasmons and dipole localized surface plasmons were investigated by the state-of-the-art terahertz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) using both transmission and reflection configurations. Extraordinary terahertz transmission was demonstrated through the subwavelength metallic hole arrays made from good conducting metals as well as poor metals. Metallic arrays m!lde from Pb, generally a poor metal, and having optically thin thicknesses less than one-third of a skin depth also contributed in enhanced THz transmission. A direct transition of a surface plasmon resonance from a photonic crystal minimum was observed in a photo-doped semiconductor array. Electrical controls of the surface plasmon resonances by hybridization of the Schottkey diode between the metallic grating and the semiconductor substrate are investigated as a function of the applied reverse bias. In addition, we have demonstrated photo-induced creation and annihilation of surface plasmons with appropriate semiconductors at room temperature. According to the Fano model, the transmission properties are characterized by two essential contributions: resonant excitation of surface plasmons and nonresonant direct transmission. Such plasmonic structures may find fascinating applications in terahertz imaging, biomedical sensing, subwavelength terahertz spectroscopy, tunable filters, and integrated terahertz devices.

  1. [Intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength gratings].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yong-li; Zhao, Da-zun

    2009-04-01

    A security grating structure, intercross cascaded dual-layer resonant sub-wavelength grating structure, is presented. It can broaden the resonant wavelength width of resonant sub-wavelength gratings and obtain the better optical variable effect. The full-width-at half-maximum (FWHM) broadening mechanism of security grating structures is analyzed. The FWHM is dependent on the energy coupled into the grating waveguide layer. The grating structure parameters are optimized and designed. The resonance performance and grating fabrication tolerances are also studied numerically using the vector diffraction theory (the rigorous coupled wave theory). Simulation results indicate that the value of the spectral resonant peak for the security grating structure is not decreased as the incident angle increases or decreases and the maximum FWHM of different depth of grating grooves is about seven times that of the basic resonant grating structure. The resonant dual grating waveguide structure is a kind of security grating configuration with the potential to achieve higher industry application value and its resonance performance is not sensitive to manufacture errors.

  2. A Ploidy-Sensitive Mechanism Regulates Aperture Formation on the Arabidopsis Pollen Surface and Guides Localization of the Aperture Factor INP1

    PubMed Central

    Reeder, Sarah H.; Lee, Byung Ha; Fox, Ronald; Dobritsa, Anna A.

    2016-01-01

    Pollen presents a powerful model for studying mechanisms of precise formation and deposition of extracellular structures. Deposition of the pollen wall exine leads to the generation of species-specific patterns on pollen surface. In most species, exine does not develop uniformly across the pollen surface, resulting in the formation of apertures–openings in the exine that are species-specific in number, morphology and location. A long time ago, it was proposed that number and positions of apertures might be determined by the geometry of tetrads of microspores–the precursors of pollen grains arising via meiotic cytokinesis, and by the number of last-contact points between sister microspores. We have tested this model by characterizing Arabidopsis mutants with ectopic apertures and/or abnormal geometry of meiotic products. Here we demonstrate that contact points per se do not act as aperture number determinants and that a correct geometric conformation of a tetrad is neither necessary nor sufficient to generate a correct number of apertures. A mechanism sensitive to pollen ploidy, however, is very important for aperture number and positions and for guiding the aperture factor INP1 to future aperture sites. In the mutants with ectopic apertures, the number and positions of INP1 localization sites change depending on ploidy or ploidy-related cell size and not on INP1 levels, suggesting that sites for aperture formation are specified before INP1 is brought to them. PMID:27177036

  3. Apodized apertures for solar coronagraphy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aime, C.

    2007-05-01

    Aims:We propose the principle of a new solar telescope that makes it possible to observe the solar corona very close to the solar limb, without the help of a Lyot coronagraph. The result is obtained using a strongly apodized aperture. Methods: We obtain the theoretical form of the diffraction halo produced by the solar disk at the level of the corona for a perfect diffraction-limited telescope, for raw and apodized apertures. The problem is first solved at one dimension for which a complete set of analytical expressions can be derived, including the effect of the center-to-limb solar variation. Formal equations are written for the two-dimensional case, and it is shown that the expression may take the form of a 1D integral. Nevertheless, the problem is difficult to solve. An analytic expression can be worked out using the line spread function, which is shown to give a valid approximation of the problem, in excellent agreement with a numerical computation that uses the exact integral. Results: We show for the raw aperture that the diffraction halo is very strong and decreases slowly as ρ-1. We propose as a solution to this problem an apodized aperture based on the generalized prolate spheroidal functions (GPSF). Such an apodized aperture may reduce the diffraction halo enough to permit a direct observation of the solar corona very close to the solar limb. A signal-to-noise ratio analysis is given. Conclusions: Different strengths of apodization may be used, but very strong apodizations are indeed mandatory. A good choice seems to be a GPSF aperture with the prolate coefficient c on the order of 10. It could reduce the halo of diffraction by a factor 105 (at the cost of an intensity throughput of 10% and a reduction in the classical resolution by a factor of about 1.6) and permit observation of the corona very close to the solar limb.

  4. Synthetic Aperture Radar Oceanographic Investigations.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    Shuchman, P.G. Teleki, S.V. Hsiao, O.H. Shemdin , and W.E. Brown, Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of Ocean Waves : Comparison with Wave Measurements, J... Shemdin , Synthetic Aperture Radar Imaging of Ocean Waves during the Marineland Experiment, IEEE J. Oceanic Eg., OE-8, pp. 83-90, 1983. 12. R.A...If the surface reflectivity is assumed to be spatially un- section. are computed from the wave height spectrum as correlated, i.e. follows . (x. Y. t

  5. Large area and deep sub-wavelength interference lithography employing odd surface plasmon modes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Liqin; Luo, Yunfei; Zhao, Zeyu; Zhang, Wei; Gao, Guohan; Zeng, Bo; Wang, Changtao; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, large area and deep sub-wavelength interference patterns are realized experimentally by using odd surface plasmon modes in the metal/insulator/metal structure. Theoretical investigation shows that the odd modes possesses much higher transversal wave vector and great inhibition of tangential electric field components, facilitating surface plasmon interference fringes with high resolution and contrast in the measure of electric field intensity. Interference resist patterns with 45 nm (∼λ/8) half-pitch, 50 nm depth, and area size up to 20 mm × 20 mm were obtained by using 20 nm Al/50 nm photo resist/50 nm Al films with greatly reduced surface roughness and 180 nm pitch exciting grating fabricated with conventional laser interference lithography. Much deeper resolution down to 19.5 nm is also feasible by decreasing the thickness of PR. Considering that no requirement of expensive EBL or FIB tools are employed, it provides a cost-effective way for large area and nano-scale fabrication. PMID:27466010

  6. Reflector antennas with low sidelobes, low cross polarization, and high aperture efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faigen, I. M.; Reichert, C. F.; Sletten, C. J.; Shore, R. A.

    1984-01-01

    Techniques are presented for computing the horn near field patterns on the subreflectors and for correcting the phase center errors of the horn pattern by shaping the subreflector surface. The diffraction pattern computations for scanned beams are described. The effects of dish aperture diffraction on pattern bandwidth are investigated. A model antenna consisting of a reflector, shaped subreflector, and corrugated feed horn is described.

  7. Subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide with trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars in optical systems

    DOEpatents

    Xu, Xiaochuan; Chen, Ray T.

    2017-02-07

    A method for reducing loss in a subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend is disclosed. The method comprising: forming the subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend with a series of trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars centered about a bend radius; wherein each of the trapezoidal shaped dielectric pillars comprise a top width, a bottom width, and a trapezoid height; wherein the length of the bottom width is greater than the length of the top width; and wherein the bottom width is closer to the center of the bend radius of the subwavelength photonic crystal waveguide bend than the top width. Other embodiments are described and claimed.

  8. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-09-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis.

  9. Properties of Transmission and Leaky Modes in a Plasmonic Waveguide Constructed by Periodic Subwavelength Metallic Hollow Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Jei Wu, Jin; Jang Wu, Chien; Qi Shen, Jian; Hou, Da Jun; Chen Lo, Wen

    2015-01-01

    Based on the concept of low-frequency spoof surface plasmon polaritons (spoof SPPs), a kind of leaky mode is proposed in a waveguide made of a subwavelength metal-block array with open slots. Numerical results reveal that a new transmission mode is found in the periodic subwavelength metal open blocks. This modal field is located inside the interior of a hollow block compared with that in a solid metal block array. The dispersion curve shows that such a new SPPs mode has a negative slope, crossing the light line, and then going into a zone of leaky mode at higher frequencies. The leaky mode has a wider frequency bandwidth, and this can lead to a radiation scanning angle of 53° together with high radiation efficiency. Based on the individual characteristics exhibited by a frequency-dependent radiation pattern for the present leaky mode, the waveguide structure can have potential applications such as frequency dividers and demultiplexers. Experimental verification of such a leaky mode at microwave has been performed, and the experimental results are found to be consistent with the theoretical analysis. PMID:26403387

  10. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A.

    2014-11-01

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell’s law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  11. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude

    PubMed Central

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed. PMID:28054662

  12. Bio-functional subwavelength optical waveguides for biodetection

    SciTech Connect

    Sirbuly, D J; Fischer, N; Huang, S; Artyukhin, A

    2007-07-10

    We report a versatile biofunctional subwavelength photonic device platform for real-time detection of biological molecules. Our devices contain lipid bilayer membranes fused onto metal oxide nanowire waveguides stretched across polymeric flow channels. The lipid bilayers incorporating target receptors are submersed in the propagating evanescent field of the optical cavity. We show that the lipid bilayers in our devices are continuous, have very high mobile fraction, and are resistant to fouling. We also demonstrate that our platform allows rapid membrane exchange. Finally we use this device for detection of specific DNA sequences in solution by anchoring complementary DNA target strands in the lipid bilayer. This evanescent wave sensing architecture holds great potential for portable, all-optical detection systems.

  13. Robust subwavelength focusing of surface plasmons on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Yang; Zhang, Zhengren; Su, Xiaopeng

    2016-11-01

    Graphene plays a substantial role in nano-scale optical engineering and miniature information signal processing systems gradually. In this letter, we propose a pipe-like substrate scheme to achieve the properly designed inhomogeneous, nonuniform conductivity distribution on a single sheet of graphene. The transverse-magnetic surface plasmon polariton wave supported by graphene will oscillate like water running in an inclined pipe and focus onto one point in a deep-subwavelength scale in the graphene sheet. Importantly, we find that this focusing behavior is robust and insensitive to the variance of background Fermi energy and incident frequency based on the analytic analysis. We verify our scheme by exploiting Hamiltonian optics and numerical calculation. This nano-scale optical manipulation will lead to the development of miniature optical system integration on a 1-atom-thick structure.

  14. Wavefront modulation and subwavelength diffractive acoustics with an acoustic metasurface.

    PubMed

    Xie, Yangbo; Wang, Wenqi; Chen, Huanyang; Konneker, Adam; Popa, Bogdan-Ioan; Cummer, Steven A

    2014-11-24

    Metasurfaces are a family of novel wavefront-shaping devices with planar profile and subwavelength thickness. Acoustic metasurfaces with ultralow profile yet extraordinary wave manipulating properties would be highly desirable for improving the performance of many acoustic wave-based applications. However, designing acoustic metasurfaces with similar functionality to their electromagnetic counterparts remains challenging with traditional metamaterial design approaches. Here we present a design and realization of an acoustic metasurface based on tapered labyrinthine metamaterials. The demonstrated metasurface can not only steer an acoustic beam as expected from the generalized Snell's law, but also exhibits various unique properties such as conversion from propagating wave to surface mode, extraordinary beam-steering and apparent negative refraction through higher-order diffraction. Such designer acoustic metasurfaces provide a new design methodology for acoustic signal modulation devices and may be useful for applications such as acoustic imaging, beam steering, ultrasound lens design and acoustic surface wave-based applications.

  15. Magnetic and electric response of single subwavelength holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotenberg, N.; Krijger, T. L.; Feber, B. le; Spasenović, M.; de Abajo, F. Javier García; Kuipers, L.

    2013-12-01

    We use polarization-resolved near-field measurements, in conjunction with electromagnetic theory, to separate and quantify the electric and magnetic optical response of subwavelength holes in thick gold films. Using 1550 nm light, we determine the amplitudes of the electric and magnetic polarizabilities of holes with diameters ranging from 600 to 1000 nm. Additionally, we study the scattered field distributions that arise from the interactions of the holes with surface plasmon polaritons, and show that forward-backward scattering ratios as high as 2.5:1 are possible. Our study provides experimental access and theoretical understanding of the full electromagnetic polarizability that describes the optical response of metallic holes at telecom wavelengths, which is a prototypical structure in currently explored optical signal processing and sensing devices.

  16. Surface wave holography on designing subwavelength metallic structures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Hui; Fu, Jin-Xin; Li, Zhi-Yuan

    2011-11-21

    We report a method in the framework of surface wave holography to manipulate the electromagnetic wave on the metallic surface for realizing complicated electromagnetic wave transport functionalities in three-dimensional (3D) space. The method allows for direct determination of the metallic surface structure morphology for a given transport functionality, by means of writing desirable object information on the metallic surface via interference with a reference surface wave. We have employed the analytical approach to design and build metallic surface structures that realize arbitrary single-point focusing, arbitrary single-direction beam collimation, and simultaneous two-point focusing of electromagnetic wave in 3D space. Good agreement between numerical simulations and microwave experimental measurements has been found and confirms the power of the method in conceptually understanding and exploiting the surface electromagnetic wave on subwavelength metal structures.

  17. Infrared polarizer employing multiple metal-film subwavelength gratings.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Kazuo; Yoda, Hidehiko

    2013-06-17

    A multiple thin metal-film subwavelength grating is proposed for polarizers in the infrared wavelength region of 10-20 μm. The dependence of the transmission characteristics of the polarizers on structural parameters was obtained numerically, and the potential for high performance was confirmed experimentally. The measured TE-wave losses in a polarizer comprising a triangular triple Al-film grating are more than 45 and 35 dB for the wavelength ranges of 10-16 and 16-20 μm, respectively, while the net TM-wave losses are lower than 1.5 dB in the wavelength rage of 15-20 μm.

  18. Biomimetic subwavelength antireflective gratings on GaAs.

    PubMed

    Sun, Chih-Hung; Ho, Brian J; Jiang, Bin; Jiang, Peng

    2008-10-01

    We have developed a simple and scalable bottom-up approach for fabricating moth-eye antireflective coatings on GaAs substrates. Monolayer, non-close-packed silica colloidal crystals are created on crystalline GaAs wafers by a spin-coating-based single-layer reduction technique. These colloidal monolayers can be used as etching masks during a BCl(3) dry-etch process to generate subwavelength-structured antireflective gratings directly on GaAs substrates. The gratings exhibit excellent broadband antireflective properties, and the specular reflection matches with the theoretical prediction using a rigorous coupled-wave analysis model. These bioinspired antireflection coatings have important technological applications ranging from efficient solar cells to IR detectors.

  19. Subwavelength plasmonics for graded-index optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Grajower, Meir; Lerman, Gilad M; Goykhman, Ilya; Desiatov, Boris; Yanai, Avner; Smith, David R; Levy, Uriel

    2013-09-15

    Planar plasmonic devices are becoming attractive for myriad applications, owing to their potential compatibility with standard microelectronics technology and the capability for densely integrating a large variety of plasmonic devices on a chip. Mitigating the challenges of using plasmonics in on-chip configurations requires precise control over the properties of plasmonic modes, in particular their shape and size. Here we achieve this goal by demonstrating a planar plasmonic graded-index lens focusing surface plasmons propagating along the device. The plasmonic mode is manipulated by carving subwavelength features into a dielectric layer positioned on top of a uniform metal film, allowing the local effective index of the plasmonic mode to be controlled using a single binary lithographic step. Focusing and divergence of surface plasmons is demonstrated experimentally. The demonstrated approach can be used for manipulating the propagation of surface plasmons, e.g., for beam steering, splitting, cloaking, mode matching, and beam shaping applications.

  20. Terahertz filter integrated with a subwavelength structured antireflection coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Jeong Min; Kim, Dae-Seon; Kim, Dong-Ju; Jang, Jae-Hyung

    2015-12-01

    Micro-pyramid shaped subwavelength structures (SWSs) were integrated on both sides of a terahertz (THz) filter by means of stamping methods. Two silicon-based stamping molds fabricated via crystallographic wet etching were utilized to replicate SWSs onto cyclo-olefin copolymer (COC) films coated onto both sides of a THz filter at the same time. The SWSs act as an broadband antireflection coating to reduce the surface reflection loss in a frequency range of 0.2 THz to 1.4 THz. Compared to a THz filter without SWSs, the filter integrated with double-sided SWSs exhibits a low standing wave ratio inside the substrate and THz signal transmission enhancement of up to 10.8%.

  1. Interplay between evanescence and disorder in deep subwavelength photonic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzig Sheinfux, Hanan; Kaminer, Ido; Genack, Azriel Z.; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-10-01

    Deep subwavelength features are expected to have minimal impact on wave transport. Here we show that in contrast to this common understanding, disorder can have a dramatic effect in a one-dimensional disordered optical system with spatial features a thousand times smaller than the wavelength. We examine a unique regime of Anderson localization where the localization length is shown to scale linearly with the wavelength instead of diverging, because of the role of evanescent waves. In addition, we demonstrate an unusual order of magnitude enhancement of transmission induced due to localization. These results are described for electromagnetic waves, but are directly relevant to other wave systems such as electrons in multi-quantum-well structures.

  2. Complete polarimetry on the asymmetric transmission through subwavelength hole arrays.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Maoz, Ben M; Nichols, Shane; Markovich, Gil; Kahr, Bart

    2014-06-02

    Dissymmetric, periodically nanostructured metal films can show non-reciprocal transmission of polarized light, in apparent violation of the Lorentz reciprocity theorem. The wave vector dependence of the extraordinary optical transmission in gold films with square and oblique subwavelength hole arrays was examined for the full range of polarized light input states. In normal incidence, the oblique lattice, in contrast to square lattice, showed strong asymmetric, non-reciprocal transmission of circularly polarized light. By analyzing the polarization of the input and the output with a complete Mueller matrix polarimeter the mechanisms that permits asymmetric transmission while preserving the requirement of electromagnetic reciprocity is revealed: the coupling of the linear anisotropies induced by misaligned surface plasmons in the film. The square lattice also shows asymmetric transmission at non-normal incidence, whenever the plane of incidence does not coincide with a mirror line.

  3. Manipulation of the polarization of Terahertz wave in subwavelength regime

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Xiao; Leung, Ho Ming; Chan, C. T.; Wen, Weijia

    2015-01-01

    By generalizing the concept of spoof surface Plasmons (Science 305, 847), we analytically demonstrate that subwavelength quarter-wave and half-wave plates can be realized in a metal hole array (MHA) sandwiched by two thin-layer materials, whose optical responses can be characterized by their optical conductivities. These abilities of polarization conversion can be attributed to the novel eigenstates induced by the hybridization of the spoof surface plamsons with the current generated in the thin-layer. Due to this mechanism, the robustness of the system is promised. The analytic predictions are verified numerically by modeling the thin-layer material as an experimentally feasible topological-insulator/SiO2 multilayer. Moreover, the possibility of extending the principle to a broad range of materials is dicussed. PMID:25655196

  4. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-01

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed.

  5. Tunable metasurfaces via subwavelength phase shifters with uniform amplitude.

    PubMed

    Colburn, Shane; Zhan, Alan; Majumdar, Arka

    2017-01-05

    Metasurfaces with tunable spatial phase functions could benefit numerous applications. Currently, most approaches to tuning rely on mechanical stretching which cannot control phase locally, or by modulating the refractive index to exploit rapid phase changes with the drawback of also modulating amplitude. Here, we propose a method to realize phase modulation at subwavelength length scales while maintaining unity amplitude. Our device is inspired by an asymmetric Fabry-Perot resonator, with pixels comprising a scattering nanopost on top of a distributed Bragg reflector, capable of providing a nearly 2π nonlinear phase shift with less than 2% refractive index modulation. Using the designed pixels, we simulate a tunable metasurface composed of an array of moderately coupled nanopost resonators, realizing axicons, vortex beam generators, and aspherical lenses with both variable focal length and in-plane scanning capability, achieving nearly diffraction-limited performance. The experimental feasibility of the proposed method is also discussed.

  6. Purcell effect in sub-wavelength semiconductor lasers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qing; Slutsky, Boris; Vallini, Felipe; Smalley, Joseph S T; Nezhad, Maziar P; Frateschi, Newton C; Fainman, Yeshaiahu

    2013-07-01

    We present a formal treatment of the modification of spontaneous emission rate by a cavity (Purcell effect) in sub-wavelength semiconductor lasers. To explicitly express the assumptions upon which our formalism builds, we summarize the results of non-relativistic quantum electrodynamics (QED) and the emitter-field-reservoir model in the quantum theory of damping. Within this model, the emitter-field interaction is modified to the extent that the field mode is modified by its environment. We show that the Purcell factor expressions frequently encountered in the literature are recovered only in the hypothetical condition when the gain medium is replaced by a transparent medium. Further, we argue that to accurately evaluate the Purcell effect, both the passive cavity boundary and the collective effect of all emitters must be included as part of the mode environment.

  7. Interplay between evanescence and disorder in deep subwavelength photonic structures

    PubMed Central

    Herzig Sheinfux, Hanan; Kaminer, Ido; Genack, Azriel Z.; Segev, Mordechai

    2016-01-01

    Deep subwavelength features are expected to have minimal impact on wave transport. Here we show that in contrast to this common understanding, disorder can have a dramatic effect in a one-dimensional disordered optical system with spatial features a thousand times smaller than the wavelength. We examine a unique regime of Anderson localization where the localization length is shown to scale linearly with the wavelength instead of diverging, because of the role of evanescent waves. In addition, we demonstrate an unusual order of magnitude enhancement of transmission induced due to localization. These results are described for electromagnetic waves, but are directly relevant to other wave systems such as electrons in multi-quantum-well structures. PMID:27708260

  8. Massively Sub-wavelength Guiding of Electromagnetic Waves

    PubMed Central

    Hooper, I. R.; Tremain, B.; Dockrey, J. A.; Hibbins, A. P.

    2014-01-01

    Recently a new form of ultra-thin flexible waveguide consisting of a conducting comb-like structure with a thickness of the order of 1/600th of the operating wavelength was presented. However, whilst the thickness of the guide was massively sub-wavelength, the remaining dimensions (the height and period of the comb) were much longer. In this paper we propose, and experimentally verify, that a modified guiding geometry consisting of a chain of ultra-thin conducting spirals allows guiding of electromagnetic waves with wavelengths that are many times (40+) longer than any characteristic dimension of the guide, enabling super-sub-wavelength guiding and localisation of electromagnetic energy. PMID:25510662

  9. Efficient Vortex Generation in Subwavelength Epsilon-Near-Zero Slabs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciattoni, Alessandro; Marini, Andrea; Rizza, Carlo

    2017-03-01

    We show that a homogeneous and isotropic slab, illuminated by a circularly polarized beam with no topological charge, produces vortices of order 2 in the opposite circularly polarized components of the reflected and transmitted fields, as a consequence of the transverse magnetic and transverse electric asymmetric response of the rotationally invariant system. In addition, in the epsilon-near-zero regime, we find that vortex generation is remarkably efficient in subwavelength thick slabs up to the paraxial regime. This physically stems from the fact that a vacuum paraxial field can excite a nonparaxial field inside an epsilon-near-zero slab since it hosts slowly varying fields over physically large portions of the bulk. Our theoretical predictions indicate that epsilon-near-zero media hold great potential as nanophotonic elements for manipulating the angular momentum of the radiation, since they are available without resorting to complicated micro- or nanofabrication processes and can operate even at very small (ultraviolet) wavelengths.

  10. Uniquely identifiable tamper-evident device using coupling between subwavelength gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fievre, Ange Marie Patricia

    Reliability and sensitive information protection are critical aspects of integrated circuits. A novel technique using near-field evanescent wave coupling from two subwavelength gratings (SWGs), with the input laser source delivered through an optical fiber is presented for tamper evidence of electronic components. The first grating of the pair of coupled subwavelength gratings (CSWGs) was milled directly on the output facet of the silica fiber using focused ion beam (FIB) etching. The second grating was patterned using e-beam lithography and etched into a glass substrate using reactive ion etching (RIE). The slightest intrusion attempt would separate the CSWGs and eliminate near-field coupling between the gratings. Tampering, therefore, would become evident. Computer simulations guided the design for optimal operation of the security solution. The physical dimensions of the SWGs, i.e. period and thickness, were optimized, for a 650 nm illuminating wavelength. The optimal dimensions resulted in a 560 nm grating period for the first grating etched in the silica optical fiber and 420 nm for the second grating etched in borosilicate glass. The incident light beam had a half-width at half-maximum (HWHM) of at least 7 microm to allow discernible higher transmission orders, and a HWHM of 28 microm for minimum noise. The minimum number of individual grating lines present on the optical fiber facet was identified as 15 lines. Grating rotation due to the cylindrical geometry of the fiber resulted in a rotation of the far-field pattern, corresponding to the rotation angle of moire fringes. With the goal of later adding authentication to tamper evidence, the concept of CSWGs signature was also modeled by introducing random and planned variations in the glass grating. The fiber was placed on a stage supported by a nanomanipulator, which permitted three-dimensional displacement while maintaining the fiber tip normal to the surface of the glass substrate. A 650 nm diode laser was

  11. Large aperture diffractive space telescope

    DOEpatents

    Hyde, Roderick A.

    2001-01-01

    A large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary objective lens functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass "aiming" at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The objective lens includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the objective lens, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets which may be either earth bound or celestial.

  12. SEASAT Synthetic Aperture Radar Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, F. M.

    1981-01-01

    The potential of radar imagery from space altitudes is discussed and the advantages of radar over passive sensor systems are outlined. Specific reference is made to the SEASAT synthetic aperture radar. Possible applications include oil spill monitoring, snow and ice reconnaissance, mineral exploration, and monitoring phenomena in the urban environment.

  13. Future of synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barath, F. T.

    1978-01-01

    The present status of the applications of Synthetic Aperture Radars (SARs) is reviewed, and the technology state-of-the art as represented by the Seasat-A and SIR-A SARs examined. The potential of SAR applications, and the near- and longer-term technology trends are assessed.

  14. Multi-shot compressed coded aperture imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Xiaopeng; Du, Juan; Wu, Tengfei; Jin, Zhenhua

    2013-09-01

    The classical methods of compressed coded aperture (CCA) still require an optical sensor with high resolution, although the sampling rate has broken the Nyquist sampling rate already. A novel architecture of multi-shot compressed coded aperture imaging (MCCAI) using a low resolution optical sensor is proposed, which is mainly based on the 4-f imaging system, combining with two spatial light modulators (SLM) to achieve the compressive imaging goal. The first SLM employed for random convolution is placed at the frequency spectrum plane of the 4-f imaging system, while the second SLM worked as a selecting filter is positioned in front of the optical sensor. By altering the random coded pattern of the second SLM and sampling, a couple of observations can be obtained by a low resolution optical sensor easily, and these observations will be combined mathematically and used to reconstruct the high resolution image. That is to say, MCCAI aims at realizing the super resolution imaging with multiple random samplings by using a low resolution optical sensor. To improve the computational imaging performance, total variation (TV) regularization is introduced into the super resolution reconstruction model to get rid of the artifacts, and alternating direction method of multipliers (ADM) is utilized to solve the optimal result efficiently. The results show that the MCCAI architecture is suitable for super resolution computational imaging using a much lower resolution optical sensor than traditional CCA imaging methods by capturing multiple frame images.

  15. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10−5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers. PMID:26923610

  16. Ultra sub-wavelength surface plasmon confinement using air-gap, sub-wavelength ring resonator arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaehak; Sung, Sangkeun; Choi, Jun-Hyuk; Eom, Seok Chan; Mortensen, N. Asger; Shin, Jung H.

    2016-02-01

    Arrays of sub-wavelength, sub-10 nm air-gap plasmonic ring resonators are fabricated using nanoimprinting. In near infra-red (NIR) range, the resonator supports a single dipole mode which is excited and identified via simple normal illumination and explored through transmission measurements. By controlling both lateral and vertical confinement via a metal edge, the mode volume is successfully reduced down to 1.3 × 10-5 λ03. The advantage of such mode confinement is demonstrated by applying the resonators biosensing. Using bovine serum albumin (BSA) molecules, a dramatic enhancement of surface sensitivity up to 69 nm/nm is achieved as the modal height approaches the thickness of the adsorbed molecule layers.

  17. Photonic spin Hall effect in hyperbolic metamaterials for polarization-controlled routing of subwavelength modes.

    PubMed

    Kapitanova, Polina V; Ginzburg, Pavel; Rodríguez-Fortuño, Francisco J; Filonov, Dmitry S; Voroshilov, Pavel M; Belov, Pavel A; Poddubny, Alexander N; Kivshar, Yuri S; Wurtz, Gregory A; Zayats, Anatoly V

    2014-01-01

    The routing of light in a deep subwavelength regime enables a variety of important applications in photonics, quantum information technologies, imaging and biosensing. Here we describe and experimentally demonstrate the selective excitation of spatially confined, subwavelength electromagnetic modes in anisotropic metamaterials with hyperbolic dispersion. A localized, circularly polarized emitter placed at the boundary of a hyperbolic metamaterial is shown to excite extraordinary waves propagating in a prescribed direction controlled by the polarization handedness. Thus, a metamaterial slab acts as an extremely broadband, nearly ideal polarization beam splitter for circularly polarized light. We perform a proof of concept experiment with a uniaxial hyperbolic metamaterial at radio-frequencies revealing the directional routing effect and strong subwavelength λ/300 confinement. The proposed concept of metamaterial-based subwavelength interconnection and polarization-controlled signal routing is based on the photonic spin Hall effect and may serve as an ultimate platform for either conventional or quantum electromagnetic signal processing.

  18. Efficient sub-wavelength light confinement using surface plasmon polaritons in tapered fibers.

    PubMed

    Renna, Fabrizio; Cox, David; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2009-04-27

    Light confinement to sub-wavelength spot sizes is proposed and realized in tapered optical fibers. To achieve high transmission efficiencies, light propagating along the taper is combined with the excitation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPP) at its tip.

  19. The plasmon-forbidden deep sub-wavelength transmission with the TE polarization.

    PubMed

    Chen, Minfeng; Chang, Hung-chun

    2009-08-03

    As is well-known, the sub-wavelength transmissions and field enhancement are related to the surface plasmon excitation. Here we demonstrate that in two-layer metallic gratings the deep sub-wavelength transmissions is supported with the TE polarization where the surface plasmon mode is forbidden. The new mechanism to the sub-wavelength transmission is discovered to be completely different from the findings in the literatures. we propose a simple resonance condition to classify the resonance types which are responsible for those sub-wavelength transmissions and confirm with numerical simulations. To give a complete explanation of underlying physics, we inspect the near-field phenomenon within the grating slits.

  20. Subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic field by guided modes of dielectric micro- and nanowaveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltikov, A. M.

    2010-04-01

    Regimes enabling the strongest confinement of electromagnetic field by guided modes of dielectric micro- and nanowaveguides are identified. Waveguides of this class are shown to allow a guidance of subwavelength optical beams.

  1. Adaptive millimeter-wave synthetic aperture imaging for compressive sampling of sparse scenes.

    PubMed

    Mrozack, Alex; Heimbeck, Martin; Marks, Daniel L; Richard, Jonathan; Everitt, Henry O; Brady, David J

    2014-06-02

    We apply adaptive sensing techniques to the problem of locating sparse metallic scatterers using high-resolution, frequency modulated continuous wave W-band RADAR. Using a single detector, a frequency stepped source, and a lateral translation stage, inverse synthetic aperture RADAR reconstruction techniques are used to search for one or two wire scatterers within a specified range, while an adaptive algorithm determined successive sampling locations. The two-dimensional location of each scatterer is thereby identified with sub-wavelength accuracy in as few as 1/4 the number of lateral steps required for a simple raster scan. The implications of applying this approach to more complex scattering geometries are explored in light of the various assumptions made.

  2. Metamaterial apertures for coherent computational imaging on the physical layer.

    PubMed

    Lipworth, Guy; Mrozack, Alex; Hunt, John; Marks, Daniel L; Driscoll, Tom; Brady, David; Smith, David R

    2013-08-01

    We introduce the concept of a metamaterial aperture, in which an underlying reference mode interacts with a designed metamaterial surface to produce a series of complex field patterns. The resonant frequencies of the metamaterial elements are randomly distributed over a large bandwidth (18-26 GHz), such that the aperture produces a rapidly varying sequence of field patterns as a function of the input frequency. As the frequency of operation is scanned, different subsets of metamaterial elements become active, in turn varying the field patterns at the scene. Scene information can thus be indexed by frequency, with the overall effectiveness of the imaging scheme tied to the diversity of the generated field patterns. As the quality (Q-) factor of the metamaterial resonators increases, the number of distinct field patterns that can be generated increases-improving scene estimation. In this work we provide the foundation for computational imaging with metamaterial apertures based on frequency diversity, and establish that for resonators with physically relevant Q-factors, there are potentially enough distinct measurements of a typical scene within a reasonable bandwidth to achieve diffraction-limited reconstructions of physical scenes.

