Science.gov

Sample records for pcp based simulacao

  1. PCP

    MedlinePlus

    ... swallowed. In some cases, PCP users snort the drug or mix it with a liquid and inject it with a syringe. Short-Term Effects PCP acts on the neurotransmitters dopamine and glutamate in the brain. It affects the user's memory, ability to process ...

  2. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a drug that is usually inhaled in an aerosol form to prevent PCP. Pentamidine is also used ... between $120 and $250 per month. Patients using aerosol pentamidine get PCP more often than people taking ...

  3. PCP (phencyclidine): an update.

    PubMed

    Garey, R E

    1979-01-01

    The steady rise in the promiscuous use of phencyclidine (PCP) as a "recreational" drug has recently gained nationwide attention because of the numerous violent and/or bizarre incidents caused by the use of this drug. Because the media often exaggerate reports of bizarre and violent behavior to make a "good" story, the potential PCP user may be tempted to ignore the media warnings. In the case of PCP, however exaggerated the story, a real danger does exist. So, despite numerous newspaper, radio and television warnings about the possible consequences of PCP use and abuse, the incidence of toxic reactions continues to climb. In many cases PCP is sold as other drugs, particularly THC, and in various colored capsules, tablets, liquids and crystals which may explain the increased usage despite the numerous warnings against its use. The advances in laboratory techniques and chemical processess have enabled the clandestine chemist to prepare relatively pure PCP and thus eliminate many of the toxic side effects due to impurities in the drug. In addition, 30 or more psychoactive PCP analogues have been developed and are starting to make an appearance on the street. PCP is perhaps the most potent psychotomimetic compound known at the present time and is capable of inducing a psychosis which is clinically indistinguishable from schizophrenia. The psychosis-producing effects of PCP are the most common toxic effects seen in hospital emergency rooms; but as the amount of PCP taken and/or the simultaneous involvement of other drugs, particularly barbiturates, occurs, severe medical problems (e.g., coma, seizures, respiratory arrest) begin to appear. Death from high doses of PCP or PCP plus other drugs does occur, but the principal cause of death from PCP abuse is due to trauma, homicide or suicide (usually of the bizarre or violent form). Young adult males, persons predisposed to mental illness and naive drug users appear to be the most susceptible to the adverse effects of PCP

  4. PCP-induced alterations in cerebral glucose utilization in rat brain: blockade by metaphit, a PCP-receptor-acylating agent

    SciTech Connect

    Tamminga, C.A.; Tanimoto, K.; Kuo, S.; Chase, T.N.; Contreras, P.C.; Rice, K.C.; Jackson, A.E.; O'Donohue, T.L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on regional cerebral glucose utilization was determined by using quantitative autoradiography with (/sup 14/C)-2-deoxyglucose. PCP increased brain metabolism in selected areas of cortex, particularly limbic, and in the basal ganglia and thalamus, whereas the drug decreased metabolism in areas related to audition. These results are consistent with the known physiology of central PCP neurons and may help to suggest brain areas involved in PCP-mediated actions. Moreover, based on the behavioral similarities between PCP psychosis and an acute schizophrenic episode, these data may be relevant to the understanding of schizophrenia. The PCP-receptor-acylating agent, metaphit, blocked most of these PCP actions. In addition, metaphit by itself was found to diminish glucose utilization rather uniformly throughout brain. These results indicate an antagonist effect of metaphit on the PCP system and suggest a widespread action of metaphit, putatively at a PCP-related site, possibly in connection with the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor.

