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Sample records for pc mutant caused

  1. Pulsating proton aurora caused by rising tone Pc1 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, R.; Shiokawa, K.; Omura, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Miyoshi, Y.; Sakaguchi, K.; Otsuka, Y.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    We found rising tone emissions with a dispersion of ˜1 Hz per several tens of seconds in the dynamic spectrum of a Pc1 geomagnetic pulsation (Pc1) observed on the ground. These Pc1 rising tones were successively observed over ˜30 min from 0250 UT on 14 October 2006 by an induction magnetometer at Athabasca, Canada (54.7°N, 246.7°E, magnetic latitude 61.7°N). Simultaneously, a Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms panchromatic (THEMIS) all-sky camera detected pulsations of an isolated proton aurora with a period of several tens of seconds, ˜10% variations in intensity, and fine structures of 3° in magnetic longitudes. The pulsations of the proton aurora close to the zenith of ATH have one-to-one correspondences with the Pc1 rising tones. This suggests that these rising tones scatter magnetospheric protons intermittently at the equatorial region. The radial motion of the magnetospheric source, of which the isolated proton aurora is a projection, can explain the central frequency increase of Pc1, but not the shorter period (tens of seconds) frequency increase of ˜1 Hz in Pc1 rising tones. We suggest that EMIC-triggered emissions generate the frequency increase of Pc1 rising tones on the ground and that they also cause the Pc1 pearl structure, which has a similar characteristic time.

  2. Hereditary protein C deficiency caused by compound heterozygous mutants in two independent Chinese families.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ying-Ting; Yue, Fei; Wang, Min; Lu, Ye-Ling; Dai, Jing; Ding, Qiu-Lan; Wang, Hong-Li; Chen, Hui-Fen; Wang, Xue-Feng

    2014-12-01

    We report two compound heterozygous mutants that caused severe type I protein C (PC) deficiency in two independent Chinese families.PC antigen was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and PC activity was measured by chromogenic assay. Genetic mutations were screened with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by direct sequencing. PC mutants were transiently expressed in COS-7 cells for the evaluation of PC secretory activity and function. The subcellular location was visualised by immunofluorescence assay. The structural analysis of mutation was performed as well.Compound heterozygous mutations of Arg178Trp and Asp255His with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 1, a 28-year-old male with deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism. The other mutations of Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile with reduced PC activity and antigen levels were identified in Proband 2, a 19-year-old male with DVT. The PC activities with Arg178Trp, Asp255His, Leu-34Pro and Thr295Ile mutations decreased significantly. Immunofluorescence assay demonstrated that only trace amount of PC with novel Thr295Ile mutation was transported to the Golgi apparatus. Subsequent structural analysis indicated severe impairments of intracellular folding and secretion.The two rare compound heterozygous mutations could cause type I PC deficiency via impairment of secretory activity of PC.

  3. Mutants of PC12 cells with altered cyclic AMP responses

    SciTech Connect

    Block, T.; Kon, C.; Breckenridge, B.M.

    1984-10-01

    PCl2 cells, derived from a rat pheochromocytoma, were mutagenized and selected in media containing agents known to elevate intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP (cAMP). More than 40 clones were isolated by selection with cholera toxin or 2-chloroadenosine or both. The variants that were deficient in accumulating cAMP were obtained by using a protocol in which 1 ..mu..m 8-bromo-cAMP was included in addition to the agonist. Certain of these variants were partially characterized with respect to the site of altered cAMP metabolism. The profiles of adenylate cyclase activity responsiveness of certain variants to guanosine-5'-(BETA,..gamma..-imido) triphosphate and to forskolin resembled those of UNC and cyc phenotypes of S49 lymphoma cells, which are functionally deficient in the GTP-sensitive coupling protein, N/sub s/. Other variants were characterized by increased cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase activity at low substrate concentration. Diverse morphological traits were observed among the variants, but it was not possible to assign them to a particular cAMP phenotype. Two revertants of a PCl2 mutant were isolated and observed to have regained a cellular cAMP response to 2-chloroadenosine and to forskolin. It is hoped that these PCl2 mutants will have utility for defining cAMP-mediated functions, including any links to the action of nerve growth factor, in cells derived from the neural crest.

  4. Mutant γPKC that causes spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 upregulates Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Kota; Seki, Takahiro; Onji, Tomoya; Adachi, Naoko; Tanaka, Shigeru; Hide, Izumi; Saito, Naoaki; Sakai, Norio

    2013-10-11

    Several missense mutations in the protein kinase Cγ (γPKC) gene have been found to cause spinocerebellar ataxia type 14 (SCA14), an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disease. We previously demonstrated that the mutant γPKC found in SCA14 is misfolded, susceptible to aggregation and cytotoxic. Molecular chaperones assist the refolding and degradation of misfolded proteins and prevention of the proteins' aggregation. In the present study, we found that the expression of mutant γPKC-GFP increased the levels of heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in SH-SY5Y cells. To elucidate the role of this elevation, we investigated the effect of siRNA-mediated knockdown of Hsp70 on the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC. Knockdown of Hsp70 exacerbated the aggregation and cytotoxicity of mutant γPKC-GFP by inhibiting this mutant's degradation. These findings suggest that mutant γPKC increases the level of Hsp70, which protects cells from the mutant's cytotoxicity by enhancing its degradation.

  5. Process optimisation for the biosynthesis of cellulase by Bacillus PC-BC6 and its mutant derivative Bacillus N3 using submerged fermentation.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Roheena; Zafar, Wajeeha; Nadeem, Muhammad; Iqtedar, Mehwish; Naz, Shagufta; Syed, Quratulain; Kaleem, Afshan

    2015-01-01

    This study deals with optimisation of cultural conditions for enhanced production of cellulase by Bacillus PC-BC6 and its mutant derivative Bacillus N3. Influence of different variables including incubation time, temperature, inoculum size, pH, nitrogen sources and metal ions has been studied. The optimum conditions for cellulase production were incubation period of 72 h, inoculum size 4% incubation temperature 37°C, pH 7, 0.25% ammonium sulphate, 0.2% peptone as inorganic and organic nitrogen source in case of Bacillus PC-BC6. In case of mutant Bacillus N3, optimal conditions were incubation period of 48 h, incubation temperature 37°C, inoculum size 3%, pH 7, 0.2% ammonium chloride and 0.15% yeast extract. Presence of MnSO4 and CaCl2 enhances the enzyme production by Bacillus PC-BC6 and mutant Bacillus N3, respectively. This study was innovative and successful in producing cellulase economically by using cheap indigenous substrate Saccharum spontaneum.

  6. Pyrin gene and mutants thereof, which cause familial Mediterranean fever

    DOEpatents

    Kastner, Daniel L.; Aksentijevichh, Ivona; Centola, Michael; Deng, Zuoming; Sood, Ramen; Collins, Francis S.; Blake, Trevor; Liu, P. Paul; Fischel-Ghodsian, Nathan; Gumucio, Deborah L.; Richards, Robert I.; Ricke, Darrell O.; Doggett, Norman A.; Pras, Mordechai

    2003-09-30

    The invention provides the nucleic acid sequence encoding the protein associated with familial Mediterranean fever (FMF). The cDNA sequence is designated as MEFV. The invention is also directed towards fragments of the DNA sequence, as well as the corresponding sequence for the RNA transcript and fragments thereof. Another aspect of the invention provides the amino acid sequence for a protein (pyrin) associated with FMF. The invention is directed towards both the full length amino acid sequence, fusion proteins containing the amino acid sequence and fragments thereof. The invention is also directed towards mutants of the nucleic acid and amino acid sequences associated with FMF. In particular, the invention discloses three missense mutations, clustered in within about 40 to 50 amino acids, in the highly conserved rfp (B30.2) domain at the C-terminal of the protein. These mutants include M6801, M694V, K695R, and V726A. Additionally, the invention includes methods for diagnosing a patient at risk for having FMF and kits therefor.

  7. A clinical and molecular review of ubiquitous glucose-6-phosphatase deficiency caused by G6PC3 mutations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The G6PC3 gene encodes the ubiquitously expressed glucose-6-phosphatase enzyme (G-6-Pase β or G-6-Pase 3 or G6PC3). Bi-allelic G6PC3 mutations cause a multi-system autosomal recessive disorder of G6PC3 deficiency (also called severe congenital neutropenia type 4, MIM 612541). To date, at least 57 patients with G6PC3 deficiency have been described in the literature. G6PC3 deficiency is characterized by severe congenital neutropenia, recurrent bacterial infections, intermittent thrombocytopenia in many patients, a prominent superficial venous pattern and a high incidence of congenital cardiac defects and uro-genital anomalies. The phenotypic spectrum of the condition is wide and includes rare manifestations such as maturation arrest of the myeloid lineage, a normocellular bone marrow, myelokathexis, lymphopaenia, thymic hypoplasia, inflammatory bowel disease, primary pulmonary hypertension, endocrine abnormalities, growth retardation, minor facial dysmorphism, skeletal and integument anomalies amongst others. Dursun syndrome is part of this extended spectrum. G6PC3 deficiency can also result in isolated non-syndromic severe neutropenia. G6PC3 mutations in result in reduced enzyme activity, endoplasmic reticulum stress response, increased rates of apoptosis of affected cells and dysfunction of neutrophil activity. In this review we demonstrate that loss of function in missense G6PC3 mutations likely results from decreased enzyme stability. The condition can be diagnosed by sequencing the G6PC3 gene. A number of G6PC3 founder mutations are known in various populations and a possible genotype-phenotype relationship also exists. G6PC3 deficiency should be considered as part of the differential diagnoses in any patient with unexplained congenital neutropenia. Treatment with G-CSF leads to improvement in neutrophil numbers, prevents infections and improves quality of life. Mildly affected patients can be managed with prophylactic antibiotics. Untreated G6PC3 deficiency

  8. Onjisaponin B Derived from Radix Polygalae Enhances Autophagy and Accelerates the Degradation of Mutant α-Synuclein and Huntingtin in PC-12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, An-Guo; Wong, Vincent Kam-Wai; Xu, Su-Wei; Chan, Wai-Kit; Ng, Choi-In; Liu, Liang; Law, Betty Yuen-Kwan

    2013-01-01

    Emerging evidence indicates important protective roles being played by autophagy in neurodegenerative disorders through clearance of aggregate-prone or mutant proteins. In the current study, we aimed to identify autophagy inducers from Chinese medicinal herbs as a potential neuroprotective agent that enhances the clearance of mutant huntingtin and α-synuclein in PC-12 cells. Through intensive screening using the green fluorescent protein-light chain 3 (GFP-LC3) autophagy detection platform, we found that the ethanol extracts of Radix Polygalae (Yuan Zhi) were capable of inducing autophagy. Further investigation showed that among three single components derived from Radix Polygalae—i.e., polygalacic acid, senegenin and onjisaponin B—onjisaponin B was able to induce autophagy and accelerate both the removal of mutant huntingtin and A53T α-synuclein, which are highly associated with Huntington disease and Parkinson disease, respectively. Our study further demonstrated that onjisaponin B induces autophagy via the AMPK-mTOR signaling pathway. Therefore, findings in the current study provide detailed insights into the protective mechanism of a novel autophagy inducer, which is valuable for further investigation as a new candidate agent for modulating neurodegenerative disorders through the reduction of toxicity and clearance of mutant proteins in the cellular level. PMID:24248062

  9. Starvation Induced Cell Death in Autophagy-Defective Yeast Mutants Is Caused by Mitochondria Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Sho W.; Onodera, Jun; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT) cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA). We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants. PMID:21364763

  10. Starvation induced cell death in autophagy-defective yeast mutants is caused by mitochondria dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Sho W; Onodera, Jun; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2011-02-25

    Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg) mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT) cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species) scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA). We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants.

  11. Impaired Mitochondrial Function Due to Familial Alzheimers Disease-Causing Presenilins Mutants Via Ca2+ Disruptions

    PubMed Central

    Toglia, Patrick; Cheung, King-Ho; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Ullah, Ghanim

    2016-01-01

    Mutants in presenilins (PS1 or PS2) is the major cause of Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD). FAD causing PS mutants affect intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis by enhancing the gating of inositol trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca2+ release channels on the endoplasmic reticulum, leading to exaggerated Ca2+ release into the cytoplasm. Using experimental IP3R-mediated Ca2+ release data, in conjunction with a computational model of cell bioenergetics, we explore how the differences in mitochondrial Ca2+ uptake in control cells and cells expressing FAD-causing PS mutants affect key variables such as ATP, reactive oxygen species (ROS), NADH, and mitochondrial Ca2+. We find that as a result of exaggerated cytosolic Ca2+ in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells, the rate of oxygen consumption increases dramatically and overcomes the Ca2+ dependent enzymes that stimulate NADH production. This leads to decreased rates in proton pumping due to diminished membrane potential along with less ATP and enhanced ROS production. These results show that through Ca2+ signaling disruption, mutant PS leads to mitochondrial dysfunction and potentially to cell death. PMID:26971122

  12. Nuclear protein import is reduced in cells expressing nuclear envelopathy-causing lamin A mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Busch, Albert; Kiel, Tilman; Heupel, Wolfgang-M.; Wehnert, Manfred; Huebner, Stefan

    2009-08-15

    Lamins, which form the nuclear lamina, not only constitute an important determinant of nuclear architecture, but additionally play essential roles in many nuclear functions. Mutations in A-type lamins cause a wide range of human genetic disorders (laminopathies). The importance of lamin A (LaA) in the spatial arrangement of nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) prompted us to study the role of LaA mutants in nuclear protein transport. Two mutants, causing prenatal skin disease restrictive dermopathy (RD) and the premature aging disease Hutchinson Gilford progeria syndrome, were used for expression in HeLa cells to investigate their impact on the subcellular localization of NPC-associated proteins and nuclear protein import. Furthermore, dynamics of the LaA mutants within the nuclear lamina were studied. We observed affected localization of NPC-associated proteins, diminished lamina dynamics for both LaA mutants and reduced nuclear import of representative cargo molecules. Intriguingly, both LaA mutants displayed similar effects on nuclear morphology and functions, despite their differences in disease severity. Reduced nuclear protein import was also seen in RD fibroblasts and impaired lamina dynamics for the nucleoporin Nup153. Our data thus represent the first study of a direct link between LaA mutant expression and reduced nuclear protein import.

  13. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example.

  14. Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant causes fire blight despite pyrimidine auxotrophy.

    PubMed

    Ramos, L S; Sinn, J P; Lehman, B L; Pfeufer, E E; Peter, K A; McNellis, T W

    2015-06-01

    Erwinia amylovora bacteria cause fire blight disease, which affects apple and pear production worldwide. The Erw. amylovora pyrC gene encodes a predicted dihydroorotase enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. Here, we discovered that the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant was a uracil auxotroph. Unexpectedly, the Erw. amylovora pyrC244::Tn5 mutant grew as well as the wild-type in detached immature apple and pear fruits. Fire blight symptoms caused by the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant in immature apple and pear fruits were attenuated compared to those caused by the wild-type. The pyrC244::Tn5 mutant also caused severe fire blight symptoms in apple tree shoots. A plasmid-borne copy of the wild-type pyrC gene restored prototrophy and symptom induction in apple and pear fruit to the pyrC244::Tn5 mutant. These results suggest that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidine from the host to support bacterial growth and fire blight disease development, although de novo pyrimidine synthesis by Erw. amylovora is required for full symptom development in fruits. Significance and impact of the study: This study provides information about the fire blight host-pathogen interaction. Although the Erwinia amylovora pyrC mutant was strictly auxotrophic for pyrimidine, it grew as well as the wild-type in immature pear and apple fruits and caused severe fire blight disease in apple trees. This suggests that Erw. amylovora can obtain sufficient pyrimidines from host tissue to support growth and fire blight disease development. This situation contrasts with findings in some human bacterial pathogens, which require de novo pyrimidine synthesis for growth in host blood, for example. PMID:25789570

  15. Phenotype Sequencing: Identifying the Genes That Cause a Phenotype Directly from Pooled Sequencing of Independent Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Harper, Marc A.; Chen, Zugen; Toy, Traci; Machado, Iara M. P.; Nelson, Stanley F.; Liao, James C.; Lee, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    Random mutagenesis and phenotype screening provide a powerful method for dissecting microbial functions, but their results can be laborious to analyze experimentally. Each mutant strain may contain 50–100 random mutations, necessitating extensive functional experiments to determine which one causes the selected phenotype. To solve this problem, we propose a “Phenotype Sequencing” approach in which genes causing the phenotype can be identified directly from sequencing of multiple independent mutants. We developed a new computational analysis method showing that 1. causal genes can be identified with high probability from even a modest number of mutant genomes; 2. costs can be cut many-fold compared with a conventional genome sequencing approach via an optimized strategy of library-pooling (multiple strains per library) and tag-pooling (multiple tagged libraries per sequencing lane). We have performed extensive validation experiments on a set of E. coli mutants with increased isobutanol biofuel tolerance. We generated a range of sequencing experiments varying from 3 to 32 mutant strains, with pooling on 1 to 3 sequencing lanes. Our statistical analysis of these data (4099 mutations from 32 mutant genomes) successfully identified 3 genes (acrB, marC, acrA) that have been independently validated as causing this experimental phenotype. It must be emphasized that our approach reduces mutant sequencing costs enormously. Whereas a conventional genome sequencing experiment would have cost $7,200 in reagents alone, our Phenotype Sequencing design yielded the same information value for only $1200. In fact, our smallest experiments reliably identified acrB and marC at a cost of only $110–$340. PMID:21364744

  16. Accumulation of SOD1 mutants in postnatal motoneurons does not cause motoneuron pathology or motoneuron disease.

    PubMed

    Lino, Maria Maddalena; Schneider, Corinna; Caroni, Pico

    2002-06-15

    Transgenic mice expressing high levels of familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (FALS)-associated mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) under the control of a human SOD1 minigene (hMg) accumulate mutant protein ubiquitously and develop motoneuron disease. However, restricted expression of SOD1 mutants in neurons apparently does not cause motor impairments in mice. Here, we investigated the possible pathogenic roles of mutant SOD1 accumulation in motoneurons. First, we used a Thy1 expression cassette to drive high constitutive expression of transgene in postnatal mouse neurons, including upper and lower motoneurons. Second, we expressed human (h) SOD1(G93A) and hSOD1(G85R) as transgenes (i.e., two SOD1 mutants with aggressive pathogenic properties in inducing FALS). Third, in addition to clinical signs of disease, we monitored early signs of disease onset and pathogenesis, including muscle innervation, astrogliosis in the spinal cord, and accumulation of ubiquitinated deposits in motoneurons and astrocytes. We report that high-level expression and accumulation of the mutant proteins in neurons failed to produce any detectable sign of pathology or disease in these transgenic mice. Crossing hMg-SOD1(G93A) mice (Gurney et al., 1994) with Thy1-SOD1(G93A) mice produced double-transgenic mice with spinal cord SOD1(G93A) levels that were approximately twofold higher than in the hMg-SOD1(G93A) single transgenics but did not affect the onset or progression of pathology or motoneuron disease. The accumulation of mutant SOD1 in postnatal motoneurons is thus not sufficient and probably also not critical to induce or accelerate motoneuron disease in FALS mice. The pathogenic process in FALS may involve non-neuronal cells, and selective vulnerability of motoneurons to this process may lead to motoneuron pathology and disease.

  17. Impaired Cellular Bioenergetics Causes Mitochondrial Calcium Handling Defects in MT-ND5 Mutant Cybrids

    PubMed Central

    Duchen, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) can cause mitochondrial disease, a group of metabolic disorders that affect both children and adults. Interestingly, individual mtDNA mutations can cause very different clinical symptoms, however the factors that determine these phenotypes remain obscure. Defects in mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation can disrupt cell signaling pathways, which may shape these disease phenotypes. In particular, mitochondria participate closely in cellular calcium signaling, with profound impact on cell function. Here, we examined the effects of a homoplasmic m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 on cellular calcium handling using transmitochondrial cybrids (ND5 mutant cybrids). We found that the oxidation of NADH and mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) were significantly reduced in ND5 mutant cybrids. These metabolic defects were associated with a significant decrease in calcium uptake by ND5 mutant mitochondria in response to a calcium transient. Inhibition of glycolysis with 2-deoxy-D-glucose did not affect cytosolic calcium levels in control cybrids, but caused an increase in cytosolic calcium in ND5 mutant cybrids. This suggests that glycolytically-generated ATP is required not only to maintain Δψm in ND5 mutant mitochondria but is also critical for regulating cellular calcium homeostasis. We conclude that the m.13565C>T mutation in MT-ND5 causes defects in both mitochondrial oxidative metabolism and mitochondrial calcium sequestration. This disruption of mitochondrial calcium handling, which leads to defects in cellular calcium homeostasis, may be an important contributor to mitochondrial disease pathogenesis. PMID:27110715

  18. Reducing ppGpp level rescues an extreme growth defect caused by mutant EF-Tu.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Jessica M; Hammarlöf, Disa L; Hughes, Diarmaid

    2014-01-01

    Transcription and translation of mRNA's are coordinated processes in bacteria. We have previously shown that a mutant form of EF-Tu (Gln125Arg) in Salmonella Typhimurium with a reduced affinity for aa-tRNA, causes ribosome pausing, resulting in an increased rate of RNase E-mediated mRNA cleavage, causing extremely slow growth, even on rich medium. The slow growth phenotype is reversed by mutations that reduce RNase E activity. Here we asked whether the slow growth phenotype could be reversed by overexpression of a wild-type gene. We identified spoT (encoding ppGpp synthetase/hydrolase) as a gene that partially reversed the slow growth rate when overexpressed. We found that the slow-growing mutant had an abnormally high basal level of ppGpp that was reduced when spoT was overexpressed. Inactivating relA (encoding the ribosome-associated ppGpp synthetase) also reduced ppGpp levels and significantly increased growth rate. Because RelA responds specifically to deacylated tRNA in the ribosomal A-site this suggested that the tuf mutant had an increased level of deacylated tRNA relative to the wild-type. To test this hypothesis we measured the relative acylation levels of 4 families of tRNAs and found that proline isoacceptors were acylated at a lower level in the mutant strain relative to the wild-type. In addition, the level of the proS tRNA synthetase mRNA was significantly lower in the mutant strain. We suggest that an increased level of deacylated tRNA in the mutant strain stimulates RelA-mediated ppGpp production, causing changes in transcription pattern that are inappropriate for rich media conditions, and contributing to slow growth rate. Reducing ppGpp levels, by altering the activity of either SpoT or RelA, removes one cause of the slow growth and reveals the interconnectedness of intracellular regulatory mechanisms.

  19. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  20. Elevated mutant dynorphin A causes Purkinje cell loss and motor dysfunction in spinocerebellar ataxia type 23.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Cleo J L M; Jezierska, Justyna; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Duarri, Anna; Fokkens, Michiel R; Meijer, Michel; Zhou, Qin; Yakovleva, Tania; Boddeke, Erik; den Dunnen, Wilfred; van Deursen, Jan; Bakalkin, Georgy; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart; Verbeek, Dineke S

    2015-09-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 is caused by mutations in PDYN, which encodes the opioid neuropeptide precursor protein, prodynorphin. Prodynorphin is processed into the opioid peptides, α-neoendorphin, and dynorphins A and B, that normally exhibit opioid-receptor mediated actions in pain signalling and addiction. Dynorphin A is likely a mutational hotspot for spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutations, and in vitro data suggested that dynorphin A mutations lead to persistently elevated mutant peptide levels that are cytotoxic and may thus play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23. To further test this and study spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 in more detail, we generated a mouse carrying the spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 mutation R212W in PDYN. Analysis of peptide levels using a radioimmunoassay shows that these PDYN(R212W) mice display markedly elevated levels of mutant dynorphin A, which are associated with climber fibre retraction and Purkinje cell loss, visualized with immunohistochemical stainings. The PDYN(R212W) mice reproduced many of the clinical features of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23, with gait deficits starting at 3 months of age revealed by footprint pattern analysis, and progressive loss of motor coordination and balance at the age of 12 months demonstrated by declining performances on the accelerating Rotarod. The pathologically elevated mutant dynorphin A levels in the cerebellum coincided with transcriptionally dysregulated ionotropic and metabotropic glutamate receptors and glutamate transporters, and altered neuronal excitability. In conclusion, the PDYN(R212W) mouse is the first animal model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 23 and our work indicates that the elevated mutant dynorphin A peptide levels are likely responsible for the initiation and progression of the disease, affecting glutamatergic signalling, neuronal excitability, and motor performance. Our novel mouse model defines a critical role for opioid

  1. Controlling aggregation propensity in A53T mutant of alpha-synuclein causing Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Sonu; Sarkar, Anita; Sundar, Durai

    2009-09-18

    Understanding {alpha}-synuclein in terms of fibrillization, aggregation, solubility and stability is fundamental in Parkinson's disease (PD). The three familial mutations, namely, A30P, E46K and A53T cause PD because the hydrophobic regions in {alpha}-synuclein acquire {beta}-sheet configuration, and have a propensity to fibrillize and form amyloids that cause cytotoxicity and neurodegeneration. On simulating the native form and mutants (A30P, E46K and A53T) of {alpha}-synuclein in water solvent, clear deviations are observed in comparison to the all-helical 1XQ8 PDB structure. We have identified two crucial residues, {sup 40}Val and {sup 74}Val, which play key roles in {beta}-sheet aggregation in the hydrophobic regions 36-41 and 68-78, respectively, leading to fibrillization and amyloidosis in familial (A53T) PD. We have also identified V40D{sub V}74D, a double mutant of A53T (the most amyloidogenic mutant). The simultaneous introduction of these two mutations in A53T nearly ends its aggregation propensity, increases its solubility and positively enhances its thermodynamic stability.

  2. Tissue-specific Expression of Dominant Negative Mutant Drosophila HSC70 Causes Developmental Defects and Lethality

    PubMed Central

    Elefant, Felice; Palter, Karen B.

    1999-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster HSC3 and HSC4 genes encode Hsc70 proteins homologous to the mammalian endoplasmic reticulum (ER) protein BiP and the cytoplasmic clathrin uncoating ATPase, respectively. These proteins possess ATP binding/hydrolysis activities that mediate their ability to aid in protein folding by coordinating the sequential binding and release of misfolded proteins. To investigate the roles of HSC3 (Hsc3p) and HSC4 (Hsc4p) proteins during development, GAL4-targeted gene expression was used to analyze the effects of producing dominant negatively acting Hsc3p (D231S, K97S) and Hsc4p (D206S, K71S) proteins, containing single amino acid substitutions in their ATP-binding domains, in specific tissues of Drosophila throughout development. We show that the production of each mutant protein results in lethality over a range of developmental stages, depending on the levels of protein produced and which tissues are targeted. We demonstrate that the functions of both Hsc3p and Hsc4p are required for proper tissue establishment and maintenance. Production of mutant Hsc4p, but not Hsc3p, results in induction of the stress-inducible Hsp70 at normal temperatures. Evidence is presented that lethality is caused by tissue-specific defects that result from a global accumulation of misfolded protein caused by lack of functional Hsc70. We show that both mutant Hsc3ps are defective in ATP-induced substrate release, although Hsc3p(D231S) does undergo an ATP-induced conformational change. We believe that the amino acid substitutions in Hsc3p interfere with the structural coupling of ATP binding to substrate release, and this defect is the basis for the mutant proteins’ dominant negative effects in vivo. PMID:10397752

  3. A new vaccine escape mutant of hepatitis B virus causes occult infection.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qing; Shang, Shi-Qiang; Li, Wei

    2015-01-01

    There is growing public concern regarding assay sensitivity to HBsAg mutants in clinical diagnosis and vaccine escape. The aim of this study is to introduce a new HBsAg mutant strain. The serum samples were those of patient X at the age of 3 months and 3 years respectively, and of her mother immediately before parturition, which were used to amplify the HBsAg-coding DNA fragments by PCR. The HBsAg DNA sequences were translated into their corresponding amino acid sequences and then aligned in pubmed with nucleotide blast. The sequencing data of S coding regions shows that patient X has been infected by a new HBV variant with an A to C substitution at nt431, resulting in an Asp(GAC)to Ala(GCC) substitution at aa144 of major protein; CC to AA substitution at nt359 and nt360, resulting in an Pro(CCC) to Gln(CAA) substitution at aa120 of pre "a" epitope; A to G substitution at nt491, resulting in an Glu(GAG) to Gly(GGG) substitution at aa164 of post "a" epitope. Three new mutations (S171F, S174N and Q181R) at the antigenic epitopes of HBV presented by HLA class I molecules are found. The HBV mutant strain causes vaccine escape and occult infection. PMID:25692622

  4. IBMPFD Disease-Causing Mutant VCP/p97 Proteins Are Targets of Autophagic-Lysosomal Degradation

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Oznur; Akkoc, Yunus; Eberhart, Karin; Kosar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) degrades soluble proteins and small aggregates, whereas macroautophagy (autophagy herein) eliminates larger protein aggregates, tangles and even whole organelles in a lysosome-dependent manner. VCP/p97 was implicated in both pathways. VCP/p97 mutations cause a rare multisystem disease called IBMPFD (Inclusion Body Myopathy with Paget’s Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia). Here, we studied the role IBMPFD-related mutants of VCP/p97 in autophagy. In contrast with the wild-type VCP/p97 protein or R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant was aggregate-prone. We showed that, unlike commonly studied R155C or R191Q mutants, the P137L mutant protein stimulated both autophagosome and autolysosome formation. Moreover, P137L mutant protein itself was a substrate of autophagy. Starvation- and mTOR inhibition-induced autophagy led to the degradation of the P137L mutant protein, while preserving the wild-type and functional VCP/p97. Strikingly, similar to the P137L mutant, other IBMPFD-related VCP/p97 mutants, namely R93C and G157R mutants induced autophagosome and autolysosome formation; and G157R mutant formed aggregates that could be cleared by autophagy. Therefore, cellular phenotypes caused by P137L mutant expression were not isolated observations, and some other IBMPFD disease-related VCP/p97 mutations could lead to similar outcomes. Our results indicate that cellular mechanisms leading to IBMPFD disease may be various, and underline the importance of studying different disease-associated mutations in order to better understand human pathologies and tailor mutation-specific treatment strategies. PMID:27768726

  5. Increased prevalence of mutant null alleles that cause hereditary fructose intolerance in the American population

    PubMed Central

    Coffee, Erin M.; Yerkes, Laura; Ewen, Elizabeth P.; Zee, Tiffany

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in the aldolase B gene (ALDOB) impairing enzyme activity toward fructose-1-phosphate cleavage cause hereditary fructose intolerance (HFI). Diagnosis of the disease is possible by identifying known mutant ALDOB alleles in suspected patients; however, the frequencies of mutant alleles can differ by population. Here, 153 American HFI patients with 268 independent alleles were analyzed to identify the prevalence of seven known HFI-causing alleles (A149P, A174D, N334K, Δ4E4, R59Op, A337V, and L256P) in this population. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization analysis was performed on polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified genomic DNA from these patients. In the American population, the missense mutations A149P and A174D are the two most common alleles, with frequencies of 44% and 9%, respectively. In addition, the nonsense mutations Δ4E4 and R59Op are the next most common alleles, with each having a frequency of 4%. Together, the frequencies of all seven alleles make up 65% of HFI-causing alleles in this population. Worldwide, these same alleles make up 82% of HFI-causing mutations. This difference indicates that screening for common HFI alleles is more difficult in the American population. Nevertheless, a genetic screen for diagnosing HFI in America can be improved by including all seven alleles studied here. Lastly, identification of HFI patients presenting with classic symptoms and who have homozygous null genotypes indicates that aldolase B is not required for proper development or metabolic maintenance. PMID:20033295

  6. What can long-lived mutants tell us about mechanisms causing aging and lifespan variation in natural environments?

    PubMed

    Briga, Michael; Verhulst, Simon

    2015-11-01

    Long-lived mutants of model organisms have brought remarkable progress in our understanding of aging mechanisms. However, long-lived mutants are usually maintained in optimal standardized laboratory environments (SLEs), and it is not obvious to what extent insights from long-lived mutants in SLEs can be generalized to more natural environments. To address this question, we reviewed experiments that compared the fitness and lifespan advantage of long-lived mutants relative to wild type controls in SLEs and more challenging environments in various model organisms such as yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, the fruitfly Drosophila melanogaster and the mouse Mus musculus. In competition experiments over multiple generations, the long-lived mutants had a lower fitness relative to wild type controls, and this disadvantage was the clearest when the environment included natural challenges such as limited food (N=6 studies). It is well known that most long-lived mutants have impaired reproduction, which provides one reason for the fitness disadvantage. However, based on 12 experiments, we found that the lifespan advantage of long-lived mutants is diminished in more challenging environments, often to the extent that the wild type controls outlive the long-lived mutants. Thus, it appears that information on aging mechanisms obtained from long-lived mutants in SLEs may be specific to such environments, because those same mechanisms do not extend lifespan in more natural environments. This suggests that different mechanisms cause variation in aging and lifespan in SLEs compared to natural populations.

  7. Multiple mutant T alleles cause haploinsufficiency of Brachyury and short tails in Manx cats

    PubMed Central

    Buckingham, Kati J.; McMillin, Margaret J.; Brassil, Margaret M.; Shively, Kathryn M.; Magnaye, Kevin M.; Cortes, Alejandro; Weinmann, Amy S.; Lyons, Leslie A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Most mammals possess a tail, humans and the Great Apes being notable exceptions. One approach to understanding the mechanisms and evolutionary forces influencing development of a tail is to identify the genetic factors that influence extreme tail length variation within a species. In mice, the Tailless locus has proven to be complex, with evidence of multiple different genes and mutations with pleiotropic effects on tail length, fertility, embryogenesis, male transmission ratio, and meiotic recombination. Five cat breeds have abnormal tail length phenotypes: the American Bobtail, the Manx, the Pixie-Bob, the Kurilian Bobtail, and the Japanese Bobtail. We sequenced the T gene in several independent lineages of Manx cats from both the US and the Isle of Man and identified three 1-bp deletions and one duplication/deletion, each predicted to cause a frameshift that leads to premature termination and truncation of the carboxy terminal end of the Brachyury protein. Ninety-five percent of Manx cats with short-tail phenotypes were heterozygous for T mutations, mutant alleles appeared to be largely lineage-specific, and a maximum LOD score of 6.21 with T was obtained at a recombination fraction (Θ) of 0.00. One mutant T allele was shared with American Bobtails and Pixie-Bobs; both breeds developed more recently in the US. The ability of mutant Brachyury protein to activate transcription of a downstream target was substantially lower than wild-type protein. Collectively, these results suggest that haploinsufficiency of Brachyury is one mechanism underlying variable tail length in domesticated cats. PMID:23949773

  8. Molecular pathogenesis of Spondylocheirodysplastic Ehlers-Danlos syndrome caused by mutant ZIP13 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Hojyo, Shintaro; Hosaka, Toshiaki; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Kano, Hiroki; Miyai, Tomohiro; Ikeda, Mariko; Kimura-Someya, Tomomi; Shirouzu, Mikako; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Fukue, Kazuhisa; Kambe, Taiho; Ohashi, Wakana; Kim, Kyu-Han; Seo, Juyeon; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Hwang, Daehee; Fukunaka, Ayako; Fujitani, Yoshio; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Superti-Furga, Andrea; Ikegawa, Shiro; Lee, Tae Ryong; Fukada, Toshiyuki

    2014-01-01

    The zinc transporter protein ZIP13 plays critical roles in bone, tooth, and connective tissue development, and its dysfunction is responsible for the spondylocheirodysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (SCD-EDS, OMIM 612350). Here, we report the molecular pathogenic mechanism of SCD-EDS caused by two different mutant ZIP13 proteins found in human patients: ZIP13G64D, in which Gly at amino acid position 64 is replaced by Asp, and ZIP13ΔFLA, which contains a deletion of Phe-Leu-Ala. We demonstrated that both the ZIP13G64D and ZIP13ΔFLA protein levels are decreased by degradation via the valosin-containing protein (VCP)-linked ubiquitin proteasome pathway. The inhibition of degradation pathways rescued the protein expression levels, resulting in improved intracellular Zn homeostasis. Our findings uncover the pathogenic mechanisms elicited by mutant ZIP13 proteins. Further elucidation of these degradation processes may lead to novel therapeutic targets for SCD-EDS. PMID:25007800

  9. Common increase of GATA-3 level in PC-12 cells by three teratogens causing autism spectrum disorders.

    PubMed

    Rout, Ujjwal K; Clausen, Pete

    2009-06-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a disease of neuro-developmental origin of uncertain etiology. The current understanding is that both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of ASD. Exposure to valproate, thalidomide and alcohol during gestation are amongst the environmental triggers that are associated with the development of ASD. These teratogens may disturb the ontogeny of the brain by altering the expression pattern of genes that regulate the normal development of the brain. In this study, a neuron-like PC-12 cell model was used to examine the effects of these compounds on the binding potential of 50 different transcription factors to understand the molecular mechanism/s that may be involved in the teratogenesis caused by these agents. Cells in culture were treated with low or high concentrations of teratogens within a range that are reported in the blood of individuals. A pronounced increase in GATA transcription factor binding was observed for all three teratogens. Furthermore, Western blot analysis showed that GATA-3 level in the nuclear fractions was enhanced by each of the three teratogens. Results suggest that altered gene expression pattern due to heightened GATA-3 activities in the fetral brains following exposure to these teratogens may contribute to the development of ASD.

  10. Sodium/Iodide Symporter Mutant V270E Causes Stunted Growth but No Cognitive Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Nicola, Juan Pablo; Reyna-Neyra, Andrea; Saenger, Paul; Rodriguez-Buritica, David F.; Gamez Godoy, José David; Muzumdar, Radhika; Amzel, L. Mario

    2015-01-01

    Context: Iodide (I−), an essential constituent of the thyroid hormones, is actively accumulated in the thyroid by the Na+/I− symporter (NIS), a key plasma membrane protein encoded by the slc5a5 gene. Mutations in slc5a5 cause I− transport defects (ITDs), autosomal-recessive disorders in which I− accumulation is totally or partially impaired, leading to congenital hypothyroidism. The characterization of NIS mutants has yielded significant insights into the molecular mechanism of NIS. Objective: This study aimed to determine the basis of a patient's ITD clinical phenotype, by sequencing her slc5a5 gene. Design: Genomic DNA was purified and the slc5a5 gene sequence determined. Functional in vitro studies were performed to characterize the V270E NIS mutant. Patient: The index patient was diagnosed with hypothyroidism with minimal radioiodide uptake in a normally located, although enlarged, thyroid gland. Results: We identified a new NIS mutation: V270E. The patient had the compound heterozygous NIS mutation R124H/V270E. R124H NIS has been characterized previously. We show that V270E markedly reduces I− uptake via a pronounced (but not total) impairment of the protein's plasma membrane targeting. Remarkably, V270E is intrinsically active. Therefore, a negative charge at position 270 interferes with NIS cell surface trafficking. The patient's minimal I− uptake enabled sufficient thyroid hormone biosynthesis to prevent cognitive impairment. Conclusions: A nonpolar residue at position 270, which all members of the SLC5A family have, is required for NIS plasma membrane targeting. PMID:26204134

  11. Mutant alpha-synuclein causes age-dependent neuropathology in monkey brain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weili; Wang, Guohao; Wang, Chuan-En; Guo, Xiangyu; Yin, Peng; Gao, Jinquan; Tu, Zhuchi; Wang, Zhengbo; Wu, Jing; Hu, Xintian; Li, Shihua; Li, Xiao-Jiang

    2015-05-27

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is an age-dependent neurodegenerative disease that often occurs in those over age 60. Although rodents and small animals have been used widely to model PD and investigate its pathology, their short life span makes it difficult to assess the aging-related pathology that is likely to occur in PD patient brains. Here, we used brain tissues from rhesus monkeys at 2-3, 7-8, and >15 years of age to examine the expression of Parkin, PINK1, and α-synuclein, which are known to cause PD via loss- or gain-of-function mechanisms. We found that α-synuclein is increased in the older monkey brains, whereas Parkin and PINK1 are decreased or remain unchanged. Because of the gain of toxicity of α-synuclein, we performed stereotaxic injection of lentiviral vectors expressing mutant α-synuclein (A53T) into the substantia nigra of monkeys and found that aging also increases the accumulation of A53T in neurites and its associated neuropathology. A53T also causes more extensive reactive astrocytes and axonal degeneration in monkey brain than in mouse brain. Using monkey brain tissues, we found that A53T interacts with neurofascin, an adhesion molecule involved in axon subcellular targeting and neurite outgrowth. Aged monkey brain tissues show an increased interaction of neurofascin with A53T. Overexpression of A53T causes neuritic toxicity in cultured neuronal cells, which can be attenuated by transfected neurofascin. These findings from nonhuman primate brains reveal age-dependent pathological and molecular changes that could contribute to the age-dependent neuropathology in PD.

  12. [Effect of microRNA on proliferation caused by mutant HBx in human hepatocytes].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiao-yu; Tan, De-ming; Hou, Zhou-hua; Hu, Zhi-liang; Liu, Guo-zhen; Ouyang, Yi; Liu, Fei

    2012-08-01

    To study the effect of micro (mi)RNA on cellular proliferation induced by hepatitis B x protein, HBx, in human liver cells and to investigate the underlying molecular mechanism of this cancer-related effect. The human L02 hepatocyte cell line was stably transfected with HBx (L02/HBx) or an HBx mutant (L02/HBx-d382) that induces higher levels of cellular proliferation. The differential miRNA expression profiles were determined by microarray analysis and confirmed by real-time PCR. Two miRNAs, miR-338-3p and miR-551b, that were found to be significantly down-regulated in the L02/HBx-d382 cells were selected for further study and transfected individually into cells using the lipofectamine procedure. The cell survival rate was analyzed by MTT assay, and cell cycles were assessed by flow cytometry. Expressions of cyclinD1, cyclinG1, and E2F1 were assessed by real-time PCR and Western blotting. Compared with the microarray miRNA profile of L02/pcDNA3.0 cells, six miRNAs were up-regulated and five miRNAs were down-regulated in the L02/HBx-d382 cells, while four miRNAs were up-regulated and 12 were down-regulated in the L02/HBx cells. The microarray results were consistent with real-time PCR results. Transfection of miR-338-3p and miR-551b significantly inhibited the cell survival rates (P less than 0.001) and induced G0/G1 phase cycle arrest. According to MTT results: for L02/HBx-d382 cells, compared with lipofectamine or non-transfected (NC) controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 10.402, 9.133 and the t value of miR-551b was 8.763, 7.403; for L02/HBx cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 9.105, 8.074 and the t value of miR-551b was 7.673, 7.52. According to flow cytometry results: for L02/HBx-d382 cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p was 12.173, 11.107 and the t value of miR-551b was 15.364, 13.377; for L02/HBx cells, compared with lipofectamine or NC controls, the t value of miR-338-3p

  13. Parkinson's disease-associated mutant VPS35 causes mitochondrial dysfunction by recycling DLP1 complexes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenzhang; Wang, Xinglong; Fujioka, Hisashi; Hoppel, Charles; Whone, Alan L; Caldwell, Maeve A; Cullen, Peter J; Liu, Jun; Zhu, Xiongwei

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction represents a critical step during the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease (PD), and increasing evidence suggests abnormal mitochondrial dynamics and quality control as important underlying mechanisms. The VPS35 gene, which encodes a key component of the membrane protein-recycling retromer complex, is the third autosomal-dominant gene associated with PD. However, how VPS35 mutations lead to neurodegeneration remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that PD-associated VPS35 mutations caused mitochondrial fragmentation and cell death in cultured neurons in vitro, in mouse substantia nigra neurons in vivo and in human fibroblasts from an individual with PD who has the VPS35(D620N) mutation. VPS35-induced mitochondrial deficits and neuronal dysfunction could be prevented by inhibition of mitochondrial fission. VPS35 mutants showed increased interaction with dynamin-like protein (DLP) 1, which enhanced turnover of the mitochondrial DLP1 complexes via the mitochondria-derived vesicle-dependent trafficking of the complexes to lysosomes for degradation. Notably, oxidative stress increased the VPS35-DLP1 interaction, which we also found to be increased in the brains of sporadic PD cases. These results revealed a novel cellular mechanism for the involvement of VPS35 in mitochondrial fission, dysregulation of which is probably involved in the pathogenesis of familial, and possibly sporadic, PD. PMID:26618722

  14. Susceptibility of Maize to Stalk Rot Caused by Fusarium graminearum Deoxynivalenol and Zearalenone Mutants.

    PubMed

    Quesada-Ocampo, L M; Al-Haddad, J; Scruggs, A C; Buell, C R; Trail, F

    2016-08-01

    Fusarium graminearum is a destructive pathogen of cereals that can cause stalk rot in maize. Stalk rot results in yield losses due to impaired grain filling, premature senescence, and lodging, which limits production and harvesting of ears. In addition, mycotoxins can make infected tissues unfit for silage. Our objectives were to evaluate the natural variation in stalk rot resistance among maize inbreds, to establish whether deoxynivalenol (DON)- and zearalenone (ZEA)-deficient strains are pathogenic on a panel of diverse inbreds, and to quantify the accumulation of DON in infected stalk tissue. Wild-type F. graminearum and mycotoxin mutants (DON and ZEA) were used to separately inoculate stalks of 9-week-old plants of 20 inbreds in the greenhouse. Plants were evaluated for lesion area at the inoculation point at 0, 2, 14, and 28 days postinoculation and tissues around lesions were sampled to determine the DON content. Regardless of their ability to produce DON or ZEA, all tested F. graminearum strains caused stalk rot; however, significant differences in disease levels were detected. Among the tested inbreds, Mp717 was resistant to all three F. graminearum strains while Mp317 and HP301 were only partially resistant. Accumulation of DON was significantly lower in infected stalks of the resistant and partially resistant inbreds than the susceptible inbreds. Analysis of the 20 inbreds using data from 17 simple-sequence repeats revealed population structure among the individuals; however, there was no association between genetic clustering and stalk rot resistance. These findings are an additional step toward breeding maize inbreds suitable for planting in fields infested with F. graminearum.

  15. A P60 mutant of Listeria monocytogenes is impaired in its ability to cause infection in intragastrically inoculated mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A spontaneous P60 mutant of Listeria monocytogenes was less able to cause systemic infection in A/J mice, following intragastric inoculation, than the parental wild type strain (SLCC 5764, serotype 1/2a). Significantly fewer CFU were recovered from internal organs (spleen, liver, gall bladder) and f...

  16. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-01-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  17. Functional Loss of Bmsei Causes Thermosensitive Epilepsy in Contractile Mutant Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Hongyi; Cheng, Tingcai; Huang, Xiaofeng; Zhou, Mengting; Zhang, Yinxia; Dai, Fangyin; Mita, Kazuei; Xia, Qingyou; Liu, Chun

    2015-07-01

    The thermoprotective mechanisms of insects remain largely unknown. We reported the Bombyx mori contractile (cot) behavioral mutant with thermo-sensitive seizures phenotype. At elevated temperatures, the cot mutant exhibit seizures associated with strong contractions, rolling, vomiting, and a temporary lack of movement. We narrowed a region containing cot to ~268 kb by positional cloning and identified the mutant gene as Bmsei which encoded a potassium channel protein. Bmsei was present in both the cell membrane and cytoplasm in wild-type ganglia but faint in cot. Furthermore, Bmsei was markedly decreased upon high temperature treatment in cot mutant. With the RNAi method and injecting potassium channel blockers, the wild type silkworm was induced the cot phenotype. These results demonstrated that Bmsei was responsible for the cot mutant phenotype and played an important role in thermoprotection in silkworm. Meanwhile, comparative proteomic approach was used to investigate the proteomic differences. The results showed that the protein of Hsp-1 and Tn1 were significantly decreased and increased on protein level in cot mutant after thermo-stimulus, respectively. Our data provide insights into the mechanism of thermoprotection in insect. As cot phenotype closely resembles human epilepsy, cot might be a potential model for the mechanism of epilepsy in future.

  18. Human congenital myopathy actin mutants cause myopathy and alter Z-disc structure in Drosophila flight muscle.

    PubMed

    Sevdali, Maria; Kumar, Vikash; Peckham, Michelle; Sparrow, John

    2013-03-01

    Over 190 mutations in the human skeletal muscle α-actin gene, ACTA1 cause congenital actin myopathies. We transgenically expressed six different mutant actins, G15R, I136M, D154N, V163L, V163M and D292V in Drosophila indirect flight muscles and investigated their effects in flies that express one wild type and one mutant actin copy. All the flies were flightless, and the IFMs showed incomplete Z-discs, disorganised actin filaments and 'zebra bodies'. No differences in levels of sarcomeric protein expression were observed, but tropomodulin staining was somewhat disrupted in D164N, V163L, G15R and V163M heterozygotes. A single copy of D292V mutant actin rescued the hypercontractile phenotypes caused by TnI and TnT mutants, suggesting that the D292V mutation interferes with thin filament regulation. Our results show that expression of actin mutations homologous to those in humans in the indirect flight muscles of Drosophila disrupt sarcomere organisation, with somewhat similar phenotypes to those observed in humans. Using Drosophila to study actin mutations may help aid our understanding of congential myopathies caused by actin mutations.

  19. S-Nitrosylating protein disulphide isomerase mediates α-synuclein aggregation caused by methamphetamine exposure in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiao-Fang; Wang, Ai-Feng; Chen, Ling; Huang, En-Ping; Xie, Wei-Bing; Liu, Chao; Huang, Wei-Ye; Chen, Chuan-Xiang; Qiu, Ping-Ming; Wang, Hui-Jun

    2014-10-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) belongs to Amphetamine-type stimulants, METH abusers are at high risk of neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease (PD). However, there are still no effective treatments to METH-induced neurodegeneration because its mechanism remains unknown. In order to investigate METH's neurotoxic mechanism, we established an in vitro PD pathology model by exposing PC12 cells to METH. We found the expression of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), nitric oxide (NO) and α-synuclein (α-syn) was significantly increased after METH treatment for 24h, in addition, the aggregattion of α-syn and the S-nitrosylation of protein disulphideisomerase(PDI) were also obviously enhanced. When we exposed PC12 cells to the NOS inhibitor N-nitro-L-arginine(L-NNA) with METH together, the L-NNA obviously inhibited these changes induced by METH. While when we exposed PC12 cells to the precursor of NO L-Arginine together with METH, the L-Arginine resulted in the opposite effect compared to L-NNA. And when we knocked down the PDI gene, the L-NNA did not have this effect. Therefore, PDI plays a significant role in neurological disorders related to α-syn aggregation, and it suggests that PDI could be as a potential target to prevent METH-induced neurodegeneration.

  20. A new disease allele for the p.C30071R mutation in titin causing hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Gerald; Sambuughin, Nyamkhishig; Olivé, Montse; Tyndel, Felix; Toro, Camilo; Goldfarb, Lev G; Chinnery, Patrick F

    2014-03-01

    Hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure is an autosomal dominant myopathy caused by mutations in the 119th fibronectin-3 domain of titin. To date all reported patients with the most common mutation in this domain (p.C30071R) appear to share ancestral disease alleles. We undertook this study of two families with the p.C30071R mutation to determine whether they share the same haplotype as previously reported British families or whether the mutation arose as a de novo event. We sequenced the 119th fibronectin-3 domain in these two probands and flanking polymorphisms associated with the British haplotype in hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure. A family of Indian descent had a haplotype that was not compatible with the British shared haplotype. Cloning of the 119th fibronectin-3 domain in this patient demonstrated polymorphisms rs191484894 and novel noncoding variant c.90225C>T on the same allele as the mutation, which is distinct from previously reported British families. This proves that the p.C30071R mutation itself (rather than the haplotype containing this mutation) causes hereditary myopathy with early respiratory failure and suggests its independent origin in different ethnic groups.

  1. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W.; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4. Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice. PMID:27588462

  2. Impaired protein translation in Drosophila models for Charcot–Marie–Tooth neuropathy caused by mutant tRNA synthetases

    PubMed Central

    Niehues, Sven; Bussmann, Julia; Steffes, Georg; Erdmann, Ines; Köhrer, Caroline; Sun, Litao; Wagner, Marina; Schäfer, Kerstin; Wang, Guangxia; Koerdt, Sophia N.; Stum, Morgane; RajBhandary, Uttam L.; Thomas, Ulrich; Aberle, Hermann; Burgess, Robert W.; Yang, Xiang-Lei; Dieterich, Daniela; Storkebaum, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Dominant mutations in five tRNA synthetases cause Charcot–Marie–Tooth (CMT) neuropathy, suggesting that altered aminoacylation function underlies the disease. However, previous studies showed that loss of aminoacylation activity is not required to cause CMT. Here we present a Drosophila model for CMT with mutations in glycyl-tRNA synthetase (GARS). Expression of three CMT-mutant GARS proteins induces defects in motor performance and motor and sensory neuron morphology, and shortens lifespan. Mutant GARS proteins display normal subcellular localization but markedly reduce global protein synthesis in motor and sensory neurons, or when ubiquitously expressed in adults, as revealed by FUNCAT and BONCAT. Translational slowdown is not attributable to altered tRNAGly aminoacylation, and cannot be rescued by Drosophila Gars overexpression, indicating a gain-of-toxic-function mechanism. Expression of CMT-mutant tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase also impairs translation, suggesting a common pathogenic mechanism. Finally, genetic reduction of translation is sufficient to induce CMT-like phenotypes, indicating a causal contribution of translational slowdown to CMT. PMID:26138142

  3. Cystic fibrosis–adapted Pseudomonas aeruginosa quorum sensing lasR mutants cause hyperinflammatory responses

    PubMed Central

    LaFayette, Shantelle L.; Houle, Daniel; Beaudoin, Trevor; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Radzioch, Danuta; Hoffman, Lucas R.; Burns, Jane L.; Dandekar, Ajai A.; Smalley, Nicole E.; Chandler, Josephine R.; Zlosnik, James E.; Speert, David P.; Bernier, Joanie; Matouk, Elias; Brochiero, Emmanuelle; Rousseau, Simon; Nguyen, Dao

    2015-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis lung disease is characterized by chronic airway infections with the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa and severe neutrophilic pulmonary inflammation. P. aeruginosa undergoes extensive genetic adaptation to the cystic fibrosis (CF) lung environment, and adaptive mutations in the quorum sensing regulator gene lasR commonly arise. We sought to define how mutations in lasR alter host-pathogen relationships. We demonstrate that lasR mutants induce exaggerated host inflammatory responses in respiratory epithelial cells, with increased accumulation of proinflammatory cytokines and neutrophil recruitment due to the loss of bacterial protease–dependent cytokine degradation. In subacute pulmonary infections, lasR mutant–infected mice show greater neutrophilic inflammation and immunopathology compared with wild-type infections. Finally, we observed that CF patients infected with lasR mutants have increased plasma interleukin-8 (IL-8), a marker of inflammation. These findings suggest that bacterial adaptive changes may worsen pulmonary inflammation and directly contribute to the pathogenesis and progression of chronic lung disease in CF patients. PMID:26457326

  4. Nuclear mRNA accumulation causes nucleolar fragmentation in yeast mtr2 mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, T; Hitomi, M; Chen, S; Tartakoff, A M

    1994-01-01

    We have identified a set of genes that affect mRNA transport (mtr) from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of these genes, MTR2, has been cloned and shown to encode a novel 21-kDa nuclear protein that is essential for vegetative growth. MTR2 shows limited homology to a protein implicated in plasmid DNA transfer in Escherichia coli. PolyA+RNA accumulates within the nucleus of mtr2-1 in two to three foci at 37 degrees C. mRNA, tRNA, and rRNA synthesis continue as do pre-mRNA splicing, tRNA processing, and rRNA export at 37 degrees C. Under these conditions the polyA tail length increases, and protein synthesis is progressively inhibited. Nucleolar antigens also redistribute to two to three nuclear foci at 37 degrees C, and this redistribution depends on ongoing transcription by RNA polymerase II. Surprisingly, these foci coincide with the sites of polyA+RNA accumulation. Comparable colocalization and dependance on RNA polymerase II transcription is seen for the mtr1-1 mutant. The disorganization of the nucleolus thus depends on mRNA accumulation in these mutants. We discuss the possible functions of MTR2 and the yeast nucleolus in mRNA export. Images PMID:7865887

  5. Degradation of Stop Codon Read-through Mutant Proteins via the Ubiquitin-Proteasome System Causes Hereditary Disorders.

    PubMed

    Shibata, Norihito; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Sugaki, Yusuke; Onodera, Chiaki; Inoue, Mizuho; Sakuraba, Yoshiyuki; Takakura, Daisuke; Hashii, Noritaka; Kawasaki, Nana; Gondo, Yoichi; Naito, Mikihiko

    2015-11-20

    During translation, stop codon read-through occasionally happens when the stop codon is misread, skipped, or mutated, resulting in the production of aberrant proteins with C-terminal extension. These extended proteins are potentially deleterious, but their regulation is poorly understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo evidence that mouse cFLIP-L with a 46-amino acid extension encoded by a read-through mutant gene is rapidly degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system, causing hepatocyte apoptosis during embryogenesis. The extended peptide interacts with an E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM21, to induce ubiquitylation of the mutant protein. In humans, 20 read-through mutations are related to hereditary disorders, and extended peptides found in human PNPO and HSD3B2 similarly destabilize these proteins, involving TRIM21 for PNPO degradation. Our findings indicate that degradation of aberrant proteins with C-terminal extension encoded by read-through mutant genes is a mechanism for loss of function resulting in hereditary disorders. PMID:26442586

  6. Female receptivity phenotype of icebox mutants caused by a mutation in the L1-type cell adhesion molecule neuroglian.

    PubMed

    Carhan, A; Allen, F; Armstrong, J D; Hortsch, M; Goodwin, S F; O'Dell, K M C

    2005-11-01

    Relatively little is known about the genes and brain structures that enable virgin female Drosophila to make the decision to mate or not. Classical genetic approaches have identified several mutant females that have a reluctance-to-mate phenotype, but most of these have additional behavioral defects. However, the icebox (ibx) mutation was previously reported to lower the sexual receptivity of females, without apparently affecting any other aspect of female behavior. We have shown that the ibx mutation maps to the 7F region of the Drosophila X chromosome to form a complex complementation group with both lethal and viable alleles of neuroglian (nrg). The L1-type cell adhesion molecule encoded by nrg consists of six immunoglobulin-like domains, five fibronectin-like domains, one transmembrane domain and one alternatively spliced intracellular domain. The ibx strain has a missense mutation causing a glycine-to-arginine change at amino acid 92 in the first immunoglobulin domain of nrg. Defects in the central brain of ibx mutants are similar to those observed in another nrg mutant, central brain deranged(1) (ceb(1)). However, both ceb(1) homozygous and ceb(1)/ibx heterozygous females are receptive. The expression of a transgene containing the non-neural isoform of nrg rescues both the receptivity and the brain structure phenotypes of ibx females.

  7. DICER-LIKE3 activity in Physcomitrella patens DICER-LIKE4 mutants causes severe developmental dysfunction and sterility.

    PubMed

    Arif, M Asif; Fattash, Isam; Ma, Zhaorong; Cho, Sung Hyun; Beike, Anna K; Reski, Ralf; Axtell, Michael J; Frank, Wolfgang

    2012-11-01

    Trans-acting small interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs) are plant-specific siRNAs released from TAS precursor transcripts after microRNA-dependent cleavage, conversion into double-stranded RNA, and Dicer-dependent phased processing. Like microRNAs (miRNAs), ta-siRNAs direct site-specific cleavage of target RNAs at sites of extensive complementarity. Here, we show that the DICER-LIKE 4 protein of Physcomitrella patens (PpDCL4) is essential for the biogenesis of 21 nucleotide (nt) ta-siRNAs. In ΔPpDCL4 mutants, off-sized 23 and 24-nt ta-siRNAs accumulated as the result of PpDCL3 activity. ΔPpDCL4 mutants display severe abnormalities throughout Physcomitrella development, including sterility, that were fully reversed in ΔPpDCL3/ΔPpDCL4 double-mutant plants. Therefore, PpDCL3 activity, not loss of PpDCL4 function per se, is the cause of the ΔPpDCL4 phenotypes. Additionally, we describe several new Physcomitrella trans-acting siRNA loci, three of which belong to a new family, TAS6. TAS6 loci are typified by sliced miR156 and miR529 target sites and are in close proximity to PpTAS3 loci.

  8. Molecular characterization of V59E NIS, a Na+/I- symporter mutant that causes congenital I- transport defect.

    PubMed

    Reed-Tsur, Mia D; De la Vieja, Antonio; Ginter, Christopher S; Carrasco, Nancy

    2008-06-01

    I(-) is actively transported into thyrocytes via the Na+/I(-) symporter (NIS), a key glycoprotein located on the basolateral plasma membrane. The cDNA encoding rat NIS was identified in our laboratory, where an extensive structure/function characterization of NIS is being conducted. Several NIS mutants have been identified as causes of congenital I(-) transport defect (ITD), including V59E NIS. ITD is characterized by low thyroid I(-) uptake, low saliva/plasma I(-) ratio, hypothyroidism, and goiter and may cause mental retardation if untreated. Studies of other ITD-causing NIS mutants have revealed valuable information regarding NIS structure/function. V59E NIS was reported to exhibit as much as 30% of the activity of wild-type NIS. However, this observation was at variance with the patients' phenotype of total lack of activity. We have thoroughly characterized V59E NIS and studied several amino acid substitutions at position 59. We demonstrated that, in contrast to the previous report, V59E NIS is inactive, although it is properly targeted to the plasma membrane. Glu and all other charged amino acids or Pro at position 59 also yielded nonfunctional NIS proteins. However, I(-) uptake was rescued to different degrees by the other substitutions. Although the Km values for Na+ and I(-) were not altered in these active mutants, we found that the structural requirement for NIS function at position 59 is a neutral, helix-promoting amino acid. This result suggests that the region that contains V59 may be involved in intramembrane helix-helix interactions during the transport cycle without being in direct contact with the substrates. PMID:18339708

  9. Premature myogenic differentiation and depletion of progenitor cells cause severe muscle hypotrophy in Delta1 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Schuster-Gossler, Karin; Cordes, Ralf; Gossler, Achim

    2007-01-01

    In vertebrates, skeletal myogenesis is initiated by the generation of myoblasts followed by their differentiation to myocytes and the formation of myofibers. The determination of myoblasts and their differentiation are controlled by muscle regulatory factors that are activated at specific stages during myogenesis. During late embryonic and fetal stages a distinct population of resident proliferating progenitor cells is the major source of myogenic cells. How the differentiation of myoblasts and progenitor cells is regulated is not clear. We show that in mouse embryos the Notch ligand Delta1 (Dll1) controls both differentiation of early myoblasts and maintenance of myogenic progenitor cells. Early dermomyotome-derived myoblasts are determined normally in Dll1 mutant embryos, but their differentiation is accelerated, leading to a transient excess of myotomal muscle fibers. Similarly, migratory hypaxial myogenic cells colonize the limb buds and activate muscle regulatory factor expression normally, but muscle differentiation progresses more rapidly. Resident progenitor cells defined by Pax3/Pax7 expression are formed initially, but they are progressively lost and virtually absent at embryonic day 14.5. Muscle growth declines beginning around embryonic day 12, leading to subsequent severe muscle hypotrophy in hypomorphic Dll1 fetuses. We suggest that premature and excessive differentiation leads to depletion of progenitor cells and cessation of muscle growth, and we conclude that Dll1 provides essential signals that are required to prevent uncontrolled differentiation early and ensure sustained muscle differentiation during development. PMID:17194759

  10. The flexibility of two tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G, that cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Xiaochuan; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Janco, Miro; Geeves, Michael A.; Marston, Steven B.; Fischer, Stefan; Lehman, William

    2012-08-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Well-known tropomyosin mutants, D175N and E180G are linked to cardiomyopathies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The structural mechanics of D175N and E180G tropomyosins have been investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer D175N and E180G mutations increase both local and global tropomyosin flexibility. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In muscle, this increased flexibility will enhance myosin interactions on actin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Extra myosin interaction can alter cardiac Ca{sup 2+}-switching, leading to dysfunction. -- Abstract: Point mutations targeting muscle thin filament proteins are the cause of a number of cardiomyopathies. In many cases, biological effects of the mutations are well-documented, whereas their structural and mechanical impact on filament assembly and regulatory function is lacking. In order to elucidate molecular defects leading to cardiac dysfunction, we have examined the structural mechanics of two tropomyosin mutants, E180G and D175N, which are associated with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Tropomyosin is an {alpha}-helical coiled-coil dimer which polymerizes end-to-end to create an elongated superhelix that wraps around F-actin filaments of muscle and non-muscle cells, thus modulating the binding of other actin-binding proteins. Here, we study how flexibility changes in the E180G and D175N mutants might affect tropomyosin binding and regulatory motion on F-actin. Electron microscopy and Molecular Dynamics simulations show that E180G and D175N mutations cause an increase in bending flexibility of tropomyosin both locally and globally. This excess flexibility is likely to increase accessibility of the myosin-binding sites on F-actin, thus destabilizing the low-Ca{sup 2+} relaxed-state of cardiac muscle. The resulting imbalance in the on-off switching mechanism of the mutants will shift the regulatory equilibrium towards Ca{sup 2+}-activation of cardiac muscle, as is observed in affected

  11. The integrity of the RRGDL sequence of the proprotein convertase PC1 is critical for its zymogen and C-terminal processing and for its cellular trafficking.

    PubMed Central

    Lusson, J; Benjannet, S; Hamelin, J; Savaria, D; Chrétien, M; Seidah, N G

    1997-01-01

    In order to define the functional importance of the conserved RRGDL motif in the P-domain of the mammalian proprotein convertases(PCs) we generated and cellularly expressed three mutant PC1 vaccinia-virus (VV) recombinants: ARGDL-PC1, RAGDL-PC1 and RRGEL-PC1. Functionally, these mutants caused a decreased level of processing of pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC) into beta-lipotropic pituitary hormone (beta-LPH), especially in the constitutively secreting BSC40 cells. Pulse-chase analyses demonstrated that, in part, this effect was due to both an increased degradation of the mutant PC1s within the endoplasmic reticulum and to a diminished level of zymogen processing in the same compartment. In addition, within cells containing secretory granules such as PC12 and GH4C1 cells, such mutations prevented the C-terminal auto-processing of PC1 into the fully mature 66 kDa form stored in the secretory granules of regulated cells. Since the 66 kDa PC1 is the most active form of the enzyme, it is proposed that the RRGDL sequence is critical for the generation of maximal intracellular PC1 activity. In regulated cells, co-expression of POMC with PC1 or its mutants together with the general PC inhibitor alpha1-antitrypsin Portland (alpha1-PDX), which acts primarily within the constitutive secretory pathway, demonstrated that the latter completely inhibited the formation of beta-LPH by PC1 mutants, whereas it only partially inhibited the ability of wild-type PC1 to process POMC. This suggests that RRGDL mutations prevent PC1 from entering secretory granules and hence the formation of the 66 kDa PC1, and result in the mis-sorting of PC1 mutants towards the constitutive secretory pathway. This conclusion was further supported by immunocytochemical data demonstrating that RRGDL mutants exhibit an intracellular localization pattern different from that of the granule-associated wild-type PC1,but similar to that of the Golgi-localized convertase PC5-B. PMID:9307023

  12. A pure chloride channel mutant of CLC-5 causes Dent's disease via insufficient V-ATPase activation.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nobuhiko; Yamada, Hideomi; Yamazaki, Osamu; Suzuki, Masashi; Nakamura, Motonobu; Suzuki, Atsushi; Ashida, Akira; Yamamoto, Daisuke; Kaku, Yoshitsugu; Sekine, Takashi; Seki, George; Horita, Shoko

    2016-07-01

    Dent's disease is characterized by defective endocytosis in renal proximal tubules (PTs) and caused by mutations in the 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger, CLC-5. However, the pathological role of endosomal acidification in endocytosis has recently come into question. To clarify the mechanism of pathogenesis for Dent's disease, we examined the effects of a novel gating glutamate mutation, E211Q, on CLC-5 functions and endosomal acidification. In Xenopus oocytes, wild-type (WT) CLC-5 showed outward-rectifying currents that were inhibited by extracellular acidosis, but E211Q and an artificial pure Cl(-) channel mutant, E211A, showed linear currents that were insensitive to extracellular acidosis. Moreover, depolarizing pulse trains induced a robust reduction in the surface pH of oocytes expressing WT CLC-5 but not E211Q or E211A, indicating that the E211Q mutant functions as a pure Cl(-) channel similar to E211A. In HEK293 cells, E211A and E211Q stimulated endosomal acidification and hypotonicity-inducible vacuolar-type H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) activation at the plasma membrane. However, the stimulatory effects of these mutants were reduced compared with WT CLC-5. Furthermore, gene silencing experiments confirmed the functional coupling between V-ATPase and CLC-5 at the plasma membrane of isolated mouse PTs. These results reveal for the first time that the conversion of CLC-5 from a 2Cl(-)/H(+) exchanger into a Cl(-) channel induces Dent's disease in humans. In addition, defective endosomal acidification as a result of insufficient V-ATPase activation may still be important in the pathogenesis of Dent's disease.

  13. Drosophila rosA gene, which when mutant causes aberrant photoreceptor oscillation, encodes a novel neurotransmitter transporter homologue.

    PubMed

    Burg, M G; Geng, C; Guan, Y; Koliantz, G; Pak, W L

    1996-12-01

    The Drosophila receptor oscillation A (rosA) mutations, which cause electroretinogram (ERG) defects, including oscillations, were localized to the 24F4-25A2 region of chromosome 2L. Genomic fragments from this region, isolated from bacteriophage P1 clones, included those that detect transcriptional defects in rosA mutants in RNA blot experiments. One of these genomic fragments was used to screen a head cDNA library. The largest cDNA clone (3.6 kb) isolated was shown to rescue a rosA mutant in P element-germline transformation experiments. The ROSA protein deduced from the open reading frame in the 3.6 kb rosA cDNA is 943 amino acids long and is 36-41% identical to members of the superfamily of Na+/Cl(-)-dependent neurotransmitter transporters, with no indication of higher sequence identity to any one subgroup within the superfamily. RNA blot experiments revealed multiple transcripts in various developmental stages, the most abundant one being a 3.7 kb transcript, particularly in the adult head. Tissue in situ experiments identified the rosA transcript to be localized to many tissues, with higher levels of hybridization in the nervous system and digestive tract. The results demonstrate that the rosA gene encodes a novel Na+/Cl(-)-dependent transporter important for normal response properties of the photoreceptor.

  14. A Thermolabile Aldolase A Mutant Causes Fever-Induced Recurrent Rhabdomyolysis without Hemolytic Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-01-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  15. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease.