  3. Near-field observation of subwavelength confinement of photoluminescence by a photonic crystal microcavity.

    PubMed

    Louvion, Nicolas; Rahmani, Adel; Seassal, Christian; Callard, Ségolène; Gérard, Davy; de Fornel, Frédérique

    2006-07-15

    We present a direct, room-temperature near-field optical study of light confinement by a subwavelength defect microcavity in a photonic crystal slab containing quantum-well sources. The observations are compared with three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain calculations, and excellent agreement is found. Moreover, we use a subwavelength cavity to study the influence of a near-field probe on the imaging of localized optical modes.

  4. Synthetic-aperture chirp confocal imaging.

    PubMed

    Chien, Wei-Chen; Dilworth, D S; Liu, Elson; Leith, E N

    2006-01-20

    An imaging system that combines synthetic-aperture imaging, holography, and an optical chirp with confocal imaging is described and analyzed. Comparisons are made with synthetic-aperture radar systems. Adaptation of several synthetic-aperture radar techniques to the optical counterparts is suggested.

  5. High numerical aperture polymer microstructured fiber with three super-wavelength bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gauvreau, Bertrand; Desevedavy, Frederic; Guo, Ning; Khadri, Dhia; Hassani, Alireza; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2009-08-01

    The transmission properties of a novel high numerical aperture polymer-based fiber are detailed. The proposed fiber features a large core (520 µm) suspended in air by three bridges of ~3 µm thickness. Unlike existing high NA fibers featuring a large number of subwavelength supports, the bridge size in our fiber is not subwavelength. However, as there are only three such bridges and the core diameter is large, our fiber still confines light efficiently in the inner core. We then detail a modified cutback measurement procedure to study fiber transmission loss. We report an extra ~5 dB m-1 leakage loss from the core through the bridges in addition to the core material absorption loss. We then present a numerical aperture measurement procedure for relatively short fiber pieces guiding in the non-equilibrium mode distribution regime. An NA of over 0.60 was demonstrated for fiber pieces smaller than 30 cm and was shown to decrease gradually for longer fibers. Furthermore, even for fibers as long as 80 cm a relatively high NA of over 0.3 was observed. Finally, we have demonstrated high NA operation of such fibers when the fiber tip was inserted into a highly diffusive aqueous environment (milk). We have also demonstrated a much higher light collection efficiency of our fibers compared to that of a simple rod-in-the-liquid fiber of identical diameter. We believe that the proposed fiber has a strong potential for short range evanescent sensing and light collection applications due to the fiber's simple fabrication methodology, wide unobstructed air channels, relatively low loss and high NA.

  6. Symmetry-broken metamaterial for blocking, cloaking, and supertunneling of sound in a subwavelength scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Baizhan; Dai, Hongqing; Yu, Dejie

    2016-06-01

    Metamaterials offer extraordinary possibilities for manipulating the propagation of the sound wave in a subwavelength scale. However, the design of acoustic metamaterials remains challenging with traditional strategies, employing two different types of acoustic resonators simultaneously or using specific substructures with multiple resonances. Here we design a symmetry-broken metamaterial comprising of only Helmholtz resonators whose periodical spatial arrangements are broken. The symmetry-broken metamaterials form a hollow hexagonal resonant absorber with two significant resonances. One is the monopolar resonance presenting a collective in-phase pattern motion independent of angle. The other is the dipolar resonance originating from the multiple scattering of symmetry-broken metamaterials. By concentrating the sound energy in peaks of their modes, the hollow hexagonal resonant absorber with extremely small filling ratio can be effectively used to block the propagation of the sound wave in a low-frequency range between monopolar and dipolar resonances. Numerical results also show that the symmetry-broken metamaterials with careful arrangement can be applied to the sound cloaking and the sound supertunneling.

  7. Reflective plasmonic waveplates based on metal-insulator-metal subwavelength rectangular annular arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhonghui; Wang, Chinhua; Xu, Fuyang; Lou, Yimin; Cao, Bing; Li, Xiaofeng

    2014-04-01

    We propose and present a quarter-wave plate using metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure with sub-wavelength rectangular annular arrays (RAA) patterned in the upper Au film. It is found that by manipulating asymmetric width of the annular gaps along two orthogonal directions, the reflected amplitude and phase of the two orthogonal components can be well controlled via the RAA metasurface tuned by the MIM cavity effect, in which the localized surface plasmon resonance dip can be flattened with the cavity length. A quarter-wave plate has been realized through an optimized design at 1.55 μm, in which the phase difference variation of less than 2% of the π/2 between the two orthogonal components can be obtained in an ultra-wide wavelength range of about 130 nm, and the reflectivity is up to ˜90% within the whole working wavelength band. It provides a great potential for applications in advanced nanophotonic devices and integrated photonic systems.

  8. Plasmonic band structures and optical properties of subwavelength metal/dielectric/metal Bragg waveguides.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Zhou, Yun-Song; Wang, Huai-Yu

    2012-03-26

    In this paper, we applied the band structure theory to investigate the plasmonic band (PB) structures and optical properties of subwavelength metal/dielectric/metal Bragg waveguides in the near infrared range with either dielectric or geometric modulation. The Bloch wave vector, density of states, slowdown factor, propagation length and transmittance are calculated and analyzed. Both the modulations are in favor of manipulating surface-plasmon-polariton (SPP) waves. For the dielectric modulation, the PB structure is mainly formed by SPP modes and possesses a "regular pattern" in which the bands and gaps have a relatively even distribution. For the geometric modulation, due to the strong transverse scattering, the contributions of higher modes have to be considered and the gap widths have a significant increase compared to the dielectric modulation. A larger slowdown factor may emerge at the band edge; especially for the geometric modulation, the group velocity can be reduced to 1/100 of light, and negative group velocity is observed as well. While inside the bands, the slowdown factor is smaller and the bands are flat. The contribution of each eigenmode to the PB structure is analyzed.

  9. Broadband synthetic aperture geoacoustic inversion.

    PubMed

    Tan, Bien Aik; Gerstoft, Peter; Yardim, Caglar; Hodgkiss, William S

    2013-07-01

    A typical geoacoustic inversion procedure involves powerful source transmissions received on a large-aperture receiver array. A more practical approach is to use a single moving source and/or receiver in a low signal to noise ratio (SNR) setting. This paper uses single-receiver, broadband, frequency coherent matched-field inversion and exploits coherently repeated transmissions to improve estimation of the geoacoustic parameters. The long observation time creates a synthetic aperture due to relative source-receiver motion. This approach is illustrated by studying the transmission of multiple linear frequency modulated (LFM) pulses which results in a multi-tonal comb spectrum that is Doppler sensitive. To correlate well with the measured field across a receiver trajectory and to incorporate transmission from a source trajectory, waveguide Doppler and normal mode theory is applied. The method is demonstrated with low SNR, 100-900 Hz LFM pulse data from the Shallow Water 2006 experiment.

  10. VSATs - Very small aperture terminals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, John L.

    The present volume on very small aperture terminals (VSATs) discusses antennas, semiconductor devices, and traveling wave tubes and amplifiers for VSAT systems, VSAT low noise downconverters, and modems and codecs for VSAT systems. Attention is given to multiaccess protocols for VSAT networks, protocol software in Ku-band VSAT network systems, system design of VSAT data networks, and the policing of VSAT networks. Topics addressed include the PANDATA and PolyCom systems, APOLLO - a satellite-based information distribution system, data broadcasting within a satellite television channel, and the NEC NEXTAR VSAT system. Also discussed are small aperture military ground terminals, link budgets for VSAT systems, capabilities and experience of a VSAT service provider, and developments in VSAT regulation.

  11. Large Aperture Scintillometer Intercomparison Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleissl, J.; Gomez, J.; Hong, S.-H.; Hendrickx, J. M. H.; Rahn, T.; Defoor, W. L.

    2008-07-01

    Two field studies with six large aperture scintillometers (LASs) were performed using horizontal and slant paths. The accuracy of this novel and increasingly popular technique for measuring sensible heat fluxes was quantified by comparing measurements from different instruments over nearly identical transects. Random errors in LAS measurements were small, since correlation coefficients between adjacent measurements were greater than 0.995. However, for an ideal set-up differences in linear regression slopes of up to 21% were observed with typical inter-instrument differences of 6%. Differences of 10% are typical in more realistic measurement scenarios over homogeneous natural vegetation and different transect heights and locations. Inaccuracies in the optics, which affect the effective aperture diameter, are the most likely explanation for the observed differences.

  12. Synthetic Aperture Radar Simulation Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    multilook are discussed. A chapter is devoted to elevation and planimetric data bases. In addition, six- teen pictures of SAR images from Hughes Aircraft, as...scans. Figure 5.4-1 is a photograph ot two SAR displays. The tirst display is made up ot six subscans and has a multilook ot one. Note that tading is...dentfi by block number) * Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) Simulation Study Radar Simulation Data Bases 5/~t. 4th.- Computer Image Generation Display 20

  13. Photonic nanowires: from subwavelength waveguides to optical sensors.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xin; Ying, Yibin; Tong, Limin

    2014-02-18

    Nanowires are one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures with comparatively large aspect ratios, which can be useful in manipulating electrons, photons, plasmons, phonons, and atoms for numerous technologies. Among various nanostructures for low-dimensional photonics, the 1D nanowire is of great importance owing to its ability to route tightly confined light fields in single-mode with lowest space and material requirements, minimized optical path, and high mechanical flexibilities. In recent years, nanowire photonics have increasingly been attracting scientists' interests for both fundamental studies and technological applications because 1D nanowires have more favorable properties than many other structures, such as 0D quantum dots (QDs) and 2D films. As subwavelength waveguides, free-standing nanowires fabricated by either chemical growth or physical drawing techniques surpass nanowaveguides fabricated by almost all other means in terms of sidewall smoothness and diameter uniformity. This conveys their low waveguiding losses. With high index contrast (typically higher than 0.5) between the core and the surrounding or with surface plasmon resonance, a nanowire can guide light with tight optical confinement. For example, the effective mode area is less than λ(2)/10 for a dielectric nanowire or less than λ(2)/100 for a metal nanowire, where λ is the vacuum wavelength of the light. As we increase the wavelength-to-diameter ratio (WDR) of a nanowire, we can enlarge the fractional power of the evanescent fields in the guiding modes to over 80% while maintaining a small effective mode area, which may enable highly localized near-field interaction between the guided fields and the surrounding media. These favorable properties have opened great opportunities for optical sensing on the single-nanowire scale. However, several questions arise with ongoing research. With a deep-subwavelength cross-section, how can we efficiently couple light into a single nanowire? How can we

  14. Sparse-aperture adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuthill, Peter; Lloyd, James; Ireland, Michael; Martinache, Frantz; Monnier, John; Woodruff, Henry; ten Brummelaar, Theo; Turner, Nils; Townes, Charles

    2006-06-01

    Aperture masking interferometry and Adaptive Optics (AO) are two of the competing technologies attempting to recover diffraction-limited performance from ground-based telescopes. However, there are good arguments that these techniques should be viewed as complementary, not competitive. Masking has been shown to deliver superior PSF calibration, rejection of atmospheric noise and robust recovery of phase information through the use of closure phases. However, this comes at the penalty of loss of flux at the mask, restricting the technique to bright targets. Adaptive optics, on the other hand, can reach a fainter class of objects but suffers from the difficulty of calibration of the PSF which can vary with observational parameters such as seeing, airmass and source brightness. Here we present results from a fusion of these two techniques: placing an aperture mask downstream of an AO system. The precision characterization of the PSF enabled by sparse-aperture interferometry can now be applied to deconvolution of AO images, recovering structure from the traditionally-difficult regime within the core of the AO-corrected transfer function. Results of this program from the Palomar and Keck adaptive optical systems are presented.

  15. Controlled-aperture wave-equation migration

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, L.; Fehler, Michael C.; Sun, H.; Li, Z.

    2003-01-01

    We present a controlled-aperture wave-equation migration method that no1 only can reduce migration artiracts due to limited recording aperlurcs and determine image weights to balance the efl'ects of limited-aperture illumination, but also can improve thc migration accuracy by reducing the slowness perturbations within thc controlled migration regions. The method consists of two steps: migration aperture scan and controlled-aperture migration. Migration apertures for a sparse distribution of shots arc determined using wave-equation migration, and those for the other shots are obtained by interpolation. During the final controlled-aperture niigration step, we can select a reference slowness in c;ontrollecl regions of the slowness model to reduce slowncss perturbations, and consequently increase the accuracy of wave-equation migration inel hods that makc use of reference slownesses. In addition, the computation in the space domain during wavefield downward continuation is needed to be conducted only within the controlled apertures and therefore, the computational cost of controlled-aperture migration step (without including migration aperture scan) is less than the corresponding uncontrolled-aperture migration. Finally, we can use the efficient split-step Fourier approach for migration-aperture scan, then use other, more accurate though more expensive, wave-equation migration methods to perform thc final controlled-apertio.ee migration to produce the most accurate image.

  16. General Mechanism Involved in Subwavelength Optics of Conducting Microstructures: Charge-Oscillation-Induced Light Emission and Interference

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, X.R.; Peng, Ru-Wen

    2010-03-15

    Interactions between light and conducting microstructures or nanostructures can result in a variety of novel phenomena, but their underlying mechanisms have not been completely understood. From calculations of surface charge density waves on conducting gratings and by comparing them with classical surface plasmons, we revealed a general yet concrete picture regarding the coupling of light to free electron oscillation on structured conducting surfaces that can lead to oscillating subwavelength charge patterns (i.e., structured surface plasmons). New wavelets emitted from these light sources then destructively interfere to form evanescent waves. This principle, usually combined with other mechanisms, is mainly a geometrical effect that can be universally involved in light scattering from all periodic and non-periodic structures containing free electrons. This picture may provide clear guidelines for developing conductor-based nano-optical devices.

  17. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, Edward E.

    1983-01-01

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The present invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput. The balance correlation response function for the self-supporting array pattern provides an accurate representation of the source of nonfocusable radiation.

  18. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-01

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  19. Sound Insulation in a Hollow Pipe with Subwavelength Thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Long; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-03-01

    Suppression of the transmission of undesired sound in ducts is a fundamental issue with wide applications in a great variety of scenarios. Yet the conventional ways of duct noise control have to rely on mismatched impedance or viscous dissipation, leading the ducts to have ventilation capability weakened by inserted absorbers or a thick shell to accommodate bulky resonators. Here we present a mechanism for insulating sound transmission in a hollow pipe with subwavelength thickness, by directly reversing its propagating direction via anomalous reflection at the flat inner boundary with well-designed phase profile. A metamaterial-based implementation is demonstrated both in simulation and in experiment, verifying the theoretical prediction on high-efficient sound insulation at the desired frequencies by the resulting device, which has a shell as thin as 1/8 wavelength and an entirely open passage that maintains the continuity of the background medium. We have also investigated the potential of our scheme to work in broadband by simply cascading different metamaterial unit cells. Without the defects of blocked path and bulky size of existing sound insulators, we envision our design will open new route to sound insulation in ducts and have deep implication in practical applications such as designs of ventilation fans and vehicle silencers.

  20. Subwavelength-Sized Narrow-Band Anechoic Waveguide Terminations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santillán, Arturo; Ćrenlund, Emil; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.

    2016-11-01

    We propose and demonstrate the use of a pair of detuned acoustic resonators to efficiently absorb narrow-band sound waves in a terminated waveguide. The suggested configuration is relatively simple and advantageous for usage at low frequencies, since the dimensions of the resonators are very small compared to the wavelength. We present a theoretical description based on lumped parameters to calculate the absorption coefficient, which agrees very well with experimental data. The experimental results verify that the anechoic (reflection approximately -38 dB ) narrow-band (Δ f /f ˜0.1 ) termination with deeply subwavelength (<λ /10 ) sizes can be realized at a target frequency, suggesting thereby applications for noise control and sensing. As an illustration of possible applications for sound absorption in a room, we demonstrate by use of numerical simulations that a given axial resonant excitation in a room can be practically eliminated. Thus, a reduction of approximately 24 dB in the average acoustic energy is achieved in the room when using only four Helmholtz resonators. We also discuss various scenarios of noise control in rooms.

  1. Shape-dependent light scattering properties of subwavelength silicon nanoblocks.

    PubMed

    Ee, Ho-Seok; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Brongersma, Mark L; Seo, Min-Kyo

    2015-03-11

    We explore the shape-dependent light scattering properties of silicon (Si) nanoblocks and their physical origin. These high-refractive-index nanostructures are easily fabricated using planar fabrication technologies and support strong, leaky-mode resonances that enable light manipulation beyond the optical diffraction limit. Dark-field microscopy and a numerical modal analysis show that the nanoblocks can be viewed as truncated Si waveguides, and the waveguide dispersion strongly controls the resonant properties. This explains why the lowest-order transverse magnetic (TM01) mode resonance can be widely tuned over the entire visible wavelength range depending on the nanoblock length, whereas the wavelength-scale TM11 mode resonance does not change greatly. For sufficiently short lengths, the TM01 and TM11 modes can be made to spectrally overlap, and a substantial scattering efficiency, which is defined as the ratio of the scattering cross section to the physical cross section of the nanoblock, of ∼9.95, approaching the theoretical lowest-order single-channel scattering limit, is achievable. Control over the subwavelength-scale leaky-mode resonance allows Si nanoblocks to generate vivid structural color, manipulate forward and backward scattering, and act as excellent photonic artificial atoms for metasurfaces.

  2. Sub-wavelength nanofluidics in photonic crystal sensors.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Yanik, Ahmet Ali; Chang, Tsung-Yao; Altug, Hatice

    2009-12-21

    We introduce a novel sensor scheme combining nano-photonics and nano-fluidics on a single platform through the use of free-standing photonic crystals. By harnessing nano-scale openings, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate that both fluidics and light can be manipulated at sub-wavelength scales. Compared to the conventional fluidic channels, we actively steer the convective flow through the nanohole openings for effective delivery of the analytes to the sensor surface. We apply our method to detect refractive index changes in aqueous solutions. Bulk measurements indicate that active delivery of the convective flow results in better sensitivities. The sensitivity of the sensor reaches 510 nm/RIU for resonance located around 850 nm with a line-width of approximately 10 nm in solution. Experimental results are matched very well with numerical simulations. We also show that cross-polarization measurements can be employed to further improve the detection limit by increasing the signal-to-noise ratio.

  3. Sound Insulation in a Hollow Pipe with Subwavelength Thickness.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hai-Long; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-03-08

    Suppression of the transmission of undesired sound in ducts is a fundamental issue with wide applications in a great variety of scenarios. Yet the conventional ways of duct noise control have to rely on mismatched impedance or viscous dissipation, leading the ducts to have ventilation capability weakened by inserted absorbers or a thick shell to accommodate bulky resonators. Here we present a mechanism for insulating sound transmission in a hollow pipe with subwavelength thickness, by directly reversing its propagating direction via anomalous reflection at the flat inner boundary with well-designed phase profile. A metamaterial-based implementation is demonstrated both in simulation and in experiment, verifying the theoretical prediction on high-efficient sound insulation at the desired frequencies by the resulting device, which has a shell as thin as 1/8 wavelength and an entirely open passage that maintains the continuity of the background medium. We have also investigated the potential of our scheme to work in broadband by simply cascading different metamaterial unit cells. Without the defects of blocked path and bulky size of existing sound insulators, we envision our design will open new route to sound insulation in ducts and have deep implication in practical applications such as designs of ventilation fans and vehicle silencers.

  4. Sound Insulation in a Hollow Pipe with Subwavelength Thickness

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hai-Long; Zhu, Yi-Fan; Liang, Bin; Yang, Jing; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Suppression of the transmission of undesired sound in ducts is a fundamental issue with wide applications in a great variety of scenarios. Yet the conventional ways of duct noise control have to rely on mismatched impedance or viscous dissipation, leading the ducts to have ventilation capability weakened by inserted absorbers or a thick shell to accommodate bulky resonators. Here we present a mechanism for insulating sound transmission in a hollow pipe with subwavelength thickness, by directly reversing its propagating direction via anomalous reflection at the flat inner boundary with well-designed phase profile. A metamaterial-based implementation is demonstrated both in simulation and in experiment, verifying the theoretical prediction on high-efficient sound insulation at the desired frequencies by the resulting device, which has a shell as thin as 1/8 wavelength and an entirely open passage that maintains the continuity of the background medium. We have also investigated the potential of our scheme to work in broadband by simply cascading different metamaterial unit cells. Without the defects of blocked path and bulky size of existing sound insulators, we envision our design will open new route to sound insulation in ducts and have deep implication in practical applications such as designs of ventilation fans and vehicle silencers. PMID:28272486

  5. Sub-wavelength efficient polarization filter (SWEP filter)

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Marcus L.; Simpson, John T.

    2003-12-09

    A polarization sensitive filter includes a first sub-wavelength resonant grating structure (SWS) for receiving incident light, and a second SWS. The SWS are disposed relative to one another such that incident light which is transmitted by the first SWS passes through the second SWS. The filter has a polarization sensitive resonance, the polarization sensitive resonance substantially reflecting a first polarization component of incident light while substantially transmitting a second polarization component of the incident light, the polarization components being orthogonal to one another. A method for forming polarization filters includes the steps of forming first and second SWS, the first and second SWS disposed relative to one another such that a portion of incident light applied to the first SWS passes through the second SWS. A method for separating polarizations of light, includes the steps of providing a filter formed from a first and second SWS, shining incident light having orthogonal polarization components on the first SWS, and substantially reflecting one of the orthogonal polarization components while substantially transmitting the other orthogonal polarization component. A high Q narrowband filter includes a first and second SWS, the first and second SWS are spaced apart a distance being at least one half an optical wavelength.

  6. Dispersionless Manipulation of Reflected Acoustic Wavefront by Subwavelength Corrugated Surface.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yi-Fan; Zou, Xin-Ye; Li, Rui-Qi; Jiang, Xue; Tu, Juan; Liang, Bin; Cheng, Jian-Chun

    2015-06-16

    Free controls of optic/acoustic waves for bending, focusing or steering the energy of wavefronts are highly desirable in many practical scenarios. However, the dispersive nature of the existing metamaterials/metasurfaces for wavefront manipulation necessarily results in limited bandwidth. Here, we propose the concept of dispersionless wavefront manipulation and report a theoretical, numerical and experimental work on the design of a reflective surface capable of controlling the acoustic wavefront arbitrarily without bandwidth limitation. Analytical analysis predicts the possibility to completely eliminate the frequency dependence with a specific gradient surface which can be implemented by designing a subwavelength corrugated surface. Experimental and numerical results, well consistent with the theoretical predictions, have validated the proposed scheme by demonstrating a distinct phenomenon of extraordinary acoustic reflection within an ultra-broad band. For acquiring a deeper insight into the underlying physics, a simple physical model is developed which helps to interpret this extraordinary phenomenon and predict the upper cutoff frequency precisely. Generations of planar focusing and non-diffractive beam have also been exemplified. With the dispersionless wave-steering capability and deep discrete resolution, our designed structure may open new avenue to fully steer classical waves and offer design possibilities for broadband optical/acoustical devices.

  7. Sub-wavelength grating mode transformers in silicon slab waveguides.

    PubMed

    Bock, Przemek J; Cheben, Pavel; Schmid, Jens H; Delâge, André; Xu, Dan-Xia; Janz, Siegfried; Hall, Trevor J

    2009-10-12

    We report on several new types of sub-wavelength grating (SWG) gradient index structures for efficient mode coupling in high index contrast slab waveguides. Using a SWG, an adiabatic transition is achieved at the interface between silicon-on-insulator waveguides of different geometries. The SWG transition region minimizes both fundamental mode mismatch loss and coupling to higher order modes. By creating the gradient effective index region in the direction of propagation, we demonstrate that efficient vertical mode transformation can be achieved between slab waveguides of different core thickness. The structures which we propose can be fabricated by a single etch step. Using 3D finite-difference time-domain simulations we study the loss, polarization dependence and the higher order mode excitation for two types (triangular and triangular-transverse) of SWG transition regions between silicon-on-insulator slab waveguides of different core thicknesses. We demonstrate two solutions to reduce the polarization dependent loss of these structures. Finally, we propose an implementation of SWG structures to reduce loss and higher order mode excitation between a slab waveguide and a phase array of an array waveguide grating (AWG). Compared to a conventional AWG, the loss is reduced from -1.4 dB to < -0.2 dB at the slab-array interface.

  8. Metallic Strip Gratings in the Sub-Subwavelength Regime

    PubMed Central

    Savin, Adriana; Steigmann, Rozina; Bruma, Alina

    2014-01-01

    Metallic strip gratings (MSG) have different applications, ranging from printed circuits to filters in microwave domains. When they are under the influence of an electromagnetic field, evanescent and/or abnormal modes appear in the region between the traces, their utilization leading to the development of new electromagnetic nondestructive evaluation methods. This paper studies the behavior of MSGs in the sub-subwavelength regime when they are excited with TEz or TMz polarized plane waves and the slits are filled with different dielectrics. The appearance of propagating, evanescent and abnormal modes is emphasized using an electromagnetic sensor with metamaterials lens realized with two conical Swiss rolls, which allows the extraction of the information carried by the guided evanescent waves. The evanescent waves, manipulated by the electromagnetic sensor with metamaterial lenses, improve the electromagnetic images so that a better spatial resolution is obtained, exceeding the limit imposed by diffraction. Their theoretical and experimental confirmation opens the perspective for development of new types of sensors working in radio and microwave frequencies. PMID:24999714

  9. Seismic metasurfaces: Sub-wavelength resonators and Rayleigh wave interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colquitt, D. J.; Colombi, A.; Craster, R. V.; Roux, P.; Guenneau, S. R. L.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the canonical problem of an array of rods, which act as resonators, placed on an elastic substrate; the substrate being either a thin elastic plate or an elastic half-space. In both cases the flexural plate, or Rayleigh surface, waves in the substrate interact with the resonators to create interesting effects such as effective band-gaps for surface waves or filters that transform surface waves into bulk waves; these effects have parallels in the field of optics where such sub-wavelength resonators create metamaterials in the bulk and metasurfaces at the free surfaces. Here we carefully analyse this canonical problem by extracting the dispersion relations analytically thereby examining the influence of both the flexural and compressional resonances on the propagating wave. For an array of resonators atop an elastic half-space we augment the analysis with numerical simulations. Amongst other effects, we demonstrate the striking effect of a dispersion curve which corresponds to a mode that transitions from Rayleigh wave-like to shear wave-like behaviour and the resultant change in the fields from surface to bulk waves.

  10. Characterization of localized transverse structures in wide-aperture lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosanov, N. N.; Fedorov, A. V.; Fedorov, S. V.; Khodova, G. V.

    The problem of characterization of spatio-temporal patterns is discussed for the case of wide-aperture lasers with nonlinear losses where variety of such patterns is especially rich. Laser autosolitons (LASs)-localized transverse structures representing “islands of lasing” on a background of the nonlasing mode on the laser aperture-are studied. Existence of stable single LASs which are motionless or moving in the transverse direction with constant linear velocity is shown. Described are also LASs with regular wavefronts, those with screw dislocations (defects) of wavefronts with different topological indices, and those with axially symmetric and asymmetric intensity distributions rotating with constant angular velocity around the LAS center. An approach is given for qualitative and quantitative characterization of a single LAS by its linear and angular velocities and frequency shift, based on a combination of analytical methods and computer simulations. Results of investigations of weak and strong interactions among the LASs are presented.

  11. Coded aperture solution for improving the performance of traffic enforcement cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudifar, Mina; Pourreza, Hamid Reza

    2016-10-01

    A coded aperture camera is proposed for automatic license plate recognition (ALPR) systems. It captures images using a noncircular aperture. The aperture pattern is designed for the rapid acquisition of high-resolution images while preserving high spatial frequencies of defocused regions. It is obtained by minimizing an objective function, which computes the expected value of perceptual deblurring error. The imaging conditions and camera sensor specifications are also considered in the proposed function. The designed aperture improves the depth of field (DoF) and subsequently ALPR performance. The captured images can be directly analyzed by the ALPR software up to a specific depth, which is 13 m in our case, though it is 11 m for the circular aperture. Moreover, since the deblurring results of images captured by our aperture yield fewer artifacts than those captured by the circular aperture, images can be first deblurred and then analyzed by the ALPR software. In this way, the DoF and recognition rate can be improved at the same time. Our case study shows that the proposed camera can improve the DoF up to 17 m while it is limited to 11 m in the conventional aperture.

  12. Dual aperture multispectral Schmidt objective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minott, P. O.

    1984-04-01

    A dual aperture, off-axis catadioptic Schmidt objective is described. It is formed by symmetrically aligning two pairs of Schmidt objectives on opposite sides of a common plane (x,z). Each objective has a spherical primary mirror with a spherical focal plane and center of curvature aligned along an optic axis laterally spaced apart from the common plane. A multiprism beamsplitter with buried dichroic layers and a convex entrance and concave exit surfaces optically concentric to the center of curvature may be positioned at the focal plane. The primary mirrors of each objective may be connected rigidly together and may have equal or unequal focal lengths.

  13. Dual aperture multispectral Schmidt objective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minott, P. O. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A dual aperture, off-axis catadioptic Schmidt objective is described. It is formed by symmetrically aligning two pairs of Schmidt objectives on opposite sides of a common plane (x,z). Each objective has a spherical primary mirror with a spherical focal plane and center of curvature aligned along an optic axis laterally spaced apart from the common plane. A multiprism beamsplitter with buried dichroic layers and a convex entrance and concave exit surfaces optically concentric to the center of curvature may be positioned at the focal plane. The primary mirrors of each objective may be connected rigidly together and may have equal or unequal focal lengths.

  14. the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Bertou, Xavier

    2009-04-30

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) aims at the detection of high energy photons from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB) using the single particle technique (SPT) in ground based water Cherenkov detectors (WCD). To reach a reasonable sensitivity, high altitude mountain sites have been selected in Mexico (Sierra Negra, 4550 m a.s.l.), Bolivia (Chacaltaya, 5300 m a.s.l.) and Venezuela (Merida, 4765 m a.s.l.). We report on the project progresses and the first operation at high altitude, search for bursts in 6 months of preliminary data, as well as search for signal at ground level when satellites report a burst.

  15. Aperture scanning Fourier ptychographic microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Ou, Xiaoze; Chung, Jaebum; Horstmeyer, Roarke; Yang, Changhuei

    2016-01-01

    Fourier ptychographic microscopy (FPM) is implemented through aperture scanning by an LCOS spatial light modulator at the back focal plane of the objective lens. This FPM configuration enables the capturing of the complex scattered field for a 3D sample both in the transmissive mode and the reflective mode. We further show that by combining with the compressive sensing theory, the reconstructed 2D complex scattered field can be used to recover the 3D sample scattering density. This implementation expands the scope of application for FPM and can be beneficial for areas such as tissue imaging and wafer inspection. PMID:27570705

  16. Buckling-induced retraction of spherical shells: A study on the shape of aperture.

    PubMed

    Lin, Sen; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2015-06-22

    Buckling of soft matter is ubiquitous in nature and has attracted increasing interest recently. This paper studies the retractile behaviors of a spherical shell perforated by sophisticated apertures, attributed to the buckling-induced large deformation. The buckling patterns observed in experiments were reproduced in computational modeling by imposing velocity-controlled loads and eigenmode-affine geometric imperfection. It was found that the buckling behaviors were topologically sensitive with respect to the shape of dimple (aperture). The shell with rounded-square apertures had the maximal volume retraction ratio as well as the lowest energy consumption. An effective experimental procedure was established and the simulation results were validated in this study.

  17. Quenched Optical Transmission in Ultrathin Subwavelength Plasmonic Gratings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    PHYSICAL REVIEW B 83, 035426 (2011) Λ =a + b d 0k E ϑ x z HH = y -100 -80 -60 -40 -20 0 20 0.25 0.50 0.75 1.00 1.25 1.50 λ (μm) εr εi (a) (b) a Grating b...FIG. 1. (Color online) (a) Metallic grating made of silver with grating thickness d , slit aperture a, and grating period = a + b where b is the length...which the magnetic field H is polarized. The input grating surface is located at z = 0 and the output surface at z = d . (b) Real (εr ) and imaginary (εi

  18. Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profiler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-10-01

    Measurements of the seeing profile of the atmospheric turbulence as a function of altitude are crucial for solar astronomical site characterization, as well as the optimized design and performance estimation of solar Multi-Conjugate Adaptive Optics (MCAO). Knowledge of the seeing distribution, up to 30 km, with a potential new solar observation site, is required for future solar MCAO developments. Current optical seeing profile measurement techniques are limited by the need to use a large facility solar telescope for such seeing profile measurements, which is a serious limitation on characterizing a site's seeing conditions in terms of the seeing profile. Based on our previous work, we propose a compact solar seeing profiler called the Advanced Multiple Aperture Seeing Profile (A-MASP). A-MASP consists of two small telescopes, each with a 100 mm aperture. The two small telescopes can be installed on a commercial computerized tripod to track solar granule structures for seeing profile measurement. A-MASP is extreme simple and portable, which makes it an ideal system to bring to a potential new site for seeing profile measurements.