  5. Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) in patients receiving neoadjuvant and adjuvant anthracycline-based chemotherapy for breast cancer: incidence and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Waks, Adrienne G; Tolaney, Sara M; Galar, Alicia; Arnaout, Amal; Porter, Julie B; Marty, Francisco M; Winer, Eric P; Hammond, Sarah P; Baden, Lindsey R

    2015-11-01

    Opportunistic infection with Pneumocystis jiroveci pneumonia (PCP) has not been recognized as a significant complication of early-stage breast cancer treatment. However, we have observed an increase in PCP incidence among patients receiving chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer. Herein we identify risk factors for and calculate incidence of PCP in this population. We identified all cases of PCP at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital (DFCI/BWH) from 1/1/2000 to 12/31/2013 in patients with stage I-III breast cancer treated with an adriamycin/cyclophosphamide (AC)-containing regimen. Nineteen cases of PCP in non-metastatic breast cancer patients were identified. All patients with PCP were diagnosed after receipt of either three or four cycles of AC chemotherapy on a dose-dense schedule. Patients who developed PCP were treated with median 16.4 mg prednisone equivalents/day as nausea prophylaxis for a median 64 days. The overall incidence of PCP among 2057 patients treated with neoadjuvant or adjuvant dose-dense AC for three or more cycles was 0.6 % (95 % confidence interval 0.3-1.0 %). No PCP was diagnosed in 1001 patients treated with non-dose-dense AC. There was one death from PCP. Women receiving dose-dense AC chemotherapy for early-stage breast cancer are at risk for PCP. Administering the same chemotherapy and corticosteroid dose over an 8-week versus 12-week non-dose-dense schedule appears to have created a novel infectious vulnerability. Replacing dexamethasone with alternative anti-emetics may mitigate this risk.

  6. Treatment of PCP addiction and PCP addiction-related behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Dewey, Stephen L.; Brodie, Jonathan D.; Ashby, Jr., Charles R.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for changing addiction-related behavior of a mammal suffering from addiction to phencyclidine (PCP). The method includes administering to the mammal an effective amount of gamma vinylGABA (GVG) or a pharmaceutically acceptable salt thereof, or an enantiomer or a racemic mixture thereof, wherein the effective amount is sufficient to diminish, inhibit or eliminate behavior associated with craving or use of PCP.

  7. PCP IMMUMOASSAY TECHNOLOGIES - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay technologies for pentachlorophenol (PCP) testing in soil and water were evaluated. Penta RISc Test Systems (formerly ENSYS, Inc.), EnviroGard™ PCP Immunoassay Test Kit (Millipore Corp.), and Pentachlorophenol RaPID Assay (formerly Ohmicron ...

  8. Pathway Controlled Penetration (PcP)

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Earl E.; Rougier, Esteban; Zubelewicz, Aleksander

    2012-08-29

    The technical approach employs advanced computational simulation tools to demonstrate how current assets can destroy RWK-RFI-12-0001's HDBT, a tunnel complex with two portals built into the base of a granite mountain. The granite over layer is assumed to be 60 meters thick over both portals and 80 meters over the facility's mission space. Key S&T is the completed development of a highly innovative viscoplastic fracture material model, 3D parallel gas-fracture capabilities into FDEM, and a stochastic handling of the material properties. Phase I - Develop and validate code simulation tools: (1) develop, incorporate and validate AZ-Frac material model for granite; and (2) Develop and incorporate gas-driven-fracture modeling into LANL's FDEM MUNROU code; (3) Develop and incorporate stochastic features into FDEM modeling. Phase II - Conduct PcP analysis on above HDBT: (1) Acquire HDBT design data, develop simulation model; and (2) Evaluate and select most promising defeat alternative. Phase III - Deliver code, train Service target analysts, and conduct simulations against real world HDBTs. PcP uses advanced computer simulations to enhance HDBT functional defeat efforts. Newly developed material models that account for fractural energy coupled with the finite discrete element methodology (FDEM) will provide targeting packages that will create penetration avenues for current or future lethality options. This novel computational approach requires full 3D geologic and structure characterization as well as significant high performance computing capabilities. The goal is to distinctively alter the targeting paradigm by leveraging critical DoD assets along with insitu geologic strata. In other words, assets will utilize underground rock structure to their benefit by creating rubbilization zones that will allow pathway controlled penetration.