  16. A thermolabile aldolase A mutant causes fever-induced recurrent rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mamoune, Asmaa; Bahuau, Michel; Hamel, Yamina; Serre, Valérie; Pelosi, Michele; Habarou, Florence; Nguyen Morel, Marie-Ange; Boisson, Bertrand; Vergnaud, Sabrina; Viou, Mai Thao; Nonnenmacher, Luc; Piraud, Monique; Nusbaum, Patrick; Vamecq, Joseph; Romero, Norma; Ottolenghi, Chris; Casanova, Jean-Laurent; de Lonlay, Pascale

    2014-11-01

    Aldolase A deficiency has been reported as a rare cause of hemolytic anemia occasionally associated with myopathy. We identified a deleterious homozygous mutation in the ALDOA gene in 3 siblings with episodic rhabdomyolysis without hemolytic anemia. Myoglobinuria was always triggered by febrile illnesses. We show that the underlying mechanism involves an exacerbation of aldolase A deficiency at high temperatures that affected myoblasts but not erythrocytes. The aldolase A deficiency was rescued by arginine supplementation in vitro but not by glycerol, betaine or benzylhydantoin, three other known chaperones, suggesting that arginine-mediated rescue operated by a mechanism other than protein chaperoning. Lipid droplets accumulated in patient myoblasts relative to control and this was increased by cytokines, and reduced by dexamethasone. Our results expand the clinical spectrum of aldolase A deficiency to isolated temperature-dependent rhabdomyolysis, and suggest that thermolability may be tissue specific. We also propose a treatment for this severe disease. PMID:25392908

  17. alpha-Thalassemia caused by an unstable alpha-globin mutant.

    PubMed Central

    Liebhaber, S A; Kan, Y W

    1983-01-01

    In a previous study, molecular cloning of the alpha-globin genes from a patient with nondeletion Hb-H disease (genotype--/alpha alpha) showed that a single nucleotide mutation (CTG to CCG) in one of the genes resulted in a leucine to proline substitution. This paper describes the approach we used to detect the abnormal alpha-globin chain. The chain was identified using a cell-free translation system. It turned over rapidly both in vitro and in vivo in the patient's reticulocytes. The unusual feature of this unstable alpha-globin is that the alpha-globin deficiency causes alpha-thalassemia. Simple heterozygotes for this lesion (alpha Pro alpha/alpha alpha) resemble alpha-thalassemia carriers and do not exhibit the hemolytic anemia usually associated with unstable hemoglobins. Images PMID:6826718

  18. Aniridia-associated cytogenetic rearrangements suggest that a position effect may cause the mutant phenotype.

    PubMed

    Fantes, J; Redeker, B; Breen, M; Boyle, S; Brown, J; Fletcher, J; Jones, S; Bickmore, W; Fukushima, Y; Mannens, M

    1995-03-01

    Current evidence suggests that aniridia (absence of iris) is caused by loss of function of one copy of the PAX6 gene, which maps to 11p13. We present the further characterisation of two aniridia pedigrees in which the disease segregates with chromosomal rearrangements which involve 11p13 but do not disrupt the PAX6 gene. We have isolated three human YAC clones which encompass the PAX6 locus and we have used these to show that in both cases the chromosomal breakpoint is at least 85 kb distal of the 3' end of PAX6. In addition, the open reading frame of PAX6 is apparently free of mutations. We propose that the PAX6 gene on the rearranged chromosome 11 is in an inappropriate chromatin environment for normal expression and therefore that a 'position effect' is the underlying mechanism of disease in these families.

  19. High Bone Mass-Causing Mutant LRP5 Receptors Are Resistant to Endogenous Inhibitors In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Niziolek, Paul J; MacDonald, Bryan T; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Zhang, Minjie; Bellido, Teresita; He, Xi; Warman, Matthew L; Robling, Alexander G

    2015-10-01

    Certain missense mutations affecting LRP5 cause high bone mass (HBM) in humans. Based on in vitro evidence, HBM LRP5 receptors are thought to exert their effects by providing resistance to binding/inhibition of secreted LRP5 inhibitors such as sclerostin (SOST) and Dickkopf homolog-1 (DKK1). We previously reported the creation of two Lrp5 HBM knock-in mouse models, in which the human p.A214V or p.G171V missense mutations were knocked into the endogenous Lrp5 locus. To determine whether HBM knock-in mice are resistant to SOST- or DKK1-induced osteopenia, we bred Lrp5 HBM mice with transgenic mice that overexpress human SOST in osteocytes ((8kb) Dmp1-SOST) or mouse DKK1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes ((2.3kb) Col1a1-Dkk1). We observed that the (8kb) Dmp1-SOST transgene significantly lowered whole-body bone mineral density (BMD), bone mineral content (BMC), femoral and vertebral trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV), and periosteal bone-formation rate (BFR) in wild-type mice but not in mice with Lrp5 p.G171V and p.A214V alleles. The (2.3kb) Col1a1-Dkk1 transgene significantly lowered whole-body BMD, BMC, and vertebral BV/TV in wild-type mice and affected p.A214V mice more than p.G171V mice. These in vivo data support in vitro studies regarding the mechanism of HBM-causing mutations, and imply that HBM LRP5 receptors differ in their relative sensitivity to inhibition by SOST and DKK1.

  20. High-bone-mass causing mutant LRP5 receptors are resistant to endogenous inhibitors in vivo†

    PubMed Central

    Niziolek, Paul J.; MacDonald, Bryan T.; Kedlaya, Rajendra; Zhang, Minjie; Bellido, Teresita; He, Xi; Warman, Matthew L.; Robling, Alexander G.

    2015-01-01

    Certain missense mutations affecting LRP5 cause high bone mass (HBM) in humans. Based on in vitro evidence, HBM LRP5 receptors are thought to exert their effects by providing resistance to binding/inhibition of secreted LRP5 inhibitors such as sclerostin (SOST) and Dickkopf homolog-1 (DKK1). We previously reported the creation of two Lrp5 HBM knock-in mouse models, in which the human p.A214V or p.G171V missense mutations were knocked into the endogenous Lrp5 locus. To determine whether HBM knock-in mice are resistant to SOST- or DKK1-induced osteopenia, we bred Lrp5 HBM mice with transgenic mice that overexpress human SOST in osteocytes (8kbDmp1-SOST) or mouse DKK1 in osteoblasts and osteocytes (2.3kbCol1a1-Dkk1). We observed that the 8kbDmp1-SOST transgene significantly lowered whole body BMD, BMC, femoral and vertebral BV/TV, and periosteal BFR in wild-type mice but not in mice with Lrp5 p.G171V and p.A214V alleles. The 2.3kbCol1a1-Dkk1 transgene significantly lowered whole body BMD, BMC, and vertebral BV/TV in wild-type mice and affected p.A214V mice more than p.G171V mice. These in vivo data support in vitro studies regarding the mechanism of HBM-causing mutations, and imply that HBM LRP5 receptors differ in their relative sensitivity to inhibition by SOST and DKK1. PMID:25808845

  1. Tricyclic pyrone compounds prevent aggregation and reverse cellular phenotypes caused by expression of mutant huntingtin protein in striatal neurons

    PubMed Central

    Trushina, Eugenia; Rana, Sandeep; McMurray, Cynthia T; Hua, Duy H

    2009-01-01

    Background Huntington's disease (HD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion mutation in the coding region of a novel gene. The mechanism of HD is unknown. Most data suggest that polyglutamine-mediated aggregation associated with expression of mutant huntingtin protein (mhtt) contributes to the pathology. However, recent studies have identified early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Suppression of aggregation is accepted as one of the markers of successful therapeutic approaches. Previously, we demonstrated that tricyclic pyrone (TP) compounds efficiently inhibited formation of amyloid-β (Aβ) aggregates in cell and mouse models representing Alzheimer's Disease (AD). In the present study, we aimed to determine whether TP compounds could prevent aggregation and restore early cellular defects in primary embryonic striatal neurons from animal model representing HD. Results TP compounds effectively inhibit aggregation caused by mhtt in neurons and glial cells. Treatment with TP compounds also alleviated cholesterol accumulation and restored clathrin-independent endocytosis in HD neurons. Conclusion We have found that TP compounds not only blocked mhtt-induced aggregation, but also alleviated early cellular dysfunctions that preclude aggregate formation. Our data suggest TP molecules may be used as lead compounds for prevention or treatment of multiple neurodegenerative diseases including HD and AD. PMID:19586540

  2. Impaired degradation of WNK1 and WNK4 kinases causes PHAII in mutant KLHL3 knock-in mice.

    PubMed

    Susa, Koichiro; Sohara, Eisei; Rai, Tatemitsu; Zeniya, Moko; Mori, Yutaro; Mori, Takayasu; Chiga, Motoko; Nomura, Naohiro; Nishida, Hidenori; Takahashi, Daiei; Isobe, Kiyoshi; Inoue, Yuichi; Takeishi, Kenta; Takeda, Naoki; Sasaki, Sei; Uchida, Shinichi

    2014-10-01

    Pseudohypoaldosteronism type II (PHAII) is a hereditary disease characterized by salt-sensitive hypertension, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis, and genes encoding with-no-lysine kinase 1 (WNK1) and WNK4 kinases are known to be responsible. Recently, Kelch-like 3 (KLHL3) and Cullin3, components of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase, were newly identified as responsible for PHAII. We have reported that WNK4 is the substrate of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase-mediated ubiquitination. However, WNK1 and Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) were also reported to be a substrate of KLHL3-Cullin3 E3 ligase by other groups. Therefore, it remains unclear which molecule is the target(s) of KLHL3. To investigate the pathogenesis of PHAII caused by KLHL3 mutation, we generated and analyzed KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice. KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice exhibited salt-sensitive hypertension, hyperkalemia and metabolic acidosis. Moreover, the phosphorylation of NCC was increased in the KLHL3(R528H/+) mouse kidney, indicating that the KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mouse is an ideal mouse model of PHAII. Interestingly, the protein expression of both WNK1 and WNK4 was significantly increased in the KLHL3(R528H/+) mouse kidney, confirming that increases in these WNK kinases activated the WNK-OSR1/SPAK-NCC phosphorylation cascade in KLHL3(R528H/+) knock-in mice. To examine whether mutant KLHL3 R528H can interact with WNK kinases, we measured the binding of TAMRA-labeled WNK1 and WNK4 peptides to full-length KLHL3 using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, and found that neither WNK1 nor WNK4 bound to mutant KLHL3 R528H. Thus, we found that increased protein expression levels of WNK1 and WNK4 kinases cause PHAII by KLHL3 R528H mutation due to impaired KLHL3-Cullin3-mediated ubiquitination. PMID:24821705

  3. Expression of four mutant fibrinogen gammaC domains in Pichia pastoris confirms them as causes of hypofibrinogenaemia.

    PubMed

    Sheen, Campbell R; Dear, Amy; Brennan, Stephen O

    2010-10-01

    Mutations in the fibrinogen gene cluster can cause low plasma fibrinogen concentrations, known as hypofibrinogenaemia. It is important to verify whether a detected sequence variant in this cluster is deleterious or benign and this can be accomplished using protein expression systems. In this study, four mutations in the fibrinogen gammaC domain that had previously been described in patients with hypofibrinogenaemia were introduced into a gammaC construct and expressed in a Pichia pastoris yeast system to investigate their effects on protein stability and secretion. These experiments showed that the fibrinogen Middlemore (N230D), Dorfen (A289V), Mannheim II (H307Y), and Muncie (T371I) mutations were not secreted, supporting their causative role in hypofibrinogenaemia. Overexpression of the N230D, A289V and H307Y mutants revealed that the majority of the synthesised protein was retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, with only a minor proportion reaching the trans-Golgi network. Regardless, none of this protein was secreted which confirms that the four mutations investigated are indeed responsible for hypofibrinogenaemia. PMID:20580674

  4. Loss of cilia causes embryonic lung hypoplasia, liver fibrosis, and cholestasis in the talpid3 ciliopathy mutant

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Megan G; McTeir, Lynn; Barrie, Andrew M; Freem, Lucy J; Stephen, Louise A

    2014-01-01

    Sonic hedgehog plays an essential role in maintaining hepatoblasts in a proliferative non-differentiating state during embryogenesis. Transduction of the Hedgehog signaling pathway is dependent on the presence of functional primary cilia and hepatoblasts, therefore, must require primary cilia for normal function. In congenital syndromes in which cilia are absent or non-functional (ciliopathies) hepatorenal fibrocystic disease is common and primarily characterized by ductal plate malformations which underlie the formation of liver cysts, as well as less commonly, by hepatic fibrosis, although a role for abnormal Hedgehog signal transduction has not been implicated in these phenotypes. We have examined liver, lung and rib development in the talpid3 chicken mutant, a ciliopathy model in which abnormal Hedgehog signaling is well characterized. We find that the talpid3 phenotype closely models that of human short-rib polydactyly syndromes which are caused by the loss of cilia, and exhibit hypoplastic lungs and liver failure. Through an analysis of liver and lung development in the talpid3 chicken, we propose that cilia in the liver are essential for the transduction of Hedgehog signaling during hepatic development. The talpid3 chicken represents a useful resource in furthering our understanding of the pathology of ciliopathies beyond the treatment of thoracic insufficiency as well as generating insights into the role Hedgehog signaling in hepatic development. PMID:24743779

  5. Mutant HSPB1 overexpression in neurons is sufficient to cause age-related motor neuronopathy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Amit K.; Renusch, Samantha R.; Naiman, Nicole E.; Gu, Shuping; Sneh, Amita; Arnold, W. David; Sahenk, Zarife; Kolb, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The small heat shock protein HSPB1 is a multifunctional, α-crystallin-based protein that has been shown to be neuroprotective in animal models of motor neuron disease and peripheral nerve injury. Missense mutations in HSPB1 result in axonal Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease with minimal sensory involvement (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy type 2 (dHMN-II). These disorders are characterized by a selective loss of motor axons in peripheral nerve resulting in distal muscle weakness and often severe disability. To investigate the pathogenic mechanisms of HSPB1 mutations in motor neurons in vivo, we have developed and characterized transgenic PrP-HSPB1 and PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice. These mice express the human HSPB1 protein throughout the nervous system including in axons of peripheral nerve. Although both mouse strains lacked obvious motor deficits, the PrP-HSPB1(R136W) mice developed an age-dependent motor axonopathy. Mutant mice showed axonal pathology in spinal cord and peripheral nerve with evidence of impaired neurofilament cytoskeleton, associated with organelle accumulation. Accompanying these findings, increases in the number of Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, as evidence of impaired axon-Schwann cell interactions, were present. These observations suggest that overexpression of HSPB1(R136W) in neurons is sufficient to cause pathological and electrophysiological changes in mice that are seen in patients with hereditary motor neuropathy. PMID:22521462

  6. High butyric acid amounts induce oxidative stress, alter calcium homeostasis, and cause neurite retraction in nerve growth factor-treated PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Cueno, Marni E; Kamio, Noriaki; Seki, Keisuke; Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    2015-07-01

    Butyric acid (BA) is a common secondary metabolite by-product produced by oral pathogenic bacteria and is detected in high amounts in the gingival tissue of patients with periodontal disease. Previous works have demonstrated that BA can cause oxidative stress in various cell types; however, this was never explored using neuronal cells. Here, we exposed nerve growth factor (NGF)-treated PC1(2) cells to varying BA concentrations (0.5, 1.0, 5.0 mM). We measured total heme, H(2)O(2), catalase, and calcium levels through biochemical assays and visualized the neurite outgrowth after BA treatment. Similarly, we determined the effects of other common periodontal short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) on neurite outgrowth for comparison. We found that high (1.0 and 5.0 mM) BA concentrations induced oxidative stress and altered calcium homeostasis, whereas low (0.5 mM) BA concentration had no significant effect. Moreover, compared to other SCFAs, we established that only BA was able to induce neurite retraction.

  7. Fusarium graminearum gene deletion mutants map1 and tri5 reveal similarities and differences in the pathogenicity requirements to cause disease on Arabidopsis and wheat floral tissue.

    PubMed

    Cuzick, Alayne; Urban, Martin; Hammond-Kosack, Kim

    2008-01-01

    The Ascomycete pathogen Fusarium graminearum can infect all cereal species and lower grain yield, quality and safety. The fungus can also cause disease on Arabidopsis thaliana. In this study, the disease-causing ability of two F. graminearum mutants was analysed to further explore the parallels between the wheat (Triticum aestivum) and Arabidopsis floral pathosystems. Wild-type F. graminearum (strain PH-1) and two isogenic transformants lacking either the mitogen-activated protein kinase MAP1 gene or the trichodiene synthase TRI5 gene were individually spray- or point-inoculated onto Arabidopsis and wheat floral tissue. Disease development was quantitatively assessed both macroscopically and microscopically and deoxynivalenol (DON) mycotoxin concentrations determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Wild-type strain inoculations caused high levels of disease in both plant species and significant DON production. The map1 mutant caused minimal disease and DON accumulation in both hosts. The tri5 mutant, which is unable to produce DON, exhibited reduced pathogenicity on wheat ears, causing only discrete eye-shaped lesions on spikelets which failed to infect the rachis. By contrast, the tri5 mutant retained full pathogenicity on Arabidopsis floral tissue. This study reveals that DON mycotoxin production is not required for F. graminearum to colonize Arabidopsis floral tissue. PMID:18179606

  8. Brassinosteroid Deficiency Due to Truncated Steroid 5α-Reductase Causes Dwarfism in the lk Mutant of Pea1

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Takahito; Jager, Corinne E.; Kitasaka, Yukiko; Takeuchi, Keiichi; Fukami, Motohiro; Yoneyama, Koichi; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi; Takatsuto, Suguru; Fujioka, Shozo; Smith, Jennifer J.; Kerckhoffs, L. Huub J.; Reid, James B.; Yokota, Takao

    2004-01-01

    The endogenous brassinosteroids in the dwarf mutant lk of pea (Pisum sativum) were quantified by gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring. The levels of castasterone, 6-deoxocastasterone, and 6-deoxotyphasterol in lk shoots were reduced 4-, 70-, and 6-fold, respectively, compared with those of the wild type. The fact that the application of brassinolide restored the growth of the mutant indicated that the dwarf mutant lk is brassinosteroid deficient. Gas chromatography-selected ion monitoring analysis of the endogenous sterols in lk shoots revealed that the levels of campestanol and sitostanol were reduced 160- and 10-fold, respectively, compared with those of wild-type plants. These data, along with metabolic studies, showed that the lk mutant has a defect in the conversion of campest-4-en-3-one to 5α-campestan-3-one, which is a key hydrogenation step in the synthesis of campestanol from campesterol. This defect is the same as that found in the Arabidopsis det2 mutant and the Ipomoea nil kbt mutant. The pea gene homologous to the DET2 gene, PsDET2, was cloned, and it was found that the lk mutation would result in a putative truncated PsDET2 protein. Thus it was concluded that the short stature of the lk mutant is due to a defect in the steroidal 5α-reductase gene. This defect was also observed in the callus induced from the lk mutant. Biosynthetic pathways involved in the conversion of campesterol to campestanol are discussed in detail. PMID:15286289

  9. Identification of p38 MAPK and JNK as new targets for correction of Wilson disease‐causing ATP7B mutants

    PubMed Central

    Chesi, Giancarlo; Hegde, Ramanath N.; Iacobacci, Simona; Concilli, Mafalda; Parashuraman, Seetharaman; Festa, Beatrice Paola; Polishchuk, Elena V.; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Carissimo, Annamaria; Montefusco, Sandro; Canetti, Diana; Monti, Maria; Amoresano, Angela; Pucci, Piero; van de Sluis, Bart; Lutsenko, Svetlana

    2016-01-01

    Wilson disease (WD) is an autosomal recessive disorder that is caused by the toxic accumulation of copper (Cu) in the liver. The ATP7B gene, which is mutated in WD, encodes a multitransmembrane domain adenosine triphosphatase that traffics from the trans‐Golgi network to the canalicular area of hepatocytes, where it facilitates excretion of excess Cu into the bile. Several ATP7B mutations, including H1069Q and R778L that are two of the most frequent variants, result in protein products, which, although still functional, remain in the endoplasmic reticulum. Thus, they fail to reach Cu excretion sites, resulting in the toxic buildup of Cu in the liver of WD patients. Therefore, correcting the location of these mutants by leading them to the appropriate functional sites in the cell should restore Cu excretion and would be beneficial to help large cohorts of WD patients. However, molecular targets for correction of endoplasmic reticulum‐retained ATP7B mutants remain elusive. Here, we show that expression of the most frequent ATP7B mutant, H1069Q, activates p38 and c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase signaling pathways, which favor the rapid degradation of the mutant. Suppression of these pathways with RNA interference or specific chemical inhibitors results in the substantial rescue of ATP7BH1069Q (as well as that of several other WD‐causing mutants) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the trans‐Golgi network compartment, in recovery of its Cu‐dependent trafficking, and in reduction of intracellular Cu levels. Conclusion: Our findings indicate p38 and c‐Jun N‐terminal kinase as intriguing targets for correction of WD‐causing mutants and, hence, as potential candidates, which could be evaluated for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat WD. (Hepatology 2016;63:1842‐1859) PMID:26660341

  10. Curcumin treatment abrogates endoplasmic reticulum retention and aggregation-induced apoptosis associated with neuropathy-causing myelin protein zero-truncating mutants.

    PubMed

    Khajavi, Mehrdad; Inoue, Ken; Wiszniewski, Wojciech; Ohyama, Tomoko; Snipes, G Jackson; Lupski, James R

    2005-11-01

    Mutations in MPZ, the gene encoding myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major protein constituent of peripheral myelin, can cause the adult-onset, inherited neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, as well as the more severe, childhood-onset Dejerine-Sottas neuropathy and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. Most MPZ-truncating mutations associated with severe forms of peripheral neuropathy result in premature termination codons within the terminal or penultimate exons that are not subject to nonsense-mediated decay and are stably translated into mutant proteins with potential dominant-negative activity. However, some truncating mutations at the 3' end of MPZ escape the nonsense-mediated decay pathway and cause a mild peripheral neuropathy phenotype. We examined the functional properties of MPZ-truncating proteins that escaped nonsense-mediated decay, and we found that frameshift mutations associated with severe disease cause an intracellular accumulation of mutant proteins, primarily within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), which induces apoptosis. Curcumin, a chemical compound derived from the curry spice tumeric, releases the ER-retained MPZ mutants into the cytoplasm accompanied by a lower number of apoptotic cells. Our findings suggest that curcumin treatment is sufficient to relieve the toxic effect of mutant aggregation-induced apoptosis and may potentially have a therapeutic role in treating selected forms of inherited peripheral neuropathies. PMID:16252242

  11. Improved plasma membrane expression of the trafficking defective P344R mutant of muscle, skeletal, receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) causing congenital myasthenic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Milhem, Reham M; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Ali, Bassam R

    2015-03-01

    Muscle, skeletal, receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK) is a key organizer at the postsynaptic membrane and critical for proper development and maintenance of the neuromuscular junction. Mutations in MUSK result in congenital myasthenic syndrome (CMS). We hypothesized that the CMS-causing missense mutation (P344R), found within the cysteine-rich domain of the protein, will affect its conformational tertiary structure. Consequently, the protein will misfold, get retained in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lose its biological function through degradation by the highly conserved ER associated degradation (ERAD) machinery. We report that P344R-MuSK mutant is trafficking-deficient when expressed at 37°C in HeLa, COS-7 and HEK293 cell lines. It colocalized with the ER marker calnexin in contrast to wild-type MuSK which localized to the plasma membrane. The N-glycosylation status of P344R-MuSK is that of an immature and not properly post-translationally modified protein. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the P344R mutant's half-life is shorter than wild-type MuSK protein. Proteasomal inhibition resulted in the stabilization of the mutant protein. The mutant protein is highly ubiquitinated compared to wild-type confirming targeting for proteasomal degradation. The mutant showed around 50% of its in vivo autophosphorylation activity. P344R-MuSK mutant's trafficking defect is correctable by culturing the expressing cells at 27°C. Moreover, chemical compounds namely 2.5% glycerol, 1% dimethyl sulfoxide, 10 μM thapsigargin and 1 μM curcumin improved the maturation and exit of the mutant protein from the ER. These findings open perspectives for potential therapeutic intervention for patients with CMS harboring the P344R-MuSK mutation.

  12. Recovery of Nonpathogenic Mutant Bacteria from Tumors Caused by Several Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strains: a Frequent Event?▿

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M.

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  13. Mirror movement-like defects in startle behavior of zebrafish dcc mutants are caused by aberrant midline guidance of identified descending hindbrain neurons.

    PubMed

    Jain, Roshan A; Bell, Hannah; Lim, Amy; Chien, Chi-Bin; Granato, Michael

    2014-02-19

    Mirror movements are involuntary movements on one side of the body that occur simultaneously with intentional movements on the contralateral side. Humans with heterozygous mutations in the axon guidance receptor DCC display such mirror movements, where unilateral stimulation results in inappropriate bilateral motor output. Currently, it is unclear whether mirror movements are caused by incomplete midline crossing and reduced commissural connectivity of DCC-dependent descending pathways or by aberrant ectopic ipsilateral axonal projections of normally commissural neurons. Here, we show that in response to unilateral tactile stimuli, zebrafish dcc mutant larvae perform involuntary turns on the inappropriate body side. We show that these mirror movement-like deficits are associated with axonal guidance defects of two identified groups of commissural reticulospinal hindbrain neurons. Moreover, we demonstrate that in dcc mutants, axons of these identified neurons frequently fail to cross the midline and instead project ipsilaterally. Whereas laser ablation of these neurons in wild-type animals does not affect turning movements, their ablation in dcc mutants restores turning movements. Thus, our results demonstrate that in dcc mutants, turns on the inappropriate side of the body are caused by aberrant ipsilateral axonal projections, and suggest that aberrant ipsilateral connectivity of a very small number of descending axons is sufficient to induce incorrect movement patterns.

  14. Mutant β-III spectrin causes mGluR1α mislocalization and functional deficits in a mouse model of spinocerebellar ataxia type 5.

    PubMed

    Armbrust, Karen R; Wang, Xinming; Hathorn, Tyisha J; Cramer, Samuel W; Chen, Gang; Zu, Tao; Kangas, Takashi; Zink, Anastasia N; Öz, Gülin; Ebner, Timothy J; Ranum, Laura P W

    2014-07-23

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 5 (SCA5), a dominant neurodegenerative disease characterized by profound Purkinje cell loss, is caused by mutations in SPTBN2, a gene that encodes β-III spectrin. SCA5 is the first neurodegenerative disorder reported to be caused by mutations in a cytoskeletal spectrin gene. We have developed a mouse model to understand the mechanistic basis for this disease and show that expression of mutant but not wild-type β-III spectrin causes progressive motor deficits and cerebellar degeneration. We show that endogenous β-III spectrin interacts with the metabotropic glutamate receptor 1α (mGluR1α) and that mice expressing mutant β-III spectrin have cerebellar dysfunction with altered mGluR1α localization at Purkinje cell dendritic spines, decreased mGluR1-mediated responses, and deficient mGluR1-mediated long-term potentiation. These results indicate that mutant β-III spectrin causes mislocalization and dysfunction of mGluR1α at dendritic spines and connects SCA5 with other disorders involving glutamatergic dysfunction and synaptic plasticity abnormalities.

  15. Rab7 Mutants Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Cause Delayed Growth Factor Receptor Transport and Altered Endosomal and Nuclear Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    BasuRay, Soumik; Mukherjee, Sanchita; Romero, Elsa G.; Seaman, Matthew N. J.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Rab7 belongs to the Ras superfamily of small GTPases and is a master regulator of early to late endocytic membrane transport. Four missense mutations in the late endosomal Rab7 GTPase (L129F, K157N, N161T, and V162M) cause the autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B (CMT2B) disease. As yet, the pathological mechanisms connecting mutant Rab7 protein expression to altered neuronal function are undefined. Here, we analyze the effects of Rab7 CMT2B mutants on epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent intracellular signaling and trafficking. Three different cell lines expressing Rab7 CMT2B mutants and stimulated with EGF exhibited delayed trafficking of EGF to LAMP1-positive late endosomes and lysosomes and slowed EGF receptor (EGFR) degradation. Expression of all Rab7 CMT2B mutants altered the Rab7 activation cycle, leading to enhanced and prolonged EGFR signaling as well as variable increases in p38 and ERK1/2 activation. However, due to reduced nuclear translocation of p38 and ERK1/2, the downstream nuclear activation of Elk-1 was decreased along with the expression of immediate early genes like c-fos and Egr-1 by the disease mutants. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that Rab7 CMT2B mutants impair growth factor receptor trafficking and, in turn, alter p38 and ERK1/2 signaling from perinuclear, clustered signaling endosomes. The resulting down-regulation of EGFR-dependent nuclear transcription that is crucial for normal axon outgrowth and peripheral innervation offers a crucial new mechanistic insight into disease pathogenesis that is relevant to other neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23188822

  16. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-10-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  17. Overaccumulation of γ-Glutamylcysteine in a Jasmonate-Hypersensitive Arabidopsis Mutant Causes Jasmonate-Dependent Growth Inhibition1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Hsin-Ho; Rowe, Martha; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Grove, Ryan; Adamec, Jiri; Jikumaru, Yusuke; Staswick, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Glutathione (GSH) is essential for many aspects of plant biology and is associated with jasmonate signaling in stress responses. We characterized an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) jasmonate-hypersensitive mutant (jah2) with seedling root growth 100-fold more sensitive to inhibition by the hormone jasmonyl-isoleucine than the wild type. Genetic mapping and genome sequencing determined that the mutation is in intron 6 of GLUTATHIONE SYNTHETASE2, encoding the enzyme that converts γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC) to GSH. The level of GSH in jah2 was 71% of the wild type, while the phytoalexin-deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant, defective in GSH1 and having only 27% of wild-type GSH level, was not jasmonate hypersensitive. Growth defects for jah2, but not pad2, were also seen in plants grown to maturity. Surprisingly, all phenotypes in the jah2 pad2-1 double mutant were weaker than in jah2. Quantification of γ-EC indicated these defects result from hyperaccumulation of this GSH precursor by 294- and 65-fold in jah2 and the double mutant, respectively. γ-EC reportedly partially substitutes for loss of GSH, but growth inhibition seen here was likely not due to an excess of total glutathione plus γ-EC because their sum in jah2 pad2-1 was only 16% greater than in the wild type. Further, the jah2 phenotypes were lost in a jasmonic acid biosynthesis mutant background, indicating the effect of γ-EC is mediated through jasmonate signaling and not as a direct result of perturbed redox status. PMID:26282239

  18. Familial amyloid precursor protein mutants cause caspase-6-dependent but amyloid β-peptide-independent neuronal degeneration in primary human neuron cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Sivananthan, S N; Lee, A W; Goodyer, C G; LeBlanc, A C

    2010-01-01

    Although familial Alzheimer disease (AD)-associated autosomal dominant mutants have been extensively studied, little is known about the underlying molecular mechanisms of neurodegeneration induced by these mutants in AD. Wild-type, Swedish or London amyloid precursor protein (APP) transfection in primary human neurons induced neuritic beading, in which several co-expressed proteins, such as enhanced green fluorescent protein, red fluorescent protein (RFP)-tau and RFP-ubiquitin, accumulated. APP-induced neuritic beading was dependent on caspase-6 (Casp6), because it was inhibited with 5 μM z-VEID-fmk or with dominant-negative Casp6. Neuritic beading was independent from APP-mediated amyloid β-peptide (Aβ) production, because the APPM596V (APPMV) mutant, which cannot generate Aβ, still induced Casp6-dependent neuritic beading. However, the beaded neurons underwent Casp6- and Aβ-dependent cell death. These results indicate that overexpression of wild-type or mutant APP causes Casp6-dependent but Aβ-independent neuritic degeneration in human neurons. Because Casp6 is activated early in AD and is involved in axonal degeneration, these results suggest that the inhibition of Casp6 may represent an efficient early intervention against familial forms of AD. Furthermore, these results indicate that removing Aβ without inhibiting Casp6 may have little effect in preventing the progressive dementia associated with sporadic or familial AD. PMID:21368865

  19. Reduced mutant yield at high doses in the Salmonella/activation assay: the cause is not always toxicity.

    PubMed

    McGregor, D; Prentice, R D; McConville, M; Lee, Y J; Caspary, W J

    1984-01-01

    In the Salmonella/activation assay developed by Ames et al [1973, 1975] toxicity is not measured, though it is recognized by the loss of a cloudy appearance on the plate. One approach to the measurement of toxicity is described here and uses a microscope-linked automated colony counter to estimate the number of microcolonies formed by histidine auxotrophs that stop growing after the depletion of histidine. This technique was used to evaluate the effect of toxicity on the revertant count for 16 mutagens, most of which were chosen because, from previous experience, their dose-response curves manifested a maximum at an intermediate dose tested. One of the sixteen, 2-nitrofluorene, was not toxic up to the maximum dose tested. The relationship between mutation and toxicity for the remaining fifteen allowed them to be grouped into two categories: (1) compounds that induced decreases in survival at the same dose at which the number of mutants decreased, and (2) compounds that induced toxicity, but survival was reduced at dose levels higher than those required to reduce the number of mutants. Possible explanations for this reduction of mutant counts occurring with little apparent concomitant increase in toxicity are examined. These results may be significant for attempts to estimate mutagenic potency and, to a lesser extent, construct mathematical models of the Ames test. PMID:6381041

  20. Loss of Tropomodulin4 in the zebrafish mutant träge causes cytoplasmic rod formation and muscle weakness reminiscent of nemaline myopathy.

    PubMed

    Berger, Joachim; Tarakci, Hakan; Berger, Silke; Li, Mei; Hall, Thomas E; Arner, Anders; Currie, Peter D

    2014-12-01

    Nemaline myopathy is an inherited muscle disease that is mainly diagnosed by the presence of nemaline rods in muscle biopsies. Of the nine genes associated with the disease, five encode components of striated muscle sarcomeres. In a genetic zebrafish screen, the mutant träge (trg) was isolated based on its reduction in muscle birefringence, indicating muscle damage. Myofibres in trg appeared disorganised and showed inhomogeneous cytoplasmic eosin staining alongside malformed nuclei. Linkage analysis of trg combined with sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in tropomodulin4 (tmod4), a regulator of thin filament length and stability. Accordingly, although actin monomers polymerize to form thin filaments in the skeletal muscle of tmod4(trg) mutants, thin filaments often appeared to be dispersed throughout myofibres. Organised myofibrils with the typical striation rarely assemble, leading to severe muscle weakness, impaired locomotion and early death. Myofibrils of tmod4(trg) mutants often featured thin filaments of various lengths, widened Z-disks, undefined H-zones and electron-dense aggregations of various shapes and sizes. Importantly, Gomori trichrome staining and the lattice pattern of the detected cytoplasmic rods, together with the reactivity of rods with phalloidin and an antibody against actinin, is reminiscent of nemaline rods found in nemaline myopathy, suggesting that misregulation of thin filament length causes cytoplasmic rod formation in tmod4(trg) mutants. Although Tropomodulin4 has not been associated with myopathy, the results presented here implicateTMOD4 as a novel candidate for unresolved nemaline myopathies and suggest that the tmod4(trg) mutant will be a valuable tool to study human muscle disorders. PMID:25288681

  1. Leaf Variegation in the Rice zebra2 Mutant Is Caused by Photoperiodic Accumulation of Tetra-Cis-Lycopene and Singlet Oxygen

    PubMed Central

    Han, Su-Hyun; Sakuraba, Yasuhito; Koh, Hee-Jong; Paek, Nam-Chon

    2012-01-01

    In field conditions, the zebra2 (z2) mutant in rice (Oryza sativa) produces leaves with transverse pale-green/yellow stripes. It was recently reported that ZEBRA2 encodes carotenoid isomerase (CRTISO) and that low levels of lutein, an essential carotenoid for non-photochemical quenching, cause leaf variegation in z2 mutants. However, we found that the z2 mutant phenotype was completely suppressed by growth under continuous light (CL; permissive) conditions, with concentrations of chlorophyll, carotenoids and chloroplast proteins at normal levels in z2 mutants under CL. In addition, three types of reactive oxygen species (ROS; superoxide [O2−], hydrogen peroxide [H2O2], and singlet oxygen [1O2]) accumulated to high levels in z2 mutants grown under short-day conditions (SD; alternate 10-h light/14-h dark; restrictive), but do not accumulate under CL conditions. However, the levels of lutein and zeaxanthin in z2 leaves were much lower than normal in both permissive CL and restrictive SD growth conditions, indicating that deficiency of these two carotenoids is not responsible for the leaf variegation phenotype. We found that the CRTISO substrate tetra-cis-lycopene accumulated during the dark periods under SD, but not under CL conditions. Its accumulation was also positively correlated with 1O2 levels generated during the light period, which consequently altered the expression of 1O2-responsive and cell death-related genes in the variegated z2 leaves. Taking these results together, we propose that the z2 leaf variegation can be largely attributed to photoperiodic accumulation of tetra-cis-lycopene and generation of excessive 1O2 under natural day-night conditions. PMID:22134723

  2. High-throughput FACS-based mutant screen identifies a gain-of-function allele of the Fusarium graminearum adenylyl cyclase causing deoxynivalenol over-production.

    PubMed

    Blum, Ailisa; Benfield, Aurélie H; Stiller, Jiri; Kazan, Kemal; Batley, Jacqueline; Gardiner, Donald M

    2016-05-01

    Fusarium head blight and crown rot, caused by the fungal plant pathogen Fusarium graminearum, impose a major threat to global wheat production. During the infection, plants are contaminated with mycotoxins such as deoxynivalenol (DON), which can be toxic for humans and animals. In addition, DON is a major virulence factor during wheat infection. However, it is not fully understood how DON production is regulated in F. graminearum. In order to identify regulators of DON production, a high-throughput mutant screen using Fluorescence Activated Cell Sorting (FACS) of a mutagenised TRI5-GFP reporter strain was established and a mutant over-producing DON under repressive conditions identified. A gain-of-function mutation in the F. graminearum adenylyl cyclase (FAC1), which is a known positive regulator of DON production, was identified as the cause of this phenotype through genome sequencing and segregation analysis. Our results show that the high-throughput mutant screening procedure developed here can be applied for identification of fungal proteins involved in diverse processes. PMID:26932301

  3. Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B disease-causing RAB7A mutant proteins show altered interaction with the neuronal intermediate filament peripherin.

    PubMed

    Cogli, Laura; Progida, Cinzia; Thomas, Claire L; Spencer-Dene, Bradley; Donno, Claudia; Schiavo, Giampietro; Bucci, Cecilia

    2013-02-01

    Charcot-Marie-Tooth type 2B (CMT2B) is a peripheral ulcero-mutilating neuropathy caused by four missense mutations in the rab7a gene. CMT2B is clinically characterized by prominent sensory loss, distal muscle weakness leading to muscle atrophy, high frequency of foot ulcers and infections that often results in toe amputations. RAB7A is a ubiquitous small GTPase, which controls transport to late endocytic compartments. Although the biochemical and functional properties of disease-causing RAB7A mutant proteins have been investigated, it is not yet clear how the disease originates. To understand how mutations in a ubiquitous protein specifically affect peripheral neurons, we performed a two-hybrid screen using a dorsal root ganglia cDNA library with the purpose of identifying RAB7A interactors specific for these cells. We identified peripherin, an intermediate filament protein expressed primarily in peripheral neurons, as a putative RAB7A interacting protein. The interaction was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation and pull-down experiments, and established that the interaction is direct using recombinant proteins. Silencing or overexpression of wild type RAB7A changed the soluble/insoluble rate of peripherin indicating that RAB7A is important for peripherin organization and function. In addition, disease-causing RAB7A mutant proteins bind more strongly to peripherin and their expression causes a significant increase in the amount of soluble peripherin. Since peripherin plays a role not only in neurite outgrowth during development but also in axonal regeneration after injury, these data suggest that the altered interaction between disease-causing RAB7A mutants and peripherin could play an important role in CMT2B neuropathy.

  4. Analyzing and Quantifying the Gain-of-Function Enhancement of IP3 Receptor Gating by Familial Alzheimer’s Disease-Causing Mutants in Presenilins

    PubMed Central

    Mak, Don-On Daniel; Cheung, King-Ho; Toglia, Patrick; Foskett, J. Kevin; Ullah, Ghanim

    2015-01-01

    Familial Alzheimer’s disease (FAD)-causing mutant presenilins (PS) interact with inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) receptor (IP3R) Ca2+ release channels resulting in enhanced IP3R channel gating in an amyloid beta (Aβ) production-independent manner. This gain-of-function enhancement of IP3R activity is considered to be the main reason behind the upregulation of intracellular Ca2+ signaling in the presence of optimal and suboptimal stimuli and spontaneous Ca2+ signals observed in cells expressing mutant PS. In this paper, we employed computational modeling of single IP3R channel activity records obtained under optimal Ca2+ and multiple IP3 concentrations to gain deeper insights into the enhancement of IP3R function. We found that in addition to the high occupancy of the high-activity (H) mode and the low occupancy of the low-activity (L) mode, IP3R in FAD-causing mutant PS-expressing cells exhibits significantly longer mean life-time for the H mode and shorter life-time for the L mode, leading to shorter mean close-time and hence high open probability of the channel in comparison to IP3R in cells expressing wild-type PS. The model is then used to extrapolate the behavior of the channel to a wide range of IP3 and Ca2+ concentrations and quantify the sensitivity of IP3R to its two ligands. We show that the gain-of-function enhancement is sensitive to both IP3 and Ca2+ and that very small amount of IP3 is required to stimulate IP3R channels in the presence of FAD-causing mutant PS to the same level of activity as channels in control cells stimulated by significantly higher IP3 concentrations. We further demonstrate with simulations that the relatively longer time spent by IP3R in the H mode leads to the observed higher frequency of local Ca2+ signals, which can account for the more frequent global Ca2+ signals observed, while the enhanced activity of the channel at extremely low ligand concentrations will lead to spontaneous Ca2+ signals in cells expressing FAD-causing

  5. Reduced immunogenicity of Arabidopsis hgl1 mutant N-glycans caused by altered accessibility of xylose and core fucose epitopes.

    PubMed

    Kaulfürst-Soboll, Heidi; Rips, Stephan; Koiwa, Hisashi; Kajiura, Hiroyuki; Fujiyama, Kazuhito; von Schaewen, Antje

    2011-07-01

    Arabidopsis N-glycosylation mutants with enhanced salt sensitivity show reduced immunoreactivity of complex N-glycans. Among them, hybrid glycosylation 1 (hgl1) alleles lacking Golgi α-mannosidase II are unique, because their glycoprotein N-glycans are hardly labeled by anti-complex glycan antibodies, even though they carry β1,2-xylose and α1,3-fucose epitopes. To dissect the contribution of xylose and core fucose residues to plant stress responses and immunogenic potential, we prepared Arabidopsis hgl1 xylT double and hgl1 fucTa fucTb triple mutants by crossing previously established T-DNA insertion lines and verified them by mass spectrometry analyses. Root growth assays revealed that hgl1 fucTa fucTb but not hgl1 xylT plants are more salt-sensitive than hgl1, hinting at the importance of core fucose modification and masking of xylose residues. Detailed immunoblot analyses with anti-β1,2-xylose and anti-α1,3-fucose rabbit immunoglobulin G antibodies as well as cross-reactive carbohydrate determinant-specific human immunoglobulin E antibodies (present in sera of allergy patients) showed that xylose-specific reactivity of hgl1 N-glycans is indeed reduced. Based on three-dimensional modeling of plant N-glycans, we propose that xylose residues are tilted by 30° because of untrimmed mannoses in hgl1 mutants. Glycosidase treatments of protein extracts restored immunoreactivity of hgl1 N-glycans supporting these models. Furthermore, among allergy patient sera, untrimmed mannoses persisting on the α1,6-arm of hgl1 N-glycans were inhibitory to immunoreaction with core fucoses to various degrees. In summary, incompletely trimmed glycoprotein N-glycans conformationally prevent xylose and, to lesser extent, core fucose accessibility. Thus, in addition to N-acetylglucosaminyltransferase I, Golgi α-mannosidase II emerges as a so far unrecognized target for lowering the immunogenic potential of plant-derived glycoproteins.

  6. Structural Stability and Local Dynamics in Disease-Causing Mutants of Human Apolipoprotein A-I: What Makes the Protein Amyloidogenic?

    PubMed

    Das, Madhurima; Wilson, Christopher J; Mei, Xiaohu; Wales, Thomas E; Engen, John R; Gursky, Olga

    2016-01-29

    ApoA-I, the major protein of plasma high-density lipoprotein, removes cellular cholesterol and protects against atherosclerosis. ApoA-I mutations can cause familial amyloidosis, a life-threatening disease wherein N-terminal protein fragments form fibrils in vital organs. To unveil the protein misfolding mechanism and to understand why some mutations cause amyloidosis while others do not, we analyzed the structure, stability, and lipid-binding properties of naturally occurring mutants of full-length human apoA-I causing either amyloidosis (G26R, W50R, F71Y, and L170P) or aberrant lipid metabolism (L159R). Global and local protein conformation and dynamics in solution were assessed by circular dichroism, fluorescence, and hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. All mutants showed increased deuteration in residues 14-22, supporting our hypothesis that decreased protection of this major amyloid "hot spot" can trigger protein misfolding. In addition, L159R showed local helical unfolding near the mutation site, consistent with cleavage of this mutant in plasma to generate the labile 1-159 fragment. Together, the results suggest that reduced protection of the major amyloid "hot spot", combined with the structural integrity of the native helix bundle conformation, shifts the balance from protein clearance to β-aggregation. A delicate balance between the overall structural integrity of a globular protein and the local destabilization of its amyloidogenic segments may be a fundamental determinant of this and other amyloid diseases. Furthermore, mutation-induced conformational changes observed in the helix bundle, which comprises the N-terminal 75% of apoA-I, and its flexible C-terminal tail suggest the propagation of structural perturbations to distant sites via an unexpected template-induced ensemble-based mechanism, challenging the classical structure-based view.

  7. Rough endoplasmic reticulum trafficking errors by different classes of mutant dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) cause dominant negative effects in both dentinogenesis imperfecta and dentin dysplasia by entrapping normal DSPP.

    PubMed

    von Marschall, Zofia; Mok, Seeun; Phillips, Matthew D; McKnight, Dianalee A; Fisher, Larry W

    2012-06-01

    Families with nonsyndromic dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) and the milder, dentin dysplasia (DD), have mutations in one allele of the dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) gene. Because loss of a single Dspp allele in mice (and likely, humans) causes no dental phenotype, the mechanism(s) underling the dominant negative effects were investigated. DSPP mutations occur in three classes. (The first class, the mid-leader missense mutation, Y6D, was not investigated in this report.) All other 5′ mutations of DSPP result in changes/loss in the first three amino acids (isoleucine-proline-valine [IPV]) of mature DSPP or, for the A15V missense mutation, some retention of the hydrophobic leader sequence. All of this second class of mutations caused mutant DSPP to be retained in the rough endoplasmic reticulum (rER) of transfected HEK293 cells. Trafficking out of the rER by coexpressed normal DSPP was reduced in a dose-responsive manner, probably due to formation of Ca2+-dependent complexes with the retained mutant DSPP. IPV-like sequences begin many secreted Ca2+-binding proteins, and changing the third amino acid to the charged aspartate (D) in three other acidic proteins also caused increased rER accumulation. Both the leader-retaining A15V and the long string of hydrophobic amino acids resulting from all known frameshift mutations within the 3′-encoded Ca2+-binding repeat domain (third class of mutations) caused retention by association of the mutant proteins with rER membranes. More 5′ frameshift mutations result in longer mutant hydrophobic domains, but the milder phenotype, DD, probably due to lower effectiveness of the remaining, shorter Ca2+-binding domain in capturing normal DSPP protein within the rER. This study presents evidence of a shared underlying mechanism of capturing of normal DSPP by two different classes of DSPP mutations and offers an explanation for the mild (DD-II) versus severe (DGI-II and III) nonsyndromic dentin phenotypes. Evidence is also

  8. The Cataract-linked Mutant Connexin50D47A Causes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress in Mouse Lenses.

    PubMed

    Berthoud, Viviana M; Minogue, Peter J; Lambert, Paul A; Snabb, Joseph I; Beyer, Eric C

    2016-08-19

    Mice expressing connexin50D47A (Cx50D47A) exhibit nuclear cataracts and impaired differentiation. Cx50D47A does not traffic properly, and homozygous mutant lenses show increased levels of the stress-responsive αB-crystallins. Therefore, we assessed whether expression of Cx50D47A led to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in the lens in vivo Although pharmacologic induction of ER stress can be transduced by three different pathways, we found no evidence for activation of the IRE1α or ATF6 pathways in Cx50D47A-expressing lenses. In contrast, heterozygous and homozygous Cx50D47A lenses showed an increase in phosphorylated PERK immunoreactivity and in the ratio of phosphorylated to total EIF2α (2.4- and 3.3-fold, respectively) compared with wild type. Levels of ATF4 were similar in wild type and heterozygous lenses but elevated in homozygotes (391%). In both heterozygotes and homozygotes, levels of calreticulin protein were increased (184 and 262%, respectively), as was Chop mRNA (1.9- and 12.4-fold, respectively). CHOP protein was increased in homozygotes (384%). TUNEL staining was increased in Cx50D47A lenses, especially in homozygous mice. Levels of two factors that may be pro-survival, Irs2 and Trib3, were greatly increased in homozygous lenses. These results suggest that expression of Cx50D47A induces ER stress, triggering activation of the PERK-ATF4 pathway, which potentially contributes to the lens pathology and leads to increased expression of anti-apoptotic factors, allowing cell survival.

  9. Traumatic brain injury causes delayed motor and cognitive impairment in a mutant mouse strain known to exhibit delayed Wallerian degeneration.

    PubMed

    Fox, G B; Faden, A I

    1998-09-15

    Delayed Wallerian degeneration after neuronal injury is a feature of the C57BL/Wld(s) mouse mutant. In the present study, we examined the effect of unilateral controlled cortical impact (CCI) on motor and cognitive performance in C57BL/6 and C57BL/Wld(s) mice. Performance on a beam-walking task was impaired in both injured groups over the first 3 weeks; however, between 28 and 35 days post injury, C57BL/6 mice continued to improve whereas C57BL/Wld(s) mice showed increased footfaults. In a spatial learning task, C57BL/Wld(s) animals performed consistently better than C57BL/6 mice when tested 7-10 days and 14-17 days following CCI. C57BL/Wld(s) mice also demonstrated improved working memory performance as compared with C57BL/6 mice when trained on days 21-22 after injury; this effect was lost on days 23 and 24, and was not evident in other animals tested in the same task at 28-31 days following injury. These results indicate a marked delay in motor and cognitive impairment following CCI in C57BL/Wld(s) mice compared with injured C57BL/6 controls. This is consistent with previous work showing delayed temporal evolution of neuronal degeneration in C57BL/Wld(s) mice and suggests CCI may be a suitable model for examining the functional consequences of traumatic brain injury (TBI) in genetically altered mice.

  10. SI PC104 Performance Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Montelongo, S

    2005-12-16

    The Spectral Instruments (SI) PC104 systems associated with the SI-1000 CCD camera exhibited intermittent power problems during setup, test and operations which called for further evaluation and testing. The SI PC104 System is the interface between the SI-1000 CCD camera and its associated Diagnostic Controller (DC). As such, the SI PC104 must be a reliable, robust system capable of providing consistent performance in various configurations and operating conditions. This SI PC104 system consists of a stackable set of modules designed to meet the PC104+ Industry Standard. The SI PC104 System consists of a CPU module, SI Camera card, Media converter card, Video card and a I/O module. The root cause of power problems was identified as failing solder joints at the LEMO power connector attached to the SI Camera Card. The recommended solution was to provide power to the PC104 system via a PC104+ power supply module configured into the PC104 stack instead of thru the LEMO power connector. Test plans (2) were developed to test SI PC104 performance and identify any outstanding issues noted during extended operations. Test Plan 1 included performance and image acquisition tests. Test Plan 2 verified performance after implementing recommendations. Test Plan 2 also included verifying integrity of system files and driver installation after bootup. Each test plan was implemented to fully test against each set of problems noted. Test Plan presentations and Test Plan results are attached as appendices. Anticipated test results will show successful operation and reliable performance of the SI PC104 system receiving its power via a PC104 power supply module. A SI PC104 Usage Recommendation Memo will be sent out to the SI PC104 User Community. Recommendation memo(s) are attached as appendices.

  11. Biomimicry 1: PC.

    PubMed

    Cumberland, D C; Gunn, J; Malik, N; Holt, C M

    1998-01-01

    The surface properties of stents can be modified by coating them, for example with a polymer. Phosphorylcoline (PC) is the major component of the outer layer of the cell membrane. The haemo- and biocompatibility of a PC-containing polymer is thus based on biomimicry, and has been confirmed by several experiments showing much reduced thrombogenicity of PC-coated surfaces, and porcine coronary artery implants showing no sign of adverse effect. Clinical experience with the PC-coated BiodivYsio appears favourable. The PC coating can be tailored for take up and controlled elution of various drugs for stent-based local delivery, a property which is being actively explored.

  12. A missense mutation in the VHYNP motif of a DELLA protein causes a semi-dwarf mutant phenotype in Brassica napus.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Wang, Jilin; Huang, Tiandai; Wang, Fang; Yuan, Fang; Cheng, Xiaomao; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Shuwen; Wu, Jiangsheng; Liu, Kede

    2010-07-01

    Although dwarf genes have been widely used to improve lodging resistance and enhance harvest index in cereal crops, lodging is still a serious problem in rapeseed (Brassica napus) production. A semi-dwarf B. napus mutant, ds-1, was identified through EMS mutagenesis of a microspore-cultured DH line. The mutant had a significant reduction in height due to a lower first branch position and shorter internodes when compared with wild-type cultivars. This dwarfism was inherited as a single semi-dominant gene, ds-1. DS-1 locus was mapped to chromosome A6, and co-segregated with a microsatellite marker BnEMS1125 derived from the gene BnRGA. BnRGA encodes a DELLA protein that functions as a GA signaling repressor. The expression of a mutant BnRGA allele from ds-1, Bnrga-ds, caused dwarf phenotypes in Arabidopsis. Comparative sequencing of RGA open-reading frames (ORFs) of ds-1 and wild-type cultivars revealed a single proline (P)-to-leucine (L) substitution that may lead to a gain-of-function mutation in GA signaling. The expression of the Arabidopsis homolog, Atrga-ds, bearing this site-directed mutation also rendered dwarf phenotypes in Arabidopsis, which demonstrated that the P-to-L mutation in the VHYNP motif of Bnrga-ds is responsible for the dwarfism. A yeast two-hybrid assay confirmed that this mutation inhibited the interaction between Bnrga-ds/Atrga-ds and the GA receptor, AtGID1A, in the presence of GA(3), suggesting that the conserved proline residue in the VHYNP motif of DELLA protein directly participates in DELLA-GID1 interaction. Identification and characterization of the dwarf gene ds-1 will facilitate its utilization in improving lodging resistance in Brassica breeding.

  13. Snyder-Robinson Syndrome: Rescuing the Disease-Causing Effect of G56S mutant by Small Molecule Binding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhe; Martiny, Virginie; Lagorce, David; Alexov, Emil; Miteva, Maria; Clemson University Team; Université Paris Diderot Team

    2013-03-01

    Snyder-Robinson Syndrome (SRS) is an X-linked mental retardation disorder, which is caused by defects in a particular gene coding for the spermine synthase (SMS) protein. Among the missense mutations known to be disease-causing is the G56S, which is positioned at the interface of the SMS homo-dimer. Previous computational and experimental investigations have shown that G56S mutation destabilizes the homo-dimer and thus greatly reduces the SMS enzymatic activity. In this study, we explore the possibility of mitigating the effect of G56S mutation by binding small molecules to suitable pockets around the mutation site. It is done by combined efforts of molecular dynamics simulations and in silico screening. The binding of selected molecules was calculated to fully compensate the effect of the mutation and rescue the wild type dimer affinity. This work was supported by NIH, NLM grant. No. 1R03LM009748

  14. Differential Phospholipid Substrates and Directional Transport by ATP-binding Cassette Proteins ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 and Disease-causing Mutants*♦

    PubMed Central

    Quazi, Faraz; Molday, Robert S.

    2013-01-01

    ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 are members of the ABCA subfamily of ATP-binding cassette transporters that share extensive sequence and structural similarity. Mutations in ABCA1 cause Tangier disease characterized by defective cholesterol homeostasis and high density lipoprotein (HDL) deficiency. Mutations in ABCA4 are responsible for Stargardt disease, a degenerative disorder associated with severe loss in central vision. Although cell-based studies have implicated ABCA proteins in lipid transport, the substrates and direction of transport have not been firmly established. We have purified and reconstituted ABCA1, ABCA7, and ABCA4 into liposomes for fluorescent-lipid transport studies. ABCA1 actively exported or flipped phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylserine, and sphingomyelin from the cytoplasmic to the exocytoplasmic leaflet of membranes, whereas ABCA7 preferentially exported phosphatidylserine. In contrast, ABCA4 transported phosphatidylethanolamine in the reverse direction. The same phospholipids stimulated the ATPase activity of these ABCA transporters. The transport and ATPase activities of ABCA1 and ABCA4 were reduced by 25% in the presence of 20% cholesterol. Nine ABCA1 Tangier mutants and the corresponding ABCA4 Stargardt mutants showed significantly reduced phospholipid transport activity and subcellular mislocalization. These studies provide the first direct evidence for ABCA1 and ABCA7 functioning as phospholipid transporters and suggest that this activity is an essential step in the loading of apoA-1 with phospholipids for HDL formation. PMID:24097981

  15. Structure–Activity Relationship of 3,5-Diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 Inhibitors Reveals Unaltered Binding Affinity for Fibrodysplasia Ossificans Progressiva Causing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure–activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG. PMID:25101911

  16. Structure-activity relationship of 3,5-diaryl-2-aminopyridine ALK2 inhibitors reveals unaltered binding affinity for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva causing mutants.

    PubMed

    Mohedas, Agustin H; Wang, You; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Canning, Peter; Choi, Sungwoon; Xing, Xuechao; Bullock, Alex N; Cuny, Gregory D; Yu, Paul B

    2014-10-01

    There are currently no effective therapies for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a debilitating and progressive heterotopic ossification disease caused by activating mutations of ACVR1 encoding the BMP type I receptor kinase ALK2. Recently, a subset of these same mutations of ACVR1 have been identified in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumors. Here we describe the structure-activity relationship for a series of novel ALK2 inhibitors based on the 2-aminopyridine compound K02288. Several modifications increased potency in kinase, thermal shift, or cell-based assays of BMP signaling and transcription, as well as selectivity for ALK2 versus closely related BMP and TGF-β type I receptor kinases. Compounds in this series exhibited a wide range of in vitro cytotoxicity that was not correlated with potency or selectivity, suggesting mechanisms independent of BMP or TGF-β inhibition. The study also highlights a potent 2-methylpyridine derivative 10 (LDN-214117) with a high degree of selectivity for ALK2 and low cytotoxicity that could provide a template for preclinical development. Contrary to the notion that activating mutations of ALK2 might alter inhibitor efficacy due to potential conformational changes in the ATP-binding site, the compounds demonstrated consistent binding to a panel of mutant and wild-type ALK2 proteins. Thus, BMP inhibitors identified via activity against wild-type ALK2 signaling are likely to be of clinical relevance for the diverse ALK2 mutant proteins associated with FOP and DIPG.

  17. Cold-aggravated pain in humans caused by a hyperactive NaV1.9 channel mutant.

    PubMed

    Leipold, Enrico; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Frick, Miya; Gong, Ping; Bernstein, Jonathan A; Voigt, Martin; Katona, Istvan; Oliver Goral, R; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Hübner, Christian A; Heinemann, Stefan H; Kurth, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the human SCN11A-encoded voltage-gated Na(+) channel NaV1.9 cause severe pain disorders ranging from neuropathic pain to congenital pain insensitivity. However, the entire spectrum of the NaV1.9 diseases has yet to be defined. Applying whole-exome sequencing we here identify a missense change (p.V1184A) in NaV1.9, which leads to cold-aggravated peripheral pain in humans. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that p.V1184A shifts the voltage dependence of channel opening to hyperpolarized potentials thereby conferring gain-of-function characteristics to NaV1.9. Mutated channels diminish the resting membrane potential of mouse primary sensory neurons and cause cold-resistant hyperexcitability of nociceptors, suggesting a mechanistic basis for the temperature dependence of the pain phenotype. On the basis of direct comparison of the mutations linked to either cold-aggravated pain or pain insensitivity, we propose a model in which the physiological consequence of a mutation, that is, augmented versus absent pain, is critically dependent on the type of NaV1.9 hyperactivity. PMID:26645915

  18. Cold-aggravated pain in humans caused by a hyperactive NaV1.9 channel mutant

    PubMed Central

    Leipold, Enrico; Hanson-Kahn, Andrea; Frick, Miya; Gong, Ping; Bernstein, Jonathan A.; Voigt, Martin; Katona, Istvan; Oliver Goral, R.; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Peter; Weis, Joachim; Hübner, Christian A.; Heinemann, Stefan H.; Kurth, Ingo

    2015-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in the human SCN11A-encoded voltage-gated Na+ channel NaV1.9 cause severe pain disorders ranging from neuropathic pain to congenital pain insensitivity. However, the entire spectrum of the NaV1.9 diseases has yet to be defined. Applying whole-exome sequencing we here identify a missense change (p.V1184A) in NaV1.9, which leads to cold-aggravated peripheral pain in humans. Electrophysiological analysis reveals that p.V1184A shifts the voltage dependence of channel opening to hyperpolarized potentials thereby conferring gain-of-function characteristics to NaV1.9. Mutated channels diminish the resting membrane potential of mouse primary sensory neurons and cause cold-resistant hyperexcitability of nociceptors, suggesting a mechanistic basis for the temperature dependence of the pain phenotype. On the basis of direct comparison of the mutations linked to either cold-aggravated pain or pain insensitivity, we propose a model in which the physiological consequence of a mutation, that is, augmented versus absent pain, is critically dependent on the type of NaV1.9 hyperactivity. PMID:26645915

  19. Rab7 Mutants Associated with Charcot-Marie-Tooth Disease Exhibit Enhanced NGF-Stimulated Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Romero, Elsa; Wilson, Michael C.; Wandinger-Ness, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Missense mutants in the late endosomal Rab7 GTPase cause the autosomal dominant peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 2B (CMT2B). As yet, the pathological mechanisms connecting mutant Rab7 protein expression to altered neuronal function are undefined. Here, we analyze the effects Rab7 CMT2B mutants on nerve growth factor (NGF) dependent intracellular signaling in PC12 cells. The nerve growth factor receptor TrkA interacted similarly with Rab7 wild-type and CMT2B mutant proteins, but the mutant proteins significantly enhanced TrkA phosphorylation in response to brief NGF stimulation. Two downstream signaling pathways (Erk1/2 and Akt) that are directly activated in response to phospho-TrkA were differentially affected. Akt signaling, arising in response to activated TrkA at the plasma membrane was unaffected. However Erk1/2 phosphorylation, triggered on signaling endosomes, was increased. Cytoplasmic phospho-Erk1/2 persisted at elevated levels relative to control samples for up to 24 h following NGF stimulation. Nuclear shuttling of phospho Erk1/2, which is required to induce MAPK phosphatase expression and down regulate signaling, was greatly reduced by the Rab7 CMT2B mutants and explains the previously reported inhibition in PC12 neurite outgrowth. In conclusion, the data demonstrate a mechanistic link between Rab7 CMT2B mutants and altered TrkA and Erk1/2 signaling from endosomes. PMID:21151572

  20. Constitutive expression of a COOH-terminal leucine mutant of lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 causes its exclusive localization in low density intracellular vesicles.

    PubMed

    Akasaki, Kenji; Shiotsu, Keiko; Michihara, Akihiro; Ide, Norie; Wada, Ikuo

    2014-07-01

    Lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) is a type I transmembrane protein with a short cytoplasmic tail that possesses a lysosome-targeting signal of GYQTI(382)-COOH. Wild-type (WT)-LAMP-1 was exclusively localized in high density lysosomes, and efficiency of LAMP-1's transport to lysosomes depends on its COOH-terminal amino acid residue. Among many different COOH-terminal amino acid substitution mutants of LAMP-1, a leucine-substituted mutant (I382L) displays the most efficient targeting to late endosomes and lysosomes [Akasaki et al. (2010) J. Biochem. 148: , 669-679]. In this study, we generated two human hepatoma cell lines (HepG2 cell lines) that stably express WT-LAMP-1 and I382L, and compared their intracellular distributions. The subcellular fractionation study using Percoll density gradient centrifugation revealed that WT-LAMP-1 had preferential localization in the high density secondary lysosomes where endogenous human LAMP-1 was enriched. In contrast, a major portion of I382L was located in a low density fraction. The low density fraction also contained approximately 80% of endogenous human LAMP-1 and significant amounts of endogenous β-glucuronidase and LAMP-2, which probably represents occurrence of low density lysosomes in the I382L-expressing cells. Double immunofluorescence microscopic analyses distinguished I382L-containing intracellular vesicles from endogenous LAMP-1-containing lysosomes and early endosomes. Altogether, constitutive expression of I382L causes its aberrant intracellular localization and generation of low density lysosomes, indicating that the COOH-terminal isoleucine is critical for normal localization of LAMP-1 in the dense lysosomes.

  1. COOH-terminal collagen Q (COLQ) mutants causing human deficiency of endplate acetylcholinesterase impair the interaction of ColQ with proteins of the basal lamina.

    PubMed

    Arredondo, Juan; Lara, Marian; Ng, Fiona; Gochez, Danielle A; Lee, Diana C; Logia, Stephanie P; Nguyen, Joanna; Maselli, Ricardo A

    2014-05-01

    Collagen Q (ColQ) is a key multidomain functional protein of the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), crucial for anchoring acetylcholinesterase (AChE) to the basal lamina (BL) and accumulating AChE at the NMJ. The attachment of AChE to the BL is primarily accomplished by the binding of the ColQ collagen domain to the heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan and the COOH-terminus to the muscle-specific receptor tyrosine kinase (MuSK), which in turn plays a fundamental role in the development and maintenance of the NMJ. Yet, the precise mechanism by which ColQ anchors AChE at the NMJ remains unknown. We identified five novel mutations at the COOH-terminus of ColQ in seven patients from five families affected with endplate (EP) AChE deficiency. We found that the mutations do not affect the assembly of ColQ with AChE to form asymmetric forms of AChE or impair the interaction of ColQ with perlecan. By contrast, all mutations impair in varied degree the interaction of ColQ with MuSK as well as basement membrane extract (BME) that have no detectable MuSK. Our data confirm that the interaction of ColQ to perlecan and MuSK is crucial for anchoring AChE to the NMJ. In addition, the identified COOH-terminal mutants not only reduce the interaction of ColQ with MuSK, but also diminish the interaction of ColQ with BME. These findings suggest that the impaired attachment of COOH-terminal mutants causing EP AChE deficiency is in part independent of MuSK, and that the COOH-terminus of ColQ may interact with other proteins at the BL.

  2. Poisson-like Fluctuation Patterns of Revertants of Leucine Auxotrophy (Leu-500) in Salmonella Typhimurium Caused by Delay in Mutant Cell Division

    PubMed Central

    Dijkmans, R.; Kreps, S.; Mergeay, M.

    1994-01-01

    Leu(+) mutants from Salmonella typhimurium leu-500 strain MA412 arise at high frequencies and mutant colonies appear over a broad range of time on selective plates. This observation suggested that these Leu(+) mutants might be induced or ``directed.'' If such a mechanism was responsible, mutants should originate on selective plates rather than in the preceding culture in nonselective conditions and should give rise to Poisson-like fluctuation curves upon plating of sister cultures on selective medium. Poisson-like distribution profiles were indeed observed for Leu(+) mutants of S. typhimurium MA412. However, an explanation for the observed Poisson-like fluctuation patterns without a need for selection-induced mutations was found. Microscopical analysis and cell mass/viable count measurements showed that the size of Leu(+) mutant cells was often much larger than those of nonmutants. This size difference was a stable characteristic of a large proportion of Leu(+) mutants, was observed both in stationary and growing culture and did not measurably affect the division rates of the cells in nutrient broth. As the transition from normal-sized nonmutant to oversized mutant cells during the nonselective culture phase of the fluctuation experiment may have been accompanied by a period with no or few completed cell division cycles, the number of mutant offspring may have been smaller than that of sibling nonmutants. Such underrepresentation of mutants in the final culture is expected to give rise to Poisson-like fluctuation patterns without invoking ``directed'' mutations. PMID:8070649

  3. Functional inactivation of endogenous MDM2 and CHIP by HSP90 causes aberrant stabilization of mutant p53 in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dun; Marchenko, Natalia D; Schulz, Ramona; Fischer, Victoria; Velasco-Hernandez, Talia; Talos, Flaminia; Moll, Ute M

    2011-05-01

    The tight control of wild-type p53 by mainly MDM2 in normal cells is permanently lost in tumors harboring mutant p53, which exhibit dramatic constitutive p53 hyperstabilization that far exceeds that of wild-type p53 tumors. Importantly, mutant p53 hyperstabilization is critical for oncogenic gain of function of mutant p53 in vivo. Current insight into the mechanism of this dysregulation is fragmentary and largely derived from ectopically constructed cell systems. Importantly, mutant p53 knock-in mice established that normal mutant p53 tissues have sufficient enzymatic reserves in MDM2 and other E3 ligases to maintain full control of mutant p53. We find that in human cancer cells, endogenous mutant p53, despite its ability to interact with MDM2, suffers from a profound lack of ubiquitination as the root of its degradation defect. In contrast to wild-type p53, the many mutant p53 proteins which are conformationally aberrant are engaged in complexes with the HSP90 chaperone machinery to prevent its aggregation. In contrast to wild-type p53 cancer cells, we show that in mutant p53 cancer cells, this HSP90 interaction blocks the endogenous MDM2 and CHIP (carboxy-terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein) E3 ligase activity. Interference with HSP90 either by RNA interference against HSF1, the transcriptional regulator of the HSP90 pathway, or by direct knockdown of Hsp90 protein or by pharmacologic inhibition of Hsp90 activity with 17AAG (17-allylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin) destroys the complex, liberates mutant p53, and reactivates endogenous MDM2 and CHIP to degrade mutant p53. Of note, 17AAG induces a stronger viability loss in mutant p53 than in wild-type p53 cancer cells. Our data support the rationale that suppression of mutant p53 levels in vivo in established cancers might achieve clinically significant effects.

  4. Cuticular Defects in Oryza sativa ATP-binding Cassette Transporter G31 Mutant Plants Cause Dwarfism, Elevated Defense Responses and Pathogen Resistance.

    PubMed

    Garroum, Imène; Bidzinski, Przemyslaw; Daraspe, Jean; Mucciolo, Antonio; Humbel, Bruno M; Morel, Jean-Benoit; Nawrath, Christiane

    2016-06-01

    The cuticle covers the surface of the polysaccharide cell wall of leaf epidermal cells and forms an essential diffusion barrier between plant and environment. Homologs of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter AtABCG32/HvABCG31 clade are necessary for the formation of a functional cuticle in both monocots and dicots. Here we characterize the osabcg31 knockout mutant and hairpin RNA interference (RNAi)-down-regulated OsABCG31 plant lines having reduced plant growth and a permeable cuticle. The reduced content of cutin in leaves and structural alterations in the cuticle and at the cuticle-cell wall interface in plants compromised in OsABCG31 expression explain the cuticle permeability. Effects of modifications of the cuticle on plant-microbe interactions were evaluated. The cuticular alterations in OsABCG31-compromised plants did not cause deficiencies in germination of the spores or the formation of appressoria of Magnaporthe oryzae on the leaf surface, but a strong reduction of infection structures inside the plant. Genes involved in pathogen resistance were constitutively up-regulated in OsABCG31-compromised plants, thus being a possible cause of the resistance to M. oryzae and the dwarf growth phenotype. The findings show that in rice an abnormal cuticle formation may affect the signaling of plant growth and defense. PMID:27121976

  5. Hose in Hose, an S locus-linked mutant of Primula vulgaris, is caused by an unstable mutation at the Globosa locus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinhong; Dudas, Brigitta; Webster, Margaret A; Cook, Holly E; Davies, Brendan H; Gilmartin, Philip M

    2010-03-23

    Hose in Hose mutants of primrose and cowslip have been cultivated since the early 17th century and show dominant homeotic conversion of sepals to petals. The phenotype shows variable penetrance and expressivity and is linked to the S locus, which controls floral heteromorphy in Primula species. Here we demonstrate that the homeotic conversion of sepals to petals in Hose in Hose is associated with up-regulation of both Primula B-function MADS box genes PvDef and PvGlo in the first floral whorl. We have defined a restriction fragment length polymorphism associated with PvGlo that cosegregates with the Hose in Hose phenotype and have also identified and characterized a retrotransposon insertion in the PvGlo promoter which is associated with the up-regulated expression of PvGlo. Excision of this retrotransposon, associated with epigenetic changes at the locus, causes reversion toward normal calyces and restores wild-type flower development. These data define the molecular basis of the Hose in Hose mutation and provide an explanation for its long-documented phenotypic instability.