  19. Multiple arrested synthetic aperture radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shuster, J. S.

    1981-05-01

    This report contains the formulation and analysis of an airborne synthetic aperture rate scheme which employs a multiplicity of antennas with the displaced phase center antenna technique to detect slowly moving targets embedded in a severe clutter environment. The radar is evaluated using the target to clutter power ratio as the measure of performance. Noise is ignored in the analysis. An optimization scheme which maximizes this ratio is employed to obtain the optimum processor weighting. The performance of the MASAR processor with optimum weights is compared against that using target weights (composed of the target signal) and that using binomial weights (which, effectively, form an n-pulse canceller). Both the target and the clutter are modeled with the electric field backscattering coefficient. The target is modeled simply as a deterministically moving point scatterer with the same albedo as a point of clutter. The clutter is modeled as a homogeneous, isotropic, two dimensional, spatiotemporal random field for which only the correlation properties are required. The analysis shows that this radar, with its optimum weighting scheme, is a promising synthetic aperture concept for the detection of slowly moving targets immersed in strong clutter environments.

  20. Diffraction smoothing aperture for an optical beam

    DOEpatents

    Judd, O'Dean P.; Suydam, Bergen R.

    1976-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to an aperture for an optical beam having an irregular periphery or having perturbations imposed upon the periphery to decrease the diffraction effect caused by the beam passing through the aperture. Such apertures are particularly useful with high power solid state laser systems in that they minimize the problem of self-focusing which frequently destroys expensive components in such systems.

  1. Adaptive subwavelength control of nano-optical fields.

    PubMed

    Aeschlimann, Martin; Bauer, Michael; Bayer, Daniela; Brixner, Tobias; García de Abajo, F Javier; Pfeiffer, Walter; Rohmer, Martin; Spindler, Christian; Steeb, Felix

    2007-03-15

    Adaptive shaping of the phase and amplitude of femtosecond laser pulses has been developed into an efficient tool for the directed manipulation of interference phenomena, thus providing coherent control over various quantum-mechanical systems. Temporal resolution in the femtosecond or even attosecond range has been demonstrated, but spatial resolution is limited by diffraction to approximately half the wavelength of the light field (that is, several hundred nanometres). Theory has indicated that the spatial limitation to coherent control can be overcome with the illumination of nanostructures: the spatial near-field distribution was shown to depend on the linear chirp of an irradiating laser pulse. An extension of this idea to adaptive control, combining multiparameter pulse shaping with a learning algorithm, demonstrated the generation of user-specified optical near-field distributions in an optimal and flexible fashion. Shaping of the polarization of the laser pulse provides a particularly efficient and versatile nano-optical manipulation method. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of this concept experimentally, by tailoring the optical near field in the vicinity of silver nanostructures through adaptive polarization shaping of femtosecond laser pulses and then probing the lateral field distribution by two-photon photoemission electron microscopy. In this combination of adaptive control and nano-optics, we achieve subwavelength dynamic localization of electromagnetic intensity on the nanometre scale and thus overcome the spatial restrictions of conventional optics. This experimental realization of theoretical suggestions opens a number of perspectives in coherent control, nano-optics, nonlinear spectroscopy, and other research fields in which optical investigations are carried out with spatial or temporal resolution.

  2. Ion mobility spectrometer with virtual aperture grid

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeifer, Kent B.; Rumpf, Arthur N.

    2010-11-23

    An ion mobility spectrometer does not require a physical aperture grid to prevent premature ion detector response. The last electrodes adjacent to the ion collector (typically the last four or five) have an electrode pitch that is less than the width of the ion swarm and each of the adjacent electrodes is connected to a source of free charge, thereby providing a virtual aperture grid at the end of the drift region that shields the ion collector from the mirror current of the approaching ion swarm. The virtual aperture grid is less complex in assembly and function and is less sensitive to vibrations than the physical aperture grid.

  3. Door assembly with shear layer control aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahn, William C. (Inventor); Johnston, John T. (Inventor); Fluegel, Kyle G. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    There is described a vehicle door assembly with shear layer control for controlling the airflow in and around an aperture in the vehicle fuselage. The vehicle door assembly consists of an upper door and a lower door, both slidably mounted to the exterior surface of the vehicle fuselage. In addition, an inner door is slidably mounted beneath the upper door. Beneath the inner door is an aperture assembly having an aperture opening positionable to be substantially flush with the exterior surface of the vehicle fuselage. Also provided are means for positioning the aperture assembly in an upward and downward direction in relation to the vehicle fuselage.

  4. Advanced optics experiments using nonuniform aperture functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Lowell T.

    2013-05-01

    A method to create instructive, nonuniform aperture functions using spatial frequency filtering is described. The diffraction from a single slit in the Fresnel limit and the interference from a double slit in the Fraunhofer limit are spatially filtered to create electric field distributions across an aperture to produce apodization, inverse apodization or super-resolution, and apertures with phase shifts across their widths. The diffraction effects from these aperture functions are measured and calculated. The excellent agreement between the experimental results and the calculated results makes the experiment ideal for use in an advanced undergraduate or graduate optics laboratory to illustrate experimentally several effects in Fourier optics.

  5. Negative Transconductance in Apertured Electron Guns

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; O'Shea, P G

    2007-09-21

    Passing an electron beam through an aperture can serve to reduce the beam current or change the transverse beam profile. For a sufficiently intense beam, space charge will drive a radial expansion of the beam, which may cause the current passing through the aperture to increase even though the current arriving at the aperture is decreasing. When a gridded electron gun is used, this may be expressed by stating that the transconductance of the apertured gun is negative. Here we explain this effect, and explore some of the key factors governing when it can occur and influencing its strength.

  6. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design. PMID:27035269

  7. Record performance of electrical injection sub-wavelength metallic-cavity semiconductor lasers at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Ding, K; Hill, M T; Liu, Z C; Yin, L J; van Veldhoven, P J; Ning, C Z

    2013-02-25

    We demonstrate a continuous wave (CW) sub-wavelength metallic-cavity semiconductor laser with electrical injection at room temperature (RT). Our metal-cavity laser with a cavity volume of 0.67λ3 (λ = 1591 nm) shows a linewidth of 0.5 nm at RT, which corresponds to a Q-value of 3182 compared to 235 of the cavity Q, the highest Q under lasing condition for RT CW operation of any sub-wavelength metallic-cavity laser. Such record performance provides convincing evidences of the feasibility of RT CW sub-wavelength metallic-cavity lasers, thus opening a wide range of practical possibilities of novel nanophotonic devices based on metal-semiconductor structures.

  8. Quantum well effect based on hybridization bandgap in deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yongqiang; Li, Yunhui; Wu, Qian; Jiang, Haitao; Zhang, Yewen; Chen, Hong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, quantum well (QW) effect in a hybridization bandgap (HBG) structure via hiring deep subwavelength coupled meta-atoms is investigated. Subwavelength zero-index-metamaterial-based resonators acting as meta-atoms are side-coupled to a microstrip, forming the HBG structure. Both numerical and microwave experimental results confirm that, through properly hiring another set of meta-atoms, band mismatch between two HBGs can be introduced resulting in the HBG QW effect. Compared with the conventional QW structure based on Bragg interferences in photonic crystal, the device length of the proposed HBG QW structure can be reduced to only 1/4, demonstrating well the deep subwavelength property. Therefore, the above features make our design of HBG QW structures suitable to be utilized as multi-channel filters or multiplexers in microwave and optical communication system.

  9. Subwavelength nonlinear phase control and anomalous phase matching in plasmonic metasurfaces

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Euclides; Shalem, Guy; Prior, Yehiam

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces, and in particular those containing plasmonic-based metallic elements, constitute an attractive set of materials with a potential for replacing standard bulky optical elements. In recent years, increasing attention has been focused on their nonlinear optical properties, particularly in the context of second and third harmonic generation and beam steering by phase gratings. Here, we harness the full phase control enabled by subwavelength plasmonic elements to demonstrate a unique metasurface phase matching that is required for efficient nonlinear processes. We discuss the difference between scattering by a grating and by subwavelength phase-gradient elements. We show that for such interfaces an anomalous phase-matching condition prevails, which is the nonlinear analogue of the generalized Snell's law. The subwavelength phase control of optical nonlinearities paves the way for the design of ultrathin, flat nonlinear optical elements. We demonstrate nonlinear metasurface lenses, which act both as generators and as manipulators of the frequency-converted signal. PMID:26797164

  10. Acoustic Resonators for Far-Field Control of Sound on a Subwavelength Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lemoult, Fabrice; Fink, Mathias; Lerosey, Geoffroy

    2011-08-01

    We prove experimentally that broadband sounds can be controlled and focused at will on a subwavelength scale by using acoustic resonators. We demonstrate our approach in the audible range with soda cans, that is, Helmholtz resonators, and commercial computer speakers. We show that diffraction-limited sound fields convert efficiently into subdiffraction modes in the collection of cans that can be controlled coherently in order to obtain focal spots as thin as 1/25 of a wavelength in air. We establish that subwavelength acoustic pressure spots are responsible for a strong enhancement of the acoustic displacement at focus, which permits us to conclude with a visual experiment exemplifying the interest of our concept for subwavelength sensors and actuators.

  11. Quasiperfect absorption by subwavelength acoustic panels in transmission using accumulation of resonances due to slow sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, Noé; Romero-García, Vicent; Pagneux, Vincent; Groby, Jean-Philippe

    2017-01-01

    We theoretically and experimentally report subwavelength resonant panels for low-frequency quasiperfect sound absorption including transmission by using the accumulation of cavity resonances due to the slow sound phenomenon. The subwavelength panel is composed of periodic horizontal slits loaded by identical Helmholtz resonators (HRs). Due to the presence of the HRs, the propagation inside each slit is strongly dispersive, with near-zero phase velocity close to the resonance of the HRs. In this slow sound regime, the frequencies of the cavity modes inside the slit are down-shifted and the slit behaves as a subwavelength resonator. Moreover, due to strong dispersion, the cavity resonances accumulate at the limit of the band gap below the resonance frequency of the HRs. Near this accumulation frequency, simultaneously symmetric and antisymmetric quasicritical coupling can be achieved. In this way, using only monopolar resonators quasiperfect absorption can be obtained in a material including transmission.

  12. Far-field subwavelength imaging with near-field resonant metalens scanning at microwave frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ren; Wang, Bing-Zhong; Gong, Zhi-Shuang; Ding, Xiao

    2015-01-01

    A method for far-field subwavelength imaging at microwave frequencies using near-field resonant metalens scanning is proposed. The resonant metalens is composed of switchable split-ring resonators (SRRs). The on-SRR has a strong magnetic coupling ability and can convert evanescent waves into propagating waves using the localized resonant modes. In contrast, the off-SRR cannot achieve an effective conversion. By changing the switch status of each cell, we can obtain position information regarding the subwavelength source targets from the far field. Because the spatial response and Green’s function do not need to be measured and evaluated and only a narrow frequency band is required for the entire imaging process, this method is convenient and adaptable to various environment. This method can be used for many applications, such as subwavelength imaging, detection, and electromagnetic monitoring, in both free space and complex environments. PMID:26053074

  13. Subwavelength microwave imaging using an array of parallel conducting wires as a lens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belov, Pavel A.; Hao, Yang; Sudhakaran, Sunil

    2006-01-01

    An original realization of a lens capable of transmitting images with subwavelength resolution is proposed. The lens is formed by an array of parallel conducting wires and effectively operates as a telegraph which captures a distribution of the electric field at the front interface of the lens and transmits it to the back side without distortions. This regime of operation is called canalization and is inherent in flat lenses formed by electromagnetic crystals. The theoretical estimations are supported by numerical simulations and experimental verification. The subwavelength resolution of λ/15 and 18% bandwidth of operation are demonstrated at gigahertz frequencies. The proposed lens is capable of transporting subwavelength images without distortion to nearly unlimited distances since the influence of losses to the lens operation is negligibly small.

  14. Subwavelength nonlinear phase control and anomalous phase matching in plasmonic metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almeida, Euclides; Shalem, Guy; Prior, Yehiam

    2016-01-01

    Metasurfaces, and in particular those containing plasmonic-based metallic elements, constitute an attractive set of materials with a potential for replacing standard bulky optical elements. In recent years, increasing attention has been focused on their nonlinear optical properties, particularly in the context of second and third harmonic generation and beam steering by phase gratings. Here, we harness the full phase control enabled by subwavelength plasmonic elements to demonstrate a unique metasurface phase matching that is required for efficient nonlinear processes. We discuss the difference between scattering by a grating and by subwavelength phase-gradient elements. We show that for such interfaces an anomalous phase-matching condition prevails, which is the nonlinear analogue of the generalized Snell's law. The subwavelength phase control of optical nonlinearities paves the way for the design of ultrathin, flat nonlinear optical elements. We demonstrate nonlinear metasurface lenses, which act both as generators and as manipulators of the frequency-converted signal.

  15. Femtosecond laser-induced subwavelength ripples formed by asymmetrical grating splitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Pin; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Zhang, Kaihu; Shi, Xuesong; Li, Bo; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-05-01

    The formation process and mechanism of subwavelength ripples were studied upon irradiation of ZnO by a femtosecond laser (800 nm, 50 fs, 1 kHz). An abnormally asymmetrical grating-splitting phenomenon was discovered. At relatively high laser fluences (F = 0.51-0.63 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split asymmetrically to create subwavelength laser-induced periodic surface structures (LIPSS) with dual gaps (˜230 nm and ˜430 nm) on the primary grooves. At relatively low laser fluences (F = 0.4-0.45 J/cm2), near-wavelength ripples were split symmetrically, leading to the formation of uniform subwavelength structures with a period of ˜340 nm. The splitting phenomena are related to the varying laser beam dose induced by the overlapping during line scanning. The two grating-splitting types further imply that the dominated mechanism for LIPSS formation may be changed under different processing conditions.

  16. Leaky-Wave Radiations by Modulating Surface Impedance on Subwavelength Corrugated Metal Structures.

    PubMed

    Cai, Ben Geng; Li, Yun Bo; Ma, Hui Feng; Jiang, Wei Xiang; Cheng, Qiang; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-04-01

    One-dimensional (1D) subwavelength corrugated metal structures has been described to support spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here we demonstrate that a periodically modulated 1D subwavelength corrugated metal structure can convert spoof SPPs to propagating waves. The structure is fed at the center through a slit with a connected waveguide on the input side. The subwavelength corrugated metal structure on the output surface is regarded as metasurface and modulated periodically to realize the leaky-wave radiation at the broadside. The surface impedance of the corrugated metal structure is modulated by using cosine function and triangle-wave function, respectively, to reach the radiation effect. Full wave simulations and measuremental results are presented to validate the proposed design.

  17. Application of Ruze Equation for Inflatable Aperture Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, Bryan W.

    2008-01-01

    Inflatable aperture reflector antennas are an emerging technology that NASA is investigating for potential uses in science and exploration missions. As inflatable aperture antennas have not been proven fully qualified for space missions, they must be characterized properly so that the behavior of the antennas can be known in advance. To properly characterize the inflatable aperture antenna, testing must be performed in a relevant environment, such as a vacuum chamber. Since the capability of having a radiofrequency (RF) test facility inside a vacuum chamber did not exist at NASA Glenn Research Center, a different methodology had to be utilized. The proposal to test an inflatable aperture antenna in a vacuum chamber entailed performing a photogrammetry study of the antenna surface by using laser ranging measurements. A root-mean-square (rms) error term was derived from the photogrammetry study to calculate the antenna surface loss as described by the Ruze equation. However, initial testing showed that problems existed in using the Ruze equation to calculate the loss due to errors on the antenna surface. This study utilized RF measurements obtained in a near-field antenna range and photogrammetry data taken from a laser range scanner to compare the expected performance of the test antenna (via the Ruze equation) with the actual RF patterns and directivity measurements. Results showed that the Ruze equation overstated the degradation in the directivity calculation. Therefore, when the photogrammetry study is performed on the test antennas in the vacuum chamber, a more complex equation must be used in light of the fact that the Ruze theory overstates the loss in directivity for inflatable aperture reflector antennas.

  18. Direct writing of continuous and discontinuous sub-wavelength periodic surface structures on single-crystalline silicon using femtosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kuladeep, Rajamudili; Sahoo, Chakradhar; Narayana Rao, Desai E-mail: dnr-laserlab@yahoo.com

    2014-06-02

    Laser-induced ripples or uniform arrays of continuous near sub-wavelength or discontinuous deep sub-wavelength structures are formed on single-crystalline silicon (Si) by femtosecond (fs) laser direct writing technique. Laser irradiation was performed on Si wafers at normal incidence in air and by immersing them in dimethyl sulfoxide using linearly polarized Ti:sapphire fs laser pulses of ∼110 fs pulse duration and ∼800 nm wavelength. Morphology studies of laser written surfaces reveal that sub-wavelength features are oriented perpendicular to laser polarization, while their morphology and spatial periodicity depend on the surrounding dielectric medium. The formation mechanism of the sub-wavelength features is explained by interference of incident laser with surface plasmon polaritons. This work proves the feasibility of fs laser direct writing technique for the fabrication of sub-wavelength features, which could help in fabrication of advanced electro-optic devices.

  19. Multifocal interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Chng, Xiong Kai Benjamin; Adie, Steven G.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Scott Carney, P.

    2014-01-01

    There is an inherent trade-off between transverse resolution and depth of field (DOF) in optical coherence tomography (OCT) which becomes a limiting factor for certain applications. Multifocal OCT and interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) each provide a distinct solution to the trade-off through modification to the experiment or via post-processing, respectively. In this paper, we have solved the inverse problem of multifocal OCT and present a general algorithm for combining multiple ISAM datasets. Multifocal ISAM (MISAM) uses a regularized combination of the resampled datasets to bring advantages of both multifocal OCT and ISAM to achieve optimal transverse resolution, extended effective DOF and improved signal-to-noise ratio. We present theory, simulation and experimental results. PMID:24977909

  20. Large aperture Fresnel telescopes/011

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A., LLNL

    1998-07-16

    At Livermore we`ve spent the last two years examining an alternative approach towards very large aperture (VLA) telescopes, one based upon transmissive Fresnel lenses rather than on mirrors. Fresnel lenses are attractive for VLA telescopes because they are launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) and because they virtually eliminate the traditional, very tight, surface shape requirements faced by reflecting telescopes. Their (potentially severe) optical drawback, a very narrow spectral bandwidth, can be eliminated by use of a second (much smaller) chromatically-correcting Fresnel element. This enables Fresnel VLA telescopes to provide either single band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda} {approximately} 0.1), multiple band, or continuous spectral coverage. Building and fielding such large Fresnel lenses will present a significant challenge, but one which appears, with effort, to be solvable.

  1. Subwavelength metrological chracterization by Mueller matrix polarimeter and finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Dev, Kapil; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Wire grid polarizers (WGP), are sub-wavelength gratings with applications in display projection system due to their compact size, wide field of view and long-term stability. Measurement and testing of these structures are important to optimize their use. This is done by first measuring the Mueller matrix of the WGP using a Mueller matrix polarimeter. Next the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate a similar Mueller matrix thus providing the period and step height of the WGP. This approach may lead to more generic determination of sub-wavelength structures including diffractive optical structures.

  2. Experimental realization and modeling of a subwavelength frequency-selective plasmonic metasurface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ping-Chun; Zhao, Yang; Alù, Andrea; Yu, Edward T.

    2011-11-01

    We have modeled, fabricated, and characterized a plasmonic metasurface with subwavelength features, whose dominant resonance is the independent of incident angle and polarization, and sensitive only to the material composition and geometry of a single element. Higher-order resonances, associated with surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupling and higher diffraction orders, are sensitive to the incident angle and the array periodicity and less pronounced compared with the metasurface resonance. Numerical simulations and theoretical analysis highlight a clear physical difference between the SPP resonances and the dominant metasurface collective resonance, whose properties may be of great interest for plasmonic solar cells and subwavelength color filters.

  3. Total Internal Reflection Tomography (TIRT) for Three-Dimensional Sub-Wavelength Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fischer, David G.; Carney, P. Scott

    2002-01-01

    We will present a novel new form of near-field microscopy known as total internal reflection tomography (TIRT), which allows for true three-dimensional sub-wavelength imaging. It is based on recent theoretical advances regarding the fundamental interaction of light with sub-wavelength structures, as well as stable algorithms for the near-field inverse problem. We will discuss its theoretical underpinnings, as well describe current efforts at the NASA Glenn Research Center to implement a TIRT system for biofluid research.

  4. Detection of embedded ultra-subwavelength-thin dielectric features using elongated photonic nanojets.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, César Méndez; Simpson, Jamesina J

    2010-08-02

    Photonic nanojets have been previously shown (both theoretically and experimentally) to be highly sensitive to the presence of an ultra-subwavelength nanoscale particle within the nanojet. In the present work, photonic nanojets elongated by almost an order of magnitude (relative to the latest previously published work) are found to possess another key characteristic: they are sensitive to the presence of ultra-subwavelength nanoscale thin features embedded within a dielectric object. This additional characteristic of photonic nanojets is demonstrated through comparisons between fundamentally different 3-D and corresponding 1-D full Maxwell's equations finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) models.

  5. Terahertz imaging of sub-wavelength particles with Zenneck surface waves

    SciTech Connect

    Navarro-Cía, M.; Natrella, M.; Graham, C.; Renaud, C. C.; Seeds, A. J.; Mitrofanov, O.; Dominec, F.; Kužel, P.; Delagnes, J. C.; Mounaix, P.

    2013-11-25

    Impact of sub-wavelength-size dielectric particles on Zenneck surface waves on planar metallic antennas is investigated at terahertz (THz) frequencies with THz near-field probe microscopy. Perturbations of the surface waves show the particle presence, despite its sub-wavelength size. The experimental configuration, which utilizes excitation of surface waves at metallic edges, is suitable for THz imaging of dielectric sub-wavelength size objects. As a proof of concept, the effects of a small strontium titanate rectangular particle and a titanium dioxide sphere on the surface field of a bow-tie antenna are experimentally detected and verified using full-wave simulations.

  6. A SEASAT-A synthetic aperture imaging radar system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, R. L.; Rodgers, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    The SEASAT, a synthetic aperture imaging radar system is the first radar system of its kind designed for the study of ocean wave patterns from orbit. The basic requirement of this system is to generate continuous radar imagery with a 100 km swath with 25m resolution from an orbital altitude of 800 km. These requirements impose unique system design problems. The end to end data system described including interactions of the spacecraft, antenna, sensor, telemetry link, and data processor. The synthetic aperture radar system generates a large quantity of data requiring the use of an analog link with stable local oscillator encoding. The problems associated in telemetering the radar information with sufficient fidelity to synthesize an image on the ground is described as well as the selected solutions to the problems.

  7. A system model and inversion for synthetic aperture radar imaging.

    PubMed

    Soumekh, M

    1992-01-01

    A system model and its corresponding inversion for synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging are presented. The system model incorporates the spherical nature of a radar's radiation pattern at far field. The inverse method based on this model performs a spatial Fourier transform (Doppler processing) on the recorded signals with respect to the available coordinates of a translational radar (SAR) or target (inverse SAR). It is shown that the transformed data provide samples of the spatial Fourier transform of the target's reflectivity function. The inverse method can be modified to incorporate deviations of the radar's motion from its prescribed straight line path. The effects of finite aperture on resolution, reconstruction, and sampling constraints for the imaging problem are discussed.

  8. Enhanced Optical Transmission with Coaxial Apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haftel, Michael; Schlockermann, Carl; Orbons, Shannon; Roberts, Ann; Jamieson, David; Freeman, Darren; Luther-Davies, Barry

    2007-03-01

    Recently it has been shown that ``cylindrical'' surface plasmons (CSP's) on cylindrical interfaces of coaxial ring apertures produce a new form of extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) that extends to ever increasing wavelengths as the dielectric ring narrows. Using analytic and FDTD calculations we present some of the consequences of CSP's on EOT as well as experimental confirmation of such effects. We find that EOT, even with cylindrical apertures, is aided by the increase in cutoff wavelength due to CSP's, which is a consequence of the mode structure of individual apertures. CSP effects also explain most of the long-wavelength features of transmission spectra measured for CR apertures. We also show that CSP's can be ``spoofed'' at low frequencies by coaxial apertures in metamaterials consisting of a (macroscopic) periodic dielectric structure embedded in a perfect conductor. F. I. Baida et al., Phys. Rev. B 67, 155314 (2003); M.I Haftel et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 88, 193104 (2006).

  9. Variable aperture collimator for high energy radiation

    DOEpatents

    Hill, Ronald A.

    1984-05-22

    An apparatus is disclosed providing a variable aperture energy beam collimator. A plurality of beam opaque blocks are in sliding interface edge contact to form a variable aperture. The blocks may be offset at the apex angle to provide a non-equilateral aperture. A plurality of collimator block assemblies may be employed for providing a channel defining a collimated beam. Adjacent assemblies are inverted front-to-back with respect to one another for preventing noncollimated energy from emerging from the apparatus. An adjustment mechanism comprises a cable attached to at least one block and a hand wheel mechanism for operating the cable. The blocks are supported by guide rods engaging slide brackets on the blocks. The guide rods are pivotally connected at each end to intermediate actuators supported on rotatable shafts to change the shape of the aperture. A divergent collimated beam may be obtained by adjusting the apertures of adjacent stages to be unequal.

  10. Micro Ring Grating Spectrometer with Adjustable Aperture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A spectrometer includes a micro-ring grating device having coaxially-aligned ring gratings for diffracting incident light onto a target focal point, a detection device for detecting light intensity, one or more actuators, and an adjustable aperture device defining a circular aperture. The aperture circumscribes a target focal point, and directs a light to the detection device. The aperture device is selectively adjustable using the actuators to select a portion of a frequency band for transmission to the detection device. A method of detecting intensity of a selected band of incident light includes directing incident light onto coaxially-aligned ring gratings of a micro-ring grating device, and diffracting the selected band onto a target focal point using the ring gratings. The method includes using an actuator to adjust an aperture device and pass a selected portion of the frequency band to a detection device for measuring the intensity of the selected portion.

  11. Performance limits of ion extraction systems with non-circular apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shagayda, A.; Madeev, S.

    2016-04-01

    A three-dimensional computer simulation is used to determine the perveance limitations of ion extraction systems with non-circular apertures. The objective of the study is to analyze the possibilities to improve mechanical strength of the ion optics made of carbon-carbon composite materials. Non-circular grid apertures are better suited to the physical structure of carbon-carbon composite materials, than conventionally used circular holes in a hexagonal pattern, because they allow a fewer number of cut fibers. However, the slit-type accelerating systems, usually regarded as the main alternative to the conventional ion optics, have an intolerably narrow range of operating perveance values at which there is no direct ion impingement on the acceleration grid. This paper presents results of comparative analysis of a number of different ion optical systems with non-circular apertures and conventional ion optical systems with circular apertures. It has been revealed that a relatively wide perveance range without direct ion impingement may be obtained with apertures shaped as a square with rounded corners. Numerical simulations show that this geometry may have equivalent perveance range as the traditional geometry with circular apertures while being more mechanically robust. In addition, such important characteristics, as the effective transparency for both the ions and the neutral atoms, the height of the potential barrier reflecting the downstream plasma electrons and the angular divergence of the beamlet also can be very close to these parameters for the optics with circular apertures.

  12. Synthetic-Aperture Silhouette Imaging (SASI)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxman, R.

    2016-09-01

    The problem of ground-based fine-resolution imaging of geosynchronous satellites continues to be an important unsolved space-surveillance problem. We are investigating a passive-illumination approach that is radically different from amplitude, intensity, or heterodyne interferometry approaches. The approach, called Synthetic-Aperture Silhouette Imaging (SASI), produces a fine-resolution image of the satellite silhouette. When plane-wave radiation emanating from a bright star is occluded by a GEO satellite, then the light is diffracted and a moving diffraction pattern (shadow) is cast on the surface of the earth. With prior knowledge of the satellite orbit and star location, the track of the moving shadow can be predicted with high precision. A linear array of inexpensive hobby telescopes can be deployed roughly perpendicular to the shadow track to collect a time history of the star intensity as the shadow passes by. A phase-retrieval algorithm, using the strong constraint that the occlusion of the satellite is a binary-valued silhouette, allows us to retrieve the missing phase and reconstruct a fine-resolution image of the silhouette. Silhouettes are highly informative, providing diagnostic information about deployment of antennas and solar panels, enabling satellite pose estimation, and revealing the presence and orientation of neighboring satellites in rendezvous and proximity operations.

  13. Forensic Facial Reconstruction: Relationship Between the Alar Cartilage and Piriform Aperture.

    PubMed

    Strapasson, Raíssa Ananda Paim; Herrera, Lara Maria; Melani, Rodolfo Francisco Haltenhoff

    2017-03-29

    During forensic facial reconstruction, facial features may be predicted based on the parameters of the skull. This study evaluated the relationships between alar cartilage and piriform aperture and nose morphology and facial typology. Ninety-six cone beam computed tomography images of Brazilian subjects (49 males and 47 females) were used in this study. OsiriX software was used to perform the following measurements: nasal width, distance between alar base insertion points, lower width of the piriform aperture, and upper width of the piriform aperture. Nasal width was associated with the lower width of the piriform aperture, sex, skeletal vertical pattern of the face, and age. The current study contributes to the improvement of forensic facial guides by identifying the relationships between the alar cartilages and characteristics of the biological profile of members of a population that has been little studied thus far.

  14. Full-Color Subwavelength Printing with Gap-Plasmonic Optical Antennas.

    PubMed

    Miyata, Masashi; Hatada, Hideaki; Takahara, Junichi

    2016-05-11

    Metallic nanostructures can be designed to effectively reflect different colors at deep-subwavelength scales. Such color manipulation is attractive for applications such as subwavelength color printing; however, challenges remain in creating saturated colors with a general and intuitive design rule. Here, we propose a simple design approach based on all-aluminum gap-plasmonic nanoantennas, which is capable of designing colors using knowledge of the optical properties of the individual antennas. We demonstrate that the individual-antenna properties that feature strong light absorption at two distinct frequencies can be encoded into a single subwavelength-pixel, enabling the creation of saturated colors, as well as a dark color in reflection, at the optical diffraction limit. The suitability of the designed color pixels for subwavelength printing applications is demonstrated by showing microscopic letters in color, the incident polarization and angle insensitivity, and color durability. Coupled with the low cost and long-term stability of aluminum, the proposed design strategy could be useful in creating microscale images for security purposes, high-density optical data storage, and nanoscale optical elements.

  15. Integrated narrowband optical filter based on embedded subwavelength resonant grating structures

    DOEpatents

    Grann, Eric B.; Sitter, Jr., David N.

    2000-01-01

    A resonant grating structure in a waveguide and methods of tuning the performance of the grating structure are described. An apparatus includes a waveguide; and a subwavelength resonant grating structure embedded in the waveguide. The systems and methods provide advantages including narrowband filtering capabilities, minimal sideband reflections, spatial control, high packing density, and tunability.

  16. Finding Optimal Apertures in Kepler Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Jeffrey C.; Morris, Robert L.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Girouard, Forrest R.

    2016-12-01

    With the loss of two spacecraft reaction wheels precluding further data collection for the Kepler primary mission, even greater pressure is placed on the processing pipeline to eke out every last transit signal in the data. To that end, we have developed a new method to optimize the Kepler Simple Aperture Photometry (SAP) photometric apertures for both planet detection and minimization of systematic effects. The approach uses a per cadence modeling of the raw pixel data and then performs an aperture optimization based on signal-to-noise ratio and the Kepler Combined Differential Photometric Precision (CDPP), which is a measure of the noise over the duration of a reference transit signal. We have found the new apertures to be superior to the previous Kepler apertures. We can now also find a per cadence flux fraction in aperture and crowding metric. The new approach has also been proven to be robust at finding apertures in K2 data that help mitigate the larger motion-induced systematics in the photometry. The method further allows us to identify errors in the Kepler and K2 input catalogs.

  17. Walking through Apertures in Individuals with Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Higuchi, Takahiro

    2017-01-01

    Objective Walking through a narrow aperture requires unique postural configurations, i.e., body rotation in the yaw dimension. Stroke individuals may have difficulty performing the body rotations due to motor paralysis on one side of their body. The present study was therefore designed to investigate how successfully such individuals walk through apertures and how they perform body rotation behavior. Method Stroke fallers (n = 10), stroke non-fallers (n = 13), and healthy controls (n = 23) participated. In the main task, participants walked for 4 m and passed through apertures of various widths (0.9–1.3 times the participant’s shoulder width). Accidental contact with the frame of an aperture and kinematic characteristics at the moment of aperture crossing were measured. Participants also performed a perceptual judgment task to measure the accuracy of their perceived aperture passability. Results and Discussion Stroke fallers made frequent contacts on their paretic side; however, the contacts were not frequent when they penetrated apertures from their paretic side. Stroke fallers and non-fallers rotated their body with multiple steps, rather than a single step, to deal with their motor paralysis. Although the minimum passable width was greater for stroke fallers, the body rotation angle was comparable among groups. This suggests that frequent contact in stroke fallers was due to insufficient body rotation. The fact that there was no significant group difference in the perceived aperture passability suggested that contact occurred mainly due to locomotor factors rather than perceptual factors. Two possible explanations (availability of vision and/or attention) were provided as to why accidental contact on the paretic side did not occur frequently when stroke fallers penetrated the apertures from their paretic side. PMID:28103299

  18. Passive microwave imaging by aperture synthesis technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Liang; Zhang, Zuyin; Guo, Wei; Gui, Liangqi

    2007-11-01

    In order to verify the theory of aperture synthesis at low expense, two-channel ka-band correlation radiometer which is basic part of synthetic aperture radiometer is designed firstly before developing the multi-channel synthetic aperture radiometer. The performance of two-channel correlation radiometer such as stability and coherence of visibility phase are tested in the digital correlation experiment. Subsequently all required baselines are acquired by moving the antenna pair sequentially, corresponding samples of the visibility function are measured and the image of noise source is constructed using an inverse Fourier transformation.