  9. Anaerobic mineralization of pentachlorophenol (PCP) by combining PCP-dechlorinating and phenol-degrading cultures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Suyin; Shibata, Atsushi; Yoshida, Naoko; Katayama, Arata

    2009-01-01

    The dechlorination and mineralization of pentachlorophenol (PCP) was investigated by simultaneously or sequentially combining two different anaerobic microbial populations, a PCP-dechlorinating culture capable of the reductive dechlorination of PCP to phenol and phenol- degrading cultures able to mineralize phenol under sulfate- or iron-reducing conditions. In the simultaneously combined mixture, PCP (about 35 microM) was mostly dechlorinated to phenol after incubation for 17 days under sulfate-reducing conditions or for 22 days under iron-reducing conditions. Thereafter, the complete removal of phenol occurred within 40 days under both conditions. In the sequentially combined mixture, most of the phenol, the end product of PCP dechlorination, was degraded within 12 days of inoculation with the phenol degrader, without a lag phase, under both sulfate- and iron-reducing conditions. In a radioactivity experiment, [14C-U]-PCP was mineralized to 14CO2 and 14CH4 by the combined anaerobic microbial activities. Analysis of electron donor and acceptor utilization and of the production and consumption of H2, CO2, and CH4 suggested that the dechlorinating and degrading microorganisms compete with other microorganisms to perform PCP dechlorination and part of the phenol degradation in complex anoxic environments in the presence of electron donors and acceptors. The presence of a small amount of autoclaved soil slurry in the medium was possibly another advantageous factor in the successful dechlorination and mineralization of PCP by the combined mixtures. This anaerobic-anaerobic combination technology holds great promise as a cost-effective strategy for complete PCP bioremediation in situ.

  10. Dissecting the PCP pathway: one or more pathways?: Does a separate Wnt-Fz-Rho pathway drive morphogenesis?

    PubMed

    Lapébie, Pascal; Borchiellini, Carole; Houliston, Evelyn

    2011-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP), the alignment of cells within 2D tissue planes, involves a set of core molecular regulators highly conserved between animals and cell types. These include the transmembrane proteins Frizzled (Fz) and VanGogh and the cytoplasmic regulators Dishevelled (Dsh) and Prickle. It is widely accepted that this core forms part of a 'PCP pathway' for signal transduction, which can affect cell morphology through activation of an evolutionary ancient regulatory module involving Rho family GTPases and Myosin II, and/or the JNK kinase cascade. We have re-examined the evidence for interactions between the proposed PCP pathway components, and question the placing of the cell morphology regulators in the same pathway as the PCP core. While Fz and Dsh are clearly involved in both PCP and Rho-based cell morphology regulation, available evidence cannot currently discriminate whether these processes are linked mechanistically by a shared Fz/Dsh population, or pass by two distinct pathways.

  11. FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) pentachlorophenol (PCP) method uses a gas chromatograph (GC) equipped with a megabore capillary column and flame ionization detector (FID) and electron capture detector (ECD) to identify and quantify PCP. The FASP PCP method is design...

  12. Phosphorus-31 Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Study of the Effect of Pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the Physiologies of PCP-Degrading Microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Lohmeier-Vogel, Elke M.; Leung, Kam T.; Lee, Hung; Trevors, Jack T.; Vogel, Hans J.

    2001-01-01

    Free and agarose-encapsulated pentachlorophenol (PCP)-degrading Sphingomonas sp. isolates UG25 and UG30 were compared to Sphingomonas chlorophenolica ATCC 39723 with respect to the ability to degrade PCP. Pretreatment of the UG25 and UG30 strains with 50 μg of PCP per ml enabled the cells to subsequently degrade higher levels of this environmental pollutant. Similar treatment of ATCC 39723 cells had no effect on the level of PCP degraded by this strain. Phosphorus-31 nuclear magnetic resonance spectra of agarose-immobilized strains UG25 and UG30 grown in the absence of PCP showed that there was marked deenergization of the cells upon exposure to a nonlethal concentration of PCP (120 μg/ml). For example, no transmembrane pH gradient was observed, and the ATP levels were lower than the levels obtained in the absence of PCP. The transmembrane pH gradient and ATP levels were restored once the immobilized cells had almost completely degraded the PCP in the perfusion medium. PCP-pretreated cells, on the other hand, maintained their transmembrane pH gradient and ATP levels even in the presence of high levels of PCP. The ability of PCP-pretreated strain UG25 and UG30 cells to remain energized in the presence of PCP was shown to correlate with an altered membrane phospholipid profile; these cells had a higher concentration of cardiolipin than cells cultured in the absence of PCP. Strain ATCC 39723, which did not degrade higher levels of PCP after PCP pretreatment, did not show this response. PMID:11472931