  6. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  7. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-01-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  8. dBRWD3 Regulates Tissue Overgrowth and Ectopic Gene Expression Caused by Polycomb Group Mutations.

    PubMed

    Shih, Hsueh-Tzu; Chen, Wei-Yu; Liu, Kwei-Yan; Shih, Zong-Siou; Chen, Yi-Jyun; Hsieh, Paul-Chen; Kuo, Kuan-Lin; Huang, Kuo-How; Hsu, Pang-Hung; Liu, Ya-Wen; Chan, Shih-Peng; Lee, Hsiu-Hsiang; Tsai, Yu-Chen; Wu, June-Tai

    2016-09-01

    To maintain a particular cell fate, a unique set of genes should be expressed while another set is repressed. One way to repress gene expression is through Polycomb group (PcG) proteins that compact chromatin into a silent configuration. In addition to cell fate maintenance, PcG proteins also maintain normal cell physiology, for example cell cycle. In the absence of PcG, ectopic activation of the PcG-repressed genes leads to developmental defects and malignant tumors. Little is known about the molecular nature of ectopic gene expression; especially what differentiates expression of a given gene in the orthotopic tissue (orthotopic expression) and the ectopic expression of the same gene due to PcG mutations. Here we present that ectopic gene expression in PcG mutant cells specifically requires dBRWD3, a negative regulator of HIRA/Yemanuclein (YEM)-mediated histone variant H3.3 deposition. dBRWD3 mutations suppress both the ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth in PcG mutants through a YEM-dependent mechanism. Our findings identified dBRWD3 as a critical regulator that is uniquely required for ectopic gene expression and aberrant tissue overgrowth caused by PcG mutations. PMID:27588417

  9. Amino Alcohol- (NPS-2143) and Quinazolinone-Derived Calcilytics (ATF936 and AXT914) Differentially Mitigate Excessive Signalling of Calcium-Sensing Receptor Mutants Causing Bartter Syndrome Type 5 and Autosomal Dominant Hypocalcemia

    PubMed Central

    Letz, Saskia; Haag, Christine; Schulze, Egbert; Frank-Raue, Karin; Raue, Friedhelm; Hofner, Benjamin; Mayr, Bernhard; Schöfl, Christof

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Activating calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) mutations cause autosomal dominant hypocalcemia (ADH) characterized by low serum calcium, inappropriately low PTH and relative hypercalciuria. Four activating CaSR mutations cause additional renal wasting of sodium, chloride and other salts, a condition called Bartter syndrome (BS) type 5. Until today there is no specific medical treatment for BS type 5 and ADH. We investigated the effects of different allosteric CaSR antagonists (calcilytics) on activating CaSR mutants. Methods All 4 known mutations causing BS type 5 and five ADH mutations were expressed in HEK 293T cells and receptor signalling was studied by measurement of intracellular free calcium in response to extracellular calcium ([Ca2+]o). To investigate the effect of calcilytics, cells were stimulated with 3 mM [Ca2+]o in the presence or absence of NPS-2143, ATF936 or AXT914. Results All BS type 5 and ADH mutants showed enhanced signalling activity to [Ca2+]o with left shifted dose response curves. In contrast to the amino alcohol NPS-2143, which was only partially effective, the quinazolinone calcilytics ATF936 and AXT914 significantly mitigated excessive cytosolic calcium signalling of all BS type 5 and ADH mutants studied. When these mutants were co-expressed with wild-type CaSR to approximate heterozygosity in patients, ATF936 and AXT914 were also effective on all mutants. Conclusion The calcilytics ATF936 and AXT914 are capable of attenuating enhanced cytosolic calcium signalling activity of CaSR mutations causing BS type 5 and ADH. Quinazolinone calcilytics might therefore offer a novel treatment option for patients with activating CaSR mutations. PMID:25506941

  10. Peak Pc Prediction in Conjunction Analysis: Conjunction Assessment Risk Analysis. Pc Behavior Prediction Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vallejo, J.J.; Hejduk, M.D.; Stamey, J. D.

    2015-01-01

    Satellite conjunction risk typically evaluated through the probability of collision (Pc). Considers both conjunction geometry and uncertainties in both state estimates. Conjunction events initially discovered through Joint Space Operations Center (JSpOC) screenings, usually seven days before Time of Closest Approach (TCA). However, JSpOC continues to track objects and issue conjunction updates. Changes in state estimate and reduced propagation time cause Pc to change as event develops. These changes a combination of potentially predictable development and unpredictable changes in state estimate covariance. Operationally useful datum: the peak Pc. If it can reasonably be inferred that the peak Pc value has passed, then risk assessment can be conducted against this peak value. If this value is below remediation level, then event intensity can be relaxed. Can the peak Pc location be reasonably predicted?

  11. Beware the PC Police.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheney, Lynne V.

    1992-01-01

    Decries the prevalence of "racism,""sexual harassment," and "speciesism" labels applied to supposed violators of "political correctness" (PC). When freedom of speech on college campuses is held hostage to political correctness, K-12 education is bound to be affected. This new brand of McCarthyism cheapens the concept of discrimination and stifles…

  12. Disease causing mutants of TDP-43 nucleic acid binding domains are resistant to aggregation and have increased stability and half-life

    PubMed Central

    Austin, James A.; Wright, Gareth S. A.; Watanabe, Seiji; Grossmann, J. Günter; Antonyuk, Svetlana V.; Yamanaka, Koji; Hasnain, S. Samar

    2014-01-01

    Over the last two decades many secrets of the age-related human neural proteinopathies have been revealed. A common feature of these diseases is abnormal, and possibly pathogenic, aggregation of specific proteins in the effected tissue often resulting from inherent or decreased structural stability. An archetype example of this is superoxide dismutase-1, the first genetic factor to be linked with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Mutant or posttranslationally modified TAR DNA binding protein-32 (TDP-43) is also strongly associated with ALS and an increasingly large number of other neurodegenerative diseases, including frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Cytoplasmic mislocalization and elevated half-life is a characteristic of mutant TDP-43. Furthermore, patient age at the onset of disease symptoms shows a good inverse correlation with mutant TDP-43 half-life. Here we show that ALS and FTLD-associated TDP-43 mutations in the central nucleic acid binding domains lead to elevated half-life and this is commensurate with increased thermal stability and inhibition of aggregation. It is achieved without impact on secondary, tertiary, or quaternary structure. We propose that tighter structural cohesion contributes to reduced protein turnover, increasingly abnormal proteostasis and, ultimately, faster onset of disease symptoms. These results contrast our perception of neurodegenerative diseases as misfolded proteinopathies and delineate a novel path from the molecular characteristics of mutant TDP-43 to aberrant cellular effects and patient phenotype. PMID:24591609

  13. Melanoma loss-of-function mutants in Xiphophorus caused by Xmrk-oncogene deletion and gene disruption by a transposable element.

    PubMed Central

    Schartl, M; Hornung, U; Gutbrod, H; Volff, J N; Wittbrodt, J

    1999-01-01

    The overexpression of the Xmrk oncogene (ONC-Xmrk) in pigment cells of certain Xiphophorus hybrids has been found to be the primary change that results in the formation of malignant melanoma. Spontaneous mutant stocks have been isolated that have lost the ability to induce tumor formation when crossed with Xiphophorus helleri. Two of these loss-of-function mutants were analyzed for genetic defects in ONC-Xmrk's. In the lof-1 mutant a novel transposable element, TX-1, has jumped into ONC-Xmrk, leading to a disruption of the gene and a truncated protein product lacking the carboxyterminal domain of the receptor tyrosine kinase. TX-1 is obviously an active LTR-containing retrotransposon in Xiphophorus that was not found in other fish species outside the family Poeciliidae. Surprisingly, it does not encode any protein, suggesting the existence of a helper function for this retroelement. In the lof-2 mutant the entire ONC-Xmrk gene was found to be deleted. These data show that ONC-Xmrk is indeed the tumor-inducing gene of Xiphophorus and thus the critical constituent of the tumor (Tu) locus. PMID:10545466

  14. Resistance Assessment for Oxathiapiprolin in Phytophthora capsici and the Detection of a Point Mutation (G769W) in PcORP1 that Confers Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Miao, Jianqiang; Cai, Meng; Dong, Xue; Liu, Li; Lin, Dong; Zhang, Can; Pang, Zhili; Liu, Xili

    2016-01-01

    The potential for oxathiapiprolin resistance in Phytophthora capsici was evaluated. The baseline sensitivities of 175 isolates to oxathiapiprolin were initially determinated and found to conform to a unimodal curve with a mean EC50 value of 5.61 × 10-4 μg/ml. Twelve stable oxathiapiprolin-resistant mutants were generated by fungicide adaptation in two sensitive isolates, LP3 and HNJZ10. The fitness of the LP3-mutants was found to be similar to or better than that of the parental isolate LP3, while the HNJZ10-mutants were found to have lost the capacity to produce zoospores. Taken together these results suggest that the risk of P. capsici developing resistance to oxathiapiprolin is moderate. Comparison of the PcORP1 genes in the LP3-mutants and wild-type parental isolate, which encode the target protein of oxathiapiprolin, revealed that a heterozygous mutation caused the amino acid substitution G769W. Transformation and expression of the mutated PcORP1-769W allele in the sensitive wild-type isolate BYA5 confirmed that the mutation in PcORP1 was responsible for the observed oxathiapiprolin resistance. Finally diagnostic tests including As-PCR and CAPs were developed to detect the oxathiapiprolin resistance resulting from the G769W point mutation in field populations of P. capsici. PMID:27199944

  15. The zebrafish early arrest mutants.

    PubMed

    Kane, D A; Maischein, H M; Brand, M; van Eeden, F J; Furutani-Seiki, M; Granato, M; Haffter, P; Hammerschmidt, M; Heisenberg, C P; Jiang, Y J; Kelsh, R N; Mullins, M C; Odenthal, J; Warga, R M; Nüsslein-Volhard, C

    1996-12-01

    This report describes mutants of the zebrafish having phenotypes causing a general arrest in early morphogenesis. These mutants identify a group of loci making up about 20% of the loci identified by mutants with visible morphological phenotypes within the first day of development. There are 12 Class I mutants, which fall into 5 complementation groups and have cells that lyse before morphological defects are observed. Mutants at three loci, speed bump, ogre and zombie, display abnormal nuclei. The 8 Class II mutants, which fall into 6 complementation groups, arrest development before cell lysis is observed. These mutants seemingly stop development in the late segmentation stages, and maintain a body shape similar to a 20 hour embryo. Mutations in speed bump, ogre, zombie, specter, poltergeist and troll were tested for cell lethality by transplanting mutant cells into wild-type hosts. With poltergeist, transplanted mutant cells all survive. The remainder of the mutants tested were autonomously but conditionally lethal: mutant cells, most of which lyse, sometimes survive to become notochord, muscles, or, in rare cases, large neurons, all cell types which become postmitotic in the gastrula. Some of the genes of the early arrest group may be necessary for progression though the cell cycle; if so, the survival of early differentiating cells may be based on having their terminal mitosis before the zygotic requirement for these genes. PMID:9007229

  16. slender rice, a constitutive gibberellin response mutant, is caused by a null mutation of the SLR1 gene, an ortholog of the height-regulating gene GAI/RGA/RHT/D8.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, A; Ueguchi-Tanaka, M; Sonoda, Y; Kitano, H; Koshioka, M; Futsuhara, Y; Matsuoka, M; Yamaguchi, J

    2001-05-01

    The rice slender mutant (slr1-1) is caused by a single recessive mutation and results in a constitutive gibberellin (GA) response phenotype. The mutant elongates as if saturated with GAs. In this mutant, (1) elongation was unaffected by an inhibitor of GA biosynthesis, (2) GA-inducible alpha-amylase was produced by the aleurone layers without gibberellic acid application, and (3) endogenous GA content was lower than in the wild-type plant. These results indicate that the product of the SLR1 gene is an intermediate of the GA signal transduction pathway. SLR1 maps to OsGAI in rice and has significant homology with height-regulating genes, such as RHT-1Da in wheat, D8 in maize, and GAI and RGA in Arabidopsis. The GAI gene family is likely to encode transcriptional factors belonging to the GRAS gene superfamily. DNA sequence analysis revealed that the slr1-1 mutation is a single basepair deletion of the nuclear localization signal domain, resulting in a frameshift mutation that abolishes protein production. Furthermore, introduction of a 6-kb genomic DNA fragment containing the wild-type SLR1 gene into the slr1-1 mutant restored GA sensitivity to normal. These results indicate that the slr1-1 mutant is caused by a loss-of-function mutation of the SLR1 gene, which is an ortholog of GAI, RGA, RHT, and D8. We also succeeded in producing GA-insensitive dwarf rice by transforming wild-type rice with a modified SLR1 gene construct that has a 17-amino acid deletion affecting the DELLA region. Thus, we demonstrate opposite GA response phenotypes depending on the type of mutations in SLR1.

  17. Rer1 and calnexin regulate endoplasmic reticulum retention of a peripheral myelin protein 22 mutant that causes type 1A Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Taichi; Hashimoto, Yukiko; Akuzawa, Tomoko; Hirai, Rika; Kobayashi, Hisae; Sato, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) resides in the plasma membrane and is required for myelin formation in the peripheral nervous system. Many PMP22 mutants accumulate in excess in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and lead to the inherited neuropathies of Charcot-Marie-Tooth (CMT) disease. However, the mechanism through which PMP22 mutants accumulate in the ER is unknown. Here, we studied the quality control mechanisms for the PMP22 mutants L16P and G150D, which were originally identified in mice and patients with CMT. We found that the ER-localised ubiquitin ligase Hrd1/SYVN1 mediates ER-associated degradation (ERAD) of PMP22(L16P) and PMP22(G150D), and another ubiquitin ligase, gp78/AMFR, mediates ERAD of PMP22(G150D) as well. We also found that PMP22(L16P), but not PMP22(G150D), is partly released from the ER by loss of Rer1, which is a Golgi-localised sorting receptor for ER retrieval. Rer1 interacts with the wild-type and mutant forms of PMP22. Interestingly, release of PMP22(L16P) from the ER was more prominent with simultaneous knockdown of Rer1 and the ER-localised chaperone calnexin than with the knockdown of each gene. These results suggest that CMT disease-related PMP22(L16P) is trapped in the ER by calnexin-dependent ER retention and Rer1-mediated early Golgi retrieval systems and partly degraded by the Hrd1-mediated ERAD system. PMID:25385046

  18. A novel tomato mutant, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit1 (Slelf1), exhibits an elongated fruit shape caused by increased cell layers in the proximal region of the ovary.

    PubMed

    Chusreeaeom, Katarut; Ariizumi, Tohru; Asamizu, Erika; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Shirasawa, Kenta; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2014-06-01

    Genes controlling fruit morphology offer important insights into patterns and mechanisms determining organ shape and size. In cultivated tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.), a variety of fruit shapes are displayed, including round-, bell pepper-, pear-, and elongate-shaped forms. In this study, we characterized a tomato mutant possessing elongated fruit morphology by histologically analyzing its fruit structure and genetically analyzing and mapping the genetic locus. The mutant line, Solanum lycopersicum elongated fruit 1 (Slelf1), was selected in a previous study from an ethylmethane sulfonate-mutagenized population generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf and rapid-growth variety. Histological analysis of the Slelf1 mutant revealed dramatically increased elongation of ovary and fruit. Until 6 days before flowering, ovaries were round and they began to elongate afterward. We also determined pericarp thickness and the number of cell layers in three designated fruit regions. We found that mesocarp thickness, as well as the number of cell layers, was increased in the proximal region of immature green fruits, making this the key sector of fruit elongation. Using 262 F2 individuals derived from a cross between Slelf1 and the cultivar Ailsa Craig, we constructed a genetic map, simple sequence repeat (SSR), cleaved amplified polymorphism sequence (CAPS), and derived CAPS (dCAPS) markers and mapped to the 12 tomato chromosomes. Genetic mapping placed the candidate gene locus within a 0.2 Mbp interval on the long arm of chromosome 8 and was likely different from previously known loci affecting fruit shape. PMID:24519535

  19. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frédérique; Buchholz, Franziska; Le Crom, Stéphane; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Austerlitz, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V; Baker, Scott E; Margeot, Antoine; et al

    2015-04-20

    Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a.

  20. A targeted deletion/insertion in the mouse Pcsk1 locus is associated with homozygous embryo preimplantation lethality, mutant allele preferential transmission and heterozygous female susceptibility to dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Mbikay, Majambu; Croissandeau, Gilles; Sirois, Francine; Anini, Younes; Mayne, Janice; Seidah, Nabil G; Chrétien, Michel

    2007-06-15

    Proprotein convertase 1 (PC1) is a neuroendocrine proteinase involved in the proteolytic activation of precursors to hormones and neuropeptides. To determine the physiological importance of PC1, we produced a mutant mouse from embryonic stem cells in which its locus (Pcsk1) had been inactivated by homologous recombination. The inactivating mutation consisted of a 32.7-kb internal deletion and a 1.8 kb insertion of the bacterial neomycin resistance gene (neo) under the mouse phosphoglycerate kinase 1 protein (PGKneo). Intercross of Pcsk1(+/-) mice produced no Pcsk1(-/-) offspring or blastocysts; in addition, more than 80% of the offspring were Pcsk1(+/-). These observations suggested that the mutation caused preimplantation lethality of homozygous embryos and preferential transmission of the mutant allele. Interestingly, RT-PCR analysis on RNA from endocrine tissues from Pcsk1(+/-) mice revealed the presence of aberrant transcripts specifying the N-terminal half of the PC1 propeptide fused to neo gene product. Mass spectrometric profiles of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in the anterior pituitary were similar between Pcsk1(+/-) and Pcsk1(+/+) mice, but significantly different between male and female mice of the same genotype. Relative to their wild-type counterparts, female mutant mice exhibited stunted growth under a low fat diet, and catch-up growth under a high-fat diet. The complex phenotype exhibited by this Pcsk1 mutant mouse model may be due to PC1 deficiency aggravated by expression of aberrant gene products from the mutant allele. PMID:17490633

  1. Human Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) overexpression in mice causes mitochondrial vacuolization, axonal degeneration, and premature motoneuron death and accelerates motoneuron disease in mice expressing a familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mutant SOD1.

    PubMed

    Jaarsma, D; Haasdijk, E D; Grashorn, J A; Hawkins, R; van Duijn, W; Verspaget, H W; London, J; Holstege, J C

    2000-12-01

    Cytosolic Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) is a ubiquitous small cytosolic metalloenzyme that catalyzes the conversion of superoxide anion to hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)). Mutations in the SOD1 gene cause a familial form of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS). The mechanism by which mutant SOD1s causes ALS is not understood. Transgenic mice expressing multiple copies of fALS-mutant SOD1s develop an ALS-like motoneuron disease resembling ALS. Here we report that transgenic mice expressing a high concentration of wild-type human SOD1 (hSOD1(WT)) develop an array of neurodegenerative changes consisting of (1) swelling and vacuolization of mitochondria, predominantly in axons in the spinal cord, brain stem, and subiculum; (2) axonal degeneration in a number of long fiber tracts, predominantly the spinocerebellar tracts; and (3) at 2 years of age, a moderate loss of spinal motoneurons. Parallel to the development of neurodegenerative changes, hSOD1(WT) mice also develop mild motor abnormalities. Interestingly, mitochondrial vacuolization was associated with accumulation of hSOD1 immunoreactivity, suggesting that the development of mitochondrial pathology is associated with disturbed SOD1 turnover. In this study we also crossed hSOD1(WT) mice with a line of fALS-mutant SOD1 mice (hSOD1(G93A)) to generate "double" transgenic mice that express high levels of both wild-type and G93A mutant hSOD1. The "double" transgenic mice show accelerated motoneuron death, earlier onset of paresis, and earlier death as compared with hSOD1(G93A) littermates. Thus in vivo expression of high levels of wild-type hSOD1 is not only harmful to neurons in itself, but also increases or facilitates the deleterious action of a fALS-mutant SOD1. Our data indicate that it is important for motoneurons to control the SOD1 concentration throughout their processes, and that events that lead to improper synthesis, transport, or breakdown of SOD1 causing its accumulation are potentially dangerous.

  2. GFI - EASY PC GRAPHICS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, R. B.

    1994-01-01

    Easy PC Graphics (GFI) is a graphical plot program that permits data to be easily and flexibly plotted. Data is input in a standard format which allows easy data entry and evaluation. Multiple dependent axes are also supported. The program may either be run in a stand alone mode or be embedded in the user's own software. Automatic scaling is built in for several logarithmic and decibel scales. New scales are easily incorporated into the code through the use of object-oriented programming techniques. For the autoscale routines and the actual plotting code, data is not retrieved directly from a file, but a "method" delivers the data, performing scaling as appropriate. Each object (variable) has state information which selects its own scaling. GFI is written in Turbo Pascal version 6.0 for IBM PC compatible computers running MS-DOS. The source code will only compile properly with the Turbo Pascal v. 6.0 or v. 7.0 compilers; however, an executable is provided on the distribution disk. This executable requires at least 64K of RAM and DOS 3.1 or higher, as well as an HP LaserJet printer to print output plots. The standard distribution medium for this program is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. An electronic copy of the documentation is provided on the distribution medium in ASCII format. GFI was developed in 1993.

  3. Distinct chaperone mechanisms can delay the formation of aggresomes by the myopathy-causing R120G alphaB-crystallin mutant.

    PubMed

    Chávez Zobel, Aura T; Loranger, Anne; Marceau, Normand; Thériault, Jimmy R; Lambert, Herman; Landry, Jacques

    2003-07-01

    A familial form of desmin-related myopathy (DRM) is associated with a missense mutation (R120G) in alphaB-crystallin (alphaB) and is characterized by intracellular desmin aggregation. Because alphaB is a molecular chaperone that participates in the assembly of desmin filaments, it has been suggested that the desmin aggregation might be due to the loss of alphaB function. We report here that alphaBR120G has indeed impaired in vivo function and structure as reflected by a highly reduced capacity to protect cells against heat shock and by an abnormal supramolecular organization even in cells not expressing desmin. In many cells, alphaBR120G accumulated in inclusion bodies that had characteristics of aggresomes concentrating around the centrosome following a microtubule-facilitated process. Three distinct chaperone mechanisms could reduce or even prevent the formation of the alphaBR120G aggresomes. Wild-type alphaB and Hsp27 prevented aggresome formation by co-oligomerizing with alphaBR120G. Hsp70 with its co-chaperone Hdj-1 or Chip-1 but not a mutant of Chip-1 lacking ubiquitin ligase activity, reduced the frequency of aggresome formation likely by targeting alphaBR120G for degradation. Finally, HspB8 interacted only transiently with alphaB but nonetheless rescued the alphaBR120G oligomeric organization, suggesting that it acted as a true chaperone assisting in the folding of the mutant protein. Hence, the formation of inclusion bodies in alphaBR120G-mediated DRM is probably due to the misfolding of alphaBR120G per se and can be delayed or prevented by expression of the wild type alphaB allele or other molecular chaperones, thereby explaining the adult onset of the disease.

  4. A Distorted Circadian Clock Causes Early Flowering and Temperature-Dependent Variation in Spike Development in the Eps-3Am Mutant of Einkorn Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Gawroński, Piotr; Ariyadasa, Ruvini; Himmelbach, Axel; Poursarebani, Naser; Kilian, Benjamin; Stein, Nils; Steuernagel, Burkhard; Hensel, Goetz; Kumlehn, Jochen; Sehgal, Sunish Kumar; Gill, Bikram S.; Gould, Peter; Hall, Anthony; Schnurbusch, Thorsten

    2014-01-01

    Viable circadian clocks help organisms to synchronize their development with daily and seasonal changes, thereby providing both evolutionary fitness and advantage from an agricultural perspective. A high-resolution mapping approach combined with mutant analysis revealed a cereal ortholog of Arabidopsis thaliana LUX ARRHYTHMO/PHYTOCLOCK 1 (LUX/PCL1) as a promising candidate for the earliness per se 3 (Eps-3Am) locus in einkorn wheat (Triticum monococcum L.). Using delayed fluorescence measurements it was shown that Eps-3Am containing einkorn wheat accession KT3-5 had a distorted circadian clock. The hypothesis was subsequently confirmed by performing a time course study on central and output circadian clock genes, which showed arrhythmic transcript patterns in KT3-5 under constant ambient conditions, i.e., constant light and temperature. It was also demonstrated that variation in spikelet number between wild-type and mutants is sensitive to temperature, becoming negligible at 25°. These observations lead us to propose that the distorted clock is causative for both early flowering and variation in spike size and spikelet number, and that having a dysfunctional LUX could have neutral, or even positive, effects in warmer climates. To test the latter hypothesis we ascertained sequence variation of LUX in a range of wheat germplasm. We observed a higher variation in the LUX sequence among accessions coming from the warmer climate and a unique in-frame mutation in early-flowering Chinese T. turgidum cultivar ‘Tsing Hua no. 559.’ Our results emphasize the importance of the circadian clock in temperate cereals as a promising target for adaptation to new environments. PMID:24443443

  5. Liver tumor formation by a mutant retinoblastoma protein in the transgenic mice is caused by an upregulation of c-Myc target genes

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bo; Hikosaka, Keisuke; Sultana, Nishat; Sharkar, Mohammad Tofael Kabir; Noritake, Hidenao; Kimura, Wataru; Wu, Yi-Xin; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Uezato, Tadayoshi; Miura, Naoyuki

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fifty percent of the mutant Rb transgenic mice produced liver tumors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the tumor, Foxm1, Skp2, Bmi1 and AP-1 mRNAs were up-regulated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer No increase in expression of the Myc-target genes was observed in the non-tumorous liver. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tumor formation depends on up-regulation of the Myc-target genes. -- Abstract: The retinoblastoma (Rb) tumor suppressor encodes a nuclear phosphoprotein that regulates cellular proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. In order to adapt itself to these biological functions, Rb is subjected to modification cycle, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. To directly determine the effect of phosphorylation-resistant Rb on liver development and function, we generated transgenic mice expressing phosphorylation-resistant human mutant Rb (mt-Rb) under the control of the rat hepatocyte nuclear factor-1 gene promoter/enhancer. Expression of mt-Rb in the liver resulted in macroscopic neoplastic nodules (adenomas) with {approx}50% incidence within 15 months old. Interestingly, quantitative reverse transcriptase-PCR analysis showed that c-Myc was up-regulated in the liver of mt-Rb transgenic mice irrespective of having tumor tissues or no tumor. In tumor tissues, several c-Myc target genes, Foxm1, c-Jun, c-Fos, Bmi1 and Skp2, were also up-regulated dramatically. We determined whether mt-Rb activated the Myc promoter in the HTP9 cells and demonstrated that mt-Rb acted as an inhibitor of wild-type Rb-induced repression on the Myc promoter. Our results suggest that continued upregulation of c-Myc target genes promotes the liver tumor formation after about 1 year of age.

  6. A study of the K(+)-site mutant of ascorbate peroxidase: mutations of protein residues on the proximal side of the heme cause changes in iron ligation on the distal side.

    PubMed

    Cheek, J; Mandelman, D; Poulos, T L; Dawson, J H

    1999-02-01

    A series of ferric and ferrous derivatives of wild-type ascorbate peroxidase (APX) and of an engineered K(+)-site mutant of APX that has had its potassium cation binding site removed have been examined by electronic absorption and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopy at 4 degrees C. Wild-type ferric APX has spectroscopic properties that are very similar to those of ferric cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP) and likely exists primarily as a five-coordinate high-spin heme ligated on the proximal side by a histidine at pH 7. There is also evidence for minority contributions from six-coordinate high- and low-spin species (histidine-water, histidine-hydroxide, and bis-histidine). The K(+)-site mutant of APX varies considerably in the electronic absorption and MCD spectra in both the ferric and ferrous states when compared with spectra of the wild-type APX. The electronic absorption and MCD spectra of the engineered K(+)-site APX mutant are essentially identical to those of cytochrome b5, a known bis-imidazole (histidine) ligated heme system. It therefore appears that the K(+)-site mutant of APX has undergone a conformational change to yield a bis-histidine coordination structure in both the ferric and ferrous oxidation states at neutral pH. This conformational change is the result of mutagenesis of the protein to remove the K(+)-binding site which is located approximately 8 A from the peroxide binding pocket. Thus, mutations of protein residues on the proximal side of the heme cause changes in iron ligation on the distal side. PMID:10499104

  7. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation.

  8. PC index and magnetic substorms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander; Sormakov, Dmitry; Podorozhkina, Nataly

    PC index is regarded as a proxy of the solar wind energy that entered into the magnetosphere as distinct from the AL and Dst indices, which are regarded as characteristics of the energy that realize in the magnetosphere in form of substorm and magnetic storms. This conclusion is based on results of analysis of relationships between the polar cap magnetic activity (PC-index) and parameters of the solar wind, on the one hand, relationships between changes of PC and development of magnetospheric substorms (AL-index) and magnetic storms (Dst-index), on the other hand. This paper describes in detail the following main results which demonstrate a strong connection between the behavior of PC and development of magnetic disturbances in the auroral zone: (1) magnetic substorms are preceded by the РС index growth (isolated and extended substorms) or long period of stationary PC (postponed substorms), (2) the substorm sudden onsets are definitely related to such PC signatures as leap and reverse, which are indicative of sharp increase of the PC growth rate, (3) substorms generally start to develop when the PC index exceeds the threshold level ~ 1.5±0.5 mV/m, irrespective of the substorm growth phase duration and type of substorm, (4) linear dependency of AL values on PC is typical of all substorm events irrespective of type and intensity of substorm.

  9. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of black caraway seeds, causes G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells with mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kimberly M; Greenshields, Anna L; Hoskin, David W

    2014-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) from black caraway seeds has several anticancer activities; however, its effect on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells that lack functional tumor suppressor p53 is not known. Here, we explored the growth inhibitory effect of TQ on 2 TNBC cell lines with mutant p53. Cell metabolism assays showed that TQ inhibited TNBC cell growth without affecting normal cell growth. Flow cytometric analyses of TQ-treated TNBC cells showed G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Western blots of lysates from TQ-treated TNBC cells showed cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor in the cytoplasm, as well as caspase-9 activation consistent with the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Caspase-8 was also activated in TQ-treated TNBC cells, although the mechanism of activation is not clear at this time. Importantly, TQ-induced apoptosis was only partially inhibited by zVAD-fmk, indicating a role for caspase-independent effector molecules. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and increased γH2AX, as well as reduced Akt phosphorylation and decreased expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, were evident in TQ-treated cells. Finally, TQ enhanced cisplatin- and docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that TQ could be useful in the management of TNBC, even when functional p53 is absent.

  10. Thymoquinone, a bioactive component of black caraway seeds, causes G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in triple-negative breast cancer cells with mutant p53.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Kimberly M; Greenshields, Anna L; Hoskin, David W

    2014-01-01

    Thymoquinone (TQ) from black caraway seeds has several anticancer activities; however, its effect on triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells that lack functional tumor suppressor p53 is not known. Here, we explored the growth inhibitory effect of TQ on 2 TNBC cell lines with mutant p53. Cell metabolism assays showed that TQ inhibited TNBC cell growth without affecting normal cell growth. Flow cytometric analyses of TQ-treated TNBC cells showed G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis characterized by the loss of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Western blots of lysates from TQ-treated TNBC cells showed cytochrome c and apoptosis-inducing factor in the cytoplasm, as well as caspase-9 activation consistent with the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Caspase-8 was also activated in TQ-treated TNBC cells, although the mechanism of activation is not clear at this time. Importantly, TQ-induced apoptosis was only partially inhibited by zVAD-fmk, indicating a role for caspase-independent effector molecules. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage and increased γH2AX, as well as reduced Akt phosphorylation and decreased expression of X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis, were evident in TQ-treated cells. Finally, TQ enhanced cisplatin- and docetaxel-induced cytotoxicity. These findings suggest that TQ could be useful in the management of TNBC, even when functional p53 is absent. PMID:24579801

  11. Further characterization of scrapie replication in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Rubenstein, R; Scalici, C L; Papini, M C; Callahan, S M; Carp, R I

    1990-04-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12, undergoes neuron-like morphological, biochemical and electrophysiological differentiation, in the presence of low concentrations of nerve growth factor (NGF). NGF-treated PC12 cells have been shown previously to support 139A scrapie agent replication. In the present report we extended these findings and analysed the cellular conditions necessary for agent replication. Following the infection of differentiated PC12 cells, scrapie replicated to relatively high titres as determined by an incubation period assay. The removal of NGF, which causes the gradual dedifferentiation of PC12 cells, resulted in the inability of scrapie to replicate. The scrapie infectivity detected in PC12 cultures is cell-associated and not released into the medium. Cells in infected cultures did not show any change in morphology when compared to cells in mock-infected cultures. Titration studies of scrapie infectivity in PC12 cells have indicated that up to 4 LD50 units per cell can be obtained although a yield of 1 LD50 per cell was more common. Using an approximate m.o.i. of 1, only differentiated PC12 cells supported 139A scrapie agent replication when compared to two other differentiated, neuronal cell types, indicating that PC12 cells are more susceptible to agent replication. These studies support further the suitability of using differentiated PC12 cells as an in vitro model to study scrapie agent replication.

  12. Wanted: A Solid, Reliable PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    This article discusses PC reliability, one of the most pressing issues regarding computers. Nearly a quarter century after the introduction of the first IBM PC and the outset of the personal computer revolution, PCs have largely become commodities, with little differentiating one brand from another in terms of capability and performance. Most of…

  13. NASA PC software evaluation project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Kuan, Julie C.

    1986-01-01

    The USL NASA PC software evaluation project is intended to provide a structured framework for facilitating the development of quality NASA PC software products. The project will assist NASA PC development staff to understand the characteristics and functions of NASA PC software products. Based on the results of the project teams' evaluations and recommendations, users can judge the reliability, usability, acceptability, maintainability and customizability of all the PC software products. The objective here is to provide initial, high-level specifications and guidelines for NASA PC software evaluation. The primary tasks to be addressed in this project are as follows: to gain a strong understanding of what software evaluation entails and how to organize a structured software evaluation process; to define a structured methodology for conducting the software evaluation process; to develop a set of PC software evaluation criteria and evaluation rating scales; and to conduct PC software evaluations in accordance with the identified methodology. Communication Packages, Network System Software, Graphics Support Software, Environment Management Software, General Utilities. This report represents one of the 72 attachment reports to the University of Southwestern Louisiana's Final Report on NASA Grant NGT-19-010-900. Accordingly, appropriate care should be taken in using this report out of context of the full Final Report.

  14. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frederique; Buchholz, Franziska; Le Crom, Stphane; Martin, Joel X.; Schackwitz, Wendy; Austerlitz, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Baker, Scott E.; Margeot, Antoine; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P.

    2015-12-01

    Background: Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a. Results: In QM9136, we detected a surprisingly low number of mutagenic events in the promoter and coding regions of genes, i.e. only eight indels and six single nucleotide variants. One of these indels led to a frame-shift in the Zn2Cys6 transcription factor XYR1, the general regulator of cellulase and xylanase expression, and resulted in its C-terminal truncation by 140 amino acids. Retransformation of strain QM9136 with the wild-type xyr1 allele fully recovered the ability to produce cellulases, and is thus the reason for the cellulase-negative phenotype. Introduction of an engineered xyr1 allele containing the truncating point mutation into the moderate producer T. reesei QM9414 rendered this strain also cellulase-negative. The correspondingly truncated XYR1 protein was still able to enter the nucleus, but failed to be expressed over the basal constitutive level. Conclusion: The missing 140 C-terminal amino acids of XYR1 are therefore responsible for its previously observed auto-regulation which is essential for cellulases to be expressed. Our data present a working example of the use of genome sequencing leading to a functional explanation of the QM9136 cellulase-negative phenotype.

  15. Identification of eight new mutations in familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus supports the concept that defective folding of the mutant provasopressin-neurophysin causes the disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rittig, S.; Siggaard, C.; Pedersen, E.B.

    1994-09-01

    Familial neurogenic diabetes insipidus (FNDI) is an autosomal dominant disorder with a uniform phenotype characterized by polyuria, polydipsia and a severe deficiency of arginine vasopressin (AVP). These abnormalities develop postnatally and appear to be due to progressive degeneration of AVP producing neurons. Previous studies in 8 FNDI kindreds have identified 5 different mutations in the gene that codes for the AVP-neurophysin (NP) precursor, AVP-NP. Four kindreds had the same missense mutation in the part of exon 1 that codes for the C-terminal amino acid of the signal peptide (SP). The other 4 had different missense mutations or a codon deletion in exon 2 which codes for the highly conserved part of NP. In the present study, the AVP-NP genes from 8 other kindreds with FNDI were sequenced bidirectionally using sequence and single-stranded DNA amplified by PCR with biotinylated primers flanking each of the 3 exons. We find that each of the 8 kindreds has a different, previously unreported mutation in either the SP coding part of exon 1, in exon 2 or in the variable, NP-coding part of exon 3. Combining these 8 new mutations with the 5 described previously reveals a distribution pattern that corresponds closely to the domains involved in the mutually interactive processes of AVP binding, folding and dimerization of NP. Based on these findings and the clinical features of FNDI, we postulate that the precursors produced by the mutant alleles are cytotoxic because they do not fold or dimerize properly for subsequent packaging and processing.

  16. [Studies on the mechanism of thermostability and thermophilicity change of thermostable alkaline phosphatase and its mutants].

    PubMed

    Yu, Feng; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Jin, Zhe

    2003-07-01

    The relationship among the substituted amino acids, the 3D structure simulated on PC through CPHmodels Server ( http://www.cbs.dtu. dk/services/CPHmodels/) and the thermostable performance of 4 thermostable alkaline phosphatase(TAP) mutants selected from a clone bank of more than 200 mutants were analyzed to explore the mechanism of thermostability change. These mutants are TAP(A410T) (A410-->T), TAP(P396S) (P396-->S), TAP2(N100S T320-->I) and TAP4(N100-->S P396-->S A410 -->V P490-->S). TAP and the mutants' thermostable performance was evaluated by measuring the highest tolerable temperature (T1/2) and the optimal reaction temperature (Topt). The 3D structure neighboring the substituted amino acids was simulated by Swiss-PDBViewer to observe the relationship between the structure change and the thermostable performance of TAP and its mutants. The results displayed that all these amino acid substitutions except the T320-->I mutant brought about only a little local change on TAP's 3D structure and very little effect on their optimal reaction temperature, but a significant decrease (nearly 10 degrees C) on their highest tolerable temperature. However, the T320-->I mutation due to close to TAP's active sites did bring about a significant descendents of the mutant in both the highest tolerable temperature and the optimal reaction temperature. Thus, it seems to be able to conclude that most of the amino acid substitutions, no matter where they locate and what structure change they may make, can cause TAP's highest tolerable temperature reduced significantly. What's more, if the mutation occurring near or in the active sites, it can also cause TAP's optimal reaction temperature reduced significantly at the same time.

  17. Activation of Rac1-dependent redox signaling is critically involved in staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Du Sik; An, Jeong Mi; Lee, Han Gil; Seo, Su Ryeon; Kim, Seon Sook; Kim, Ju Yeon; Kang, Jeong Wan; Bae, Yun Soo; Seo, Jeong Taeg

    2013-02-01

    Staurosporine, a non-specific protein kinase inhibitor, has been shown to induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells, but the mechanism by which staurosporine induces neurite outgrowth is still obscure. In the present study, we investigated whether the activation of Rac1 was responsible for the neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. Staurosporine caused rapid neurite outgrowth independent of the ERK signaling pathways. In contrast, neurite outgrowth in response to staurosporine was accompanied by activation of Rac1, and the Rac1 inhibitor NSC23766 attenuated the staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, suppression of Rac1 activity by expression of the dominant negative mutant Rac1N17 also blocked the staurosporine-induced morphological differentiation of PC12 cells. Staurosporine caused an activation of NADPH oxidase and increased the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which was prevented by NSC23766 and diphenyleneiodonium (DPI), an NADPH oxidase inhibitor. Staurosporine-induced neurite outgrowth was attenuated by pretreatment with DPI and exogenous addition of sublethal concentration of H2O2 accelerated neurite outgrowth triggered by staurosporine. These results indicate that activation of Rac1, which leads to ROS generation, is required for neurite outgrowth induced by staurosporine in PC12 cells.

  18. A shutoff and exonuclease mutant of murine gammaherpesvirus-68 yields infectious virus and causes RNA loss in type I interferon receptor knockout cells.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Victoria; Polychronopoulos, Louise; Dutia, Bernadette M; Ebrahimi, Bahram

    2014-05-01

    Significant loss of RNA followed by severely reduced cellular protein pool, a phenomenon termed host shutoff, is associated with a number of lytic virus infections and is a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Until recently, viral DNA exonucleases were associated only with processing of viral genomic DNA and its encapsidation. However, recent observations have identified host shutoff and exonuclease function for the highly conserved viral exonucleases in γ-herpesviruses, which include Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus and the mouse model murine gammaherpesvirus-68, also referred to as MHV-68. In this study, we show that although ablation of the MHV-68 exonuclease ORF37 caused a restrictive phenotype in WT IFN-α/β receptor-positive cells such as NIH 3T3, lack of ORF37 was tolerated in cells lacking the IFN-α/β receptor: the ORF37Stop virus was capable of forming infectious particles and caused loss of mRNA in IFN-α/β receptor knockout cells. Moreover, ORF37Stop virus was able to establish lytic infection in the lungs of mice lacking the IFN-α/β receptor. These observations provide evidence that lytic MHV-68 infection and subsequent loss of mRNA can take place independently of ORF37. Moreover, efficient growth of ORF37Stop virus also identifies a role for this family of viral nucleases in providing a window of opportunity for virus growth by overcoming type I IFN-dependent responses.

  19. CACNA1H(M1549V) Mutant Calcium Channel Causes Autonomous Aldosterone Production in HAC15 Cells and Is Inhibited by Mibefradil.

    PubMed

    Reimer, Esther N; Walenda, Gudrun; Seidel, Eric; Scholl, Ute I

    2016-08-01

    We recently demonstrated that a recurrent gain-of-function mutation in a T-type calcium channel, CACNA1H(M1549V), causes a novel Mendelian disorder featuring early-onset primary aldosteronism and hypertension. This variant was found independently in five families. CACNA1H(M1549V) leads to impaired channel inactivation and activation at more hyperpolarized potentials, inferred to cause increased calcium entry. We here aimed to study the effect of this variant on aldosterone production. We heterologously expressed empty vector, CACNA1H(WT) and CACNA1H(M1549V) in the aldosterone-producing adrenocortical cancer cell line H295R and its subclone HAC15. Transfection rates, expression levels, and subcellular distribution of the channel were similar between CACNA1H(WT) and CACNA1H(M1549V). We measured aldosterone production by an ELISA and CYP11B2 (aldosterone synthase) expression by real-time PCR. In unstimulated cells, transfection of CACNA1H(WT) led to a 2-fold increase in aldosterone levels compared with vector-transfected cells. Expression of CACNA1H(M1549V) caused a 7-fold increase in aldosterone levels. Treatment with angiotensin II or increased extracellular potassium levels further stimulated aldosterone production in both CACNA1H(WT)- and CACNA1H(M1549V)-transfected cells. Similar results were obtained for CYP11B2 expression. Inhibition of CACNA1H channels with the T-type calcium channel blocker Mibefradil completely abrogated the effects of CACNA1H(WT) and CACNA1H(M1549V) on CYP11B2 expression. These results directly link CACNA1H(M1549V) to increased aldosterone production. They suggest that calcium channel blockers may be beneficial in the treatment of a subset of patients with primary aldosteronism. Such blockers could target CACNA1H or both CACNA1H and the L-type calcium channel CACNA1D that is also expressed in the adrenal gland and mutated in patients with primary aldosteronism.

  20. AMD3100 is a potent antagonist at CXCR4R334X, a hyperfunctional mutant chemokine receptor and cause of WHIM syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, David H; Lopez, Joseph; Deng, Francis; Liu, Qian; Ojode, Teresa; Chen, Haoqian; Ulrick, Jean; Kwatemaa, Nana; Kelly, Corin; Anaya-O’Brien, Sandra; Garofalo, Mary; Marquesen, Martha; Hilligoss, Dianne; DeCastro, Rosamma; Malech, Harry L; Murphy, Philip M

    2011-01-01

    WHIM is an acronym for a rare immunodeficiency syndrome (OMIM #193670) caused by autosomal dominant mutations truncating the C-terminus of the chemokine receptor CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4). WHIM mutations may potentiate CXCR4 signalling, suggesting that the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved CXCR4 antagonist AnorMED3100 (AMD3100) (also known as Plerixafor) may be beneficial in WHIM syndrome. We have tested this at the preclinical level by comparing Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and K562 cell lines matched for expression of recombinant wild-type CXCR4 (CXCR4WT) and the most common WHIM variant of CXCR4 (CXCR4R334X), as well as leucocytes from a WHIM patient with the CXCR4R334X mutation versus healthy controls. We found that CXCR4R334X mediated modestly increased signalling (∼2-fold) in all functional assays tested, but strongly resisted ligand-dependent down-regulation. AMD3100 was equipotent and equieffective as an antagonist at CXCR4R334X and CXCR4WT. Together, our data provide further evidence that CXCR4R334X is a gain-of-function mutation, and support clinical evaluation of AMD3100 as mechanism-based treatment in patients with WHIM syndrome. PMID:21070597

  1. Polymorphic human (CTAT)n microsatellite provides a conserved linkage marker for mouse mutants causing cleft palate, vestibular defects, obesity and ataxia

    SciTech Connect

    Griffith, A.J.; Burgess, D.L.; Kohrman, D.

    1994-09-01

    The Twirler mutation (Tw) causing cleft palate {plus_minus} cleft lip, vestibular defects and obesity is located within 0.5 cM of an ataxia locus (ax) on mouse chromosome 18. We identified a transgene-induced insertional mutation with vestibular and craniofacial defects that appears to be a new allele of Twirler. Mouse DNA flanking the transgene insertion site was isolated from a cosmid library. An evolutionarily conserved, zoo blot positive cosmid subclone was used to probe a human {lambda} genomic library. From the sequence of a highly homologous human {lambda} clone, we designed STS primers and screened a human P1 library. DNA from two positive P1 clones was hybridized with simple sequence probes, and a (CTAT){sub 12} repeat was detected. Analysis of 62 CEPH parents with primers flanking the repeat identified six alleles containing 9 to 14 copies of the repeat, at frequencies of 0.17, 0.17, 0.17, 0.27, 0.15 and 0.07, respectively. The observed heterozygosity was 49/62 with a calculated PIC value of 0.76. This polymorphic microsatellite marker, designated Umi3, was mapped to the predicted conserved human linkage group by analysis of somatic cell hybrid panels. The anticipated short distance between Umi3 and the disease genes will facilitate detection of linkage in small families. We would like to type appropriate human pedigrees with Umi3 in order to identify patients with inherited disorders homologous to the mouse mutations Twirler and ataxia.

  2. The rice StMADS11-like genes OsMADS22 and OsMADS47 cause floral reversions in Arabidopsis without complementing the svp and agl24 mutants

    PubMed Central

    Fornara, Fabio; Gregis, Veronica; Pelucchi, Nilla; Colombo, Lucia; Kater, Martin

    2008-01-01

    During floral induction and flower development plants undergo delicate phase changes which are under tight molecular control. MADS-box transcription factors have been shown to play pivotal roles during these transition phases. SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP) and AGAMOUS LIKE 24 (AGL24) are important regulators both during the transition to flowering and during flower development. During vegetative growth they exert opposite roles on floral transition, acting as repressor and promoter of flowering, respectively. Later during flower development they act redundantly as negative regulators of AG expression. In rice, the orthologues of SVP and AGL24 are OsMADS22, OsMADS47, and OsMADS55 and these three genes are involved in the negative regulation of brassinosteroid responses. In order to understand whether these rice genes have maintained the ability to function as regulators of flowering time in Arabidopsis, complementation tests were performed by expressing OsMADS22 and OsMADS47 in the svp and agl24 mutants. The results show that the rice genes are not able to complement the flowering-time phenotype of the Arabidopsis mutants, indicating that they are biologically inactive in Arabidopsis. Nevertheless, they cause floral reversions, which mimic the SVP and AGL24 floral overexpressor phenotypes. Yeast two-hybrid analysis suggests that these floral phenotypes are probably the consequence of protein interactions between OsMADS22 and OsMADS47 and other MADS-box proteins which interfere with the formation of complexes required for normal flower development. PMID:18453531

  3. Cooperation between SMYD3 and PC4 drives a distinct transcriptional program in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Man; Kim, Kyunghwan; Schmidt, Thomas; Punj, Vasu; Tucker, Haley; Rice, Judd C.; Ulmer, Tobias S.; An, Woojin

    2015-01-01

    SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a histone methyltransferase, which has been implicated in cell growth and cancer pathogenesis. Increasing evidence suggests that SMYD3 can influence distinct oncogenic processes by acting as a gene-specific transcriptional regulator. However, the mechanistic aspects of SMYD3 transactivation and whether SMYD3 acts in concert with other transcription modulators remain unclear. Here, we show that SMYD3 interacts with the human positive coactivator 4 (PC4) and that such interaction potentiates a group of genes whose expression is linked to cell proliferation and invasion. SMYD3 cooperates functionally with PC4, because PC4 depletion results in the loss of SMYD3-mediated H3K4me3 and target gene expression. Individual depletion of SMYD3 and PC4 diminishes the recruitment of both SMYD3 and PC4, indicating that SMYD3 and PC4 localize at target genes in a mutually dependent manner. Artificial tethering of a SMYD3 mutant incapable of binding to its cognate elements and interacting with PC4 to target genes is sufficient for achieving an active transcriptional state in SMYD3-deficient cells. These observations suggest that PC4 contributes to SMYD3-mediated transactivation primarily by stabilizing SMYD3 occupancy at target genes. Together, these studies define expanded roles for SMYD3 and PC4 in gene regulation and provide an unprecedented documentation of their cooperative functions in stimulating oncogenic transcription. PMID:26350217

  4. D2PC sensitivity analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Lombardi, D.P.

    1992-08-01

    The Chemical Hazard Prediction Model (D2PC) developed by the US Army will play a critical role in the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program by predicting chemical agent transport and dispersion through the atmosphere after an accidental release. To aid in the analysis of the output calculated by D2PC, this sensitivity analysis was conducted to provide information on model response to a variety of input parameters. The sensitivity analysis focused on six accidental release scenarios involving chemical agents VX, GB, and HD (sulfur mustard). Two categories, corresponding to conservative most likely and worst case meteorological conditions, provided the reference for standard input values. D2PC displayed a wide variety of sensitivity to the various input parameters. The model displayed the greatest overall sensitivity to wind speed, mixing height, and breathing rate. For other input parameters, sensitivity was mixed but generally lower. Sensitivity varied not only with parameter, but also over the range of values input for a single parameter. This information on model response can provide useful data for interpreting D2PC output.

  5. Computer (PC/Network) Coordinator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Univ., Columbus. Center on Education and Training for Employment.

    This publication contains 22 subjects appropriate for use in a competency list for the occupation of computer (PC/network) coordinator, 1 of 12 occupations within the business/computer technologies cluster. Each unit consists of a number of competencies; a list of competency builders is provided for each competency. Titles of the 22 units are as…

  6. The single-strand DNA binding activity of human PC4 preventsmutagenesis and killing by oxidative DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jen-Yeu; Sarker, Altaf Hossain; Cooper, Priscilla K.; Volkert, Michael R.

    2004-02-01

    Human positive cofactor 4 (PC4) is a transcriptional coactivator with a highly conserved single-strand DNA (ssDNA) binding domain of unknown function. We identified PC4 as a suppressor of the oxidative mutator phenotype of the Escherichia coli fpg mutY mutant and demonstrate that this suppression requires its ssDNA binding activity. Yeast mutants lacking their PC4 ortholog Sub1 are sensitive to hydrogen peroxide and exhibit spontaneous and peroxide induced hypermutability. PC4 expression suppresses the peroxide sensitivity of the yeast sub l{Delta} mutant, suggesting that the human protein has a similar function. A role for yeast and human proteins in DNA repair is suggested by the demonstration that Sub1 acts in a peroxide-resistance pathway involving Rad2 and by the physical interaction of PC4 with the human Rad2 homolog XPG. We show XPG recruits PC4 to a bubble-containing DNA substrate with resulting displacement of XPG and formation of a PC4-DNA complex. We discuss the possible requirement for PC4 in either global or transcription-coupled repair of oxidative DNA damage to mediate the release of XPG bound to its substrate.

  7. Effect of an EDA-A1 gene mutant on the proliferation and cell cycle distribution of cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    LEI, KE; WANG, LUNCHANG; MA, BING; SHI, PING; LI, LONGJIANG; CHE, TUANJIE; HE, XIANGYI

    2016-01-01

    Ectodysplasin (EDA) gene mutation is associated with hypohidrotic ectodermal dysplasia (HED). The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ectodysplasin, transcript variant 1 (EDA-A1) on the proliferation and cell cycle of ECV304 human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). Recombinant eukaryotic expression vectors containing mutant (M) and wild-type (W) EDA-A1 coding sequences, pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-M and pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-W, respectively, were transfected into ECV304 cells. The EDA-A1 gene was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein was detected by western blotting. The EDA-A1 gene and protein were detected in ECV304 cells transfected with pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-M and pcDNA3.1 (−)-EDA-A1-W, but not in ECV304 cells transfected with empty plasmid or cells that had not undergone transfection. Compared with the control group, the EDA-A1 gene mutant significantly decreased the proliferation of ECV304 cells and its inhibition rate was 45.70% (P<0.01), whereas the wild-type EDA-A1 gene did not cause such growth inhibition (P>0.05). A significant increase of the fraction of cells in the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle was observed in the ECV304 cells of the mutant group compared with wild type group, with an increase in the S phase population and a concomitant reduction in the G2/M phase population (P<0.05). These results indicate that compared with the wild-type gene, transfection with a mutant EDA-A1 gene inhibited the proliferation and cell cycle of cultured HUVECs. PMID:26893642

  8. Proteomic and transcriptomic characterization of a virulence-deficient phosphatidylcholine-negative Agrobacterium tumefaciens mutant.

    PubMed

    Klüsener, Sonja; Hacker, Stephanie; Tsai, Yun-Long; Bandow, Julia E; Gust, Ronald; Lai, Erh-Min; Narberhaus, Franz

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in eukaryotic membranes, whereas only a limited number of bacteria are able to synthesize PC. Intriguingly, many of the bacteria with PC-containing membranes interact with eukaryotic hosts. PC is one of the major membrane lipids in the phytopathogenic bacterium Agrobacterium tumefaciens. The presence of PC is critical for diverse cellular processes like motility, biofilm formation, stress resistance, and virulence. The exact role of PC in these processes is unknown. Here, we examined the global consequences of the complete loss of PC at the proteomic and transcriptomic levels. Both strategies validated the impaired virulence gene induction responsible for the virulence defect of the PC-deficient mutant. In addition, the proteomic approach revealed a limited subset of proteins with altered abundance including the reduced flagellar proteins FlaA and FlaB, which explains the motility defect of the PC mutant. At the whole-genome level, the loss of PC was correlated with altered expression of up to 13% of all genes, most encoding membrane or membrane-associated proteins and proteins with functions in the extracytoplasmic stress response. Our integrated analysis revealed that A. tumefaciens dynamically remodels its membrane protein composition in order to sustain normal growth in the absence of PC. PMID:20437057

  9. Deletion of Inpp5a causes ataxia and cerebellar degeneration in mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Andy W; Sachs, Andrew J; Nystuen, Arne M

    2015-10-01

    The progressive and permanent loss of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PC) is a hallmark of many inherited ataxias. Mutations in several genes involved in the regulation of Ca(2+) release from intracellular stores by the second messenger IP3 have been associated with PC dysfunction or death. While much is known about the defects in production and response to IP3, less is known about the defects in breakdown of the IP3 second messenger. A mutation in Inpp4a of the pathway is associated with a severe, early-onset PC degeneration in the mouse model weeble. The step preceding the removal of the 4-phosphate is the removal of the 5-phosphate by Inpp5a. Gene expression analysis was performed on an Inpp5a (Gt(OST50073)Lex) mouse generated by gene trap insertion using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), immunohistochemistry, and Western blot. Phenotypic analyses were performed using rotarod, β-galactosidase staining, and phosphatase activity assay. Statistical significance was calculated. The deletion of Inpp5a causes an early-onset yet slowly progressive PC degeneration and ataxia. Homozygous mutants (90%) exhibit perinatal lethality; surviving homozygotes show locomotor instability at P16. A consistent pattern of PC loss in the cerebellum is initially detectable by weaning and widespread by P60. Phosphatase activity toward phosphoinositol substrates is reduced in the mutant relative to littermates. The ataxic phenotype and characteristics neurodegeneration of the Inpp5a (Gt(OST50073)Lex) mouse indicate a crucial role for Inpp5a in PC survival. The identification of the molecular basis of the selective PC survival will be important in defining a neuroprotective gene applicable to establishing a disease mechanism.

  10. Poster session ELIPGRID-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1995-02-01

    ELIPGRID-PC, a new personal computer program, has been developed to provide easy access to Singer`s ELIPGRID algorithm for hot-spot detection probabilities. Three features of the program are the ability to determine: (1) the grid size required for specified conditions, (2) the smallest hot spot that can be sampled with a given probability, and (3) the approximate grid size resulting from specified conditions and sampling cost. ELIPGRID-PC also provides probability of detection versus cost data for graphing with spreadsheets or graphics software. The program has been successfully tested using Singer`s published ELIPGRID results. An apparent error in the published ELIPGRID code has been uncovered and an appropriate modification incorporated into the new program.

  11. The Pseudophosphatase MK-STYX Induces Neurite-Like Outgrowths in PC12 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Brittany M.; Rusnak, Lauren E.; Wong, Kristen E.; Banks, Dallas A.; Munyikwa, Michelle R.; McFarland, Alexander G.; Hinton, Shantá D.

    2014-01-01

    The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line is a widely used system to study neuronal differentiation for which sustained activation of the extracellular signaling related kinase (ERK) pathway is required. Here, we investigate the function of MK-STYX [MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase) phosphoserine/threonine/tyrosine-binding protein] in neuronal differentiation. MK-STYX is a member of the MAPK phosphatase (MKP) family, which is generally responsible for dephosphorylating the ERKs. However, MK-STYX lacks catalytic activity due to the absence of the nucleophilic cysteine in the active site signature motif HC(X5)R that is essential for phosphatase activity. Despite being catalytically inactive, MK-STYX has been shown to play a role in important cellular pathways, including stress responses. Here we show that PC12 cells endogenously express MK-STYX. In addition, MK-STYX, but not its catalytically active mutant, induced neurite-like outgrowths in PC12 cells. Furthermore, MK-STYX dramatically increased the number of cells with neurite extensions in response to nerve growth factor (NGF), whereas the catalytically active mutant did not. MK-STYX continued to induce neurites in the presence of a MEK (MAP kinase kinase) inhibitor suggesting that MK-STYX does not act through the Ras-ERK/MAPK pathway but is involved in another pathway whose inactivation leads to neuronal differentiation. RhoA activity assays indicated that MK-STYX induced extensions through the Rho signaling pathway. MK-STYX decreased RhoA activation, whereas RhoA activation increased when MK-STYX was down-regulated. Furthermore, MK-STYX affected downstream players of RhoA such as the actin binding protein cofilin. The presence of MK-STYX decreased the phosphorylation of cofilin in non NGF stimulated cells, but increased its phosphorylation in NGF stimulated cells, whereas knocking down MK-STYX caused an opposite effect. Taken together our data suggest that MK-STYX may be a regulator of RhoA signaling, and

  12. PC25{trademark} product and manufacturing experience

    SciTech Connect

    Hall, E.W.; Riley, W.C.; Sandelli, G.J.

    1996-12-31

    Product and manufacturing experience accumulated since the beginning of PC25. A production in 1991 provides a strong base of demonstration and experience for establishing future improvements to the PC25 power plant.

  13. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-07

    Highlights: • Dioctanoyl-PC (diC8PC) supported growth of a yeast mutant defective in PC synthesis. • diC8PC was converted to PC species containing longer acyl residues in the mutant. • Both acyl residues of diC8PC were replaced by longer fatty acids in vitro. • This system will contribute to the elucidation of the acyl chain remodeling of PC. - Abstract: A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of {sup 13}C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-{sup 13}C){sub 3}-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  14. Motor Proteins at Work in PC12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, David; Holzwarth, George; Superfine, Richard

    2003-11-01

    Motor proteins such as kinesin and dynein drive vesicle transport within cells by converting the chemical energy of ATP into mechanical work. As vesicles are transported in PC12 neurites, they travel at constant velocity for long intervals before changing to a different constant velocity. When scaled by the minimum observed velocity of a vesicles, the changes in velocity occur in quantizes intervals of +/- 1, 2, 3 etc. These changes in velocity are caused by a change in the number of motor proteins actively transporting the vesicle. The viscoelastic modulus and viscosity appropriate for large vesicles (0.25 - 0.5 micron radius) in PC12 was determined by measuring the Brownian motion of vesicles within the distal expansions of neurites. The corresponding Stokes' drag on the vesicles was 4.2 +/- 0.6 pN per motor. Assuming that kinesin hydrolyzes 1 ATP per 8 nm step (consistent with in-vitro measurements), the motor's efficiency is 33apply forces in magnetic beeds in the hopes of mimicking vesicle motion.

  15. Functional Analysis of Mouse G6pc1 Mutations Using a Novel In Situ Assay for Glucose-6-Phosphatase Activity and the Effect of Mutations in Conserved Human G6PC1/G6PC2 Amino Acids on G6PC2 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Boortz, Kayla A.; Syring, Kristen E.; Pound, Lynley D.; Wang, Yingda; Oeser, James K.; O’Brien, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) has been associated with increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in G6PC2 are the most important common determinants of variations in FBG in humans. Studies using G6pc2 knockout mice suggest that G6pc2 regulates the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. G6PC2 and the related G6PC1 and G6PC3 genes encode glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. This study describes a functional analysis of 22 non-synonymous G6PC2 SNPs, that alter amino acids that are conserved in human G6PC1, mouse G6pc1 and mouse G6pc2, with the goal of identifying variants that potentially affect G6PC2 activity/expression. Published data suggest strong conservation of catalytically important amino acids between all four proteins and the related G6PC3 isoform. Because human G6PC2 has very low glucose-6-phosphatase activity we used an indirect approach, examining the effect of these SNPs on mouse G6pc1 activity. Using a novel in situ functional assay for glucose-6-phosphatase activity we demonstrate that the amino acid changes associated with the human G6PC2 rs144254880 (Arg79Gln), rs149663725 (Gly114Arg) and rs2232326 (Ser324Pro) SNPs reduce mouse G6pc1 enzyme activity without affecting protein expression. The Arg79Gln variant alters an amino acid mutation of which, in G6PC1, has previously been shown to cause glycogen storage disease type 1a. We also demonstrate that the rs368382511 (Gly8Glu), rs138726309 (His177Tyr), rs2232323 (Tyr207Ser) rs374055555 (Arg293Trp), rs2232326 (Ser324Pro), rs137857125 (Pro313Leu) and rs2232327 (Pro340Leu) SNPs confer decreased G6PC2 protein expression. In summary, these studies identify multiple G6PC2 variants that have the potential to be associated with altered FBG in humans. PMID:27611587

  16. Functional Analysis of Mouse G6pc1 Mutations Using a Novel In Situ Assay for Glucose-6-Phosphatase Activity and the Effect of Mutations in Conserved Human G6PC1/G6PC2 Amino Acids on G6PC2 Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Boortz, Kayla A; Syring, Kristen E; Pound, Lynley D; Wang, Yingda; Oeser, James K; O'Brien, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Elevated fasting blood glucose (FBG) has been associated with increased risk for development of type 2 diabetes. Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in G6PC2 are the most important common determinants of variations in FBG in humans. Studies using G6pc2 knockout mice suggest that G6pc2 regulates the glucose sensitivity of insulin secretion. G6PC2 and the related G6PC1 and G6PC3 genes encode glucose-6-phosphatase catalytic subunits. This study describes a functional analysis of 22 non-synonymous G6PC2 SNPs, that alter amino acids that are conserved in human G6PC1, mouse G6pc1 and mouse G6pc2, with the goal of identifying variants that potentially affect G6PC2 activity/expression. Published data suggest strong conservation of catalytically important amino acids between all four proteins and the related G6PC3 isoform. Because human G6PC2 has very low glucose-6-phosphatase activity we used an indirect approach, examining the effect of these SNPs on mouse G6pc1 activity. Using a novel in situ functional assay for glucose-6-phosphatase activity we demonstrate that the amino acid changes associated with the human G6PC2 rs144254880 (Arg79Gln), rs149663725 (Gly114Arg) and rs2232326 (Ser324Pro) SNPs reduce mouse G6pc1 enzyme activity without affecting protein expression. The Arg79Gln variant alters an amino acid mutation of which, in G6PC1, has previously been shown to cause glycogen storage disease type 1a. We also demonstrate that the rs368382511 (Gly8Glu), rs138726309 (His177Tyr), rs2232323 (Tyr207Ser) rs374055555 (Arg293Trp), rs2232326 (Ser324Pro), rs137857125 (Pro313Leu) and rs2232327 (Pro340Leu) SNPs confer decreased G6PC2 protein expression. In summary, these studies identify multiple G6PC2 variants that have the potential to be associated with altered FBG in humans. PMID:27611587

  17. PC/104 Embedded IOCs at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Jianxun Yan, Trent Allison, Sue Witherspoon, Anthony Cuffe

    2009-10-01

    Jefferson Lab has developed embedded IOCs based on PC/104 single board computers (SBC) for low level control systems. The PC/104 IOCs run EPICS on top of the RTEMS operating system. Two types of control system configurations are used in different applications, PC/104 SBC with commercial PC/104 I/O cards and PC/104 SBC with custom designed FPGA-based boards. RTEMS was built with CEXP shell to run on the PC/104 SBC. CEXP shell provides the function of dynamic object loading, which is similar to the widely used VxWorks operating system. Standard software configurations were setup for PC/104 IOC application development to provide a familiar format for new projects as well as ease the conversion of applications from VME based IOCs to PC/104 IOCs. Many new projects at Jefferson Lab are going to employ PC/104 SBCs as IOCs and some applications have already been running them for accelerator operations. The PC/104 - RTEMS IOC provides a free open source Real-Time Operating System (RTOS), low cost/maintenance, easily installed/ configured, flexible, and reliable solution for accelerator control and 12GeV Upgrade projects.

  18. PC Basic Linear Algebra Subroutines

    1992-03-09

    PC-BLAS is a highly optimized version of the Basic Linear Algebra Subprograms (BLAS), a standardized set of thirty-eight routines that perform low-level operations on vectors of numbers in single and double-precision real and complex arithmetic. Routines are included to find the index of the largest component of a vector, apply a Givens or modified Givens rotation, multiply a vector by a constant, determine the Euclidean length, perform a dot product, swap and copy vectors, andmore » find the norm of a vector. The BLAS have been carefully written to minimize numerical problems such as loss of precision and underflow and are designed so that the computation is independent of the interface with the calling program. This independence is achieved through judicious use of Assembly language macros. Interfaces are provided for Lahey Fortran 77, Microsoft Fortran 77, and Ryan-McFarland IBM Professional Fortran.« less

  19. Precore/basal core promoter mutants quantification throughout phases of hepatitis B virus infection by Simpleprobe

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Wen-Hui; Lv, Ying; Zhang, Yong-Mei; Hou, Wei; Wang, Jin-Yu; Zhang, Yi-Jun; Liu, Hong-Yan; Zhu, Hao-Xiang; Qin, Yan-Li; Mao, Ri-Cheng; Zhang, Ji-Ming

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate precore/basal core promoter (PC/BCP) mutants throughout hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection and to determine their relationship to hepatitis B early antigen (HBeAg) titers. METHODS: We enrolled 191 patients in various stages of HBV infection at the Huashan Hospital and the Taizhou Municipal Hospital from 2010 to 2012. None of the patients received antiviral therapy. HBV DNA from serum, was quantified by real-time PCR. The HBV genotype was determined by direct sequencing of the S gene. We used the Simpleprobe ultrasensitive quantitative method to detect PC/BCP mutants in each patient. We compared the strain number, percentage, and the changes in PC/BCP mutants in different phases, and analyzed the relationship between PC/BCP mutants and HBeAg by multiple linear regression and logistic regression. RESULTS: Patients with HBV infection (n = 191) were assigned to groups by phase: Immune tolerance (IT) = 55, Immune clearance (IC) = 67, Low-replicative (LR) = 49, and HBeAg-negative hepatitis (ENH) = 20. Of the patients (male, 112; female, 79) enrolled, 122 were HBeAg-positive and 69 were HBeAg-negative. The median age was 33 years (range: 18-78 years). PC and BCP mutation detection rates were 84.82% (162/191) and 96.86% (185/191), respectively. In five HBeAg-negative cases, we detected double mutation G1896A/G1899A. The logarithm value of PC mutant quantities (log10 PC) significantly differed in IT, IC, and LR phases, as well as in the ENH phase (F = 49.350, P < 0.001). The logarithm value of BCP mutant quantities (log10 BCP) also differed during the four phases (F = 25.530, P < 0.001). Log10 PC and log10 BCP values were high in the IT and IC phases, decreased in the LR phase, and increased in the ENH phase, although the absolute value at this point remained lower than that in the IT and IC phases. PC mutant quantity per total viral load (PC%) and BCP mutant quantity per total viral load (BCP%) differed between phases (F = 20.040, P < 0.001; F = 10

  20. Effect of K doping on CuPc: C{sub 60} heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Chiu-Ping; Chen, Wen-Yen; Wei, Ching-Hsuan; Pi, Tun-Wen

    2011-12-01

    Here, the electronic properties of K-doped copper phthalocyanine (CuPc): C{sub 60} heterojunctions are studied via synchrotron-radiation photoemission. The K-doped heterointerfaces were obtained by means of C{sub 60} on K{sub 1.5}CuPc and CuPc on K{sub 3}C{sub 60}. The photoelectron spectra show that the potassium prefers to combine with C{sub 60}. At the C{sub 60}/K{sub 1.5}CuPc interface, the K diffuses and transfers negative charge into the C{sub 60} overlayer, while no strong chemical reaction could be found at the CuPc/K{sub 3}C{sub 60} interface. A significant shift of the vacuum level was observed in both cases, which was caused by the charge transfer for the C{sub 60}/K{sub 1.5}CuPc and by the induced density of interface states (IDIS) dipole for the CuPc/K{sub 3}C{sub 60}. The energy level diagrams show that using C{sub 60} adsorption on a K-doped CuPc film is good for the improvement of photovoltaic devices. However, the inverse process, that of CuPc on a K-doped C{sub 60}, is unfavorable for the photovoltaic effect.