  19. Fabrication and THz loss measurements of porous subwavelength fibers using a directional coupler method.

    PubMed

    Dupuis, Alexandre; Allard, Jean-François; Morris, Denis; Stoeffler, Karen; Dubois, Charles; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2009-05-11

    We report several strategies for the fabrication of porous subwavelength fibers using low density Polyethylene plastic for low-loss terahertz light transmission applications. We also characterize transmission losses of the fabricated fibers in terahertz using a novel non-destructive directional coupler method. Within this method a second fiber is translated along the length of the test fiber to probe the power attenuation of a guided mode. The method is especially suitable for measuring transmission losses through short fiber segments, a situation in which standard cutback method is especially difficult to perform. We demonstrate experimentally that introduction of porosity into a subwavelength rod fiber, further reduces its transmission loss by as much as a factor of 10. The lowest fiber loss measured in this work is 0.01 cm(-1) and it is exhibited by the 40% porous subwavelength fiber of diameter 380 microm. For comparison, the loss of a rod-in-the-air subwavelength fiber of a similar diameter was measured to be approximately 0.1 cm(-1), while the bulk loss of a PE plastic used in the fabrication of such fibers is >or= 1 cm(-1). Finally, we present theoretical studies of the optical properties of individual subwavelength fibers and a directional coupler. From these studies we conclude that coupler setup studied in this paper also acts as a low pass filter with a cutoff frequency around 0.3 THz. Considering that the spectrum of a terahertz source used in this work falls off rapidly below 0.25 THz, the reported loss measurements are, thus, the bolometer averages over the approximately 0.25 THz-0.3 THz region.

  20. An implementation of synthetic aperture focusing technique in frequency domain.

    PubMed

    Stepinski, Tadeusz

    2007-07-01

    A new implementation of a synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT) based on concepts used in synthetic aperture radar and sonar is presented in the paper. The algorithm, based on the convolution model of the imaging system developed in frequency domain, accounts for the beam pattern of the finite-sized transducer used in the synthetic aperture. The 2D fast Fourier transform (FFT) is used for the calculation of a 2D spectrum of the ultrasonic data. The spectrum is then interpolated to convert the polar coordinate system used for the acquisition of ultrasonic signals to the rectangular coordinates used for the presentation of imaging results. After compensating the transducer lobe amplitude profile using a Wiener filter, the transformed spectrum is subjected to the 2D inverse Fourier transform to get the time-domain image again. The algorithm is computationally attractive due to the use of 2D FFT. The performance of the proposed frequency-domain algorithm and the classical time-domain SAFT are compared in the paper using simulated and real ultrasonic data.

  1. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2016-01-01

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and “cutting” into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size. PMID:27185385

  2. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E.

    2016-05-01

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and “cutting” into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size.

  3. Feasibility demonstration of a massively parallelizable optical near-field sensor for sub-wavelength defect detection and imaging.

    PubMed

    Mostafavi, Mahkamehossadat; Diaz, Rodolfo E

    2016-05-17

    To detect and resolve sub-wavelength features at optical frequencies, beyond the diffraction limit, requires sensors that interact with the electromagnetic near-field of those features. Most instruments operating in this modality scan a single detector element across the surface under inspection because the scattered signals from a multiplicity of such elements would end up interfering with each other. However, an alternative massively parallelized configuration, capable of interrogating multiple adjacent areas of the surface at the same time, was proposed in 2002. Full physics simulations of the photonic antenna detector element that enables this instrument, show that using conventional red laser light (in the 600 nm range) the detector magnifies the signal from an 8 nm particle by up to 1.5 orders of magnitude. The antenna is a shaped slot element in a 60 nm silver film. The ability of this detector element to resolve λ/78 objects is confirmed experimentally at radio frequencies by fabricating an artificial material structure that mimics the optical permittivity of silver scaled to 2 GHz, and "cutting" into it the slot antenna. The experimental set-up is also used to demonstrate the imaging of a patterned surface in which the critical dimensions of the pattern are λ/22 in size.

  4. Control of aperture closure during reach-to-grasp movements in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Rand, M K; Smiley-Oyen, A L; Shimansky, Y P; Bloedel, J R; Stelmach, G E

    2006-01-01

    This study examined whether the pattern of coordination between arm-reaching toward an object (hand transport) and the initiation of aperture closure for grasping is different between PD patients and healthy individuals, and whether that pattern is affected by the necessity to quickly adjust the reach-to-grasp movement in response to an unexpected shift of target location. Subjects reached for and grasped a vertical dowel, the location of which was indicated by illuminating one of the three dowels placed on a horizontal plane. In control conditions, target location was fixed during the trial. In perturbation conditions, target location was shifted instantaneously by switching the illumination to a different dowel during the reach. The hand distance from the target at which the subject initiated aperture closure (aperture closure distance) was similar for both the control and perturbation conditions within each group of subjects. However, that distance was significantly closer to the target in the PD group than in the control group. The timing of aperture closure initiation varied considerably across the trials in both groups of subjects. In contrast, aperture closure distance was relatively invariant, suggesting that aperture closure initiation was determined by spatial parameters of arm kinematics rather than temporal parameters. The linear regression analysis of aperture closure distance showed that the distance was highly predictable based on the following three parameters: the amplitude of maximum grip aperture, hand velocity, and hand acceleration. This result implies that a control law, the arguments of which include the above parameters, governs the initiation of aperture closure. Further analysis revealed that the control law was very similar between the subject groups under each condition as well as between the control and perturbation conditions for each group. Consequently, the shorter aperture closure distance observed in PD patients apparently is a

  5. Synthetic Aperture Radar Missions Study Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bard, S.

    2000-01-01

    This report reviews the history of the LightSAR project and summarizes actions the agency can undertake to support industry-led efforts to develop an operational synthetic aperture radar (SAR) capability in the United States.

  6. An empirical explanation of aperture effects.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyongje; Wojtach, William T; Purves, Dale

    2009-01-06

    The perceived direction of a moving line changes, often markedly, when viewed through an aperture. Although several explanations of this remarkable effect have been proposed, these accounts typically focus on the percepts elicited by a particular type of aperture and offer no biological rationale. Here, we test the hypothesis that to contend with the inherently ambiguous nature of motion stimuli the perceived direction of objects moving behind apertures of different shapes is determined by a wholly empirical strategy of visual processing. An analysis of moving line stimuli generated by objects projected through apertures shows that the directions of motion subjects report in psychophysical testing is accounted for by the frequency of occurrence of the 2D directions of stimuli generated by simulated 3D sources. The completeness of these predictions supports the conclusion that the direction of perceived motion is fully determined by accumulated behavioral experience with sources whose physical motions cannot be conveyed by image sequences as such.

  7. Contour-Mapping Synthetic-Aperture Radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldstein, R. M.; Caro, E. R.; Wu, C.

    1985-01-01

    Airborne two-antenna synthetic-aperture-radar (SAR) interferometric system provides data processed to yield terrain elevation as well as reflectedintensity information. Relative altitudes of terrain points measured to within error of approximately 25 m.

  8. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Y.W.; Wiedermann, A.H.; Ockert, C.E.

    1983-08-26

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  9. Shock wave absorber having apertured plate

    DOEpatents

    Shin, Yong W.; Wiedermann, Arne H.; Ockert, Carl E.

    1985-01-01

    The shock or energy absorber disclosed herein utilizes an apertured plate maintained under the normal level of liquid flowing in a piping system and disposed between the normal liquid flow path and a cavity pressurized with a compressible gas. The degree of openness (or porosity) of the plate is between 0.01 and 0.60. The energy level of a shock wave travelling down the piping system thus is dissipated by some of the liquid being jetted through the apertured plate toward the cavity. The cavity is large compared to the quantity of liquid jetted through the apertured plate, so there is little change in its volume. The porosity of the apertured plate influences the percentage of energy absorbed.

  10. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes.

    PubMed

    Hyde, R A

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25-100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band (Deltalambda/lambda approximately 0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage.

  11. Eyeglass. 1. Very large aperture diffractive telescopes

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, R.A.

    1999-07-01

    The Eyeglass is a very large aperture (25{endash}100-m) space telescope consisting of two distinct spacecraft, separated in space by several kilometers. A diffractive lens provides the telescope{close_quote}s large aperture, and a separate, much smaller, space telescope serves as its mobile eyepiece. Use of a transmissive diffractive lens solves two basic problems associated with very large aperture space telescopes; it is inherently launchable (lightweight, packagable, and deployable) it and virtually eliminates the traditional, very tight surface shape tolerances faced by reflecting apertures. The potential drawback to use of a diffractive primary (very narrow spectral bandwidth) is eliminated by corrective optics in the telescope{close_quote}s eyepiece; the Eyeglass can provide diffraction-limited imaging with either single-band ({Delta}{lambda}/{lambda}{approximately}0.1), multiband, or continuous spectral coverage. {copyright} 1999 Optical Society of America

  12. Active multi-aperture imaging through turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Nicholas J.; Widiker, Jeffrey J.; McManamon, Paul F.; Haus, Joseph W.

    2012-06-01

    We describe our Innovative Multi Aperture Gimbaless Electro-Optical (IMAGE) testbed which uses coherent detection of the complex field reflected off a diffuse target with seven hexagonally arranged apertures. The seven measured optical fields are then phased with a digital optimization algorithm to synthesize a composite image whose angular resolution exceeds that of a single aperture. This same post-detection phasing algorithm also corrects aberrations induced by imperfect optics and a turbulent atmospheric path. We present the coherent imaging sub-aperture design used in the IMAGE array as well as the design of a compact range used to perform scaled tests of the IMAGE array. We present some experimental results of imaging diffuse targets in the compact range with two phase screens which simulates a ~7[Km] propagation path through distributed atmospheric turbulence.

  13. Very Large Aperture Diffractive Space Telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, Roderick Allen

    1998-04-20

    A very large (10's of meters) aperture space telescope including two separate spacecraft--an optical primary functioning as a magnifying glass and an optical secondary functioning as an eyepiece. The spacecraft are spaced up to several kilometers apart with the eyepiece directly behind the magnifying glass ''aiming'' at an intended target with their relative orientation determining the optical axis of the telescope and hence the targets being observed. The magnifying glass includes a very large-aperture, very-thin-membrane, diffractive lens, e.g., a Fresnel lens, which intercepts incoming light over its full aperture and focuses it towards the eyepiece. The eyepiece has a much smaller, meter-scale aperture and is designed to move along the focal surface of the magnifying glass, gathering up the incoming light and converting it to high quality images. The positions of the two space craft are controlled both to maintain a good optical focus and to point at desired targets.

  14. Movable aperture lensless transmission microscopy: a novel phase retrieval algorithm.

    PubMed

    Faulkner, H M L; Rodenburg, J M

    2004-07-09

    We propose an iterative phase retrieval method that uses a series of diffraction patterns, measured only in intensity, to solve for both amplitude and phase of the image wave function over a wide field of view and at wavelength-limited resolution. The new technique requires an aperture that is scanned to two or more positions over the object wave function. A simple implementation of the method is modeled and demonstrated, showing how the algorithm uses overlapping data in real space to resolve ambiguities in the solution. The technique opens up the possibility of practical transmission lensless microscopy at subatomic resolution using electrons, x rays, or nuclear particles.

  15. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal.

  16. Aperture Engineering for Impulse Radiating Antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyo, J. S.

    The past several years have seen the development of an improved understanding of the role of aperture design for impulse radiating antennas (IRAs). The understanding began with the emergence of the concept of prompt aperture efficiency for ultra-wideband (UWB) antennas. This emergence allowed us to concentrate on ways to shape the aperture and control the field distribution within the aperture in order to maximize the prompt response from IRAs. In many high voltage UWB applications it is impossible to increase the radiated fields by increasing the source power. This is because in such instances the sources are already at the limits of linear electromagnetics. In these cases, we would like to come up with methods to improve the radiated field without altering the input impedance of the IRA. In this paper we will explore several such methods including the position of the feed arms to maximize field uniformity, the shaping of the aperture to increase radiated fields by reducing the aperture size, the relative sizing of the reflector (or lens) and the feed horn, and actually reorienting the currents on the reflector by controlling the direction of current flow. One common thread appears in all of these studies, that is the influence of Dr. Carl Baum on the direction and development of the work.

  17. Application of a geocentrifuge and sterolithographically fabricated apertures to multiphase flow in complex fracture apertures.

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn E. McCreery; Robert D. Stedtfeld; Alan T. Stadler; Daphne L. Stoner; Paul Meakin

    2005-09-01

    A geotechnical centrifuge was used to investigate unsaturated multiphase fluid flow in synthetic fracture apertures under a variety of flow conditions. The geocentrifuge subjected the fluids to centrifugal forces allowing the Bond number to be systematically changed without adjusting the fracture aperture of the fluids. The fracture models were based on the concept that surfaces generated by the fracture of brittle geomaterials have a self-affine fractal geometry. The synthetic fracture surfaces were fabricated from a transparent epoxy photopolymer using sterolithography, and fluid flow through the transparent fracture models was monitored by an optical image acquisition system. Aperture widths were chosen to be representative of the wide range of geological fractures in the vesicular basalt that lies beneath the Idaho Nation Laboratory (INL). Transitions between different flow regimes were observed as the acceleration was changed under constant flow conditions. The experiments showed the transition between straight and meandering rivulets in smooth walled apertures (aperture width = 0.508 mm), the dependence of the rivulet width on acceleration in rough walled fracture apertures (average aperture width = 0.25 mm), unstable meandering flow in rough walled apertures at high acceleration (20g) and the narrowing of the wetted region with increasing acceleration during the penetration of water into an aperture filled with wetted particles (0.875 mm diameter glass spheres).

  18. Apparent apertures from ground penetrating radar data and their relation to heterogeneous aperture fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakas, A.; Linde, N.

    2017-03-01

    Considering fractures with heterogeneous aperture distributions, we explore the reliability of constant-aperture estimates derived from ground penetrating radar (GPR) reflection data. We generate geostatistical fracture aperture realizations that are characterized by the same mean-aperture and variance, but different Hurst exponents and cutoff lengths. For each of the 16 classes of heterogeneity considered, we generate 1000 fracture realizations from which we compute GPR reflection data using our recent effective-dipole forward model. We then use each (noise-contaminated) dataset individually to invert for a single 'apparent' aperture, i.e., we assume that the fracture aperture is homogeneous. We find that the inferred 'apparent' apertures are only reliable when fracture heterogeneity is non-fractal (the Hurst exponent is close to 1) and the scale of the dominant aperture heterogeneities is larger than the first Fresnel zone. These results are a direct consequence of the non-linear character of the thin-bed reflection coefficients. As fracture heterogeneity is ubiquitous and often fractal, our results suggest that robust field-based inference of fracture aperture can only be achieved by accounting for the non-linear response of fracture heterogeneity on GPR data.

  19. Large Metasurface Aperture for Millimeter Wave Computational Imaging at the Human-Scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gollub, J. N.; Yurduseven, O.; Trofatter, K. P.; Arnitz, D.; F. Imani, M.; Sleasman, T.; Boyarsky, M.; Rose, A.; Pedross-Engel, A.; Odabasi, H.; Zvolensky, T.; Lipworth, G.; Brady, D.; Marks, D. L.; Reynolds, M. S.; Smith, D. R.

    2017-02-01

    We demonstrate a low-profile holographic imaging system at millimeter wavelengths based on an aperture composed of frequency-diverse metasurfaces. Utilizing measurements of spatially-diverse field patterns, diffraction-limited images of human-sized subjects are reconstructed. The system is driven by a single microwave source swept over a band of frequencies (17.5–26.5 GHz) and switched between a collection of transmit and receive metasurface panels. High fidelity image reconstruction requires a precise model for each field pattern generated by the aperture, as well as the manner in which the field scatters from objects in the scene. This constraint makes scaling of computational imaging systems inherently challenging for electrically large, coherent apertures. To meet the demanding requirements, we introduce computational methods and calibration approaches that enable rapid and accurate imaging performance.

  20. Large Metasurface Aperture for Millimeter Wave Computational Imaging at the Human-Scale.

    PubMed

    Gollub, J N; Yurduseven, O; Trofatter, K P; Arnitz, D; F Imani, M; Sleasman, T; Boyarsky, M; Rose, A; Pedross-Engel, A; Odabasi, H; Zvolensky, T; Lipworth, G; Brady, D; Marks, D L; Reynolds, M S; Smith, D R

    2017-02-20

    We demonstrate a low-profile holographic imaging system at millimeter wavelengths based on an aperture composed of frequency-diverse metasurfaces. Utilizing measurements of spatially-diverse field patterns, diffraction-limited images of human-sized subjects are reconstructed. The system is driven by a single microwave source swept over a band of frequencies (17.5-26.5 GHz) and switched between a collection of transmit and receive metasurface panels. High fidelity image reconstruction requires a precise model for each field pattern generated by the aperture, as well as the manner in which the field scatters from objects in the scene. This constraint makes scaling of computational imaging systems inherently challenging for electrically large, coherent apertures. To meet the demanding requirements, we introduce computational methods and calibration approaches that enable rapid and accurate imaging performance.

  1. Large Metasurface Aperture for Millimeter Wave Computational Imaging at the Human-Scale

    PubMed Central

    Gollub, J. N.; Yurduseven, O.; Trofatter, K. P.; Arnitz, D.; F. Imani, M.; Sleasman, T.; Boyarsky, M.; Rose, A.; Pedross-Engel, A.; Odabasi, H.; Zvolensky, T.; Lipworth, G.; Brady, D.; Marks, D. L.; Reynolds, M. S.; Smith, D. R.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate a low-profile holographic imaging system at millimeter wavelengths based on an aperture composed of frequency-diverse metasurfaces. Utilizing measurements of spatially-diverse field patterns, diffraction-limited images of human-sized subjects are reconstructed. The system is driven by a single microwave source swept over a band of frequencies (17.5–26.5 GHz) and switched between a collection of transmit and receive metasurface panels. High fidelity image reconstruction requires a precise model for each field pattern generated by the aperture, as well as the manner in which the field scatters from objects in the scene. This constraint makes scaling of computational imaging systems inherently challenging for electrically large, coherent apertures. To meet the demanding requirements, we introduce computational methods and calibration approaches that enable rapid and accurate imaging performance. PMID:28218254

  2. Time-reversing a monochromatic subwavelength optical focus by optical phase conjugation of multiply-scattered light

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jongchan; Park, Chunghyun; Lee, KyeoReh; Cho, Yong-Hoon; Park, YongKeun

    2017-01-01

    Due to its time-reversal nature, optical phase conjugation generates a monochromatic light wave which retraces its propagation paths. Here, we demonstrate the regeneration of a subwavelength optical focus by phase conjugation. Monochromatic light from a subwavelength source is scattered by random nanoparticles, and the scattered light is phase conjugated at the far-field region by coupling its wavefront into a single-mode optical reflector using a spatial light modulator. Then the conjugated beam retraces its propagation paths and forms a refocus on the source at the subwavelength scale. This is the first direct experimental realisation of subwavelength focusing beyond the diffraction limit with far-field time reversal in the optical domain. PMID:28134267

  3. Directional synthetic aperture flow imaging.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Nikolov, Svetoslav Ivanov

    2004-09-01

    A method for flow estimation using synthetic aperture imaging and focusing along the flow direction is presented. The method can find the correct velocity magnitude for any flow angle, and full color flow images can be measured using only 32 to 128 pulse emissions. The approach uses spherical wave emissions with a number of defocused elements and a linear frequency-modulated pulse (chirp) to improve the signal-to-noise ratio. The received signals are dynamically focused along the flow direction and these signals are used in a cross-correlation estimator for finding the velocity magnitude. The flow angle is manually determined from the B-mode image. The approach can be used for both tissue and blood velocity determination. The approach was investigated using both simulations and a flow system with a laminar flow. The flow profile was measured with a commercial 7.5 MHz linear array transducer. A plastic tube with an internal diameter of 17 mm was used with an EcoWatt 1 pump generating a laminar, stationary flow. The velocity profile was measured for flow angles of 90 and 60 degrees. The RASMUS research scanner was used for acquiring radio frequency (RF) data from 128 elements of the array, using 8 emissions with 11 elements in each emission. A 20-micros chirp was used during emission. The RF data were subsequently beamformed off-line and stationary echo canceling was performed. The 60-degree flow with a peak velocity of 0.15 m/s was determined using 16 groups of 8 emissions, and the relative standard deviation was 0.36% (0.65 mm/s). Using the same setup for purely transverse flow gave a standard deviation of 1.2% (2.1 mm/s). Variation of the different parameters revealed the sensitivity to number of lines, angle deviations, length of correlation interval, and sampling interval. An in vivo image of the carotid artery and jugular vein of a healthy 29-year-old volunteer was acquired. A full color flow image using only 128 emissions could be made with a high

  4. Reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation of visible light based on a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Chi-Young; Yi, Yoonsik; Choi, Choon-Gi

    2016-03-01

    We present a method for reflection-type spatial amplitude modulation using a sub-wavelength plasmonic absorber structure that can operate in the visible region. We utilize a pixelated array of absorbing elements based on a two-dimensional sub-wavelength metal grating, and the reflectance of each pixel is controlled by simple structural modification. For the purpose of validation, numerical simulations were performed on an amplitude modulation hologram fabricated using our method.

  5. Image quality affected by diffraction of aperture structure arrangement in transparent active-matrix organic light-emitting diode displays.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Yu-Hsiang; Huang, Mao-Hsiu; Jeng, Wei-de; Huang, Ting-Wei; Lo, Kuo-Lung; Ou-Yang, Mang

    2015-10-01

    Transparent display is one of the main technologies in next-generation displays, especially for augmented reality applications. An aperture structure is attached on each display pixel to partition them into transparent and black regions. However, diffraction blurs caused by the aperture structure typically degrade the transparent image when the light from a background object passes through finite aperture window. In this paper, the diffraction effect of an active-matrix organic light-emitting diode display (AMOLED) is studied. Several aperture structures have been proposed and implemented. Based on theoretical analysis and simulation, the appropriate aperture structure will effectively reduce the blur. The analysis data are also consistent with the experimental results. Compared with the various transparent aperture structure on AMOLED, diffraction width (zero energy position of diffraction pattern) of the optimize aperture structure can be reduced 63% and 31% in the x and y directions in CASE 3. Associated with a lenticular lens on the aperture structure, the improvement could reach to 77% and 54% of diffraction width in the x and y directions. Modulation transfer function and practical images are provided to evaluate the improvement of image blurs.

  6. Deployable Wide-Aperture Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W.; Dobbins, Justin A.; Lin, Greg Y.; Chu, Andrew; Scully, Robert C.

    2005-01-01

    Inexpensive, lightweight array antennas on flexible substrates are under development to satisfy a need for large-aperture antennas that can be stored compactly during transport and deployed to full size in the field. Conceived for use aboard spacecraft, antennas of this type also have potential terrestrial uses . most likely, as means to extend the ranges of cellular telephones in rural settings. Several simple deployment mechanisms are envisioned. One example is shown in the figure, where the deployment mechanism, a springlike material contained in a sleeve around the perimeter of a flexible membrane, is based on a common automobile window shade. The array can be formed of antenna elements that are printed on small sections of semi-flexible laminates, or preferably, elements that are constructed of conducting fabric. Likewise, a distribution network connecting the elements can be created from conventional technologies such as lightweight, flexible coaxial cable and a surface mount power divider, or preferably, from elements formed from conductive fabrics. Conventional technologies may be stitched onto a supporting flexible membrane or contained within pockets that are stitched onto a flexible membrane. Components created from conductive fabrics may be attached by stitching conductive strips to a nonconductive membrane, embroidering conductive threads into a nonconductive membrane, or weaving predetermined patterns directly into the membrane. The deployable antenna may comprise multiple types of antenna elements. For example, thin profile antenna elements above a ground plane, both attached to the supporting flexible membrane, can be used to create a unidirectional boresight radiation pattern. Or, antenna elements without a ground plane, such as bow-tie dipoles, can be attached to the membrane to create a bidirectional array such as that shown in the figure. For either type of antenna element, the dual configuration, i.e., elements formed of slots in a conductive

  7. Programmable Aperture with MEMS Microshutter Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, Samuel; Li, Mary; Kutyrev, Alexander; Kletetschka, Gunther; Fettig, Rainer

    2011-01-01

    A microshutter array (MSA) has been developed for use as an aperture array for multi-object selections in James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) technology. Light shields, molybdenum nitride (MoN) coating on shutters, and aluminum/aluminum oxide coatings on interior walls are put on each shutter for light leak prevention, and to enhance optical contrast. Individual shutters are patterned with a torsion flexure that permits shutters to open 90 deg. with a minimized mechanical stress concentration. The shutters are actuated magnetically, latched, and addressed electrostatically. Also, micromechanical features are tailored onto individual shutters to prevent stiction. An individual shutter consists of a torsion hinge, a shutter blade, a front electrode that is coated on the shutter blade, a backside electrode that is coated on the interior walls, and a magnetic cobalt-iron coating. The magnetic coating is patterned into stripes on microshutters so that shutters can respond to an external magnetic field for the magnetic actuation. A set of column electrodes is placed on top of shutters, and a set of row electrodes on sidewalls is underneath the shutters so that they can be electrostatically latched open. A linear permanent magnet is aligned with the shutter rows and is positioned above a flipped upside-down array, and sweeps across the array in a direction parallel to shutter columns. As the magnet sweeps across the array, sequential rows of shutters are rotated from their natural horizontal orientation to a vertical open position, where they approach vertical electrodes on the sidewalls. When the electrodes are biased with a sufficient electrostatic force to overcome the mechanical restoring force of torsion bars, shutters remain latched to vertical electrodes in their open state. When the bias is removed, or is insufficient, the shutters return to their horizontal, closed positions. To release a shutter, both the electrode on the shutter and the one on the back wall where

  8. Fabrication-friendly subwavelength-structure-assisted waveguide for dispersion engineering.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Zeinab; Zarifkar, Abbas

    2016-11-10

    A subwavelength structure deposited on top of a silicon strip is utilized as a novel tool for dispersion engineering. The equivalent refractive index of the subwavelength structure can be tailored through adjusting its period and duty cycle. As finding suitable materials with both appropriate refractive index and fabrication compatibility is one of the main difficulties in dispersion engineering, the possibility of refractive index engineering is the most significant advantage of the proposed waveguide. It can be beneficial for controlling the properties of the fundamental quasi-TM mode and consequently its dispersion characteristics without any concern about material compatibility. Utilizing this waveguide geometry, a wide and flattened low-dispersion bandwidth can be achieved. Moreover, high anomalous and normal dispersion is realizable without any degradation in dispersion flatness over bandwidth. Therefore, the proposed waveguide structure is promising for dispersion tailoring in both linear and nonlinear applications.

  9. Wide dynamic range wavefront sensor using sub-wavelength grating array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Xiaobin; Li, Yanqiu; Liu, Ke

    2015-07-01

    We propose a new zonal wavefront sensor with a very wide dynamic range. The proposed sensor uses a sub-wavelength grating array to subdivide the input wavefront and produce transmitted light spots on CCD. The wavefront tilts are calculated from the transmissions of a sub-wavelength grating array. The dynamic range and resolution of the proposed sensor are respectively decided by the grating parameters and the sub-unit size of the array. So these two performances of the sensor are independent of one another, which enables the realization of wide dynamic range and high resolution simultaneously. We introduce the principle of the sensor by both Rigorous Coupled Wave Analysis and Finite-Difference Time-Domain methods. A simulation is designed to validate our proposed method, and the measurement errors are analyzed. The sensor performs good sensitivity for wide incident angles, which is particularly suitable for spherical input wavefront.

  10. Sub-wavelength energy trapping of elastic waves in a metamaterial.

    PubMed

    Colombi, Andrea; Roux, Philippe; Rupin, Matthieu

    2014-08-01

    Deep sub-wavelength focusing has been demonstrated for locally resonant metamaterials using electromagnetic and acoustic waves. The elastic equivalents of such objects are made of sub-wavelength resonating beams fixed to a two-dimensional plate, as presented here. Independent of a random or regular arrangement of the resonators, the metamaterial shows large bandgaps that are independent of the incident wave direction. Numerical simulations demonstrate that the insertion of a defect in the layout, as a shorter resonator, creates strong amplification of the wave-field on the defect. This energy trapping, which is localized on a spatial scale that is much smaller than the wavelength in the two-dimensional plate, leads to a >1 factor in terms of the local density of energy.

  11. Efficient ion acceleration by relativistic self-induced transparency in subwavelength targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Shivani; Holkundkar, Amol R.

    2016-10-01

    We studied the effect of target thickness on relativistic self-induced transparency (RSIT) and observed that, for subwavelength targets, the corresponding threshold target density (beyond which the target is opaque to an incident laser pulse of given intensity) increases. The accelerating longitudinal electrostatic field created by RSIT from the subwavelength target is then used to accelerate the ions from a thin, low density layer behind the main target to 100 MeV using a 6 cycle flat-top (with rise and fall of one cycle each) circularly polarized laser with peak dimensionless amplitude of 20. A suitable scaling law for optimum laser and target conditions is also deduced. We observed that, as far as energy spectrum is concerned, an extra low density layer is more advantageous than relying on target ions alone.

  12. Surface-wave mechanism of subwavelength imaging by a flat left-handed superlens

    SciTech Connect

    Zharov, A. A.; Zharova, N. A.; Noskov, R. E.

    2009-11-15

    We develop a theory describing the dynamics and interaction of electromagnetic surface waves (ESWs) resonantly excited by an external source in a slab of left-handed material (LHM) with identical negative (equal to -1) values of dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability that makes up a so-called perfect lens, or a superlens. We show that subwavelength imaging by a superlens is associated with the degeneracy of the spectrum of eigen electromagnetic surface modes at the interfaces of the metamaterial slab, whereas the dynamic response of the superlens is completely determined by the dynamics of these modes and the dispersion properties of the metamaterial. We obtain conditions that enable one to find out when a superlens produces subwavelength images of an external source. We consider the cases of a stationary and a pulse source, as well as of a source that moves with constant velocity or oscillates in space.

  13. Using a Semiconductor-to-Metal Transition to Control Optical Transmission through Subwavelength Hole Arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Donev, E. U.; Suh, J. Y.; Lopez, R.; ...

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simple configuration in which the extraordinary optical transmission effect through subwavelength hole arrays in noble-metal films can be switched by the semiconductor-to-metal transition in an underlying thin film of vanadium dioxide. In these experiments, the transition is brought about by thermal heating of the bilayer film. The surprising reverse hysteretic behavior of the transmission through the subwavelength holes in the vanadium oxide suggest that this modulation is accomplished by a dielectric-matching condition rather than plasmon coupling through the bilayer film. The results of this switching, including the wavelength dependence, are qualitatively reproduced by a transfer matrix model.more » The prospects for effecting a similar modulation on a much faster time scale by using ultrafast laser pulses to trigger the semiconductor-to-metal transition are also discussed.« less

  14. Wide-band achromatic flat focusing lens based on all-dielectric subwavelength metasurface.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shaowu; Lai, Jianjun; Wu, Tao; Chen, Changhong; Sun, Junqiang

    2017-03-20

    A new method for realizing achromatic flat focusing based on all-dielectric silicon subwavelength metasurface is presented. The designed subwavelength silicon-air slits waveguide array with varied widths can provide desired phase shift of beam focusing and has the non-dispersive characteristic when the period of each unit cell is far less than the wavelength of incident electromagnetic wave (about λ/10) in mid-infrared and far-infrared spectral range. Numerical simulation of an achromatic flat focusing lens in wide spectral range from 8μm to 12μm is performed by the finite difference time domain method and the results show agreement with theory analysis results. This work indicates an effective solution for wide-band achromatic flat optical elements and potential application in integrated achromatic infrared optical systems.