  13. A recyclable perfluoroalkylated PCP pincer palladium complex.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Daniel; Hope, Eric G; Singh, Kuldip; Stuart, Alison M

    2011-03-01

    A new fluorous PCP pincer ligand has been coordinated to Ni(II), Pd(II) and Pt(II). The air stable palladium complex, which promotes Heck reactions between methyl acrylate and either aryl bromides or iodides, can be recovered intact by fluorous solid-phase extraction and was reused four times in the Heck reaction between methyl acrylate and 4-bromoacetophenone without loss in catalytic activity. PMID:21264422

  14. Characterization of the pcp gene of Pseudomonas fluorescens and of its product, pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase (Pcp).

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, T; Robert-Baudouy, J

    1994-01-01

    The gene pcp, encoding pyrrolidone carboxyl peptidase (Pcp), from Pseudomonas fluorescens MFO was cloned and its nucleotide sequence was determined. This sequence contains a unique open reading frame (pcp) coding for a polypeptide of 213 amino acids (M(r) 22,441) which has significant homology to the Pcps from Streptococcus pyogenes, Bacillus subtilis, and Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. Comparison of the four Pcp sequences revealed two highly conserved motifs which may be involved in the active site of these enzymes. The cloned Pcp from P. fluorescens was purified to homogeneity and appears to exist as a dimer. This enzyme displays a Michaelis constant of 0.21 mM with L-pyroglutamyl-beta-naphthylamide as the substrate and an absolute substrate specificity towards N-terminal pyroglutamyl residues. Studies of inhibition by chemical compounds revealed that the cysteine and histidine residues are essential for enzyme activity. From their conservation in the four enzyme sequences, the Cys-144 and His-166 amino acids are proposed to form a part of the active site of these enzymes. Images PMID:7909543

  15. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation using heme and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.T.

    1996-11-01

    Investigations of pentachlorophenol (PCP) degradation using both biotic and abiotic methods have been extensively studied. Due to the hydrophobic nature of PCP and its toxicity, the performance of the biotic treatments varies from site to site and is not satisfactory in most cases. An abiotic method for oxidative PCP degradation in soil under unsaturated conditions and a neutral pH was found. Hydrogen peroxide was used as an oxidant and heme as a catalyst. A mechanism was proposed to describe the possible reaction of heme and peroxide at the presence of PCP. In order to ensure that heme and peroxide are the most important factors during the reaction, two screening tests were run. In order to find the best conditions of PCP degradation using heme and peroxide, a statistical technique, so-called response surface methodology (RSM), was employed and the best conditions for PCP degradation in soil were determined. In order to examine the rate and extent of PCP degradation, kinetic studies were conducted and the results showed that about 70% of PCP was degraded within the first two hours and up to 80% of PCP was degraded within one day. Up to 17% of the PCP was mineralized to carbon dioxide as well. A scaled-up experiment was also studied to confirm the results in the laboratory. The result of the scaled-up experiment showed not much difference between the laboratory and the scaled-up experiments.