  1. Heterozygosity for an in-frame deletion causes glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase deficiency in a patient detected by newborn screening: investigation of the effect of the mutant allele.

    PubMed

    Bross, Peter; Frederiksen, Jane B; Bie, Anne S; Hansen, Jakob; Palmfeldt, Johan; Nielsen, Marit N; Duno, Morten; Lund, Allan M; Christensen, Ernst

    2012-09-01

    A patient with suspected glutaric aciduria type 1 (GA-1) was detected by newborn screening. GA-1 is known as an autosomal recessively inherited disease due to defects in the gene coding for glutaryl-CoA dehydrogenase (GCDH), a mitochondrial enzyme involved in the catabolism of the amino acids hydroxylysine, lysine and tryptophan. DNA and cDNA sequencing revealed a 18 bp deletion (c.553_570del18) resulting in deletion of six amino acids (p.Gly185_Ser190del) in one allele and no sequence changes in the other allele. Confirmatory biochemical analysis of blood, urine and cultured fibroblasts from the proband were consistent with a mild biochemical GA-1 phenotype. Recombinant expression of the mutant variant in E. coli showed that the GCDH-(p.Gly185_Ser190del) protein displayed severely decreased assembly into tetramers and enzyme activity. To discover a potential dominant negative effect of the mutant protein, we engineered a prokaryotic expression system in which expression of a wild type and a mutant GCDH allele is controlled by separately inducible promoters. These cells displayed decreased levels of GCDH tetramer and enzyme activity when expressing both the wild type and the mutant GCDH variant protein compared to the situation when only the wild type allele was expressed. Further experiments suggest that the major impact of the GCDH-(p.Gly185_Ser190del) protein in heterozygous cells consists of hampering the assembly of wild type GCDH into tetramers. Our experimental data are consistent with the hypothesis that heterozygosity for this mutation confers a dominant negative effect resulting in a GCDH enzyme activity that is significantly lower than the expected 50%.

  2. State identification and tunable Kondo effect of MnPc on Ag(001)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kügel, Jens; Karolak, Michael; Krönlein, Andreas; Senkpiel, Jacob; Hsu, Pin-Jui; Sangiovanni, Giorgio; Bode, Matthias

    2015-06-01

    We present a detailed investigation of spectroscopic features located at the central metal ion of MnPc (where Pc represents phthalocyanine) on Ag(001) by means of scanning tunneling spectroscopy (STS) and first-principles theory. STS data taken close to the Fermi level reveal an asymmetric feature that cannot be fitted with a single Fano function representing a one-channel Kondo effect. Instead, our data indicate the existence of a second superimposed feature. Two potential physical origins, a second Kondo channel related to the dx z /y z orbitals, and a spectral feature of the dz2 orbital itself, are discussed. A systematic experimental and theoretical comparison of MnPc with CoPc and FePc indicates that the second feature observed on MnPc is caused by the dz2 orbital. This conclusion is corroborated by STM-induced dehydrogenation experiments on FePc and MnPc which in both cases result in a gradual shift towards more positive binding energies and a narrowing of the Kondo resonance. Theoretical analysis reveals that the latter is caused by the reduced hybridization between the d orbital and the substrate. Spatially resolved differential conductivity maps taken close to the respective peak positions show that the intensity of both features is highest over the central Mn ion, thereby providing further evidence against a second Kondo channel originating from the dx z /y z orbital of the central Mn ion.

  3. Genome sequencing of the Trichoderma reesei QM9136 mutant identifies a truncation of the transcriptional regulator XYR1 as the cause for its cellulase-negative phenotype

    SciTech Connect

    Lichius, Alexander; Bidard, Frédérique; Buchholz, Franziska; Le Crom, Stéphane; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Austerlitz, Tina; Grigoriev, Igor V; Baker, Scott E; Margeot, Antoine; Seiboth, Bernhard; Kubicek, Christian P

    2015-04-20

    Trichoderma reesei is the main industrial source of cellulases and hemicellulases required for the hydrolysis of biomass to simple sugars, which can then be used in the production of biofuels and biorefineries. The highly productive strains in use today were generated by classical mutagenesis. As byproducts of this procedure, mutants were generated that turned out to be unable to produce cellulases. In order to identify the mutations responsible for this inability, we sequenced the genome of one of these strains, QM9136, and compared it to that of its progenitor T. reesei QM6a.

  4. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system

    PubMed Central

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J.; De Jaco, Antonella

    2015-01-01

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations. PMID:26621873

  5. Autism-associated R451C mutation in neuroligin3 leads to activation of the unfolded protein response in a PC12 Tet-On inducible system.

    PubMed

    Ulbrich, Lisa; Favaloro, Flores Lietta; Trobiani, Laura; Marchetti, Valentina; Patel, Vruti; Pascucci, Tiziana; Comoletti, Davide; Marciniak, Stefan J; De Jaco, Antonella

    2016-02-15

    Several forms of monogenic heritable autism spectrum disorders are associated with mutations in the neuroligin genes. The autism-linked substitution R451C in neuroligin3 induces local misfolding of its extracellular domain, causing partial retention in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) of expressing cells. We have generated a PC12 Tet-On cell model system with inducible expression of wild-type or R451C neuroligin3 to investigate whether there is activation of the UPR (unfolded protein response) as a result of misfolded protein retention. As a positive control for protein misfolding, we also expressed the mutant G221R neuroligin3, which is known to be completely retained within the ER. Our data show that overexpression of either R451C or G221R mutant proteins leads to the activation of all three signalling branches of the UPR downstream of the stress sensors ATF6 (activating transcription factor 6), IRE1 (inositol-requiring enzyme 1) and PERK [PKR (dsRNA-dependent protein kinase)-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase]. Each branch displayed different activation profiles that partially correlated with the degree of misfolding caused by each mutation. We also show that up-regulation of BiP (immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) and CHOP [C/EBP (CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein)-homologous protein] was induced by both mutant proteins but not by wild-type neuroligin3, both in proliferative cells and cells differentiated to a neuron-like phenotype. Collectively, our data show that mutant R451C neuroligin3 activates the UPR in a novel cell model system, suggesting that this cellular response may have a role in monogenic forms of autism characterized by misfolding mutations.

  6. Elevated PC responsive B cells and anti-PC antibody production in transgenic mice harboring anti-PC immunoglobulin genes.

    PubMed

    Pinkert, C A; Manz, J; Linton, P J; Klinman, N R; Storb, U

    1989-12-01

    The rearrangement of heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes is necessary for the production of functional antibody molecules. The myeloma MOPC 167 produces specific antibodies to the antigen phosphorylcholine (PC), which is present on bacterial surfaces, fungi and other environmental contaminants. Rearranged heavy and light chain immunoglobulin genes cloned from MOPC 167 were microinjected into mouse eggs. Within the resulting transgenic mice, expression of the transgenes were limited to lymphoid tissues. Transgenic mice produced elevated levels of anti-PC antibodies constitutively, at 16 days of age, when normal non-transgenic mice were not fully immunocompetent. A triggering antigenic stimulus was not necessary to evoke anti-PC immunoglobulin production. Additionally, the frequency of PC-responsive B cells in these transgenic mice was further increased upon specific immunization.

  7. Lesion mimic mutants

    PubMed Central

    Moeder, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Over the last decade a substantial number of lesion mimic mutants (LMM) have been isolated and a growing number of the genes have been cloned. It is now becoming clear that these mutants are valuable tools to dissect various aspects of programmed cell death (PCD) and pathogen resistance pathways in plants. Together with other forward genetics approaches LMMs shed light on the PCD machinery in plant cells and revealed important roles for sphingolipids, Ca2+ and chloroplast-derived porphyrin-metabolites during cell death development. PMID:19513227

  8. Dispersive Pc1 bursts observed by Freja

    SciTech Connect

    Mursula, K.; Braeysy, T.; Rasinkangas, R.; Tanskanen, P.; Blomberg, L.G.; Lindqvist, P.A.; Marklund, G.T.

    1994-08-15

    The authors report on observation of electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves (Pc1 pulsations) by the Freja satellite on November 18, 1992. These observations are coincident with ground based observation of such pearl like Pc1 pulsations extending over a 12 hour period. This is the first observation by a satellite above the ionosphere of such phenomena. The wave pulsations were observed to come in 10 to 25 second pulses, and to be clearly dispersive in nature. Two spectral bands were observed in all Pc1 pearls. In the longer bursts, the authors observed time differences between the two distinct spectral bands.

  9. GOMER: a PC-based expert system

    SciTech Connect

    Cochrell, G.D.

    1986-04-01

    The algorithm for a PC-based expert system for interpretation of seismic data from remote sensors is described. The original expert system was written on a Symbolics computer using Zeta LISP. The PC version is written in Pascal and runs on the IBM PC or on any IBM-compatible computer. The Pascal source code is included with this report. To date the software has been used only on simulated sensor data but will be modified to accept data from fielded sensors. Extensive field testing will be required to refine the program's knowledge base. 8 figs.

  10. Functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiwei; Yu, Yongfeng; Fu, Da; Li, Ziming; Niu, Xiaoming; Liao, Meilin; Lu, Shun

    2010-06-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is the major enzyme in the Phosphatidylcholine (PC) cycle and is involved in many long-term cellular responses such as activation, proliferation, and differentiation events. Cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) is an essential cell-cycle regulator required for the completion of mitosis. Our previous studies identified the interaction between PC-PLC and Cdc20. Through the interaction, Cdc20 could mediate the degradation of PC-PLC by Cdc20-mediated ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). In this study, we found that PC-PLC might not be involved in cancer metastasis. Inhibition of PC-PLC by D609 could cause cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis inhibition in CBRH-7919 cells. Inhibition of PC-PLC could also influence the cell cycle by arresting the cells in G1 phase, and Cdc20 might be involved in these processes. Taken together, in this report, we provided new evidence for the functional roles of PC-PLC and Cdc20 in the cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis in CBRH-7919 cells.

  11. Lamin A/C sustains PcG protein architecture, maintaining transcriptional repression at target genes

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Elisa; Mozzetta, Chiara; Marullo, Fabrizia; Gregoretti, Francesco; Gargiulo, Annagiusi; Columbaro, Marta; Cortesi, Alice; Antonelli, Laura; Di Pelino, Simona; Squarzoni, Stefano; Palacios, Daniela; Zippo, Alessio; Bodega, Beatrice; Oliva, Gennaro

    2015-01-01

    Beyond its role in providing structure to the nuclear envelope, lamin A/C is involved in transcriptional regulation. However, its cross talk with epigenetic factors—and how this cross talk influences physiological processes—is still unexplored. Key epigenetic regulators of development and differentiation are the Polycomb group (PcG) of proteins, organized in the nucleus as microscopically visible foci. Here, we show that lamin A/C is evolutionarily required for correct PcG protein nuclear compartmentalization. Confocal microscopy supported by new algorithms for image analysis reveals that lamin A/C knock-down leads to PcG protein foci disassembly and PcG protein dispersion. This causes detachment from chromatin and defects in PcG protein–mediated higher-order structures, thereby leading to impaired PcG protein repressive functions. Using myogenic differentiation as a model, we found that reduced levels of lamin A/C at the onset of differentiation led to an anticipation of the myogenic program because of an alteration of PcG protein–mediated transcriptional repression. Collectively, our results indicate that lamin A/C can modulate transcription through the regulation of PcG protein epigenetic factors. PMID:26553927

  12. The PC index: review of methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCreadie, H.; Menvielle, M.

    2010-10-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index is a controversial topic within the IAGA scientific community. Since 1997 discussions of the validity of the index to be endorsed as an official IAGA index have ensued. There is no doubt as to the scientific merit of the index which is not discussed here. What is in doubt is the methodology of the derivation of the index by different groups. The Polar Cap index (PC: PCN, northern; PCS, southern) described in Troshichev et al. (2006) and Stauning et al. (2006), both termed the "unified PC index", and the PCN index routinely derived at DMI are inspected using only available published literature. They are found to contain different derivation procedures, thus are not unified. The descriptions of the derivation procedures are found to not be adequate to independently derive the PC indices.

  13. Mutant fatty acid desaturase

    DOEpatents

    Shanklin, John; Cahoon, Edgar B.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention relates to a method for producing mutants of a fatty acid desaturase having a substantially increased activity towards fatty acid substrates with chains containing fewer than 18 carbons relative to an unmutagenized precursor desaturase having an 18 carbon atom chain length substrate specificity. The method involves inducing one or more mutations in the nucleic acid sequence encoding the precursor desaturase, transforming the mutated sequence into an unsaturated fatty acid auxotroph cell such as MH13 E. coli, culturing the cells in the absence of supplemental unsaturated fatty acids, thereby selecting for recipient cells which have received and which express a mutant fatty acid desaturase with an elevated specificity for fatty acid substrates having chain lengths of less than 18 carbon atoms. A variety of mutants having 16 or fewer carbon atom chain length substrate specificities are produced by this method. Mutant desaturases produced by this method can be introduced via expression vectors into prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and can also be used in the production of transgenic plants which may be used to produce specific fatty acid products.

  14. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of a magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observations at high latitudes.

  15. Magnetospheric filter effect for Pc 3 Alfven mode waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, X.; Comfort, R. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Green, J. L.; Musielak, Z. E.; Moore, T. E.

    1995-01-01

    We present a ray-tracing study of the propagation of Pc 3 Alfven mode waves originating at the dayside magnetopause. This study reveals interesting features of magnetospheric filter effect for these waves. Pc 3 Alfven mode waves cannot penetrate to low Earth altitudes unless the wave frequency is below approximately 30 mHz. Configurations of the dispersion curves and the refractive index show that the gyroresonance and pseudo-cutoff introduced by the heavy ion O(+) block the waves. When the O(+) concentration is removed from the plasma composition, the barriers caused by the O(+) no longer exist, and waves with much higher frequencies than 30 mHz can penetrate to low altitudes. The result that the 30 mHz or lower frequency Alfven waves can be guided to low altitudes agrees with ground-based power spectrum observation at high altitudes.

  16. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1. PMID:23663131

  17. The catalytic domain CysPc of the DEK1 calpain is functionally conserved in land plants.

    PubMed

    Liang, Zhe; Demko, Viktor; Wilson, Robert C; Johnson, Kenneth A; Ahmad, Rafi; Perroud, Pierre-François; Quatrano, Ralph; Zhao, Sen; Shalchian-Tabrizi, Kamran; Otegui, Marisa S; Olsen, Odd-Arne; Johansen, Wenche

    2013-09-01

    DEK1, the single calpain of land plants, is a member of the ancient membrane bound TML-CysPc-C2L calpain family that dates back 1.5 billion years. Here we show that the CysPc-C2L domains of land plant calpains form a separate sub-clade in the DEK1 clade of the phylogenetic tree of plants. The charophycean alga Mesostigma viride DEK1-like gene is clearly divergent from those in land plants, suggesting that a major evolutionary shift in DEK1 occurred during the transition to land plants. Based on genetic complementation of the Arabidopsis thaliana dek1-3 mutant using CysPc-C2L domains of various origins, we show that these two domains have been functionally conserved within land plants for at least 450 million years. This conclusion is based on the observation that the CysPc-C2L domains of DEK1 from the moss Physcomitrella patens complements the A. thaliana dek1-3 mutant phenotype. In contrast, neither the CysPc-C2L domains from M. viride nor chimeric animal-plant calpains complement this mutant. Co-evolution analysis identified differences in the interactions between the CysPc-C2L residues of DEK1 and classical calpains, supporting the view that the two enzymes are regulated by fundamentally different mechanisms. Using the A. thaliana dek1-3 complementation assay, we show that four conserved amino acid residues of two Ca²⁺-binding sites in the CysPc domain of classical calpains are conserved in land plants and functionally essential in A. thaliana DEK1.

  18. [Functions of prion protein PrPc].

    PubMed

    Cazaubon, Sylvie; Viegas, Pedro; Couraud, Pierre-Olivier

    2007-01-01

    It is now well established that both normal and pathological (or scrapie) isoforms of prion protein, PrPc and PrPsc respectively, are involved in the development and progression of various forms of neurodegenerative diseases, including scrapie in sheep, bovine spongiform encephalopathy (or "mad cow disease") and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in human, collectively known as prion diseases. The protein PrPc is highly expressed in the central nervous system in neurons and glial cells, and also present in non-brain cells, such as immune cells or epithelial and endothelial cells. Identification of the physiological functions of PrPc in these different cell types thus appears crucial for understanding the progression of prion diseases. Recent studies highlighted several major roles for PrPc that may be considered in two major domains : (1) cell survival (protection against oxidative stress and apoptosis) and (2) cell adhesion. In association with cell adhesion, distinct functions of PrPc were observed, depending on cell types : neuronal differentiation, epithelial and endothelial barrier integrity, transendothelial migration of monocytes, T cell activation. These observations suggest that PrPc functions may be particularly relevant to cellular stress, as well as inflammatory or infectious situations. PMID:17875293

  19. Management and transmission of DICOM files using PC to PC multicasting methodology.

    PubMed

    Kim, I K; Kwon, G B; Choi, W K; Cho, H; Kwak, Y S

    2001-01-01

    The PACS system built and used in hospitals nowadays has quite significant overload on its central server because of both treatment of very large data and full management of medical images. We suggest a distributed communication and management methodology using PC to PC multicasting strategy for efficient management of medical images produced by DICOM modalities. It is absolutely necessary for reducing strict degradation of PACS system due to large size of medical images and its very high transport rates. DICOM PC to PC component is composed a service manager to execute requested queries, a communication manager to take charge of file transmission, and a DICOM manager to manage stored data and system behavior. Each manager itself is a component to search for requested file by interaction or transmit the file to other PCs. Distributed management and transformation of medical information based on PC to PC multicasting methodology will enhance performance of central server and network capacity reducing overload on them.

  20. RTP801 Is Involved in Mutant Huntingtin-Induced Cell Death.

    PubMed

    Martín-Flores, Núria; Romaní-Aumedes, Joan; Rué, Laura; Canal, Mercè; Sanders, Phil; Straccia, Marco; Allen, Nicholas D; Alberch, Jordi; Canals, Josep M; Pérez-Navarro, Esther; Malagelada, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    RTP801 expression is induced by cellular stress and has a pro-apoptotic function in non-proliferating differentiated cells such as neurons. In several neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's disease and Alzheimer's disease, elevated levels of RTP801 have been observed, which suggests a role for RTP801 in neuronal death. Neuronal death is also a pathological hallmark in Huntington's disease (HD), an inherited neurodegenerative disorder caused by a CAG repeat expansion in the huntingtin gene. Currently, the exact mechanisms underlying mutant huntingtin (mhtt)-induced toxicity are still unclear. Here, we investigated whether RTP801 is involved in (mhtt)-induced cell death. Ectopic exon-1 mhtt elevated RTP801 mRNA and protein levels in nerve growth factor (NGF)-differentiated PC12 cells and in rat primary cortical neurons. In neuronal PC12 cells, mhtt also contributed to RTP801 protein elevation by reducing its proteasomal degradation rate, in addition to promoting RTP801 gene expression. Interestingly, silencing RTP801 expression with short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) blocked mhtt-induced cell death in NGF-differentiated PC12 cells. However, RTP801 protein levels were not altered in the striatum of Hdh(Q7/Q111) and R6/1 mice, two HD models that display motor deficits but not neuronal death. Importantly, RTP801 protein levels were elevated in both neural telencephalic progenitors differentiated from HD patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells and in the putamen and cerebellum of human HD postmortem brains. Taken together, our results suggest that RTP801 is a novel downstream effector of mhtt-induced toxicity and that it may be relevant to the human disease.

  1. Cytotoxic Effects of the Ethanol Bane Skin Extract in Human Prostate Cancer Pc3 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Maryam; Kazerouni, Faranak; Namaki, Saeed; Darbandi Tamijani, Hassan; Rahimipour, Hooman; Boroumand, Nasrin; Barghi, Siyamak; Ebrahimi, Nazanin; Gheibi Hayat, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: It is extensively supposed that vegetarian diet could affect cancer progress and increase the influence of formal chemotherapy. Objectives: The present study was designed to determine the effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract against chemo resistant prostate cancer PC3 cells. Materials and Methods: PC3 and L929 cells were cultivated and then incubated in the ethanol Bane skin extract with various concentrations of 0.78, 1.5, 3.13, 6.25, 12.5 mg/mL in 3 times 24, 48, 72 hours. Cytotoxic effect of the ethanol Bane skin extract on PC3 and L929 cells was examined by MTT assay after 24, 48, and 72 hours. Morphology of PC3 cells was evaluated by Gimsa staining. Results: The ethanol Bane skin extract inhibited proliferation and caused cell death with IC50 values of 2.8 mg/mL on PC3 cells and the IC50 was 6.1 mg/mL on l929 cells. Morphological changes and apoptotic bodies were observed in PC3 cells faced with the ethanol Bane skin extract by staining with Gimsa. Conclusions: The ethanol Bane skin extract could repress the growth of PC3 cell line. This inhibitory effect of the Bane extract depended on the dose and the time on PC3. The result of this study shows that the ethanol Bane skin extract includes photochemical and inhibitory function against proliferation and inducer of apoptosis in human prostate cancer PC3 cells and also has less cytotoxic effect on l929 than PC3 cells. The ethanol Bane skin extract might be a good candidate for the new herbal anticancer drug. PMID:27482333

  2. CARES/PC - CERAMICS ANALYSIS AND RELIABILITY EVALUATION OF STRUCTURES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Szatmary, S. A.

    1994-01-01

    The beneficial properties of structural ceramics include their high-temperature strength, light weight, hardness, and corrosion and oxidation resistance. For advanced heat engines, ceramics have demonstrated functional abilities at temperatures well beyond the operational limits of metals. This is offset by the fact that ceramic materials tend to be brittle. When a load is applied, their lack of significant plastic deformation causes the material to crack at microscopic flaws, destroying the component. CARES/PC performs statistical analysis of data obtained from the fracture of simple, uniaxial tensile or flexural specimens and estimates the Weibull and Batdorf material parameters from this data. CARES/PC is a subset of the program CARES (COSMIC program number LEW-15168) which calculates the fast-fracture reliability or failure probability of ceramic components utilizing the Batdorf and Weibull models to describe the effects of multi-axial stress states on material strength. CARES additionally requires that the ceramic structure be modeled by a finite element program such as MSC/NASTRAN or ANSYS. The more limited CARES/PC does not perform fast-fracture reliability estimation of components. CARES/PC estimates ceramic material properties from uniaxial tensile or from three- and four-point bend bar data. In general, the parameters are obtained from the fracture stresses of many specimens (30 or more are recommended) whose geometry and loading configurations are held constant. Parameter estimation can be performed for single or multiple failure modes by using the least-squares analysis or the maximum likelihood method. Kolmogorov-Smirnov and Anderson-Darling goodness-of-fit tests measure the accuracy of the hypothesis that the fracture data comes from a population with a distribution specified by the estimated Weibull parameters. Ninety-percent confidence intervals on the Weibull parameters and the unbiased value of the shape parameter for complete samples are provided

  3. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  4. High Persister Mutants in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Torrey, Heather L.; Keren, Iris; Via, Laura E.; Lee, Jong Seok; Lewis, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis forms drug-tolerant persister cells that are the probable cause of its recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. While genetically identical to the rest of the population, persisters are dormant, which protects them from killing by bactericidal antibiotics. The mechanism of persister formation in M. tuberculosis is not well understood. In this study, we selected for high persister (hip) mutants and characterized them by whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analysis. In parallel, we identified and characterized clinical isolates that naturally produce high levels of persisters. We compared the hip mutants obtained in vitro with clinical isolates to identify candidate persister genes. Genes involved in lipid biosynthesis, carbon metabolism, toxin-antitoxin systems, and transcriptional regulators were among those identified. We also found that clinical hip isolates exhibited greater ex vivo survival than the low persister isolates. Our data suggest that M. tuberculosis persister formation involves multiple pathways, and hip mutants may contribute to the recalcitrance of the infection. PMID:27176494

  5. pyewacket, a new zebrafish fin pigment pattern mutant.

    PubMed

    Mellgren, Eve M; Johnson, Stephen L

    2006-06-01

    Many mutants that disrupt zebrafish embryonic pigment pattern have been isolated, and subsequent cloning of the mutated genes causing these phenotypes has contributed to our understanding of pigment cell development. However, few mutants have been identified that specifically affect development of the adult pigment pattern. Through a mutant screen for adult pigment pattern phenotypes, we identified pyewacket (pye), a novel zebrafish mutant in which development of the adult caudal fin pigment pattern is aberrant. Specifically, pye mutants have fin melanocyte pigment pattern defects and fewer xanthophores than wild-type fins. We mapped pye to an interval where a single gene, the zebrafish ortholog of the human gene DHRSX, is present. pye will be an informative mutant for understanding how xanthophores and melanocytes interact to form the pigment pattern of the adult zebrafish fin.

  6. The effect of modulating top-down attention deployment on the N2pc/PCN.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qiang; Lin, Shuyu; Zhao, Guang; Roberson, Debi

    2016-05-01

    The N2pc (PCN) component of the event-related potential (ERP) waveform provides a useful tool for directly assessing the locus of spatial attention in visual search. It is still unclear whether the amplitude of the N2pc/PCN relates to the deployment of attentional resources. A key issue is the lack of evidence that top-down allocation of attention affects the N2pc/PCN amplitude. Previous findings could be explained if manipulating different expectancy strategies changes participants' search mode, causing them to redefine the target's features. In this study, we explored the relationship between N2pc/PCN amplitude and top-down attention allocation by manipulating the discriminative difficulty (differences in the response-defining feature) but leaving the search difficulty (target's saliency) unchanged. Using the same sets of stimuli, in a blocked condition, participants showed the expected higher amplitude of N2pc/PCN in the hardest condition, compared to easier discrimination conditions. Importantly, there was no difference in the N2pc/PCN when the exact same stimulus sets were presented in a randomly interleaved mixed set. At a behavioral level, in both conditions performance was significantly slower for the hardest condition. This finding indicates that the N2pc/PCN component is modulated by the predictability of discriminative difficulty, which reflects the modulation of top-down attentional deployment.

  7. APC-PC Combined Scheme in Gilbert Two State Model: Proposal and Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bulo, Yaka; Saring, Yang; Bhunia, Chandan Tilak

    2016-08-01

    In an automatic repeat request (ARQ) scheme, a packet is retransmitted if it gets corrupted due to transmission errors caused by the channel. However, an erroneous packet may contain both erroneous bits and correct bits and hence it may still contain useful information. The receiver may be able to combine this information from multiple erroneous copies to recover the correct packet. Packet combining (PC) is a simple and elegant scheme of error correction in transmitted packet, in which two received copies are XORed to obtain the bit location of erroneous bits. Thereafter, the packet is corrected by bit inversion of bit located as erroneous. Aggressive packet combining (APC) is a logic extension of PC primarily designed for wireless communication with objective of correcting error with low latency. PC offers higher throughput than APC, but PC does not correct double bit errors if occur in same bit location of erroneous copies of the packet. A hybrid technique is proposed to utilize the advantages of both APC and PC while attempting to remove the limitation of both. In the proposed technique, applications of APC-PC on Gilbert two state model has been studied. The simulation results show that the proposed technique offers better throughput than the conventional APC and lesser packet error rate than PC scheme.

  8. Broad spectral sensitivity and improved efficiency in CuPc/Sub-Pc organic photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Hemant; Kumar, Pankaj; Bhardwaj, Ramil; Sharma, G. D.; Chand, Suresh; Jain, S. C.; Kumar, Vikram

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate organic photovoltaic devices incorporating two donors, namely, copper phthalocyanine (CuPc) and boron sub-phthalocyanine chloride (Sub-Pc) in association with single acceptor fullerene (C60) with sensitivity extending across the visible solar spectrum. It has been found that the absorption in different spectral regions in CuPc and Sub-Pc results in efficient harvesting of incident light photons which leads to enhanced power conversion efficiency (η). An enhancement in η from 0.64%, in the device architecture indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/CuPc(20 nm)/C60(40 nm)/bathophenanthroline (BPhen) (8 nm)/Al(150 nm), to ~1.3% in the optimized device having a 2 nm layer of Sub-Pc in the geometry ITO/CuPc(18 nm)/Sub-Pc(2 nm)/C60 (40 nm)/BPhen (8 nm)/Al(150 nm) has been observed. This enhancement in η is dominantly attributed to the increment in short circuit current density (Jsc) due to efficient photon harvesting by incorporation of dual donors.

  9. Fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Linkevicius, Marius; Anderssen, Jytte Mark; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline after exposure to adverse conditions in vitro and in vivo. Methods Survival in response to low pH, bile salts, oxidative stress and human serum was examined for E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline due to single mutations that caused increased efflux (marR, lon) or impaired LPS (rfaC, rfaE, lpcA). An in vitro competition assay was used to determine growth fitness defects. Competitive fitness was assessed using mouse infection models. MICs, exponential growth rates and expression levels of efflux-related genes were measured for genetically reconstructed double and triple mutants. Results The LPS mutants were 48–85-fold more susceptible to bile salts compared with the ERN mutants and the WT. As shown by in vitro competitions, the fitness reduction was 0.3%–13% for ERN mutants and ∼24% for LPS mutants. During in vivo survival experiments, LPS mutants were outcompeted by the WT strain in the thigh infection model. Constructed double ERN and LPS mutants showed additive and synergistic increases in tigecycline MICs. Conclusions Generally, reduced susceptibility to tigecycline caused a decrease in fitness under stressful in vitro and in vivo conditions with ERN mutants being fitter than LPS mutants. When combined, ERN mutations caused a synergistic increase in the MIC of tigecycline. These findings could explain why clinical resistance to tigecycline in E. coli is mainly associated with up-regulation of the AcrAB efflux system. PMID:26851608

  10. The IBM PC at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Like many large companies, Ames relies very much on its computing power to get work done. And, like many other large companies, finding the IBM PC a reliable tool, Ames uses it for many of the same types of functions as other companies. Presentation and clarification needs demand much of graphics packages. Programming and text editing needs require simpler, more-powerful packages. The storage space needed by NASA's scientists and users for the monumental amounts of data that Ames needs to keep demand the best database packages that are large and easy to use. Availability to the Micom Switching Network combines the powers of the IBM PC with the capabilities of other computers and mainframes and allows users to communicate electronically. These four primary capabilities of the PC are vital to the needs of NASA's users and help to continue and support the vast amounts of work done by the NASA employees.

  11. Emissions tracking system (ETS-PC) software

    SciTech Connect

    Weatherbee, J. Jr.; Kress, T.

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. EPA Acid Rain Division developed and is maintaining the Emissions Tracking System (ETS) to receive, store and analyze data from continuous emissions monitors (CEMs) submitted by utilities affected by the 1990 Clean Air Act. This paper will describe ETS-PC, a PC application developed by EPA to assist utilities in analyzing and submitting emission data files each quarter. ETS-PC includes quality assurance software which helps utilities identify possible errors in their quarterly data files (QDFs) prior to submission. It also includes communications software which allows utilities to transfer QDFs via modem directly to the EPA mainframe computer located in Research Triangle Park, NC. After a file is transferred, users are provided with immediate feedback from the mainframe in the form of a file transfer receipt and summary.

  12. Mutations in GANAB, Encoding the Glucosidase IIα Subunit, Cause Autosomal-Dominant Polycystic Kidney and Liver Disease.

    PubMed

    Porath, Binu; Gainullin, Vladimir G; Cornec-Le Gall, Emilie; Dillinger, Elizabeth K; Heyer, Christina M; Hopp, Katharina; Edwards, Marie E; Madsen, Charles D; Mauritz, Sarah R; Banks, Carly J; Baheti, Saurabh; Reddy, Bharathi; Herrero, José Ignacio; Bañales, Jesús M; Hogan, Marie C; Tasic, Velibor; Watnick, Terry J; Chapman, Arlene B; Vigneau, Cécile; Lavainne, Frédéric; Audrézet, Marie-Pierre; Ferec, Claude; Le Meur, Yannick; Torres, Vicente E; Harris, Peter C

    2016-06-01

    Autosomal-dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is a common, progressive, adult-onset disease that is an important cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD), which requires transplantation or dialysis. Mutations in PKD1 or PKD2 (∼85% and ∼15% of resolved cases, respectively) are the known causes of ADPKD. Extrarenal manifestations include an increased level of intracranial aneurysms and polycystic liver disease (PLD), which can be severe and associated with significant morbidity. Autosomal-dominant PLD (ADPLD) with no or very few renal cysts is a separate disorder caused by PRKCSH, SEC63, or LRP5 mutations. After screening, 7%-10% of ADPKD-affected and ∼50% of ADPLD-affected families were genetically unresolved (GUR), suggesting further genetic heterogeneity of both disorders. Whole-exome sequencing of six GUR ADPKD-affected families identified one with a missense mutation in GANAB, encoding glucosidase II subunit α (GIIα). Because PRKCSH encodes GIIβ, GANAB is a strong ADPKD and ADPLD candidate gene. Sanger screening of 321 additional GUR families identified eight further likely mutations (six truncating), and a total of 20 affected individuals were identified in seven ADPKD- and two ADPLD-affected families. The phenotype was mild PKD and variable, including severe, PLD. Analysis of GANAB-null cells showed an absolute requirement of GIIα for maturation and surface and ciliary localization of the ADPKD proteins (PC1 and PC2), and reduced mature PC1 was seen in GANAB(+/-) cells. PC1 surface localization in GANAB(-/-) cells was rescued by wild-type, but not mutant, GIIα. Overall, we show that GANAB mutations cause ADPKD and ADPLD and that the cystogenesis is most likely driven by defects in PC1 maturation. PMID:27259053

  13. Simian virus 40 large T-antigen point mutants that are defective in viral DNA replication but competent in oncogenic transformation.

    PubMed Central

    Manos, M M; Gluzman, Y

    1984-01-01

    The large T antigen of simian virus 40 (SV40) is a multifunctional protein that is essential in both the virus lytic cycle and the oncogenic transformation of cells by SV40. To investigate the role of the numerous biochemical and physiological activities of T antigen in the lytic and transformation processes, we have studied DNA replication-deficient, transformation-competent large T-antigen mutants. Here we describe the genetic and biochemical analyses of two such mutants, C2/SV40 and C11/SV40. The mutants were isolated by rescuing the integrated SV40 DNA from C2 and C11 cells (CV-1 cell lines transformed with UV-irradiated SV40). The mutant viral early regions were cloned into the plasmid vector pK1 to generate pC2 and pC11. The mutations that are responsible for the deficiency in viral DNA replication were localized by marker rescue. Subsequent DNA sequencing revealed point mutations that predict amino acid substitutions in the carboxyl third of the protein in both mutants. The pC2 mutation predicts the change of Lys----Arg at amino acid 516. pC11 has two mutations, one predicting a change of Pro----Ser at residue 522, and another predicting a Pro----Arg change at amino acid 549. The two C11 mutations were separated from each other to form two distinct viral genomes in pC11A and pC11B. pC2, pC11, pC11A, and pC11B are able to transform both primary and established rodent cell cultures. The C11 and C11A T antigens are defective in ATPase activity, suggesting that wild-type levels of ATPase activity are not necessary for the oncogenic transformation of cells by T antigen. Images PMID:6330530

  14. Mannosylerythritol lipid increases levels of galactoceramide in and neurite outgrowth from PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Shibahara, M; Zhao, X; Wakamatsu, Y; Nomura, N; Nakahara, T; Jin, C; Nagaso, H; Murata, T; Yokoyama, K K

    2000-07-01

    We report here that a microbial extracellular glycolipid,mannosylerythritol lipid (MEL), induces the outgrowth ofneurites from and enhances the activity of acetylcholinesterase(AChE) in PC12 pheochromocytoma cells. Furthermore, treatment ofPC12 cells with MEL increased levels of galactosylceramide(Galbeta1-1'Cer; GalCer). Exposure of PC12 cells to exogenous GalCer caused the dose-dependent outgrowth ofneurites. By contrast, treatment of PC12 cells with nerve growthfactor (NGF) did not increase the level of GalCer in the cells. The neurite-related morphological changes induced by GalCerdifferend from those induced by NGF, indicating differencesbetween the signal transduction pathways triggered by NGF and by GalCer. PMID:19002832

  15. Histidine-rich human salivary peptides are inhibitors of proprotein convertases furin and PC7 but act as substrates for PC1.

    PubMed

    Basak, A; Ernst, B; Brewer, D; Seidah, N G; Munzer, J S; Lazure, C; Lajoie, G A

    1997-06-01

    A 32 amino acid peptide called histatin-3 (H3; 22% His) and its N-terminal 24 amino acid fragment histatin-5 (H5, 33% His), are found in human saliva and possess powerful antimicrobial properties. These His-rich peptides have been synthesized by Fmoc-based solid-phase chemistry. Their sequences are: DSHAKRHHGYKRKFHEKHHSHRGYRSNYLYDN (H3) and DSHAKRHHGYKRKFHEKHHSHRGY (H5). In addition, we also prepared two H5 and one H3 mutants. The H5 mutants were: DH5 (all amino acids in D configuration) and H5F (where all His are replaced by Phe at positions 3, 7, 8, 15, 18, 19, 21). The 9-24 segment of H3 with all the His at positions 15,18,19,21 replaced by Tyr was also prepared (delta 1-8 H3Y). The behavior of these five peptides was examined with three proprotein convertases (PC's) which possess cleavage specificity directed towards single and pairs of basic residues. These were: human (h)PC1, an endocrine and neural convertase, hfurin and rat (r)PC7, two widely expressed enzymes. All are serine endoproteases belonging to the kexin/subtilisin family. Our in vitro study revealed that H3 behaves as a substrate for PC1, being cleaved by this endoprotease primarily at a site carboxy terminal to the single Arg25 residue (HRGYR decrease SN). On prolonged incubation some minor cleavage was also observed C-terminal to the first LysArg6 pairs of basic amino acids namely at: HAKR decrease HH, which contains a P4 as well as P'1 and P'2 His residues. The second potential site YKRK12-FH which does not have a P4 basic residues is not cleaved, even upon incubation with excess protease. PC1 only poorly cleaves H5 at the same site mentioned above for H3, i.e., at HAKR decrease HH. As expected, neither the D-amino acid analogue (DH5), nor the Phe and Tyr mutant analogues of the long and short histatins, respectively, are cleaved at all. In contrast to the above findings for hPC1, the convertase hfurin did not cleave any of the five synthetic peptides. Instead, H3 and H5 were found to be

  16. Stretch Your PC Dollars--Buy Clones.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    True, John

    1986-01-01

    Relates how the story of how San Francisco State University evaluated IBM PC look-alikes, considered some of the risks involved, and decided to purchase over 100 of them. Questions of compatibility, vendor longevity, support, and other risk management issues are discussed. (Author/MLW)

  17. New unifying procedure for PC index calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index is a controversial topic within the IAGA scientific community. Since 1997 discussions of the validity of the index to be endorsed as an official IAGA index have ensued. Currently, there are now the three separate PC index versions constructed from the different procedures used at the three institutes: the Arctic and Antarctic Research Institute (AARI), the Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), and the Danish National Space Institute (DTU Space). It is demonstrated in this presentation, that two consistent unifying procedures can be built from the best elements of the three different versions. One procedure uses a set of coefficients aimed at the calculation of final PC index values to be accepted by IAGA. The other procedure uses coefficients aimed at on-line real-time production of preliminary PC index values for Space Weather monitoring applications. For each of the two cases the same procedure is used for the northern (PCN) and the southern (PCS) polar cap indices, and the derived PCN and PCS coefficients are similar.

  18. NASTRAN data deck generation on the PC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guyan, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    Using two commercial programs an application was developed to aid in generating a run-ready NASTRAN data deck on the PC. Macros are used to access relevant reference material and card files while editing the deck. The application can be easily customized to suit individual or group needs.

  19. Mathematics Instruction and the Tablet PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fister, K. Renee; McCarthy, Maeve L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of tablet PCs in teaching is a relatively new phenomenon. A cross between a notebook computer and a personal digital assistant (PDA), the tablet PC has all of the features of a notebook with the additional capability that the screen can also be used for input. Tablet PCs are usually equipped with a stylus that allows the user to write on…

  20. Jargon that Computes: Today's PC Terminology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crawford, Walt

    1997-01-01

    Discusses PC (personal computer) and telecommunications terminology in context: Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN); Asymmetric Digital Subscriber Line (ADSL); cable modems; satellite downloads; T1 and T3 lines; magnitudes ("giga-,""nano-"); Central Processing Unit (CPU); Random Access Memory (RAM); Universal Serial Bus (USB); "Firewire,"…

  1. PC Kiosk Trends in Rural India

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toyama, Kentaro; Kiri, Karishma; Menon, Deepak; Sethi, Suneet; Pal, Joyojeet; Srinivasan, Janaki

    2006-01-01

    This article presents a series of preliminary, quantitative results on rural PC kiosks in India. An analysis of the data confirms many expected trends and correlations and shows that kiosks still face the challenge of sustainability as a business. This study is based on questionnaires presented to kiosk operators and customers of kiosks operated…

  2. SCIRR39 promotes neurite extension via RhoA in NGF-induced PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C F; Liu, Y; Ni, Y L; Yang, J W; Hui, H D; Sun, Z B; Liu, S J

    2013-01-01

    SCIRR39 is an identified upregulated gene in rat primary neuron injury and/or regeneration process with roles largely unexplored. Using real-time quantitative PCR, Western blotting and immunofluorescence, SCIRR39 expression was detected in normal PC12 cells and upregulated in differentiated cells. The results of cell proliferation by Cell Counting Kit and cell cycle by flow cytometry indicated that SCIRR39 inhibited cell proliferation and induced the decrease in S phase. Importantly, immunofluorescent and RhoA pull-down assays showed that SCIRR39 strongly affected the neurite extension of NGF-treated PC12 cells through a RhoA-dependent mechanism, but the truncated mutants of SCIRR39 containing a truncation from 141AA to 211AA or from 397AA to 424AA failed to mock the SCIRR39 effect on neurite extension. Moreover, change of SCIRR39 expression in NGF-treated PC12 cells regulated the expression and phosphorylation of Fyn, a regulator of RhoA activity, but not the expression of ROCK II protein. Finally, immunofluorescence and RhoA pull-down assays revealed that obvious inhibition of neurite extension by SCIRR39 shRNA was reversed by RhoA inhibitor C3-transferase. Our results indicated that SCIRR39 increased the neurite extension in NGF-treated PC12 cells via RhoA, suggesting that SCIRR39 contributes to the regeneration of neuron injury by specifically altering the differentiation program.

  3. SB203580 promotes EGF-stimulated early morphological differentiation in PC12 cell through activating ERK pathway.

    PubMed

    New, L; Li, Y; Ge, B; Zhong, H; Mansbridge, J; Liu, K; Han, J

    2001-01-01

    MAP kinases have important role in PC12 cell differentiation, since the activities of both extracellular regulated protein kinase (ERK) and p38 have been indicated as necessary signal for PC12 cell differentiation. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) and NGF both activate ERK and p38 in PC12 cells, but only NGF trigger differentiation. It has been proposed that the duration of ERK activation determines the switch from proliferation to differentiation, since EGF causes more transient activation of ERK than NGF in PC12 cells. Here we report that treatment of PC12 cells with EGF in the presence of SB203580, a widely used p38 inhibitor, caused differentiation. The pro-differentiation effect of SB203580 in EGF-treated PC12 cells was found to be independent of its function of p38 inhibition but was through an effect on the ERK pathway that has been recently reported (Kalmes et al. [1999] FEBS Lett. 444: 71-74; Hall-Jackson et al. [1999] Onc. 18: 2047-2054). We found that SB203580 by itself did not affect the activity of ERK1/2 but significantly extended EGF-induced ERK activation in PC12 cells, which resulted in early morphological differentiation. Our data indicated that although both ERK and p38 are required for PC12 cell differentiation, activation of p38 is not required when ERK is superactivated. Our data provided further evidence for the threshold theory that differentiation is determined by the duration of ERK activation.

  4. Identification of Arabidopsis rat Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yanmin; Nam, Jaesung; Humara, Jaime M.; Mysore, Kirankumar S.; Lee, Lan-Ying; Cao, Hongbin; Valentine, Lisa; Li, Jingling; Kaiser, Anthony D.; Kopecky, Andrea L.; Hwang, Hau-Hsuan; Bhattacharjee, Saikat; Rao, Praveen K.; Tzfira, Tzvi; Rajagopal, Jyothi; Yi, HoChul; Veena; Yadav, Badam S.; Crane, Yan M.; Lin, Kui; Larcher, Yves; Gelvin, Matthew J.K.; Knue, Marnie; Ramos, Cynthia; Zhao, Xiaowen; Davis, Susan J.; Kim, Sang-Ic; Ranjith-Kumar, C.T.; Choi, Yoo-Jin; Hallan, Vipin K.; Chattopadhyay, Sudip; Sui, Xiangzhen; Ziemienowicz, Alicja; Matthysse, Ann G.; Citovsky, Vitaly; Hohn, Barbara; Gelvin, Stanton B.

    2003-01-01

    Limited knowledge currently exists regarding the roles of plant genes and proteins in the Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation process. To understand the host contribution to transformation, we carried out root-based transformation assays to identify Arabidopsis mutants that are resistant to Agrobacterium transformation (rat mutants). To date, we have identified 126 rat mutants by screening libraries of T-DNA insertion mutants and by using various “reverse genetic” approaches. These mutants disrupt expression of genes of numerous categories, including chromatin structural and remodeling genes, and genes encoding proteins implicated in nuclear targeting, cell wall structure and metabolism, cytoskeleton structure and function, and signal transduction. Here, we present an update on the identification and characterization of these rat mutants. PMID:12805582

  5. ECB deacylase mutants

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Frances H.; Shao, Zhixin; Zhao, Huimin; Giver, Lorraine J.

    2002-01-01

    A method for in vitro mutagenesis and recombination of polynucleotide sequences based on polymerase-catalyzed extension of primer oligonucleotides is disclosed. The method involves priming template polynucleotide(s) with random-sequences or defined-sequence primers to generate a pool of short DNA fragments with a low level of point mutations. The DNA fragments are subjected to denaturization followed by annealing and further enzyme-catalyzed DNA polymerization. This procedure is repeated a sufficient number of times to produce full-length genes which comprise mutants of the original template polynucleotides. These genes can be further amplified by the polymerase chain reaction and cloned into a vector for expression of the encoded proteins.

  6. Comparison of somatic reversions between the ivory allele and transposon-caused mutant alleles at the white locus of Drosophila melanogaster after larval treatment with X rays and ethyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Ryo, H.; Yoo, M.A.; Fujikawa, K.; Kondo, S.

    1985-07-01

    Somatic reversion of strains with the ivory (wi) allele, a mutation associated with a tandem duplication of a DNA sequence at the white locus, increased with the age of larvae at the time of X-irradiation as expected from the increase in the number of target cells. In contrast, two independently isolated strains with unstable w+ loci associated with insertion of transposable elements showed higher reversion frequencies after treatment with X rays or ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) at early larval stages than at late stages. Nevertheless, both the wi strain and the two unstable w+ strains reverted at nearly equal rates after treatment with X rays or EMS at early larval stages. Possible similarity in hot spot structure for the high reversibility of the two types of mutations is discussed in relation to production of presumed mutator-type cofactors specific to the transposon-caused mutations at early larval stages.

  7. Differences between the catalytic properties of recombinant human PC2 and endogenous rat PC2.

    PubMed Central

    Bailyes, E M; Shennan, K I; Usac, E F; Arden, S D; Guest, P C; Docherty, K; Hutton, J C

    1995-01-01

    Human prohormone convertase PC2 was expressed in Xenopus oocytes and its properties were compared with those of the Type-2 endopeptidase of rat insulin secretory granules, previously identified as PC2 [Bennett, Bailyes, Nielson, Guest, Rutherford, Arden and Hutton (1992) J. Biol. Chem. 267, 15229-15236]. Recombinant PC2 had the same substrate specificity as the Type-2 endopeptidase, cleaving at the CA-junction (Lys64, Arg65) of human des-31,32-proinsulin to generate insulin; little activity was found toward human des-64,65-proinsulin or proinsulin itself. Recombinant PC2 was maximally active in 5-7 mM Ca2+ (K0.5 = 1.6 mM) whereas the Type-2 endopeptidase was maximally active in 0.5-1 mM Ca2+ (K0.5 = 40 microM). Both enzymes had a pH optimum of 5.0-5.5 but the Type-2 endopeptidase was active over a wider pH range. Two molecular forms of recombinant PC2 (71 kDa and 68 kDa) were found, both had an intact C-terminus but differed by the presence of the propeptide. The endogenous PC2 comprised several overlapping forms (size range 64-68 kDa), approximately two-thirds of which lacked C-terminal immunoreactivity. Part of the size difference between recombinant and endogenous PC2 was attributable to differences in N-glycosylation. The different post-translational proteolytic modifications of recombinant and endogenous PC2 did not account for the different pH and Ca2+ sensitivities shown by the enzymes. A modulating effect of carbohydrate on enzyme activity could not be excluded. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7626024

  8. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin.

    PubMed

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT.

  9. Huntington's disease cerebrospinal fluid seeds aggregation of mutant huntingtin

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Z; Dai, W; van Erp, T G M; Overman, J; Demuro, A; Digman, M A; Hatami, A; Albay, R; Sontag, E M; Potkin, K T; Ling, S; Macciardi, F; Bunney, W E; Long, J D; Paulsen, J S; Ringman, J M; Parker, I; Glabe, C; Thompson, L M; Chiu, W; Potkin, S G

    2015-01-01

    Huntington's disease (HD), a progressive neurodegenerative disease, is caused by an expanded CAG triplet repeat producing a mutant huntingtin protein (mHTT) with a polyglutamine-repeat expansion. Onset of symptoms in mutant huntingtin gene-carrying individuals remains unpredictable. We report that synthetic polyglutamine oligomers and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from BACHD transgenic rats and from human HD subjects can seed mutant huntingtin aggregation in a cell model and its cell lysate. Our studies demonstrate that seeding requires the mutant huntingtin template and may reflect an underlying prion-like protein propagation mechanism. Light and cryo-electron microscopy show that synthetic seeds nucleate and enhance mutant huntingtin aggregation. This seeding assay distinguishes HD subjects from healthy and non-HD dementia controls without overlap (blinded samples). Ultimately, this seeding property in HD patient CSF may form the basis of a molecular biomarker assay to monitor HD and evaluate therapies that target mHTT. PMID:26100538

  10. Poliovirus Mutants Resistant to Neutralization with Soluble Cell Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplan, Gerardo; Peters, David; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    1990-12-01

    Poliovirus mutants resistant to neutralization with soluble cellular receptor were isolated. Replication of soluble receptor-resistant (srr) mutants was blocked by a monoclonal antibody directed against the HeLa cell receptor for poliovirus, indicating that the mutants use this receptor to enter cells. The srr mutants showed reduced binding to HeLa cells and cell membranes. However, the reduced binding phenotype did not have a major impact on viral replication, as judged by plaque size and one-step growth curves. These results suggest that the use of soluble receptors as antiviral agents could lead to the selection of neutralization-resistant mutants that are able to bind cell surface receptors, replicate, and cause disease.

  11. IBM PC enhances the world's future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Jozelle

    1988-01-01

    Although the purpose of this research is to illustrate the importance of computers to the public, particularly the IBM PC, present examinations will include computers developed before the IBM PC was brought into use. IBM, as well as other computing facilities, began serving the public years ago, and is continuing to find ways to enhance the existence of man. With new developments in supercomputers like the Cray-2, and the recent advances in artificial intelligence programming, the human race is gaining knowledge at a rapid pace. All have benefited from the development of computers in the world; not only have they brought new assets to life, but have made life more and more of a challenge everyday.

  12. A PC based fault diagnosis expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marsh, Christopher A.

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Status Assessment (ISA) prototype expert system performs system level fault diagnosis using rules and models created by the user. The ISA evolved from concepts to a stand-alone demonstration prototype using OPS5 on a LISP Machine. The LISP based prototype was rewritten in C and the C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) to run on a Personal Computer (PC) and a graphics workstation. The ISA prototype has been used to demonstrate fault diagnosis functions of Space Station Freedom's Operation Management System (OMS). This paper describes the development of the ISA prototype from early concepts to the current PC/workstation version used today and describes future areas of development for the prototype.

  13. PC-based automation system streamlines operations

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, J.

    1995-10-01

    The continued emergence of PC-based automation systems in the modern compressor station is driving the need for personnel who have the special skills need to support them. However, the dilemma is that operating budget restraints limit the overall number of people available to operate and maintain compressor stations. An ideal solution is to deploy automation systems which can be easily understood and supported by existing compressor station personnel. This paper reviews such a system developed by Waukesha-Pearce Industries, Inc.

  14. Virtual Reality at the PC Level

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dean, John

    1998-01-01

    The main objective of my research has been to incorporate virtual reality at the desktop level; i.e., create virtual reality software that can be run fairly inexpensively on standard PC's. The standard language used for virtual reality on PC's is VRML (Virtual Reality Modeling Language). It is a new language so it is still undergoing a lot of changes. VRML 1.0 came out only a couple years ago and VRML 2.0 came out around last September. VRML is an interpreted language that is run by a web browser plug-in. It is fairly flexible in terms of allowing you to create different shapes and animations. Before this summer, I knew very little about virtual reality and I did not know VRML at all. I learned the VRML language by reading two books and experimenting on a PC. The following topics are presented: CAD to VRML, VRML 1.0 to VRML 2.0, VRML authoring tools, VRML browsers, finding virtual reality applications, the AXAF project, the VRML generator program, web communities and future plans.

  15. PC8 [corrected], a new member of the convertase family.

    PubMed

    Bruzzaniti, A; Goodge, K; Jay, P; Taviaux, S A; Lam, M H; Berta, P; Martin, T J; Moseley, J M; Gillespie, M T

    1996-03-15

    A novel subtilisin-like protein, PC8, was identified by PCR using degenerate primers to conserved amino acid residues in the catalytic region of members of the prohormone convertase family. PC8 was predicted to be 785 residues long and was structurally related to the mammalian convertases furin, PACE4, PC1 and PC2, sharing more than 50% amino acid identity over the catalytic region with these family members. PC8 possessed the catalytically important Asp, His, Asn and Ser amino acids, the homo B domain of this family of enzymes and a C-terminal hydrophobic sequence indicative of a transmembrane domain. Structurally, PC8 is more related to furin and PACE4 than to PC1 or PC2. Like furin and PACE4, PC8 mRNA was found to be widely expressed; this is in contrast with PC1 and PC2, which have a restricted distribution. Two transcripts, of 4.5 and 3.5 kb, were detected in both human cell lines and rat tissues. Unlike furin and PACE4, both of which map to chromosome 15, PC8 maps to chromosome 11q23-11q24, suggesting that this gene may have resulted from an ancient gene duplication event from either furin or PACE4, or conversely that these genes arose from PC8. PMID:8615762

  16. Mutant SOD1-expressing astrocytes release toxic factors that trigger motoneuron death by inducing hyperexcitability.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Elsa; Izaurieta, Pamela; Weiss, Alexandra; Mir, Franco R; Rojas, Patricio; Gonzalez, David; Rojas, Fabiola; Brown, Robert H; Madrid, Rodolfo; van Zundert, Brigitte

    2013-06-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating paralytic disorder caused by dysfunction and degeneration of motoneurons starting in adulthood. Recent studies using cell or animal models document that astrocytes expressing disease-causing mutations of human superoxide dismutase 1 (hSOD1) contribute to the pathogenesis of ALS by releasing a neurotoxic factor(s). Neither the mechanism by which this neurotoxic factor induces motoneuron death nor its cellular site of action has been elucidated. Here we show that acute exposure of primary wild-type spinal cord cultures to conditioned medium derived from astrocytes expressing mutant SOD1 (ACM-hSOD1(G93A)) increases persistent sodium inward currents (PC(Na)), repetitive firing, and intracellular calcium transients, leading to specific motoneuron death days later. In contrast to TTX, which paradoxically increased twofold the amplitude of calcium transients and killed motoneurons, reduction of hyperexcitability by other specific (mexiletine) and nonspecific (spermidine and riluzole) blockers of voltage-sensitive sodium (Na(v)) channels restored basal calcium transients and prevented motoneuron death induced by ACM-hSOD1(G93A). These findings suggest that riluzole, the only FDA-approved drug with known benefits for ALS patients, acts by inhibiting hyperexcitability. Together, our data document that a critical element mediating the non-cell-autonomous toxicity of ACM-hSOD1(G93A) on motoneurons is increased excitability, an observation with direct implications for therapy of ALS. PMID:23486205

  17. Acyl-chain remodeling of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant defective in de novo and salvage phosphatidylcholine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kishino, Hideyuki; Eguchi, Hiroki; Takagi, Keiko; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2014-03-01

    A yeast strain, in which endogenous phosphatidylcholine (PC) synthesis is controllable, was constructed by the replacement of the promoter of PCT1, encoding CTP:phosphocholine cytidylyltransferase, with GAL1 promoter in a double deletion mutant of PEM1 and PEM2, encoding phosphatidylethanolamine methyltransferase and phospholipid methyltransferase, respectively. This mutant did not grow in the glucose-containing medium, but the addition of dioctanoyl-phosphatidylcholine (diC8PC) supported its growth. Analyses of the metabolism of (13)C-labeled diC8PC ((methyl-(13)C)3-diC8PC) in this strain using electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry revealed that it was converted to PC species containing acyl residues of 16 or 18 carbons at both sn-1 and sn-2 positions. In addition, both acyl residues of (methyl-(13)C)3-diC8PC were replaced with 16:1 acyl chains in the in vitro reaction using the yeast cell extract in the presence of palmitoleoyl-CoA. These results indicate that PC containing short acyl residues was remodeled to those with acyl chains of physiological length in yeast.

  18. Mutant PAX6 downregulates prohormone convertase 2 expression in mouse islets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Cao, Wenwan; Zhou, Shixin; Shen, Liang; Wen, Jinhua

    2013-11-01

    Transcriptional factor paired box 6 (PAX6) is very important for the development of the eyes, central nervous system, and pancreas. PAX6 mutations are associated with a diabetic phenotype and abnormal glucose metabolism. Our previous study showed that PAX6 directly bound to and activated the prohormone convertase 1/3 (Pc1/3) gene promoter and subsequently regulated proinsulin processing. Prohormone convertase 2 (PC2) is the essential enzyme for pancreatic proinsulin processing. To study the regulation of PAX6 in Pc2 expression, we did research on the pancreas of Pax6 R266Stop mutant mice, where truncated mutations happened in the C-terminal of the PAX6 protein. Our studies showed that the mutant PAX6 protein was stable and regulated the activity of Pc2 promoter as shown by luciferase activity assays. We found that the wild-type PAX6 protein imparts a transcriptional effect, and the mutant PAX6 can also regulate the downstream molecules. The results provide new insights into the mechanism of truncated PAX6 in regulating the functions of the pancreas and endocrine system. PMID:24047795

  19. The nerve growth factor-responsive PC12 cell line does not express the Myc dimerization partner Max.

    PubMed Central

    Hopewell, R; Ziff, E B

    1995-01-01

    Heterodimerization of Max with the nuclear oncoprotein Myc and the differentiation-associated proteins Mad and Mxi1 enables these factors to bind E-box sites in DNA and control genes implicated in cell proliferation and differentiation. We show that in the PC12 pheochromocytoma tumor cell line, functional Max protein is not expressed because of the synthesis of a mutant max transcript. This transcript encodes a protein incapable of homo- or heterodimerization. Furthermore, the mutant Max protein, unlike wild-type Max, is incapable of repressing transcription from an E-box element. Synthesis of mutant max transcripts appears to be due to a homozygous chromosomal alteration within the max gene. Reintroduction of max into PC12 cells results in repression of E-box-dependent transcription and a reduction in growth rate, which may explain the loss of Max expression either during the growth of the pheochromocytoma or in subsequent passage of the PC12 cell line in vitro. Finally, the ability of these cells to divide, differentiate, and apoptose in the absence of Max demonstrates for the first time that these processes can occur via Max- and possibly Myc-independent mechanisms. PMID:7791753

  20. Methods of producing protoporphyrin IX and bacterial mutants therefor

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Jizhong; Qiu, Dongru; He, Zhili; Xie, Ming

    2016-03-01

    The presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed in certain embodiments to a method of producing protoporphyrin IX by (1) cultivating a strain of Shewanella bacteria in a culture medium under conditions suitable for growth thereof, and (2) recovering the protoporphyrin IX from the culture medium. The strain of Shewanella bacteria comprises at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX. In certain embodiments of the method, the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or of shew_1140. In other embodiments, the presently disclosed inventive concepts are directed to mutant strains of Shewanella bacteria having at least one mutant hemH gene which is incapable of normal expression, thereby causing an accumulation of protoporphyrin IX during cultivation of the bacteria. In certain embodiments the strain of Shewanella bacteria is a strain of S. loihica, and more specifically may be S. loihica PV-4. In certain embodiments, the mutant hemH gene of the strain of Shewanella bacteria may be a mutant of shew_2229 and/or shew_1140.

  1. Generation and identification of Arabidopsis EMS mutants.

    PubMed

    Qu, Li-Jia; Qin, Genji

    2014-01-01

    EMS mutant analysis is a routine experiment to identify new players in a specific biological process or signaling pathway using forward genetics. It begins with the generation of mutants by treating Arabidopsis seeds with EMS. A mutant with a phenotype of interest (mpi) is obtained by screening plants of the M2 generation under a specific condition. Once the phenotype of the mpi is confirmed in the next generation, map-based cloning is performed to locate the mpi mutation. During the map-based cloning, mpi plants (Arabidopsis Columbia-0 (Col-0) ecotype background) are first crossed with Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta (Ler) ecotype, and the presence or absence of the phenotype in the F1 hybrids indicates whether the mpi is recessive or dominant. F2 plants with phenotypes similar to the mpi, if the mpi is recessive, or those without the phenotype, if the mpi is dominant, are used as the mapping population. As few as 24 such plants are selected for rough mapping. After finding one marker (MA) linked to the mpi locus or mutant phenotype, more markers near MA are tested to identify recombinants. The recombinants indicate the interval in which the mpi is located. Additional recombinants and molecular markers are then required to narrow down the interval. This is an iterative process of narrowing down the mapping interval until no further recombinants or molecular markers are available. The genes in the mapping interval are then sequenced to look for the mutation. In the last step, the wild-type or mutated gene is cloned to generate binary constructs. Complementation or recapitulation provides the most convincing evidence in determining the mutation that causes the phenotype of the mpi. Here, we describe the procedures for generating mutants with EMS and analyzing EMS mutations by map-based cloning.

  2. Study of Pc1 pearl structures observed at multi-point ground stations in Russia, Japan, and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Chae-Woo; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Poddelsky, Igor; Shevtsov, Boris

    2014-12-01

    We investigate possible generation mechanisms of Pc1 pearl structures using multi-point induction magnetometers in Athabasca in Canada, Magadan in Russia, and Moshiri in Japan. We selected two Pc1 pulsations that were simultaneously observed at the three stations and applied a polarization analysis. In case 1, on 8 April 2010, Pc1 pearl structures were slightly different in some time intervals at different stations, and their polarization angles varied depending on the frequencies at the three stations. Case 2, on 11 April 2010, showed Pc1 pearl structures that were similar at different stations, and their polarization angle was independent of frequency at all three stations. In order to understand these differences, we performed two simple model calculations of Pc1 pearl structures under different conditions. The first model assumes that Pc1 waves propagated from a latitudinally extended source with different frequencies at different latitudes to the observation points, representing beating of these waves in the ionosphere. The second model considers Pc1 waves for which different frequencies are mixed at a point source to cause the beating at the source point, indicating that the Pc1 pearl structures are generated in the magnetosphere. The first model shows slightly different waveforms at different stations. In contrast, the second model shows identical waveforms at different stations. From these results, we conclude that, in case 1, Pc1 pearl structures were caused by beating in the ionosphere. On the other hand, in case 2, they were the result of magnetospheric effects. We suggest that beating processes in the ionosphere could be one of the generation mechanisms of Pc1 pearl structures.

  3. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... DISTRIBUTE POSTAGE EVIDENCING SYSTEMS § 501.16 PC postage payment methodology. (a) The PC Postage customer is... issues a refund to a customer for any unused postage in a Postage Evidencing System. After...

  4. High efficacy of third generation EGFR inhibitor AZD9291 in a leptomeningeal carcinomatosis model with EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, Shigeki; Ebi, Hiromichi; Arai, Sachiko; Takeuchi, Shinji; Yamada, Tadaaki; Mochizuki, Satsuki; Okada, Yasunori; Nakada, Mitsutoshi; Murakami, Takashi; Yano, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) remarkably decreases the quality of life of EGFR-mutant lung cancer patients. In contrast to the lesions outside the central nervous system (CNS), molecular mechanisms of EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) resistance in CNS lesions including LMC are largely unknown. In this study, we established an in vivo imaging model for LMC with EGFR mutant lung cancer cell lines harboring an exon 19 deletion in EGFR and evaluated the effect of first generation EGFR-TKIs, erlotinib, second generation afatinib, and third generation AZD9291. In PC-9/ffluc model, erlotinib treatment slowed the development of LMC. Importantly, treatment with afatinib or AZD9291 apparently delayed the development of LMC. Moreover, treatment with a higher dose of AZD9291, also associated with inhibited phosphorylation of EGFR downstream molecule S6, regressed LMC refractory to the aforementioned EGFR-TKI treatments. These observations suggest that the third generation EGFR-TKI AZD9291 may be an effective treatment for first or second generation EGFR-TKI resistant LMC caused by EGFR-mutant lung cancer. PMID:26716903

  5. Cell-cycle-dependent PC-PLC regulation by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Fu, Da; Ma, Yushui; Wu, Wei; Zhu, Xuchao; Jia, Chengyou; Zhao, Qianlei; Zhang, Chunyi; Wu, Xing Zhong

    2009-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine-specific phospholipase C (PC-PLC) is involved in the cell signal transduction, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. The mechanism of its action, however, has not been fully understood, particularly, the role of PC-PLC in the cell cycle. In the present study, we found that cell division cycle 20 homolog (Cdc20) and PC-PLC were co-immunoprecipitated reciprocally by either antibody in rat hepatoma cells CBRH-7919 as well as in rat liver tissue. Using confocal microscopy, we found that PC-PLC and Cdc20 were co-localized in the perinuclear endoplasmic reticulum region (the "juxtanuclear quality control" compartment, JUNQ). The expression level and activities of PC-PLC changed in a cell-cycle-dependent manner and were inversely correlated with the expression of Cdc20. Intriguingly, Cdc20 overexpression altered the subcellular localization and distribution of PC-PLC, and caused PC-PLC degradation by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway (UPP). Taken together, our data indicate that PC-PLC regulation in cell cycles is controlled by APC/C(Cdc20)-mediated UPP.

  6. PC, a Novel Oral Insecticidal Toxin from Bacillus bombysepticus Involved in Host Lethality via APN and BtR-175

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Jin, Shengkai; Wu, Yuqian; Fu, Bohua; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-01-01

    Insect pests have developed resistance to chemical insecticides, insecticidal toxins as bioinsecticides or genetic protection built into crops. Consequently, novel, orally active insecticidal toxins would be valuable biological alternatives for pest control. Here, we identified a novel insecticidal toxin, parasporal crystal toxin (PC), from Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb). PC shows oral pathogenic activity and lethality towards silkworms and Cry1Ac-resistant Helicoverpa armigera strains. In vitro assays, PC after activated by trypsin binds to BmAPN4 and BtR-175 by interacting with CR7 and CR12 fragments. Additionally, trypsin-activated PC demonstrates cytotoxicity against Sf9 cells expressing BmAPN4, revealing that BmAPN4 serves as a functional receptor that participates in Bb and PC pathogenicity. In vivo assay, knocking out BtR-175 increased the resistance of silkworms to PC. These data suggest that PC is the first protein with insecticidal activity identified in Bb that is capable of causing silkworm death via receptor interactions, representing an important advance in our understanding of the toxicity of Bb and the contributions of interactions between microbial pathogens and insects to disease pathology. Furthermore, the potency of PC as an insecticidal protein makes it a good candidate for inclusion in integrated agricultural pest management systems. PMID:26057951

  7. PC, a Novel Oral Insecticidal Toxin from Bacillus bombysepticus Involved in Host Lethality via APN and BtR-175.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ping; Cheng, Tingcai; Jin, Shengkai; Wu, Yuqian; Fu, Bohua; Long, Renwen; Zhao, Ping; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-06-09

    Insect pests have developed resistance to chemical insecticides, insecticidal toxins as bioinsecticides or genetic protection built into crops. Consequently, novel, orally active insecticidal toxins would be valuable biological alternatives for pest control. Here, we identified a novel insecticidal toxin, parasporal crystal toxin (PC), from Bacillus bombysepticus (Bb). PC shows oral pathogenic activity and lethality towards silkworms and Cry1Ac-resistant Helicoverpa armigera strains. In vitro assays, PC after activated by trypsin binds to BmAPN4 and BtR-175 by interacting with CR7 and CR12 fragments. Additionally, trypsin-activated PC demonstrates cytotoxicity against Sf9 cells expressing BmAPN4, revealing that BmAPN4 serves as a functional receptor that participates in Bb and PC pathogenicity. In vivo assay, knocking out BtR-175 increased the resistance of silkworms to PC. These data suggest that PC is the first protein with insecticidal activity identified in Bb that is capable of causing silkworm death via receptor interactions, representing an important advance in our understanding of the toxicity of Bb and the contributions of interactions between microbial pathogens and insects to disease pathology. Furthermore, the potency of PC as an insecticidal protein makes it a good candidate for inclusion in integrated agricultural pest management systems.

  8. Functional analysis and drug response to zinc and D-penicillamine in stable ATP7B mutant hepatic cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Chandhok, Gursimran; Horvath, Judit; Aggarwal, Annu; Bhatt, Mohit; Zibert, Andree; Schmidt, Hartmut HJ

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the effect of anti-copper treatment for survival of hepatic cells expressing different ATP7B mutations in cell culture. METHODS: The most common Wilson disease (WD) mutations p.H1069Q, p.R778L and p.C271*, found in the ATP7B gene encoding a liver copper transporter, were studied. The mutations represent major genotypes of the United States and Europe, China, and India, respectively. A human hepatoma cell line previously established to carry a knockout of ATP7B was used to stably express WD mutants. mRNA and protein expression of mutant ATP7B, survival of cells, apoptosis, and protein trafficking were determined. RESULTS: Low temperature increased ATP7B protein expression in several mutants. Intracellular ATP7B localization was significantly impaired in the mutants. Mutants were classified as high, moderate, and no survival based on their viability on exposure to toxic copper. Survival of mutant p.H1069Q and to a lesser extent p.C271* improved by D-penicillamine (DPA) treatment, while mutant p.R778L showed a pronounced response to zinc (Zn) treatment. Overall, DPA treatment resulted in higher cell survival as compared to Zn treatment; however, only combined Zn + DPA treatment fully restored cell viability. CONCLUSION: The data indicate that the basic impact of a genotype might be characterized by analysis of mutant hepatic cell lines. PMID:27122662

  9. The USL NASA PC R and D development environment standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Moreau, Dennis R.