  15. Sub-wavelength energy concentration with electrically generated mid-infrared surface plasmons.

    PubMed

    Bousseksou, A; Babuty, A; Tetienne, J-P; Moldovan-Doyen, I; Braive, R; Beaudoin, G; Sagnes, I; De Wilde, Y; Colombelli, R

    2012-06-18

    While freely propagating photons cannot be focused below their diffraction limit, surface-plasmon polaritons follow the metallic surface to which they are bound, and can lead to extremely sub-wavelength energy volumes. These properties are lost at long mid-infrared and THz wavelengths where metals behave as quasi-perfect conductors, but can in principle be recovered by artificially tailoring the surface-plasmon dispersion. We demonstrate - in the important mid-infrared range of the electromagnetic spectrum - the generation onto a semiconductor chip of plasmonic excitations which can travel along long distances, on bent paths, to be finally focused into a sub-wavelength volume. The demonstration of these advanced functionalities is supported by full near-field characterizations of the electromagnetic field distribution on the surface of the active plasmonic device.

  16. A tunable acoustic barrier based on periodic arrays of subwavelength slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio, Constanza; Uris, Antonio; Candelas, Pilar; Belmar, Francisco; Gomez-Lozano, Vicente

    2015-05-01

    The most usual method to reduce undesirable enviromental noise levels during its transmission is the use of acoustic barriers. A novel type of acoustic barrier based on sound transmission through subwavelength slits is presented. This system consists of two rows of periodic repetition of vertical rigid pickets separated by a slit of subwavelength width and with a misalignment between them. Here, both the experimental and the numerical analyses are presented. The acoustic barrier proposed can be easily built and is frequency tunable. The results demonstrated that the proposed barrier can be tuned to mitigate a band noise without excesive barrier thickness. The use of this system as an environmental acoustic barrier has certain advantages with regard to the ones currently used both from the constructive and the acoustical point of view.

  17. Ultra-subwavelength resonators for high temperature high performance quantum detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palaferri, Daniele; Todorov, Yanko; Mottaghizadeh, Alireza; Frucci, Giulia; Biasiol, Giorgio; Sirtori, Carlo

    2016-11-01

    In this article we have investigated two important properties of metallic nano-resonators which can substantially improve the temperature performances of infrared quantum detectors. The first is the antenna effect that increases the effective surface of photon collection and the second is the subwavelength metallic confinement that compresses radiation into very small volumes of interaction. To quantify our analysis we have defined and discussed two figures of merit, the collection area A coll and the focusing factor F. Both quantities depend solely on the geometrical parameters of the structure and can be applied to improve the performance of any detector active region. In the last part, we describe three-dimensional electronic nano-resonators that provide highly subwavelength confinement of the electromagnetic energy, beyond the microcavity limits and illustrate that these device architectures have a tremendous potential to increase the temperature of operation of infrared quantum detectors.

  18. Magnetic and electric coherence in forward- and back-scattered electromagnetic waves by a single dielectric subwavelength sphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geffrin, J. M.; García-Cámara, B.; Gómez-Medina, R.; Albella, P.; Froufe-Pérez, L. S.; Eyraud, C.; Litman, A.; Vaillon, R.; González, F.; Nieto-Vesperinas, M.; Sáenz, J. J.; Moreno, F.

    2012-11-01

    Magnetodielectric small spheres present unusual electromagnetic scattering features, theoretically predicted a few decades ago. However, achieving such behaviour has remained elusive, due to the non-magnetic character of natural optical materials or the difficulty in obtaining low-loss highly permeable magnetic materials in the gigahertz regime. Here we present unambiguous experimental evidence that a single low-loss dielectric subwavelength sphere of moderate refractive index (n=4 like some semiconductors at near-infrared) radiates fields identical to those from equal amplitude crossed electric and magnetic dipoles, and indistinguishable from those of ideal magnetodielectric spheres. The measured scattering radiation patterns and degree of linear polarization (3-9 GHz/33-100 mm range) show that, by appropriately tuning the a/λ ratio, zero-backward (‘Huygens’ source) or almost zero-forward (‘Huygens’ reflector) radiated power can be obtained. These Kerker scattering conditions only depend on a/λ. Our results open new technological challenges from nano- and micro-photonics to science and engineering of antennas, metamaterials and electromagnetic devices.

  19. Focused laser lithographic system with sub-wavelength resolution based on vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic material.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhen; Bai, Jian; Xu, Jianfeng; Wang, Chen; Yao, Yuan; Hu, Neibin; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Yang, Guoguang

    2014-12-01

    A focused laser lithographic system combines with vortex laser induced opacity of photochromic layer to write patterns with linewidth below wavelength. A photochromic layer is formed by coating the mixture of metanil yellow and aqueous PVA solution on the photoresist layer. In our system, the center of a lithographic laser with a 405 nm wavelength coincides with the center of vortex laser with a 532 nm wavelength. When a photochromic layer is illuminated by both lasers simultaneously, the absorbance for the lithographic laser decreases at the hollow region of the vortex laser but increases at its annular region, so that a transparent aperture for the lithographic laser is created and its size could be tuned by changing the power of vortex laser; therefore, the linewidth of written patterns is variable. Experimentally, using a 20× lens (NA = 0.4), this system condenses the linewidth of written patterns from 6614 to 350 nm.

  20. Multifunctional bowtie-shaped ridge aperture for overlay alignment in plasmonic direct writing lithography using a contact probe.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seonghyeon; Lee, Taekyong; Hahn, Jae W

    2013-07-01

    We propose a scheme of overlay alignment for plasmonic lithography using a scanning contact probe. Using two resonances of a ridge aperture in a metal film, we introduce the aperture's multifunctional characteristics for patterning and alignment at different wavelengths. To verify this idea, we measure an image of an alignment mark using a scanning ridge aperture and determine the reference point for the alignment. We then analyze the uncertainty of the alignment method with respect to the image data noise and compare the numerical results with the experimental results. The uncertainty of the overlay alignment method is shown to be less than approximately 2 nm.

  1. Suspended core subwavelength fibers: towards practical designs for low-loss terahertz guidance.

    PubMed

    Rozé, Mathieu; Ung, Bora; Mazhorova, Anna; Walther, Markus; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2011-05-09

    In this work we report two designs of subwavelength fibers packaged for practical terahertz wave guiding. We describe fabrication, modeling and characterization of microstructured polymer fibers featuring a subwavelength-size core suspended in the middle of a large porous outer cladding. This design allows convenient handling of the subwavelength fibers without distorting their modal profile. Additionally, the air-tight porous cladding serves as a natural enclosure for the fiber core, thus avoiding the need for a bulky external enclosure for humidity-purged atmosphere. Fibers of 5 mm and 3 mm in outer diameters with a 150 µm suspended solid core and a 900 µm suspended porous core respectively, were obtained by utilizing a combination of drilling and stacking techniques. Characterization of the fiber optical properties and the subwavelength imaging of the guided modes were performed using a terahertz near-field microscopy setup. Near-field imaging of the modal profiles at the fiber output confirmed the effectively single-mode behavior of such waveguides. The suspended core fibers exhibit transmission from 0.10 THz to 0.27 THz (larger core), and from 0.25 THz to 0.51 THz (smaller core). Due to the large fraction of power that is guided in the holey cladding, fiber propagation losses as low as 0.02 cm(-1) are demonstrated specifically for the small core fiber. Low-loss guidance combined with the core isolated from environmental perturbations make these all-dielectric fibers suitable for practical terahertz imaging and sensing applications.

  2. Ultrafast optical control of terahertz surface plasmons in subwavelength hole-arrays at room temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Abul Kalam; Chen, Hou - Tong; Taylor, Antoinette; O' Hara, John

    2010-12-10

    Extraordinary optical transmission through subwavelength metallic hole-arrays has been an active research area since its first demonstration. The frequency selective resonance properties of subwavelength metallic hole arrays, generally known as surface plasmon polaritons, have potential use in functional plasmonic devices such as filters, modulators, switches, etc. Such plasmonic devices are also very promising for future terahertz applications. Ultrafast switching or modulation of the resonant behavior of the 2-D metallic arrays in terahertz frequencies is of particular interest for high speed communication and sensing applications. In this paper, we demonstrate optical control of surface plasmon enhanced resonant terahertz transmission in two-dimensional subwavelength metallic hole arrays fabricated on gallium arsenide based substrates. Optically pumping the arrays creates a conductive layer in the substrate reducing the terahertz transmission amplitude of both the resonant mode and the direct transmission. Under low optical fluence, the terahertz transmission is more greatly affected by resonance damping than by propagation loss in the substrate. An ErAs:GaAs nanoisland superlattice substrate is shown to allow ultrafast control with a switching recovery time of {approx}10 ps. We also present resonant terahertz transmission in a hybrid plasmonic film comprised of an integrated array of subwavelength metallic islands and semiconductor holes. A large dynamic transition between a dipolar localized surface plasmon mode and a surface plasmon resonance near 0.8 THz is observed under near infrared optical excitation. The reversal in transmission amplitude from a stopband to a passband and up to {pi}/2 phase shift achieved in the hybrid plasmonic film make it promising in large dynamic phase modulation, optical changeover switching, and active terahertz plasmonics.

  3. Aperture effects in squid jet propulsion.

    PubMed

    Staaf, Danna J; Gilly, William F; Denny, Mark W

    2014-05-01

    Squid are the largest jet propellers in nature as adults, but as paralarvae they are some of the smallest, faced with the inherent inefficiency of jet propulsion at a low Reynolds number. In this study we describe the behavior and kinematics of locomotion in 1 mm paralarvae of Dosidicus gigas, the smallest squid yet studied. They swim with hop-and-sink behavior and can engage in fast jets by reducing the size of the mantle aperture during the contraction phase of a jetting cycle. We go on to explore the general effects of a variable mantle and funnel aperture in a theoretical model of jet propulsion scaled from the smallest (1 mm mantle length) to the largest (3 m) squid. Aperture reduction during mantle contraction increases propulsive efficiency at all squid sizes, although 1 mm squid still suffer from low efficiency (20%) because of a limited speed of contraction. Efficiency increases to a peak of 40% for 1 cm squid, then slowly declines. Squid larger than 6 cm must either reduce contraction speed or increase aperture size to maintain stress within maximal muscle tolerance. Ecological pressure to maintain maximum velocity may lead them to increase aperture size, which reduces efficiency. This effect might be ameliorated by nonaxial flow during the refill phase of the cycle. Our model's predictions highlight areas for future empirical work, and emphasize the existence of complex behavioral options for maximizing efficiency at both very small and large sizes.

  4. High numerical aperture focusing of singular beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Normatov, Alexander; Spektor, Boris; Shamir, Joseph

    2009-02-01

    Rigorous vector analysis of high numerical aperture optical systems encounters severe difficulties. While existing analytic methods, based on the Richards-Wolf approach, allow focusing of nearly planar incident wavefronts, these methods break down for beams possessing considerable phase jumps, such as beams containing phase singularities. This work was motivated by the need to analyze a recently introduced metrological application of singular beams that demonstrated an experimental sensitivity of 20nm under a moderate numerical aperture of 0.4. One of the possibilities to obtain even better sensitivity is by increasing the numerical aperture of the optical system. In this work we address the issue of high numerical aperture focusing of the involved singular beams. Our solution exploits the superposition principle to evaluate the three dimensional focal distribution of the electromagnetic field provided the illuminating wavefront can be described as having piecewise quasi constant phase. A brief overview of singular beam microscopy is followed by deeper discussion of the involved high numerical aperture focusing issue. Further, a few examples of different singular beam focal field distributions are presented.

  5. Polarization-driven self-organization of silver nanoparticles in 1D and 2D subwavelength gratings for plasmonic photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baraldi, G.; Bakhti, S.; Liu, Z.; Reynaud, S.; Lefkir, Y.; Vocanson, F.; Destouches, N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges in plasmonics is to conceive large-scale, low-cost techniques suitable for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle patterns showing precise spatial organization. Here, we introduce a simple method based on continuous-wave laser illumination to induce the self-organization of silver nanoparticles within high-index thin films. We show that highly regular and homogeneous nanoparticle gratings can be produced on large areas using laser-controlled self-organization processes. This very versatile technique can provide 1D and 2D patterns at a subwavelength scale with tunable features. It does not need any stabilization or expensive devices, such as those required by optical or electron lithography, and is rapid to implement. Accurate in-plane and in-depth characterizations provide valuable information to explain the mechanisms that lead to pattern formation and especially how 2D self-organization can fall into place with successive laser scans. The regular and homogeneous 2D self-organization of metallic NPs with a single laser scan is also reported for the first time in this article. As the reported nanostructures are embedded in porous TiO2, we also theoretically explore the interesting potential of organization on the photocatalytic activity of Ag-NP-containing TiO2 porous films, which is one of the most promising materials for self-cleaning or remediation applications. Realistic electromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the periodic organization of silver nanoparticles can increase the light intensity within the film more than ten times that produced with randomly distributed nanoparticles, leading as expected to enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

  6. Evolutionary optimization of compact dielectric lens for farfield sub-wavelength imaging

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jingjing

    2015-01-01

    The resolution of conventional optical lenses is limited by diffraction. For decades researchers have made various attempts to beat the diffraction limit and realize subwavelength imaging. Here we present the approach to design modified solid immersion lenses that deliver the subwavelength information of objects into the far field, yielding magnified images. The lens is composed of an isotropic dielectric core and anisotropic or isotropic dielectric matching layers. It is designed by combining a transformation optics forward design with an inverse design scheme, where an evolutionary optimization procedure is applied to find the material parameters for the matching layers. Notably, the total radius of the lens is only 2.5 wavelengths and the resolution can reach λ/6. Compared to previous approaches based on the simple discretized approximation of a coordinate transformation design, our method allows for much more precise recovery of the information of objects, especially for those with asymmetric shapes. It allows for the far-field subwavelength imaging at optical frequencies with compact dielectric devices. PMID:26017657

  7. Subwavelength elastic joints connecting torsional waveguides to maximize the power transmission coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joong Seok; Lee, Il Kyu; Seung, Hong Min; Lee, Jun Kyu; Kim, Yoon Young

    2017-03-01

    Joints with slowly varying tapered shapes, such as linear or exponential profiles, are known to transmit incident wave power efficiently between two waveguides with dissimilar impedances. This statement is valid only when the considered joint length is longer than the wavelengths of the incident waves. When the joint length is shorter than the wavelengths, however, appropriate shapes of such subwavelength joints for efficient power transmission have not been explored much. In this work, considering one-dimensional torsional wave motion in a cylindrical elastic waveguide system, optimal shapes or radial profiles of a subwavelength joint maximizing the power transmission coefficient are designed by a gradient-based optimization formulation. The joint is divided into a number of thin disk elements using the transfer matrix approach and optimal radii of the disks are determined by iterative shape optimization processes for several single or bands of wavenumbers. Due to the subwavelength constraint, the optimized joint profiles were found to be considerably different from the slowly varying tapered shapes. Specifically, for bands of wavenumbers, peculiar gourd-like shapes were obtained as optimal shapes to maximize the power transmission coefficient. Numerical results from the proposed optimization formulation were also experimentally realized to verify the validity of the present designs.

  8. Subwavelength silicon through-hole arrays as an all-dielectric broadband terahertz gradient index metamaterial

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Sang-Gil; Jeong, Ki-Hun; Lee, Kanghee; Han, Daehoon; Ahn, Jaewook

    2014-09-01

    Structuring at subwavelength scales brings out artificial media with anomalous optical features called metamaterials. All-dielectric metamaterials have high potential for practical applications over the whole electromagnetic spectrum owing to low loss and optical isotropy. Here, we report subwavelength silicon through-hole arrays as an all-dielectric gradient index metamaterial with broadband THz operation. The unit cell consists of a single subwavelength through-hole on highly resistive monocrystalline silicon. Depending on the fill-factor and period, the effective index was linearly modulated at 0.3–1.6 THz. The experimental results also demonstrate silicon gradient refractive index (Si-GRIN) lenses with parabolic index profiles through the spatial modification of a single unit cell along the radial direction. Si-GRIN lenses either focus 0.4–1.6 THz beam to the diffraction-limit or serve as a flat and thin solid immersion lens on the backside of THz photoconductive antenna for highly efficient pulse extraction. This all-dielectric gradient index metamaterial opens up opportunities for integrated THz GRIN optics.

  9. Optical dimensional metrology at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB) on deep sub-wavelength nanostructured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodermann, B.; Ehret, G.; Endres, J.; Wurm, M.

    2016-06-01

    The dark-field microscopy method with alternating grazing incidence UV illumination (UV-AGID) developed at Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt offers the possibility of measuring individual isolated line structures with linewidths down to the sub-wavelength regime. In contrast, scatterometry is able and already widely used to measure average dimensional parameters of periodic structures down to the deep sub-wavelength regime. Both methods can be used for dimensional measurements of micro- and nanostructures, in particular the critical dimensions (CDs) on wafers or photomasks in the semiconductor industry, complementing each other favourably. Based on numerical simulations, we have investigated the ultimate limits of these two methods in the deep sub-wavelength regime. It has been shown that AGID microscopy in the DUV spectral range is in principle capable of measuring line structures with CDs down to a few 10 nm, depending on the structure material. For scatterometry, no fundamental limit has been observed. In practice, a technical limit due to the limited signal-to-noise ratio is expected for CDs of a few nm in width.

  10. Deep sub-wavelength nanofocusing of UV-visible light by hyperbolic metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Minkyung; So, Sunae; Yao, Kan; Liu, Yongmin; Rho, Junsuk

    2016-01-01

    Confining light into a sub-wavelength area has been challenging due to the natural phenomenon of diffraction. In this paper, we report deep sub-wavelength focusing via dispersion engineering based on hyperbolic metamaterials. Hyperbolic metamaterials, which can be realized by alternating layers of metal and dielectric, are materials showing opposite signs of effective permittivity along the radial and the tangential direction. They can be designed to exhibit a nearly-flat open isofrequency curve originated from the large-negative permittivity in the radial direction and small-positive one in the tangential direction. Thanks to the ultraflat dispersion relation and curved geometry of the multilayer stack, hyperlens can magnify or demagnify an incident beam without diffraction depending on the incident direction. We numerically show that hyperlens-based nanofocusing device can compress a Gaussian beam down to tens-of-nanometers of spot size in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible frequency range. We also report four types of hyperlenses using different material combinations to span the entire range of visible frequencies. The nanofocusing device based on the hyperlens, unlike conventional lithography, works under ordinary light source without complex optics system, giving rise to practical applications including truly nanoscale lithography and deep sub-wavelength scale confinement. PMID:27924937

  11. Deep sub-wavelength nanofocusing of UV-visible light by hyperbolic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minkyung; So, Sunae; Yao, Kan; Liu, Yongmin; Rho, Junsuk

    2016-12-01

    Confining light into a sub-wavelength area has been challenging due to the natural phenomenon of diffraction. In this paper, we report deep sub-wavelength focusing via dispersion engineering based on hyperbolic metamaterials. Hyperbolic metamaterials, which can be realized by alternating layers of metal and dielectric, are materials showing opposite signs of effective permittivity along the radial and the tangential direction. They can be designed to exhibit a nearly-flat open isofrequency curve originated from the large-negative permittivity in the radial direction and small-positive one in the tangential direction. Thanks to the ultraflat dispersion relation and curved geometry of the multilayer stack, hyperlens can magnify or demagnify an incident beam without diffraction depending on the incident direction. We numerically show that hyperlens-based nanofocusing device can compress a Gaussian beam down to tens-of-nanometers of spot size in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible frequency range. We also report four types of hyperlenses using different material combinations to span the entire range of visible frequencies. The nanofocusing device based on the hyperlens, unlike conventional lithography, works under ordinary light source without complex optics system, giving rise to practical applications including truly nanoscale lithography and deep sub-wavelength scale confinement.

  12. Deep sub-wavelength nanofocusing of UV-visible light by hyperbolic metamaterials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minkyung; So, Sunae; Yao, Kan; Liu, Yongmin; Rho, Junsuk

    2016-12-07

    Confining light into a sub-wavelength area has been challenging due to the natural phenomenon of diffraction. In this paper, we report deep sub-wavelength focusing via dispersion engineering based on hyperbolic metamaterials. Hyperbolic metamaterials, which can be realized by alternating layers of metal and dielectric, are materials showing opposite signs of effective permittivity along the radial and the tangential direction. They can be designed to exhibit a nearly-flat open isofrequency curve originated from the large-negative permittivity in the radial direction and small-positive one in the tangential direction. Thanks to the ultraflat dispersion relation and curved geometry of the multilayer stack, hyperlens can magnify or demagnify an incident beam without diffraction depending on the incident direction. We numerically show that hyperlens-based nanofocusing device can compress a Gaussian beam down to tens-of-nanometers of spot size in the ultraviolet (UV) and visible frequency range. We also report four types of hyperlenses using different material combinations to span the entire range of visible frequencies. The nanofocusing device based on the hyperlens, unlike conventional lithography, works under ordinary light source without complex optics system, giving rise to practical applications including truly nanoscale lithography and deep sub-wavelength scale confinement.

  13. Micro-fabrication considerations for MEMS-based reconfigurable antenna apertures: with emphasis on DC bias network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadas, Hamid; Mousavi, Pedram; Daneshmand, Mojgan

    2016-11-01

    This note addresses the main challenges involved in monolithic micro-fabrication of large capacitive-MEMS-based reconfigurable electromagnetic apertures in antenna applications. The fabrication of a large DC bias line network, and also the metallic features in such apertures, requires special attention and optimization. It is shown that the choice of DC bias network material can impact DC and RF performance of the structure, and a trade-off between switching time and radiation pattern integrity should be considered.

  14. Fiber Optic Synthetic Aperture Interferometer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    cube can be moved in two ways: (1) it can be moved over a range of about ±40cm by a variable-speed DC motor , and (2) it can be moved over a range of...are eventually picked up by the DC motor drive. (The DC component of the moving coil current is servo- controlled to keep the largest fringe in the...center of the scan; the DC motor is servo-controlled to keep the DC moving coil current at zero). A typical fringe pattern recorded with the FOSI would

  15. Solar energy apparatus with apertured shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collings, Roger J. (Inventor); Bannon, David G. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A protective apertured shield for use about an inlet to a solar apparatus which includesd a cavity receiver for absorbing concentrated solar energy. A rigid support truss assembly is fixed to the periphery of the inlet and projects radially inwardly therefrom to define a generally central aperture area through which solar radiation can pass into the cavity receiver. A non-structural, laminated blanket is spread over the rigid support truss in such a manner as to define an outer surface area and an inner surface area diverging radially outwardly from the central aperture area toward the periphery of the inlet. The outer surface area faces away from the inlet and the inner surface area faces toward the cavity receiver. The laminated blanket includes at least one layer of material, such as ceramic fiber fabric, having high infra-red emittance and low solar absorption properties, and another layer, such as metallic foil, of low infra-red emittance properties.

  16. Class of near-perfect coded apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannon, T. M.; Fenimore, E. E.

    1977-01-01

    Coded aperture imaging of gamma ray sources has long promised an improvement in the sensitivity of various detector systems. The promise has remained largely unfulfilled, however, for either one of two reasons. First, the encoding/decoding method produces artifacts, which even in the absence of quantum noise, restrict the quality of the reconstructed image. This is true of most correlation-type methods. Second, if the decoding procedure is of the deconvolution variety, small terms in the transfer function of the aperture can lead to excessive noise in the reconstructed image. It is proposed to circumvent both of these problems by use of a uniformly redundant array (URA) as the coded aperture in conjunction with a special correlation decoding method.

  17. Near-field to far-field characterization of speckle patterns generated by disordered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Parigi, Valentina; Perros, Elodie; Binard, Guillaume; Bourdillon, Céline; Maître, Agnès; Carminati, Rémi; Krachmalnicoff, Valentina; De Wilde, Yannick

    2016-04-04

    We study the intensity spatial correlation function of optical speckle patterns above a disordered dielectric medium in the multiple scattering regime. The intensity distributions are recorded by scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) with sub-wavelength spatial resolution at variable distances from the surface in a range which spans continuously from the near-field (distance ≪ λ) to the far-field regime (distance ≫ λ). The non-universal behavior at sub-wavelength distances reveals the connection between the near-field speckle pattern and the internal structure of the medium.

  18. Enhanced single-photon emission from a diamond-silver aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, Jennifer T.; Hausmann, Birgit J. M.; Babinec, Thomas M.; Bulu, Irfan; Khan, Mughees; Maletinsky, Patrick; Yacoby, Amir; Lončar, Marko

    2011-12-01

    Solid-state quantum emitters, such as the nitrogen-vacancy centre in diamond, are robust systems for practical realizations of various quantum information processing protocols and nanoscale magnetometry schemes at room temperature. Such applications benefit from the high emission efficiency and flux of single photons, which can be achieved by engineering the electromagnetic environment of the emitter. One attractive approach is based on plasmonic resonators, in which sub-wavelength confinement of optical fields can strongly modify the spontaneous emission of a suitably embedded dipole despite having only modest quality factors. Meanwhile, the scalability of solid-state quantum systems critically depends on the ability to control such emitter-cavity interaction in a number of devices arranged in parallel. Here, we demonstrate a method to enhance the radiative emission rate of single nitrogen-vacancy centres in ordered arrays of plasmonic apertures that promises greater scalability over the previously demonstrated bottom-up approaches for the realization of on-chip quantum networks.

  19. Large-Aperture Wide-Bandwidth Anti-Reflection-Coated Silicon Lenses for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, R.; Munson, C. D.; Niemack, M. D.; McMahon, J. J.; Britton, J.; Wollack, E. J.; Beall, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Fowler, J.; Gallardo, P.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Newburgh, L.; Nibarger, J. P.; Page, L.; Quijada, M. A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Thornton, R.; Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing scale of cryogenic detector arrays for sub-millimeter and millimeter wavelength astrophysics has led to the need for large aperture, high index of refraction, low loss, cryogenic refracting optics. Silicon with n = 3.4, low loss, and relatively high thermal conductivity is a nearly optimal material for these purposes, but requires an antireflection (AR) coating with broad bandwidth, low loss, low reflectance, and a matched coffecient of thermal expansion. We present an AR coating for curved silicon optics comprised of subwavelength features cut into the lens surface with a custom three axis silicon dicing saw. These features constitute a metamaterial that behaves as a simple dielectric coating. We have fabricated and coated silicon lenses as large as 33.4 cm in diameter with coatings optimized for use between 125-165 GHz. Our design reduces average reflections to a few tenths of a percent for angles of incidence up to 30 deg. with low cross-polarization. We describe the design, tolerance, manufacture, and measurements of these coatings and present measurements of the optical properties of silicon at millimeter wavelengths at cryogenic and room temperatures. This coating and lens fabrication approach is applicable from centimeter to sub-millimeter wavelengths and can be used to fabricate coatings with greater than octave bandwidth.

  20. Large-aperture Wide-bandwidth Antireflection-coated Silicon Lenses for Millimeter Wavelengths

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, R.; Munson, C. D.; Niemack, M. D.; McMahon, J. J.; Britton, J.; Wollack, Edward J.; Beall, J.; Devlin, M. J.; Fowler, J.; Gallardo, P.; Hubmayr, J.; Irwin, K.; Newburgh, L.; Nibarger, J. P.; Page, L.; Quijada, Manuel A.; Schmitt, B. L.; Staggs, S. T.; Thornton, R.; Zhang, L.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing scale of cryogenic detector arrays for submillimeter and millimeter wavelength astrophysics has led to the need for large aperture, high index of refraction, low loss, cryogenic refracting optics. Silicon with n 3.4, low loss, and high thermal conductivity is a nearly optimal material for these purposes but requires an antireflection (AR) coating with broad bandwidth, low loss, low reflectance, and a matched coefficient of thermal expansion. We present an AR coating for curved silicon optics comprised of subwavelength features cut into the lens surface with a custom three-axis silicon dicing saw. These features constitute a metamaterial that behaves as a simple dielectric coating.We have fabricated silicon lenses as large as 33.4 cm in diameter with micromachined layers optimized for use between 125 and 165 GHz. Our design reduces average reflections to a few tenths of a percent for angles of incidence up to 30deg with low cross polarization.We describe the design, tolerance, manufacture, and measurements of these coatings and present measurements of the optical properties of silicon at millimeter wavelengths at cryogenic and room temperatures. This coating and lens fabrication approach is applicable from centimeter to submillimeter wavelengths and can be used to fabricate coatings with greater than octave bandwidth.

  1. Distributed Apertures in Laminar Flow Laser Turrets.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-01

    t r by Oe" Vmbat) High Energy Lasers Aperture Arrays Laser Turrets Aero-Optics 20. Aeft*ACT (CieOuu en revere siea of 400arind OE#1 by.*f Week.1a...ciation to Mom and Dad for their love and resolve which encourages the author to fulfill his potential. 11 I. INTRODUCTION Propagation of laser energy ...is the true measure of the "goodness" of a system of one or more apertures. PIB FPIB A (11) Power projected is found by use of the relation for the on

  2. PDII- Additional discussion of the dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Norman M. Gelfand

    2002-07-23

    This note is in the nature of an addition to the dynamic aperture calculations found in the report on the Proton Driver, FERMILAB-TM-2169. A extensive discussion of the Proton Driver lattice, as well as the nomenclature used to describe it can be found in TM-2169. Basically the proposed lattice is a racetrack design with the two arcs joined by two long straight sections. The straight sections are dispersion free. Tracking studies were undertaken with the objective of computing the dynamic aperture for the lattice and some of the results have been incorporated into TM-2169. This note is a more extensive report of those calculations.

  3. Synthetic aperture radar capabilities in development

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.

    1994-11-15

    The Imaging and Detection Program (IDP) within the Laser Program is currently developing an X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) to support the Joint US/UK Radar Ocean Imaging Program. The radar system will be mounted in the program`s Airborne Experimental Test-Bed (AETB), where the initial mission is to image ocean surfaces and better understand the physics of low grazing angle backscatter. The Synthetic Aperture Radar presentation will discuss its overall functionality and a brief discussion on the AETB`s capabilities. Vital subsystems including radar, computer, navigation, antenna stabilization, and SAR focusing algorithms will be examined in more detail.

  4. Comparison of calculated with measured dynamic aperture

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmermann, F.

    1994-06-01

    The measured dynamic aperture of the HERA proton ring and the value expected from simulation studies agree within a factor of 2. A better agreement is achieved if a realistic tune modulation is included in the simulation. The approximate threshold of tune-modulation induced diffusion can be calculated analytically. Its value is in remarkable agreement with the dynamic aperture measured. The calculation is based on parameters of resonances through order 11 which are computed using differential-algebra methods and normal-form algorithms. Modulational diffusion in conjunction with drifting machine parameters appears to be the most important transverse diffusion process.

  5. Sub-aperture stitching test of a cylindrical mirror with large aperture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xue, Shuai; Chen, Shanyong; Shi, Feng; Lu, Jinfeng

    2016-09-01

    Cylindrical mirrors are key optics of high-end equipment of national defense and scientific research such as high energy laser weapons, synchrotron radiation system, etc. However, its surface error test technology develops slowly. As a result, its optical processing quality can not meet the requirements, and the developing of the associated equipment is hindered. Computer Generated-Hologram (CGH) is commonly utilized as null for testing cylindrical optics. However, since the fabrication process of CGH with large aperture is not sophisticated yet, the null test of cylindrical optics with large aperture is limited by the aperture of the CGH. Hence CGH null test combined with sub-aperture stitching method is proposed to break the limit of the aperture of CGH for testing cylindrical optics, and the design of CGH for testing cylindrical surfaces is analyzed. Besides, the misalignment aberration of cylindrical surfaces is different from that of the rotational symmetric surfaces since the special shape of cylindrical surfaces, and the existing stitching algorithm of rotational symmetric surfaces can not meet the requirements of stitching cylindrical surfaces. We therefore analyze the misalignment aberrations of cylindrical surfaces, and study the stitching algorithm for measuring cylindrical optics with large aperture. Finally we test a cylindrical mirror with large aperture to verify the validity of the proposed method.

  6. Coded aperture imaging with self-supporting uniformly redundant arrays. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Fenimore, E.E.

    1980-09-26

    A self-supporting uniformly redundant array pattern for coded aperture imaging. The invention utilizes holes which are an integer times smaller in each direction than holes in conventional URA patterns. A balance correlation function is generated where holes are represented by 1's, nonholes are represented by -1's, and supporting area is represented by 0's. The self-supporting array can be used for low energy applications where substrates would greatly reduce throughput.

  7. Prototype Development of a Geostationary Synthetic Thinned Aperture Radiometer, GeoSTAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tanner, Alan B.; Wilson, William J.; Kangaslahti, Pekka P.; Lambrigsten, Bjorn H.; Dinardo, Steven J.; Piepmeier, Jeffrey R.; Ruf, Christopher S.; Rogacki, Steven; Gross, S. M.; Musko, Steve

    2004-01-01

    Preliminary details of a 2-D synthetic aperture radiometer prototype operating from 50 to 58 GHz will be presented. The instrument is being developed as a laboratory testbed, and the goal of this work is to demonstrate the technologies needed to do atmospheric soundings with high spatial resolution from Geostationary orbit. The concept is to deploy a large sparse aperture Y-array from a geostationary satellite, and to use aperture synthesis to obtain images of the earth without the need for a large mechanically scanned antenna. The laboratory prototype consists of a Y-array of 24 horn antennas, MMIC receivers, and a digital cross-correlation sub-system. System studies are discussed, including an error budget which has been derived from numerical simulations. The error budget defines key requirements, such as null offsets, phase calibration, and antenna pattern knowledge. Details of the instrument design are discussed in the context of these requirements.