    1984-01-01

    The development environment standards which have been established in order to control usage of the IBM PC/XT development systems and to prevent interference between projects being currently developed on the PC's are discussed. The standards address the following areas: scheduling PC resources; login/logout procedures; training; file naming conventions; hard disk organization; diskette care; backup procedures; and copying policies.

  10. 41 CFR 128-1.5002-8 - Property custodian (PC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Property custodian (PC... Personal Property Management § 128-1.5002-8 Property custodian (PC). An individual responsible for the... required on all actions affecting the personal property within his jurisdiction. The designation as PC...

  11. Identification of Two Nickel Ion-Induced Genes, NCI16 and PcGST1, in Paramecium caudatum

    PubMed Central

    Haga, Nobuyuki; Nakano, Takanari; Ikeda, Masaaki; Katayama, Shigehiro; Awata, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe the isolation of two nickel-induced genes in Paramecium caudatum, NCI16 and PcGST1, by subtractive hybridization. NCI16 encoded a predicted four-transmembrane domain protein (∼16 kDa) of unknown function, and PcGST1 encoded glutathione S-transferase (GST; ∼25 kDa) with GST and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activities. Exposing cells to cobalt chloride also caused the moderate upregulation of NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs. Both nickel sulfate and cobalt chloride dose dependently induced NCI16 and PcGST1 mRNAs, but with different profiles. Nickel treatment caused a continuous increase in PcGST1 and NCI16 mRNA levels for up to 3 and 6 days, respectively, and a notable increase in H2O2 concentrations in P. caudatum. NCI16 expression was significantly enhanced by incubating cells with H2O2, implying that NCI16 induction in the presence of nickel ions is caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS). On the other hand, PcGST1 was highly induced by the antioxidant tert-butylhydroquinone (tBHQ) but not by H2O2, suggesting that different mechanisms mediate the induction of NCI16 and PcGST1. We introduced a luciferase reporter vector with an ∼0.42-kb putative PcGST1 promoter into cells and then exposed the transformants to nickel sulfate. This resulted in significant luciferase upregulation, indicating that the putative PcGST1 promoter contains a nickel-responsive element. Our nickel-inducible system also may be applicable to the efficient expression of proteins that are toxic to host cells or require temporal control. PMID:25001407

  12. Longitudinal frequency variation of long-lasting EMIC Pc1-Pc2 waves localized in the inner magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, K.-H.; Shiokawa, K.; Mann, I. R.; Park, J.-S.; Kwon, H.-J.; Hyun, K.; Jin, H.; Connors, M.

    2016-02-01

    Long-lasting (> 20 h) electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) Pc1-Pc2 waves were observed by the Athabasca (L =˜ 4.6) induction magnetometer and Canadian Array for Realtime Investigations of Magnetic Activity (L =˜ 4-6) fluxgate magnetometers on 5 April 2007. These waves showed a systematic frequency change with local time, the minimum frequency near dusk, and the maximum frequency near dawn. Assuming the plasmapause as a potential source region of the waves, we estimated the plasmapause location from localized proton enhancement (LPE) events observed at NOAA-Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites and METOP-2 satellites. We found that the longitudinal frequency variation of EMIC waves has a clear correlation with the estimated plasmapause location and that the waves are in the frequency band between the equatorial helium and oxygen gyrofrequencies at the estimated plasmapause. With our analysis results we suggest that the LPE events are caused by wave-particle interaction with the helium band EMIC waves generated near the plasmapause.

  13. SnPhPc phthalocyanines with dianion Pc(2-) and radical trianion Pc˙(3-) macrocycles: syntheses, structures, and properties.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Kuzmin, Alexey V; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Khasanov, Salavat S; Ishikawa, Manabu; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2016-06-28

    The interaction of Sn(IV)Cl2Pc with an excess of NaBPh4 in the presence of fullerenes C60 and C70 provides complete dissolution of Sn(IV)Cl2Pc and the formation of blue solutions from which the crystals of [SnPhPc(2-)](+)(BPh4)(-)·C6H14 () or [SnPhPc˙(3-)]·C6H4Cl2 () were selectively isolated. According to the optical spectra, salt contains dianionic Pc(2-) macrocycles, whereas macrocycles are reduced to form the Pc˙(3-) radical trianions in . As a result, the phthalocyanine macrocycle is dianionic in , and the positive charge of Sn(IV) is compensated by the Ph(-), Pc(2-), and BPh4(-) anions in this compound. The formally neutral compound contains two anionic species of Ph(-) and Pc˙(3-) and the Sn(IV) ion as the counter cation. Phenyl substituents are linked to the Sn(IV) atoms by the Sn-C(Ph) bonds of 2.098(2) () and 2.105(2) Å () length. The dianionic Pc(2-) macrocycle significantly deviates from planarity in while Pc˙(3-) is planar in . Salt manifests only a weak impurity EPR signal. Compound manifests an intense EPR signal with g = 2.0046 and a linewidth of 0.5 mT at 298 K due to the presence of Pc˙(3-). Spins are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled in the π-stacking [SnPhPc˙(3-)]2 dimers of with a Weiss temperature of -3 K and the estimated magnetic exchange interaction J/kB = -0.23 K.

  14. SnPhPc phthalocyanines with dianion Pc(2-) and radical trianion Pc˙(3-) macrocycles: syntheses, structures, and properties.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Kuzmin, Alexey V; Nakano, Yoshiaki; Khasanov, Salavat S; Ishikawa, Manabu; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2016-06-28

    The interaction of Sn(IV)Cl2Pc with an excess of NaBPh4 in the presence of fullerenes C60 and C70 provides complete dissolution of Sn(IV)Cl2Pc and the formation of blue solutions from which the crystals of [SnPhPc(2-)](+)(BPh4)(-)·C6H14 () or [SnPhPc˙(3-)]·C6H4Cl2 () were selectively isolated. According to the optical spectra, salt contains dianionic Pc(2-) macrocycles, whereas macrocycles are reduced to form the Pc˙(3-) radical trianions in . As a result, the phthalocyanine macrocycle is dianionic in , and the positive charge of Sn(IV) is compensated by the Ph(-), Pc(2-), and BPh4(-) anions in this compound. The formally neutral compound contains two anionic species of Ph(-) and Pc˙(3-) and the Sn(IV) ion as the counter cation. Phenyl substituents are linked to the Sn(IV) atoms by the Sn-C(Ph) bonds of 2.098(2) () and 2.105(2) Å () length. The dianionic Pc(2-) macrocycle significantly deviates from planarity in while Pc˙(3-) is planar in . Salt manifests only a weak impurity EPR signal. Compound manifests an intense EPR signal with g = 2.0046 and a linewidth of 0.5 mT at 298 K due to the presence of Pc˙(3-). Spins are weakly antiferromagnetically coupled in the π-stacking [SnPhPc˙(3-)]2 dimers of with a Weiss temperature of -3 K and the estimated magnetic exchange interaction J/kB = -0.23 K. PMID:27295607

  15. Isolation and characterization of Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in exopolysaccharide production.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Navarro, D N; Palomares, A J; Casadesús, J

    1991-06-01

    Rhizobium meliloti mutants affected in the production of exopolysaccharide (EPS) were isolated after N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis. The mutants were classified into three phenotypic classes: (I) Exo-, rough mutants lacking exopolysaccharide; (II) Exos (for "small") which form tiny, compact colonies and synthesize reduced amounts of EPS; and (III) Exoc (for "constitutive"), hypermucoid mutants which overproduce EPS. Hypermucoid strains showed increased resistance to desiccation. All the mutants were able to nodulate, although a significant decrease in infectivity degree and/or competitiveness was found in rough and compact strains. Two mutants proved to be deficient in nitrogen fixation. Complementation analysis with cloned R. meliloti exo genes could not be applied to the study of these Fix- mutants because introduction of plasmids derived from cosmid vector pLAFR1 caused loss of nodulating ability. However, complementation of calcofluor staining and EPS production was observed. Complementation with certain exo genes also caused a marked increase in motility.

  16. PC-based car license plate reader

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Chung-Mu; Shu, Shyh-Yeong; Chen, Wen-Yu; Chen, Yie-Wern; Wen, Kuang-Pu

    1992-11-01

    A car license plate reader (CLPR) using fuzzy inference and neural network algorithm has been developed in Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) and installed in highway toll stations to identify stolen cars. It takes an average of 0.7 seconds to recognize a car license plate by using a PC with 80486-50 CPU. The recognition rate of the system is about 97%. The techniques of CLPR include vehicle sensing, image grab control, optic pre- processing, lighting, and optic character recognition (OCR). The CLPR can be used in vehicle flow statistics, the checking of stolen vehicles, automatic charging systems in parking lots or garage management, and so on.

  17. PC-assisted translation of photogrammetric papers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Güthner, Karlheinz; Peipe, Jürgen

    A PC-based system for machine translation of photogrammetric papers from the English into the German language and vice versa is described. The computer-assisted translating process is not intended to create a perfect interpretation of a text but to produce a rough rendering of the content of a paper. Starting with the original text, a continuous data flow is effected into the translated version by means of hardware (scanner, personal computer, printer) and software (OCR, translation, word processing, DTP). An essential component of the system is a photogrammetric microdictionary which is being established at present. It is based on several sources, including e.g. the ISPRS Multilingual Dictionary.

  18. A PC-interactive stereonet plotting program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilant, Walter L.

    The computer program here described allows the structural geologist to rotate and revolve structural data interactively (strike dip: trend plunge). These actions can remove the effects of dip and plunge. Once a final screen plot is obtained, it may be printed on an associated graphics printer. This program requires an IBM PC/XT AT or compatible equipped with the color graphics (CGA) card. It also works satisfactorily on compatible PCs such as the COMPAQ or AT&T 6300 (which use a combination mono CGA screen). The addition of a math coprocessor (8087 or 80287) greatly speeds up the response time but is not required.

  19. Characterization and responses to environmental cues of a photosynthetic antenna-deficient mutant of the filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Leganés, Francisco; Martínez-Granero, Francisco; Muñoz-Martín, M Ángeles; Marco, Eduardo; Jorge, Alberto; Carvajal, Laura; Vida, Teresa; González-Pleiter, Miguel; Fernández-Piñas, Francisca

    2014-07-01

    The cyanobacterial phycobilisome (PBS) is a giant pigment-protein complex which harvests light energy for photosynthesis and comprises two structures: a core and peripheral rods. Most studies on PBS structure and function are based on mutants of unicellular strains. In this report, we describe the phenotypic and genetic characterization of a transposon mutant of the filamentous Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120, denoted LC1, which cannot synthesize the phycobiliprotein phycocyanin (PC), the main component of the rods; in this mutant, the transposon had inserted into the cpcB gene (orf alr0528) which putatively encodes PC-β chain. Mutant LC1 was able to synthesize phycoerythrocyanin (PEC), a phycobiliprotein (PBP) located at the terminal region of the rods; but in the absence of PC, PEC did not attach to the PBSs that only retained the allophycocyanin (APC) core; ferredoxin: NADP+-oxidoreductase (FNR) that is associated with the PBS in the wild type, was not found in isolated PBSs from LC1. The performance of the mutant exposed to different environmental conditions was evaluated. The mutant phenotype was successfully complemented by cloning and transfer of the wild type complete cpc operon to mutant LC1. Interestingly, LC1 compensated its mutation by significantly increasing the number of its core-PBS and the effective quantum yield of photosystem II (PSII) photochemistry; this feature suggests a more efficient energy conversion in the mutant which may be useful for biotechnological applications.

  20. IBM PC/IX operating system evaluation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Granier, Martin; Hall, Philip P.; Triantafyllopoulos, Spiros

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation plan for the IBM PC/IX Operating System designed for IBM PC/XT computers is discussed. The evaluation plan covers the areas of performance measurement and evaluation, software facilities available, man-machine interface considerations, networking, and the suitability of PC/IX as a development environment within the University of Southwestern Louisiana NASA PC Research and Development project. In order to compare and evaluate the PC/IX system, comparisons with other available UNIX-based systems are also included.

  1. Comparison of Polar Cap (PC) index calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index introduced by Troshichev and Andrezen (1985) is derived from polar magnetic variations and is mainly a measure of the intensity of the transpolar ionospheric currents. These currents relate to the polar cap antisunward ionospheric plasma convection driven by the dawn-dusk electric field, which in turn is generated by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. Coefficients to calculate PCN and PCS index values from polar magnetic variations recorded at Thule and Vostok, respectively, have been derived by several different procedures in the past. The first published set of coefficients for Thule was derived by Vennerstrøm, 1991 and is still in use for calculations of PCN index values by DTU Space. Errors in the program used to calculate index values were corrected in 1999 and again in 2001. In 2005 DMI adopted a unified procedure proposed by Troshichev for calculations of the PCN index. Thus there exists 4 different series of PCN index values. Similarly, at AARI three different sets of coefficients have been used to calculate PCS indices in the past. The presentation discusses the principal differences between the various PC index procedures and provides comparisons between index values derived from the same magnetic data sets using the different procedures. Examples from published papers are examined to illustrate the differences.

  2. Evaluating security systems using SNAP-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, C.D.; Gregg, M.L.; Erdbruegger, M.R.

    1986-08-01

    SNAP-PC (Safeguards Network Analysis Procedure for the Personal Computer) is a user-friendly version of SNAP designed for IBM XT or AT compatible microcomputers. SNAP is a simulation-based analysis technique supporting the evaluation of fixed-site security systems to prevent theft or sabotage of a specified target. Through SNAP the user is able to define the facility, the sensor system, the guard operating policies and response tactics, and the adversary's attack plan. SNAP uses the system definition to analyze its effectiveness in defending against specific threats. The system performance statistics measured by SNAP include: Adversary mission success probability, guard and adversary casualties, duration of engagements, outcome of engagements, duration of scenario by outcome (adversary success/fail), and adversary duration by facility location. The SNAP-PC package provides a compact analysis tool that can be used to analyze a wide variety of security systems. It places SNAP, a proven evaluation technique, in the hands of on-site personnel, not just computer analysts. The support programs eliminate the labor intensive tedious task of organizing and sorting through reams of output reports and greatly reduce the time previously required to analyze a security system.

  3. Nonchemotactic Mutants of Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, John B.; Adler, Julius; Dahl, Margaret M.

    1967-01-01

    We have isolated 40 mutants of Escherichia coli which are nonchemotactic as judged by their failure to swarm on semisolid tryptone plates or to make bands in capillary tubes containing tryptone broth. All the mutants have normal flagella, a fact shown by their shape and reaction with antiflagella serum. All are fully motile under the microscope and all are sensitive to the phage chi. Unlike its parent, one of the mutants, studied in greater detail, failed to show chemotaxis toward oxygen, glucose, serine, threonine, or aspartic acid. The failure to exhibit chemotaxis does not result from a failure to use the chemicals. The swimming of this mutant was shown to be random. The growth rate was normal under several conditions, and the growth requirements were unchanged. Images PMID:5335897

  4. PcFKH1, a novel regulatory factor from the forkhead family, controls the biosynthesis of penicillin in Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Domínguez-Santos, Rebeca; García-Estrada, Carlos; Kosalková, Katarina; Prieto, Carlos; Santamarta, Irene; Martín, Juan-Francisco

    2015-08-01

    Penicillin biosynthesis in Penicillium chrysogenum (re-identified as Penicillium rubens) is a good example of a biological process subjected to complex global regulatory networks and serves as a model to study fungal secondary metabolism. The winged-helix family of transcription factors recently described, which includes the forkhead type of proteins, is a key type of regulatory proteins involved in this process. In yeasts and humans, forkhead transcription factors are involved in different processes (cell cycle regulation, cell death control, pre-mRNA processing and morphogenesis); one member of this family of proteins has been identified in the P. chrysogenum genome (Pc18g00430). In this work, we have characterized this novel transcription factor (named PcFKH1) by generating knock-down mutants and overexpression strains. Results clearly indicate that PcFKH1 positively controls antibiotic biosynthesis through the specific interaction with the promoter region of the penDE gene, thus regulating penDE mRNA levels. PcFKH1 also binds to the pcbC promoter, but with low affinity. In addition, it also controls other ancillary genes of the penicillin biosynthetic process, such as phlA (encoding phenylacetyl CoA ligase) and ppt (encoding phosphopantetheinyl transferase). PcFKH1 also plays a role in conidiation and spore pigmentation, but it does not seem to be involved in hyphal morphology or cell division in the improved laboratory reference strain Wisconsin 54-1255. A genome-wide analysis of processes putatively coregulated by PcFKH1 and PcRFX1 (another winged-helix transcription factor) in P. chrysogenum provided evidence of the global effect of these transcription factors in P. chrysogenum metabolism.

  5. Escherichia coli mutants resistant to inactivation by high hydrostatic pressure.

    PubMed Central

    Hauben, K J; Bartlett, D H; Soontjens, C C; Cornelis, K; Wuytack, E Y; Michiels, C W

    1997-01-01

    Alternating cycles of exposure to high pressure and outgrowth of surviving populations were used to select for highly pressure-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli MG1655. Three barotolerant mutants (LMM1010, LMM1020, and LMM1030) were isolated independently by using outgrowth temperatures of 30, 37, and 42 degrees C, respectively. Survival of these mutants after pressure treatment for 15 min at ambient temperature was 40 to 85% at 220 MPa and 0.5 to 1.5% at 800 MPa, while survival of the parent strain, MG1655, decreased from 15% at 220 MPa to 2 x 10(-8)% at 700 MPa. Heat resistance of mutants LMM1020 and LMM1030 was also altered, as evident by higher D values at 58 and 60 degrees C and reduced z values compared to those for the parent strain. D and z values for mutant LMM1010 were not significantly different from those for the parent strain. Pressure sensitivity of the mutants increased from 10 to 50 degrees C, as opposed to the parent strain, which showed a minimum around 40 degrees C. The ability of the mutants to grow at moderately elevated pressure (50 MPa) was reduced at temperatures above 37 degrees C, indicating that resistance to pressure inactivation is unrelated to barotolerant growth. The development of high levels of barotolerance as demonstrated in this work should cause concern about the safety of high-pressure food processing. PMID:9055412

  6. ICAN - INTEGRATED COMPOSITE ANALYZER (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    , macromechanics, and laminate analysis including the hygrothermal response of fiber composites. ICAN output includes the various ply and composite properties, composite structural response, and composite stress analysis results with details of failure. Output can be tailored to specific needs by choosing the appropriate options. Two machine versions of ICAN are available. The IBM 370 series version (LEW-14468) is written in FORTRAN IV for the IBM 370 series computers running OS/TSS. The IBM PC version (LEW-15592) is written in FORTRAN 77 for use on the IBM PC series computers running MS-DOS and Microsoft FORTRAN 5.1. The IBM 370 version requires 3.5Mb of memory for execution. No sample executable is provided. For the IBM PC version, a sample executable, along with sample input and output data, is included on the distribution medium. Although the included executable requires a math coprocessor, the ICAN source can be recompiled into an executable which does not require a math coprocessor. The standard distribution medium for the IBM 370 version of ICAN is a 9-track 1600 BPI magnetic tape in EBCDIC CARD IMAGE format. The standard distribution medium for the IBM PC version is one 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskette. The contents of the diskette are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. ICAN was developed in 1986 and the IBM PC version was released in 1992.

  7. CoPc 2D and 1D Arrangement on a Ferromagnetic Surface.

    PubMed

    Annese, Emilia; ViolBarbosa, Carlos E; Rossi, Giorgio; Fujii, Jun

    2016-05-31

    We investigated the growth and electronic properties of Co-phthalocyanine (CoPc) molecule deposited on iron film with different structures (pseudomorph-fcc and bcc) and on iron nanowires by scanning tunnelling microscopy and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). CoPc molecules self-assemble in a two-dimensional (2D) arrangement with the molecular plane parallel to the iron surfaces, and the local order is lost after the first layer. The molecule-ferromagnet interaction causes the broadening of Co and N unoccupied molecular states as well as different electronic distribution of N states as a function of the atomic structure of iron surface. The ferromagnetic coupling between the molecule and the iron film is dominated by the electronic interaction between Co and the first Fe layer. CoPc 2D arrangement turns into 1D by using as a template the iron nanowire grown on a facet surface of oxidized Cu(332) surface. CoPc molecules interact weakly with the iron nanowires manifesting a substantial Co 3dz spectral feature in XAS spectrum and the possibility of a magnetic interaction between Co moment and iron nanowires. Both CoPc 2D and 1D arrangements can open up new interesting scenarios to tune the magnetic properties of hybrid interfaces involving metallorganic molecules. PMID:27191039

  8. Radial transport of radiation belt electrons due to stormtime Pc5 waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukhorskiy, A. Y.; Sitnov, M. I.; Takahashi, K.; Anderson, B. J.

    2009-05-01

    During geomagnetic storms relativistic electron fluxes in the outer radiation belt exhibit dynamic variability over multiple orders of magnitude. This requires radial transport of electrons across their drift shells and implies violation of their third adiabatic invariant. Radial transport is induced by the interaction of the electron drift motion with electric and magnetic field fluctuations in the ULF frequency range. It was previously shown that solar-wind driven ULF waves have long azimuthal wave lengths and thus can violate the third invariant of trapped electrons in the process of resonant interaction with their gradient-curvature motion. However, the amplitude of solar-wind driven ULF waves rapidly decreases with decreasing L. It is therefore not clear what mechanisms are responsible for fast transport rates observed inside the geosynchronous orbit. In this paper we investigate wether stormtime Pc5 waves can contribute to this process. Stormtime Pc5s have short azimuthal wave lengths and therefore cannot exhibit resonance with the the electron drift motion. However we show that stormtime Pc5s can cause localized random scattering of electron drift motion that violates the third invariant. According to our results electron interaction with stormtime Pc5s can produce rapid radial transport even as low as L≃4. Numerical simulations show that electron transport can exhibit large deviations from radial diffusion. The diffusion approximation is not valid for individual storms but only applies to the statistically averaged response of the outer belt to stormtime Pc5 waves.

  9. Candida albicans mutant construction and characterization of selected virulence determinants.

    PubMed

    Motaung, T E; Albertyn, J; Pohl, C H; Köhler, Gerwald

    2015-08-01

    Candida albicans is a diploid, polymorphic yeast, associated with humans, where it mostly causes no harm. However, under certain conditions it can cause infections ranging from superficial to life threatening. This ability to become pathogenic is often linked to the immune status of the host as well as the expression of certain virulence factors by the yeast. Due to the importance of C. albicans as a pathogen, determination of the molecular mechanisms that allow this yeast to cause disease is important. These studies rely on the ability of researchers to create deletion mutants of specific genes in order to study their function. This article provides a critical review of the important techniques used to create deletion mutants in C. albicans and highlights how these deletion mutants can be used to determine the role of genes in the expression of virulence factors in vitro.

  10. The Origin of OB Clusters: From 10 pc to 0.1 pc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hauyu Baobab; Quintana-Lacaci, Guillermo; Wang, Ke; Ho, Paul T. P.; Li, Zhi-Yun; Zhang, Qizhou; Zhang, Zhi-Yu

    2012-01-01

    We observe the 1.2 mm continuum emission around the OB cluster-forming region G10.6-0.4, using the MAMBO-2 bolometer array of the IRAM 30 m telescope and the Submillimeter Array (SMA). Comparison of the Spitzer 24 μm and 8 μm images with our 1.2 mm continuum maps reveal an ionization front of an H II region, the photon-dominated layer, and several 5 pc scale filaments that follow the outer edge of the photon-dominated layer. The filaments, which are resolved in the MAMBO-2 observations, show regularly spaced parsec-scale molecular clumps, embedded with a cluster of dense molecular cores as shown in the SMA 0.87 mm observations. Toward the center of the G10.6-0.4 region, the combined SMA+IRAM 30 m continuum image reveals several parsec-scale protrusions. They may continue down to within 0.1 pc of the geometric center of a dense 3 pc scale structure, where a 200 M ⊙ OB cluster resides. The observed filaments may facilitate mass accretion onto the central cluster-forming region in the presence of strong radiative and mechanical stellar feedback. Their filamentary geometry may also facilitate fragmentation. We did not detect any significant polarized emission at 0.87 mm in the inner 1 pc region with SMA.

  11. PC-based Multiple Information System Interface (PC/MISI) detailed design and implementation plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    The design plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (PC/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intended to be used as a blueprint for the implementation of the system. Each component is described in the detail necessary to allow programmers to implement the system. A description of the system data flow and system file structures is given.

  12. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN-PC

  13. Rhizobium phaseoli symbiotic mutants with transposon Tn5 insertions.

    PubMed Central

    Noel, K D; Sanchez, A; Fernandez, L; Leemans, J; Cevallos, M A

    1984-01-01

    Rhizobium phaseoli CFN42 DNA was mutated by random insertion of Tn5 from suicide plasmid pJB4JI to obtain independently arising strains that were defective in symbiosis with Phaseolus vulgaris but grew normally outside the plant. When these mutants were incubated with the plant, one did not initiate visible nodule tissue (Nod-), seven led to slow nodule development (Ndv), and two led to superficially normal early nodule development but lacked symbiotic nitrogenase activity (Sna-). The Nod- mutant lacked the large transmissible indigenous plasmid pCFN42d that has homology to Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase (nif) genes. The other mutants had normal plasmid content. In the two Sna- mutants and one Ndv mutant, Tn5 had inserted into plasmid pCFN42d outside the region of nif homology. The insertions of the other Ndv mutants were apparently in the chromosome. They were not in plasmids detected on agarose gels, and, in contrast to insertions on indigenous plasmids, they were transmitted in crosses to wild-type strain CFN42 at the same frequency as auxotrophic markers and with the same enhancement of transmission by conjugation plasmid R68.45. In these Ndv mutants the Tn5 insertions were the same as or very closely linked to mutations causing the Ndv phenotype. However, in two mutants with Tn5 insertions on plasmid pCFN42d, an additional mutation on the same plasmid, rather than Tn5, was responsible for the Sna- or Ndv phenotype. When plasmid pJB4JI was transferred to two other R. phaseoli strains, analysis of symbiotic mutants was complicated by Tn5-containing deleted forms of pJB4JI that were stably maintained. Images PMID:6325385

  14. Ibrutinib selectively and irreversibly targets EGFR (L858R, Del19) mutant but is moderately resistant to EGFR (T790M) mutant NSCLC Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenchao; Hu, Chen; Ye, Zi; Zhao, Zheng; Wang, Li; Li, Xixiang; Yu, Kailin; Liu, Juan; Wu, Jiaxin; Yan, Xiao-E; Zhao, Peng; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Chu; Weisberg, Ellen L.; Gray, Nathanael S.; Yun, Cai-Hong; Liu, Jing; Chen, Liang; Liu, Qingsong

    2015-01-01

    Through comprehensive comparison study, we found that ibrutinib, a clinically approved covalent BTK kinase inhibitor, was highly active against EGFR (L858R, del19) mutant driven NSCLC cells, but moderately active to the T790M ‘gatekeeper’ mutant cells and not active to wild-type EGFR NSCLC cells. Ibrutinib strongly affected EGFR mediated signaling pathways and induced apoptosis and cell cycle arrest (G0/G1) in mutant EGFR but not wt EGFR cells. However, ibrutinib only slowed down tumor progression in PC-9 and H1975 xenograft models. MEK kinase inhibitor, GSK1120212, could potentiate ibrutinib's effect against the EGFR (L858R/T790M) mutation in vitro but not in vivo. These results suggest that special drug administration might be required to achieve best clinical response in the ongoing phase I/II clinical trial with ibrutinib for NSCLC. PMID:26375053

  15. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda).

    PubMed

    Sravanthi, A; Srivalli, P; Gopal, K V T; Rao, T Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2(nd) decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  16. Pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda)

    PubMed Central

    Sravanthi, A.; Srivalli, P.; Gopal, K. V. T.; Rao, T. Narayana

    2016-01-01

    Pachyonychia congenita is a rare type of ectodermal dysplasia further classified into 4 types. Cutaneous manifestations seen in most of the cases of Pachyonychia congenita include palmoplantar keratoderma, follicular hyperkeratosis, wedge shaped nails, oral leukokeratosis and woolly hair. A 25-year-old male presented to us with thickened nails and scanty scalp hair. On examination, we noticed hyperkeratotic plaques over both the soles, palmoplantar hyperhidrosis and yellowish discoloration, wedging with subungual hyperkeratosis of all the nails. Follicular hyperkeratotic papules and steatocystoma multiplex were also observed over the scalp and face. The patient had history of natal teeth and on dental examination, lower central incisors were absent. All cutaneous changes in our case had manifested first in the 2nd decade except for natal teeth. All the above features suggested the diagnosis of pachyonychia congenita with late onset (PC tarda), which is an infrequently reported rare variant. PMID:27559502

  17. Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Zubelewicz, Aleksander

    2012-08-29

    The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

  18. The neurite-initiating effect of microbial extracellular glycolipids in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Isoda, H; Shinmoto, H; Matsumura, M; Nakahara, T

    1999-09-01

    The effects of several kinds of microbial extracellular glycolipids on neurite initiation in PC12 cells were examined. Addition of mannosylerythritol lipid-A (MEL-A), MEL-B, and sophorose lipid (SL) to PC12 cells caused significant neurite outgrowth. Other glycolipids, such as polyol lipid (PL), rhamnose lipid (RL), succinoyl trehalose lipid-A (STL-A) and STL-B caused no neurite-initiation. MEL-A increased acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity to an extent similar to nerve growth factor (NGF). However, MEL-A induced one or two long neurites from the cell body, while NGF induced many neurites. In addition, MEL-A-induced differentiation was transient, and after 48 h, percentage of cells with neurites started to decrease in contrast to neurons induced by NGF, which occurred in a time-dependent manner. MEL-A could induce neurite outgrowth after treatment of PC12 cells with an anti-NGF receptor antibody that obstructed NGF action. These results indicate that MEL-A and NGF induce differentiation of PC12 cells through different mechanisms. PMID:19003137

  19. ELIPGRID-PC: A PC program for calculating hot spot probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1994-10-01

    ELIPGRID-PC, a new personal computer program has been developed to provide easy access to Singer`s 1972 ELIPGRID algorithm for hot-spot detection probabilities. Three features of the program are the ability to determine: (1) the grid size required for specified conditions, (2) the smallest hot spot that can be sampled with a given probability, and (3) the approximate grid size resulting from specified conditions and sampling cost. ELIPGRID-PC also provides probability of hit versus cost data for graphing with spread-sheets or graphics software. The program has been successfully tested using Singer`s published ELIPGRID results. An apparent error in the original ELIPGRID code has been uncovered and an appropriate modification incorporated into the new program.

  20. Features of Pc5 pulsations in the geomagnetic field, auroral luminosity, and Riometer absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belakhovsky, V. B.; Pilipenko, V. A.; Samsonov, S. N.; Lorentsen, D.

    2016-01-01

    Simultaneous morning Pc5 pulsations ( f ~ 3-5 mHz) in the geomagnetic field, aurora intensities (in the 557.7 and 630.0 nm oxygen emissions and the 471.0 nm nitrogen emission), and riometer absorption, were studied based on the CARISMA, CANMOS, and NORSTAR network data for the event of January 1, 2000. According to the GOES-8 satellite observations, these Pc5 geomagnetic pulsations are observed as incompressible Alfvén waves with toroidal polarization in the magnetosphere. Although the Pc5 pulsation frequencies in auroras, the geomagnetic field, and riometer absorption are close to one another, stable phase relationships are not observed between them. Far from all trains of geomagnetic Pc5 pulsations are accompanied by corresponding auroral pulsations; consequently, geomagnetic pulsations are primary with respect to auroral pulsations. Both geomagnetic and auroral pulsations propagate poleward, and the frequency decreases with increasing geomagnetic latitude. When auroral Pc5 pulsations appear, the ratio of the 557.7/630.0 nm emission intensity sharply increases, which indicates that auroral pulsations result from not simply modulated particle precipitation but also an additional periodic acceleration of auroral electrons by the wave field. A high correlation is not observed between Pc5 pulsations in auroras and the riometer absorption, which indicates that these pulsations have a common source but different generation mechanisms. Auroral luminosity modulation is supposedly related to the interaction between Alfvén waves and the region with the field-aligned potential drop above the auroral ionosphere, and riometer absorption modulation is caused by the scattering of energetic electrons by VLF noise pulsations.

  1. Application of PC-ANN and PC-LS-SVM in QSAR of CCR1 antagonist compounds: a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Shahlaei, Mohsen; Fassihi, Afshin; Saghaie, Lotfollah

    2010-04-01

    Principal component regression (PCR), principal component-artificial neural network (PC-ANN), and principal component-least squares-support vector machine (PC-LS-SVM) as regression methods were investigated for building quantitative structure-activity relationships for the prediction of inhibitory activity of some CCR1 antagonists. Nonlinear methods (PC-ANN and PC-LS-SVM) were better than the PCR method considerably in the goodness of fit and predictivity parameters and other criteria for evaluation of the proposed model. These results reflect a nonlinear relationship between the principal components obtained from molecular descriptors and the inhibitory activity of this set of molecules. The maximum variance in activity of the molecules, in PCR method was 45.5%, whereas nonlinear methods, PC-ANN and PC-LS-SVM, could explain more than 93.7% and 95.6% variance in activity data respectively.

  2. Electronic properties of CuPc and H2Pc: an experimental and theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Nardi, Marco Vittorio; Detto, Francesca; Aversa, Lucrezia; Verucchi, Roberto; Salviati, Giancarlo; Iannotta, Salvatore; Casarin, Maurizio

    2013-08-21

    Phthalocyanine (H2Pc) and its open-shell copper complex (CuPc) deposited on amorphous gold films have been studied by combining the outcomes of several synchrotron based spectroscopic tools (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, UV photoelectron spectroscopy and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure, NEXAFS, spectroscopy) with those of density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The assignment of experimental evidence has been guided by the results of DFT numerical experiments carried out on isolated molecules. With specific reference to CuPc NEXAFS data collected at the N K-edge, they have been assigned by using the open-shell time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) in the framework of the zeroth order regular approximation (ZORA) scalar relativistic approach. The agreement between theory and experiment has been found to be satisfactory, thus indicating that the open-shell TDDFT (F. Wang and T. Ziegler, Mol. Phys., 2004, 102, 2585) may be used with some confidence to look into the X-ray absorption spectroscopy results pertinent to transition metal complexes. As far as the metal-ligand interaction is concerned, the combined use of NEXAFS spectroscopy and DFT outcomes ultimately testified the significant ionic contribution characterizing the bonding between the metal centre and the nitrogen atoms of the phthalocyanine coordinative pocket.

  3. Inhibition of Prohormone Convertases PC1/3 and PC2 by 2,5-Dideoxystreptamine Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Vivoli, Mirella; Caulfield, Thomas R.; Martínez-Mayorga, Karina; Johnson, Alan T.; Jiao, Guan-Sheng

    2012-01-01

    The prohormone convertases PC1/3 and PC2 are eukaryotic serine proteases involved in the proteolytic maturation of peptide hormone precursors and are implicated in a variety of pathological conditions, including obesity, diabetes, and neurodegenerative diseases. In this work, we screened 45 compounds obtained by derivatization of a 2,5-dideoxystreptamine scaffold with guanidinyl and aryl substitutions for convertase inhibition. We identified four promising PC1/3 competitive inhibitors and three PC2 inhibitors that exhibited various inhibition mechanisms (competitive, noncompetitive, and mixed), with sub- and low micromolar inhibitory potency against a fluorogenic substrate. Low micromolar concentrations of certain compounds blocked the processing of the physiological substrate proglucagon. The best PC2 inhibitor effectively inhibited glucagon synthesis, a known PC2-mediated process, in a pancreatic cell line; no cytotoxicity was observed. We also identified compounds that were able to stimulate both 87 kDa PC1/3 and PC2 activity, behavior related to the presence of aryl groups on the dideoxystreptamine scaffold. By contrast, inhibitory activity was associated with the presence of guanidinyl groups. Molecular modeling revealed interactions of the PC1/3 inhibitors with the active site that suggest structural modifications to further enhance potency. In support of kinetic data suggesting that PC2 inhibition probably occurs via an allosteric mechanism, we identified several possible allosteric binding sites using computational searches. It is noteworthy that one compound was found to both inhibit PC2 and stimulate PC1/3. Because glucagon acts in functional opposition to insulin in blood glucose homeostasis, blocking glucagon formation and enhancing proinsulin cleavage with a single compound could represent an attractive therapeutic approach in diabetes. PMID:22169851

  4. A role for the SHP-2 tyrosine phosphatase in nerve growth-induced PC12 cell differentiation.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J H; Drueckes, P; Bartoe, J; Zhao, Z; Shen, S H; Krebs, E G

    1997-01-01

    SHP-1 and SHP-2 are intracellular protein tyrosine phosphatases containing two adjacent src homology 2 domains that target these phosphatases to cell surface receptor signaling complexes and play a role in receptor signal transduction. In this report the PC12 cell system was used to investigate the potential roles of SHP-1 and SHP-2 in the induction of neuronal differentiation by nerve growth factor (NGF). By using neurite outgrowth as a marker for differentiation, the effects of transfected constructs of SHP-1 and SHP-2 were assessed. Overexpression of a catalytically inactive SHP-2, but not a catalytically inactive SHP-1, blocked NGF-stimulated neurite outgrowth. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascade is important for the morphological differentiation in PC12 cells, and both SHP-1 and SHP-2 have been implicated to act upstream of MAPK in other receptor signaling systems. A positive role for SHP-2 but not SHP-1 in the activation of MAPK by NGF was demonstrated by introduction of the SHP-2 phosphatase mutants along with hemagglutinin-tagged MAPK. Coexpression studies with the SHP-2 mutant along with mutant forms of MAPK kinase suggested that SHP-2 functions upstream of MAPK kinase and MAPK in NGF-induced neurite outgrowth. Images PMID:9285826

  5. Bcl-xS and Bax induce different apoptotic pathways in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Lindenboim, L; Yuan, J; Stein, R

    2000-03-30

    Apoptosis is regulated by the action of the Bcl-2 family of proteins, which includes anti- and pro-apoptotic members such as Bcl-xS and Bax. These proteins may differ from each other in structure, mechanism of action and interactions with anti-apoptotic signaling. The mechanism whereby Bax induces cell death has been studied in some cellular systems, but the mechanism of Bcl-xS-induced apoptosis is largely unknown. In this study we investigated and compared the apoptotic effects of Bcl-xS and Bax in the pheochromocytoma cell line, PC12 (a useful model system for studying neuronal apoptosis), and the extent to which they are protected by the survival factor, nerve growth factor (NGF). PC12 cells express endogenous Bcl-xS, Bax and Bcl-xL proteins. Subcellular fractionation revealed that Bax is presented mainly in the cytosolic and the heavy membrane fractions, Bcl-xS is present only in the cytosol, and the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL is located mainly in the heavy membrane fraction. In contrast to the cytosolic localization of endogenous Bcl-xS, the exogenously overexpressed Bcl-xS is localized to the mitochondria. Overexpression of Bcl-xS or Bax induces cell death in the transfected cells. The cell death induced by overexpression of Bcl-xS was inhibited by coexpression of Bcl-xS with Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL, or by treatment with the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoro-methylketone (Z-VAD-FMK) or with NGF. The Bcl-2 mutants deltaC22, which lacks the transmembrane domain, and G145A (mI-3) were able to inhibit the death-inducing effect of Bcl-xS. These results therefore suggest that the apoptotic pathway induced by overexpression of Bcl-xS in PC12 cells can be controlled by Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL, is mediated by caspases, and can be inhibited by the NGF signaling pathway. The Bax-induced cell death was inhibited by co-expression of Bax with Bcl-2 or Bcl-xL, but was not inhibited by Z-VAD-FMK, NGF, or the Bcl-2 ml-3 or deltaC22 mutants. These

  6. Pearl structures of Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations observed at multipoint ground stations at Russia, Japan and Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, C.; Shiokawa, K.; Connors, M. G.; Schofield, I.; Poddelsky, I.; Shevtsov, B.

    2013-12-01

    Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations propagate from high to low latitudes through the ionospheric wave duct. A few papers had shown longitudinal propagation of Pc1 pulsations [e.g., Kawamura et al. 1981; Sakaguchi et al.2012]. Despite these previous researches, diurnal variations of longitudinally-distributed Pc1 pulsations and the pearl structures at different stations have not been investigated yet. In order to understand generation and propagation processes of Pc1 pulsations in the magnetosphere and the ionosphere, it is necessary to investigate spatial distribution of Pc1 pulsations using magnetometers at longitudinally and latitudinally separated ground stations. We have investigated spatial distributions of the Pc1 pulsations observed by induction magnetometers at three ground stations at Moshiri (MOS) in Japan, Magadan (MGD) in far-eastern Russia and Athabasca (ATH) in central Canada from January 2009 to December 2011. Simultaneous Pc1 events observed at MGD and ATH occurred in the morning and afternoon sectors. This result is consistent with the global distribution of EMIC waves observed in space [Min et al. 2012]. The simultaneous Pc1 events with high coherence (> 0.5) observed at ATH and MGD concentrates in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector. The Pc1 frequencies of the simultaneous Pc1 events at ATH and MGD in the afternoon to pre-midnight sector were higher than those in the post-midnight to morning sector. Most of the simultaneous Pc1 events with high coherence observed at ATH and MGD have different pearl structures. This result indicates that the pearl structures should be not caused in the magnetosphere, and rather made during the propagation in the ionospheric duct. Simultaneous Pc1 events observed at MGD and MOS at subauroral and middle latitudes, respectively, were most frequently observed at night suggesting that propagation in the ionospheric duct suffers less attenuation at night. In the presentation we discuss these results in combination with the EMIC

  7. Pc1 propagation in the ionospheric duct: wave vector determination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Reiko; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz; Narita, Yasuhito; Plaschke, Fedinand; Mann, Ian

    2013-04-01

    Pc1 geomagnetic pulsations (Pc1) are believed to propagate as fast mode waves in the ionospheric duct. Previous studies tried to locate the Pc1 source region with different methods using the characteristics of the ionospheric duct propagation (e.g., polarization method and amplitude distributions). However, no observational study of the wave vectors and the dispersion relations in the Pc1 source region has been compared with the results estimated from model calculations of the Pc1 ionospheic duct propagation. We have investigated propagation directions of Pc1 pulsations in the ionospheric duct with the 2D Wave Telescope technique. For our study, we used ground-based measurements of Pc1 pulsations from 27 May 2011, observed at 17 different stations of the Canadian magnetometer network CARISMA (www.carisma.ca). These multi-point measurements allow to derive detailed information directly on the wave propagation directions. We also show the dispersion relation of the Pc1 pulsations in the ionospheric duct.

  8. Chromosomal Distribution of PcG Proteins during Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Nègre, Nicolas; Hennetin, Jérôme; Sun, Ling V; Lavrov, Sergey; Bellis, Michel; White, Kevin P

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are able to maintain the memory of silent transcriptional states of homeotic genes throughout development. In Drosophila, they form multimeric complexes that bind to specific DNA regulatory elements named PcG response elements (PREs). To date, few PREs have been identified and the chromosomal distribution of PcG proteins during development is unknown. We used chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) with genomic tiling path microarrays to analyze the binding profile of the PcG proteins Polycomb (PC) and Polyhomeotic (PH) across 10 Mb of euchromatin. We also analyzed the distribution of GAGA factor (GAF), a sequence-specific DNA binding protein that is found at most previously identified PREs. Our data show that PC and PH often bind to clustered regions within large loci that encode transcription factors which play multiple roles in developmental patterning and in the regulation of cell proliferation. GAF co-localizes with PC and PH to a limited extent, suggesting that GAF is not a necessary component of chromatin at PREs. Finally, the chromosome-association profile of PC and PH changes during development, suggesting that the function of these proteins in the regulation of some of their target genes might be more dynamic than previously anticipated. PMID:16613483

  9. PrPC from stem cells to cancer

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Lannerée, Séverine; Hirsch, Théo Z.; Hernandez-Rapp, Julia; Halliez, Sophie; Vilotte, Jean-Luc; Launay, Jean-Marie; Mouillet-Richard, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    The cellular prion protein PrPC was initially discovered as the normal counterpart of the pathological scrapie prion protein PrPSc, the main component of the infectious agent of Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies. While clues as to the physiological function of this ubiquitous protein were greatly anticipated from the development of knockout animals, PrP-null mice turned out to be viable and to develop without major phenotypic abnormalities. Notwithstanding, the discovery that hematopoietic stem cells from PrP-null mice have impaired long-term repopulating potential has set the stage for investigating into the role of PrPC in stem cell biology. A wealth of data have now exemplified that PrPC is expressed in distinct types of stem cells and regulates their self-renewal as well as their differentiation potential. A role for PrPC in the fate restriction of embryonic stem cells has further been proposed. Paralleling these observations, an overexpression of PrPC has been documented in various types of tumors. In line with the contribution of PrPC to stemness and to the proliferation of cancer cells, PrPC was recently found to be enriched in subpopulations of tumor-initiating cells. In the present review, we summarize the current knowledge of the role played by PrPC in stem cell biology and discuss how the subversion of its function may contribute to cancer progression. PMID:25364760

  10. Transforming PC Power Supplies into Smart Car Battery Conditioners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rodriguez-Ascariz, J. M.; Boquete-Vazquez, L.

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes a laboratory project consisting of a PC power supply modification into an intelligent car-battery conditioner with both wireless and wired networking capabilities. Adding a microcontroller to an average PC power supply transforms it into a flexible, intelligent device that can be configured and that is suitable to keep car…

  11. Hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) structure. The results indicate that PC{sub 61}BM combines into C–H⋯O{sub d} bonded molecular chains, where O{sub d} denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C–H⋯O{sub s} bonds, where O{sub s} denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC{sub 61}BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) PC{sub 61}BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C–H⋯O{sub d} bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC{sub 61}BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC{sub 61}BM.

  12. Cetuximab-modified mesoporous silica nano-medicine specifically targets EGFR-mutant lung cancer and overcomes drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuetong; Huang, Hsin-Yi; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Zhanxia; Ji, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) is the main obstacle for efficient treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-mutant lung cancer patients. Here we design a cetuximab-capped mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MP-SiO2 NP) as the drug carrier to specifically target EGFR-mutant lung cancer cells and efficiently release loaded drugs including doxorubicin and gefitinib. This innovative nano-medicine can specifically target lung cancer cells with high EGFR expression rather than those with low EGFR level. Treatment of a gefitinib-resistant cell line derived from PC9 cell (PC9-DR) with the gefitinib-loaded cetuximab-capped MP-SiO2 NP showed a significant inhibition of cell growth. Moreover, this nano-medicine successfully suppressed the progression of PC9-DR xenograft tumors. This tumor suppression was due to the endocytosis of large amount of nano-medicine and the effective gefitinib release induced by high glutathione (GSH) level in PC9-DR cells. Collectively, our study provides a novel approach to overcome EGFR-TKI resistance using cetuximab modified MP-SiO2 NP, which holds strong potential for effective management of EGFR-mutant lung cancer. PMID:27151505

  13. Monte Carlo tests of the ELIPGRID-PC algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, J.R.

    1995-04-01

    The standard tool for calculating the probability of detecting pockets of contamination called hot spots has been the ELIPGRID computer code of Singer and Wickman. The ELIPGRID-PC program has recently made this algorithm available for an IBM{reg_sign} PC. However, no known independent validation of the ELIPGRID algorithm exists. This document describes a Monte Carlo simulation-based validation of a modified version of the ELIPGRID-PC code. The modified ELIPGRID-PC code is shown to match Monte Carlo-calculated hot-spot detection probabilities to within {plus_minus}0.5% for 319 out of 320 test cases. The one exception, a very thin elliptical hot spot located within a rectangular sampling grid, differed from the Monte Carlo-calculated probability by about 1%. These results provide confidence in the ability of the modified ELIPGRID-PC code to accurately predict hot-spot detection probabilities within an acceptable range of error.

  14. Cytotoxic, Genotoxic, and Neurotoxic Effects of Mg, Pb, and Fe on Pheochromocytoma (PC-12) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Talia; Liu, Yi-Ming; Tchounwou, Paul B.

    2014-01-01

    Metals such as lead (Pb), magnesium (Mg), and iron (Fe) are ubiquitous in the environment as a result of natural occurrence and anthropogenic activities. Although Mg, Fe and others are considered essential elements, high level of exposure has been associated with severe adverse health effects including cardiovascular, hematological, nephrotoxic, hepatotoxic, and neurologic abnormalities in humans. In the present study we hypothesized that Mg, Pb, and Fe are cytotoxic, genotoxic and neurotoxic, and their toxicity is mediated through oxidative stress and alteration in protein expression. To test the hypothesis, we used the pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell line as a neuro cell model and performed the LDH assay for cell viability, Comet assay for DNA damage, Western blot for oxidative stress, and HPLC-MS to assess the concentration levels of neurological biomarkers such as glutamate, dopamine (DA), and 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT). The results of this study clearly show that Mg, Pb, and Fe, respectively in the form of MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 induce cytotoxicity, oxidative stress, and genotoxicity in PC-12 cells. In addition, exposure to these metallic compounds caused significant changes in the concentration levels of glutamate, dopamine, and 3-MT in PC-12 cells. Taken together the findings suggest that MgSO4, Pb(NO3)2, FeCl2, and FeCl3 have the potential to induce substantial toxicity to PC-12 cells. PMID:24942330

  15. Response of dayside Pc 5 pulsations to substorm activity in the nighttime magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samson, J. C.; Rostoker, G.

    1981-02-01

    The possibility of using ULF (1-20 mHz) waves to diagnose the structure of the magnetosphere has recently given new impetus to the study of Pc 4,5 magnetic pulsations. In this paper it is demonstrated that the frequency spectrum of dayside Pc 4,5 pulsations near noon may be significantly altered in association with the onset of a magnetospheric substorm near midnight. The response time for the dayside Pc pulsations to a substorm onset can be as short as 2-3 min, suggesting information transfer across the magnetosphere at velocities of the order of the Alfven speed. The characteristic response of the dayside pulsations is a marked increase in the dominant frequency at stations inside the dayside auroral oval. The results taken together with the observations of dayside auroras by Eather et al. (1979) suggest that substorm onsets are accompanied by a sudden inward motion of the center of the partial ring current. It is proposed that this ring current motion causes changes in the magnetic field in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere that result in changes in the Alfven velocity on field lines where the magnetic pulsations are observed. Possible mechanisms for the generation of Pc 4,5 pulsations are discussed in the light of the observations reported.

  16. Response of dayside Pc 5 pulsations to substorm activity in the nighttime magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect

    Samson, J.C.; Rostoker, G.

    1981-02-01

    The possibility of using ULF (1-20 mHz) waves to diagnose the structure of the magnetosphere has recently given new impetus to the study of Pc 4,5 magnetic pulsations. In this paper we demonstrate that the frequency spectrum of dayside Pc 4,5 pulsations near noon may be significantly altered in association with the onset of a magnetospheric substorm near midnight. The response time for the dayside Pc pulsations to a substorm onset can be as short as 2-3 min, suggesting information transfer across the magnetosphere at velocities of the order of the Alfven speed. The characteristic response of the dayside pulsations is a marked increase in the dominant frequency at stations inside the dayside auroral oval. Our results taken together with the observations of dayside auroras by Eather et al. (1979) suggest that substorm onsets are accompanied by a sudden inward motion of the center of the partial ring current. We propose that this ring current motion causes changes in the magnetic field in the equatorial plane of the magnetosphere that result in changes in the Alfven velocity on field lines where the magnetic pulsations are observed. Possible mechanisms for the generation of Pc 4,5 pulsations are discussed in the light of the observations reported in this paper.

  17. Color Shift Investigations for LED Secondary Optical Designs: Comparison between BPA-PC and PMMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Guangjun; Yazdan Mehr, M.; van Driel, W. D.; Fan, Xuejun; Fan, Jiajie; Jansen, K. M. B.; Zhang, G. Q.

    2015-07-01

    Recently, color shift of LED-based lighting products has attracted much attention due to its increasing impact on the field application. However, significant research investigations on the color shift mechanisms are not publically available especially for important transmission materials used for secondary optical design. In this paper, broadly used such commercial materials (BPA-PC and PMMA) are experimentally investigated on the color shift effects during aging. Besides this, color shift mechanisms of degradation of transmittance are also studied. Results revealed: (1) Inconsistent degradation of wavelength-dependent transmittance induces the decrease of the blue/yellow light intensity ratio and thus gives rise to the color shift toward the yellow field, which is the color shift mechanism of BPA-PC; (2) Even for the non-aged BPA-PC, the transmittance varies with wavelength in the visible light field due to the chemistry of the material, which caused the change of intensify ratio of blue light to yellow light in the SPD, leading to color change in perception; (3) Oxidation plays a key role in the degradation of transmittance at around the peak wavelength of the blue light field, which is in correlation with the discoloration of thermally-aged BPA-PC materials. By contrast, for the PMMA specimen aged up to 3000 h, oxidation was neither occurred at 85 °C, nor with additional exposure to blue light, nor even with additional humidity of 85%RH.

  18. Activation of muscarinic receptors inhibits glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ke; Yang, Li-min; Chen, Hong-zhuan; Lu, Yang

    2013-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the actions of the muscarinic agonist carbachol on glutamate-induced neurotoxicity in PC12 cells, and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: PC12 cells were treated with different concentrations of glutamate for 24 or 48 h. The cell viability was measured using MTT assay, and the expression and activation of GSK-3β were detected with Western blot. β-Catenin translocation was detected using immunofluorescence. Luciferase reporter assay and real-time PCR were used to analyze the transcriptional activity of β-catenin. Results: Glutamate (1, 3, and 10 mmol/L) induced PC12 cell death in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, treatment of the cells with glutamate (1 mmol/L) caused significant overactivation of GSK-3β and prevented β-catenin translocation to the nucleus. Pretreatment with carbachol (0.01 μmol/L) blocked glutamate-induced cell death and GSK-3β overactivation, and markedly enhanced β-catenin transcriptional activity. Conclusion: Activation of muscarinic receptors exerts neuroprotection in PC12 cells by attenuating glutamate-induced GSK-3β overactivation, suggesting potential benefits of muscarinic agonists for Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23685950

  19. Hypoxia regulates glutamate metabolism and membrane transport in rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Millhorn, D E

    2001-03-01

    We investigated the effect of hypoxia on glutamate metabolism and uptake in rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. Various key enzymes relevant to glutamate production, metabolism and transport were coordinately regulated by hypoxia. PC12 cells express two glutamate-metabolizing enzymes, glutamine synthetase (GS) and glutamate decarboxylase (GAD), as well as the glutamate-producing enzyme, phosphate-activated glutaminase (PAG). Exposure to hypoxia (1% O(2)) for 6 h or longer increased expression of GS mRNA and protein and enhanced GS enzymatic activity. In contrast, hypoxia caused a significant decrease in expression of PAG mRNA and protein, and also decreased PAG activity. In addition, hypoxia led to an increase in GAD65 and GAD67 protein levels and GAD enzymatic activity. PC12 cells express three Na(+)-dependent glutamate transporters; EAAC1, GLT-1 and GLAST. Hypoxia increased EAAC1 and GLT-1 protein levels, but had no effect on GLAST. Chronic hypoxia significantly enhanced the Na(+)-dependent component of glutamate transport. Furthermore, chronic hypoxia decreased cellular content of glutamate, but increased that of glutamine. Taken together, the hypoxia-induced changes in enzymes related to glutamate metabolism and transport are consistent with a decrease in the extracellular concentration of glutamate. This may have a role in protecting PC12 cells from the cytotoxic effects of glutamate during chronic hypoxia. PMID:11259512

  20. Analysis of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis mutant libraries reveals loci-dependent transcription biases and strategies to novel mutant discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) is the etiologic agent of Johne’s disease in ruminants and it has been implicated as a cause of Crohn’s disease in humans. The generation of comprehensive random mutant banks by transposon mutagenesis is a fundamental wide genomic technology utilized...

  1. PC viruses: How do they do that

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They've been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  2. PC viruses: How do they do that?

    SciTech Connect

    Pichnarczyk, K.

    1992-07-01

    The topic of PC Viruses has been an issue for a number of years now. They`ve been reported in every major newspaper, tabloids, television and radio. People from all fields get viruses: government, private sector businesses, home computers, schools, computer software suppliers. A definition is proposed to introduce the virus phenomenon. Virus authors come from a variety of communities. Motives and ideologies of authors are discussed, and examples of viruses are offered. Also mentioned is the growing number of viruses developed, isolated, and never distributed to the public at large, but kept within the antivirus research community. Virus examples are offered as well. Viruses are distributed not only through bulletin boards and shareware, but also from areas previously assumed to be safe, including the threat of receiving a virus through a standard in-house function, such as an in-house hardware maintenance shop. Three categories of viruses are presented: File Infecter viruses, Boot Sector Infecters, and the new category of Directory Entry Infecter virus. Also discussed are crossover viruses, that is, viruses which utilize a variety of techniques to ensure survival. An explanation of what is occurring within every stage of various viruses is given. Replication strategies common to all three types is noted, mainly the two different replication strategies of memory resident infecters and active selection infecters. A detailed definition, description and application of a stealth virus is presented. Detection strategies are discussed as each topic in this section is completed; a high level schemata of the operation of various virus detection programs ispresented. Since most eradication today is done using virus detection/eradication software, this paper attempts to reveal the techniques used by these packages.Included in the paper is the topic of manual eradication.

  3. HOTSPOT Health Physics codes for the PC

    SciTech Connect

    Homann, S.G.

    1994-03-01

    The HOTSPOT Health Physics codes were created to provide Health Physics personnel with a fast, field-portable calculation tool for evaluating accidents involving radioactive materials. HOTSPOT codes are a first-order approximation of the radiation effects associated with the atmospheric release of radioactive materials. HOTSPOT programs are reasonably accurate for a timely initial assessment. More importantly, HOTSPOT codes produce a consistent output for the same input assumptions and minimize the probability of errors associated with reading a graph incorrectly or scaling a universal nomogram during an emergency. The HOTSPOT codes are designed for short-term (less than 24 hours) release durations. Users requiring radiological release consequences for release scenarios over a longer time period, e.g., annual windrose data, are directed to such long-term models as CAPP88-PC (Parks, 1992). Users requiring more sophisticated modeling capabilities, e.g., complex terrain; multi-location real-time wind field data; etc., are directed to such capabilities as the Department of Energy`s ARAC computer codes (Sullivan, 1993). Four general programs -- Plume, Explosion, Fire, and Resuspension -- calculate a downwind assessment following the release of radioactive material resulting from a continuous or puff release, explosive release, fuel fire, or an area contamination event. Other programs deal with the release of plutonium, uranium, and tritium to expedite an initial assessment of accidents involving nuclear weapons. Additional programs estimate the dose commitment from the inhalation of any one of the radionuclides listed in the database of radionuclides; calibrate a radiation survey instrument for ground-survey measurements; and screen plutonium uptake in the lung (see FIDLER Calibration and LUNG Screening sections).

  4. Run-09 pC polarimeter analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I.; Aschenauer, E.; Atoyan, G.; Bazilevsky, A.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Lee, S.; Li, X.; Makdisi, Y.; Morozov, B.; Nakagawa, I.; Svirida, D.; Zelenski, A.

    2010-08-01

    Analysis of PC polarimeter data at {radical}s = 200 and 500 GeV from Run9 is presented. Final polarization results, fill-by-fill, for blue and yellow beams, as to be used by RHIC experiments (in collisions) are released and collected in http://www4.rcf.bnl.gov/cnipol/pubdocs/Run09Offline/. Global relative systematic uncertainties {delta}P/P (to be considered as correlated from fill to fill) are 4.7% for 100 GeV beams, and 8.3% (12.1%) for blue (yellow) 250 GeV beams. For a product of two beam polarizations P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y} (used in double spin asymmetry measurements) the relative uncertainty {delta}(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y})/(P{sub B} {center_dot} P{sub Y}) 8.8% for 100 GeV beams and 18.5% for 250 GeV beams. For the average between two beam polarization (P{sub B} + P{sub Y})/2 (used in single spin asymmetry measurements, when data from two polarized beams are combined) the relative uncertainty is 4.4% for 100 GeV beams and 9.2% for 250 GeV beams. Larger uncertainties for 250 GeV beams relate to significant rate related systematic effects experienced in the first part of Run9 (due to thicker targets used and smaller trans. beam size at higher beam energy).

  5. Identical substitutions in magnesium chelatase paralogs result in chlorophyll deficient soybean mutants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr.) chlorophyll deficient line MinnGold is a spontaneous mutant characterized by yellow foliage. Map-based cloning and transgenic complementation revealed that the mutant phenotype is caused by a non-synonymous nucleotide substitution in the third exon of a Mg-chelat...

  6. Scanning tunneling microscopy investigation of self-assembled CuPc/F16CuPc binary superstructures on graphite.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu Li; Li, Hui; Ma, Jing; Huang, Han; Chen, Wei; Wee, Andrew T S

    2010-03-01

    The self-assembly of the binary molecular system comprising copper(II) phthalocyanine (CuPc) and copper-hexadecafluoro-phthalocyanine (F(16)CuPc) on graphite has been investigated by in situ low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy (LT-STM). The adsorption of this binary molecular system on graphite results in the formation of a well-ordered chessboardlike nanopattern. The in-plane molecular orientation of the guest CuPc molecules can be tuned by varying the coverage. At low coverage, the sparse CuPc molecules are randomly embedded in the host F(16)CuPc monolayer, possessing two different in-plane orientations; as the CuPc coverage increases, the in-plane molecular orientations of CuPc and F(16)CuPc become unidirectional and a highly ordered chessboardlike pattern forms. Molecular dynamic (MD) simulation results suggest that the selective and directional intermolecular hydrogen bonding determines the in-plane molecular orientation as well as the supramolecular packing arrangement.

  7. Diversification of Photoperiodic Response Patterns in a Collection of Early-Flowering Mutants of Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Pouteau, Sylvie; Carré, Isabelle; Gaudin, Valérie; Ferret, Valérie; Lefebvre, Delphine; Wilson, Melanie

    2008-01-01

    Many plant species exhibit seasonal variation of flowering time in response to daylength. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) flowers earlier under long days (LDs) than under short days (SDs). This quantitative response to photoperiod is characterized by two parameters, the critical photoperiod (Pc), below which there is a delay in flowering, and the ceiling photoperiod (Pce), below which there is no further delay. Thus Pc and Pce define the thresholds beyond which maximum LD and SD responses are observed, respectively. We studied the quantitative response to photoperiod in 49 mutants selected for early flowering in SDs. Nine of these mutants exhibited normal Pce and Pc, showing that their precocious phenotype was not linked to abnormal measurement of daylength. However, we observed broad diversification in the patterns of quantitative responses in the other mutants. To identify factors involved in abnormal measurement of daylength, we analyzed the association of these various patterns with morphogenetic and rhythmic defects. A high proportion of mutants with altered Pce exhibited abnormal hypocotyl elongation in the dark and altered circadian periods of leaf movements. This suggested that the circadian clock and negative regulators of photomorphogenesis may contribute to the specification of SD responses. In contrast, altered Pc correlated with abnormal hypocotyl elongation in the light and reduced photosynthetic light-input requirements for bolting. This indicated that LD responses may be specified by positive elements of light signal transduction pathways and by regulators of resource allocation. Furthermore, the frequency of circadian defects in mutants with normal photoperiodic responses suggested that the circadian clock may regulate the number of leaves independently of its effect on daylength perception. PMID:18799658

  8. PcTx1 affords neuroprotection in a conscious model of stroke in hypertensive rats via selective inhibition of ASIC1a.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Claudia A; Rash, Lachlan D; Chassagnon, Irène R; King, Glenn F; Widdop, Robert E

    2015-12-01

    Acid-sensing ion channel 1a (ASIC1a) is the primary acid sensor in mammalian brain and plays a major role in neuronal injury following cerebral ischemia. Evidence that inhibition of ASIC1a might be neuroprotective following stroke was previously obtained using "PcTx1 venom" from the tarantula Psalmopeous cambridgei. We show here that the ASIC1a-selective blocker PcTx1 is present at only 0.4% abundance in this venom, leading to uncertainty as to whether the observed neuroprotective effects were due to PcTx1 blockade of ASIC1a or inhibition of other ion channels and receptors by the hundreds of peptides and small molecules present in the venom. We therefore examined whether pure PcTx1 is neuroprotective in a conscious model of stroke via direct inhibition of ASIC1a. A focal reperfusion model of stroke was induced in conscious spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) by administering endothelin-1 to the middle cerebral artery via a surgically implanted cannula. Two hours later, SHR were treated with a single intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) dose of PcTx1 (1 ng/kg), an ASIC1a-inactive mutant of PcTx1 (1 ng/kg), or saline, and ledged beam and neurological tests were used to assess the severity of symptomatic changes. PcTx1 markedly reduced cortical and striatal infarct volumes measured 72 h post-stroke, which correlated with improvements in neurological score, motor function and preservation of neuronal architecture. In contrast, the inactive PcTx1 analogue had no effect on stroke outcome. This is the first demonstration that selective pharmacological inhibition of ASIC1a is neuroprotective in conscious SHRs, thus validating inhibition of ASIC1a as a potential treatment for stroke. PMID:26320544

  9. Ball-milled CuPc/TiO{sub 2} hybrid nanocomposite and its photocatalytic degradation of aqueous Rhodamine B

    SciTech Connect

    Mekprasart, W.; Vittayakorn, N.; Pecharapa, W.

    2012-11-15

    B dye solution using as-synthesized composites was investigated under ultraviolet irradiation. The optimized condition for RhB photodegradation was obtained for 1 wt.% CuPc/TiO{sub 2} nanocomposite with efficiency of 87.5% and reaction rate of 0.15 min{sup −1}. The significant improvement in photocatalytic activity of the hybrid composite may be associated to the enhancement of optical absorption and the inhibition of electron–hole recombination caused by the presence of CuPc in TiO{sub 2} matrix.

  10. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance.

  12. Auditory development in progressive motor neuronopathy mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Brors, Dominik; Hansen, Stefan; Berend, Achim; Mlynski, Robert; Aletsee, Christoph; Dazert, Stefan

    2009-11-01

    The present study was performed to elucidate the hearing development in the progressive motor neuronopathy (pmn) mouse mutant. This mouse has been used as a model for human motoneuron disease. A missense mutation in the tubulin-specific chaperon E (Tbce) gene on mouse chromosome 13 was localized as the underlying genetic defect. The protein encoded by the Tbce gene is essential for the formation of primary tubulin complexes. Studies on motoneurons show disorganization in microtubules and disturbed axonal transport, followed by retrograde degeneration of the motoneurons. A similar pathomechanism is also possible for hearing disorders where disrupted microtubules could cause functional deficits in spiral ganglion neurons or in cochlear hair cells. Click auditory brainstem response (ABR) audiometry in homozygous pmn mutants showed a normal onset of hearing, but an increasing hearing threshold from postnatal day 26 (P26) on to death, compared to heterozygous mutants and wild-type mice. Histological sections of the cochlea at different ages showed a regular morphology. Additionally, spiral ganglion explants from mutant and wild-type mice were cultured. The neurite length from pmn mutants was shorter than in wild-type mice, and the neurite number/explant was significantly decreased in pmn mutants. We show that the pmn mouse mutant is a model for a progressive rapid hearing loss from P26 on, after initially normal hearing development. Heterozygous mice are not affected by this defect. With the knowledge of the well-known pathomechanism of this defect in motoneurons, a dysfunction of cellular mechanisms regulating tubulin assembling suggests that tubulin assembling plays an essential role in hearing function and maintenance. PMID:19735697

  13. Defective Glycinergic Synaptic Transmission in Zebrafish Motility Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Hirata, Hiromi; Carta, Eloisa; Yamanaka, Iori; Harvey, Robert J.; Kuwada, John Y.

    2009-01-01

    Glycine is a major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the spinal cord and brainstem. Recently, in vivo analysis of glycinergic synaptic transmission has been pursued in zebrafish using molecular genetics. An ENU mutagenesis screen identified two behavioral mutants that are defective in glycinergic synaptic transmission. Zebrafish bandoneon (beo) mutants have a defect in glrbb, one of the duplicated glycine receptor (GlyR) β subunit genes. These mutants exhibit a loss of glycinergic synaptic transmission due to a lack of synaptic aggregation of GlyRs. Due to the consequent loss of reciprocal inhibition of motor circuits between the two sides of the spinal cord, motor neurons activate simultaneously on both sides resulting in bilateral contraction of axial muscles of beo mutants, eliciting the so-called ‘accordion’ phenotype. Similar defects in GlyR subunit genes have been observed in several mammals and are the basis for human hyperekplexia/startle disease. By contrast, zebrafish shocked (sho) mutants have a defect in slc6a9, encoding GlyT1, a glycine transporter that is expressed by astroglial cells surrounding the glycinergic synapse in the hindbrain and spinal cord. GlyT1 mediates rapid uptake of glycine from the synaptic cleft, terminating synaptic transmission. In zebrafish sho mutants, there appears to be elevated extracellular glycine resulting in persistent inhibition of postsynaptic neurons and subsequent reduced motility, causing the ‘twitch-once’ phenotype. We review current knowledge regarding zebrafish ‘accordion’ and ‘twitch-once’ mutants, including beo and sho, and report the identification of a new α2 subunit that revises the phylogeny of zebrafish GlyRs. PMID:20161699

  14. ALS-linked mutant SOD1 damages mitochondria by promoting conformational changes in Bcl-2

    PubMed Central

    Pedrini, Steve; Sau, Daniela; Guareschi, Stefania; Bogush, Marina; Brown, Robert H.; Naniche, Nicole; Kia, Azadeh; Trotti, Davide; Pasinelli, Piera

    2010-01-01

    In mutant superoxide dismutase (SOD1)-linked amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), accumulation of misfolded mutant SOD1 in spinal cord mitochondria is thought to cause mitochondrial dysfunction. Whether mutant SOD1 is toxic per se or whether it damages the mitochondria through interactions with other mitochondrial proteins is not known. We previously identified Bcl-2 as an interacting partner of mutant SOD1 specifically in spinal cord, but not in liver, mitochondria of SOD1 mice and patients. We now show that mutant SOD1 toxicity relies on this interaction. Mutant SOD1 induces mitochondrial morphological changes and compromises mitochondrial membrane integrity leading to release of Cytochrome C only in the presence of Bcl-2. In cells, mouse and human spinal cord with SOD1 mutations, the binding to mutant SOD1 triggers a conformational change in Bcl-2 that results in the uncovering of its toxic BH3 domain and conversion of Bcl-2 into a toxic protein. Bcl-2 carrying a mutagenized, non-toxic BH3 domain fails to support mutant SOD1 mitochondrial toxicity. The identification of Bcl-2 as a specific target and active partner in mutant SOD1 mitochondrial toxicity suggests new therapeutic strategies to inhibit the formation of the toxic mutant SOD1/Bcl-2 complex and to prevent mitochondrial damage in ALS. PMID:20460269

  15. Morphological stability and performance of polymer-fullerene solar cells under thermal stress: the impact of photoinduced PC60BM oligomerization.