  8. Buckling-induced retraction of spherical shells: A study on the shape of aperture

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Sen; Xie, Yi Min; Li, Qing; Huang, Xiaodong; Zhou, Shiwei

    2015-01-01

    Buckling of soft matter is ubiquitous in nature and has attracted increasing interest recently. This paper studies the retractile behaviors of a spherical shell perforated by sophisticated apertures, attributed to the buckling-induced large deformation. The buckling patterns observed in experiments were reproduced in computational modeling by imposing velocity-controlled loads and eigenmode-affine geometric imperfection. It was found that the buckling behaviors were topologically sensitive with respect to the shape of dimple (aperture). The shell with rounded-square apertures had the maximal volume retraction ratio as well as the lowest energy consumption. An effective experimental procedure was established and the simulation results were validated in this study. PMID:26096171

  9. High power 808 nm vertical cavity surface emitting laser with multi-ring-shaped-aperture structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Y. Q.; Shang, C. Y.; Feng, Y.; Yan, C. L.; Zhao, Y. J.; Wang, Y. X.; Wang, X. H.; Liu, G. J.

    2011-02-01

    The carrier conglomeration effect has been one of the main problems in developing electrically pumped high power vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL) with large aperture. We demonstrate a high power 808 nm VCSEL with multi-ring-shaped-aperture (MRSA) to weaken the carrier conglomeration effect. Compared with typical VCSEL with single large aperture (SLA), the 300-μm-diameter VCSEL with MRSA has more uniform near field and far field patterns. Moreover, MRSA laser exhibits maximal CW light output power 0.3 W which is about 3 times that of SLA laser. And the maximal wall-plug efficiency of 17.4% is achieved, higher than that of SLA laser by 10%.

  10. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Microwave Radiometers : an Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colliander, Andreas; McKague, Darren

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes 1) the progress of the work of the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society (GRSS) Instrumentation and Future Technologies Technical Committee (IFT-TC) Microwave Radiometer Working Group and 2) an overview of the development of interferometric synthetic aperture microwave radiometers as an introduction to a dedicated session.

  11. Vowel Aperture and Syllable Segmentation in French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goslin, Jeremy; Frauenfelder, Ulrich H.

    2008-01-01

    The theories of Pulgram (1970) suggest that if the vowel of a French syllable is open then it will induce syllable segmentation responses that result in the syllable being closed, and vice versa. After the empirical verification that our target French-speaking population was capable of distinguishing between mid-vowel aperture, we examined the…

  12. Radiation safety considerations in proton aperture disposal.

    PubMed

    Walker, Priscilla K; Edwards, Andrew C; Das, Indra J; Johnstone, Peter A S

    2014-04-01

    Beam shaping in scattered and uniform scanned proton beam therapy (PBT) is made commonly by brass apertures. Due to proton interactions, these devices become radioactive and could pose safety issues and radiation hazards. Nearly 2,000 patient-specific devices per year are used at Indiana University Cyclotron Operations (IUCO) and IU Health Proton Therapy Center (IUHPTC); these devices require proper guidelines for disposal. IUCO practice has been to store these apertures for at least 4 mo to allow for safe transfer to recycling contractors. The devices require decay in two staged secure locations, including at least 4 mo in a separate building, at which point half are ready for disposal. At 6 mo, 20-30% of apertures require further storage. This process requires significant space and manpower and should be considered in the design process for new clinical facilities. More widespread adoption of pencil beam or spot scanning nozzles may obviate this issue, as apertures then will no longer be necessary.

  13. Perceiving Affordances for Fitting through Apertures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ishak, Shaziela; Adolph, Karen E.; Lin, Grace C.

    2008-01-01

    Affordances--possibilities for action--are constrained by the match between actors and their environments. For motor decisions to be adaptive, affordances must be detected accurately. Three experiments examined the correspondence between motor decisions and affordances as participants reached through apertures of varying size. A psychophysical…

  14. Demonstration of synthetic aperture imaging ladar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, W.; Marechal, N.; Buck, J.; Dickinson, R.; Kozlowski, D.; Wright, T.; Beck, S.

    2005-05-01

    The spatial resolution of a conventional imaging LADAR system is constrained by the diffraction limit of the telescope aperture. The purpose of this work is to investigate Synthetic Aperture Imaging LADAR (SAIL), which employs aperture synthesis with coherent laser radar to overcome the diffraction limit and achieve fine-resolution, long range, two-dimensional imaging with modest aperture diameters. This paper details our laboratory-scale SAIL testbed, digital signal processing techniques, and image results. A number of fine-resolution, well-focused SAIL images are shown including both retro-reflecting and diffuse scattering targets. A general digital signal processing solution to the laser waveform instability problem is described and demonstrated, involving both new algorithms and hardware elements. These algorithms are primarily data-driven, without a priori knowledge of waveform and sensor position, representing a crucial step in developing a robust imaging system. These techniques perform well on waveform errors, but not on external phase errors such as turbulence or vibration. As a first step towards mitigating phase errors of this type, we have developed a balanced, quadrature phase, laser vibrometer to work in conjunction with our SAIL system to measure and compensate for relative line of sight motion between the target and transceiver. We describe this system and present a comparison of the vibrometer-measured phase error with the phase error inferred from the SAIL data.

  15. Processing for spaceborne synthetic aperture radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lybanon, M.

    1973-01-01

    The data handling and processing in using synthetic aperture radar as a satellite-borne earth resources remote sensor is considered. The discussion covers the nature of the problem, the theory, both conventional and potential advanced processing techniques, and a complete computer simulation. It is shown that digital processing is a real possibility and suggests some future directions for research.

  16. Dynamic aperture of the recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Meiqin; Sen, Tanaji

    2000-11-15

    This report describes the dynamic aperture tracking for the Recycler Ring based on the latest modified lattice Ver 20. The purpose of the calculation is to check the optical properties of the lattice with the replacement of the high beta straight section (HB30) by a low beta straight section (LB30) for stochastic cooling.

  17. Sub-wavelength Laser Nanopatterning using Droplet Lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duocastella, Martí; Florian, Camilo; Serra, Pere; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-11-01

    When a drop of liquid falls onto a screen, e.g. a cell phone, the pixels lying underneath appear magnified. This lensing effect is a combination of the curvature and refractive index of the liquid droplet. Here, the spontaneous formation of such lenses is exploited to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional laser direct-writing system. In particular, micro-droplets are first laser-printed at user-defined locations on a surface and they are later used as lenses to focus the same laser beam. Under conditions described herein, nanopatterns can be obtained with a reduction in spot size primarily limited by the refractive index of the liquid. This all-optics approach is demonstrated by writing arbitrary patterns with a feature size around 280 nm, about one fourth of the processing wavelength.

  18. Sub-wavelength Laser Nanopatterning using Droplet Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Duocastella, Martí; Florian, Camilo; Serra, Pere; Diaspro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    When a drop of liquid falls onto a screen, e.g. a cell phone, the pixels lying underneath appear magnified. This lensing effect is a combination of the curvature and refractive index of the liquid droplet. Here, the spontaneous formation of such lenses is exploited to overcome the diffraction limit of a conventional laser direct-writing system. In particular, micro-droplets are first laser-printed at user-defined locations on a surface and they are later used as lenses to focus the same laser beam. Under conditions described herein, nanopatterns can be obtained with a reduction in spot size primarily limited by the refractive index of the liquid. This all-optics approach is demonstrated by writing arbitrary patterns with a feature size around 280 nm, about one fourth of the processing wavelength. PMID:26541765

  19. RF Performance of Membrane Aperture Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flint, Eirc M.; Lindler, Jason E.; Thomas, David L.; Romanofsky, Robert

    2007-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of recent results establishing the suitability of Membrane Aperture Shell Technology (MAST) for Radio Frequency (RF) applications. These single surface shells are capable of maintaining their figure with no preload or pressurization and minimal boundary support, yet can be compactly roll stowed and passively self deploy. As such, they are a promising technology for enabling a future generation of RF apertures. In this paper, we review recent experimental and numerical results quantifying suitable RF performance. It is shown that candidate materials possess metallic coatings with sufficiently low surface roughness and that these materials can be efficiently fabricated into RF relevant doubly curved shapes. A numerical justification for using a reflectivity metric, as opposed to the more standard RF designer metric of skin depth, is presented and the resulting ability to use relatively thin coating thickness is experimentally validated with material sample tests. The validity of these independent film sample measurements are then confirmed through experimental results measuring RF performance for reasonable sized doubly curved apertures. Currently available best results are 22 dBi gain at 3 GHz (S-Band) for a 0.5m aperture tested in prime focus mode, 28dBi gain for the same antenna in the C-Band (4 to 6 GHz), and 36.8dBi for a smaller 0.25m antenna tested at 32 GHz in the Ka-Band. RF range test results for a segmented aperture (one possible scaling approach) are shown as well. Measured antenna system actual efficiencies (relative to the unachievable) ideal for these on axis tests are generally quite good, typically ranging from 50 to 90%.

  20. Depth estimation from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suh, Sungjoo; Choi, Changkyu; Park, Dusik

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel depth estimation method from multiple coded apertures for 3D interaction. A flat panel display is transformed into lens-less multi-view cameras which consist of multiple coded apertures. The sensor panel behind the display captures the scene in front of the display through the imaging pattern of the modified uniformly redundant arrays (MURA) on the display panel. To estimate the depth of an object in the scene, we first generate a stack of synthetically refocused images at various distances by using the shifting and averaging approach for the captured coded images. And then, an initial depth map is obtained by applying a focus operator to a stack of the refocused images for each pixel. Finally, the depth is refined by fitting a parametric focus model to the response curves near the initial depth estimates. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm, we construct an imaging system to capture the scene in front of the display. The system consists of a display screen and an x-ray detector without a scintillator layer so as to act as a visible sensor panel. Experimental results confirm that the proposed method accurately determines the depth of an object including a human hand in front of the display by capturing multiple MURA coded images, generating refocused images at different depth levels, and refining the initial depth estimates.

  1. Simultaneous beam sampling and aperture shape optimization for SPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Ye, Yinyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital linear accelerators, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle, can be optimized simultaneously. SPORT promises to deliver remarkable radiation dose distributions in an efficient manner, yet there exists no optimization algorithm for its implementation. The purpose of this work is to develop an algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: The authors build a mathematical model with the fundamental station point parameters as the decision variables. To solve the resulting large-scale optimization problem, the authors devise an effective algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques: column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search. Column generation adds the most beneficial stations sequentially until the plan quality improvement saturates and provides a good starting point for the subsequent optimization. It also adds the new stations during the algorithm if beneficial. For each update resulted from column generation, the subgradient method improves the selected stations locally by reshaping the apertures and updating the beam angles toward a descent subgradient direction. The algorithm continues to improve the selected stations locally and globally by a pattern search algorithm to explore the part of search space not reachable by the subgradient method. By combining these three techniques together, all plausible combinations of station parameters are searched efficiently to yield the optimal solution. Results: A SPORT optimization framework with seamlessly integration of three complementary algorithms, column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search, was established. The proposed technique was applied to two previously treated clinical cases: a head and

  2. Characterization of three-dimensional field distribution of bowtie aperture using quasi-spherical waves and surface plasmon polaritons

    PubMed Central

    Park, Changhoon; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W.

    2017-01-01

    We present an analytical formula to predict the three-dimensional field distribution of a nanoscale bowtie aperture using quasi-spherical waves (QSWs) and surface plasmon polaritons, which are excited by the fundamental waveguide mode and local plasmons of the aperture, respectively. Assuming two separate bowtie apertures in a metal film, we analysed the decay characteristics of QSWs using a finite difference time-domain method. To verify the formula, we recorded the spot patterns of the bowtie aperture on a photoresist film using various exposure times, and fit the patterns to the analytical formula in terms of the width and depth of the patterns. In addition, it was found that the formula successfully represented the dipole characteristics of the spot patterns, which were in agreement with the surface geometry, with a root-mean-square error of 9.4%. We expect that our theoretical formula will extend the potential applications of nanoscale bowtie apertures to plasmonic device fabrication, three-dimensional plasmonic lithography, and other technologies. PMID:28358013

  3. Characterization of three-dimensional field distribution of bowtie aperture using quasi-spherical waves and surface plasmon polaritons.

    PubMed

    Park, Changhoon; Jung, Howon; Hahn, Jae W

    2017-03-30

    We present an analytical formula to predict the three-dimensional field distribution of a nanoscale bowtie aperture using quasi-spherical waves (QSWs) and surface plasmon polaritons, which are excited by the fundamental waveguide mode and local plasmons of the aperture, respectively. Assuming two separate bowtie apertures in a metal film, we analysed the decay characteristics of QSWs using a finite difference time-domain method. To verify the formula, we recorded the spot patterns of the bowtie aperture on a photoresist film using various exposure times, and fit the patterns to the analytical formula in terms of the width and depth of the patterns. In addition, it was found that the formula successfully represented the dipole characteristics of the spot patterns, which were in agreement with the surface geometry, with a root-mean-square error of 9.4%. We expect that our theoretical formula will extend the potential applications of nanoscale bowtie apertures to plasmonic device fabrication, three-dimensional plasmonic lithography, and other technologies.

  4. Fraunhofer diffraction of a slit aperture between a knife-edge and a metal cylinder.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, J; Sasaki, A; Matsuda, Y; Aoyama, H

    1995-12-01

    The Fraunhofer diffraction pattern of a slit aperture formed between a reference knife-edge and a metal-cylinder surface is different from that of an ideal slit aperture. This pattern should include reflected light coming from both the front and rear sides of a cylinder surface. To investigate the influence of light reflected from the cylinder surface, we discuss the theoretical consideration based on the simple model of the reflected light on the surface. The experimental setup is designed and constructed to measure the actual diffraction pattern produced by the slit between the knife-edge and the cylinder surface. As a result it is obvious that the reflection of diffracted light on the rear side is dominant in both the simulation and the experiment.

  5. Fractal characteristics of fracture roughness and aperture data

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Boernge, J.

    1991-05-01

    In this study mathematical expressions are developed for the characteristics of apertures between rough surfaces. It has shown that the correlation between the opposite surfaces influences the aperture properties and different models are presented for these different surface correlations. Fracture and apertures profiles measured from intact fractures are evaluated and it is found that they qualitatively follow the mathematically predicted trends.

  6. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, W.F.

    1983-08-31

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  7. Dual aperture dipole magnet with second harmonic component

    DOEpatents

    Praeg, Walter F.

    1985-01-01

    An improved dual aperture dipole electromagnet includes a second-harmonic frequency magnetic guide field winding which surrounds first harmonic frequency magnetic guide field windings associated with each aperture. The second harmonic winding and the first harmonic windings cooperate to produce resultant magnetic waveforms in the apertures which have extended acceleration and shortened reset portions of electromagnet operation.

  8. Vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection from laser-irradiated target

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, Robert F.; Mitchell, Kenneth B.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a vacuum aperture isolator for retroreflection of a laser-irradiated target. Within a vacuum chamber are disposed a beam focusing element, a disc having an aperture and a recollimating element. The edge of the focused beam impinges on the edge of the aperture to produce a plasma which refracts any retroreflected light from the laser's target.

  9. Semiconductor-based superlens for subwavelength resolution below the diffraction limit at extreme ultraviolet frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincenti, M. A.; D'Orazio, A.; Cappeddu, M. G.; Akozbek, Neset; Bloemer, M. J.; Scalora, M.

    2009-05-01

    We theoretically demonstrate negative refraction and subwavelength resolution below the diffraction limit in the UV and extreme UV ranges using semiconductors. The metal-like response of typical semiconductors such as GaAs or GaP makes it possible to achieve negative refraction and superguiding in resonant semiconductor/dielectric multilayer stacks, similar to what has been demonstrated in metallodielectric photonic band gap structures. The exploitation of this basic property in semiconductors raises the possibility of yet-untapped applications in the UV and soft x-ray ranges.

  10. Steering light by a sub-wavelength metallic grating from transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yadong; Fu, Yangyang; Chen, Huanyang

    2015-07-17

    Transformation optics has shown great ability in designing devices with novel functionalities, such as invisibility cloaking. A recent work shows that it can also be used to design metasurfaces which usually come from the concept of phase discontinuities. However, metasurfaces from transformation optics have very complicated material parameters. Here in this work, we propose a practical design, a sub-wavelength metallic grating with discrete and gradient index materials. Such a design not only inherits some functionalities of metasurfaces from phase discontinuities, but also shows richer physics. Our work will also provide a guidance to recent activities of acoustic metasurfaces, especially for those made of extremely anisotropic metamaterials.

  11. Optical Properties of Sub-Wavelength Dielectric Gratings and Their Application for Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    propagating GMRs of the grating itself. We performed the Raman experiment with the trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)-ethylene ( BPE ) molecules adsorbed on the...for both 632.8 nm and 784.5 nm laser. The integration time was at 10s. The sub-wavelength grating substrates coated with Au were soaked in 1 mM BPE ...in ethanol for 10 minutes. Then the substrates were washed with copious amounts of ethanol to remove the physically attached BPE molecules and

  12. Sub-wavelength ultrasonic therapy using a spherical cavity transducer with open ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Faqi; Wang, Hua; Zeng, Deping; Fan, Tingbo; Geng, Hao; Tu, Juan; Guo, Xiasheng; Gong, Xiaobo; Zhao, Chunliang; Wang, Zhilong; Zhang, Dong; Wang, Zhibiao

    2013-05-01

    High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focusing precision is limited by conventional focusing ultrasound methods. The aim of this study is to develop an ultrasonic focusing modality by using a spherical cavity transducer with open ends. Experimental measurements and numerical simulations were performed to study the acoustic field and the induced tissue lesion using this transducer. The results demonstrate that the focusing zone is smaller while the focusing gain of sound pressure is higher (about 3 times) than the conventional concave focusing method. The results demonstrate great clinical potentials of enhancing the precision of HIFU therapy to the sub-wavelength level.

  13. Magneto-exciton-polariton condensation in a sub-wavelength high contrast grating based vertical microcavity

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, J.; Brodbeck, S.; Worschech, L.; Kamp, M.; Schneider, C.; Höfling, S.; Zhang, B.; Wang, Z.; Deng, H.

    2014-03-03

    We comparably investigate the diamagnetic shift of an uncoupled quantum well exciton with a microcavity exciton-polariton condensate on the same device. The sample is composed of multiple GaAs quantum wells in an AlAs microcavity, surrounded by a Bragg reflector and a sub-wavelength high contrast grating reflector. Our study introduces an independent and easily applicable technique, namely, the measurement of the condensate diamagnetic shift, which directly probes matter contributions in polariton condensates and hence discriminates it from a conventional photon laser.

  14. Evanescent wave amplification and subwavelength imaging by ultrathin uniaxial μ-near-zero material

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yan

    2014-02-15

    We demonstrate strong evanescent wave amplification by a thin slab of uniaxial μ-near-zero (UMNZ) material. It is found that while retaining the same amplification effect, the slab can be made arbitrarily thin when the negative permeability along the axis of anisotropy approaches zero. Numerical results show that using a single layer of split-ring resonators (SRRs) with its thickness equal three thousandth of the incident wavelength (λ/3000), a subwavelength source distribution with λ/4 resolution can be transferred to a distance of λ/3.

  15. Enhanced absorption of graphene strips with a multilayer subwavelength grating structure

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jin-Hua; Huang, Yong-Qing Duan, Xiao-Feng; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xia; Wang, Jun; Ren, Xiao-Min

    2014-12-01

    The optical absorption of graphene strips covered on a multilayer subwavelength grating (MSG) surface is theoretically investigated. The absorption of graphene strips with MSG is enhanced in the wavelength range of 1500 nm to 1600 nm by critical coupling, which is associated with the combined effects of a guided resonance of MSG and its photonic band gap effect. The critical coupling of the graphene strips can be controlled by adjusting the incident angle without changing the structural parameters of MSG. The absorption of graphene strips can also be tuned by varying key parameters, such as grating period, strip width, and incident angle.

  16. Normal incidence filters using symmetry-protected modes in dielectric subwavelength gratings

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xuan; Tian, Hao; Du, Yan; Shi, Guang; Zhou, Zhongxiang

    2016-01-01

    We investigate narrowband transmission filters based on subwavelength-grating reflectors at normal incidence. Computational results show that the filtering is realized through symmetry-protected mode coupling. The guided mode resonances introduced by the slab layer allow flexible control of the filter frequencies. The quality factor of the filters could exceed 106. Dielectric gratings can be used over the entire range of electromagnetic waves, owing to their scale-invariant operations. Owing to the high refraction index and low index dispersion of semiconductors in the infrared range, these filters can be applied over a broad range from near infrared to terahertz frequencies. PMID:27824049

  17. Ultraviolet and solar-blind spectral imaging with subwavelength transmission gratings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, S. H.; Yu, E. T.

    2009-10-01

    Aluminum gratings with subwavelength slit widths were designed and analyzed for spectral filtering of ultraviolet (UV) light. Although schemes for optical wavelength filtering have been thoroughly studied, options for UV wavelength filtering are far more limited. We analyze the unique requirements for UV based imaging and evaluate the suitability of our structures by electromagnetic simulations and experimental measurements. Rayleigh-Wood anomalies are shown to lead to sharp drops in transmission at resonance wavelengths, producing a high finesse band reject filter. Finally, we show that the structures are effective for both TE and TM polarizations and easily integrated onto semiconductor photodetectors.

  18. Design of binary diffractive microlenses with subwavelength structures using the genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Tatsuya; Ishikawa, Kenichi L; Suzuki, Shuichi; Yamada, Yasufumi; Takahashi, Hiroyuki

    2010-04-12

    We present a method to design binary diffractive microlenses with subwavelength structures, based on the finite-difference time-domain method and the genetic algorithm, also accounting for limitations on feature size and aspect ratio imposed by fabrication. The focusing efficiency of the microlens designed by this method is close to that of the convex lens and much higher than that of the binary Fresnel lens designed by a previous method. Although the optimized structure appears to be a binary Fresnel lens qualitatively, it is hard to quantitatively derive directly from the convex Fresnel lens. The design of a microlens with reduced chromatic aberration is also presented.

  19. Far-field subwavelength imaging for ultrasonic elastic waves in a plate using an elastic hyperlens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyung Jin; Kim, Hoe Woong; Kim, Yoon Young

    2011-06-01

    Subwavelength imaging was experimentally performed for ultrasonic elastic waves by using an angularly stratified plat, an elastic plate hyperlens. It consists of alternating layers of aluminum and air, exhibiting a large contrast in elastic stiffness. A specially configured experimental setup is used to locate two sources within half the wavelength at 100 kHz. To explain the observed phenomenon, the homogenization of the elasticity coefficients of the stratified structure is employed. Because of the strong cylindrical anisotropy, an equifrequency contour becomes nearly flat along the angular wave vector so that evanescent waves involved with high angular resolution are converted to propagating waves.

  20. Optical beam focusing by a single subwavelength metal slit surrounded by chirped dielectric surface gratings

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Seyoon; Lim, Yongjun; Kim, Hwi; Park, Junghyun; Lee, Byoungho

    2008-01-07

    A method for optical beam focusing by a single subwavelength metal slit surrounded by surface gratings is proposed. In our proposed method, the period of each surface grating is chirped so that the radiation fields of surface plasmon polaritons can be controlled to make a beam spot at the desired focal length. Through our proposed method, it is numerically shown that we can make a beam spot which is located at the several times of wavelength distance from the slit, and its focal length can be controlled.

  1. Nanopillar optical antenna nBn detectors for subwavelength infrared pixels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chung Hong; Senanayake, Pradeep; Lee, Wook-Jae; Farrell, Alan; Hsieh, Nick; Huffaker, Diana L.

    2015-06-01

    The size, weight and power (SWaP) of state of the art infrared focal plane arrays are limited by the pixel size approaching the diffraction limit. We investigate a novel detector architecture which allows improvements in detectivity by shrinking the absorber volume while maintaining high quantum efficiency and wide field of view (FOV). It has been previously shown that the Nanopillar Optical Antenna (NOA) utilizes 3D plasmonic modes to funnel light into a subwavelength nanopillar absorber. We show detailed electro-optical simulations for the NOA-nBn architecture for overcoming generation recombination current with suitable surface passivation to achieve background limited infrared performance.

  2. Adjustment of ablation shapes and subwavelength ripples based on electron dynamics control by designing femtosecond laser pulse trains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Yanping; Jiang, Lan; Li, Xin; Wang, Cong; Lu, Yongfeng

    2012-11-01

    A quantum model is proposed to investigate femtosecond laser pulse trains processing of dielectrics by including the plasma model with the consideration of laser particle-wave duality. Central wavelengths (400 nm and 800 nm) strongly impact the surface plasmon field distribution, the coupling field intensity distribution (between the absorbed intensity and the surface plasma), and the distribution of transient localized free electron density in the material. This, in turn, significantly changes the localized transient optical/thermal properties during laser materials processing. The effects of central wavelengths on ablation shapes and subwavelength ripples are discussed. The simulation results show that: (1) ablation shapes and the spacing of subwavelength ripples can be adjusted by localized transient electron dynamics control using femtosecond laser pulse trains; (2) the adjustment of the radii of ablation shapes is stronger than that of the periods of subwavelength ripples.

  3. LOW-Tg Bismuth Phosphate Glasses for Glass-Imprinting and Fabrication of 2d Sub-Wavelength Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Naoyuki; Fukumi, Kohei; Nakamura, Junichi; Hidaka, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Takurou; Hashima, Hidekazu; Nishii, Junji

    We have developed zinc-bismuth-phosphate glasses, which have deformation temperatures under 450°C and refractive indices higher than 1.7, in order to produce an antireflection structure on the surface by a glass-imprinting process. Two-dimensionally arrayed conical cavities of sub-wavelength size were fabricated on a SiC mold by electron lithography and dry etching techniques. The sub-wavelength periodic structure was transferred onto the glass surface by a glass-imprinting process using the mold. The sub-wavelength structure suppressed the reflectance by approximately 90%. A weak maximum was observed in the reflection spectra around 400-500 nm, which decreased in intensity and shifted toward shorter wavelengths with decreasing pitch.

  4. Transverse Mode Structure and Pattern Formation in Oxide Confined Vertical Cavity Semiconductor Lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Choquette, K.D.; Geib, K.M.; Hegarty, S.P.; Hou, H.Q.; Huyet, G.; McInerney, J.G.; Porta, P.

    1999-07-06

    We analyze the transverse profiles of oxide-confined vertical cavity laser diodes as a function of aperture size. For small apertures we demonstrate that thermal lensing can be the dominant effect in determining the transverse resonator properties. We also analyze pattern formation in lasers with large apertures where we observe the appearance of tilted waves.

  5. Remote sensing with spaceborne synthetic aperture imaging radars: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cimino, J. B.; Elachi, C.

    1983-01-01

    A review is given of remote sensing with Spaceborne Synthetic Aperture Radars (SAR's). In 1978, a spaceborne SA was flown on the SEASAT satellite. It acquired high resulution images over many regions in North America and the North Pacific. The acquired data clearly demonstrate the capability of spaceborne SARs to: image and track polar ice floes; image ocean surface patterns including swells, internal waves, current boundaries, weather boundaries and vessels; and image land features which are used to acquire information about the surface geology and land cover. In 1981, another SAR was flown on the second shuttle flight. This Shuttle Imaging Radar (SIR-A) acquired land and ocean images over many areas around the world. The emphasis of the SIR-A experiment was mainly toward geologic mapping. Some of the key results of the SIR-A experiment are given.

  6. Moving receive beam method and apparatus for synthetic aperture radar

    DOEpatents

    Kare, Jordin T.

    2001-01-01

    A method and apparatus for improving the performance of Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems by reducing the effect of "edge losses" associated with nonuniform receiver antenna gain. By moving the receiver antenna pattern in synchrony with the apparent motion of the transmitted pulse along the ground, the maximum available receiver antenna gain can be used at all times. Also, the receiver antenna gain for range-ambiguous return signals may be reduced, in some cases, by a large factor. The beam motion can be implemented by real-time adjustment of phase shifters in an electronically-steered phased-array antenna or by electronic switching of feed horns in a reflector antenna system.

  7. Large aperture compound lenses made of lithium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cremer, J. T.; Piestrup, M. A.; Beguiristain, H. R.; Gary, C. K.; Pantell, R. H.

    2003-04-01

    We have measured the intensity profile and transmission of x rays focused by a series of biconcave parabolic unit lenses fabricated in lithium. For specified focal length and photon energy lithium compound refractive lenses (CRL) have a larger transmission, aperture size, and gain compared to aluminum, kapton, and beryllium CRLs. The lithium compound refractive lens was composed of 335 biconcave, parabolic unit lenses each with an on-axis radius of curvature of 0.95 mm. Two-dimensional focusing was obtained at 8.0 keV with a focal length of 95 cm. The effective aperture of the CRL was measured to be 1030 μm with on-axis (peak) transmissions of 27% and an on-axis intensity gain of 18.9.

  8. Compact high precision adjustable beam defining aperture

    DOEpatents

    Morton, Simon A; Dickert, Jeffrey

    2013-07-02

    The present invention provides an adjustable aperture for limiting the dimension of a beam of energy. In an exemplary embodiment, the aperture includes (1) at least one piezoelectric bender, where a fixed end of the bender is attached to a common support structure via a first attachment and where a movable end of the bender is movable in response to an actuating voltage applied to the bender and (2) at least one blade attached to the movable end of the bender via a second attachment such that the blade is capable of impinging upon the beam. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is electromagnetic radiation. In an exemplary embodiment, the beam of energy is X-rays.

  9. Performance limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2006-02-01

    The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is often difficult to ''get your arms around'' the problem of ascertaining achievable performance limits, and yet those limits exist and are dictated by physics, no matter how bright the engineer tasked to generate a system design. This report identifies and explores those limits, and how they depend on hardware system parameters and environmental conditions. Ultimately, this leads to a characterization of parameters that offer optimum performance for the overall SAR system. For example, there are definite optimum frequency bands that depend on weather conditions and range, and minimum radar PRF for a fixed real antenna aperture dimension is independent of frequency. While the information herein is not new to the literature, its collection into a single report hopes to offer some value in reducing the ''seek time''.

  10. Design of large aperture focal plane shutter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jia-wen; Ma, Wen-li; Huang, Jin-long

    2012-09-01

    To satisfy the requirement of large telescope, a large aperture focal plane shutter with aperture size of φ200mm was researched and designed to realize, which could be started and stopped in a relative short time with precise position, and also the blades could open and close at the same time at any orientation. Timing-belts and stepper motors were adopted as the drive mechanism. Velocity and position of the stepper motors were controlled by the PWM pulse generated by DSP. Exponential curve is applied to control the velocity of the stepper motors to make the shutter start and stop in a short time. The closing/open time of shutter is 0.2s, which meets the performance requirements of large telescope properly.

  11. Polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy

    PubMed Central

    South, Fredrick A.; Liu, Yuan-Zhi; Xu, Yang; Shemonski, Nathan D.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional optical microscopy suffers from the well-known compromise between transverse resolution and depth-of-field. This is true for both structural imaging methods and their functional extensions. Interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (ISAM) is a solution to the 3D coherent microscopy inverse problem that provides depth-independent transverse resolution. We demonstrate the extension of ISAM to polarization sensitive imaging, termed polarization-sensitive interferometric synthetic aperture microscopy (PS-ISAM). This technique is the first functionalization of the ISAM method and provides improved depth-of-field for polarization-sensitive imaging. The basic assumptions of polarization-sensitive imaging are explored, and refocusing of birefringent structures is experimentally demonstrated. PS-ISAM enables high-resolution volumetric imaging of birefringent materials and tissue. PMID:26648593

  12. Large-Aperture Membrane Active Phased-Array Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Karasik, Boris; McGrath, William; Leduc, Henry

    2009-01-01

    Large-aperture phased-array microwave antennas supported by membranes are being developed for use in spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar systems. There may also be terrestrial uses for such antennas supported on stationary membranes, large balloons, and blimps. These antennas are expected to have areal mass densities of about 2 kg/sq m, satisfying a need for lightweight alternatives to conventional rigid phased-array antennas, which have typical areal mass densities between 8 and 15 kg/sq m. The differences in areal mass densities translate to substantial differences in total mass in contemplated applications involving aperture areas as large as 400 sq m. A membrane phased-array antenna includes patch antenna elements in a repeating pattern. All previously reported membrane antennas were passive antennas; this is the first active membrane antenna that includes transmitting/receiving (T/R) electronic circuits as integral parts. Other integral parts of the antenna include a network of radio-frequency (RF) feed lines (more specifically, a corporate feed network) and of bias and control lines, all in the form of flexible copper strip conductors on flexible polymeric membranes. Each unit cell of a prototype antenna (see Figure 1) contains a patch antenna element and a compact T/R module that is compatible with flexible membrane circuitry. There are two membrane layers separated by a 12.7-mm air gap. Each membrane layer is made from a commercially available flexible circuit material that, as supplied, comprises a 127-micron-thick polyimide dielectric layer clad on both sides with 17.5-micron-thick copper layers. The copper layers are patterned into RF, bias, and control conductors. The T/R module is located on the back side of the ground plane and is RF-coupled to the patch element via a slot. The T/R module is a hybrid multilayer module assembled and packaged independently and attached to the membrane array. At the time of reporting the information for

  13. Aperture modulated, translating bed total body irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Amjad; Villarreal-Barajas, Jose Eduardo; Dunscombe, Peter; Brown, Derek W.

    2011-02-15

    Purpose: Total body irradiation (TBI) techniques aim to deliver a uniform radiation dose to a patient with an irregular body contour and a heterogeneous density distribution to within {+-}10% of the prescribed dose. In the current article, the authors present a novel, aperture modulated, translating bed TBI (AMTBI) technique that produces a high degree of dose uniformity throughout the entire patient. Methods: The radiation beam is dynamically shaped in two dimensions using a multileaf collimator (MLC). The irregular surface compensation algorithm in the Eclipse treatment planning system is used for fluence optimization, which is performed based on penetration depth and internal inhomogeneities. Two optimal fluence maps (AP and PA) are generated and beam apertures are created to deliver these optimal fluences. During treatment, the patient/phantom is translated on a motorized bed close to the floor (source to bed distance: 204.5 cm) under a stationary radiation beam with 0 deg. gantry angle. The bed motion and dynamic beam apertures are synchronized. Results: The AMTBI technique produces a more homogeneous dose distribution than fixed open beam translating bed TBI. In phantom studies, the dose deviation along the midline is reduced from 10% to less than 5% of the prescribed dose in the longitudinal direction. Dose to the lung is reduced by more than 15% compared to the unshielded fixed open beam technique. At the lateral body edges, the dose received from the open beam technique was 20% higher than that prescribed at umbilicus midplane. With AMTBI the dose deviation in this same region is reduced to less than 3% of the prescribed dose. Validation of the technique was performed using thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Rando phantom. Agreement between calculation and measurement was better than 3% in all cases. Conclusions: A novel, translating bed, aperture modulated TBI technique that employs dynamically shaped MLC defined beams is shown to improve dose uniformity

  14. Infrared interferometer with a scanned aperture.

    PubMed

    Edwin, R P

    1975-08-01

    A Twyman-Green interferometer operating at a 3.39-microm wavelength has been built in which the collimator aperture was scanned by a laser beam. The scanning was produced by reflecting the laser beam from a mirror supported by four piezoelectric elements and oscillated about two orthogonal axes. The radiation transmitted by the interferometer was measured by a stationary detector of small area. The complete system offers a cheap and efficient alternative to conventional ir interferometers.

  15. Synthetic aperture ladar concept for infrastructure monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turbide, Simon; Marchese, Linda; Terroux, Marc; Bergeron, Alain

    2014-10-01

    Long range surveillance of infrastructure is a critical need in numerous security applications, both civilian and military. Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) continues to provide high resolution radar images in all weather conditions from remote distances. As well, Interferometric SAR (InSAR) and Differential Interferometric SAR (D-InSAR) have become powerful tools adding high resolution elevation and change detection measurements. State of the art SAR systems based on dual-use satellites are capable of providing ground resolutions of one meter; while their airborne counterparts obtain resolutions of 10 cm. D-InSAR products based on these systems could produce cm-scale vertical resolution image products. Deformation monitoring of railways, roads, buildings, cellular antennas, power structures (i.e., power lines, wind turbines, dams, or nuclear plants) would benefit from improved resolution, both in the ground plane and vertical direction. The ultimate limitation to the achievable resolution of any imaging system is its wavelength. State-of-the art SAR systems are approaching this limit. The natural extension to improve resolution is to thus decrease the wavelength, i.e. design a synthetic aperture system in a different wavelength regime. One such system offering the potential for vastly improved resolution is Synthetic Aperture Ladar (SAL). This system operates at infrared wavelengths, ten thousand times smaller than radar wavelengths. This paper presents a laboratory demonstration of a scaled-down infrastructure deformation monitoring with an Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Ladar (IFSAL) system operating at 1.5 μm. Results show sub-millimeter precision on the deformation applied to the target.

  16. Performance Limits for Synthetic Aperture Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-02-01

    LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT Same as Report ( SAR ) 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 70 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE PERSON a. REPORT unclassified b. ABSTRACT...second edition Armin W. Doerry SAR Applications Department Sandia National Laboratories PO Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185-1330...ABSTRACT The performance of a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) system depends on a variety of factors, many which are interdependent in some manner. It is

  17. Vortex characteristics of Fraunhofer diffractions of a plane wave by a spiral phase plate limited by pseudoring polygonal apertures.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huiqin; Wang, Taofen; Zhu, Kaicheng

    2008-08-15

    We introduce a multilevel spiral phase plate (SPP) limited by a pseudoring polygonal aperture (PRPA). Such an SPP has the advantages of easier fabrication and greater suppression of the sidelobes of the diffraction field over that generated with a polygonal aperture (PA). The Fraunhofer diffraction fields generated by an SPP with a PRPA or with a PA have the same topological charge features and a similar diffraction pattern. Numerical evaluations show that the maximum bright annular-intensity difference between the diffraction patterns for the SPP with a PRPA and that of a PA does not exceed 3% under optimal design parameters.

  18. Metal-dielectric composites for beam splitting and far-field deep sub-wavelength resolution for visible wavelengths.

    PubMed

    Yan, Changchun; Zhang, Dao Hua; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Dongdong; Fiddy, M A

    2010-07-05

    We report beam splitting in a metamaterial composed of a silver-alumina composite covered by a layer of chromium containing one slit. By simulating distributions of energy flow in the metamaterial for H-polarized waves, we find that the beam splitting occurs when the width of the slit is shorter than the wavelength, which is conducive to making a beam splitter in sub-wavelength photonic devices. We also find that the metamaterial possesses deep sub-wavelength resolution capabilities in the far field when there are two slits and the central silver layer is at least 36 nm in thickness, which has potential applications in superresolution imaging.

  19. Rapid production of large-area deep sub-wavelength hybrid structures by femtosecond laser light-field tailoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Qi-Dai E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn; Yang, Rui; Xu, Bin-Bin; Wang, Hai-Yu; Yang, Hai; Huo, Cheng-Song; Tu, Hai-Ling; Sun, Hong-Bo E-mail: hbsun@jlu.edu.cn

    2014-01-20

    The goal of creation of large-area deep sub-wavelength nanostructures by femtosecond laser irradiation onto various materials is being hindered by the limited coherence length. Here, we report solution of the problem by light field tailoring of the incident beam with a phase mask, which serves generation of wavelets. Direct interference between the wavelets, here the first-order diffracted beams, and interference between a wavelet and its induced waves such as surface plasmon polariton are responsible for creation of microgratings and superimposed nanogratings, respectively. The principle of wavelets interference enables extension of uniformly induced hybrid structures containing deep sub-wavelength nanofeatures to macro-dimension.

  20. Substrate effect on aperture resonances in a thin metal film.

    PubMed

    Kang, J H; Choe, Jong-Ho; Kim, D S; Park, Q-Han

    2009-08-31

    We present a simple theoretical model to study the effect of a substrate on the resonance of an aperture in a thin metal film. The transmitted energy through an aperture is shown to be governed by the coupling of aperture waveguide mode to the incoming and the outgoing electromagnetic waves into the substrate region. Aperture resonance in the energy transmission thus depends critically on the refractive index of a substrate. We explain the substrate effect on aperture resonance in terms of destructive interference among evanescent modes or impedance mismatch. Our model shows an excellent agreement with a rigorous FDTD calculation and is consistent with previous experimental observations.

  1. Synthetic aperture radar processing with tiered subapertures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, A.W.

    1994-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is used to form images that are maps of radar reflectivity of some scene of interest, from range soundings taken over some spatial aperture. Additionally, the range soundings are typically synthesized from a sampled frequency aperture. Efficient processing of the collected data necessitates using efficient digital signal processing techniques such as vector multiplies and fast implementations of the Discrete Fourier Transform. Inherent in image formation algorithms that use these is a trade-off between the size of the scene that can be acceptably imaged, and the resolution with which the image can be made. These limits arise from migration errors and spatially variant phase errors, and different algorithms mitigate these to varying degrees. Two fairly successful algorithms for airborne SARs are Polar Format processing, and Overlapped Subaperture (OSA) processing. This report introduces and summarizes the analysis of generalized Tiered Subaperture (TSA) techniques that are a superset of both Polar Format processing and OSA processing. It is shown how tiers of subapertures in both azimuth and range can effectively mitigate both migration errors and spatially variant phase errors to allow virtually arbitrary scene sizes, even in a dynamic motion environment.

  2. Restoring Aperture Profile At Sample Plane

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J L; Hackel, R P; Lungershausen, A W

    2003-08-03

    Off-line conditioning of full-size optics for the National Ignition Facility required a beam delivery system to allow conditioning lasers to rapidly raster scan samples while achieving several technical goals. The main purpose of the optical system designed was to reconstruct at the sample plane the flat beam profile found at the laser aperture with significant reductions in beam wander to improve scan times. Another design goal was the ability to vary the beam size at the sample to scan at different fluences while utilizing all of the laser power and minimizing processing time. An optical solution was developed using commercial off-the-shelf lenses. The system incorporates a six meter relay telescope and two sets of focusing optics. The spacing of the focusing optics is changed to allow the fluence on the sample to vary from 2 to 14 Joules per square centimeter in discrete steps. More importantly, these optics use the special properties of image relaying to image the aperture plane onto the sample to form a pupil relay with a beam profile corresponding almost exactly to the flat profile found at the aperture. A flat beam profile speeds scanning by providing a uniform intensity across a larger area on the sample. The relayed pupil plane is more stable with regards to jitter and beam wander. Image relaying also reduces other perturbations from diffraction, scatter, and focus conditions. Image relaying, laser conditioning, and the optical system designed to accomplish the stated goals are discussed.

  3. Large aperture adaptive optics for intense lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deneuville, François; Ropert, Laurent; Sauvageot, Paul; Theis, Sébastien

    2015-05-01

    ISP SYSTEM has developed a range of large aperture electro-mechanical deformable mirrors (DM) suitable for ultra short pulsed intense lasers. The design of the MD-AME deformable mirror is based on force application on numerous locations thanks to electromechanical actuators driven by stepper motors. DM design and assembly method have been adapted to large aperture beams and the performances were evaluated on a first application for a beam with a diameter of 250mm at 45° angle of incidence. A Strehl ratio above 0.9 was reached for this application. Simulations were correlated with measurements on optical bench and the design has been validated by calculation for very large aperture (up to Ø550mm). Optical aberrations up to Zernike order 5 can be corrected with a very low residual error as for actual MD-AME mirror. Amplitude can reach up to several hundreds of μm for low order corrections. Hysteresis is lower than 0.1% and linearity better than 99%. Contrary to piezo-electric actuators, the μ-AME actuators avoid print-through effects and they permit to keep the mirror shape stable even unpowered, providing a high resistance to electro-magnetic pulses. The MD-AME mirrors can be adapted to circular, square or elliptical beams and they are compatible with all dielectric or metallic coatings.

  4. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-01-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  5. The AdaptiSPECT Imaging Aperture

    PubMed Central

    Chaix, Cécile; Moore, Jared W.; Van Holen, Roel; Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the imaging aperture of an adaptive SPECT imaging system being developed at the Center for Gamma Ray Imaging (AdaptiSPECT). AdaptiSPECT is designed to automatically change its configuration in response to preliminary data, in order to improve image quality for a particular task. In a traditional pinhole SPECT imaging system, the characteristics (magnification, resolution, field of view) are set by the geometry of the system, and any modification can be accomplished only by manually changing the collimator and the distance of the detector to the center of the field of view. Optimization of the imaging system for a specific task on a specific individual is therefore difficult. In an adaptive SPECT imaging system, on the other hand, the configuration can be conveniently changed under computer control. A key component of an adaptive SPECT system is its aperture. In this paper, we present the design, specifications, and fabrication of the adaptive pinhole aperture that will be used for AdaptiSPECT, as well as the controls that enable autonomous adaptation. PMID:27019577

  6. Synthetic aperture imaging in ultrasound calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Jayaranthe, Uditha L.; Chen, Elvis C. S.; Peters, Terry M.

    2014-03-01

    Ultrasound calibration allows for ultrasound images to be incorporated into a variety of interventional applica­ tions. Traditional Z- bar calibration procedures rely on wired phantoms with an a priori known geometry. The line fiducials produce small, localized echoes which are then segmented from an array of ultrasound images from different tracked probe positions. In conventional B-mode ultrasound, the wires at greater depths appear blurred and are difficult to segment accurately, limiting the accuracy of ultrasound calibration. This paper presents a novel ultrasound calibration procedure that takes advantage of synthetic aperture imaging to reconstruct high resolution ultrasound images at arbitrary depths. In these images, line fiducials are much more readily and accu­ rately segmented, leading to decreased calibration error. The proposed calibration technique is compared to one based on B-mode ultrasound. The fiducial localization error was improved from 0.21mm in conventional B-mode images to 0.15mm in synthetic aperture images corresponding to an improvement of 29%. This resulted in an overall reduction of calibration error from a target registration error of 2.00mm to 1.78mm, an improvement of 11%. Synthetic aperture images display greatly improved segmentation capabilities due to their improved resolution and interpretability resulting in improved calibration.

  7. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, Chris; Null, Tom; Wagstaff, Ronald A.

    2003-04-01

    Achieving fine resolution bearing estimates for multiple sources using acoustic arrays with small apertures, in number of wavelengths, is a difficult challenge. It requires both large signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gains and very narrow beam responses. High resolution beamforming for small aperture arrays is accomplished by exploiting acoustical fluctuations. Acoustical fluctuations in the atmosphere are caused by wind turbulence along the propagation path, air turbulence at the sensor, source/receiver motion, unsteady source level, and fine scale temperature variations. Similar environmental and source dependent phenomena cause fluctuations in other propagation media, e.g., undersea, optics, infrared. Amplitude fluctuations are exploited to deconvolve the beam response functions from the beamformed data of small arrays to achieve high spatial resolution, i.e., fine bearing resolution, and substantial SNR gain. Results are presented for a six microphone low-frequency array with an aperture of less than three wavelengths. [Work supported by U.S. Army Armament Research Development and Engineering Center.

  8. Coded-aperture imaging in nuclear medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Warren E.; Barrett, Harrison H.; Aarsvold, John N.

    1989-11-01

    Coded-aperture imaging is a technique for imaging sources that emit high-energy radiation. This type of imaging involves shadow casting and not reflection or refraction. High-energy sources exist in x ray and gamma-ray astronomy, nuclear reactor fuel-rod imaging, and nuclear medicine. Of these three areas nuclear medicine is perhaps the most challenging because of the limited amount of radiation available and because a three-dimensional source distribution is to be determined. In nuclear medicine a radioactive pharmaceutical is administered to a patient. The pharmaceutical is designed to be taken up by a particular organ of interest, and its distribution provides clinical information about the function of the organ, or the presence of lesions within the organ. This distribution is determined from spatial measurements of the radiation emitted by the radiopharmaceutical. The principles of imaging radiopharmaceutical distributions with coded apertures are reviewed. Included is a discussion of linear shift-variant projection operators and the associated inverse problem. A system developed at the University of Arizona in Tucson consisting of small modular gamma-ray cameras fitted with coded apertures is described.

  9. Filled aperture concepts for the Terrestrial Planet Finder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridgway, Stephen T.

    2003-02-01

    Filled aperture telescopes can deliver a real, high Strehl image which is well suited for discrimination of faint planets in the vicinity of bright stars and against an extended exo-zodiacal light. A filled aperture offers a rich variety of PSF control and diffraction suppression techniques. Filled apertures are under consideration for a wide spectral range, including visible and thermal-IR, each of which offers a significant selection of biomarker molecular bands. A filled aperture visible TPF may be simpler in several respects than a thermal-IR nuller. The required aperture size (or baseline) is much smaller, and no cryogenic systems are required. A filled aperture TPF would look and act like a normal telescope - vendors and users alike would be comfortable with its design and operation. Filled aperture telescopes pose significant challenges in production of large primary mirrors, and in very stringent wavefront requirements. Stability of the wavefront control, and hence of the PSF, is a major issue for filled aperture systems. Several groups have concluded that these and other issues can be resolved, and that filled aperture options are competitive for a TPF precursor and/or for the full TPF mission. Ball, Boeing-SVS and TRW have recently returned architecture reviews on filled aperture TPF concepts. In this paper, I will review some of the major considerations underlying these filled aperture concepts, and suggest key issues in a TPF Buyers Guide.

  10. Coherent synthetic imaging using multi-aperture scanning Fourier ptychography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zongliang; Ma, Haotong; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge

    2016-10-01

    The high resolution is what the synthetic aperture technique quests for. In this paper, we propose an approach of coherent synthetic imaging with sparse aperture systems using multi-aperture scanning Fourier ptychography algorithm, which can further improve the resolution of sparse aperture systems. The reported technique first acquires a series of raw images by scanning a sparse aperture system and then the captured images are used to synthesize a larger spectrum in the frequency domain using aperture-scanning Fourier ptychography algorithm. The system's traveling circumvent its diffraction limit so that a super-resolution image can be obtained. Numerical simulation demonstrates the validity. The technique proposed in this paper may find wide applications in synthetic aperture imaging and astronomy.

  11. Imaging performance of annular apertures. II - Line spread functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tschunko, H. F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Line images formed by aberration-free optical systems with annular apertures are investigated in the whole range of central obstruction ratios. Annular apertures form lines images with central and side line groups. The number of lines in each line group is given by the ratio of the outer diameter of the annular aperture divided by the width of the annulus. The theoretical energy fraction of 0.889 in the central line of the image formed by an unobstructed aperture increases for centrally obstructed apertures to 0.932 for the central line group. Energy fractions for the central and side line groups are practically constant for all obstruction ratios and for each line group. The illumination of rectangular secondary apertures of various length/width ratios by apertures of various obstruction ratios is discussed.

  12. Rank minimization code aperture design for spectrally selective compressive imaging.

    PubMed

    Arguello, Henry; Arce, Gonzalo R

    2013-03-01

    A new code aperture design framework for multiframe code aperture snapshot spectral imaging (CASSI) system is presented. It aims at the optimization of code aperture sets such that a group of compressive spectral measurements is constructed, each with information from a specific subset of bands. A matrix representation of CASSI is introduced that permits the optimization of spectrally selective code aperture sets. Furthermore, each code aperture set forms a matrix such that rank minimization is used to reduce the number of CASSI shots needed. Conditions for the code apertures are identified such that a restricted isometry property in the CASSI compressive measurements is satisfied with higher probability. Simulations show higher quality of spectral image reconstruction than that attained by systems using Hadamard or random code aperture sets.

  13. Polarized GaN-based LED with an integrated multi-layer subwavelength structure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guiju; Wang, Chinhua; Cao, Bing; Huang, Zengli; Wang, Jianfeng; Zhang, Baoshun; Xu, Ke

    2010-03-29

    A novel type of GaN-based LED with a highly polarized output using an integrated multi-layer subwavelength grating structure is proposed. Characteristics of both optical transmission and polarization extinction ratio of the polarized GaN-based LED with three different multi-layer subwavelength structures are investigated. It is found that both TM transmission (T(TM)) and the extinction ratio(ER) of the LED output can be effectively enhanced by incorporating a dielectric transition layer between the metal grating and GaN substrate with a lower refractive index than that of the GaN substrate. Flat sensitivity of the T(TM) on the period, duty cycle of the metallic grating, and the wide range of operating wavelength have been achieved in contrast to the conventional sensitive behavior in single-layer metallic grating. Up to 0.75 high duty cycle of the metallic grating can be employed to achieve >60dB ER while T(TM) maintains higher than ~90%, which breaks the conventional limit of T(TM) and ER being always a pair of trade-off parameters. Typical optimized multilayer structures in terms of material, thickness, grating periods and duty cycle using MgF(2) and ZnS, respectively, as the transition layers are obtained. The results provide guidance in designing, optimizing and fabricating the novel integrated GaN-based and polarized photonic devices.

  14. Organized chromophoric assemblies for nonlinear optical materials: towards (sub)wavelength scale architectures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jialiang; Semin, Sergey; Rasing, Theo; Rowan, Alan E

    2015-03-01

    Photonic circuits are expected to greatly contribute to the next generation of integrated chips, as electronic integrated circuits become confronted with bottlenecks such as heat generation and bandwidth limitations. One of the main challenges for the state-of-the-art photonic circuits lies in the development of optical materials with high nonlinear optical (NLO) susceptibilities, in particular in the wavelength and subwavelength dimensions which are compatible with on-chip technologies. In this review, the varied approaches to micro-/nanosized NLO materials based on building blocks of bio- and biomimetic molecules, as well as synthetic D-π-A chromophores, have been categorized as supramolecular self-assemblies, molecular scaffolds, and external force directed assemblies. Such molecular and supramolecular NLO materials have intrinsic advantages, such as structural diversities, high NLO susceptibilities, and clear structure-property relationships. These "bottom-up" fabrication approaches are proposed to be combined with the "top-down" techniques such as lithography, etc., to generate multifunctionality by coupling light and matter on the (sub)wavelength scale.

  15. Application of holographic sub-wavelength diffraction gratings for monitoring of kinetics of bioprocesses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tamulevičius, Tomas; Šeperys, Rimas; Andrulevičius, Mindaugas; Kopustinskas, Vitoldas; Meškinis, Šarūnas; Tamulevičius, Sigitas; Mikalayeva, Valeryia; Daugelavičius, Rimantas

    2012-09-01

    In this work we present a refractive index (RI) sensor based on a sub-wavelength holographic diffraction grating. The sensor chip was fabricated by dry etching of the finely spaced (d = 428 nm) diffraction grating in SiOx doped diamond like carbon (DLC) film. It is shown that employing a fabricated sensor chip, and using the proposed method of analysis of data, one can inspect kinetics of processes in liquids occurring in the vicinity of the grating surface. The method is based on the spectral composition analysis of polarized polychromatic light reflected from the sub-wavelength diffraction grating. The RI measurement system was tested with different model liquid analytes including 25 wt.%, 50 wt.% sugar water solutions, 10 °C, 50 °C distilled water, also Gram-positive bacteria Bacillus subtilis interaction with ion-permeable channels forming antibiotic gramicidin D and a murolytic enzyme lysozyme. Analysis of the data set of specular reflection spectra enabled us to follow the kinetics of the RI changes in the analyte with millisecond resolution. Detectable changes in the effective RI were not worse than Δn = 10-4.

  16. Three-dimensional all-dielectric metamaterial solid immersion lens for subwavelength imaging at visible frequencies

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Wen; Yan, Bing; Wang, Zengbo; Wu, Limin

    2016-01-01

    Although all-dielectric metamaterials offer a low-loss alternative to current metal-based metamaterials to manipulate light at the nanoscale and may have important applications, very few have been reported to date owing to the current nanofabrication technologies. We develop a new “nano–solid-fluid assembly” method using 15-nm TiO2 nanoparticles as building blocks to fabricate the first three-dimensional (3D) all-dielectric metamaterial at visible frequencies. Because of its optical transparency, high refractive index, and deep-subwavelength structures, this 3D all-dielectric metamaterial-based solid immersion lens (mSIL) can produce a sharp image with a super-resolution of at least 45 nm under a white-light optical microscope, significantly exceeding the classical diffraction limit and previous near-field imaging techniques. Theoretical analysis reveals that electric field enhancement can be formed between contacting TiO2 nanoparticles, which causes effective confinement and propagation of visible light at the deep-subwavelength scale. This endows the mSIL with unusual abilities to illuminate object surfaces with large-area nanoscale near-field evanescent spots and to collect and convert the evanescent information into propagating waves. Our all-dielectric metamaterial design strategy demonstrates the potential to develop low-loss nanophotonic devices at visible frequencies. PMID:27536727

  17. Highly efficient and ultra-broadband graphene oxide ultrathin lenses with three-dimensional subwavelength focusing

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Xiaorui; Jia, Baohua; Lin, Han; Qiu, Ling; Li, Dan; Gu, Min

    2015-01-01

    Nanometric flat lenses with three-dimensional subwavelength focusing are indispensable in miniaturized optical systems. However, they are fundamentally challenging to achieve because of the difficulties in accurately controlling the optical wavefront by a film with nanometric thickness. Based on the unique and giant refractive index and absorption modulations of the sprayable graphene oxide thin film during its laser reduction process, we demonstrate a graphene oxide ultrathin (∼200 nm) flat lens that shows far-field three-dimensional subwavelength focusing (λ3/5) with an absolute focusing efficiency of >32% for a broad wavelength range from 400 to 1,500 nm. Our flexible graphene oxide lenses are mechanically robust and maintain excellent focusing properties under high stress. The simple and scalable fabrication approach enables wide potential applications in on-chip nanophotonics. The wavefront shaping concept opens up new avenues for easily accessible, highly precise and efficient optical beam manipulations with a flexible and integratable planar graphene oxide ultrathin film. PMID:26391504

  18. Ultra-wideband filtering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons using deep subwavelength planar structures

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ming Zhe; Zhang, Hao Chi; Yin, Jia Yuan; Ding, Zhao; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wen Xuan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-01-01

    Novel ultra-wideband filtering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is proposed in the microwave frequency using deep subwavelength planar structures printed on thin and flexible dielectric substrate. The proposed planar SPPs waveguide is composed of two mirror-oriented metallic corrugated strips, which are further decorated with parallel-arranged slots in the main corrugated strips. This compound structure provides deep subwavelength field confinement as well as flexible parameters when employed as a plasmonic waveguide, which is potential to construct miniaturization. Using momentum and impedance matching technology, we achieve a smooth conversion between the proposed SPPs waveguide and the conventional transmission line. To verify the validity of the design, we fabricate a spoof SPPs filter, and the measured results illustrate excellent performance, in which the reflection coefficient is less than −10 dB within the −3 dB passband from 1.21 GHz to 7.21 GHz with the smallest insertion loss of 1.23 dB at 2.21 GHz, having very good agreements with numerical simulations. The ultra-wideband filter with low insertion loss and high transmission efficiency possesses great potential in modern communication systems. PMID:27883028

  19. Ultra-wideband filtering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons using deep subwavelength planar structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming Zhe; Zhang, Hao Chi; Yin, Jia Yuan; Ding, Zhao; Liu, Jun Feng; Tang, Wen Xuan; Cui, Tie Jun

    2016-11-01

    Novel ultra-wideband filtering of spoof surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) is proposed in the microwave frequency using deep subwavelength planar structures printed on thin and flexible dielectric substrate. The proposed planar SPPs waveguide is composed of two mirror-oriented metallic corrugated strips, which are further decorated with parallel-arranged slots in the main corrugated strips. This compound structure provides deep subwavelength field confinement as well as flexible parameters when employed as a plasmonic waveguide, which is potential to construct miniaturization. Using momentum and impedance matching technology, we achieve a smooth conversion between the proposed SPPs waveguide and the conventional transmission line. To verify the validity of the design, we fabricate a spoof SPPs filter, and the measured results illustrate excellent performance, in which the reflection coefficient is less than ‑10 dB within the ‑3 dB passband from 1.21 GHz to 7.21 GHz with the smallest insertion loss of 1.23 dB at 2.21 GHz, having very good agreements with numerical simulations. The ultra-wideband filter with low insertion loss and high transmission efficiency possesses great potential in modern communication systems.

  20. Tunable dual-band subwavelength imaging with a wire medium slab loaded with nanostructured graphene metasurfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forouzmand, Ali; Yakovlev, Alexander B.

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that a wire medium slab loaded with graphene-nanopatch metasurfaces (GNMs) enables the enhancement of evanescent waves for the subwavelength imaging at terahertz (THz) frequencies. The analysis is based on the nonlocal homogenization model for wire medium with the additional boundary condition at the connection of wires to graphene. The physical mechanism behind this lens can be described as the surface plasmons excitement at the lower and upper GNMs which are coupled by an array of metallic wires. The dual nature (capacitive/inductive) of the GNM is utilized in order to design a dual-band lens in which the unique controllable properties of graphene and the structural parameters of wire medium (WM) slab provide more degrees of freedom in controlling two operating frequency bands. The lens can support the subwavelength imaging simultaneously at two tunable distinct frequencies with the resolution better than λ/6 even if the distance between GNMs is a significant fraction of wavelength (>λ/5.5). The major future challenges in the fabrication of the lens have been demonstrated and a promising approach for the practical configuration of the lens has been proposed.

  1. Three-dimensional all-dielectric metamaterial solid immersion lens for subwavelength imaging at visible frequencies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Wen; Yan, Bing; Wang, Zengbo; Wu, Limin

    2016-08-01

    Although all-dielectric metamaterials offer a low-loss alternative to current metal-based metamaterials to manipulate light at the nanoscale and may have important applications, very few have been reported to date owing to the current nanofabrication technologies. We develop a new "nano-solid-fluid assembly" method using 15-nm TiO2 nanoparticles as building blocks to fabricate the first three-dimensional (3D) all-dielectric metamaterial at visible frequencies. Because of its optical transparency, high refractive index, and deep-subwavelength structures, this 3D all-dielectric metamaterial-based solid immersion lens (mSIL) can produce a sharp image with a super-resolution of at least 45 nm under a white-light optical microscope, significantly exceeding the classical diffraction limit and previous near-field imaging techniques. Theoretical analysis reveals that electric field enhancement can be formed between contacting TiO2 nanoparticles, which causes effective confinement and propagation of visible light at the deep-subwavelength scale. This endows the mSIL with unusual abilities to illuminate object surfaces with large-area nanoscale near-field evanescent spots and to collect and convert the evanescent information into propagating waves. Our all-dielectric metamaterial design strategy demonstrates the potential to develop low-loss nanophotonic devices at visible frequencies.

  2. Sub-wavelength plasmonic modes in a conductor-gap-dielectric system with a nanoscale gap.

    PubMed

    Avrutsky, Ivan; Soref, Richard; Buchwald, Walter

    2010-01-04

    We study guided modes in a conductor-gap-dielectric (CGD) system that includes a low-index dielectric gap layer of deep sub-wavelength thickness sandwiched between a conductor and a high-index dielectric cladding. Analysis of the dispersion equation for CGD modes provides an analytical estimation for the cut-off thickness of the gap layer. This guided mode is unusual because it exists when the gap thickness is less than the cutoff thickness. In the direction normal to the interfaces, the modal electric field is tightly confined within the gap. Sub-wavelength lateral mode confinement is readily provided by a spatial variation of the gap-layer thickness: the modal field localizes at the narrowest gap. Various lateral confinement schemes are proposed and verified by numerical simulations. Possible applications of CGD modes include surface-plasmon nano-lasers (SPASERs) and sensors. If these plasmonic waveguides are scaled for operation at far infrared rather than telecomm wavelengths, then the propagation losses are dramatically reduced, thereby enabling the construction of practical chip-scale plasmonic integrated circuits or PLICs.

  3. Refraction index sensor based on phase resonances in a subwavelength structure with double period.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Lester, Marcelo

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we numerically demonstrate a refraction index sensor based on phase resonance excitation in a subwavelength-slit structure with a double period. The sensor consists of a metal layer with subwavelength slots arranged in a bi-periodic form, separated from a high refraction index medium. Between the metallic structure and the incident medium, a dielectric waveguide is formed whose refraction index is going to be determined. Variations in the refraction index of the waveguide are detected as shifts in the peaks of transmitted intensity originated by resonant modes supported by the compound metallic structure. At normal incidence, the spectral position of these resonant peaks exhibits a linear or a quadratic dependence with the refraction index, which permits us to obtain the unknown refraction index value with a high precision for a wide range of wavelengths. Since the operating principle of the sensor is due to the morphological resonances of the slits' structure, this device can be scaled to operate in different wavelength ranges while keeping similar characteristics.

  4. Numerical Modeling of Sub-Wavelength Anti-Reflective Structures for Solar Module Applications.

    PubMed

    Han, Katherine; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2014-01-29

    This paper reviews the current progress in mathematical modeling of anti-reflective subwavelength structures. Methods covered include effective medium theory (EMT), finite-difference time-domain (FDTD), transfer matrix method (TMM), the Fourier modal method (FMM)/rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) and the finite element method (FEM). Time-based solutions to Maxwell's equations, such as FDTD, have the benefits of calculating reflectance for multiple wavelengths of light per simulation, but are computationally intensive. Space-discretized methods such as FDTD and FEM output field strength results over the whole geometry and are capable of modeling arbitrary shapes. Frequency-based solutions such as RCWA/FMM and FEM model one wavelength per simulation and are thus able to handle dispersion for regular geometries. Analytical approaches such as TMM are appropriate for very simple thin films. Initial disadvantages such as neglect of dispersion (FDTD), inaccuracy in TM polarization (RCWA), inability to model aperiodic gratings (RCWA), and inaccuracy with metallic materials (FDTD) have been overcome by most modern software. All rigorous numerical methods have accurately predicted the broadband reflection of ideal, graded-index anti-reflective subwavelength structures; ideal structures are tapered nanostructures with periods smaller than the wavelengths of light of interest and lengths that are at least a large portion of the wavelengths considered.