    PubMed

    Wong, Him Cheng; Li, Zhe; Tan, Ching Hong; Zhong, Hongliang; Huang, Zhenggang; Bronstein, Hugo; McCulloch, Iain; Cabral, João T; Durrant, James R

    2014-02-25

    We report a general light processing strategy for organic solar cells (OSC) that exploits the propensity of the fullerene derivative PC60BM to photo-oligomerize, which is capable of both stabilizing the polymer:PC60BM active layer morphology and enhancing the device stability under thermal annealing. The observations hold for blends of PC60BM with an array of benchmark donor polymer systems, including P3HT, DPP-TT-T, PTB7, and PCDTBT. The morphology and kinetics of the thermally induced PC60BM crystallization within the blend films are investigated as a function of substrate and temperature. PC60BM nucleation rates on SiOx substrates exhibit a pronounced peak profile with temperature, whose maximum is polymer and blend-composition dependent. Modest illumination (<10 mW/cm(2)) significantly suppresses nucleation, which is quantified as function of dose, but does not affect crystalline shape or growth, in the micrometer range. On PEDOT:PSS substrates, thermally induced PC60BM aggregation is observed on smaller (≈ 100 nm) length scales, depending upon donor polymer, and also suppressed by light exposure. The concurrent thermal dissociation process of PC60BM oligomers in blend films is also investigated and the activation energy of the fullerene-fullerene bond is estimated to be 0.96 ± 0.04 eV. Following light processing, the thermal stability, and thus lifetime, of PCDTBT:PC60BM devices increases for annealing times up to 150 h. In contrast, PCDTBT:PC70BM OSCs are found to be largely light insensitive. The results are rationalized in terms of the suppression of PC60BM micro- and nanoscopic crystallization processes upon thermal annealing caused by photoinduced PC60BM oligomerization.

  16. Possible generation mechanisms for Pc1 pearl structures in the ionosphere based on 6 years of ground observations in Canada, Russia, and Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jun, Chae-Woo; Shiokawa, Kazuo; Connors, Martin; Schofield, Ian; Poddelsky, Igor; Shevtsov, Boris

    2016-05-01

    We investigate pearl structures (amplitude modulations) of Pc1 pulsations simultaneously observed at Athabasca (ATH, 54.7°N, 246.7°E, L = 4.3) in Canada, Magadan (MGD, 60.1°N, 150.7°E, L = 2.6) in Russia, and Moshiri (MOS, 44.4°N, 142.3°E, L = 1.5) in Japan. From 6 years of ground observations, from 2008 to 2013, we selected 84 Pc1 events observed simultaneously at the longitudinally separated stations (ATH and MGD) and 370 events observed at the latitudinally separated stations (MGD and MOS), all with high coherence (>0.7) of Pc1 waveforms. We calculated the cross-correlation coefficient (similarity: r) for the Pc1 pearl structures and found that more than half of the events in both pairs had low similarity (r < 0.7), indicating that most Pc1 waves exhibit different pearl structures at different stations. We found that high-similarity Pc1 pearl structures (r > 0.7) at the longitudinally separated stations are concentrated from 6 to 15 UT when both stations are in the nighttime. The similarity of Pc1 pearl structures tends to show a negative correlation with the standard deviation of the polarization angle in both pairs. The observed repetition period of Pc1 pearl structures has a clear positive correlation with the repetition period estimated from Pc1 bandwidth by assuming beating of different frequencies. From these results, we suggest that ionospheric beating effect could be a dominant process for the generation of Pc1 pearl structures. Beating processes in the ionosphere with a spatially distributed ionospheric source can cause the different shapes of Pc1 pearl structures at different observation points during ionospheric duct propagation.

  17. Stochastic simulation of pulverized coal (PC) processes

    SciTech Connect

    Salazar, J.; Diwekar, U.; Zitney, S.

    2010-01-01

    An increasing population and electricity demand in the U.S. require capacity expansion of power systems. The National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), has invested considerable efforts on research and development to improve the design and simulation of these power plants. Incorporation of novel process synthesis techniques and realistic simulation methodologies yield optimal flowsheet configurations and accurate estimation of their performance parameters. To provide a better estimation of such performance indicators, simulation models should predict the process behavior based on not only deterministic values of well-known input parameters but also uncertain variables associated with simulation assumptions. In this work, the stochastic simulation of a load-following pulverized coal (PC) power plant takes into account the variation of three input variables, namely, atmospheric air temperature, atmospheric air humidity, and generation load. These uncertain variables are characterized with probability density functions (pdfs) obtained from available atmospheric and electrical energy generation data. The stochastic simulation is carried out by obtaining a sample of values from the pdfs that generates a set of scenarios under which the model is run. An efficient sampling technique [Hammersley sequence sampling (HSS)] guarantees a set of scenarios uniformly distributed throughout the uncertain variable range. Then, each model run generates results on performance parameters as cycle efficiency, carbon emissions, sulfur emissions, and water consumption that are statistically analyzed after all runs are completed. Among these parameters, water consumption is of importance because an increasing demand has been observed mostly in arid regions of the country and, therefore, constrains the operability of the processes. This water consumption is significantly affected by atmospheric uncertainties. The original deterministic process model

  18. User`s guide and documentation manual for ``PC-Gel`` simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Ming-Ming; Gao, Hong W.

    1993-10-01

    PC-GEL is a three-dimensional, three-phase (oil, water, and gas) permeability modification simulator developed by incorporating an in-situ gelation model into a black oil simulator (BOAST) for personal computer application. The features included in the simulator are: transport of each chemical species of the polymer/crosslinker system in porous media, gelation reaction kinetics of the polymer with crosslinking agents, rheology of the polymer and gel, inaccessible pore volume to macromolecules, adsorption of chemical species on rock surfaces, retention of gel on the rock matrix, and permeability reduction caused by the adsorption of polymer and gel. The in-situ gelation model and simulator were validated against data reported in the literature. The simulator PC-GEL is useful for simulating and optimizing any combination of primary production, waterflooding, polymer flooding, and permeability modification treatments. A general background of permeability modification using crosslinked polymer gels is given in Section I and the governing equations, mechanisms, and numerical solutions of PC-GEL are given in Section II. Steps for preparing an input data file with reservoir and gel-chemical transport data, and recurrent data are described in Sections III and IV, respectively. Example data inputs are enclosed after explanations of each input line to help the user prepare data files. Major items of the output files are reviewed in Section V. Finally, three sample problems for running PC-GEL are described in Section VI, and input files and part of the output files of these problems are listed in the appendices. For the user`s reference a copy of the source code of PC-GEL computer program is attached in Appendix A.

  19. Active extracts of black tea (Camellia Sinensis) induce apoptosis of PC-3 prostate cancer cells via mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shili; Pan, Shunshun; Miao, Aiqing; Ling, Caijin; Pang, Shi; Tang, Jinchi; Chen, Dong; Zhao, Chaoyi

    2013-08-01

    Cancer of the prostate gland is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in human males. Many studies have shown that black tea reduces the risk of several types of cancer. We studied the effects of active extracts of black tea and the black tea polyphenols theaflavins (TFs), on the cellular proliferation and mitochondria of the human prostate cancer cell line PC-3. Our studies revealed that Yinghong black tea extracts (YBT), Assam black tea extracts (ABT) and TFs inhibited cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. We also showed that TFs, YBT and ABT affected the morphology of PC-3 cells and induced apoptosis or even necrosis in PC-3 cells. In addition, it was observed that the samples significantly caused loss of the mitochondrial membrane potential, release of cytochrome c from the intermembrane space into the cytosol, decrease of the ATP content and activation of caspase-3 compared with the control. Taken together, these findings suggest that black tea could act as an effective anti-proliferative agent in PC-3 cells, and TFs, YBT and ABT induced apoptosis of PC-3 cells through mitochondrial dysfunction.

  20. Nanoformulated cell-penetrating survivin mutant and its dual actions

    PubMed Central

    Sriramoju, Bhasker; Kanwar, Rupinder K; Kanwar, Jagat R

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the differential actions of a dominant-negative survivin mutant (SurR9-C84A) against cancerous SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cell lines and differentiated SK-N-SH neurons. In both the cases, the mutant protein displayed dual actions, where its effects were cytotoxic toward cancerous cells and proliferative toward the differentiated neurons. This can be explained by the fact that tumorous (undifferentiated SK-N-SH) cells have a high endogenous survivin pool and upon treatment with mutant SuR9-C84A causes forceful survivin expression. These events significantly lowered the microtubule dynamics and stability, eventually leading to apoptosis. In the case of differentiated SK-N-SH neurons that express negligible levels of wild-type survivin, the mutant indistinguishably behaved in a wild-type fashion. It also favored cell-cycle progression, forming the chromosome-passenger complex, and stabilized the microtubule-organizing center. Therefore, mutant SurR9-C84A represents a novel therapeutic with its dual actions (cytotoxic toward tumor cells and protective and proliferative toward neuronal cells), and hence finds potential applications against a variety of neurological disorders. In this study, we also developed a novel poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticulate formulation to surmount the hurdles associated with the delivery of SurR9-C84A, thus enhancing its effective therapeutic outcome. PMID:25045261

  1. Characterization of Leber Congenital Amaurosis-associated NMNAT1 Mutants*

    PubMed Central

    Sasaki, Yo; Margolin, Zachary; Borgo, Benjamin; Havranek, James J.; Milbrandt, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    Leber congenital amaurosis 9 (LCA9) is an autosomal recessive retinal degeneration condition caused by mutations in the NAD+ biosynthetic enzyme NMNAT1. This condition leads to early blindness but no other consistent deficits have been reported in patients with NMNAT1 mutations despite its central role in metabolism and ubiquitous expression. To study how these mutations affect NMNAT1 function and ultimately lead to the retinal degeneration phenotype, we performed detailed analysis of LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants, including the expression, nuclear localization, enzymatic activity, secondary structure, oligomerization, and promotion of axonal and cellular integrity in response to injury. In many assays, most mutants produced results similar to wild type NMNAT1. Indeed, NAD+ synthetic activity is unlikely to be a primary mechanism underlying retinal degeneration as most LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants had normal enzymatic activity. In contrast, the secondary structure of many NMNAT1 mutants was relatively less stable as they lost enzymatic activity after heat shock, whereas wild type NMNAT1 retains significant activity after this stress. These results suggest that LCA-associated NMNAT1 mutants are more vulnerable to stressful conditions that lead to protein unfolding, a potential contributor to the retinal degeneration observed in this syndrome. PMID:26018082

  2. Problem-Solving Test: Tryptophan Operon Mutants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a problem-solving test that deals with the regulation of the "trp" operon of "Escherichia coli." Two mutants of this operon are described: in mutant A, the operator region of the operon carries a point mutation so that it is unable to carry out its function; mutant B expresses a "trp" repressor protein unable to bind…

  3. Single-event upset in advanced PowerPC microprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irom, F.; Swift, G. M.; Farmanesh, F.; Millward, D. G.

    2002-01-01

    Proton and heavy-ion single-event upset susceptibility has been measured for the MotorolaPowerPC7400. The results show that this advanced device has low upset susceptibility, despite the scaling and design advances.

  4. Present (unified) and past Polar Cap (PC) index calculations.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter; Troshichev, Oleg; Janzhura, Alexander

    2010-05-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) index was introduced by Troshichev and Andrezen (1985). Index values are derived from polar cap magnetic variations and are mainly related to the intensity of the variable transpolar ionospheric currents. These currents relate to the polar cap antisunward ionospheric plasma convection driven by the dawn-dusk electric field, which in turn is generated by the interaction of the solar wind with the Earth's magnetosphere. Thus the PC index is an important Space Weather parameter. Coefficients to calculate PC index values from polar magnetic variations have been derived by several different procedures in the past. Now, a unified procedure (Troshichev et al., 2005) has been adopted for both the PCN (north) and the PCS (south) index values. The presentation outlines and discusses the principles and the details of the unified procedure, which will be submitted to IAGA for formal approval. The PC index can be made available on-line in real-time for Space Weather applications.

  5. PC-SPES (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  6. OCEAN-PC and a distributed network for ocean data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclain, Douglas R.

    1992-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission (IOC) wishes to develop an integrated software package for oceanographic data entry and access in developing countries. The software, called 'OCEAN-PC', would run on low cost PC microcomputers and would encourage and standardize: (1) entry of local ocean observations; (2) quality control of the local data; (3) merging local data with historical data; (4) improved display and analysis of the merged data; and (5) international data exchange. OCEAN-PC will link existing MS-DOS oceanographic programs and data sets with table-driven format conversions. Since many ocean data sets are now being distributed on optical discs (Compact Discs - Read Only Memory, CD-ROM, Mass et al. 1987), OCEAN-PC will emphasize access to CD-ROMs.

  7. PC-SPES (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Cancer.gov

    Expert-reviewed information summary about the use of PC-SPES as a treatment for prostate cancer. Note: The information in this summary is no longer being updated and is provided for reference purposes only.

  8. Neuroprotective effects of constituents of Eragrostis ferruginea against Aβ-induced toxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Na, Chae Sun; Hong, Seong Su; Choi, Yun-Hyeok; Lee, Yong Ho; Hong, Sun Hee; Lim, Ji-Youn; Kang, Byeong Hoa; Park, So-Young; Lee, Dongho

    2010-07-01

    A new flavonoid, 7-demethylageconyflavone A (1), and five known compounds, tricin (2), ageconyflavone A (3), corylin (4), nectandrin B (5), and 4-ketopinoresinol (6) were isolated from the aerial parts of Eragrostis ferruginea. Their structures were determined using spectroscopic techniques, including 1D- and 2D-NMR. All compounds were tested for the neuroprotective effects against amyloid beta peptide (Abeta) using PC12 cells, a major cause of the pathology of Alzheimer's disease. Tricin (2) was found to have a neuroprotective effect with an ED(50) value of 20.3 microM against Abeta-induced toxicity in PC12 cells. Ageconyflavone A (3), nectandrin B (5) and 4-ketopinoresinol (6) demonstrated moderate neuroprotective effects with ED(50) values of 58.7, 44.1, and 54.8 microM, respectively.

  9. Screening for gene regulation mutants by bioluminescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Chinnusamy, Viswanathan; Stevenson, Becky; Lee, Byeong-ha; Zhu, Jian-Kang

    2002-07-09

    Because plants cannot move, they have evolved complex sensing and response systems to cope with the physical environment. Adverse environmental conditions, such as those causing abiotic stress, often cause significant losses in crop productivity and quality. Because of a paucity of well-defined visible phenotypes, conventional genetic screens have not been very successful in isolating abiotic stress signal transduction mutants of plants. Here, we describe a reporter gene-based strategy to screen for mutants affected in abiotic stress-regulated gene transcription. Our genetic screen uses the firefly luciferase reporter gene driven by the cold, drought, salt, and abscisic acid (ABA)-responsive RD29A promoter (RD29A::LUC). Arabidopsis plants transformed with the RD29A::LUC reporter emit bioluminescence in response to cold, drought, salt, or ABA treatment. After mutagenesis of these plants with ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS), mutants can be screened from the M2 population by monitoring the level of stress-inducible bioluminescence with a high-throughput, low-light imaging system. This protocol describes in detail the procedures for this luciferase reporter-based genetic screen for Arabidopsis mutants defective in abiotic stress signaling.

  10. Mutant IDH is sufficient to initiate enchondromatosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Makoto; Sasaki, Masato; Cairns, Rob A; Inoue, Satoshi; Puviindran, Vijitha; Li, Wanda Y; Snow, Bryan E; Jones, Lisa D; Wei, Qingxia; Sato, Shingo; Tang, Yuning J; Nadesan, Puviindran; Rockel, Jason; Whetstone, Heather; Poon, Raymond; Weng, Angela; Gross, Stefan; Straley, Kimberly; Gliser, Camelia; Xu, Yingxia; Wunder, Jay; Mak, Tak W; Alman, Benjamin A

    2015-03-01

    Enchondromas are benign cartilage tumors and precursors to malignant chondrosarcomas. Somatic mutations in the isocitrate dehydrogenase genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are present in the majority of these tumor types. How these mutations cause enchondromas is unclear. Here, we identified the spectrum of IDH mutations in human enchondromas and chondrosarcomas and studied their effects in mice. A broad range of mutations was identified, including the previously unreported IDH1-R132Q mutation. These mutations harbored enzymatic activity to catalyze α-ketoglutarate to d-2-hydroxyglutarate (d-2HG). Mice expressing Idh1-R132Q in one allele in cells expressing type 2 collagen showed a disordered growth plate, with persistence of type X-expressing chondrocytes. Chondrocyte cell cultures from these animals or controls showed that there was an increase in proliferation and expression of genes characteristic of hypertrophic chondrocytes with expression of Idh1-R132Q or 2HG treatment. Col2a1-Cre;Idh1-R132Q mutant knock-in mice (mutant allele expressed in chondrocytes) did not survive after the neonatal stage. Col2a1-Cre/ERT2;Idh1-R132 mutant conditional knock-in mice, in which Cre was induced by tamoxifen after weaning, developed multiple enchondroma-like lesions. Taken together, these data show that mutant IDH or d-2HG causes persistence of chondrocytes, giving rise to rests of growth-plate cells that persist in the bone as enchondromas. PMID:25730874

  11. The antiandrogenic effect of finasteride against a mutant androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yue; Chhipa, Rishi Raj; Zhang, Haitao; Ip, Clement

    2011-05-15

    Finasteride is known to inhibit Type 2 5α-reductase and thus block the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT). The structural similarity of finasteride to DHT raises the possibility that finasteride may also interfere with the function of the androgen receptor (AR). Experiments were carried out to evaluate the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride in LNCaP, C4-2 and VCaP human prostate cancer cells. Finasteride decreased DHT binding to AR, and DHT-stimulated AR activity and cell growth in LNCaP and C4-2 cells, but not in VCaP cells. LNCaP and C4-2 (derived from castration-resistant LNCaP) cells express the T877A mutant AR, while VCaP cells express the wild type AR. When PC-3 cells, which are AR-null, were transfected with either the wild type or the T877A mutant AR, only the mutant AR-expressing cells were sensitive to finasteride inhibition of DHT binding. Peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx1) is a novel endogenous facilitator of AR binding to DHT. In Prx1-rich LNCaP cells, the combination of Prx1 knockdown and finasteride was found to produce a greater inhibitory effect on AR activity and cell growth than either treatment alone. The observation suggests that cells with a low expression of Prx1 are likely to be more responsive to the antiandrogenic effect of finasteride. Additional studies showed that the efficacy of finasteride was comparable to that of bicalutamide (a widely used non-steroidal antiandrogen). The implication of the above findings is discussed in the context of developing strategies to improve the outcome of androgen deprivation therapy.

  12. Src mediates endocytosis of TWIK-related acid-sensitive K+ 1 channels in PC12 cells in response to nerve growth factor.

    PubMed

    Matsuoka, Hidetada; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-08-15

    TWIK-related acid-sensitive K(+) (TASK) channels produce background K(+) currents. We elucidated that TASK1 channels in rat adrenal medullary cells and PC12 cells are internalized in a clathrin-dependent manner in response to nerve growth factor (NGF). Here, the molecular mechanism for this internalization in PC12 cells was explored. The combination of enzyme inhibitors with tropomyosin receptor kinase A mutants revealed that the internalization was mediated by both phospholipase C and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathways that converge on protein kinase C with the consequent activation of Src, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase. The NGF-induced endocytosis of TASK1 channels did not occur in the presence of the Src inhibitor or with the expression of a kinase-dead Src mutant. Additionally, NGF induced a transient colocalization of Src with the TASK1 channel, but not the TASK1 mutant, in which tyrosine at 370 was replaced with phenylalanine. This TASK1 mutant showed no increase in tyrosine phosphorylation and markedly diminished internalization in response to NGF. We concluded that NGF induces endocytosis of TASK1 channels via tyrosine phosphorylation in its carboxyl terminus.

  13. Probing the core-mantle boundary beneath Europe and Western Eurasia: A detailed study using PcP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, Alexandra; Thomas, Christine; Krüger, Frank; Weber, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We use PcP (the core reflected P phase) recordings of deep earthquakes and nuclear explosions from the Gräfenberg (Germany) and NORSAR (Norway) arrays to investigate the core-mantle boundary region beneath Europe and western Eurasia. We find evidence for a previously unknown ultra-low velocity zone 600 km south-east of Moscow, located at the edge of a middle-size low shear- velocity region imaged in seismic tomography that is located beneath the Volga river region. The observed amplitude variations of PcP can be modelled by velocity reductions of P and S-waves of -5% and -15%, respectively, with a density increase of +15%. Travel time delays of pre-and postcursors are indicating a thickness of about 13 km for this ultra-low velocity region (ULVZ). However, our modelling also reveals highly ambiguous amplitude variations of PcP and a reflection off the top of the anomaly for various ULVZs and topography models. Accordingly, large velocity contrasts of up to -10% in VP and -20% in VS cannot be excluded. In general, the whole Volga river region shows a complex pattern of PcP amplitudes caused most likely by CMB undulations. Further PcP probes beneath Paris, Kiev and northern Italy indicate likely normal CMB conditions, whereas the samples below Finland and the Hungary-Slovakia border yield strongly amplified PcP signals suggesting strong CMB topography effects. We evaluate the amplitude behaviour of PcP as a function of distance and several ULVZ models using the 1D reflectivity and the 2D Gauss beam method. The influence of the velocity and density perturbations is analysed as well as the anomaly thickness, the dominant period of the source wavelet and interface topographies. Strong variation of the PcP amplitude are obtained as a function of distance and of the impedance contrast. We also consider two types of topographies: undulations atop the CMB in the presence of flat ULVZs and vice versa. Where a broad range of CMB topography dimensions lead to large Pc

  14. Epitaxial growth and electronic properties of well ordered phthalocyanine heterojunctions MnPc/F{sub 16}CoPc

    SciTech Connect

    Lindner, Susi; Mahns, Benjamin; Treske, Uwe; Knupfer, Martin; Vilkov, Oleg; Haidu, Francisc; Fronk, Michael; Zahn, Dietrich R. T.

    2014-09-07

    We have prepared phthalocyanine heterojunctions out of MnPc and F{sub 16}CoPc, which were studied by means of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This heterojunction is characterized by a charge transfer at the interface, resulting in charged MnPc{sup δ} {sup +} and F{sub 16}CoPc{sup δ} {sup −} species. Our data reveal that the molecules are well ordered and oriented parallel to the substrate surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate the filling of the Co 3d{sub z{sup 2}} orbital due to the charge transfer, which supports the explanation of the density functional theory, that the charge transfer is local and affects the metal centers only.

  15. Detection of Cell Wall Chemical Variation in Zea Mays Mutants Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Buyck, N.; Thomas, S.

    2001-01-01

    Corn stover is regarded as the prime candidate feedstock material for commercial biomass conversion in the United States. Variations in chemical composition of Zea mays cell walls can affect biomass conversion process yields and economics. Mutant lines were constructed by activating a Mu transposon system. The cell wall chemical composition of 48 mutant families was characterized using near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy. NIR data were analyzed using a multivariate statistical analysis technique called Principal Component Analysis (PCA). PCA of the NIR data from 349 maize leaf samples reveals 57 individuals as outliers on one or more of six Principal Components (PCs) at the 95% confidence interval. Of these, 19 individuals from 16 families are outliers on either PC3 (9% of the variation) or PC6 (1% of the variation), the two PCs that contain information about cell wall polymers. Those individuals for which altered cell wall chemistry is confirmed with wet chemical analysis will then be subjected to fermentation analysis to determine whether or not biomass conversion process kinetics, yields and/or economics are significantly affected. Those mutants that provide indications for a decrease in process cost will be pursued further to identify the gene(s) responsible for the observed changes in cell wall composition and associated changes in process economics. These genes will eventually be incorporated into maize breeding programs directed at the development of a truly dual use crop.

  16. Electronic structure of Pc2Lu and (PcAlF)n oriented thin films using angle resolved photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahy, M. R.; Fujimoto, H.; Dann, A. J.; Hoshi, H.; Inokuchi, H.; Maruyama, Y.; Willis, M. R.

    1990-04-01

    Ultraviolet photoelectron spectra have been measured for the radical phthalocyanine dimer, Pc2Lu, and the fluorine bridge stacked phthalocyanine polymer (PcAlF)n. Previous workers have shown that both materials can, under appropriate conditions, be prepared in a well characterised, highly oriented thin film form. Thus, samples for this work were prepared by in situ sublimation at very slow evaporation rates onto crystalline substrates to try to maximise the degree of sample orientation. The angle dependence of the spectra were measured and the sample structure subsequently examined using high resolution TEM. The TEM results show that the (PcAlF)n films have a much higher level of orientation than the Pc2Lu films and this is reflected by the angle dependences of the UPS measurements. The spectra for (PcAlF)n are very similar to measurements on most other simple phthalocyanine compounds and have a small angular dependence. The spectra for Pc2Lu show almost no angular dependence. Again the spectra are broadly similar to that of other Pc's with two significant differences, the lowest energy peak is split and the whole spectra is shifted to lower energy. This result will be discussed in terms of simple molecular orbital ideas. The effect of air on the spectra of both materials was examined and the spectra of (PcAlF)n was found to be particularly sensitive. Attempts to determine the position of the lutetium orbitals by varying the light frequency around the lutetium resonance energies was attempted but no significant variation in the spectra was observed.

  17. Paranodal permeability in `myelin mutants'

    PubMed Central

    Shroff, S.; Mierzwa, A.; Scherer, S.S.; Peles, E.; Arevalo, J.C.; Chao, M.V.; Rosenbluth, J.

    2011-01-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three `myelin mutant' mice, Caspr-null, cst-null and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3kDa, 10kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40kDa, 70kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of transverse bands in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of transverse bands. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of transverse bands but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of `pathway 3', the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  18. Paranodal permeability in "myelin mutants".

    PubMed

    Shroff, Seema; Mierzwa, Amanda; Scherer, Steven S; Peles, Elior; Arevalo, Juan C; Chao, Moses V; Rosenbluth, Jack

    2011-10-01

    Fluorescent dextran tracers of varying sizes have been used to assess paranodal permeability in myelinated sciatic nerve fibers from control and three "myelin mutant" mice, Caspr-null, cst-null, and shaking. We demonstrate that in all of these the paranode is permeable to small tracers (3 kDa and 10 kDa), which penetrate most fibers, and to larger tracers (40 kDa and 70 kDa), which penetrate far fewer fibers and move shorter distances over longer periods of time. Despite gross diminution in transverse bands (TBs) in the Caspr-null and cst-null mice, the permeability of their paranodal junctions is equivalent to that in controls. Thus, deficiency of TBs in these mutants does not increase the permeability of their paranodal junctions to the dextrans we used, moving from the perinodal space through the paranode to the internodal periaxonal space. In addition, we show that the shaking mice, which have thinner myelin and shorter paranodes, show increased permeability to the same tracers despite the presence of TBs. We conclude that the extent of penetration of these tracers does not depend on the presence or absence of TBs but does depend on the length of the paranode and, in turn, on the length of "pathway 3," the helical extracellular pathway that passes through the paranode parallel to the lateral edge of the myelin sheath. PMID:21618613

  19. PC Tutor. Bericht uber ein PC-gestutzes Tutorensystem = PC Tutor. Report on a Tutoring System with Personal Computer. ZIFF Papiere 75.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fritsch, Helmut

    A project was conducted to increase as well as to professionalize communication between tutors and learners in a West German university's distance education program by the use of personal computers. Two tutors worked on the systematic development of a PC-based correcting system. The goal, apart from developing general language skills in English,…

  20. Correction of Hair Shaft Defects through Allele-Specific Silencing of Mutant Krt75.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Snedecor, Elizabeth R; Zhang, Xu; Xu, Yanfeng; Huang, Lan; Jones, Evan C; Zhang, Lianfeng; Clark, Richard A; Roop, Dennis R; Qin, Chuan; Chen, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Dominant mutations in keratin genes can cause a number of inheritable skin disorders characterized by intraepidermal blistering, epidermal hyperkeratosis, or abnormalities in skin appendages, such as nail plate dystrophy and structural defects in hair. Allele-specific silencing of mutant keratins through RNA interference is a promising therapeutic approach for suppressing the expression of mutant keratins and related phenotypes in the epidermis. However, its effectiveness on skin appendages remains to be confirmed in vivo. In this study, we developed allele-specific small interfering RNAs capable of selectively suppressing the expression of a mutant Krt75, which causes hair shaft structural defects characterized by the development of blebs along the hair shaft in mice. Hair regenerated from epidermal keratinocyte progenitor cells isolated from mutant Krt75 mouse models reproduced the blebbing phenotype when grafted in vivo. In contrast, mutant cells manipulated with a lentiviral vector expressing mutant Krt75-specific short hairpin RNA (shRNA) persistently suppressed this phenotype. The phenotypic correction was associated with a significant reduction of mutant Krt75 mRNA in the skin grafts. Thus, data obtained from this study demonstrated the feasibility of utilizing RNA interference to achieve durable correction of hair structural phenotypes through allele-specific silencing of mutant keratin genes. PMID:26763422

  1. A novel function of the human oncogene Stil: Regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility through the Shh pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lei; Carr, Aprell L.; Sun, Lei; Drewing, Audrey; Lee, Jessica; Rao, Zihe

    2015-01-01

    The human oncogene SCL/TAL1 interrupting locus (Stil) is highly conserved in vertebrate species. Here, we report new findings of Stil in the regulation of toxic susceptibility in mammalian dopaminergic (DA)-like PC12 cells. RNAi-mediated knockdown of Stil expression did not affect the survival of proliferating PC12 cells but caused a significant amount of cell death in differentiated neurons after toxic drug treatment. In contrast, overexpression of Stil increased toxic susceptibility only in proliferating cells but produced no effect in mature neurons. Exogenetic inactivation or activation of the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling transduction mimicked the effect of Stil knockdown or overexpression in regulation of PC12 cell toxic susceptibility, suggesting that Stil exerts its role through the Shh pathway. Together, the data provide evidence for novel functions of the human oncogene Stil in neural toxic susceptibility. PMID:26549353

  2. Analysis of Tyr to Phe and fa/fa leptin receptor mutations in the PC12 cell line.

    PubMed

    Eyckerman, S; Waelput, W; Verhee, A; Broekaert, D; Vandekerckhove, J; Tavernier, J

    1999-12-01

    Weight regulation through body-fat content and energy homeostasis, is regulated mainly through the actions of leptin. Herein, we analyse the effect of mutations in the mouse leptin receptor using the PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line as a model system. Both the induction of pancreatitis associated protein 1 and metallothionein-II, two leptin regulated genes in PC12, was evaluated. Tyr to Phe mutations in the cytoplasmic tail of the mouse leptin receptor confirmed the critical role of Tyr1138 (a YxxQ motif) and STAT-3 activation for induction of leptin-induced genes in PC12. In addition, the Tyr985Phe mutation showed enhanced responsiveness to leptin, which was even more pronounced in combination with Tyr1077Phe. The short isoform of the leptin receptor showed complete loss of stimulation of both genes. In contrast, a leptin receptor devoid of all Tyr residues in its cytoplasmic tail was still capable of a limited induction of the PAP 1 gene. A mutant mouse leptin receptor containing the fa/fa mutation showed constitutive signalling and impaired responsiveness to leptin. Treatment with the adenylate cyclase activator forskolin alone, in the absence of leptin was sufficient to obtain full induction of both genes. PMID:10586122

  3. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Olga Hernández de la; Marchat, Laurence A.; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; Rosas, Itzel López; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  4. Multinucleation and Polykaryon Formation is Promoted by the EhPC4 Transcription Factor in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Hernández de la Cruz, Olga; Marchat, Laurence A; Guillén, Nancy; Weber, Christian; López Rosas, Itzel; Díaz-Chávez, José; Herrera, Luis; Rojo-Domínguez, Arturo; Orozco, Esther; López-Camarillo, César

    2016-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the intestinal parasite responsible for human amoebiasis that is a leading cause of death in developing countries. In this protozoan, heterogeneity in DNA content, polyploidy and genome plasticity have been associated to alterations in mechanisms controlling DNA replication and cell division. Studying the function of the transcription factor EhPC4, we unexpectedly found that it is functionally related to DNA replication, and multinucleation. Site-directed mutagenesis on the FRFPKG motif revealed that the K127 residue is required for efficient EhPC4 DNA-binding activity. Remarkably, overexpression of EhPC4 significantly increased cell proliferation, DNA replication and DNA content of trophozoites. A dramatically increase in cell size resulting in the formation of giant multinucleated trophozoites (polykaryon) was also found. Multinucleation event was associated to cytokinesis failure leading to abortion of ongoing cell division. Consistently, genome-wide profiling of EhPC4 overexpressing trophozoites revealed the up-regulation of genes involved in carbohydrates and nucleic acids metabolism, chromosome segregation and cytokinesis. Forced overexpression of one of these genes, EhNUDC (nuclear movement protein), led to alterations in cytokinesis and partially recapitulated the multinucleation phenotype. These data indicate for the first time that EhPC4 is associated with events related to polyploidy and genome stability in E. histolytica. PMID:26792358

  5. Expression of PKC iota affects neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells at least partly independent of kinase function

    PubMed Central

    Doonachar, Alana; Schoenfeld, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical PKC (aPKC) plays a role in establishing cell polarity and has been indicated in neuronal differentiation and polarization, including neurite formation in rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, albeit by unclear mechanisms. Here, the role of the aPKC isoform, PKC iota (PKCι), in the early neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells was investigated. NGF-treated PC12 cells with stably expressed exogenous wild-type PKCι showed decreased expression of a neuroendocrine marker, increased expression of a neuronal marker, and increased neurite formation. Stable expression of a kinase- inactive PKCι, but not constitutively active PKCι lacking a regulatory domain, had similar although less potent effects. Pharmacological inhibition of endogenous aPKC kinase activity in parental PC12 cells did not inhibit neurite formation, suggesting that some of the observed effects of PKCι expression on neuronal differentiation are kinase- independent. Interestingly, exogenous expression of wild-type and kinase-inactive PKCι had little effect on overall PKCι activity, but caused a decrease in PKC zeta (PKCζ) kinase activity, suggesting an interplay between the two isoforms that may underlie the observed results. Overall, these findings suggest that in PC12 and perhaps other neuroendocrine precursor cells, PKCι influences an early differentiation decision between the neuroendocrine (chromaffin) and sympathetic neuron cell lineages, potentially by affecting PKCζ function. PMID:24910851

  6. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-01-31

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NOx emissions to 0.15 lb per million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and PC burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. A revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and PC burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was then begun with BBP personnel. During the previous reporting period, reactivation of the pilot test system was completed with the modified Preheat gas combustor. Following shakedown of the modified gas combustor alone, a series of successful tests of the new combustor with PRB coal using the original PC burner were completed. NOx at the furnace exit was reduced significantly with the modified gas combustor, to as low as 150 ppm with only 36 ppm CO (both corrected to 3% O2). Concurrent with testing, GTI and BBP collaborated on development of two modified designs for the PC burner optimized to fire preheated char and pyrolysis products from the Preheat gas combustor. During the current reporting period, one of the two modified PC burner designs was fabricated and installed in the pilot test facility. Testing of the modified pilot system (modified gas combustor and modified PC burner) during the quarter included 38 tests with PRB coal. NOx reduction was significantly improved to levels as low as 60-100 ppmv with CO in the range of 35-112 ppmv without any furnace air staging.

  7. Autophagy regulates colistin-induced apoptosis in PC-12 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Zhao, Yonghao; Ding, Wenjian; Jiang, Guozheng; Lu, Ziyin; Li, Li; Wang, Jinli; Li, Jian; Li, Jichang

    2015-04-01

    Colistin is a cyclic cationic polypeptide antibiotic with activity against multidrug-resistant Gram-negative bacteria. Our recent study demonstrated that colistin induces apoptosis in primary chick cortex neurons and PC-12 cells. Although apoptosis and autophagy have different impacts on cell fate, there is a complex interaction between them. Autophagy plays an important role as a homeostasis regulator by removing excessive or unnecessary proteins and damaged organelles. The aim of the present study was to investigate the modulation of autophagy and apoptosis regulation in PC-12 cells in response to colistin treatment. PC-12 cells were exposed to colistin (125 to 250 μg/ml), and autophagy was detected by visualization of monodansylcadaverine (MDC)-labeled vacuoles, LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) immunofluorescence microscopic examination, and Western blotting. Apoptosis was measured by flow cytometry, Hoechst 33258 staining, and Western blotting. Autophagosomes were observed after treatment with colistin for 12 h, and the levels of LC3-II gene expression were determined; observation and protein levels both indicated that colistin induced a high level of autophagy. Colistin treatment also led to apoptosis in PC-12 cells, and the level of caspase-3 expression increased over the 24-h period. Pretreatment of cells with 3-methyladenine (3-MA) increased colistin toxicity in PC-12 cells remarkably. However, rapamycin treatment significantly increased the expression levels of LC3-II and beclin 1 and decreased the rate of apoptosis of PC-12 cells. Our results demonstrate that colistin induced autophagy and apoptosis in PC-12 cells and that the latter was affected by the regulation of autophagy. It is very likely that autophagy plays a protective role in the reduction of colistin-induced cytotoxicity in neurons.

  8. Structural studies of the C-terminal tail of polycystin-2 (PC2) reveal insights into the mechanisms used for the functional regulation of PC2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yifei; Ehrlich, Barbara E

    2016-08-01

    Mutations in polycystin-2 (PC2) lead to autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD). The molecular mechanism linking mutations in PC2 and the pathogenesis of ADPKD is not well understood. Therefore, understanding the functional regulation of PC2 and its interaction with other proteins under both physiological and pathogenic conditions is important for elucidating the disease mechanism and identifying potential molecular targets for treatment. Normally, PC2 functions as a calcium-permeable channel whose activity is regulated by calcium binding to the C-terminal domain of PC2 (PC2 Cterm). The PC2 Cterm is also involved in the PC2 channel assembly and hetero-oligomerization with other binding partners in cells. Different functional domains of the PC2 Cterm have been studied using structural approaches. Within the PC2 Cterm, there is a calcium-binding EF-hand domain, crucial for the calcium-dependent activity of the PC2 channel. Downstream of the EF-hand domain lies a coiled-coil region, which is involved in the assembly and hetero-interaction of the PC2 protein. The PC2 Cterm can form an oligomer, mediated by the coiled-coil region. Although PC2 Cterm has been extensively studied for its relationship with ADPKD and its importance in PC2 regulation, there are misunderstandings with respect to the definition of the domain topology within the PC2 Cterm and the functional role of each domain. Here, we review previous studies that connect the molecular properties of the domains of PC2 Cterm to distinct aspects of PC2 functions and regulation. PMID:26857659

  9. Parent-of-Origin-Effect rough endosperm Mutants in Maize.

    PubMed

    Bai, Fang; Daliberti, Mary; Bagadion, Alyssa; Xu, Miaoyun; Li, Yubing; Baier, John; Tseung, Chi-Wah; Evans, Matthew M S; Settles, A Mark

    2016-09-01

    Parent-of-origin-effect loci have non-Mendelian inheritance in which phenotypes are determined by either the maternal or paternal allele alone. In angiosperms, parent-of-origin effects can be caused by loci required for gametophyte development or by imprinted genes needed for seed development. Few parent-of-origin-effect loci have been identified in maize (Zea mays) even though there are a large number of imprinted genes known from transcriptomics. We screened rough endosperm (rgh) mutants for parent-of-origin effects using reciprocal crosses with inbred parents. Six maternal rough endosperm (mre) and three paternal rough endosperm (pre) mutants were identified with three mre loci mapped. When inherited from the female parent, mre/+ seeds reduce grain fill with a rough, etched, or pitted endosperm surface. Pollen transmission of pre mutants results in rgh endosperm as well as embryo lethality. Eight of the mutants had significant distortion from the expected one-to-one ratio for parent-of-origin effects. Linked markers for mre1, mre2, and mre3 indicated that the mutant alleles have no bias in transmission. Histological analysis of mre1, mre2, mre3, and pre*-949 showed altered timing of starch grain accumulation and basal endosperm transfer cell layer (BETL) development. The mre1 locus delays BETL and starchy endosperm development, while mre2 and pre*-949 cause ectopic starchy endosperm differentiation. We conclude that many parent-of-origin effects in maize have incomplete penetrance of kernel phenotypes and that there is a large diversity of endosperm developmental roles for parent-of-origin-effect loci.

  10. Carnosine protects against Abeta42-induced neurotoxicity in differentiated rat PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiuli; Dai, Haibin; Hu, Weiwei; Fan, Yanying; Shen, Yao; Zhang, Weiping; Chen, Zhong

    2008-02-01

    (1) The present study was designed to investigate whether histamine is involved in the protective effect of carnosine on Abeta42-induced impairment in differentiated PC12 cells. (2) PC12 cells were exposed to Abeta42 (5 muM) for 24 h after carnosine (5 mM) applied for 18 h. Histamine receptor antagonists (diphenhydramine, zolantidine, thioperamide, clobenpropit) or histidine decarboxylase inhibitor (alpha-fluoromethylhistidine) were added 15 min before carnosine. Cell viability, glutamate release or cell surface expression of NMDA receptor was examined. (3) Abeta42 caused a concentration-dependent reduction of viability in PC12 cells and pretreatment with carnosine ameliorated this impairment. This amelioration was reversed by the H(3) receptor antagonists thioperamide and clobenpropit, but not by either the H(1) receptor antagonist diphenhydramine or the H(2) receptor antagonist zolantidine. Further, alpha-fluoromethylhistidine, an irreversible inhibitor of histidine decarboxylase, also had no effect. In the presence of Abeta42, carnosine significantly decreased glutamate release and carnosine increased the surface expression of NMDA receptor. (4) These results indicate that the mechanism by which carnosine attenuates Abeta42-induced neurotoxicity is independent of the carnosine-histidine-histamine pathway, but may act through regulation of glutamate release and NMDA receptor trafficking.

  11. Protective effect of bixin on cisplatin-induced genotoxicity in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Graciela Cristina; Mendonça, Leonardo Meneghin; Antonucci, Gilmara Ausech; Dos Santos, Antonio Cardozo; Antunes, Lusânia Maria Greggi; Bianchi, Maria de Lourdes Pires

    2012-02-01

    Bixin is the main carotenoid found in annatto seeds (Bixa orellana L.) and is responsible for their reddish-orange color. The antioxidant properties of this compound are associated with its ability to scavenge free radicals, which may reduce damage and protect tissues against toxicity caused by anticancer drugs such as cisplatin. In this study, the genotoxicity and antigenotoxicity of bixin on cisplatin-induced toxicity in PC12 cells was assessed. Cytotoxicity was evaluated using the MTT assay, mutagenicity, genotoxicity, and protective effect of bixin were evaluated using the micronucleus test and comet assay. PC12 cells were treated with bixin (0.05, 0.08, and 0.10μg/mL), cisplatin (0.1μg/mL) or a combination of both bixin and cisplatin. Bixin was neither cytotoxic nor genotoxic compared to the controls. In the combined treatment bixin significantly reduced the percentage of DNA in tail and the frequency of micronuclei induced by cisplatin. This result suggests that bixin can function as a protective agent, reducing cisplatin-induced DNA damage in PC12 cells, and it is possible that this protection could also extend to neuronal cells. Further studies are being conducted to better understand the mechanisms involved in the activity of this protective agent prior to using it therapeutically. PMID:22019694

  12. Two-dimensional iron-phthalocyanine (Fe-Pc) monolayer as a promising single-atom-catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu; Yuan, Hao; Li, Yafei; Chen, Zhongfang

    2015-07-01

    supplementary information (ESI) available: Adsorption energy of O2 on four TM-Pc (TM = Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni) monolayers, spin charge density of the Fe-Pc monolayer, free energy profile for O2 dissociation on the Fe-Pc monolayer, the transition state structures for ORR steps on the Fe-Pc monolayer, the optimized geometric structures of various states along the reaction path of ORR proceeded on the Fe-Pc molecule and Fe-Pc-CN monolayer, schematic diagrams of Fe/H substitution reaction for the Fe-Pc monolayer and molecule, the free energy change caused by substituting one Fe atom with two protons (ΔGsub) in both the Fe-Pc monolayer and molecule as a function of pH. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr00302d

  13. Ternary phase diagram of dipalmitoyl-PC/dilauroyl-PC/cholesterol: nanoscopic domain formation driven by cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Feigenson, G W; Buboltz, J T

    2001-01-01

    A ternary phase diagram is proposed for the hydrated lamellar lipid mixture dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine/dilauroylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (DPPC/DLPC/cholesterol) at room temperature. The entire composition space has been thoroughly mapped by complementary experimental techniques, revealing interesting phase behavior that has not been previously described. Confocal fluorescence microscopy shows a regime of coexisting DPPC-rich ordered and DLPC-rich fluid lamellar phases, having an upper boundary at apparently constant cholesterol mole fraction chi(chol) approximately 0.16. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments confirm the identification and extent of this two-phase regime and, furthermore, reveal a 1-phase regime between chi(chol) approximately 0.16 and 0.25, consisting of ordered and fluid nanoscopic domains. Dipyrene-PC excimer/monomer measurements confirm the new regime between chi(chol) approximately 0.16 and 0.25 and also show that rigidly ordered phases seem to disappear around chi(chol) approximately 0.25. This study should be considered as a step toward a more complete understanding of lateral heterogeneity within biomembranes. Cholesterol may play a role in domain separation on the nanometer scale. PMID:11371452

  14. Construction of mouse adenovirus type 1 mutants.

    PubMed

    Cauthen, Angela N; Welton, Amanda R; Spindler, Katherine R

    2007-01-01

    Mouse adenovirus provides a model for studying adenovirus pathogenesis in the natural host. The ability to make viral mutants allows the investigation of specific mouse adenoviral gene contributions to virus-host interactions. Methods for propagation and titration of wild-type mouse adenovirus, production of viral DNA and viral DNA-protein complex, and transfection of mouse cells to obtain mouse adenovirus mutants are described in this chapter. Plaque purification, propagation, and titration of the mutant viruses are also presented.

  15. The role of ribosylated-BSA in regulating PC12 cell viability.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Tsun-Yung; Huang, Chuen-Lin; Yang, Jung-Mou; Huang, Wei-Jung; Huang, Nai-Kuei; Chen, Yue-Wen; Lin, Ren-Jye; Yang, Ying-Chen

    2012-08-01

    Glycation, one of the post-translational modifications, is known to influence protein structure and biological function. Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) have been shown to cause pathologies of diabetes. Glycation levels in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) are higher than in normal people. However, whether the glycation of susceptible proteins is a triggering event for cell damage or simply a result remains to be elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that ribose-conjugated BSA (Rib-BSA) directly induces PC12 cell death in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC(50) is 4.6 μM. Unlike glucose-incubated BSA, Rib-BSA rapidly forms cytotoxic AGEs. PC12 is vulnerable to Rib-BSA. However, fructose can induce AGE formation, although no effect on cell survival was observed. This effect of Rib-BSA is reversed by pretreatment of pioglitazone and rosiglitazone, which belongs to thiazolidinediones (TZDs) and are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR-γ) ligands. Moreover, Rib-BSA upregulates inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cycloxygenase 2 (COX-2) expression, and p-38 phosphorylation and leaves extracellular regulated protein1/2 (ERK1/2) phosphorylation unchanged. The Rib-BSA-induced signaling changes are blocked by rosiglitazone and confirmed by PPAR-γ small-interfering RNA transfection. The reduction of cell survival by Rib-BSA is blocked by the iNOS inhibitor and p38 inhibitor. No effect on cell survival was observed using the COX-2 inhibitor. Consequently, these results show that Rib-BSA directly inducing PC12 cell death is a triggering event and TZDs protect PC12 cell from Rib-BSA damage. Signaling molecules, such as PPAR-γ, P38, and iNOS, are involved in Rib-BSA-mediated cytotoxicity.

  16. Mechanisms of manganese-induced rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cell death and cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Roth, Jerome A; Horbinski, Craig; Higgins, Dennis; Lein, Pamela; Garrick, Michael D

    2002-07-01

    Mn is a neurotoxin that leads to a syndrome resembling Parkinson's disease after prolonged exposure to high concentrations. Our laboratory has been investigating the mechanism by which Mn induces neuronal cell death. To accomplish this, we have utilized rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells as a model since they possess much of the biochemical machinery associated with dopaminergic neurons. Mn, like nerve growth factor (NGF), can induce neuronal differentiation of PC12 cells but Mn-induced cell differentiation is dependent on its interaction with the cell surface integrin receptors and basement membrane proteins, vitronectin or fibronectin. Similar to NGF, Mn-induced neurite outgrowth is dependent on the phosphorylation and activation of the MAP kinases, ERK1 and 2 (p44/42). Unlike NGF, Mn is also cytotoxic having an IC50 value of approximately 600 microM. Although many apoptotic signals are turned on by Mn, cell death is caused ultimately by disruption of mitochondrial function leading to loss of ATP. RT-PCR and immunoblotting studies suggest that some uptake of Mn into PC12 cells depends on the divalent metal transporter 1 (DMT1). DMT1 exists in two isoforms resulting from alternate splicing of a single gene product with one of the two mRNA species containing an iron response element (IRE) motif downstream from the stop codon. The presence of the IRE provides a binding site for the iron response proteins (IRP1 and 2); binding of either of these proteins could stabilize DMT1 mRNA and would increase expression of the +IRE form of the transporter. Iron and Mn compete for transport into PC12 cells via DMT1, so removal of iron from the culture media enhances Mn toxicity. The two isoforms of DMT1 (+/-IRE) are distributed in different subcellular compartments with the -IRE species selectively present in the nucleus of neuronal and neuronal-like cells. PMID:12224755

  17. Dasatinib inhibits both osteoclast activation and prostate cancer PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast formation

    PubMed Central

    Araujo, John C.; Poblenz, Ann; Corn, Paul G.; Parikh, Nila U.; Starbuck, Michael W.; Thompson, Jerry T.; Lee, Francis; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Darnay, Bryant G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Therapies to target prostate cancer bone metastases have only limited effects. New treatments are focused on the interaction between cancer cells, bone marrow cells and the bone matrix. Osteoclasts play an important role in the development of bone tumors caused by prostate cancer. Since Src kinase has been shown to be necessary for osteoclast function, we hypothesized that dasatinib, a Src family kinase inhibitor, would reduce osteoclast activity and prostate cancer (PC-3) cell-induced osteoclast formation. Results Dasatinib inhibited RANKL-induced osteoclast differentiation of bone marrow-derived monocytes with an EC50 of 7.5 nM. PC-3 cells, a human prostate cancer cell line, were able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells, a murine monocytic cell line, into osteoclasts and dasatinib inhibited this differentiation. In addition, conditioned medium from PC-3 cell cultures was able to differentiate RAW 264.7 cells into osteoclasts and this too, was inhibited by dasatinib. Even the lowest concentration of dasatinib, 1.25 nmol, inhibited osteoclast differentiation by 29%. Moreover, dasatinib inhibited osteoclast activity by 58% as measured by collagen 1 release. Experimental design We performed in vitro experiments utilizing the Src family kinase inhibitor dasatinib to target osteoclast activation as a means of inhibiting prostate cancer bone metastases. Conclusion Dasatinib inhibits osteoclast differentiation of mouse primary bone marrow-derived monocytes and PC-3 cell-induced osteoclast differentiation. Dasatinib also inhibits osteoclast degradation activity. Inhibiting osteoclast differentiation and activity may be an effective targeted therapy in patients with prostate cancer bone metastases. PMID:19855158

  18. Preventing neurodegeneration in the Drosophila mutant bubblegum.

    PubMed

    Min, K T; Benzer, S

    1999-06-18

    The Drosophila melanogaster recessive mutant bubblegum (bgm) exhibits adult neurodegeneration, with marked dilation of photoreceptor axons. The bubblegum mutant shows elevated levels of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), as seen in the human disease adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD). In ALD, the excess can be lowered by dietary treatment with "Lorenzo's oil," a mixture of unsaturated fatty acids. Feeding the fly mutant one of the components, glyceryl trioleate oil, blocked the accumulation of excess VLCFAs as well as development of the pathology. Mutant flies thus provide a potential model system for studying mechanisms of neurodegenerative disease and screening drugs for treatment.

  19. Melanin-deficient mutants of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Torres-Guererro, H; Edman, J C

    1994-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a significant fungal pathogen in immunocompromised patients. The ability of C. neoformans to produce melanin has been correlated with virulence. The role of melanin in promoting virulence is unclear, although an anti-oxidant function has been suggested. To begin to define the genetic mechanisms responsible for melanin production in C. neoformans, we describe the isolation of seven melanin-deficient mutant classes. Some of the mutants can be suppressed by addition of Cu2+ to media, suggesting that the phenoloxidase of C. neoformans, like other fungal phenoloxidases, contains copper. Other mutants display a recessive sterile phenotype. A genetic and phenotypic characterisation of these mutants is presented. PMID:7983575

  20. Abnormal grooming activity in Dab1(scm) (scrambler) mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Strazielle, C; Lefevre, A; Jacquelin, C; Lalonde, R

    2012-07-15

    Dab1(scm) mutant mice, characterized by cell ectopias and degeneration in cerebellum, hippocampus, and neocortex, were compared to non-ataxic controls for different facets of grooming caused by brief water immersions, as well as some non-grooming behaviors. Dab1(scm) mutants were strongly affected in their quantitative functional parameters, exhibiting higher starting latencies before grooming relative to non-ataxic littermates of the A/A strain, fewer grooming bouts, and grooming components of shorter duration, with an unequal regional distribution targeting almost totally the rostral part (head washing and forelimb licking) of the animal. Only bouts of a single grooming element were preserved. The cephalocaudal order of grooming elements appeared less disorganized, mutant and control mice initiating the grooming with head washing and forelimb licking prior to licking posterior parts. However, mutants differed from controls in that all their bouts were incomplete but uninterrupted, although intergroup difference for percentage of the incorrect transitions was not significant. In contrast to grooming, Dab1(scm) mice ambulated for a longer time. During walking episodes, they exhibited more body scratching than controls, possibly to compensate for the lack of licking different body parts. In conjunction with studies with other ataxic mice, these results indicate that the cerebellar cortex affects grooming activity and is consequently involved in executing various components, but not in its sequential organization, which requires other brain regions such as cerebral cortices or basal ganglia.

  1. Reverse genetic screening reveals poor correlation between morpholino-induced and mutant phenotypes in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Kok, Fatma O; Shin, Masahiro; Ni, Chih-Wen; Gupta, Ankit; Grosse, Ann S; van Impel, Andreas; Kirchmaier, Bettina C; Peterson-Maduro, Josi; Kourkoulis, George; Male, Ira; DeSantis, Dana F; Sheppard-Tindell, Sarah; Ebarasi, Lwaki; Betsholtz, Christer; Schulte-Merker, Stefan; Wolfe, Scot A; Lawson, Nathan D

    2015-01-12

    The widespread availability of programmable site-specific nucleases now enables targeted gene disruption in the zebrafish. In this study, we applied site-specific nucleases to generate zebrafish lines bearing individual mutations in more than 20 genes. We found that mutations in only a small proportion of genes caused defects in embryogenesis. Moreover, mutants for ten different genes failed to recapitulate published Morpholino-induced phenotypes (morphants). The absence of phenotypes in mutant embryos was not likely due to maternal effects or failure to eliminate gene function. Consistently, a comparison of published morphant defects with the Sanger Zebrafish Mutation Project revealed that approximately 80% of morphant phenotypes were not observed in mutant embryos, similar to our mutant collection. Based on these results, we suggest that mutant phenotypes become the standard metric to define gene function in zebrafish, after which Morpholinos that recapitulate respective phenotypes could be reliably applied for ancillary analyses.

  2. Erythritol production with minimum by-product using Candida magnoliae mutant.

    PubMed

    Ghezelbash, G R; Nahvi, I; Malekpour, A

    2014-01-01

    In order to enhance erythritol production, mutants of Candida magnoliae DSM70638 were generated by ultraviolet and chemical mutagenesis. Erythritol productivity of samples was analyzed by TLC and HPLC with the refractive index detector. One of the mutants named mutant 12-2 gave a 2.4-fold increase in erythritol (20.32 g/L) and a 5.5-fold decrease in glycerol production compared to the wild strain. A sequence-based map of erythrose reductase gene in this mutant showed a replacement of the A321 by G321 that did not cause any amino acid exchange in protein structure. Therefore, the reason of higher erythritol production in C. magnoliae mutant 12-2 is probably the increase in expression of the open reading frame gene. This study revealed that a mutation or minor change in the sequence of genes involved in a production pathway can lead to a significant increase in protein translation.

  3. Oxysterol-binding protein ORP3 rescues the Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis-linked mutant VAPB phenotype.

    PubMed

    Darbyson, Angie; Ngsee, Johnny K

    2016-02-01

    A mutation in VAPB causes a familial form of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. The mutant protein (VAPB-P56S) is aggregate prone and blocks retrograde traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC) including trafficking to the nuclear envelope (NE). Here we report a morphological screen where overexpression of oxysterol binding protein-related protein-3 (ORP3) rescued the mutant VAPB phenotype. It resolved the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions, restored solubility of the mutant protein in non-ionic detergent, and restored trafficking of Emerin to the NE. Knockdown of ORP3 or VAPB increased the intracellular level of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P). Decreasing PtdIns4P levels by inhibiting its synthesis reduced the severity of the mutant VAPB-induced membrane expansions and restored Emerin trafficking to the NE. Thus, VAPB and its interacting partners cooperatively regulate protein trafficking through the ERGIC by modulating PtdIns4P levels.

  4. Reverse genetic screening reveals poor correlation between Morpholino-induced and mutant phenotypes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, A.; Grosse, A. S.; van Impel, A.; Kirchmaier, B. C.; Peterson-Maduro, J.; Kourkoulis, G.; Male, I.; DeSantis, D.F.; Sheppard-Tindell, S.; Ebarasi, L.; Betsholtz, C.; Schulte-Merker, S.; Wolfe, S. A.; Lawson, N. D.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The widespread availability of programmable site-specific nucleases now enables targeted gene disruption in the zebrafish. In this study, we applied site-specific nucleases to generate zebrafish lines bearing individual mutations in more than twenty genes. We found that mutations in only a small proportion of genes caused defects in embryogenesis. Moreover, mutants for ten different genes failed to recapitulate published Morpholino-induced phenotypes (morphants). The absence of phenotypes in mutant embryos was not likely due to maternal effects or failure to eliminate gene function. Consistently, a comparison of published morphant defects with the Sanger Zebrafish Mutation Project revealed that approximately eighty percent of morphant phenotypes were not observed in mutant embryos, similar to our mutant collection. Based on these results, we suggest that mutant phenotypes become the standard metric to define gene function in zebrafish, after which Morpholinos that recapitulate respective phenotypes could be reliably applied for ancillary analyses. PMID:25533206

  5. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-04-29

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NOx emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and PC burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. During the current reporting period, BBP's subcontract was modified to reflect changes in the pilot testing program, and the modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor were completed. The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling approach was defined for the combined PC burner and 3-million Btu/h pilot system. Modeling of the modified gas-fired preheat combustor was also started.

  6. Pc3 Excitation of the Ionosphere: a Preliminary Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winkler, L. I.; Howell, N.; Rajapakse, M.; Chi, P.; Moldwin, M. B.; Russell, C. T.; Skone, S.

    2006-12-01

    The fast mode (poloidal) Alfven wave should be accompanied by Pc3 events simultaneously in the ionospheric Total Electron Content (TEC) and ground magnetometer data. We examine this prediction through analyzing both field-line resonance (FLR) and non-FLR pc3 events. Ground magnetometer data collected at a 2-Hz sampling rate from the Glyndon, MN station in the McMAC chain is compared to 1- Hz data from the nearby Pinawa, Manitoba magnetometer station in the CARISMA chain using cross-phase analysis to separate FLR and non-FLR pc3 events. High-data rate GPS (0.5 Hz and 1 Hz) observations of TEC in Moorhead, MN (15 miles from the Glyndon site) are then compared to ground magnetometer data. Preliminary results from a number of events from Oct., 2005 onward show pulsations in TEC occurring in a similar timeframe to the magnetometer pulsations for both FLR and non-FLR occurrences.

  7. Review of methods to derive a Polar Cap (PC) index.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, Peter

    2016-07-01

    Since a Polar Cap (PC) index was introduced in 1985, several different methods have been used to derive index values. Basically, the northern (PCN) and southern (PCS) are based on geomagnetic recordings at Qaanaaq (Thule) and Vostok, respectively. However, different derivation methods can give index values differing by more than a factor 2. The PC indices are used, among other, in scientific analyses to link solar wind conditions to relevant geophysical effects and in forecast efforts to establish numerical criteria for imminent risk of geomagnetic storms and substorms. Thus, it is unfortunate that several different versions of the PC index have been in use, often without specifically mentioning the index version being used or without ensuring that proper documention and specification of the derivation method is available. The presentation shall briefly describe the basic calculation of a Polar Cap index and point specifically to the differences between the different derivation methods and to the consequences for the index values

  8. Relations of PC indices to further geophysical activity parameters.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauning, P.

    2012-04-01

    The Polar Cap (PC) indices, PCN for the index values derived from Thule magnetic data and PCS derived from Vostok data, relate to the polar cap ionospheric plasma convection driven mainly by the interaction of the solar wind with the magnetosphere. Thus, the PC indices serve to monitor the input power from the solar wind which drives a range of geophysical disturbances such as magnetic storms and substorms, energization of the plasma trapped in the Earth's near space, auroral activity, and heating of the upper atmosphere. The presentation will demonstrate the relations between the PC indices and further parameters and indices used to describe geophysical activity such as polar cap potentials, auroral electrojet activity, Joule and particle heating of the upper atmosphere, mid-latitude magnetic variations, and ring current indices Dst, SYM-H and ASY-H.

  9. Demonstration of a PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia

    SciTech Connect

    John C. Trocciola; Thomas N. Pompa; Linda S. Boyd

    2004-09-01

    This project involved the installation of a 200kW PC25C{trademark} phosphoric-acid fuel cell power plant at Orgenergogaz, a Gazprom industrial site in Russia. In April 1997, a PC25C{trademark} was sold by ONSI Corporation to Orgenergogaz, a subsidiary of the Russian company ''Gazprom''. Due to instabilities in the Russian financial markets, at that time, the unit was never installed and started by Orgenergogaz. In October of 2001 International Fuel Cells (IFC), now known as UTC Fuel Cells (UTCFC), received a financial assistance award from the United States Department of Energy (DOE) entitled ''Demonstration of PC 25 Fuel Cell in Russia''. Three major tasks were part of this award: the inspection of the proposed site and system, start-up assistance, and installation and operation of the powerplant.

  10. PC-1D installation manual and user's guide

    SciTech Connect

    Basore, P.A.

    1991-05-01

    PC-1D is a software package for personal computers that uses finite-element analysis to solve the fully-coupled two-carrier semiconductor transport equations in one dimension. This program is particularly useful for analyzing the performance of optoelectronic devices such as solar cells, but can be applied to any bipolar device whose carrier flows are primarily one-dimensional. This User's Guide provides the information necessary to install PC-1D, define a problem for solution, solve the problem, and examine the results. Example problems are presented which illustrate these steps. The physical models and numerical methods utilized are presented in detail. This document supports version 3.1 of PC-1D, which incorporates faster numerical algorithms with better convergence properties than previous versions of the program. 51 refs., 17 figs., 5 tabs.

  11. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Horio, Yukari; Sun, Yongkun; Liu, Chuang; Saito, Takeshi; Kurasaki, Masaaki

    2014-01-01

    Aspartame is an artificial sweetner added to many low-calorie foods. The safety of aspartame remains controversial even though there are many studies on its risks. In this study, to understand the physiological effects of trace amounts of artificial sweetners on cells, the effects of aspartame on apoptosis were investigated using a PC12 cell system. In addition, the mechanism of apoptosis induced by aspartame in PC12 cells and effects on apoptotic factors such as cytochrome c, apoptosis-inducing factor, and caspase family proteins were studied by Western blotting and RT-PCR. Aspartame-induced apoptosis in PC12 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, aspartame exposure increased the expressions of caspases 8 and 9, and cytochrome c. These results indicate that aspartame induces apoptosis mainly via mitochondrial pathway involved in apoptosis due to oxigen toxicity.

  12. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2003-04-01

    During the current quarter, pilot scale testing was continued with the modified combustor and modified channel burner using the new PRB coal delivered in late December. Testing included benchmark testing to determine whether the system performance was comparable to that with the previous batch of PRB coal, baseline testing to characterize performance of the PC Burner without coal preheating, and parametric testing to evaluate the effect of various preheat combustor and PC burner operating variables, including reduced gas usage in the preheat combustor. A second version of the PC burner in which the secondary air channels were closed and replaced with six air nozzles was then tested with PRB coal. Plans were developed with RPI for the next phase of testing at the 100 million Btu/h scale using RPI's Coal Burner Test Facility (CBTF). A cost estimate for preparation of the CBTF and preheat burner system design, installation and testing was then prepared by RPI.

  13. Thermal Conductivity behavior of MWCNT based PMMA and PC composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubey, Girija; Jindal, Prashant; Bhandari, Rajiv; Dhiman, Neha; Bajaj, Chetan; Jindal, Vijay

    Poly methyl methacrylate (PMMA) and Polycarbonate (PC) are low cost polymer materials which can be easily transformed into desired shapes for various applications. However they have poor mechanical, thermal and electrical properties which are required to be enhanced to widen their scope of applications specifically where along with high strength, rapid heat transfer is essential. Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are excellent new materials having extraordinary mechanical and transport properties. We will report results of fabricating composites of varying compositions of MWCNTs with PMMA and PC and their thermal conductivity behaviour using simple transient heat flow methods. The samples in disk shapes of around 2 cm diameters and 0.2 cm thickness with MWCNT compositions varying up to 10 wt% were fabricated. We found that both PMMA and PC measured high thermal conductivity with increase in the composition of CNTs. The thermal conductivity of 10wt% MWCNT/PMMA composite increased by nearly two times in comparison to pure PMMA.

  14. Regulation of the differentiation of PC12 pheochromocytoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, K; Lazarovici, P; Guroff, G

    1989-01-01

    The PC12 clone, developed from a pheochromocytoma tumor of the rat adrenal medulla, has become a premiere model for the study of neuronal differentiation. When treated in culture with nanomolar concentrations of nerve growth factor, PC12 cells stop dividing, elaborate processes, become electrically excitable, and will make synapses with appropriate muscle cells in culture. The changes induced by nerve growth factor lead to cells that, by any number of criteria, resemble mature sympathetic neurons. These changes are accompanied by a series of biochemical alterations occurring in the membrane, the cytoplasm, and the nucleus of the cell. Some of these events are independent of changes in transcription, while others clearly involve changes in gene expression. A number of the alterations seen in the cells involve increases or decreases in the phosphorylation of key cellular proteins. The information available thus far allows the construction of a hypothesis regarding the biochemical basis of PC12 differentiation. PMID:2647474

  15. Plasma and field observations of a Pc 5 wave event

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waite, J. H.; Gallagher, D. L.; Chappell, C. R.; Chandler, M. O.; Olsen, R. C.; Comfort, R. H.; Johnson, J. F. E.; Peterson, W. K.; Weimer, D.; Shawhan, S. D.

    1986-01-01

    The particle detector and electric field data collected by the Dynamo Explorer 1 on the Pc 5 wave event encounter on July 14, 1982 are presented, yielding a nearly complete picture of the event. The overall structure of the Pc 5 seems to order the event into two distinct halves, suggesting a temporal or spatial variation of the micropulsation. Thermal plasma measurements showed that the dominant ion throughout both lobes was H(+). Significant quantities of He(+), O(+), N(+), and O(2+) were also observed to be present and rotating together in a plane normal to the magnetic field direction, due to the Pc5 E x B drift. The plasma parameters determined for the two lobes were used in theoretical calculations to predict the period of the observed resonance.

  16. Effects of vibration on differentiation of cultured PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yukiko; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Nam, Kwangwoo; Katoh, Ayako; Masuzawa, Toru; Kishida, Akio

    2011-03-01

    Different types of physiological-mechanical stress, such as shear stress in vascular endothelial cells or hydrostatic pressure in chondrocytes are well known as regulators of cell function. In this study, the effects of vibration, a type of non-physiological mechanical stimulation, on differentiation of rat pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells are reported. A nano-vibration system was designed to produce nanometer-scale vibration. The frequency and amplitude of the nano-vibrations were monitored by a capacitance displacement sensor connected to an oscilloscope. When PC12 cells exposed to nerve growth factor were subjected to vibration at 10 kHz, differentiation and elongation of their neurites were promoted earlier in the culture. Vibration promoted differentiation of PC12 cells. This approach could therefore also be promising for determining of the effects of the physical environment on cell differentiation.

  17. Haloperidol induces the nuclear translocation of phosphatidylinositol 3′-kinase to disrupt Akt phosphorylation in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Yunxiu; Wei, Zelan; Sephton, Chantelle F.; Zhang, Di; Anderson, Deborah H.; Mousseau, Darrell D.

    2007-01-01

    Objective The antipsychotic drug haloperidol (HAL) has been linked to apoptosis and to inhibition of prosurvival Akt signalling in pheochromocytoma (PC12) and neuronal cell cultures. However, the mechanism involved is unclear. Methods We used HAL to induce cytotoxicity in preneuronal PC12 cells. The expression and the subcellular localization of selected components of the PI3K–Akt survival cascade were monitored with standard biochemical approaches, such as subcellular fractionation, western blot analysis, gene transfer and fluorescence microscopy. Results PC12 cell stimulation with the epidermal growth factor (used as a control) results in normal processing of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase (PI3K)–Akt signalling (e.g., localization of PI3K to the plasma membrane and phosphorylation of Akt (Ser473). Surprisingly, HAL induces PI3K-generated phosphoinositol [phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3), which conflicts with its ability to inhibit Akt. In fact, the production of PIP3s is nuclear, as assessed by the localized concentration of a fluorophore-tagged PIP3-targeting pleckstrin homology protein and a fluorophore-tagged substrate-trapping mutant of the phosphoinositide phosphatase, phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN). However, phosphoinositide-dependent protein kinase 1 (PDK1, the activating kinase of Akt) does not colocalize to the nucleus with the PI3K complex. This effectively inactivates both cytoplasmic and nuclear pools of Akt. Conclusion The differential compartmentalization of effectors of the PI3K–PDK1–Akt pathway is a unique means by which HAL disrupts Akt functioning in PC12 cells. PMID:17823648

  18. METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-01-31

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during the quarter included completion of the equipment fabrication and installation efforts for the 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Selection and procurement of the first two test coals and preliminary selection of the final two test coals were completed. Shakedown and commissioning activities were finished and PC Preheat pilot scale tests commenced with PRB coal.

  19. Nonbinomial distribution of relative neurite outgrowth in PC-12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blackman, C.F.; House, D.E.; Blanchard, J.P.

    1996-12-31

    Previously the authors reported the results of a series of experimental tests using PC-12 cells to examine the biological effects of prescribed combinations of both nerve growth factor and magnetic fields. Because the assay of the PC-12 cells is based on a binary classification of the cells following treatment, the data might be expected to have a binomial distribution. However, the data consistently show a smaller variability than that predicted by the binomial distribution model. In this paper, they examine some possible reasons for this reduction in variability in the results.

  20. [A skin cell segregating control system based on PC].

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen-zhong; Zhou, Ming; Zhang, Hong-bing

    2005-11-01

    A skin cell segregating control system based on PC (personal computer) is presented in this paper. Its front controller is a single-chip microcomputer which enables the manipulation for 6 patients simultaneously, and thus provides a great convenience for clinical treatments for vitiligo. With the use of serial port communication technology, it's possible to monitor and control the front controller in a PC terminal. And the application of computer image acquisition technology realizes the synchronous acquisition of pathologic shin cell images pre/after the operation and a case history. Clinical tests prove its conformity with national standards and the pre-set technological requirements.

  1. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-06-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter has focused on disposition of PC Preheat experimental equipment at the CBTF as well as methods for disposal of about 100 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; a final report is due in December 2005.

  2. Effect of morphine on PC12 cells with molecular radar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Chen; Yu, Xiaoli; Lu, Jiuyi; Zhang, Chunyang; Jin, Lei; Ma, Hui; Zhang, Dacheng; Chen, Die Yan

    2000-10-01

    Molecular Radar (MR) is a new method to detect biological processes in living cells at the level of molecular, it is also the newest means to get intracellular information. In this paper we study the effect of morphine on PC12 cells using MR. The results show that the effect of morphine on PC12 cells is time- and concentration-dependent. Morphine treating for short time induces the increase and fluctuation of intracellular (CA2+), while morphine treating for long time induces chromatin condensation, loss of mitochondria membrane potential apoptosis.

  3. Run-08 pC polarization analysis - October 16, 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Dharmawardane,V.; Bazilevsky,A.; Bunce, G.; Gill, R.; Huang, H.; Makdisi, Y.; Nakagawa, I.; Morozov, B.; Okada, H.; Sivertz, M.; Zelenski, A.; Alekseev, I.; Svirida, D.

    2009-03-01

    In this note we will discuss the analysis of RHIC run 08 pC data that were collected during February 14 - March 10, 2008. An analysis method that is similar to Run 05 and Run 06 was adopted for Run 08 analysis (except few minor changes, which are described below). A detailed analysis note and a NIM article that describe the pC analysis procedure (for run 05 and run 06) can be found elsewhere. In brief, the analysis consists of calibrating the detectors, determining energy corrections ('dead layers'), determining good runs and extracting the polarization from data.

  4. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens.

    PubMed

    McGrann, Graham R D; Steed, Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K M

    2015-06-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  5. Differential effects of lesion mimic mutants in barley on disease development by facultative pathogens

    PubMed Central

    McGrann, Graham R. D.; Steed, , Andrew; Burt, Christopher; Nicholson, Paul; Brown, James K. M.

    2015-01-01

    Lesion mimic mutants display spontaneous necrotic spots and chlorotic leaves as a result of mis-regulated cell death programmes. Typically these mutants have increased resistance to biotrophic pathogens but their response to facultative fungi that cause necrotrophic diseases is less well studied. The effect of altered cell death regulation on the development of disease caused by Ramularia collo-cygni, Fusarium culmorum and Oculimacula yallundae was explored using a collection of barley necrotic (nec) lesion mimic mutants. nec8 mutants displayed lower levels of all three diseases compared to nec9 mutants, which had increased R. collo-cygni but decreased F. culmorum disease symptoms. nec1 mutants reduced disease development caused by both R. collo-cygni and F. culmorum. The severity of the nec1-induced lesion mimic phenotype and F. culmorum symptom development was reduced by mutation of the negative cell death regulator MLO. The significant reduction in R. collo-cygni symptoms caused by nec1 was completely abolished in the presence of the mlo-5 allele and both symptoms and fungal biomass were greater than in the wild-type. These results indicate that physiological pathways involved in regulation of cell death interact with one another in their effects on different fungal pathogens. PMID:25873675

  6. amontillado, the Drosophila homolog of the prohormone processing protease PC2, is required during embryogenesis and early larval development.

    PubMed Central

    Rayburn, Lowell Y M; Gooding, Holly C; Choksi, Semil P; Maloney, Dhea; Kidd, Ambrose R; Siekhaus, Daria E; Bender, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Biosynthesis of most peptide hormones and neuropeptides requires proteolytic excision of the active peptide from inactive proprotein precursors, an activity carried out by subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (SPCs) in constitutive or regulated secretory pathways. The Drosophila amontillado (amon) gene encodes a homolog of the mammalian PC2 protein, an SPC that functions in the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine tissues. We have identified amon mutants by isolating ethylmethanesulfonate (EMS)-induced lethal and visible mutations that define two complementation groups in the amon interval at 97D1 of the third chromosome. DNA sequencing identified the amon complementation group and the DNA sequence change for each of the nine amon alleles isolated. amon mutants display partial embryonic lethality, are defective in larval growth, and arrest during the first to second instar larval molt. Mutant larvae can be rescued by heat-shock-induced expression of the amon protein. Rescued larvae arrest at the subsequent larval molt, suggesting that amon is also required for the second to third instar larval molt. Our data indicate that the amon proprotein convertase is required during embryogenesis and larval development in Drosophila and support the hypothesis that AMON acts to proteolytically process peptide hormones that regulate hatching, larval growth, and larval ecdysis. PMID:12586710

  7. corto genetically interacts with Pc-G and trx-G genes and maintains the anterior boundary of Ultrabithorax expression in Drosophila larvae.

    PubMed

    Lopez, A; Higuet, D; Rosset, R; Deutsch, J; Peronnet, F

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila melanogaster, segment identity is determined by specific expression of homeotic genes (Hox). The Hox expression pattern is first initiated by gap and pair-rule genes and then maintained by genes of the Polycomb-group (Pc-G) and the trithorax-group (trx-G). The corto gene is a putative regulator of the Hox genes since mutants exhibit homeotic transformations. We show here that, in addition to previously reported genetic interactions with the Pc-G genes Enhancer of zeste, Polycomb and polyhomeotic, mutations in corto enhance the extra-sex-comb phenotype of multi sex combs, Polycomb-like and Sex combs on midleg. corto also genetically interacts with a number of trx-G genes (ash1, kismet, kohtalo, moira, osa, Trithorax-like and Vha55). The interactions with genes of the trx-G lead to phenotypes displayed in the wing, in the postpronotum or in the thoracic mechanosensory bristles. In addition, we analyzed the regulation of the Hox gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) in corto mutants. Our results provide evidence that corto maintains the anterior border of Ubx expression in third-instar larvae. We suggest that this regulation is accomplished through an interaction with the products of the Pc-G and trx-G genes.

  8. Processing and intracellular localization of rice stripe virus Pc2 protein in insect cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Shuling; Zhang, Gaozhan; Dai, Xuejuan; Hou, Yanling; Li, Min; Liang, Jiansheng; Liang, Changyong

    2012-08-01

    Rice stripe virus (RSV) belongs to the genus Tenuivirus and its genome consists of four single-stranded RNAs encoding seven proteins. Here, we have analyzed the processing and membrane association of Pc2 encoded by vcRNA2 in insect cells. The enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) was fused to the Pc2 and used for the detection of Pc2 fusion proteins. The results showed that Pc2 was cleaved to produce two proteins named Pc2-N and Pc2-C. When expressed alone, either Pc2-N or Pc2-C could transport to the Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes independently. Further mutagenesis studies revealed that Pc2 contained three ER-targeting domains. The results led us to propose a model for the topology of the Pc2 in which an internal signal peptide immediately followed a cleavage site, and two transmembrane regions are contained.

  9. Regulation of Mutant p53 Protein Expression

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumaran, Reshma; Tan, Kah Hin; Miranda, Panimaya Jeffreena; Haupt, Sue; Haupt, Ygal

    2015-01-01

    For several decades, p53 has been detected in cancer biopsies by virtue of its high protein expression level which is considered indicative of mutation. Surprisingly, however, mouse genetic studies revealed that mutant p53 is inherently labile, similar to its wild type (wt) counterpart. Consistently, in response to stress conditions, both wt and mutant p53 accumulate in cells. While wt p53 returns to basal level following recovery from stress, mutant p53 remains stable. In part, this can be explained in mutant p53-expressing cells by the lack of an auto-regulatory loop with Mdm2 and other negative regulators, which are pivotal for wt p53 regulation. Further, additional protective mechanisms are acquired by mutant p53, largely mediated by the co-chaperones and their paralogs, the stress-induced heat shock proteins. Consequently, mutant p53 is accumulated in cancer cells in response to chronic stress and this accumulation is critical for its oncogenic gain of functions (GOF). Building on the extensive knowledge regarding wt p53, the regulation of mutant p53 is unraveling. In this review, we describe the current understanding on the major levels at which mutant p53 is regulated. These include the regulation of p53 protein levels by microRNA and by enzymes controlling p53 proteasomal degradation. PMID:26734569

  10. Schwann cells expressing dismutase active mutant SOD1 unexpectedly slow disease progression in ALS mice

    PubMed Central

    Lobsiger, Christian S.; Boillee, Severine; McAlonis-Downes, Melissa; Khan, Amir M.; Feltri, M. Laura; Yamanaka, Koji; Cleveland, Don W.

    2009-01-01

    Neurodegeneration in an inherited form of ALS is non-cell-autonomous, with ALS-causing mutant SOD1 damage developed within multiple cell types. Selective inactivation within motor neurons of an ubiquitously expressed mutant SOD1 gene has demonstrated that mutant damage within motor neurons is a determinant of disease initiation, whereas mutant synthesis within neighboring astrocytes or microglia accelerates disease progression. We now report the surprising finding that diminished synthesis (by 70%) within Schwann cells of a fully dismutase active ALS-linked mutant (SOD1G37R) significantly accelerates disease progression, accompanied by reduction of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) in nerves. Coupled with shorter disease duration in mouse models caused by dismutase inactive versus dismutase active SOD1 mutants, our findings implicate an oxidative cascade during disease progression that is triggered within axon ensheathing Schwann cells and that can be ameliorated by elevated dismutase activity. Thus, therapeutic down-regulation of dismutase active mutant SOD1 in familial forms of ALS should be targeted away from Schwann cells. PMID:19251638

  11. Utilization of arsenic trioxide as a treatment of cisplatin-resistant non-small cell lung cancer PC-9/CDDP and PC-14/CDDP cells

    PubMed Central

    SUZUKI, TOSHIHIRO; ISHIBASHI, KENICHI; YUMOTO, ATSUSHI; NISHIO, KAZUTO; OGASAWARA, YUKI

    2015-01-01

    Cisplatin is a commonly used drug in combination chemotherapy. However, various malignant tumors frequently acquire resistance to cisplatin. Arsenic trioxide (ATO) has been approved as a chemotherapeutic drug for the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, and the combination of ATO and cisplatin has been revealed to demonstrate synergistic effects in ovarian and small cell lung cancer cells. Thus, it was hypothesized that ATO may also be active against cisplatin-resistant non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) PC-9/CDDP and PC-14/CDDP cells. The present study also evaluated the effects of ATO on the cisplatin-sensitive NSCLC PC-9 and PC-14 cell lines. Notably, ATO demonstrated a markedly decreased IC50 in the cisplatin-resistant PC-9/CDDP and PC-14/CDDP cells compared with the IC50 in the cisplatin-sensitive parental PC-9 and PC-14 cells. Additionally, it was found that arsenite accumulation in the PC-9 cell line was affected through the downregulation of GS-X pump systems. Although it is likely that cisplatin resistance in PC-9 cells does not depend on the GS-X pump systems, ATO was effective against cisplatin-resistant NSCLC PC-9/CDDP and PC-14/CDDP cells in combination chemotherapy. PMID:26622574

  12. Differential localization of prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in two distinct types of secretory granules in rat pituitary gonadotrophs.

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Yaoi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, K; Tanaka, S

    2001-04-01

    Prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 are endoproteases involved in prohormone cleavage at pairs of basic amino acids. There is a report that prohormone convertase exists in the rat anterior pituitary gonadotrophs, where it had previously been considered that proprotein processing does not take place. In addition to luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, rat pituitary gonadotrophs contain chromogranin A (CgA) and secretogranin II (SgII), two members of the family of granin proteins, which have proteolytic sites in their molecules. In the present study we examined whether there is a close correlation between subcellular localization of prohormone convertases and granin proteins. Ultrathin sections of rat anterior pituitary were immunolabeled with anti-PC1 or -PC2 antisera and then stained with immunogold. Immunogold particles for PC1 were exclusively found in large, lucent secretory granules, whereas those for PC2 were seen in both large, lucent and small, dense granules. The double-immunolabeling also demonstrated colocalization of PC2 and SgII in small, dense granules and of PC1, PC2, and CgA in large, lucent granules. These immunocytochemical results suggest that PC2 may be involved in the proteolytic processing of SgII and that both PC1 and PC2 may be necessary to process CgA. PMID:11383885

  13. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database.

    PubMed

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes.

  14. CMPD: cancer mutant proteome database

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Po-Jung; Lee, Chi-Ching; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Yeh, Yuan-Ming; Julie Chu, Lichieh; Chen, Ting-Wen; Chang, Kai-Ping; Lee, Cheng-Yang; Gan, Ruei-Chi; Liu, Hsuan; Tang, Petrus

    2015-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing, which centres on the protein coding regions of disease/cancer associated genes, represents the most cost-effective method to-date for deciphering the association between genetic alterations and diseases. Large-scale whole exome/genome sequencing projects have been launched by various institutions, such as NCI, Broad Institute and TCGA, to provide a comprehensive catalogue of coding variants in diverse tissue samples and cell lines. Further functional and clinical interrogation of these sequence variations must rely on extensive cross-platforms integration of sequencing information and a proteome database that explicitly and comprehensively archives the corresponding mutated peptide sequences. While such data resource is a critical for the mass spectrometry-based proteomic analysis of exomic variants, no database is currently available for the collection of mutant protein sequences that correspond to recent large-scale genomic data. To address this issue and serve as bridge to integrate genomic and proteomics datasets, CMPD (http://cgbc.cgu.edu.tw/cmpd) collected over 2 millions genetic alterations, which not only facilitates the confirmation and examination of potential cancer biomarkers but also provides an invaluable resource for translational medicine research and opportunities to identify mutated proteins encoded by mutated genes. PMID:25398898

  15. The Chaperoning Activity of Amino-oxyacetic Acid on Folding-Defective Variants of Human Alanine:Glyoxylate Aminotransferase Causing Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I.

    PubMed

    Oppici, Elisa; Montioli, Riccardo; Dindo, Mirco; Maccari, Laura; Porcari, Valentina; Lorenzetto, Antonio; Chellini, Sara; Voltattorni, Carla Borri; Cellini, Barbara

    2015-10-16

    The rare disease Primary Hyperoxaluria Type I (PH1) results from the deficit of liver peroxisomal alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase (AGT), as a consequence of inherited mutations on the AGXT gene frequently leading to protein misfolding. Pharmacological chaperone (PC) therapy is a newly developed approach for misfolding diseases based on the use of small molecule ligands able to promote the correct folding of a mutant enzyme. In this report, we describe the interaction of amino-oxyacetic acid (AOA) with the recombinant purified form of two polymorphic species of AGT, AGT-Ma and AGT-Mi, and with three pathogenic variants bearing previously identified folding defects: G41R-Ma, G170R-Mi, and I244T-Mi. We found that for all these enzyme AOA (i) forms an oxime at the active site, (ii) behaves as a slow, tight-binding inhibitor with KI values in the nanomolar range, and (iii) increases the thermal stability. Furthermore, experiments performed in mammalian cells revealed that AOA acts as a PC by partly preventing the intracellular aggregation of G41R-Ma and by promoting the correct peroxisomal import of G170R-Mi and I244T-Mi. Based on these data, we carried out a small-scale screening campaign. We identified four AOA analogues acting as AGT inhibitors, even if only one was found to act as a PC. The possible relationship between the structure and the PC activity of these compounds is discussed. Altogether, these results provide the proof-of-principle for the feasibility of a therapy with PCs for PH1-causing variants bearing folding defects and provide the scaffold for the identification of more specific ligands. PMID:26161999

  16. Mutants of thermotaxis in Dictyostelium discoideum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, M.J.; Fontana, D.R.; Poff, K.L.

    1982-08-01

    Amoebae of Dictyostelium discoideum, strain HL50 were mutagenized with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, cloned, allowed to form pseudoplasmodia and screened for aberrant positive and negative thermotaxis. Three types of mutants were found. Mutant HO428 exhibits only positive thermotaxis over the entire temperature range (no negative thermotaxis). HO596 and HO813 exhibit weakened positive thermotaxis and normal negative thermotaxis. The weakened positive thermotactic response results in a shift toward warmer temperatures in the transition temperature from negative to positive thermotaxis. Mutant HO209 exhibits weakened positive and negative thermotactic responses and has a transition temperature similar to the 'wild type' (HL50).The two types of mutants represented by HO428, HO596 and HO813 support the model that positive and negative thermotaxis have separate pathways for temperature sensing. The type of mutants which contains HO209 suggests that those two pathways converge at some point before the response.

  17. Inositol depletion restores vesicle transport in yeast phospholipid flippase mutants.

    PubMed

    Yamagami, Kanako; Yamamoto, Takaharu; Sakai, Shota; Mioka, Tetsuo; Sano, Takamitsu; Igarashi, Yasuyuki; Tanaka, Kazuma

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, type 4 P-type ATPases function as phospholipid flippases, which translocate phospholipids from the exoplasmic leaflet to the cytoplasmic leaflet of the lipid bilayer. Flippases function in the formation of transport vesicles, but the mechanism remains unknown. Here, we isolate an arrestin-related trafficking adaptor, ART5, as a multicopy suppressor of the growth and endocytic recycling defects of flippase mutants in budding yeast. Consistent with a previous report that Art5p downregulates the inositol transporter Itr1p by endocytosis, we found that flippase mutations were also suppressed by the disruption of ITR1, as well as by depletion of inositol from the culture medium. Interestingly, inositol depletion suppressed the defects in all five flippase mutants. Inositol depletion also partially restored the formation of secretory vesicles in a flippase mutant. Inositol depletion caused changes in lipid composition, including a decrease in phosphatidylinositol and an increase in phosphatidylserine. A reduction in phosphatidylinositol levels caused by partially depleting the phosphatidylinositol synthase Pis1p also suppressed a flippase mutation. These results suggest that inositol depletion changes the lipid composition of the endosomal/TGN membranes, which results in vesicle formation from these membranes in the absence of flippases.

  18. Installing and Managing PC Time-Control Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Employees of a West Virginia library system were tired of intervening in frequent patron fights over the public access PCs. In this article, the author discusses how the implementation of time-control software for an automated session reservation/management service reduced the conflict. A team was assigned to investigate PC management software.…

  19. PC-SPES: herbal formulation for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marks, Leonard S; DiPaola, Robert S; Nelson, Peter; Chen, Sophie; Heber, David; Belldegrun, Arie S; Lowe, Franklin C; Fan, John; Leaders, Floyd E; Pantuck, Allan J; Tyler, Varro E

    2002-09-01

    PC-SPES is a potent eight-herb formulation sold directly to consumers; it has promising efficacy in the treatment of prostate cancer (CaP). The product induces a castrate status in most, if not all, men, resulting in a 50% or greater prostate-specific antigen reduction in the great majority of men with androgen-dependent CaP and in more than one half of the men with androgen-independent CaP. The duration of response is not yet clear. The efficacy of PC-SPES appears to exceed that of androgen ablation alone, but is not necessarily separate from an estrogenic effect. Common side effects include gynecomastia, nipple tenderness, loss of libido, and impotency; uncommon side effects include a 4% incidence of thromboembolic phenomena, but also two reports of bleeding diatheses. The mechanisms of action may involve downregulation of the androgen receptor, induction of apoptosis by way of inhibition of the bcl-2 gene, and increased expression of p53. Two marker compounds in PC-SPES are baicalin and oridonin, both of which exhibit antiproliferative effects in CaP cell lines. Thousands of men are currently obtaining this nonprescription medicine, and physicians should ask patients specifically about its use. PC-SPES is of great interest in men with androgen-independent CaP, an area in which future research should be primarily directed. PMID:12350462

  20. PC Board Layout and Electronic Drafting with CAD. Teacher Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryson, Jimmy

    This teacher's guide contains 11 units of instruction for a course on computer electronics and computer-assisted drafting (CAD) using a personal computer (PC). The course covers the following topics: introduction to electronic drafting with CAD; CAD system and software; basic electronic theory; component identification; basic integrated circuit…

  1. Deciding when It's Time to Buy a New PC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldsborough, Reid

    2004-01-01

    How to best decide when it's time to replace your PC, whether at home or at work, is always tricky. Spending on computers can make you more productive, but it's money you otherwise cannot spend, invest or save, and faster systems always await you in the future. What is clear is that the computer industry really wants you to buy, and the computer…

  2. 39 CFR 501.16 - PC postage payment methodology.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... examination of its PC Postage system and any other applications and technology infrastructure that may have a... effectiveness of relevant provider internal controls (SOC1 Type II SSAE 16 Report). If the service organization... provider and the Postal Service with an opinion on the design and operating effectiveness of the...

  3. PC-CUBE: A Personal Computer Based Hypercube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Alex; Fox, Geoffrey; Walker, David; Snyder, Scott; Chang, Douglas; Chen, Stanley; Breaden, Matt; Cole, Terry

    1988-01-01

    PC-CUBE is an ensemble of IBM PCs or close compatibles connected in the hypercube topology with ordinary computer cables. Communication occurs at the rate of 115.2 K-band via the RS-232 serial links. Available for PC-CUBE is the Crystalline Operating System III (CrOS III), Mercury Operating System, CUBIX and PLOTIX which are parallel I/O and graphics libraries. A CrOS performance monitor was developed to facilitate the measurement of communication and computation time of a program and their effects on performance. Also available are CXLISP, a parallel version of the XLISP interpreter; GRAFIX, some graphics routines for the EGA and CGA; and a general execution profiler for determining execution time spent by program subroutines. PC-CUBE provides a programming environment similar to all hypercube systems running CrOS III, Mercury and CUBIX. In addition, every node (personal computer) has its own graphics display monitor and storage devices. These allow data to be displayed or stored at every processor, which has much instructional value and enables easier debugging of applications. Some application programs which are taken from the book Solving Problems on Concurrent Processors (Fox 88) were implemented with graphics enhancement on PC-CUBE. The applications range from solving the Mandelbrot set, Laplace equation, wave equation, long range force interaction, to WaTor, an ecological simulation.

  4. PC vs. Mac--Which Way Should You Go?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wodarz, Nan

    1997-01-01

    Outlines the factors in hardware, software, and administration to consider in developing specifications for choosing a computer operating system. Compares Microsoft Windows 95/NT that runs on PC/Intel-based systems and System 7.5 that runs on the Apple-based systems. Lists reasons why the Microsoft platform clearly stands above the Apple platform.…

  5. A PC-based Workstation for Robotic Discectomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casadei, C.; Fiorini, P.; Martelli, S.; Montanari, M.; Morri, A.

    1998-01-01

    Ths paper describes a PC-based controller for robot-assisted minimally invasive surgery. The development is motivated by the need of reducing the exposure of operating room personnel to X-rays during surgical procedures such as percutanrous discectomy.

  6. What's Under Your PC's 'Hood': A Primer for Today's Machines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, Li; Mills, Joyce White

    2002-01-01

    Explains how to decide what type of computer to buy for a small academic library, based on software requirements, staff and patron use, and PC technology. Topics include the central processing unit; types of memory; storage devices; ports; multimedia capabilities; modems; operating systems; and monitors. (LRW)

  7. Desktop Publishing in a PC-Based Environment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Harold A.

    1987-01-01

    Identifies, considers, and interrelates the functionality of hardware, firmware, and software types; discusses the relationship of input and output devices in the PC-based desktop publishing environment; and reports some of what has been experienced in three years of working intensively in/with desktop publishing devices and solutions. (MES)

  8. 36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. View of preset counter (PC) console and tracking console on right, located in MWOC facility in transmitter building no. 102. - Clear Air Force Station, Ballistic Missile Early Warning System Site II, One mile west of mile marker 293.5 on Parks Highway, 5 miles southwest of Anderson, Anderson, Denali Borough, AK

  9. Wf/pc Cycle 1 Calib: 4-CHIP UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1990-12-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done for each CCD detector using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only during a UV campaign.

  10. Wf/pc Cycle 2 Calib: Single Chip UV Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKenty, John

    1991-07-01

    THIS PROGRAM CALIBRATES THE QE OF THE WFC AND PC IN THE ULTRAVIOLET (F194W, F230W, AND F284W). This calibration is done using exposures of a UV flux standard star. This program is intended for use only following a UV decontamination.

  11. The PC index: method of calculation and physical sense

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janzhura, A.; Troshichev, O.

    2012-04-01

    The PC index has been introduced [Troshichev and Andrezen, 1985; Troshichev et al., 1988] to characterize magnetic activity in the polar caps generated by the solar wind coupling with the magnetosphere. The concept of the antisunward convection within the polar cap, controlled by the interplanetary electric field EKL determined by Kan and Lee (1979), served as a basis for the method of the index calculation. Value of disturbances in the polar cap geomagnetic H and D (or X and Y) components form the basis for derivation of the PC index. The technique of PC index derivation consists of two separate procedures: (1) derivation of the statistically justified regression coefficients determining relationship between the coupling function EKL and vector of polar cap magnetic disturbance δF, and (2) calculation of PC indices by data on current δF values with use of the regression coefficients established in course of the first procedure. To exclude from examination the geomagnetic field changes unrelated to the solar wind variations the value of geomagnetic disturbance is calculated in reference to the quiet daily variation. The regression coefficients α (slope) and β (intersection) describing a linear link between values δF and EKL are calculated in combination with the optimal angle φ providing the highest correlation between δF and EKL. Parameters α, β and φ are derived based on the statistically justified sets of data. As a result the PC index corresponding to the value of coupling function EKL, irrespective of UT time, season and point of observation is determined. Validation of the PC proper derivation has been testified by the following requirements imposed on the calculated PCN and PCS indices: PCN and PCS indices should be consistent with the interplanetary electric field EKL; PCN and PCS indices should be in close agreement with each other irrespective of season and UT time; indices should not demonstrate seasonal variation; indices should not

  12. Effect of nanoscale SubPc interfacial layer on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells based on P3HT/PC71BM.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Yong; Noh, Seunguk; Nam, Young Min; Kim, Jun Young; Roh, Jeongkyun; Park, Myeongjin; Amsden, Jason J; Yoon, Do Y; Lee, Changhee; Jo, Won Ho

    2011-11-01

    The effect of a nanoscale boron subphthalocyanine chloride (SubPc) interfacial layer on the performance of inverted polymer solar cells based on poly (3-hexyl thiophene) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C(71)-butyric acid methyl ester (PC(71)BM) was studied. When a 1 nm SubPc layer was introduced between the active layer (P3HT:PC(71)BM) and MoO(x) in the device with ITO/ZnO/P3HT:PC(71)BM/SubPc/MoO(x)/Al configuration, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) was increased from 3.42 (without SubPc) to 3.59%. This improvement is mainly attributed to the enhanced open-circuit voltage from 0.62 to 0.64 V. When the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters were estimated from the solubility parameters through the contact angle measurement, it revealed that the interaction between SubPc and PC(71)BM is more attractive than that between SubPc and P3HT at the interface of P3HT:PC(71)BM/SubPc, through which charges are well transported from the active layer to the anode. This is supported by a decrease of the contact resistance from 5.49 (SubPc 0 nm) to 0.94 MΩ cm (SubPc 1 nm). The photoelectron spectra provide another evidence for the enhanced PCE, exhibiting that the 1 nm thick SubPc layer extracts more photoelectrons from the active layer than other thicknesses. PMID:21970412

  13. Molecular cloning and expression of prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in the pituitary gland of the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Yaoi, Yuichi; Suzuki, Masakazu; Tomura, Hideaki; Kikuyama, Sakae; Tanaka, Shigeyasu

    2003-09-01

    We cloned cDNAs encoding PC1 and PC2 from a cDNA library constructed for the anterior pituitary gland of the bullfrog (Rana catesbeiana) and sequenced them. The bullfrog PC1 cDNA consisted of 2972 base pairs (bp) with an open reading frame of 2208 bp and encoded a protein of 736 amino acids, including a putative signal peptide of 26 amino acids. The protein showed a high homology to R. ridibunda PC1 (95.1%) and mammalian PC1 (72.6%). The bullfrog PC2 cDNA consisted of 2242 bp with an open reading frame of 1914 bp and encoded a protein of 638 amino acids, including a putative signal peptide of 23 amino acids. This protein showed a high homology to R. ridibunda PC2 (95.5%) and mammalian PC2 (84.8%). The catalytic triad of serine proteinases of the subtilisin family was found at Asp-168, His-209, and Ser-383 in the PC1 protein and at Asp-167, His-208, and Ser-384 in the PC2 protein. In situ hybridization staining revealed that PC2 mRNA was detected in corticotrope cells of the tadpoles, but not in those of the adults. In the adult, only PC1 mRNA was detected in the pars distalis but both PC1 and PC2 mRNAs were detected in the pars intermedia. The data also showed that PC1 mRNA was expressed in gonadotrope cells. PMID:14578575

  14. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-10-29

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb per million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and PC burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. A revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and PC burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was then begun with BBP personnel. During the current reporting period, reactivation of the pilot test system was completed with the modified Preheat gas combustor. Following shakedown of the modified gas combustor alone, a series of successful tests of the new combustor with PRB coal using the original PC burner were completed. NO{sub x} at the furnace exit was reduced significantly with the modified gas combustor, to as low as 150 ppm with only 36 ppm CO (both corrected to 3% O{sub 2}). Concurrent with testing, GTI and BBP collaborated on development of two modified designs for the PC burner optimized to fire preheated char and pyrolysis products from the Preheat gas combustor.

  15. IPEG- IMPROVED PRICE ESTIMATION GUIDELINES (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aster, R. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Improved Price Estimation Guidelines, IPEG, program provides a simple yet accurate estimate of the price of a manufactured product. IPEG facilitates sensitivity studies of price estimates at considerably less expense than would be incurred by using the Standard Assembly-line Manufacturing Industry Simulation, SAMIS, program (COSMIC program NPO-16032). A difference of less than one percent between the IPEG and SAMIS price estimates has been observed with realistic test cases. However, the IPEG simplification of SAMIS allows the analyst with limited time and computing resources to perform a greater number of sensitivity studies than with SAMIS. Although IPEG was developed for the photovoltaics industry, it is readily adaptable to any standard assembly line type of manufacturing industry. IPEG estimates the annual production price per unit. The input data includes cost of equipment, space, labor, materials, supplies, and utilities. Production on an industry wide basis or a process wide basis can be simulated. Once the IPEG input file is prepared, the original price is estimated and sensitivity studies may be performed. The IPEG user selects a sensitivity variable and a set of values. IPEG will compute a price estimate and a variety of other cost parameters for every specified value of the sensitivity variable. IPEG is designed as an interactive system and prompts the user for all required information and offers a variety of output options. The IPEG/PC program is written in TURBO PASCAL for interactive execution on an IBM PC computer under DOS 2.0 or above with at least 64K of memory. The IBM PC color display and color graphics adapter are needed to use the plotting capabilities in IPEG/PC. IPEG/PC was developed in 1984. The original IPEG program is written in SIMSCRIPT II.5 for interactive execution and has been implemented on an IBM 370 series computer with a central memory requirement of approximately 300K of 8 bit bytes. The original IPEG was developed in 1980.

  16. Induction of cytoprotective autophagy in PC-12 cells by cadmium

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Qiwen; Zhu, Jiaqiao; Zhang, Kangbao; Jiang, Chenyang; Wang, Yi; Yuan, Yan; Bian, Jianchun; Liu, Xuezhong; Gu, Jianhong; Liu, Zongping

    2013-08-16

    Highlights: •Cadmium can promote early upregulation of autophagy in PC-12 cells. •Autophagy precedes apoptosis in cadmium-treated PC-12 cells. •Cadmium-induced autophagy is cytoprotective in PC-12 cells. •Class III PI3K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathway plays a positive role in cadmium-triggered autophagy. -- Abstract: Laboratory data have demonstrated that cadmium (Cd) may induce neuronal apoptosis. However, little is known about the role of autophagy in neurons. In this study, cell viability decreased in a dose- and time-dependent manner after treatment with Cd in PC-12 cells. As cells were exposed to Cd, the levels of LC3-II proteins became elevated, specific punctate distribution of endogenous LC3-II increased, and numerous autophagosomes appeared, which suggest that Cd induced a high level of autophagy. In the late stages of autophagy, an increase in the apoptosis ratio was observed. Likewise, pre-treatment with chloroquine (an autophagic inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagic inducer) resulted in an increased and decreased percentage of apoptosis in contrast to other Cd-treated groups, respectively. The results indicate that autophagy delayed apoptosis in Cd-treated PC-12 cells. Furthermore, co-treatment of cells with chloroquine reduced autophagy and cell activity. However, rapamycin had an opposite effect on autophagy and cell activity. Moreover, class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways served a function in Cd-induced autophagy. The findings suggest that Cd can induce cytoprotective autophagy by activating class III PI3 K/beclin-1/Bcl-2 signaling pathways. In sum, this study strongly suggests that autophagy may serve a positive function in the reduction of Cd-induced cytotoxicity.

  17. Silibinin inhibits fibronectin induced motility, invasiveness and survival in human prostate carcinoma PC3 cells via targeting integrin signaling.

    PubMed

    Deep, Gagan; Kumar, Rahul; Jain, Anil K; Agarwal, Chapla; Agarwal, Rajesh

    2014-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the 2nd leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the United States. Preventing or inhibiting metastasis-related events through non-toxic agents could be a useful approach for lowering high mortality among PCA patients. We have earlier reported that natural flavonoid silibinin possesses strong anti-metastatic efficacy against PCA however, mechanism/s of its action still remains largely unknown. One of the major events during metastasis is the replacement of cell-cell interaction with integrins-based cell-matrix interaction that controls motility, invasiveness and survival of cancer cells. Accordingly, here we examined silibinin effect on advanced human PCA PC3 cells' interaction with extracellular matrix component fibronectin. Silibinin (50-200 μM) treatment significantly decreased the fibronectin (5 μg/ml)-induced motile morphology via targeting actin cytoskeleton organization in PC3 cells. Silibinin also decreased the fibronectin-induced cell proliferation and motility but significantly increased cell death in PC3 cells. Silibinin also inhibited the PC3 cells invasiveness in Transwell invasion assays with fibronectin or cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs) serving as chemoattractant. Importantly, PC3-luc cells cultured on fibronectin showed rapid dissemination and localized in lungs following tail vein injection in athymic male nude mice; however, in silibinin-treated PC3-luc cells, dissemination and lung localization was largely compromised. Molecular analyses revealed that silibinin treatment modulated the fibronectin-induced expression of integrins (α5, αV, β1 and β3), actin-remodeling (FAK, Src, GTPases, ARP2 and cortactin), apoptosis (cPARP and cleaved caspase 3), EMT (E-cadherin and β-catenin), and cell survival (survivin and Akt) related signaling molecules in PC3 cells. Furthermore, PC3-xenograft tissue analyses confirmed the inhibitory effect of silibinin on fibronectin and integrins expression. Together, these

  18. Lethal infection by Bordetella pertussis mutants in the infant mouse model.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, A A; Goodwin, M S

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of lethal infection of infant mice with Bordetella pertussis were examined. Mutants deficient in vir-regulated genes were tested for the ability to cause a lethal infection in the infant mouse model. Adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin and pertussis toxin were required to cause a lethal infection at low doses. Mixed infection caused by challenging the mice with an equal number of pertussis toxin and adenylate cyclase toxin-hemolysin mutants at a dose at which neither alone was lethal was also unable to cause a lethal infection. Production of the filamentous hemagglutinin and the dermonecrotic toxin was not required to cause a lethal infection. Nine other mutants in vir-regulated genes whose phenotypes have yet to be determined were also tested. Only two of these mutants were impaired in the ability to cause a lethal infection. Expression of fimbriae does not appear to affect the dose required to cause a lethal infection; however, fimbrial expression was correlated with the later stages of a nonlethal, persistent infection. Growth of the bacteria in MgSO4, a condition which reversibly suppresses expression of the genes required for virulence, did not alter the ability of the bacteria to cause a lethal infection. Auxotrophic mutants deficient in leucine biosynthesis were as virulent as the parental strain; however, mutants deficient in methionine biosynthesis were less virulent. A B. parapertussis strain was much less effective in promoting a lethal infection than any of the wild-type B. pertussis strains examined. A persistent infection in the lungs was observed for weeks after challenge for mice given a sublethal dose of B. pertussis, and transmission from infected infants to the mother was never observed. PMID:2572561

  19. Chromosomal assignment of the genes for proprotein convertases PC4, PC5, and PACE 4 in mouse and human

    SciTech Connect

    Mbikay, M.; Seidah, N.G.; Chretien, M.

    1995-03-01

    The genes for three subtilisin/kexin-like proprotein convertases, PC4, PC5, and PACE4, were mapped in the mouse by RFLP analysis of a DNA panel from a (C57BL/6JEi x SPRET/Ei) F{sub 1} x SPRET/Ei backcross. The chromosomal locations of the human homologs were determined by Southern blot analysis of a DNA panel from human-rodent somatic cell hybrids, most of which contained a single human chromosome each. The gene for PC4 (Pcsk4 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 10, close to the Adn (adipsin, a serine protease) locus and near the Amh (anti-Mullerian hormone) locus; in a human, the gene was localized to chromosome 19. The gene for PC5 (Pcsk5 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 19 close to the Lpc1 (lipoacortin-1) locus and, in human, was localized to chromosome 9. The gene for PACE4 (Pcsk6 locus) mapped to mouse chromosome 7, at a distance of 13 cM from the Pcsk3 locus, which specifies furin, another member of this family of enzymes previoulsy mapped to this chromosome. This is in concordance with the known close proximity of these two loci in the homologous region on human chromosome 15q25-qter. Pcsk3 and Pcsk6 mapped to a region of mouse chromosome 7 that has been associated cytogenetically with postnatal lethality in maternal disomy, suggesting that these genes might be candidates for imprinting. 43 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  1. Ipsen 5i is a Novel Potent Pharmacoperone for Intracellularly Retained Melanocortin-4 Receptor Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Ya-Xiong; Huang, Hui

    2014-01-01

    Inactivating mutations of the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) cause early-onset severe obesity in humans. Comprehensive functional studies show that most of the inactivating mutants of the MC4R are retained intracellularly. In the present study, we investigated whether a small molecule inverse agonist of the MC4R, Ipsen 5i, could act as a pharmacoperone and correct the cell surface expression and function of intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs using multiple cell lines, including HEK293 and two neuronal cell lines. We showed that Ipsen 5i rescued the cell surface expression of all 11 intracellularly retained mutant MC4Rs studied herein in at least one cell line. Ipsen 5i functionally rescued seven mutants in all cell lines used. One mutant (Y157S) was functionally rescued in HEK293 cells but not in the two neuronal cell lines. Ipsen 5i increased cell surface expression of three mutants (S58C, G98R, and F261S) but did not affect signaling. Ipsen 5i had no effect on mutant MC4Rs with other defects (Δ88-92, D90N, I102S) or no defect (N274S). It also did not affect trafficking of a misrouted MC3R mutant (I335S). Cell impermeable peptide ligands of the MC4R or cell permeable small molecule ligand of δ opioid receptor could not rescue misrouted mutant MC4R. In summary, we demonstrated that Ipsen 5i was a novel potent pharmacoperone of the MC4R, correcting trafficking and signaling of a significant portion (73%) of intracellularly retained mutants. Additional studies are needed to demonstrate its in vivo efficacy. PMID:25136332

  2. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Joseph Rabovitser; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to ready technology for full-scale commercial deployment to meet the market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies. Over half of the electric power generated in the U.S. is produced by coal combustion, and more than 80% of these units utilize PC combustion technology. Conventional measures for NOx reduction in PC combustion processes rely on combustion and post-combustion modifications. A variety of combustion-based NO{sub x} reduction technologies are in use today, including low-NO{sub x} burners (LNBs), flue gas recirculation (FGR), air staging, and natural gas or other fuel reburning. Selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) are post-combustion techniques. NO{sub x} reduction effectiveness from these technologies ranges from 30 to 60% and up to 90-93% for SCR. Typically, older wall-fired PC burner units produce NO{sub x} emissions in the range of 0.8-1.6 lb/million Btu. Low-NO{sub x} burner systems, using combinations of fuel staging within the burner and air staging by introduction of overfire air in the boiler, can reduce NO{sub x} emissions by 50-60%. This approach alone is not sufficient to meet the desired 0.15 lb/million Btu NO{sub x} standard with a range of coals and boiler loads. Furthermore, the heavy reliance on overfire air can lead to increased slagging and corrosion in furnaces, particularly with higher-sulfur coals, when LNBs are operated at sub-stoichiometric conditions to reduce fuel-derived NOx in the flame. Therefore, it is desirable

  3. A role for SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance in prostate cancer PC3 and DU145 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Keitaro; Ohhashi, Riyako; Fujita, Yasunori; Hamada, Nanako; Akao, Yukihiro; Nozawa, Yoshinori; Deguchi, Takashi; Ito, Masafumi

    2008-08-29

    SIRT1, which belongs to the family of type III histone deacetylase, is implicated in diverse cellular processes. We have determined the expression levels of SIRT1 in human prostate cancer cell lines and have examined the roles of SIRT1 in cell growth and chemoresistance. SIRT1 expression was markedly up-regulated in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells compared with androgen-sensitive LNCaP cells and its expression level was correlated with cell growth in PC3 cells. Treatment with a SIRT1 inhibitor, sirtinol, inhibited cell growth and increased sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. Silencing of SIRT1 expression by siRNA also suppressed cell proliferation and reduced camptothecin resistance in PC3 cells, mimicking the chemosensitizing effect caused by sirtinol. Also in DU145 cells, sirtinol treatment enhanced sensitivity to camptothecin and cisplatin. These results suggest that up-regulation of SIRT1 expression may play an important role in promoting cell growth and chemoresistance in androgen-refractory PC3 and DU145 cells.

  4. Chronic hypoxia enhances adenosine release in rat PC12 cells by altering adenosine metabolism and membrane transport.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Zimmermann, H; Millhorn, D E

    2000-02-01

    Acute exposure to hypoxia causes a release of adenosine (ADO) that is inversely related to the O2 levels in oxygen-sensitive pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells. In the current study, chronic exposure (48 h) of PC12 cells to moderate hypoxia (5% O2) significantly enhanced the release of ADO during severe, acute hypoxia (1% O2). Investigation into the intra- and extracellular mechanisms underpinning the secretion of ADO in PC12 cells chronically exposed to hypoxia revealed changes in gene expression and activities of several key enzymes associated with ADO production and metabolism, as well as the down-regulation of a nucleoside transporter. Decreases in the enzymatic activities of ADO kinase and ADO deaminase accompanied by an increase in those of cytoplasmic and ecto-5'-nucleotidases bring about an increased capacity to produce intra- and extracellular ADO. This increased potential to generate ADO and decreased capacity to metabolize ADO indicate that PC12 cells shift toward an ADO producer phenotype during hypoxia. The reduced function of the rat equilibrative nucleoside transporter rENT1 also plays a role in controlling extracellular ADO levels. The hypoxia-induced alterations in the ADO metabolic enzymes and the rENT1 transporter seem to increase the extracellular concentration of ADO. The biological significance of this regulation is unclear but is likely to be associated with modulating cellular activity during hypoxia. PMID:10646513

  5. scyllo-Inositol promotes robust mutant Huntingtin protein degradation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Aaron Y; Lan, Cynthia P; Hasan, Salwa; Brown, Mary E; McLaurin, Joanne

    2014-02-01

    Huntington disease is characterized by neuronal aggregates and inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin protein and peptide fragments (polyQ-Htt). We have used an established cell-based assay employing a PC12 cell line overexpressing truncated exon 1 of Htt with a 103-residue polyQ expansion that yields polyQ-Htt aggregates to investigate the fate of polyQ-Htt-drug complexes. scyllo-Inositol is an endogenous inositol stereoisomer known to inhibit accumulation and toxicity of the amyloid-β peptide and α-synuclein. In light of these properties, we investigated the effect of scyllo-inositol on polyQ-Htt accumulation. We show that scyllo-inositol lowered the number of visible polyQ-Htt aggregates and robustly decreased polyQ-Htt protein abundance without concomitant cellular toxicity. We found that scyllo-inositol-induced polyQ-Htt reduction was by rescue of degradation pathways mediated by the lysosome and by the proteasome but not autophagosomes. The rescue of degradation pathways was not a direct result of scyllo-inositol on the lysosome or proteasome but due to scyllo-inositol-induced reduction in mutant polyQ-Htt protein levels.

  6. The phenotype of a phospholipase C (plc-1) mutant in a filamentous fungus, Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    Lew, Roger R; Giblon, Rachel E; Lorenti, Miranda S H

    2015-09-01

    In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, phospholipase C may play a role in hyphal extension at the growing tips as part of a growth-sensing mechanism that activates calcium release from internal stores to mediate continued expansion of the hyphal tip. One candidate for a tip-localized phospholipase C is PLC-1. We characterized morphology and growth characteristics of a knockout mutant (KO plc-1) and a RIP mutated strain (RIP plc-1) (missense mutations and a nonsense mutation render the gene product non-functional). Growth and hyphal cytology of wildtype and KO plc-1 were similar, but the RIP plc-1 mutant grew slower and exhibited abnormal membrane structures at the hyphal tip, imaged using the fluorescence dye FM4-64. To test for causes of the slower growth of the RIP plc-1 mutant, we examined its physiological poise compared to wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. The electrical properties of all three strains and the electrogenic contribution of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (identified by cyanide inhibition) were the same. Responses to high osmolarity were also similar. However, the RIP plc-1 mutant had a significantly lower turgor, a possible cause of its slower growth. While growth of all three strains was inhibited by the phospholipase C inhibitor 3-nitrocoumarin, the RIP plc-1 mutant did not exhibit hyphal bursting after addition of the inhibitor, observed in both wildtype and the KO plc-1 mutant. Although the plc-1 gene is not obligatory for tip growth, the phenotype of the RIP plc-1 mutant - abnormal tip cytology, lower turgor and resistance to inhibitor-induced hyphal bursting - suggest it does play a role in tip growth. The expression of a dysfunctional plc-1 gene may cause a shift to alternative mechanism(s) of growth sensing in hyphal extension.

  7. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Pratt, Ashley J; Shin, David S; Merz, Gregory E; Rambo, Robert P; Lancaster, W Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N; Borbat, Peter P; Poole, Farris L; Adams, Michael W W; Freed, Jack H; Crane, Brian R; Tainer, John A; Getzoff, Elizabeth D

    2014-10-28

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu(2+) binding site and defined cross-dimer copper-copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies.

  8. Aggregation propensities of superoxide dismutase G93 hotspot mutants mirror ALS clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, Ashley J.; Shin, David S.; Merz, Gregory E.; Rambo, Robert P.; Lancaster, W. Andrew; Dyer, Kevin N.; Borbat, Peter P.; Poole, Farris L.; Adams, Michael W. W.; Freed, Jack H.; Crane, Brian R.; Tainer, John A.; Getzoff, Elizabeth D.

    2014-01-01

    Protein framework alterations in heritable Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) mutants cause misassembly and aggregation in cells affected by the motor neuron disease ALS. However, the mechanistic relationship between superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) mutations and human disease is controversial, with many hypotheses postulated for the propensity of specific SOD mutants to cause ALS. Here, we experimentally identify distinguishing attributes of ALS mutant SOD proteins that correlate with clinical severity by applying solution biophysical techniques to six ALS mutants at human SOD hotspot glycine 93. A small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) assay and other structural methods assessed aggregation propensity by defining the size and shape of fibrillar SOD aggregates after mild biochemical perturbations. Inductively coupled plasma MS quantified metal ion binding stoichiometry, and pulsed dipolar ESR spectroscopy evaluated the Cu2+ binding site and defined cross-dimer copper–copper distance distributions. Importantly, we find that copper deficiency in these mutants promotes aggregation in a manner strikingly consistent with their clinical severities. G93 mutants seem to properly incorporate metal ions under physiological conditions when assisted by the copper chaperone but release copper under destabilizing conditions more readily than the WT enzyme. Altered intradimer flexibility in ALS mutants may cause differential metal retention and promote distinct aggregation trends observed for mutant proteins in vitro and in ALS patients. Combined biophysical and structural results test and link copper retention to the framework destabilization hypothesis as a unifying general mechanism for both SOD aggregation and ALS disease progression, with implications for disease severity and therapeutic intervention strategies. PMID:25316790

  9. Insights into prevention of human neural tube defects by folic acid arising from consideration of mouse mutants.

    PubMed

    Harris, Muriel J

    2009-04-01

    Almost 30 years after the initial study by Richard W. Smithells and coworkers, it is still unknown how maternal periconceptional folic acid supplementation prevents human neural tube defects (NTDs). In this article, questions about human NTD prevention are considered in relation to three groups of mouse models: NTD mutants that respond to folate, NTD mutants and strains that do not respond to folate, and mutants involving folate-pathway genes. Of the 200 mouse NTD mutants, only a few have been tested with folate; half respond and half do not. Among responsive mutants, folic acid supplementation reduces exencephaly and/or spina bifida aperta frequency in the Sp(2H), Sp, Cd, Cited2, Cart1, and Gcn5 mutants. Prevention ranges from 35 to 85%. The responsive Sp(2H) (Pax3) mutant has abnormal folate metabolism, but the responsive Cited2 mutant does not. Neither folic nor folinic acid reduces NTD frequency in Axd, Grhl3, Fkbp8, Map3k4, or Nog mutants or in the curly tail or SELH/Bc strains. Spina bifida frequency is reduced in Axd by methionine and in curly tail by inositol. Exencephaly frequency is reduced in SELH/Bc by an alternative commercial ration. Mutations in folate-pathway genes do not cause NTDs, except for 30% exencephaly in folate-treated Folr1. Among folate-pathway mutants, neural tube closure is normal in Cbs, Folr2, Mthfd1, Mthfd2, Mthfr, and Shmt1 mutants. Embryos die by midgestation in Folr1, Mtr, Mtrr, and RFC1 mutants. The mouse models point to genetic heterogeneity in the ability to respond to folic acid and also to heterogeneity in genetic cause of NTDs that can be prevented by folic acid.

  10. c-Fos activated phospholipid synthesis is required for neurite elongation in differentiating PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Gil, Germán A; Bussolino, Daniela F; Portal, Maximiliano M; Alfonso Pecchio, Adolfo; Renner, Marianne L; Borioli, Graciela A; Guido, Mario E; Caputto, Beatriz L

    2004-04-01

    We have previously shown that c-Fos activates phospholipid synthesis through a mechanism independent of its genomic AP-1 activity. Herein, using PC12 cells induced to differentiate by nerve growth factor, the genomic effect of c-Fos in initiating neurite outgrowth is shown as distinct from its nongenomic effect of activating phospholipid synthesis and sustaining neurite elongation. Blocking c-Fos expression inhibited differentiation, phospholipid synthesis activation, and neuritogenesis. In cells primed to grow, blocking c-Fos expression determined neurite retraction. However, transfected cells expressing c-Fos or c-Fos deletion mutants with capacity to activate phospholipid synthesis sustain neurite outgrowth and elongation in the absence of nerve growth factor. Results disclose a dual function of c-Fos: it first releases the genomic program for differentiation and then associates to the endoplasmic reticulum and activates phospholipid synthesis. Because phospholipids are key membrane components, we hypothesize this latter phenomenon as crucial to support membrane genesis demands required for cell growth and neurite elongation. PMID:14767061

  11. Mutants of yeast sensitive to ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Snow, R

    1967-09-01

    Six uvr mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with hypersensitivity to ultraviolet (UV) light were isolated after mutagen treatment with ethylmethanesulfonate. UV sensitivity ranges from moderate to extreme, and four of the mutants are also sensitive to nitrous acid. Ranking in terms of UV sensitivity does not parallel ranking in terms of nitrous acid sensitivity. Homozygous diploid mutant strains are somewhat less sensitive than the corresponding haploids. All mutations are recessive. None of the mutants is sensitive to gamma rays, and each shows photoreactivation after UV radiation. Complementation tests and tetrad analysis indicate that each strain represents mutation in a different gene. Two of the uvr genes are linked, and two others are centromere-linked.

  12. Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcesens.

    PubMed

    Morrison, D A

    1966-04-01

    Morrison, D. A. (Harvard College, Cambridge, Mass.). Prodigiosin synthesis in mutants of Serratia marcescens. J. Bacteriol. 91:1509-1604. 1966.-Exchange of biosynthetic intermediates through the culture medium was used to characterize several hundred new color mutants of Serratia marcescens. The general scheme of prodigiosin synthesis as a bifurcated pathway, in which monopyrrole and bipyrrole precursors are synthesized separately and then coupled to form pigment, was confirmed and extended. Mutants of one new class excreted a product likely to be a new intermediate in monopyrrole synthesis, those of a second excreted a new product in the bipyrrole pathway, and those of a third were blocked at early steps in both pathways. Two novel classes of mutants were isolated, in each of which a lack of some product present in Serratia and Escherichia cultures resulted in loss of all steps in prodigiosin biosynthesis.

  13. Cooperative Interaction Within RNA Virus Mutant Spectra.

    PubMed

    Shirogane, Yuta; Watanabe, Shumpei; Yanagi, Yusuke

    2016-01-01

    RNA viruses usually consist of mutant spectra because of high error rates of viral RNA polymerases. Growth competition occurs among different viral variants, and the fittest clones predominate under given conditions. Individual variants, however, may not be entirely independent of each other, and internal interactions within mutant spectra can occur. Examples of cooperative and interfering interactions that exert enhancing and suppressing effects on replication of the wild-type virus, respectively, have been described, but their underlying mechanisms have not been well defined. It was recently found that the cooperation between wild-type and variant measles virus genomes produces a new phenotype through the heterooligomer formation of a viral protein. This observation provides a molecular mechanism underlying cooperative interactions within mutant spectra. Careful attention to individual sequences, in addition to consensus sequences, may disclose further examples of internal interactions within mutant spectra. PMID:26162566

  14. Conversion from 8800 to 8800PC -- Evaluation and experience

    SciTech Connect

    Miner, A.E.; Lawson, B.J.

    1998-03-20

    Though a final version of the software is pending the 8800PC operating system host computer is a welcomed change from the old Digital (DEC) host computer. The 8800PC host computer uses the Windows NT operating system and has proven to be very user friendly. Descriptive window messages replace the cryptic coding of the DEC host. Though numerous electrical components were replaced, system calibration remained constant. Calibrated Thermoluminescent (TL) output from a randomly selected 8815 field card was measured before and after the upgrade. The % difference, when comparing calibrated output from an upgraded reader to the non upgraded reader, ranged from 0.2 to 3%. The most disappointing aspect of the upgrade experience was the lag time between hardware installation and software completion.

  15. Extracellular toxicity of 6-hydroxydopamine on PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blum, D; Torch, S; Nissou, M F; Benabid, A L; Verna, J M

    2000-04-14

    6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) is usually thought to cross cell membrane through dopamine uptake transporters, to inhibit mitochondrial respiration and to generate intracellular reactive oxygen species. In this study, we show that the anti-oxidants catalase, glutathione and N-acetyl-cysteine are able to reverse the toxic effects of 6-OHDA. These two latter compounds considerably slow down 6-OHDA oxidation in a cell free system suggesting a direct chemical interaction with the neurotoxin. Moreover, desipramine does not protect PC12 cells and 6-OHDA is also strongly toxic towards non-catecholaminergic C6 and NIH3T3 cells. These results thus suggest that 6-OHDA toxicity on PC12 cells mainly involves an extracellular process. PMID:10754220

  16. METHANE de-NOX for Utility PC Boilers

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2005-09-30

    Large-scale combustion tests with caking bituminous coal has stopped. This stoppage has come about due to limitations in current funding available to continue large scale research and development activities at Riley Power's Commercial Burner Test Facility (CBTF) of the PC Preheat technology. The CBTF was secured and decommissioned in the previous quarter; work this quarter work completed the securing the proper disposition of all PC Preheat experimental equipment at the PSCF and CBTF and completing negotiations with AES Westover (a power plant in Johnson City, New York) to accept 130 tons of residual PRB test coal in storage. The coal transport to Westover occurred at the end of August. GTI was granted a no-cost time extension through September 2005; immediate efforts are focused on completing a draft final report, which is due in October 31, 2005 and the final report in December.

  17. Flexible missile autopilot design studies with PC-MATLAB/386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a responsive, high-bandwidth missile autopilot for airframes which have structural modes of unusually low frequency presents a challenging design task. Such systems are viable candidates for modern, state-space control design methods. The PC-MATLAB interactive software package provides an environment well-suited to the development of candidate linear control laws for flexible missile autopilots. The strengths of MATLAB include: (1) exceptionally high speed (MATLAB's version for 80386-based PC's offers benchmarks approaching minicomputer and mainframe performance); (2) ability to handle large design models of several hundred degrees of freedom, if necessary; and (3) broad extensibility through user-defined functions. To characterize MATLAB capabilities, a simplified design example is presented. This involves interactive definition of an observer-based state-space compensator for a flexible missile autopilot design task. MATLAB capabilities and limitations, in the context of this design task, are then summarized.

  18. Toward the optimization of PC-based training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Kohei; Murai, Shunji

    Since 1992, the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) and the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP) have been co-organising the Regional Remote Sensing Seminar on Tropical Ecosystem Management (Program Chairman: Prof. Shunji Murai) every year in some country in Asia. In these seminars, the members of the ISPRS Working Group VI/2 'Computer Assisted Teaching' have been performing a PC-based hands-on-training on remote sensing and GIS for beginners. The main objective of the training was to transfer not only knowledge but also the technology of remote sensing and GIS to the beginners. The software and CD-ROM data set provided at the training were well designed not only for training but also for practical data analysis. This paper presents an outline of the training and discusses the optimisation of PC-based training for remote sensing and GIS.

  19. Tablet PC Enabled Body Sensor System for Rural Telehealth Applications

    PubMed Central

    Panicker, Nitha V.; Kumar, A. Sukesh

    2016-01-01

    Telehealth systems benefit from the rapid growth of mobile communication technology for measuring physiological signals. Development and validation of a tablet PC enabled noninvasive body sensor system for rural telehealth application are discussed in this paper. This system includes real time continuous collection of physiological parameters (blood pressure, pulse rate, and temperature) and fall detection of a patient with the help of a body sensor unit and wireless transmission of the acquired information to a tablet PC handled by the medical staff in a Primary Health Center (PHC). Abnormal conditions are automatically identified and alert messages are given to the medical officer in real time. Clinical validation is performed in a real environment and found to be successful. Bland-Altman analysis is carried out to validate the wrist blood pressure sensor used. The system works well for all measurements. PMID:26884757

  20. Functional rescue of a kidney anion exchanger 1 trafficking mutant in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chu, Carmen Y S; King, Jennifer C; Berrini, Mattia; Alexander, R Todd; Cordat, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the SLC4A1 gene encoding the anion exchanger 1 (AE1) can cause distal renal tubular acidosis (dRTA), a disease often due to mis-trafficking of the mutant protein. In this study, we investigated whether trafficking of a Golgi-retained dRTA mutant, G701D kAE1, or two dRTA mutants retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, C479W and R589H kAE1, could be functionally rescued to the plasma membrane of Madin-Darby Canine Kidney (MDCK) cells. Treatments with DMSO, glycerol, the corrector VX-809, or low temperature incubations restored the basolateral trafficking of G701D kAE1 mutant. These treatments had no significant rescuing effect on trafficking of the mis-folded C479W or R589H kAE1 mutants. DMSO was the only treatment that partially restored G701D kAE1 function in the plasma membrane of MDCK cells. Our experiments show that trafficking of intracellularly retained dRTA kAE1 mutants can be partially restored, and that one chemical treatment rescued both trafficking and function of a dRTA mutant. These studies provide an opportunity to develop alternative therapeutic solutions for dRTA patients. PMID:23460825

  1. Characterization of the ERAD process of the L444P mutant glucocerebrosidase variant.

    PubMed

    Bendikov-Bar, Inna; Ron, Idit; Filocamo, Mirella; Horowitz, Mia

    2011-01-15

    A large number of mutations in the glucocerebrosidase gene (GBA gene), encoding the lysosomal acid hydrolase glucocerebrosidase (GCase), lead to Gaucher disease (GD). The second most prevalent GD causing mutation, carried by 38% of non-Jewish patients, is L444P, resulting from a T to C transition in nucleotide 6092 of the GBA gene. It is a severe mutation that, in homozygosity, leads to neuropathic type 3 GD. We have previously shown that mutant GCase variants present variable degrees of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) retention and undergo ER associated degradation (ERAD). However, ERAD of the L444P mutant variant of GCase has never been tested. In the current study, we present results indicating that the L444P mutant protein undergoes extensive ERAD. In skin fibroblasts, originated from GD patients homozygous for L444P mutation, the level of GCase is 12%-21% of normal and at least 50% of it is in the ER. The mutant protein undergoes polyubiquitination and proteasome-dependent degradation. Recently Ambroxol, a known expectorant, was identified as a pharmacological chaperone for mutant GCase. We tested the effect of Ambroxol on the L444P mutant GCase and found that it enhances the removal of the mutant enzyme from the ER. In some cases, this removal leads to a concomitant increase in enzymatic activity. PMID:21106416

  2. Substrate Availability of Mutant SPT Alters Neuronal Branching and Growth Cone Dynamics in Dorsal Root Ganglia

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Byung Kyu; Chandra, Ankush; Kuljis, Dika; Schmidt, Brian P.

    2015-01-01

    Serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) is a key enzyme in the first step of sphingolipid biosynthesis. Mutations in the SPTLC1 gene that encodes for SPT subunits cause hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1. However, little is understood about how mutant SPT regulates mechanisms of sensory neuron and axonal growth. Using transgenic mice overexpressing the C133W SPT mutant, we found that mutant dorsal root ganglia (DRG) during growth in vitro exhibit increased neurite length and branching, coinciding with elevated expression of actin-cross-linking proteins at the neuronal growth cone, namely phosphorylated Ezrin/Radixin/Moesin. In addition, inhibition of SPT was able to reverse the mutant phenotype. Because mutant SPT preferentially uses l-alanine over its canonical substrate l-serine, we also investigated the effects of substrate availability on DRG neurons. Supplementation with l-serine or removal of l-alanine independently restored normal growth patterns in mutant SPTLC1C133W DRG. Therefore, we report that substrate availability and selectivity of SPT influence the regulation of neurite growth in DRG neurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Hereditary sensory neuropathy type 1 is an autosomal-dominant disorder that leads to a sensory neuropathy due to mutations in the serine palmitoyltransferase (SPT) enzyme. We investigated how mutant SPT and substrate levels regulate neurite growth. Because SPT is an important enzyme in the synthesis of sphingolipids, our data are of broader significance to other peripheral and metabolic disorders. PMID:26446223

  3. The molecular basis for the alternative stable phenotype in a behavioral mutant of Paramecium tetraurelia.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, A; Takahashi, M

    2001-10-01

    In the sexual reproduction of Paramecium tetraurelia, the somatic nucleus (macronucleus) undergoes massive genomic rearrangement, including gene amplification and excision of internal eliminated sequences (IESs), in its normal developmental process. Strain d4-662, one of the pawn mutants, is a behavioral mutant of P. tetraurelia that carries a recessive allele of pwB662. ThepwB gene in the macronucleus of the strain has an insertion of the IES because a base substitution within the IES prevents its excision during gene rearrangement. Cultures of this strain frequently contain cells reverting to the wild type in the behavioral phenotype. The mutant and revertant cells maintained stable clonal phenotypes under the various environmental conditions examined unless they underwent sexual reproduction. After sexual reproduction, both mutant and revertant produced 2.7-7.1% reverted progeny. A molecular analysis performed on the macronuclear DNA of the mutant and revertant of d4-662 showed that much less than 1% of the mutant IES was precisely excised at every sexual reproduction of the strain. Therefore, the alternative phenotype of strain d4-662 seems to be caused by an alternative excision of the mutant IES. PMID:11817644

  4. Characterization and mapping of a spotted leaf mutant in rice (Oryza sativa)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xue; Zhang, Lili; Liu, Binmei; Ye, Yafeng; Wu, Yuejin

    2014-01-01

    Spotted leaf mutant belongs to a class of mutants that can produce necrotic lesions spontaneously in plants without any attack by pathogens. These mutants have no beneficial effect on plant productivity but provide a unique opportunity to study programmed cell death in plant defense responses. A novel rice spotted leaf mutant (spl30) was isolated through low-energy heavy ion irradiation. Lesion expression was sensitive to light and humidity. The spl30 mutant caused a decrease in chlorophyll and soluble protein content, with marked accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) around the lesions. In addition, the spl30 mutant significantly enhanced resistance to rice bacterial blight (X. oryzae pv. oryzae) from China (C1–C7). The use of SSR markers showed that the spl30 gene was located between markers XSN2 and XSN4. The genetic distance between the spl30 gene and XSN2 and between spl30 and XSN4 was 1.7 cM and 0.2 cM, respectively. The spl30 gene is a new gene involved in lesion production and may be related to programmed cell death in rice. The ability of this mutant to confer broad resistance to bacterial blight provides a model for studying the interaction between plants and pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25071406

  5. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2002-07-30

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during previous reporting periods completed the design, installation, shakedown and initial PRB coal testing of a 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Based on these results, modifications to the gas-fired preheat combustor and PC burner were defined, along with a modified testing plan and schedule. During the current reporting period, a revised subcontract was executed with BBP to reflect changes in the pilot testing program. Modeling activities were continued to develop and verify revised design approaches for both the Preheat gas combustor and PC burner. Reactivation of the pilot test system was begun with BBP personnel. A presentation on the project results to date was given at the NETL-sponsored 2002 Conference on SCR and SNCR for NO{sub x} Control on May 15-16, 2002 in Pittsburgh PA. The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NO{sub x} reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to make this technology ready for full-scale commercial deployment in order to meet an anticipated market demand for NO{sub x} reduction technologies resulting from the EPA's NO{sub x} SIP call.

  6. Teaching mathematics in the PC lab - the students' viewpoints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Karsten; Köhler, Anke

    2013-04-01

    The Matrix Algebra portion of the intermediate mathematics course at the Schmalkalden University Faculty of Business and Economics has been moved from a traditional classroom setting to a technology-based setting in the PC lab. A Computer Algebra System license was acquired that also allows its use on the students' own PCs. A survey was carried out to analyse the students' attitudes towards the use of technology in mathematics teaching.

  7. Implications of a J{sup PC} exotic

    SciTech Connect

    P.R. Page

    1997-09-01

    Recent experimental data from BNL on the isovector J{sup PC} = 1{sup {-+}} exotic at 1.6 GeV indicate the existence of a non-quarkonium state consistent with lattice gauge theory predictions. The authors discuss how further experiments can strengthen this conclusion. They show that the {rho}{pi}, {eta}{prime}{pi} and {eta}{pi} couplings of this state qualitatively support the hypothesis that it is a hybrid meson, although other interpretations cannot be eliminated.

  8. A PC-Based Controller for Dextrous Arms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Seraji, Homayoun; Long, Mark

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes the architecture and performance of a PC-based controller for 7-DOF dextrous manipulators. The computing platform is a 486-based personal computer equipped with a bus extender to access the robot Multibus controller, together with a single board computer as the graphical engine, and with a parallel I/O board to interface with a force-torque sensor mounted on the manipulator wrist.

  9. Falling PC Solitaire Cards: An Open-Inquiry Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Espada, Wilson J.

    2012-01-01

    Many of us have played the PC Solitaire game that comes as standard software in many computers. Although I am not a great player, occasionally I win a game or two. The game celebrates my accomplishment by pushing the cards forward, one at a time, falling gracefully in what appears to look like a parabolic path in a drag-free environment. One day,…

  10. Practical Pocket PC Application w/Biometric Security

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Julian

    2004-01-01

    I work in the Flight Software Engineering Branch, where we provide design and development of embedded real-time software applications for flight and supporting ground systems to support the NASA Aeronautics and Space Programs. In addition, this branch evaluates, develops and implements new technologies for embedded real-time systems, and maintains a laboratory for applications of embedded technology. The majority of microchips that are used in modern society have been programmed using embedded technology. These small chips can be found in microwaves, calculators, home security systems, cell phones and more. My assignment this summer entails working with an iPAQ HP 5500 Pocket PC. This top-of-the-line hand-held device is one of the first mobile PC's to introduce biometric security capabilities. Biometric security, in this case a fingerprint authentication system, is on the edge of technology as far as securing information. The benefits of fingerprint authentication are enormous. The most significant of them are that it is extremely difficult to reproduce someone else's fingerprint, and it is equally difficult to lose or forget your own fingerprint as opposed to a password or pin number. One of my goals for this summer is to integrate this technology with another Pocket PC application. The second task for the summer is to develop a simple application that provides an Astronaut EVA (Extravehicular Activity) Log Book capability. The Astronaut EVA Log Book is what an astronaut would use to report the status of field missions, crew physical health, successes, future plans, etc. My goal is to develop a user interface into which these data fields can be entered and stored. The applications that I am developing are created using eMbedded Visual C++ 4.0 with the Pocket PC 2003 Software Development Kit provided by Microsoft.

  11. Potent inhibition of HIV-1 replication by a Tat mutant.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Luke W; Sivakumaran, Haran; Major, Lee; Suhrbier, Andreas; Harrich, David

    2009-11-10

    Herein we describe a mutant of the two-exon HIV-1 Tat protein, termed Nullbasic, that potently inhibits multiple steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle. Nullbasic was created by replacing the entire arginine-rich basic domain of wild type Tat with glycine/alanine residues. Like similarly mutated one-exon Tat mutants, Nullbasic exhibited transdominant negative effects on Tat-dependent transactivation. However, unlike previously reported mutants, we discovered that Nullbasic also strongly suppressed the expression of unspliced and singly-spliced viral mRNA, an activity likely caused by redistribution and thus functional inhibition of HIV-1 Rev. Furthermore, HIV-1 virion particles produced by cells expressing Nullbasic had severely reduced infectivity, a defect attributable to a reduced ability of the virions to undergo reverse transcription. Combination of these inhibitory effects on transactivation, Rev-dependent mRNA transport and reverse transcription meant that permissive cells constitutively expressing Nullbasic were highly resistant to a spreading infection by HIV-1. Nullbasic and its activities thus provide potential insights into the development of potent antiviral therapeutics that target multiple stages of HIV-1 infection.