  5. Broadband and wide-angle hybrid antireflection coatings prepared by combining interference multilayers with subwavelength structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruynooghe, Stéphane; Schulze, Marcel; Helgert, Michael; Challier, Michel; Tonova, Diana; Sundermann, Michael; Koch, Thomas; Gatto, Alexandre; Kley, Ernst-Bernhard

    2016-07-01

    To reduce the intensity of the Fresnel reflections of optical components, subwavelength structures prepared by reactive ion etching of SiO2 thin films were combined as the outermost layer with a multilayer system made of conventional thin-film materials. A hybrid coating was thus realized, with the nanoscaled structured outermost layer expected to further improve the antireflection properties of common interference stacks. The microscopic and optical spectroscopic analysis of the subwavelength structures revealed that pillar-shaped nanostructures formed during etching exhibit low-refractive-index properties and have a depth-dependent refractive index. To take into account the refractive-index gradient in the coating design, the optical properties of the nanostructures were modeled using the effective-medium approximation. The calculated average effective refractive index turned out to be 1.11 at 500-nm wavelength. A hybrid coating was designed to minimize the residual reflectance in the 400-nm to 900-nm spectral range for BK7 glass substrate. Experimental results demonstrated that the hybrid-coating approach yields a low residual reflectance with very good omnidirectional properties, owing to the properties of the nanostructured surface.

  6. Numerical Modeling of Sub-Wavelength Anti-Reflective Structures for Solar Module Applications

    PubMed Central

    Han, Katherine; Chang, Chih-Hung

    2014-01-01

    This paper reviews the current progress in mathematical modeling of anti-reflective subwavelength structures. Methods covered include effective medium theory (EMT), finite-difference time-domain (FDTD), transfer matrix method (TMM), the Fourier modal method (FMM)/rigorous coupled-wave analysis (RCWA) and the finite element method (FEM). Time-based solutions to Maxwell’s equations, such as FDTD, have the benefits of calculating reflectance for multiple wavelengths of light per simulation, but are computationally intensive. Space-discretized methods such as FDTD and FEM output field strength results over the whole geometry and are capable of modeling arbitrary shapes. Frequency-based solutions such as RCWA/FMM and FEM model one wavelength per simulation and are thus able to handle dispersion for regular geometries. Analytical approaches such as TMM are appropriate for very simple thin films. Initial disadvantages such as neglect of dispersion (FDTD), inaccuracy in TM polarization (RCWA), inability to model aperiodic gratings (RCWA), and inaccuracy with metallic materials (FDTD) have been overcome by most modern software. All rigorous numerical methods have accurately predicted the broadband reflection of ideal, graded-index anti-reflective subwavelength structures; ideal structures are tapered nanostructures with periods smaller than the wavelengths of light of interest and lengths that are at least a large portion of the wavelengths considered.

  7. Subwavelength Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-12

    arrangement. The Kramers- Kronig relations, which describe the spectral relationship between the real and imag- inary parts of, for example, the dielectric...be analytic in the upper half ω plane. Satisfaction of the Kramers- Kronig relations guarantees causality, as does an analytic ǫ(ω) in the upper half...in direction to the Poynting vector (the direction of power flow) for a negative index material. The Kramers- Kronig relations do not convey the causal

  8. The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope (CAST)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ennico, Kimberly; Bendek, Eduardo A.; Lynch, Dana H.; Vassigh, Kenny K.; Young, Zion

    2016-07-01

    The Configurable Aperture Space Telescope, CAST, is a concept that provides access to a UV/visible-infrared wavelength sub-arcsecond imaging platform from space, something that will be in high demand after the retirement of the astronomy workhorse, the 2.4 meter diameter Hubble Space Telescope. CAST allows building large aperture telescopes based on small, compatible and low-cost segments mounted on autonomous cube-sized satellites. The concept merges existing technology (segmented telescope architecture) with emerging technology (smartly interconnected modular spacecraft, active optics, deployable structures). Requiring identical mirror segments, CAST's optical design is a spherical primary and secondary mirror telescope with modular multi-mirror correctors placed at the system focal plane. The design enables wide fields of view, up to as much as three degrees, while maintaining aperture growth and image performance requirements. We present a point design for the CAST concept based on a 0.6 meter diameter (3 x 3 segments) growing to a 2.6 meter diameter (13 x 13 segments) primary, with a fixed Rp=13,000 and Rs=8,750 mm curvature, f/22.4 and f/5.6, respectively. Its diffraction limited design uses a two arcminute field of view corrector with a 7.4 arcsec/mm platescale, and can support a range of platescales as fine as 0.01 arcsec/mm. Our paper summarizes CAST, presents a strawman optical design and requirements for the underlying modular spacecraft, highlights design flexibilities, and illustrates applications enabled by this new method in building space observatories.

  9. Optimization of synthetic aperture image quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moshavegh, Ramin; Jensen, Jonas; Villagomez-Hoyos, Carlos A.; Stuart, Matthias B.; Hemmsen, Martin Christian; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic Aperture (SA) imaging produces high-quality images and velocity estimates of both slow and fast flow at high frame rates. However, grating lobe artifacts can appear both in transmission and reception. These affect the image quality and the frame rate. Therefore optimization of parameters effecting the image quality of SA is of great importance, and this paper proposes an advanced procedure for optimizing the parameters essential for acquiring an optimal image quality, while generating high resolution SA images. Optimization of the image quality is mainly performed based on measures such as F-number, number of emissions and the aperture size. They are considered to be the most contributing acquisition factors in the quality of the high resolution images in SA. Therefore, the performance of image quality is quantified in terms of full-width at half maximum (FWHM) and the cystic resolution (CTR). The results of the study showed that SA imaging with only 32 emissions and maximum sweep angle of 22 degrees yields a very good image quality compared with using 256 emissions and the full aperture size. Therefore the number of emissions and the maximum sweep angle in the SA can be optimized to reach a reasonably good performance, and to increase the frame rate by lowering the required number of emissions. All the measurements are performed using the experimental SARUS scanner connected to a λ/2-pitch transducer. A wire phantom and a tissue mimicking phantom containing anechoic cysts are scanned using the optimized parameters for the transducer. Measurements coincide with simulations.

  10. Synthetic aperture radar autofocus via semidefinite relaxation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kuang-Hung; Wiesel, Ami; Munson, David C

    2013-06-01

    The autofocus problem in synthetic aperture radar imaging amounts to estimating unknown phase errors caused by unknown platform or target motion. At the heart of three state-of-the-art autofocus algorithms, namely, phase gradient autofocus, multichannel autofocus (MCA), and Fourier-domain multichannel autofocus (FMCA), is the solution of a constant modulus quadratic program (CMQP). Currently, these algorithms solve a CMQP by using an eigenvalue relaxation approach. We propose an alternative relaxation approach based on semidefinite programming, which has recently attracted considerable attention in other signal processing problems. Experimental results show that our proposed methods provide promising performance improvements for MCA and FMCA through an increase in computational complexity.

  11. Dual-sided coded-aperture imager

    DOEpatents

    Ziock, Klaus-Peter

    2009-09-22

    In a vehicle, a single detector plane simultaneously measures radiation coming through two coded-aperture masks, one on either side of the detector. To determine which side of the vehicle a source is, the two shadow masks are inverses of each other, i.e., one is a mask and the other is the anti-mask. All of the data that is collected is processed through two versions of an image reconstruction algorithm. One treats the data as if it were obtained through the mask, the other as though the data is obtained through the anti-mask.

  12. Synthetic aperture radar in geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tomiyasu, K.

    1978-01-01

    Radar images of the earth were taken with a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) from geosynchronous orbital ranges by utilizing satellite motion relative to a geostationary position. A suitable satellite motion was obtained by having an orbit plane inclined relative to the equatorial plane and by having an eccentric orbit. Potential applications of these SAR images are topography, water resource management and soil moisture determination. Preliminary calculations show that the United States can be mapped with 100 m resolution cells in about 4 hours. With the use of microwave signals the mapping can be performed day or night, through clouds and during adverse weather.

  13. Combined synthetic aperture radar/Landsat imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marque, R. E.; Maurer, H. E.

    1978-01-01

    This paper presents the results of investigations into merging synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) images using optical and digital merging techniques. The unique characteristics of airborne and orbital SAR and Landsat MSS imagery are discussed. The case for merging the imagery is presented and tradeoffs between optical and digital merging techniques explored. Examples of Landsat and airborne SAR imagery are used to illustrate optical and digital merging. Analysis of the merged digital imagery illustrates the improved interpretability resulting from combining the outputs from the two sensor systems.

  14. Aperture correction for a sphere interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold Nicolaus, R.; Bönsch, Gerhard

    2009-12-01

    Considerations have been made to derive a correction for the diameter measurements of a sphere by means of a special sphere interferometer. This correction is caused by the finite diameter of the light source acting as the entrance 'pinhole' aperture in the light collimating system. The finite diameter has the effect that the wave which is incident on the sphere is a superposition of spherical waves which are slightly inclined with respect to each other. The resulting correction is essential for high accuracy dimensional measurements of silicon spheres to determine the Avogadro constant—a new determination of which is a contribution to a new definition of the kilogram.

  15. Synthetic aperture radar for disaster monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunkel, R.; Saddler, R.; Doerry, A. W.

    2011-06-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is well known to afford imaging in darkness and through clouds, smoke, and other obscurants. As such, it is particularly useful for mapping and monitoring a variety of natural and man-made disasters. A portfolio of SAR image examples has been collected using General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc.'s (GA-ASI's) Lynx® family of Ku-Band SAR systems, flown on both operational and test-bed aircraft. Images are provided that include scenes of flooding, ice jams in North Dakota, agricultural field fires in southern California, and ocean oil slicks from seeps off the coast of southern California.

  16. Motor asymmetry and estimation of body-scaled aperture width in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, J G; Harris, J P; Khan, S; Atkinson, E A; Fowler, M S; Ewins, D; D'Souza, S; Gregory, R P; Kean, R J

    2011-09-01

    The present study examined how asymmetrical motor symptomatology helps predict the pattern of perceptual judgements of body-scaled aperture width in lateralised Parkinson's disease (PD). Eleven patients with PD predominantly affecting the left side of their body (LPD), 16 patients with PD predominantly affecting their right side (RPD), and 16 healthy controls made forced-choice judgements about whether or not they would fit without turning their shoulders through a life-sized schematic doorway shown on a large screen. Whereas control and LPD groups made accurate estimations of body-scaled aperture width, RPD patients significantly underestimated aperture width relative to their body, perceiving doorways on average that were 12% narrower than their bodies as wide enough to allow them to pass through without rotation. Across all patients, estimates of body-scaled aperture width correlated with ratio of right-to-left symptom severity. These perceptual errors may indicate a mismatch between the neural representation of external space and that of body size in PD.

  17. Sparse synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements (S-SAFE) using digital incoherent holograms

    PubMed Central

    Kashter, Yuval; Rivenson, Yair; Stern, Adrian; Rosen, Joseph

    2015-01-01

    Creating a large-scale synthetic aperture makes it possible to break the resolution boundaries dictated by the wave nature of light of common optical systems. However, their implementation is challenging, since the generation of a large size continuous mosaic synthetic aperture composed of many patterns is complicated in terms of both phase matching and time-multiplexing duration. In this study we present an advanced configuration for an incoherent holographic imaging system with super resolution qualities that creates a partial synthetic aperture. The new system, termed sparse synthetic aperture with Fresnel elements (S-SAFE), enables significantly decreasing the number of the recorded elements, and it is free from positional constrains on their location. Additionally, in order to obtain the best image quality we propose an optimal mosaicking structure derived on the basis of physical and numerical considerations, and introduce three reconstruction approaches which are compared and discussed. The super-resolution capabilities of the proposed scheme and its limitations are analyzed, numerically simulated and experimentally demonstrated. PMID:26367947

  18. A split-aperture transmit beamforming technique with phase coherence grating lobe suppression.

    PubMed

    Torbatian, Zahra; Adamson, Rob; Bance, Manohar; Brown, Jeremy A

    2010-11-01

    A small element-to-element pitch (~.5λ) is conventionally required for phased array ultrasound transducers to avoid large grating lobes. This constraint can introduce many fabrication difficulties, particularly in the development of highfrequency phased arrays at operating frequencies greater than 30 MHz. In this paper, a new transmit beamforming technique along with sign coherence factor (SCF) receive beamforming is proposed to suppress grating lobes in large-pitch phased-array transducers. It is based on splitting the transmit aperture (N elements) into N/K transmit elements and receive beamforming on all N elements to reduce the temporal length of the transmit grating lobe signal. Therefore, the use of synthetic aperture beamforming, which can introduce relative phase distortions between the echoes received over many transmit events, can be avoided. After each transmit-receive event, the received signals are weighted by the calculated SCF to suppress the grating lobes. After pulsing all sub-apertures, the RF signals are added to generate one line of the image. Simulated 2-way radiation patterns for different K values show that grating lobes can be suppressed significantly at different steering angles. Grating lobes can be suppressed by approximately 20 dB with K = 2 at steering angles greater than 25° and an element pitch greater than 0.75λ. A technique for determining the optimal transmit sub-apertures has been developed.

  19. Statistically normalized coherent change detection for synthetic aperture sonar imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    G-Michael, Tesfaye; Tucker, J. D.; Roberts, Rodney G.

    2016-05-01

    Coherent Change Detection (CCD) is a process of highlighting an area of activity in scenes (seafloor) under survey and generated from pairs of synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) images of approximately the same location observed at two different time instances. The problem of CCD and subsequent anomaly feature extraction/detection is complicated due to several factors such as the presence of random speckle pattern in the images, changing environmental conditions, and platform instabilities. These complications make the detection of weak target activities even more difficult. Typically, the degree of similarity between two images measured at each pixel locations is the coherence between the complex pixel values in the two images. Higher coherence indicates little change in the scene represented by the pixel and lower coherence indicates change activity in the scene. Such coherence estimation scheme based on the pixel intensity correlation is an ad-hoc procedure where the effectiveness of the change detection is determined by the choice of threshold which can lead to high false alarm rates. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for anomalous change pattern detection using the statistical normalized coherence and multi-pass coherent processing. This method may be used to mitigate shadows by reducing the false alarms resulting in the coherent map due to speckles and shadows. Test results of the proposed methods on a data set of SAS images will be presented, illustrating the effectiveness of the normalized coherence in terms statistics from multi-pass survey of the same scene.

  20. Development of large aperture composite adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kmetik, Viliam; Vitovec, Bohumil; Jiran, Lukas; Nemcova, Sarka; Zicha, Josef; Inneman, Adolf; Mikulickova, Lenka; Pavlica, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Large aperture composite adaptive optics for laser applications is investigated in cooperation of Institute of Plasma Physic, Department of Instrumentation and Control Engineering FME CTU and 5M Ltd. We are exploring opportunity of a large-size high-power-laser deformable-mirror production using a lightweight bimorph actuated structure with a composite core. In order to produce a sufficiently large operational free aperture we are developing new technologies for production of flexible core, bimorph actuator and deformable mirror reflector. Full simulation of a deformable-mirrors structure was prepared and validated by complex testing. A deformable mirror actuation and a response of a complicated structure are investigated for an accurate control of the adaptive optics. An original adaptive optics control system and a bimorph deformable mirror driver were developed. Tests of material samples, components and sub-assemblies were completed. A subscale 120 mm bimorph deformable mirror prototype was designed, fabricated and thoroughly tested. A large-size 300 mm composite-core bimorph deformable mirror was simulated and optimized, fabrication of a prototype is carried on. A measurement and testing facility is modified to accommodate large sizes optics.

  1. KAOS: kilo-aperture optical spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barden, Samuel C.; Dey, Arjun; Boyle, Brian; Glazebrook, Karl

    2004-09-01

    A design is described for a potential new facility capable of taking detailed spectroscopy of millions of objects in the Universe to explore the complexity of the Universe and to answer fundamental questions relating to the equation of state of dark energy and to how the Milky Way galaxy formed. The specific design described is envisioned for implementation on the Gemini 8-meter telescopes. It utilizes a 1.5° field of view and samples that field with up to ~5000 apertures. This Kilo-Aperture Optical Spectrograph (KAOS) is mounted at prime focus with a 4-element corrector, atmospheric dispersion compensator (ADC), and an Echidna-style fiber optic positioner. The ADC doubles as a wobble plate, allowing fast guiding that cancels out the wind buffeting of the telescope. The fibers, which can be reconfigured in less than 10 minutes, feed to an array of 12 spectrographs located in the pier of the telescope. The spectrographs are capable of provided spectral resolving powers of a few thousand up to about 40,000.

  2. Very large aperture optics for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horwath, T. G.; Smith, J. P.; Johnson, M. T.

    1994-09-01

    A new type of space optics technology is presented which promises the realization of very large apertures (tens of meters), while packagable into lightweight, small volume containers compatible with conventional launch vehicles. This technology makes use of thin foils of circular shape which are uniformly mass loaded around the perimeter. Once unfurled and set into rapid rotation about the transversal axis, the foil is stretched into a perfectly flat plane by the centrifugal forces acting on the peripheral masses. The simplest applications of this novel technology are optically flat reflectors, using metallized foils of Mylar, Kevlar, or Kapton. Other more complex optical components can be realized by use of binary optics techniques, such as depositing holograms by selective local microscale removal of the reflective surface. Electrostatic techniques, in conjunction with an auxiliary foil, under local, distributed real-time control of the optical parameters, allow implementation of functions like beam steering and focal length adjustments. Gas pressurization allows stronger curvatures and thus smaller focal ratios for non-imaging applications. Limits on aperture are imposed primarily by manufacturing capabilities. Applications of such large optics in space are numerous. They range from military, such as space based lasers, to the civilian ones of power beaming, solar energy collection, and astronomy. This paper examines this simple and innovative concept in detail, discusses deployment and attitude control issues and presents approaches for realization.

  3. The SKA New Instrumentation: Aperture Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Ardenne, A.; Faulkner, A. J.; de Vaate, J. G. bij

    The radio frequency window of the Square Kilometre Array is planned to cover the wavelength regime from cm up to a few meters. For this range to be optimally covered, different antenna concepts are considered enabling many science cases. At the lowest frequency range, up to a few GHz, it is expected that multi-beam techniques will be used, increasing the effective field-of-view to a level that allows very efficient detailed and sensitive exploration of the complete sky. Although sparse narrow band phased arrays are as old as radio astronomy, multi-octave sparse and dense arrays now being considered for the SKA, requiring new low noise design, signal processing and calibration techniques. These new array techniques have already been successfully introduced as phased array feeds upgrading existing reflecting telescopes and for new telescopes to enhance the aperture efficiency as well as greatly increasing their field-of-view (van Ardenne et al., Proc IEEE 97(8):2009) by [1]. Aperture arrays use phased arrays without any additional reflectors; the phased array elements are small enough to see most of the sky intrinsically offering a large field of view.

  4. Integrated feeds for electronically reconfigurable apertures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholls, Jeffrey Grant

    With the increasing ubiquity of wireless technology, the need for lower-profile, electronically reconfigurable, highly-directive beam-steering antennas is increasing. This thesis proposes a new electronic beam-steering antenna architecture which combines the full-space beam-steering properties of reflectarrays and transmitarrays with the low-profile feeding characteristics of leaky-wave antennas. Two designs are developed: an integrated feed reflectarray and an integrated feed transmitarray, both of which integrate a leaky-wave feed directly next to the reconfigurable aperture itself. The integrated feed transmitarray proved to be the better architecture due to its simpler design and better performance. A 6-by-6 element array was fabricated and experimentally verified, and full-space (both azimuth and elevation) beam-steering was demonstrated at angles up to 45 degrees off broadside. In addition to the reduction in profile, the integrated feed design enables robust fixed control of the amplitude distribution across the aperture, a characteristic not as easily attained in typical reflectarrays/transmitarrays.

  5. New physics and applications of apertures in thin metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Reuven; Al-Balushi, Ahmed A.; Kotnala, Abhay; Gelfand, Ryan F.; Wheaton, Skylar; Chen, Shuwen; Jin, Shilong

    2014-08-01

    The nanoplasmonic properties of apertures in metal films have been studied extensively; however, we have recently discovered surprising new features of this simple system with applications to super-focusing and super-scattering. Furthermore, apertures allow for optical tweezers that can hold onto particles of the order of 1 nm; I will briefly highlight our work using these apertures to study protein - small molecule interactions and protein - DNA binding.

  6. Experimental investigations of 3 mm aperture PPLN structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolker, D.; Pronyushkina, A.; Boyko, A.; Kostyukova, N.; Trashkeev, S.; Nuyshkov, B.; Shur, V.

    2017-01-01

    We are reporting about investigation of domestic 3 mm aperture periodically polled lithium niobate (PPLN) structures for cascaded mid-IR OPO. Wide aperture periodically poled MgO-doped lithium niobate (LiNbO3) structures at multigrating, fan-out and multi fan-out configuration were prepared at “Labfer LTD”. Laser source based on such structures can be used for special applications. Four different PPLN structures were investigated and effective aperture for effective pumping was defined.

  7. Tomographic Processing of Synthetic Aperture Radar Signals for Enhanced Resolution

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    digital signal processing view of strip-mapping synthetic aperture radar," M.S. thesis , University of Illinois, Urbana, IL,1988." [571 David C. Munson...TOMOGRAPHIC PROCESSING OF 1 SYNTHETIC APERTURE I RADAR SIGNALS FOR ENHANCED RESOLUTION,I * Jerald Lee Bauck DTIC ELECTE JAN2419901D I I UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS...NC 27709-2211 ELEMENT NO. NO. NO CCESSION NO. 11i. TITLE (Include Security Classification) TOMOGRAPHIC PROCESSING OF SYNTHETIC APERTURE RADlAR SIGNALS

  8. Subwavelength InSb-based Slot wavguides for THz transport: concept and practical implementations

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Youqiao; Zhou, Jun; Pištora, Jaromír; Eldlio, Mohamed; Nguyen-Huu, Nghia; Maeda, Hiroshi; Wu, Qiang; Cada, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Seeking better surface plasmon polariton (SPP) waveguides is of critical importance to construct the frequency-agile terahertz (THz) front-end circuits. We propose and investigate here a new class of semiconductor-based slot plasmonic waveguides for subwavelength THz transport. Optimizations of the key geometrical parameters demonstrate its better guiding properties for simultaneous realization of long propagation lengths (up to several millimeters) and ultra-tight mode confinement (~λ2/530) in the THz spectral range. The feasibility of the waveguide for compact THz components is also studied to lay the foundations for its practical implementations. Importantly, the waveguide is compatible with the current complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) fabrication technique. We believe the proposed waveguide configuration could offer a potential for developing a CMOS plasmonic platform and can be designed into various components for future integrated THz circuits (ITCs). PMID:27924939

  9. Investigation of the chip to photodetector coupler with subwavelength grating on SOI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hongqiang; Cui, Beibei; Liu, Yu; Liu, Hongwei; Zhang, Zanyun; Zhang, Cheng; Tang, Chunxiao; Li, Enbang

    2016-01-01

    We report on two kinds of investigation of the chip to photodetector coupler (CTPC) with uniform and blazed subwavelength grating (SWG) on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) that were conducted for silicon-based hybrid photodetector integration in an arrayed waveguide grating demodulation integrated microsystem. The theoretical model is presented, 3D FDTD and BPM simulations are used to optimize the coupler design. InP/InGaAs photodetector and SOI wafer were integrated through benzocyclobutene bonding. An efficient high-power absorption for TE mode in a broad band is achieved. The power absorption efficiencies of uniform and blazed SWGs in silicon-based hybrid photodetector integration at 1550 nm reach 73% and 75%, respectively in the simulation and it reaches as high as 25% in the measurement when coupling the TE-polarized 1550 nm light.

  10. The fabrication of subwavelength anti-reflective nanostructures using a bio-template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Guoyong; Zhang, Guoming; Lin, Feng; Zhang, Jin; Liu, Zhongfan; Mu, Shichen

    2008-03-01

    This paper describes a paradigm, a simple, low-cost and conventional approach to the fabrication of large-area subwavelength anti-reflective nanostructures on films directly with a bio-template. Specifically, the nano-nipple arrays on the surface of cicada wings have been precisely replicated to a PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) film with high reproducibility by a technique of replica molding, which mainly involves two processes: one is that a negative Au mold is prepared directly from the bio-template of the cicada wing by thermal deposition; the other is that the Au mold is used to obtain the replica of the nanostructures on the original cicada wing by casting polymer. The reflectance spectra measurement shows that the replicated PMMA film can considerably reduce reflectivity at its surface over a large wavelength range from 250 to 800 nm, indicating that the anti-reflective property has also been inherited by the PMMA film.

  11. Asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguides with centimeter-scale propagation length under subwavelength confinement for photonic components.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Zhang, Xia; Ren, Xiaomin

    2014-01-01

    An asymmetric hybrid plasmonic metal-wire waveguide is proposed by combining the advantages of symmetric and hybrid plasmonic modes. The idea of asymmetric structure eliminates the adverse effect of a substrate and enhances the optical performance of the waveguide. The guiding properties of the proposed waveguide are intensively investigated using the finite elements method. The results exhibit a quite long propagation length of 2.69 cm with subwavelength confinement. More importantly, an extremely large figure of merit of 139037 is achieved. Furthermore, the proposed waveguides can be used as directional couplers. They can achieve a coupling length of only 1.01 μm at S = 0.1 μm with negligible loss. A strong dependence of coupling length on the operating wavelength makes the proposed waveguide promising for realizing wavelength-selective components at telecommunication wavelengths.

  12. Asymmetric hybrid plasmonic waveguides with centimeter-scale propagation length under subwavelength confinement for photonic components

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    An asymmetric hybrid plasmonic metal-wire waveguide is proposed by combining the advantages of symmetric and hybrid plasmonic modes. The idea of asymmetric structure eliminates the adverse effect of a substrate and enhances the optical performance of the waveguide. The guiding properties of the proposed waveguide are intensively investigated using the finite elements method. The results exhibit a quite long propagation length of 2.69 cm with subwavelength confinement. More importantly, an extremely large figure of merit of 139037 is achieved. Furthermore, the proposed waveguides can be used as directional couplers. They can achieve a coupling length of only 1.01 μm at S = 0.1 μm with negligible loss. A strong dependence of coupling length on the operating wavelength makes the proposed waveguide promising for realizing wavelength-selective components at telecommunication wavelengths. PMID:25400529

  13. All-metamaterial-based subwavelength cavities (λ/60) for ultrathin directive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ourir, Abdelwaheb; de Lustrac, André; Lourtioz, Jean-Michel

    2006-02-01

    In this letter, we present the characterization and modeling of a metamaterial-based resonant cavity for ultrathin directive printed antennas. A planar artificial magnetic conductor is used for the two reflectors of the Fabry-Pérot-type resonant cavity. One reflector behaves as a high impedance surface, and serves as a substrate for the printed antenna. The other reflector is a partially reflective surface used as a transmitting window. The cavity is operated on subwavelength modes, the smallest cavity thickness being of the order of λ /60. A drastic enhancement of the antenna directivity and gain is obtained over a relatively wide band from 7.5to10.1GHz, corresponding to a range of cavity thicknesses from ˜λ/3 to ˜λ/60. The cavity resonance is seen to be correctly predicted from the standard ray theory approach.

  14. Subwavelength grating as both emission mirror and electrical contact for VCSELs in any material system

    PubMed Central

    Czyszanowski, Tomasz; Gebski, Marcin; Dems, Maciej; Wasiak, Michał; Sarzała, Robert; Panajotov, Krassimir

    2017-01-01

    Semiconductor-metal subwavelength grating (SMSG) can serve a dual purpose in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers (VCSELs), as both optical coupler and current injector. SMSGs provide optical as well as lateral current confinement, eliminating the need for ring contacts and lateral build-in optical and current confinement, allowing their implementation on arbitrarily large surfaces. Using an SMSG as the top mirror enables fabrication of monolithic VCSELs from any type of semiconductor crystal. The construction of VCSELs with SMSGs requires significantly less p-type material, in comparison to conventional VCSELs. In this paper, using a three-dimensional, fully vectorial optical model, we analyse the properties of the stand-alone SMSG in a number of semiconductor materials for a broad range of wavelengths. Integrating the optical model with thermal and electrical numerical models, we then simulate the threshold operation of an exemplary SMSG VCSEL. PMID:28079149

  15. A subwavelength resolution microwave/6.3 GHz camera based on a metamaterial absorber

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yunsong; Fan, Xin; Chen, Yunpeng; Wilson, Jeffrey D.; Simons, Rainee N.; Xiao, John Q.

    2017-01-01

    The design, fabrication and characterization of a novel metamaterial absorber based camera with subwavelength spatial resolution are investigated. The proposed camera is featured with simple and lightweight design, easy portability, low cost, high resolution and sensitivity, and minimal image interference or distortion to the original field distribution. The imaging capability of the proposed camera was characterized in both near field and far field ranges. The experimental and simulated near field images both reveal that the camera produces qualitatively accurate images with negligible distortion to the original field distribution. The far field demonstration was done by coupling the designed camera with a microwave convex lens. The far field results further demonstrate that the camera can capture quantitatively accurate electromagnetic wave distribution in the diffraction limit. The proposed camera can be used in application such as non-destructive image and beam direction tracer. PMID:28071734

  16. Acoustic one-way metasurfaces: Asymmetric Phase Modulation of Sound by Subwavelength Layer

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xue; Liang, Bin; Zou, Xin-ye; Yang, Jing; Yin, Lei-lei; Yang, Jun; Cheng, Jian-chun

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically design and numerically demonstrate an acoustic one-way metasurface, which is a planar and acoustically subwavelength layer behaving like a nearly-reflectionless surface with arbitrary wave-steering capability for incident wave impinging on one side, while virtually blocking the reversed wave. The underlying mechanism is based on an asymmetric phase modulation by coupling a phase array and a near-zero-index medium. We exemplify a metastructure-based implementation by combining the hybrid metastuctures and labyrinthine structures. Moreover, the performance of the proposed implementation is demonstrated via three distinct phenomena of anomalous refraction, wave splitting and conversion of propagation wave to surface wave. Our findings may offer more possibilities for sound manipulation and improve the application potential of acoustic artificial devices in situations such as ultrasonic imaging and therapy. PMID:27305973

  17. Efficient bending and focusing of light beam with all-dielectric subwavelength structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yue; Luo, Xiangang

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, all-dielectric subwavelength structures are proposed to construct beam deflectors and lenses that modulate the light fields efficiently. These devices are composed of planar array of silicon pyramids with spatially varying geometric shapes, thereby introducing arbitrary phase shift to the propagating light. Meanwhile, owing to the intrinsic low-reflection property, average reflectance as low as 10% is accomplished. The lenses were rigorously designed in both one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) cases. Due to the symmetry of the unit cell, there is no limitation on the polarization state of the incident light. Since no plasmonic loss is incorporated, this design could meet the requirement of wavefront manipulation for laser beams.

  18. Subwavelength film sensing based on terahertz anti-resonant reflecting hollow waveguides.

    PubMed

    You, Borwen; Lu, Ja-Yu; Liou, Jia-Hong; Yu, Chin-Ping; Chen, Hao-Zai; Liu, Tze-An; Peng, Jin-Long

    2010-08-30

    A simple dielectric hollow-tube has been experimentally demonstrated at terahertz range for bio-molecular layer sensing based on the anti-resonant reflecting wave-guidance mechanism. We experimentally study the dependence of thin-film detection sensitivity on the optical geometrical parameters of tubes, different thicknesses and tube wall refractive indices, and on different resonant frequencies. A polypropylene hollow-tube with optimized sensitivity of 0.003 mm/μm is used to sense a subwavelength-thick (λ/225) carboxypolymethylene molecular overlayer on the tube's inner surface, and the minimum detectable quantity of molecules could be down to 1.22 picomole/mm(2). A double-layered Fabry-Pérot model is proposed for calculating the overlayer thicknesses, which agrees well with the experimental results.

  19. Narrow gaps for transmission through metallic structured gratings with subwavelength slits.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Depine, Ricardo A

    2006-10-01

    Transmission dips in the response of metallic compound gratings formed by several wires and slits in each period have been recently reported for normal illumination. These anomalies are generated by a particular arrangement of the magnetic field phases inside the subwavelength slits, and they are characterized by a significant enhancement of the interior field. We investigate the microwave response of such systems under non-normal illumination and show that new phase modes appear in this configuration. Contrary to the effect produced by a defect in a photonic crystal, these systems exhibit forbidden channels within a permitted band. We also found that the appearance of these resonances is not highly dependent on the slits' width and thickness, even though these parameters modify the overall transmittance.

  20. Bandwidth control of forbidden transmission gaps in compound structures with subwavelength slits.

    PubMed

    Skigin, Diana C; Loui, Hung; Popovic, Zoya; Kuester, Edward F

    2007-07-01

    Phase resonances in transmission compound structures with subwavelength slits produce sharp dips in the transmission response. For all equal slits, the wavelengths of these sharp transmission minima can be varied by changing the width or the length of all the slits. In this paper we show that the width of the dip, i.e., the frequency range of minimum transmittance, can be controlled by making at least one slit different from the rest within a compound unit cell. In particular, we investigate the effect that a change in the dielectric filling, or in the length of a single slit, produces in the transmission response. We also analyze the scan angle behavior of these structures by means of band diagrams and compare them with previous results for all-equal slit structures.