  12. Genetic analysis of salt-tolerant mutants in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed Central

    Quesada, V; Ponce, M R; Micol, J L

    2000-01-01

    Stress caused by the increased salinity of irrigated fields impairs plant growth and is one of the major constraints that limits crop productivity in many important agricultural areas. As a contribution to solving such agronomic problems, we have carried out a large-scale screening for Arabidopsis thaliana mutants induced on different genetic backgrounds by EMS treatment, fast neutron bombardment, or T-DNA insertions. From the 675,500 seeds we screened, 17 mutant lines were isolated, all but one of which yielded 25-70% germination levels on 250 mm NaCl medium, a condition in which their ancestor ecotypes are unable to germinate. Monogenic recessive inheritance of NaCl-tolerant germination was displayed with incomplete penetrance by all the selected mutants, which fell into five complementation groups. These were named SALOBRENO (SAN) and mapped relative to polymorphic microsatellites, the map positions of three of them suggesting that they are novel genes. Strains carrying mutations in the SAN1-SAN4 genes display similar responses to both ionic effects and osmotic pressure, their germination being NaCl and mannitol tolerant but KCl and Na(2)SO(4) sensitive. In addition, NaCl-, KCl-, and mannitol-tolerant as well as abscisic-acid-insensitive germination was displayed by sañ5, whose genetic and molecular characterization indicates that it carries an extremely hypomorphic or null allele of the ABI4 gene, its deduced protein product lacking the APETALA2 DNA binding domain. PMID:10629000

  13. Epilepsy-induced abnormal striatal plasticity in Bassoon mutant mice.

    PubMed

    Ghiglieri, Veronica; Picconi, Barbara; Sgobio, Carmelo; Bagetta, Vincenza; Barone, Ilaria; Paillè, Vincent; Di Filippo, Massimiliano; Polli, Federica; Gardoni, Fabrizio; Altrock, Wilko; Gundelfinger, Eckart D; De Sarro, Giovambattista; Bernardi, Giorgio; Ammassari-Teule, Martine; Di Luca, Monica; Calabresi, Paolo

    2009-05-01

    Recently, the striatum has been implicated in the spread of epileptic seizures. As the absence of functional scaffolding protein Bassoon in mutant mice is associated with the development of pronounced spontaneous seizures, we utilized this new genetic model of epilepsy to investigate seizure-induced changes in striatal synaptic plasticity. Mutant mice showed reduced long-term potentiation in striatal spiny neurons, associated with an altered N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor subunit distribution, whereas GABAergic fast-spiking (FS) interneurons showed NMDA-dependent short-term potentiation that was absent in wild-type animals. Alterations in the dendritic morphology of spiny neurons and in the number of FS interneurons were also observed. Early antiepileptic treatment with valproic acid reduced epileptic attacks and mortality, rescuing physiological striatal synaptic plasticity and NMDA receptor subunit composition. However, morphological alterations were not affected by antiepileptic treatment. Our results indicate that, in Bsn mutant mice, initial morphological alterations seem to reflect a more direct effect of the abnormal genotype, whereas plasticity changes are likely to be caused by the occurrence of repeated cortical seizures.

  14. Fatty acid regulates gene expression and growth of human prostate cancer PC-3 cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Chen, Y.; Tjandrawinata, R. R.

    2001-01-01

    It has been proposed that the omega-6 fatty acids increase the rate of tumor growth. Here we test that hypothesis in the PC-3 human prostate tumor. We found that the essential fatty acids, linoleic acid (LA) and arachidonic acid (AA), and the AA metabolite PGE(2) stimulate tumor growth while oleic acid (OA) and the omega-3 fatty acid, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) inhibited growth. In examining the role of AA in growth response, we extended our studies to analyze changes in early gene expression induced by AA. We demonstrate that c-fos expression is increased within minutes of addition in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, the immediate early gene cox-2 is also increased in the presence of AA in a dose-dependent manner, while the constitutive cox-1 message was not increased. Three hours after exposure to AA, the synthesis of PGE(2) via COX-2 was also increased. Previous studies have demonstrated that AA was primarily delivered by low density lipoprotein (LDL) via its receptor (LDLr). Since it is known that hepatomas, acute myelogenous leukemia and colorectal tumors lack normal cholesterol feedback, we examined the role of the LDLr in growth regulation of the PC-3 prostate cancer cells. Analysis of ldlr mRNA expression and LDLr function demonstrated that human PC-3 prostate cancer cells lack normal feedback regulation. While exogenous LDL caused a significant stimulation of cell growth and PGE(2) synthesis, no change was seen in regulation of the LDLr by LDL. Taken together, these data show that normal cholesterol feedback of ldlr message and protein is lost in prostate cancer. These data suggest that unregulated over-expression of LDLr in tumor cells would permit increased availability of AA, which induces immediate early genes c-fos and cox-2 within minutes of uptake.

  15. PC/AT-based architecture for shared telerobotic control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schinstock, Dale E.; Faddis, Terry N.; Barr, Bill G.

    1993-03-01

    A telerobotic control system must include teleoperational, shared, and autonomous modes of control in order to provide a robot platform for incorporating the rapid advances that are occurring in telerobotics and associated technologies. These modes along with the ability to modify the control algorithms are especially beneficial for telerobotic control systems used for research purposes. The paper describes an application of the PC/AT platform to the control system of a telerobotic test cell. The paper provides a discussion of the suitability of the PC/AT as a platform for a telerobotic control system. The discussion is based on the many factors affecting the choice of a computer platform for a real time control system. The factors include I/O capabilities, simplicity, popularity, computational performance, and communication with external systems. The paper also includes a description of the actuation, measurement, and sensor hardware of both the master manipulator and the slave robot. It also includes a description of the PC-Bus interface cards. These cards were developed by the researchers in the KAT Laboratory, specifically for interfacing to the master manipulator and slave robot. Finally, a few different versions of the low level telerobotic control software are presented. This software incorporates shared control by supervisory systems and the human operator and traded control between supervisory systems and the human operator.

  16. Capsaicin induces apoptosis in PC12 cells through ER stress.

    PubMed

    Krizanova, Olga; Steliarova, Iveta; Csaderova, Lucia; Pastorek, Michal; Hudecova, Sona

    2014-02-01

    Capsaicin, the pungent agent in chili peppers, has been shown to act as a tumor-suppressor in cancer. In our previous study, capsaicin was shown to induce apoptosis in the rat pheochromocytoma cell line (PC12 cells). Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the potential mechanism by which capsaicin induces apoptosis. We treated PC12 cells with 50, 100 and 500 µM capsaicin and measured the reticular calcium content and expression of the reticular calcium transport systems. These results were correlated with endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers CHOP, ATF4 and X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1), as well as with apoptosis induction. We observed that capsaicin decreased reticular calcium in a concentration-dependent manner. Simultaneously, expression levels of the sarco/endoplasmic reticulum pump and ryanodin receptor of type 2 were modified. These changes were accompanied by increased ER stress, as documented by increased stress markers. Thus, from these results we propose that in PC12 cells capsaicin induces apoptosis through increased ER stress. PMID:24337105

  17. Hypergravity Stimulation Enhances PC12 Neuron-Like Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity is a strong physical cue able to elicit different cellular responses, representing a largely uninvestigated opportunity for tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. Our recent studies have shown that both proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells can be enhanced by hypergravity treatment; given these results, PC12 neuron-like cells were chosen to test the hypothesis that hypergravity stimulation might also affect the behavior of neuronal cells, in particular promoting an enhanced differentiated phenotype. PC12 cells were thus cultured under differentiating conditions for either 12 h or 72 h before being stimulated with different values of hypergravity (50 g and 150 g). Effects of hypergravity were evaluated at transcriptional level 1 h and 48 h after the stimulation, and at protein level 48 h from hypergravity exposure, to assess its influence on neurite development over increasing differentiation times. PC12 differentiation resulted strongly affected by the hypergravity treatments; in particular, neurite length was significantly enhanced after exposure to high acceleration values. The achieved results suggest that hypergravity might induce a faster and higher neuronal differentiation and encourage further investigations on the potential of hypergravity in the preparation of cellular constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering purposes. PMID:25785273

  18. Hypergravity stimulation enhances PC12 neuron-like cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Genchi, Giada Graziana; Cialdai, Francesca; Monici, Monica; Mazzolai, Barbara; Mattoli, Virgilio; Ciofani, Gianni

    2015-01-01

    Altered gravity is a strong physical cue able to elicit different cellular responses, representing a largely uninvestigated opportunity for tissue engineering/regenerative medicine applications. Our recent studies have shown that both proliferation and differentiation of C2C12 skeletal muscle cells can be enhanced by hypergravity treatment; given these results, PC12 neuron-like cells were chosen to test the hypothesis that hypergravity stimulation might also affect the behavior of neuronal cells, in particular promoting an enhanced differentiated phenotype. PC12 cells were thus cultured under differentiating conditions for either 12 h or 72 h before being stimulated with different values of hypergravity (50 g and 150 g). Effects of hypergravity were evaluated at transcriptional level 1 h and 48 h after the stimulation, and at protein level 48 h from hypergravity exposure, to assess its influence on neurite development over increasing differentiation times. PC12 differentiation resulted strongly affected by the hypergravity treatments; in particular, neurite length was significantly enhanced after exposure to high acceleration values. The achieved results suggest that hypergravity might induce a faster and higher neuronal differentiation and encourage further investigations on the potential of hypergravity in the preparation of cellular constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering purposes.

  19. Arabidopsis mutants with increased sensitivity to aluminum.

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, P B; Tai, C Y; Kochian, L V; Howell, S H

    1996-01-01

    Al-sensitive (als) mutants of Arabidopsis were isolated and characterized with the aim of defining mechanisms of Al toxicity and resistance. Most als mutants selected on the basis of root growth sensitivity to Al were recessive, and together the mutants constituted eight complementation groups. Also, in most als mutants, Al sensitivity appeared to be specific for Al relative to La (another trivalent cation), except als2, which was more sensitive to La than wild type. The tendency of roots on mutant seedlings to accumulate Al was examined by staining with morin and hematoxylin, dyes used to indicate the presence of Al. A significant increase in morin staining was observed in als5, consistent with its increased sensitivity to Al. Unexpectedly, als7 and als4 showed less morin staining, suggesting that the roots on these mutants accumulate less Al than wild type seedlings after exposure to Al-containing solutions. Roots of wild-type seedlings produce callose in response to AlCl3 concentrations that inhibit root growth. Only als5 accumulated more callose than wild type in response to low levels (25 mu M) of AICI3 However, als4 and als7 did not accumulate callose at this AlCl3 concentration even though root growth was significantly inhibited. The lack of callose accumulation in als4 and als7 suggests that there is not an obligatory relationship between callose deposition and Al-induced inhibition of root growth. PMID:8819866

  20. Growth-dependent DNA breakage and cell death in a gyrase mutant of Salmonella.

    PubMed Central

    Garí, E; Bossi, L; Figueroa-Bossi, N

    2001-01-01

    A class of gyrase mutants of Salmonella enterica mimics the properties of bacteria exposed to quinolones. These mutants suffer spontaneous DNA breakage during normal growth and depend on recombinational repair for viability. Unlike quinolone-treated bacteria, however, they do not show accumulation of cleavable gyrase-DNA complexes. In recA or recB mutant backgrounds, the temperature-sensitive (ts) allele gyrA208 causes rapid cell death at 43 degrees. Here, we isolated "suppressor-of-death" mutations, that is, secondary changes that allow a gyrA208 recB double mutant to survive a prolonged exposure to 43 degrees and subsequently to form colonies at 28 degrees. In most isolates, the secondary change was itself a ts mutation. Three ts alleles were mapped in genes coding for amino acyl tRNA synthetases (alaS, glnS, and lysS). Allele alaS216 completely abolished DNA breakage in a gyrA208 recA double mutant. Likewise, treating this mutant with chloramphenicol prevented death and DNA damage at 43 degrees. Additional suppressors of gyrA208 lethality include rpoB mutations and, surprisingly, icd mutations inactivating isocitrate dehydrogenase. We postulate that the primary effect of the gyrase alteration is to hamper replication fork movement. Inhibiting DNA replication under conditions of continuing macromolecular synthesis ("unbalanced growth") activates a mechanism that causes DNA breakage and cell death, reminiscent of "thymineless" lethality. PMID:11779784

  1. Uric acid accumulation in an Arabidopsis urate oxidase mutant impairs seedling establishment by blocking peroxisome maintenance.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Oliver K; Scharnberg, Jana; Escobar, Nieves Medina; Wanner, Gerhard; Giavalisco, Patrick; Witte, Claus-Peter

    2014-07-01

    Purine nucleotides can be fully catabolized by plants to recycle nutrients. We have isolated a urate oxidase (uox) mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana that accumulates uric acid in all tissues, especially in the developing embryo. The mutant displays a reduced germination rate and is unable to establish autotrophic growth due to severe inhibition of cotyledon development and nutrient mobilization from the lipid reserves in the cotyledons. The uox mutant phenotype is suppressed in a xanthine dehydrogenase (xdh) uox double mutant, demonstrating that the underlying cause is not the defective purine base catabolism, or the lack of UOX per se, but the elevated uric acid concentration in the embryo. Remarkably, xanthine accumulates to similar levels in the xdh mutant without toxicity. This is paralleled in humans, where hyperuricemia is associated with many diseases whereas xanthinuria is asymptomatic. Searching for the molecular cause of uric acid toxicity, we discovered a local defect of peroxisomes (glyoxysomes) mostly confined to the cotyledons of the mature embryos, which resulted in the accumulation of free fatty acids in dry seeds. The peroxisomal defect explains the developmental phenotypes of the uox mutant, drawing a novel link between uric acid and peroxisome function, which may be relevant beyond plants. PMID:25052714

  2. The effect of novel rhenium compounds on lymphosarcoma, PC-3 prostate and myeloid leukemia cancer cell lines and an investigation on the DNA binding properties of one of these compounds through electronic spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Parson, Carl; Smith, Valerie; Krauss, Christopher; Banerjee, Hirendra N.; Reilly, Christopher; Krause, Jeanette A.; Wachira, James M.; Giri, Dipak; Winstead, Angela; Mandal, Santosh K.

    2014-01-01

    Despite the tremendous success of cisplatin and other platinum-based anticancer drugs, severe toxicity and resistance to tumors limit their applications. It is believed that the coordination (formation of covalent bond) of the metal (platinum) to the nitrogen bases of DNA cause the ruptures of the cancer as well as normal cells. A search for anticancer drugs with different modes of action resulted in the synthesis of variety of novel compounds. Many of them are in clinical trials now. Recently we synthesized a series of novel rhenium pentylcarbonato compounds (PC1–PC6). The rhenium atom in each compound is coordinated (bonded) to a planar polypyridyl aromatic ligand, thereby forcing each compound to intercalate between the DNA bases. We have investigated the DNA binding properties of one of the PC-series of compounds (PC6) using electronic spectroscopy. The UV absorption titration of PC6 with DNA shows hypochromic effect with concomitant bathochromic shift of the charge transfer band at 290 nm. These results suggest that the compound PC6 binds to DNA through intercalation. It is therefore likely that the other PC-series of compounds will behave in a similar manner. Thus it is expected that these compounds will exhibit negligible or no side effect. We have observed that the PC-series of compounds are strong cytotoxic agents against lymphosarcoma (average GI50 ≈ 2±2.6 µM), PC-3 prostate (average GI50 ≈ 3±2.8 µM) and myeloid leukemia (average GI50 ≈ 3±2.8 µM) cancer cell lines. The average GI50 values of the PC-series of compounds are 2–3 less than the corresponding GI50 values of cisplatin. Also each of the PC-series of compounds exhibits less toxicity than cisplatin in the glomerular mesangial cells. PMID:25221731

  3. Nerve growth factor stimulates the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol in PC-12 cells: A mechanism of protein kinase C regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, B.L.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Chao, M.V. )

    1989-03-01

    Treatment of PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells with nerve growth factor (NGF) results in the differentiation of these cells into a sympathetic neuron-like phenotype. Although the initial intracellular signals elicited by NGF remain unknown, some of the cellular effects of NGF are similar to those of other growth factors, such as insulin. The authors have investigated the involvement of a newly identified inositol-containing glycolipid in signal transduction for the actions of NGF. NGF stimulates the rapid generation of a species of diacylglycerol that is labeled with ({sup 3}H)myristate but not with ({sup 3}H)arachidonate. NGF stimulates ({sup 3}H)myristate- or ({sup 32}P)phosphate-labeled phosphatidic acid production over the same time course. Although NGF alone has no effect on the turnover of inositol phospholipids, it does stimulate the hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol. The NGF-dependent cleavage of this lipid is accompanied by an increase in the accumulation of its polar head group, an inositol phosphate glycan, which is generated within 30-60 sec of NGF treatment. In an unresponsive PC-12 mutant cell line, neither the diacylglycerol nor inositol phosphate glycan response is detected. A possible role for the NGF-stimulated diacylglycerol is suggested by the inhibition of NGF-dependent c-fos induction by staurosporin, a potent inhibitor of protein kinase C. These results suggest that, like insulin, some of the cellular effects of NGF may be mediated by the phospholipase C-catalyzed hydrolysis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol.

  4. ALS-associated mutant FUS induces selective motor neuron degeneration through toxic gain of function

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Aarti; Lyashchenko, Alexander K.; Lu, Lei; Nasrabady, Sara Ebrahimi; Elmaleh, Margot; Mendelsohn, Monica; Nemes, Adriana; Tapia, Juan Carlos; Mentis, George Z.; Shneider, Neil A.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in FUS cause amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), including some of the most aggressive, juvenile-onset forms of the disease. FUS loss-of-function and toxic gain-of-function mechanisms have been proposed to explain how mutant FUS leads to motor neuron degeneration, but neither has been firmly established in the pathogenesis of ALS. Here we characterize a series of transgenic FUS mouse lines that manifest progressive, mutant-dependent motor neuron degeneration preceded by early, structural and functional abnormalities at the neuromuscular junction. A novel, conditional FUS knockout mutant reveals that postnatal elimination of FUS has no effect on motor neuron survival or function. Moreover, endogenous FUS does not contribute to the onset of the ALS phenotype induced by mutant FUS. These findings demonstrate that FUS-dependent motor degeneration is not due to loss of FUS function, but to the gain of toxic properties conferred by ALS mutations. PMID:26842965

  5. Disruption of Endocytosis with the Dynamin Mutant shibirets1 Suppresses Seizures in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, Jason R.; Wong, Karen G.; Siddiqui, Faria M.; Tanouye, Mark A.

    2015-01-01

    One challenge in modern medicine is to control epilepsies that do not respond to currently available medications. Since seizures consist of coordinated and high-frequency neural activity, our goal was to disrupt neurotransmission with a synaptic transmission mutant and evaluate its ability to suppress seizures. We found that the mutant shibire, encoding dynamin, suppresses seizure-like activity in multiple seizure–sensitive Drosophila genotypes, one of which resembles human intractable epilepsy in several aspects. Because of the requirement of dynamin in endocytosis, increased temperature in the shits1 mutant causes impairment of synaptic vesicle recycling and is associated with suppression of the seizure-like activity. Additionally, we identified the giant fiber neuron as critical in the seizure circuit and sufficient to suppress seizures. Overall, our results implicate mutant dynamin as an effective seizure suppressor, suggesting that targeting or limiting the availability of synaptic vesicles could be an effective and general method of controlling epilepsy disorders. PMID:26341658

  6. The molecular mechanism of sensitization to Fas-mediated apoptosis by 2-methoxyestradiol in PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Keiji; Nakamura, Mitsutoshi; Ishida, Eiwa; Kishi, Munehiro; Matsuyoshi, Syuchi; Konishi, Noboru

    2004-01-01

    It is widely known that death receptor Fas-dependent apoptotic signals are associated with development of prostate cancer, but the key pathways involved in sensitivity to the apoptosis remain unclear. Here we investigated the molecular mechanism by which 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) effectively sensitizes a human prostate cancer cell line, PC3, to Fas-mediated apoptosis. 2-ME significantly inhibited nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) activation and downregulated Fas-associated death domain (FADD) protein interluekin-1beta-converting enzyme inhibitory protein (FLIP). Overexpression of the dominant negative mutant form of IkappaBalpha (d/n IkappaBalpha) or treatment with Ikappa kinase-specific inhibitor Bay117082 gave the same results, although the sensitizing effect was not as pronounced. A selective inhibitor of Akt phosphorylation, LY294002, accelerated formation of the death-inducing signaling complex (DISC) not only by FLIP reduction but also by enhancement of recruitment of the FADD to Fas, thereby sensitizing PC3 cells to apoptosis similar to the case with 2-ME stimulation. Moreover, we found that inhibition of 2-ME-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the upstream kinase inhibitor PD98059 significantly enhanced 2-ME-mediated suppression of Akt activation, resulting in much greater sensitization to apoptosis. Taken together, the present findings indicate that 2-ME suppresses NF-kappaB/FLIP signaling and enhances DISC formation through inhibition of Akt, and that PC3 cells thereby are being sensitized to Fas-mediated apoptosis and by a process closely associated with ERK.

  7. Fangchinoline induced G1/S arrest by modulating expression of p27, PCNA, and cyclin D in human prostate carcinoma cancer PC3 cells and tumor xenograft.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chang-Dong; Huang, Jian-Guo; Gao, Xuan; Li, Yi; Zhou, Shi-Yi; Yan, Xu; Zou, An; Chang, Jun-Li; Wang, Yue-Sheng; Yang, Guang-Xiao; He, Guang-Yuan

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCA) is the most common invasive malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in males. The present study investigated the effects of fangchinoline (Fan), an important compound in Stephania Tetradra S. Moore (Fenfangji) with pain-relieving, blood pressure-depressing, and antibiotic activities, on human PCA. It was found that Fan inhibited human prostate cancer cell lines (PC3) cell proliferation in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Studies of cell-cycle progression showed that the anti-proliferative effect of Fan was associated with an increase in the G1/S phase of PC3 cells. Western blot results indicated that Fan-induced G1/S phase arrest was mediated through inhibition of cyclin-regulated signaling pathways. Fan induced p27 expression and inhibited cyclin D and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expression in PC3 cells. Increased exposure time to Fan caused apoptosis of PC3 cells, which was associated with up-regulation of pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and caspase 3, and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2. Furthermore, Fan had anti-tumorigenic activity in vivo, including reduction of tumor volume and pro-apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects in a PC3 nude mouse xenograft. Taking all this together, it can be concluded that Fan is an effective anti-proliferative agent that modulates cell growth regulators in prostate cancer cells. PMID:20208355

  8. An overview of the evaluation plan for PC/MISI: PC-based Multiple Information System Interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor); Lim, Bee Lee; Hall, Philip P.

    1985-01-01

    An initial evaluation plan for the personal computer multiple information system interface (PC/MISI) project is discussed. The document is intend to be used as a blueprint for the evaluation of this system. Each objective of the design project is discussed along with the evaluation parameters and methodology to be used in the evaluation of the implementation's achievement of those objectives. The potential of the system for research activities related to more general aspects of information retrieval is also discussed.

  9. Phosphorylation of Tau at Thr212, Thr231, and Ser262 Combined Causes Neurodegeneration*

    PubMed Central

    Alonso, Alejandra D.; Di Clerico, John; Li, Bin; Corbo, Christopher P.; Alaniz, Maria E.; Grundke-Iqbal, Inge; Iqbal, Khalid

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal hyperphosphorylation of the microtubule-associated protein Tau is a hallmark of Alzheimer disease and related diseases called tauopathies. As yet, the exact mechanism by which this pathology causes neurodegeneration is not understood. The present study provides direct evidence that Tau abnormal hyperphosphorylation causes its aggregation, breakdown of the microtubule network, and cell death and identifies phosphorylation sites involved in neurotoxicity. We generated pseudophosphorylated Tau proteins by mutating Ser/Thr to Glu and, as controls, to Ala. These mutations involved one, two, or three pathological phosphorylation sites by site-directed mutagenesis using as backbones the wild type or FTDP-17 mutant R406W Tau. Pseudophosphorylated and corresponding control Tau proteins were expressed transiently in PC12 and CHO cells. We found that a single phosphorylation site alone had little influence on the biological activity of Tau, except Thr212, which, upon mutation to Glu in the R406W background, induced Tau aggregation in cells, suggesting phosphorylation at this site along with a modification on the C-terminal of the protein facilitates self-assembly of Tau. The expression of R406W Tau pseudophosphorylated at Thr212, Thr231, and Ser262 triggered caspase-3 activation in as much as 85% of the transfected cells, whereas the corresponding value for wild type pseudophosphorylated Tau was 30%. Cells transfected with pseudophosphorylated Tau became TUNEL-positive. PMID:20663882

  10. Homozygous missense and nonsense mutations in BMPR1B cause acromesomelic chondrodysplasia-type Grebe.

    PubMed

    Graul-Neumann, Luitgard M; Deichsel, Alexandra; Wille, Ulrike; Kakar, Naseebullah; Koll, Randi; Bassir, Christian; Ahmad, Jamil; Cormier-Daire, Valerie; Mundlos, Stefan; Kubisch, Christian; Borck, Guntram; Klopocki, Eva; Mueller, Thomas D; Doelken, Sandra C; Seemann, Petra

    2014-06-01

    Acromesomelic chondrodysplasias (ACDs) are characterized by disproportionate shortening of the appendicular skeleton, predominantly affecting the middle (forearms and forelegs) and distal segments (hands and feet). Here, we present two consanguineous families with missense (c.157T>C, p.(C53R)) or nonsense (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) mutations in BMPR1B. Homozygous affected individuals show clinical and radiographic findings consistent with ACD-type Grebe. Functional analysis of the missense mutation C53R revealed that the mutated receptor was partially located at the cell membrane. In contrast to the wild-type receptor, C53R mutation hindered the activation of the receptor by its ligand GDF5, as shown by reporter gene assay. Further, overexpression of the C53R mutation in an in vitro chondrogenesis assay showed no effect on cell differentiation, indicating a loss of function. The nonsense mutation (c.657G>A, p.(W219*)) introduces a premature stop codon, which is predicted to be subject to nonsense-mediated mRNA decay, causing reduced protein translation of the mutant allele. A loss-of-function effect of both mutations causing recessive ACD-type Grebe is further supported by the mild brachydactyly or even non-penetrance of these mutations observed in the heterozygous parents. In contrast, dominant-negative BMPR1B mutations described previously are associated with autosomal-dominant brachydactyly-type A2. PMID:24129431

  11. Chemotactic properties of Escherichia coli mutants having abnormal Ca2+ content.

    PubMed Central

    Tisa, L S; Adler, J

    1995-01-01

    The calA, calC, and calD mutants of Escherichia coli are known to be sensitive to Ca2+ (R. N. Brey and B. P. Rosen, J. Bacteriol. 139:824-834, 1979). In the absence of any added stimuli for chemotaxis, both the calC and the calD mutants swam with a tumbly bias. Both the calC and the calD mutants were defective in chemotaxis as measured by computer analysis, use of swarm plates, and capillary assays. The calA mutant was only slightly defective in motility and only slightly impaired in chemotaxis. Chemotactically wild-type cells had an intra-cellular free-Ca2+ level of about 105 nM. The intracellular free-Ca2+ levels of the mutants, as determined by use of the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator dye fura-2 or fluo-3, were about 90, about 1,130, and about 410 nM for calA, calC, and calD, respectively. Lowering the intracellular free-Ca2+ levels in wild-type cells and in the tumbly cal mutants by use of Ca2+ chelators promoted running (smooth swimming). Overexpression of CheZ (which causes dephosphorylation of CheY-phosphate) in the wild type and in the tumbly cal mutants decreased the level of tumbliness (which is caused by CheY-phosphate). The calA mutant was 4- to 10-fold more resistant than the wild type to the inhibitory effect of omega-conotoxin on chemotaxis. omega-Conotoxin had no effect on Ca2+ extrusion by wild-type E. coli; that result suggests that omega-conotoxin affects Ca2+ transport at the point of entry instead of exit. PMID:8522517

  12. Isolation of a novel mutant gene for soil-surface rooting in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Root system architecture is an important trait affecting the uptake of nutrients and water by crops. Shallower root systems preferentially take up nutrients from the topsoil and help avoid unfavorable environments in deeper soil layers. We have found a soil-surface rooting mutant from an M2 population that was regenerated from seed calli of a japonica rice cultivar, Nipponbare. In this study, we examined the genetic and physiological characteristics of this mutant. Results The primary roots of the mutant showed no gravitropic response from the seedling stage on, whereas the gravitropic response of the shoots was normal. Segregation analyses by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the soil-surface rooting mutant and wild-type Nipponbare indicated that the trait was controlled by a single recessive gene, designated as sor1. Fine mapping by using an F2 population derived from a cross between the mutant and an indica rice cultivar, Kasalath, revealed that sor1 was located within a 136-kb region between the simple sequence repeat markers RM16254 and 2935-6 on the terminal region of the short arm of chromosome 4, where 13 putative open reading frames (ORFs) were found. We sequenced these ORFs and detected a 33-bp deletion in one of them, Os04g0101800. Transgenic plants of the mutant transformed with the genomic fragment carrying the Os04g0101800 sequence from Nipponbare showed normal gravitropic responses and no soil-surface rooting. Conclusion These results suggest that sor1, a rice mutant causing soil-surface rooting and altered root gravitropic response, is allelic to Os04g0101800, and that a 33-bp deletion in the coding region of this gene causes the mutant phenotypes. PMID:24280269

  13. Coordinated satellite and ground observations of global monochromatic Pc5 oscillations on the morning side

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motoba, T.; Takahashi, K.; Gjerloev, J. W.; Ohtani, S.

    2012-12-01

    Strong Pc5 activity on the morning side was observed by the CARISMA ground magnetometer array on 7 December 2002, for several hours under moderately high solar wind speed (~580 km/s). In this study, we focus on the 30-min time interval from 1245 to 1315 UT, when a narrow-band Pc5 oscillation (~4.0 mHz) was clearly visible near 6 MLT over a wide range of L, 4-11. During this interval, the Cluster spacecraft was crossing L shells in the MLT sector covered by the CARISMA array. On the ground the X component of the magnetic field indicated the classical field line resonance signatures, latitudinal localization in amplitude (peaking at 300 nT at the Gillam station, L=6.6) and 180-degree phase shift. The ground Pc5 propagated tailward at a low azimuthal number of 3~5, suggesting that the ground Pc5 was caused by an external source. In the magnetosphere there were toroidal oscillations, which had a constant (i.e., global) frequency of ~4.0 mHz over the L shells 3.8-6.2 covered by the Custer spacecraft. Consistent with the ground observations, the toroidal wave amplitude in space was large at Cluster 3, which was moving from L= 6.2 to L= 4.8, and small at the other three Cluster spacecraft located at L= 4.0-4.5. The toroidal magnetic and electric field components at each Cluster spacecraft were approximately 90 degrees out of phase, as expected for a standing Alfven wave. In addition, the toroidal oscillations at the Cluster were accompanied by a significant compressional component with the same frequency, and by periodic modulations in oxygen ions of 1-38 keV and energetic electrons of 30-120 keV. We discuss possible mechanisms for the excitation of the global 4 mHz oscillations and for the modulation of such particle fluxes.

  14. Protective Effects of Costunolide against Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Injury in PC12 Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheong, Chong-Un; Yeh, Ching-Sheng; Hsieh, Yi-Wen; Lee, Ying-Ray; Lin, Mei-Ying; Chen, Chung-Yi; Lee, Chien-Hsing

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress-mediated cellular injury has been considered as a major cause of neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. The scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediated by antioxidants may be a potential strategy for retarding the diseases' progression. Costunolide (CS) is a well-known sesquiterpene lactone, used as a popular herbal remedy, which possesses anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of CS against the cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide (H₂O₂) and to elucidate potential protective mechanisms in PC12 cells. The results showed that the treatment of PC12 cells with CS prior to H₂O₂ exposure effectively increased the cell viability. Furthermore, it decreased the intracellular ROS, stabilized the mitochondria membrane potential (MMP), and reduced apoptosis-related protein such as caspase 3. In addition, CS treatment attenuated the cell injury by H₂O₂ through the inhibition of phosphorylation of p38 and the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK). These results demonstrated that CS is promising as a potential therapeutic candidate for neurodegenerative diseases resulting from oxidative damage and further research on this topic should be encouraged. PMID:27409597

  15. Histone deacetylase inhibitor attenuates neurotoxicity of clioquinol in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Fukui, Takao; Asakura, Kunihiko; Hikichi, Chika; Ishikawa, Tomomasa; Murai, Rie; Hirota, Seiko; Murate, Ken-Ichiro; Kizawa, Madoko; Ueda, Akihiro; Ito, Shinji; Mutoh, Tatsuro

    2015-05-01

    Clioquinol is considered to be a causative agent of subacute myelo-optico neuropathy (SMON), although the pathogenesis of SMON is yet to be elucidated. We have previously shown that clioquinol inhibits nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced Trk autophosphorylation in PC12 cells transformed with human Trk cDNA. To explore the further mechanism of neuronal damage by clioquinol, we evaluated the acetylation status of histones in PC12 cells. Clioquinol reduced the level of histone acetylation, and the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor Trichostatin A upregulated acetylated histones and prevented the neuronal cell damage caused by clioquinol. In addition, treatment with HDAC inhibitor decreased neurite retraction and restored the inhibition of NGF-induced Trk autophosphorylation by clioquinol. Thus, clioquinol induced neuronal cell death via deacetylation of histones, and HDAC inhibitor alleviates the neurotoxicity of clioquinol. Clioquinol is now used as a potential medicine for malignancies and neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, HDAC inhibitors can be used as a candidate medicine for the prevention of its side effects on neuronal cells.

  16. Molecular weight dependent vertical composition profiles of PCDTBT:PC71BM blends for organic photovoltaics

    PubMed Central

    Kingsley, James W.; Marchisio, Pier Paolo; Yi, Hunan; Iraqi, Ahmed; Kinane, Christy J.; Langridge, Sean; Thompson, Richard L.; Cadby, Ashley J.; Pearson, Andrew J.; Lidzey, David G.; Jones, Richard A. L.; Parnell, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    We have used Soxhlet solvent purification to fractionate a broad molecular weight distribution of the polycarbazole polymer PCDTBT into three lower polydispersity molecular weight fractions. Organic photovoltaic devices were made using a blend of the fullerene acceptor PC71BM with the molecular weight fractions. An average power conversion efficiency of 5.89% (peak efficiency of 6.15%) was measured for PCDTBT blend devices with a number average molecular weight of Mn = 25.5 kDa. There was significant variation between the molecular weight fractions with low (Mn = 15.0 kDa) and high (Mn = 34.9 kDa) fractions producing devices with average efficiencies of 5.02% and 3.70% respectively. Neutron reflectivity measurements on these polymer:PC71BM blend layers showed that larger molecular weights leads to an increase in the polymer enrichment layer thickness at the anode interface, this improves efficiency up to a limiting point where the polymer solubility causes a reduction of the PCDTBT concentration in the active layer. PMID:24924096

  17. Differentiation induced by Achyrocline satureioides (Lam) infusion in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Blasina, M F; Vaamonde, L; Morquio, A; Echeverry, C; Arredondo, F; Dajas, F

    2009-09-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that flavonoid-rich plants induce beneficial health effects that are likely beyond their potent antioxidant capacity. Thus, the mechanisms by which Achyrocline satureioides (AS), a popular South American medicinal plant, protects cells and neurons in culture, are still unclear. In this sense, a recently described trophic capacity for flavonoids, similar to that evoked by growth factors, could be one of the mechanisms involved in AS cellular protection. Since this trophic activity causes differentiation of PC12 cells, the cell differentiation capacity of AS and some of its flavonoids were evaluated. PC12 cells were treated with AS infusion (10 or 20 microg/mL of total polyphenols), quercetin (Q) (12.5 or 25 microm), luteolin (L) (25 microm), Q + L (12.5 microm each one) or nerve growth factor (NGF) for 3 days. Four morphological parameters (percentage of cells with neurites longer than one cell body diameter, percentage of cells with neurites, average number of neurites per cell and percentage of fusiform cells) were explored. The AS infusion showed differentiation capacity on all parameters with similar potency when compared with NGF. Besides, AS was more potent than some of its constituent flavonoids: Q, L or their combination.

  18. Safrole-induced Ca2+ mobilization and cytotoxicity in human PC3 prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, H C; Cheng, H H; Huang, C J; Chen, W C; Chen, I S; Liu, S I; Hsu, S S; Chang, H T; Wang, J K; Lu, Y C; Chou, C T; Jan, C R

    2006-01-01

    The effect of the carcinogen safrole on intracellular Ca2+ mobilization and on viability of human PC3 prostate cancer cells was examined. Cytosolic free Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i) were measured by using fura-2 as a probe. Safrole at concentrations above 10 microM increased [Ca2+]i in a concentration-dependent manner with an EC50 value of 350 microM. The Ca2+ signal was reduced by more than half after removing extracellular Ca2+ but was unaffected by nifedipine, nicardipine, nimodipine, diltiazem, or verapamil. In Ca2+-free medium, after treatment with 650 microM safrole, 1 microM thapsigargin (an endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ pump inhibitor) failed to release Ca2+. Neither inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 nor modulation of protein kinase C activity affected safrole-induced Ca2+ release. Overnight incubation with 0.65-65 microM safrole did not affect cell viability, but incubation with 325-625 microM safrole decreased viability. Collectively, the data suggest that in PC3 cells, safrole induced a [Ca2+]i increase by causing Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum in a phospholipase C- and protein kinase C-independent fashion, and by inducing Ca2+ influx. Safrole can decrease cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner.

  19. Cytoprotective effect of chlorogenic acid against α-synuclein-related toxicity in catecholaminergic PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Teraoka, Mari; Nakaso, Kazuhiro; Kusumoto, Chiaki; Katano, Satoshi; Tajima, Naoko; Yamashita, Atsushi; Zushi, Teppei; Ito, Satoru; Matsura, Tatsuya

    2012-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease is a major neurodegenerative disease involving the selective degeneration of dopaminergic neurons and α-synuclein containing Lewy bodies formation in the substantia nigra. Although α-synuclein is a key molecule for both dopaminergic neuron death and the formation of inclusion bodies, the mechanism of α-synuclein induction of Parkinson’s disease-related pathogenesis is not understood. In the present study, we found that the interaction between dopamine and α-synuclein requires the oxidation of dopamine. Furthermore, we examined the protective effect of chlorogenic acid, a major polyphenol contained in coffee, against α-syn and dopamine-related toxicity. Chlorogenic acid inhibits several DA/α-synuclein-related phenomenon, including the oxidation of dopamine, the interaction of oxidized dopamine with α-synuclein, and the oligomerization of α-synuclein under dopamine existing conditions in vitro. Finally, we showed that the cytoprotective effect against α-synuclein-related toxicity in PC12 cells that can be controlled by the Tet-Off system. Although the induction of α-synuclein in catecholaminergic PC12 cells causes a decrease in cell viability, chlorogenic acid rescued this cytotoxicity significantly in a dose dependent manner. These results suggest that the interaction of oxidized DA with α-synuclein may be a novel therapeutic target for Parkinson’s disease, and polyphenols, including chlorogenic acid, are candidates as protective and preventive agents for Parkinson’s disease onset. PMID:22962530

  20. Characterization of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 in Multiple Organic Photovoltaic Device Architectures: Comparing against and Combining with Cl-BsubPc.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, Jeffrey S; Garner, Richard K; Dang, Jeremy D; Thibau, Emmanuel; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Bender, Timothy P

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate the first application of a unique boron subphthalocyanine (BsubPc) derivative, the oxygen bridged dimer μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, as a multifunctional material within planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. We first explored the pairing of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 with well-known electron accepting and electron donating materials to explore its basic functionality. These preliminary device structures and metrics indicated that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 is best applied as an electron donating material when used in simple bilayer structures, as it yielded comparable OPV device efficiencies to that of the more well-established and highly optimized chloro-boron subphthalocyanine (Cl-BsubPc) OPV device structures. Thereafter we established that the HOMO/LUMO energy levels of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 are well-placed to apply it as a bifunctional donor/acceptor interlayer material in both energy and charge cascade OPV device architectures. Within this context, we found that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 was particularly effective in a charge cascade device as an interlayer between Cl-BsubPc and C70. We finally found evidence of an alloying-like effect for devices with mixed electron donor layers of (Cl-BsubPc) and μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, achieved through co-deposition. The overarching conclusion is therefore that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 has the ability to improve the performance of Cl-BsubPc OPV devices and is a multifunctional material worthy of further study.

  1. Characterization of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 in Multiple Organic Photovoltaic Device Architectures: Comparing against and Combining with Cl-BsubPc.

    PubMed

    Castrucci, Jeffrey S; Garner, Richard K; Dang, Jeremy D; Thibau, Emmanuel; Lu, Zheng-Hong; Bender, Timothy P

    2016-09-21

    We demonstrate the first application of a unique boron subphthalocyanine (BsubPc) derivative, the oxygen bridged dimer μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, as a multifunctional material within planar heterojunction organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices. We first explored the pairing of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 with well-known electron accepting and electron donating materials to explore its basic functionality. These preliminary device structures and metrics indicated that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 is best applied as an electron donating material when used in simple bilayer structures, as it yielded comparable OPV device efficiencies to that of the more well-established and highly optimized chloro-boron subphthalocyanine (Cl-BsubPc) OPV device structures. Thereafter we established that the HOMO/LUMO energy levels of μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 are well-placed to apply it as a bifunctional donor/acceptor interlayer material in both energy and charge cascade OPV device architectures. Within this context, we found that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 was particularly effective in a charge cascade device as an interlayer between Cl-BsubPc and C70. We finally found evidence of an alloying-like effect for devices with mixed electron donor layers of (Cl-BsubPc) and μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2, achieved through co-deposition. The overarching conclusion is therefore that μ-oxo-(BsubPc)2 has the ability to improve the performance of Cl-BsubPc OPV devices and is a multifunctional material worthy of further study. PMID:27548372

  2. Multi-satellite study of the excitation of Pc3 and Pc4-5 ULF waves and their penetration across the plasmapause during the 2003 Halloween superstorm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasis, G.; Daglis, I. A.; Mann, I. R.; Papadimitriou, C.; Zesta, E.; Georgiou, M.; Haagmans, R.; Tsinganos, K.

    2015-10-01

    We use multi-satellite and ground-based magnetic data to investigate the concurrent characteristics of Pc3 (22-100 mHz) and Pc4-5 (1-22 mHz) ultra-low-frequency (ULF) waves on the 31 October 2003 during the Halloween magnetic superstorm. ULF waves are seen in the Earth's magnetosphere, topside ionosphere, and Earth's surface, enabling an examination of their propagation characteristics. We employ a time-frequency analysis technique and examine data from when the Cluster and CHAMP spacecraft were in good local time (LT) conjunction near the dayside noon-midnight meridian. We find clear evidence of the excitation of both Pc3 and Pc4-5 waves, but more significantly we find a clear separation in the L shell of occurrence of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 waves in the equatorial inner magnetosphere, separated by the density gradients at the plasmapause boundary layer. A key finding of the wavelet spectral analysis of data collected from the Geotail, Cluster, and CHAMP spacecraft and the CARISMA and GIMA magnetometer networks was a remarkably clear transition of the waves' frequency into dominance in a higher-frequency regime within the Pc3 range. Analysis of the local field line resonance frequency suggests that the separation of the Pc4-5 and Pc3 emissions across the plasmapause is consistent with the structure of the inhomogeneous field line resonance Alfvén continuum. The Pc4-5 waves are consistent with direct excitation by the solar wind in the plasma trough, as well as Pc3 wave absorption in the plasmasphere following excitation by upstream waves originating at the bow shock in the local noon sector. However, despite good solar wind coverage, our study was not able to unambiguously identify a clear explanation for the sharp universal time (UT) onset of the discrete frequency and large-amplitude Pc3 wave power.

  3. A novel FBN1 missense mutation (p.C102Y) associated with ectopia lentis syndrome in a Chinese family

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Yi; Wang, Wei; Zhu, Ya-Nan; Li, Jin-Yu; Yu, Yin-Hui; Lai, Kai-Ran; Yao, Ke

    2015-01-01

    AIM To characterize the disease-causing mutations in a Chinese family with ectopia lentis syndrome (ELS). METHODS Patients and their family members were given complete physical, ophthalmic, and cardiovascular examinations. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood of the pedigree members and 100 healthy controls. Mutation screening was performed in the fibrillin-1 (FBN1) gene by bi-directional sequencing of the amplified products. The mutation was analyzed using two bioinformatics methods. RESULTS A novel heterozygous c.305G>A mutation in exon 3 of FBN1 was detected. As a result of this change, a highly conserved cysteine residue was replaced by a tyrosine residue (p.C102Y). Another mutation was found in the same exon (c.303T>C), which did not change the amino acid sequence. Both mutations were discovered in each affected individual, but not in the unaffected family members, or in 100 ethnically matched controls. A bioinformatics analysis predicted that mutation p.C102Y would affect protein function. CONCLUSION In the first epidermal growth factor-like module, we identified a novel FBN1 mutation (p.C102Y), which caused ELS in the family. Our study presented a unique phenotype, including some distinct ophthalmic findings, such as hypoplasia of the iris and anisometropia. Our results expanded the mutation spectrum of FBN1 and enriched the overall knowledge of genotype-phenotype correlations due to FBN1 mutations. PMID:26558191

  4. Comparison microstructure and sliding wear properties of nickel-cobalt/CNT composite coatings by DC, PC and PRC current electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karslioglu, Ramazan; Akbulut, Hatem

    2015-10-01

    Nickel-cobalt (Ni-Co) alloys and Ni-Co/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) composite coatings were prepared under direct current (DC), pulse current (PC) and pulse reverse current (PRC) methods. The effect of different deposition currents on the surface microstructure, crystallographic structure, microhardness, and reciprocating sliding wear behavior were investigated. MWCNT co-deposition caused to modify Ni-Co surface morphology, decrease in grain size, and increase in surface roughness, since MWCNTs effected the deposition mechanisms of Ni-Co alloy. The nanocomposite coatings deposited using PC and PRC deposition exhibited significant improvement in microhardness and wear resistance due to unique enhanced reinforcement of MWCNTs in Ni-Co coatings. Reciprocating sliding wear tests evidenced that co-deposition of MWCNTs provided effective load bearing ability and self-lubrication between the friction surfaces. However, the friction coefficient increases for all the nanocomposites produced with DC, PC and PRC methods showed to be increased. In the Ni-Co alloy coatings, the predominant wear mechanisms was delamination caused by fatigue micro cracking whereas in the MWCNT co-deposited composites wear mechanism showed abrasive grooves and plastic deformation due to decreased real contact area.

  5. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  6. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive... relative changes in a hemodynamically stable patient's cutaneous carbon dioxide tension as an adjunct...

  7. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. 868... dioxide (PcCO 2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive... relative changes in a hemodynamically stable patient's cutaneous carbon dioxide tension as an adjunct...

  8. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  9. 21 CFR 868.2480 - Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. 868.2480... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2480 Cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor. (a) Identification. A cutaneous carbon dioxide (PcCO2) monitor is a noninvasive...

  10. The USL NASA PC R and D project: General specifications of objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dominick, Wayne D. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    Given here are the general specifications of the objectives of the University of Southwestern Louisiana Data Base Management System (USL/DBMS) NASA PC R and D Project, a project initiated to address future R and D issues related to PC-based processing environments acquired pursuant to the NASA contract work; namely, the IBM PC/XT systems.

  11. Differential inhibitory effects of 2-azafluorenones on PI-PLC activation but not on PC-PLC- or PC-PLD-activation induced by histamine, PAF, PMA or A23187 in C6 glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Long; Wang, Li-Chuan; Wei, Jiann-Wu

    2013-02-28

    In this study, C6 glioma cells were used to test the effects of 2-azafluorenone and its related compounds on membrane phosphatidylinositol (PI) and phosphatidylcholine (PC) turnover. An increase of [³H]-labeled inositol phosphate (IP1) formation by histamine (100 μM) or A23187 (100 nM) via the activation of phosphatidylinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) to breakdown labeled substrate was observed, and this effect could be partially blocked by about half at 100 μM of 2-azafluorenones. Histamine induced the increase of IP1 formation, but failed to cause an increase in extracellularly releasing of [3H]choline metabolites, or intracellular accumulation of [³H]phosphscholine. However, platelet activation factor (PAF) from 0.2 to 1 μM, and phorbol 12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) at 1 μM caused an increase in extracellularly releasing of [³H]choline metabolites, and intracellular accumulation of [³H]phosphocholine via the activation on phosphatidylcholine (PC)-PLC. These responses of PAF and PMA were not affected by 2-azafluorenone or 4-methyl-2-azafluorenone even at high concentration (10⁻⁴ M). A23187 induced an increase of intracellular [³H]choline release via the activation of PCphospholipase D (PLD). This increasing effect of 100 nM A23187 was not affected by 2-azafluorenone or 4-methyl-2-azafluorenone even at a high concentration of 10⁻⁴ M. In summary, the inhibitory effect of 2-azafluorenone and its related compound 4-methyl-2-azafluorenone was observed selectively on PIPLC, but not on PC-PLC or PC-PLD based on changes of products after the activation of these enzymes.

  12. Triptolide Inhibited Cytotoxicity of Differentiated PC12 Cells Induced by Amyloid-Beta25–35 via the Autophagy Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Pengjuan; Li, Zhigui; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Xiaochen; Yang, Zhuo

    2015-01-01

    Evidence shows that an abnormal deposition of amyloid beta-peptide25–35 (Aβ25–35) was the primary cause of the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). And the elimination of Aβ25–35 is considered an important target for the treatment of AD. Triptolide (TP), isolated from Tripterygium wilfordii Hook.f. (TWHF), has been shown to possess a broad spectrum of biological profiles, including neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects. In our study investigating the effect and potential mechanism of triptolide on cytotoxicity of differentiated rat pheochromocytoma cell line (the PC12 cell line is often used as a neuronal developmental model) induced by Amyloid-Beta25–35 (Aβ25–35), we used 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5- diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, flow cytometry, Western blot, and acridine orange staining to detect whether triptolide could inhibit Aβ25–35–induced cell apoptosis. We focused on the potential role of the autophagy pathway in Aβ25–35-treated differentiated PC12 cells. Our experiments show that cell viability is significantly decreased, and the apoptosis increased in Aβ25–35-treated differentiated PC12 cells. Meanwhile, Aβ25–35 treatment increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein light chain 3 II (LC3 II), which indicates an activation of autophagy. However, triptolide could protect differentiated PC12 cells against Aβ25–35-induced cytotoxicity and attenuate Aβ25–35-induced differentiated PC12 cell apoptosis. Triptolide could also suppress the level of autophagy. In order to assess the effect of autophagy on the protective effects of triptolide in differentiated PC12 cells treated with Aβ25–35, we used 3-Methyladenine (3-MA, an autophagy inhibitor) and rapamycin (an autophagy activator). MTT assay showed that 3-MA elevated cell viability compared with the Aβ25–35-treated group and rapamycin inhibits the protection of triptolide. These results suggest that triptolide will repair the

  13. Phanerochaete mutants with enhanced ligninolytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Kakar, S.N.; Perez, A.; Gonzales, J.

    1993-06-01

    In addition to lignin, the white rot fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium has the ability to degrade a wide spectrum of recalcitrant organopollutants in soils and aqueous media. Although some of the organic compounds are degraded under nonligninolytic conditions, most are degraded under ligninolytic conditions with the involvement of the extracellular enzymes, lignin peroxidases, and manganese-dependent peroxidases, which are produced as secondary metabolites triggered by conditions of nutrient starvation (e.g., nitrogen limitation). The fungus and its enzymes can thus provide alternative technologies for bioremediation, biopulping, biobleaching, and other industrial applications. The efficiency and effectiveness of the fungus can be enhanced by increasing production and secretion of the important enzymes in large quantities and as primary metabolites under enriched conditions. One way this can be achieved is through isolation of mutants that are deregulated or are hyperproducers or supersecretors of key enzymes under enriched conditions. Through ultraviolet-light and gamma-rays mutagenesis we have isolated a variety of mutants, some of which produce key enzymes of the ligninolytic system under high-nitrogen growth conditions. One of the mutants produced 272 units (U) of lignin peroxidases enzyme activity per liter after nine days under high nitrogen. The mutant and the parent strains produced up to 54 U/L and 62 U/L, respectively, of the enzyme activity under low-nitrogen growth conditions during this period. In some experiments the mutant showed 281 U/L of enzyme activity under high nitrogen after 17 days.

  14. Accelerated bang recovery in Drosophila genderblind mutants.

    PubMed

    Featherstone, David E; Yanoga, Fatoumata; Grosjean, Yael

    2008-07-01

    Cystine-glutamate transporters import cystine into cells for glutathione synthesis and protection from oxidative stress, but also export significant amounts of glutamate. Increasing evidence suggests that 'ambient extracellular glutamate' secreted by cystine-glutamate transporters in the nervous system modulates glutamatergic synapse strength and behavior. To date, the only cystine-glutamate transporter mutants examined behaviorally are Drosophila genderblind mutants. These animals contain loss-of-function mutations in the 'genderblind' gene, which encodes an xCT subunit essential for cystine-glutamate transporter function. Genderblind was named based on a mutant courtship phenotype: male genderblind mutants are attracted to normally aversive male pheromones and thus court and attempt to copulate with both male and female partners equally. However, genderblind protein is expressed in many parts of the fly brain and thus might be expected to also regulate other behaviors, including behaviors not related to male courtship or chemosensation. Here, we show that genderblind mutants display faster recovery and increased negative geotaxis after strong mechanical stimuli (e.g., they climb faster and farther after vial banging). This phenotype is displayed by both males and females, consistent with strong genderblind expression in both sexes. PMID:19430543

  15. Regulation of chloroplast biogenesis: the immutans mutant of Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    Rodermel, Steven

    2015-11-16

    The immutans (im) variegation mutant of Arabidopsis is an ideal model to gain insight into factors that control chloroplast biogenesis. im defines the gene for PTOX, a plastoquinol terminal oxidase that participates in control of thylakoid redox. Here, we report that the im defect can be suppressed during the late stages of plant development by gigantea (gi2), which defines the gene for GIGANTEA (GI), a central component of the circadian clock that plays a poorly-understood role in diverse plant developmental processes. imgi2 mutants are late-flowering and display other well-known phenotypes associated with gi2, such as starch accumulation and resistance to oxidative stress. We show that the restoration of chloroplast biogenesis in imgi2 is caused by a developmental-specific de-repression of cytokinin signaling that involves crosstalk with signaling pathways mediated by gibberellin (GA) and SPINDLY (SPY), a GA response inhibitor. Suppression of the plastid defect in imgi2 is likely caused by a relaxation of excitation pressures in developing plastids by factors contributed by gi2, including enhanced rates of photosynthesis and increased resistance to oxidative stress. Interestingly, the suppression phenotype of imgi can be mimicked by crossing im with the starch accumulation mutant, sex1, perhaps because sex1 utilizes pathways similar to gi. We conclude that our studies provide a direct genetic linkage between GIGANTEA and chloroplast biogenesis, and we construct a model of interactions between signaling pathways mediated by gi, GA, SPY, cytokinins, and sex1 that are required for chloroplast biogenesis.

  16. [Role of RNA-polymerase in gene activity regulation of E. coli RNA-polymerase mutants with a pleiotropic effect. I. Physiological and biochemical studies].

    PubMed

    Kamzolova, S G; Arutiunian, A V; Ozolin', O N; Oganesian, M G

    1979-01-01

    Four Rifr-mutants of E. coli B/r (rpo B401, rpo B402, rpo B403, rpo B409) which differ from the wild strain in one or more phenotypic properties besides rifampicin resistance were obtained. Transfer of the mutant Rifr-alleles into the parent strain gives the latter all the properties of the mutant. This indicates that the new properties are due to the pleiotropic effect of Rifr-mutations. Biochemical studies of the properties of RNA-polymerases from the mutants and the parent showed that some new properties of the mutants could not be explained by the appearance of analogous properties in the mutant RNA-polymerase itself. They seem to be caused by alteration in functional activity of the mutant enzyme, particulary, alteration of its control properties during transcription. The function of the beta-subunit in genetic transcription is discussed.

  17. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, G.

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh

  18. Hydralazine rescues PC12 cells from acrolein-mediated death.

    PubMed

    Liu-Snyder, Peishan; Borgens, Richard Ben; Shi, Riyi

    2006-07-01

    Acrolein, a major lipid peroxidation product, has been associated with both CNS trauma and neurodegenerative diseases. Because of its long half-life, acrolein is a potent endogenous toxin capable of killing healthy cells during the secondary injury process. Traditionally, attempts to intervene in the process of progressive cell death after the primary injury have included scavenging reactive oxygen species (so-called free radicals). The animal data supporting such an approach have generally been positive, but all human clinical trials attempting a similar outcome in human CNS injury have failed. New drugs that might reduce toxicity by scavenging the products of lipid peroxidation present a promising, and little investigated, therapeutic approach. Hydralazine, a well-known treatment for hypertension, has been reported to react with acrolein, forming hydrazone in cell-free systems. In the companion paper, we have established an acrolein-mediated cell injury model using PC12 cells in vitro. Here we test the hypothesis that the formation of hydrazone adducts with acrolein is able to reduce acrolein toxicity and spare a significant percentage of the population of PC12 cells from death. Concentrations of approximately 1 mM of this aldehyde scavenger can rescue over 80% of the population of PC12 cells. This study provides a basis for a new pharmacological treatment to reduce the effects of secondary injury in the damaged and/or diseased nervous system. In particular, we describe the need for new drugs that possess aldehyde scavenging properties but do not interfere with the regulation of blood pressure.

  19. Ionospheric signatures of cusp latitude Pc 3 pulsations

    SciTech Connect

    Engebretson, M.J.; Anderson, B.J. ); Cahill, L.J. Jr. ); Arnoldy, R.L. ); Rosenberg, T.J. ); Carpenter, D.L. ); Gail, W.B. ); Eather, R.H. )

    1990-03-01

    The authors have compared search coil magnetometer, riometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver data obtained at South Pole Station and McMurdo, Antarctica, during selected days in March and April 1986. Narrow-band magnetic pulsations in the Pc 3 period range are observed simultaneously at both stations in the dayside sector during times of low interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) cone angle, but are considerably stronger at South Pole, which is located at a latitude near the nominal foot point of the daysie cusp/cleft region. Pulsations in auroral light a 427.8 nm wavelength are often observed with magnetic pulsations at South Pole, but such optical pulsations are not observed at McMurdo. When Pc 3 pulsations are present, they exhibit nearly identical frequencies, proportional to the magnitude of the IMF, in magnetometer, photometer, and ELF-VLF receiver signals at South Pole Station and in magnetometer signals at McMurdo. Singals from the 30-MHz riometer at South Pole are modulated in concert with the magnetic and optical variations during periods of broadband pulsation activity, but no riometer variations are noted during periods of narrow-band activity. Because riometers are sensitive to electrons of auroral energies (several keV and above), while the 427.8-nm photometer is sensitive to precipitation with much lower energies, they interpret these observatons as showing that precipitating magnetosheathlike electrons (with energies {le} 1 keV) at nominal dayside cleft latitudes are at times modulated with frequencies similar to those of upstream waves. They suggest that these particles may play an important role, via modification of ionospheric currents and conductivities, in the transmission of upstream wave signals into the magnetosphere and in the generation of dayside high-latitude Pc 3 pulsations.

  20. FLUID- THERMODYNAMIC AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF FLUIDS (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fessler, T. E.

    1994-01-01

    The accurate computation of the thermodynamic and transport properties of fluids is a necessity for many engineering calculations. The FLUID program was developed to calculate the thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids in both the liquid and gas phases. Fluid properties are calculated using a simple gas model, empirical corrections, and an efficient numerical interpolation scheme. FLUID produces results that are in very good agreement with measured values, while being much faster than older more complex programs developed for the same purpose. A Van der Waals equation of state model is used to obtain approximate state values. These values are corrected for real-gas effects by model correction factors obtained from tables based on experimental data. These tables also accurately compensate for the special circumstances which arise whenever phase conditions occur. Viscosity and thermal conductivity values are computed directly from tables. Interpolation within tables is based on Lagrange's three point formula. A set of tables must be generated for each fluid implemented. FLUID currently contains tables for nine fluids including dry air and steam. The user can add tables for any fluid for which adequate thermal property data is available. The FLUID routine is structured so that it may easily be incorporated into engineering programs. The IBM 360 version of FLUID was developed in 1977. It is written in FORTRAN IV and has been implemented on an IBM 360 with a central memory requirement of approximately 222K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID is written in Microsoft FORTRAN 77 and has been implemented on an IBM PC with a memory requirement of 128K of 8 bit bytes. The IBM PC version of FLUID was developed in 1986.

  1. A PC-controlled voltage pulse generator for electroanalytical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heredia-López, Francisco J.; Góngora-Alfaro, José L.; Alvarez-Cervera, Fernando J.; Bata-García, José Luis

    1997-04-01

    We present the design of a voltage pulse generator controlled by an IBM or compatible AT Personal Computer (PC) capable of synthesizing some of the voltage pulse wave forms commonly used in electrochemical studies. The included signals are: differential pulse voltametry, differential normal pulse voltametry, and differential pulse amperometry. Additionally, a triangular wave form and a constant-voltage signal, used in the pretreatment of carbon fiber microelectrodes for neurochemical analysis, are also available. Operating the generator imposes a minimum of restrictions on the specification of the duration, amplitude, and type of wave shapes. Low-cost PC-based design allows for compatibility, portability, and versatility. The operating ranges of the wave form parameters for the three voltametric signals are: initial voltage, -0.9-+0.9 V; step amplitude, 0.1-900 mV; period, 6 ms-60 s; measuring pulse amplitude, 0.1-900 mV; measuring pulse duration, 2 ms-20 s; prepulse duration, 2 ms-20 s. In the electrode pretreatment mode, the operating ranges are: amplitude, 0-±5 V; duration, unlimited; frequency, 15-240 Hz. The generator uses its own time base for the generation of all signals, thereby rendering it independent of processor clock speed or power-line frequency. The results of the experimental evaluation indicate that the system is accurate within ±10% of the expected values, taking into account the errors associated with the signal synthesis and the digitizing process. The maximum achievable scan rate is 500 V/s, and the highest frequency for the triangular wave form is 240 Hz. Therefore, the pulse generator could be used for fast cyclic voltametry (FCV). FCV and other wave forms could be added through software modules, without any hardware changes. We conclude that the PC-based electrochemistry pulse generator represents an economical and flexible alternative for electroanalytical applications.

  2. METHANE DE-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser; Bruce Bryan; Serguei Nester; Stan Wohadlo

    2001-10-30

    The project seeks to develop and validate a new pulverized coal combustion system to reduce utility PC boiler NO{sub x} emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less without post-combustion flue gas cleaning. Work during the quarter included completion of the equipment fabrication and installation efforts for the 3-million Btu/h pilot system at BBP's Pilot-Scale Combustion Facility (PSCF) in Worcester, MA. Final selection of the first two test coals and preliminary selection of the final two test coals were also completed.

  3. METHANE de-NOX FOR UTILITY PC BOILERS

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Rabovitser

    2001-01-30

    The overall project objective is the development and validation of an innovative combustion system, based on a novel coal preheating concept prior to combustion, that can reduce NOx emissions to 0.15 lb/million Btu or less on utility pulverized coal (PC) boilers. This NOx reduction should be achieved without loss of boiler efficiency or operating stability, and at more than 25% lower levelized cost than state-of-the-art SCR technology. A further objective is to make this technology ready for full-scale commercial deployment by 2002-2003 in order to meet an anticipated market demand for NOx reduction technologies resulting from the EPA's NOx SIP call.

  4. PC analysis of an acousto-ultrasonic signal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiernan, M. T.; Duke, J. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    An introduction is given to PC software developed to analyze a digitized signal. The specific way in which the software was implemented and the relative ease with which the same software can be implemented in different systems for various applications are discussed. The basic equations and related theory used in the software are furnished. Specifically, mention is made of signal digitization, dc biasing, Fourier analysis, moment analysis, digital filtering, and transfer functions. Examples of calculations are given to indicate the physical significance of variables calculated from the frequency domain via moment equations.

  5. A PC-based titrator for flow gradient titrations

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrmann, B.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes a PC (personal computer) based titrator which was developed for gradient flow titrations. Concentration gradients were generated electrolytically or volumetrically in small tubes. Complete titration curves can be recorded on-line and evaluated automatically. The titrator can be used with all liquid flow detectors with low axial dispersion. The titrator was evaluated for the titration of thiosulphate with electrogenerated triiodide and for the titration of ammonia with electrogenerated hypobromite after continuous gas dialytic separation of ammonia from the sample solution. PMID:18924977

  6. Enhanced cellulase production in mutants of Thermomonospora

    SciTech Connect

    Fennington, G.; Lupo, D.; Stutzenberger, F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermomonospora curvata, a thermophilic actinomycete, secretes multiple forms of endo-beta, 1-4-glucanase (EG) when grown on cellulose-mineral salts liquid medium. The EG activity (measured as carboxymethyl cellulose hydrolysis) was separated by ion exchange chromatography into three distinct components which differed in their kinetic properties. Exposure of T. curvata to ultraviolet light, N-nitrosoguanidine, or ethane methyl sulfonate produced mutants with enhanced EG production. Selection of colonies which cleared cellulose agar plants containing 2-deoxyglucose or glycerol yielded mutants having 1.5 to 2.6 times the extracellular EG and saccharifying activity (measured by filter-paper and cotton-fiber hydrolysis). The secretion of extracellular protein was increased proportionally in mutant cultures. (Refs. 40).

  7. [Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53].

    PubMed

    Tongyang, Liu; Haiqiang, Guo; Meiyan, Zhu; Yingze, Huang; Shuting, Jia; Ying, Luo; Jihong, Zhang

    2015-04-01

    Targeted therapy has become a powerful approach for cancer treatment. Better understanding of oncogenes as well as synthetic lethal interactions with oncogenes will lead to new strategies for tumor-specific treatment. It is well known that mutant p53 plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Thus, understanding the synthetic lethal relationship between p53 mutations and interacting genes in tumor is critical for the personalized treatments of p53 mutant tumors. Synthetic lethal genes to mutant p53 can be divided into cell cycle regulators and non-cell cycle regulators. This paper review show these two types of target genes contribute to synthetic lethal interactions with p53 mutations and potential applications of these interactions in anticancer therapy.

  8. Structure of mutant human oncogene protein determined

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, R.

    1989-01-16

    The protein encoded by a mutant human oncogene differs only slightly in structure from the native protein that initiates normal cell division, a finding that may complicate efforts to develop inhibitors of the mutant protein. Previously, the x-ray structure of the protein encoded by the normal c-Ha-ras gene, a protein believed to signal cells to start or stop dividing through its interaction with guanosine triphosphate (GTP), was reported. The structure of the protein encoded by a transforming c-Ha-ras oncogene, in which a valine codon replaces the normal glycine codon at position 12 in the gene, has now been determined. The differences in the structures of the mutant and normal proteins are located primarily in a loop that interacts with the /beta/-phosphate of a bound guanosine diphosphate (GDP) molecule.

  9. Stargazer (stg), new deafness mutant in the Zucker rat.

    PubMed

    Truett, G E; Brock, J W; Lidl, G M; Kloster, C A

    1994-12-01

    We describe a new deafness mutant found in the Zucker rat. The mutant phenotype appears to be caused by an autosomal recessive gene, tentatively named stargazer, gene symbol stg. The phenotype is characterized by stargazing, head tossing, drawing back, circling, and hyperactivity, all of which are apparent by the third week of life. Although the affected animals sire or bear normal-sized litters, mortality is high for litters of affected dams, apparently due to trampling or neglect by the hyperactive dams. Affected animals are unable to swim and, when lifted by the tail, they are likely to curl ventrally, rather than extending their paws downward. These behaviors are consistent with a disorder of the vestibular system. Auditory evoked potential recordings were attempted as a hearing test. The failure of audible clicks up to 90 decibels to stimulate the auditory tract indicates that stargazers are profoundly deaf. These disruptions of vestibular and auditory systems suggest that the stargazer phenotype may be caused by disordered development of the inner ear. Histologic examination of the inner ear revealed progressive degeneration of cells in the acoustic ganglion and of hair cells. The stargazer rat may be useful as a model for hereditary deafness or hyperactivity. PMID:7898033

  10. TOMATOMA: A Novel Tomato Mutant Database Distributing Micro-Tom Mutant Collections

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Takeshi; Ariizumi, Tohru; Okabe, Yoshihiro; Asamizu, Erika; Hiwasa-Tanase, Kyoko; Fukuda, Naoya; Mizoguchi, Tsuyoshi; Yamazaki, Yukiko; Aoki, Koh; Ezura, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    The tomato is an excellent model for studies of plants bearing berry-type fruits and for experimental studies of the Solanaceae family of plants due to its conserved genetic organization. In this study, a comprehensive mutant tomato population was generated in the background of Micro-Tom, a dwarf, rapid-growth variety. In this and previous studies, a family including 8,598 and 6,422 M2 mutagenized lines was produced by ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) mutagenesis and γ-ray irradiation, and this study developed and investigated these M2 plants for alteration of visible phenotypes. A total of 9,183 independent M2 families comprising 91,830 M2 plants were inspected for phenotypic alteration, and 1,048 individual mutants were isolated. Subsequently, the observed mutant phenotypes were classified into 15 major categories and 48 subcategories. Overall, 1,819 phenotypic categories were found in 1,048 mutants. Of these mutants, 549 were pleiotropic, whereas 499 were non-pleiotropic. Multiple different mutant alleles per locus were found in the mutant libraries, suggesting that the mutagenized populations were nearly saturated. Additionally, genetic analysis of backcrosses indicated the successful inheritance of the mutations in BC1F2 populations, confirming the reproducibility in the morphological phenotyping of the M2 plants. To integrate and manage the visible phenotypes of mutants and other associated data, we developed the in silico database TOMATOMA, a relational system interfacing modules between mutant line names and phenotypic categories. TOMATOMA is a freely accessible database, and these mutant recourses are available through the TOMATOMA (http://tomatoma.nbrp.jp/index.jsp). PMID:21258066

  11. Trifluoperazine binding to mutant calmodulins.

    PubMed

    Massom, L R; Lukas, T J; Persechini, A; Kretsinger, R H; Watterson, D M; Jarrett, H W

    1991-01-22

    Trifluoperazine (TFP) binding by 14 calmodulins, including 12 produced by site-directed mutagenesis, was determined. While vertebrate calmodulin binds 4.2 +/- 0.2 equiv of TFP, Escherichia coli expressed but unmutated calmodulins bind about 5.0 +/- 0.5 equiv of TFP. The cause for this difference is not known. The E. coli expressed proteins consist of two different series expressed from different calmodulin genes, CaMI and SYNCAM. The wild-type genes code for proteins that differ by nine conservative amino acid substitutions. Both these calmodulins bind 5 equiv of TFP with similar affinities, thus none of these conservative substitutions has any additional effect on TFP binding. Some altered calmodulins (deletion of EE83-84 or SEEE81-84, changing DEE118-120----KKK, M124----I,E120----K, or E82----K) have no appreciable effect on TFP binding. Other mutations affect either the binding of one TFP (deletion of E84) or about two TFP (changing E84----K, EEE82-84----KKK, E67----A, DEQ6-8----KKK, or E11----K). The mutations that affect TFP binding are localized to three regions of calmodulin: The amino-terminal alpha-helix, the central helix between the two globular ends of calmodulin, and a calcium-binding site in the second calcium-binding domain. The results are consistent with each of these regions either directly participating in drug binding or involved structurally in maintaining or inducing the correct conformation for TFP binding in the amino-terminal half of calmodulin.

  12. Behavioral characterization of system xc- mutant mice.

    PubMed

    McCullagh, Elizabeth A; Featherstone, David E

    2014-05-15

    The slc7a11 gene encodes xCT, an essential component of 'system xc-', a plasma membrane exchanger that imports cyst