  16. A guide to the management of urologic dilemmas for the primary care physician (PCP).

    PubMed

    Barkin, Jack; Rosenberg, Matt T; Miner, Martin

    2014-06-01

    Patients with urologic conditions may present to a primary care physician (PCP) in the emergency department or in the PCP's office. Some conditions are true emergencies that require immediate surgical intervention. Others may require medical treatment or possibly simply reassuring the patient that there is no serious medical problem. Sometimes the diagnosis can be easily made, whereas other times the PCP needs to be able to rule out serious causes for a presenting problem and execute a guideline-recommended patient work up, to make a final diagnosis. Sometimes recommended diagnostic tests may not be readily available. When a PCP believes that a patient may have a serious urologic condition and is unsure of the appropriate patient management strategy, then he or she must quickly refer the patient to a urologist. This article describes common urology-related issues-hematuria, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) test interpretation, phimosis and paraphimosis, acute scrotal pain and masses in the child and adult, urinary tract infection, renal colic, and castration-treatment-induced bone loss. It provides insights into decision-making processes for patient management of some urologic conditions, and information about managing sequelae and side effects of long term treatment. It includes practical diagnostic suggestions and patient management strategies based on the authors' years of urologic clinical practice experience. PMID:24978632

  17. Biodegradation of low aqueous concentration pentachlorophenol (PCP) contaminated groundwater.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, L M; Delfino, J J; Preston, J F; St Laurent, G

    1999-05-01

    Bioremedial treatment to remove low level organic contamination to regulatory standards has met with limited success. In this study source water from a contaminated surficial aquifer at a former wood treatment facility was used to evaluate the potential for indigenous microorganisms to degrade low level (< 1.0 mg) pentachlorophenol (PCP) to a regulatory drinking water standard of 0.001 mg/L. PCP degradation was evaluated in series of batch reactors in a two phase study to (a) determine the rate and extent of PCP removal and (b) evaluate the impact of nutrient amendment (N and P) on removal rate. All reactors with the exception of the abiotic control demonstrated PCP removal to a level < 0.002 mg/L within a maximum period of 32 d with and without nutrient amendment. A regression analysis of reactive phosphate (ortho-P) concentration versus removal rate produced an R2 of 0.94 (p = 0.006) indicating a significant correlation between the level of available phosphate and PCP degradation rate. Selective bacterial enumeration (for PCP degrading bacteria) revealed PCP-degrading bacteria increased in abundance prior to and in conjunction with the degradation phase to a density of between 10(3) to 10(4) CFU/ml. Isolates were also analyzed for total fatty acids using Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) methodology and the results indicated that PCP degrading bacteria were present in the aquifer and consisted of predominately fluorescent, oxidase positive Pseudomonas species. Overall, data indicate that autochthonous microbes are capable of removing low level PCP (< 1.0 mg/L) to approach if not reach the regulatory standard of 0.001 mg/L with the addition of oxygen, with or without nutrient amendment. Results of this research can be applied to full-scale implementation of in-situ or ex-situ bioremediation of groundwater at former wood treatment facilities.

  18. A review of PCP abuse trends and perceptions.

    PubMed Central

    Thombs, D L

    1989-01-01

    A critical review of epidemiologic literature on the abuse of phencyclidine (PCP) suggests that current perceptions by the public and among members of the health professions and drug treatment communities about abuse of the drug are distorted. Epidemiologic data indicate that PCP abuse is not widespread in the United States, nor is its abuse prevalent among adolescents. Its abuse has become concentrated among post-high school age, black males in a limited number of cities, especially Washington, DC. The degree of PCP abuse in a metropolitan area may be related to the availability and cost of other, more highly coveted drugs, such as crack cocaine. PMID:2502802

  19. Predictors of PCP, OH-PCBs, PCBs and chlorinated pesticides in a general female Norwegian population.

    PubMed

    Rylander, Charlotta; Lund, Eiliv; Frøyland, Livar; Sandanger, Torkjel M

    2012-08-01

    The aims of the current study were to assess plasma concentrations and predictors of halogenated phenolic compounds (HPCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and chlorinated pesticides in a representative group of postmenopausal Norwegian women (n=311, mean age: 56 years). In addition to delivering a blood sample, the participants had also filled out a detailed questionnaire regarding their current health status, use of medication and dietary habits, etc. The association between a large number of dietary variables, lifestyle factors and plasma concentration of organic pollutants were investigated using multivariate statistics. Within the current study group, p,p'-DDE (median: 903 ng/L w.w.) and pentachlorophenol (PCP, median: 711 ng/L w.w.) were the dominating compounds on a wet weight basis and were present in considerable higher concentrations than the PCBs, the hydroxylated PCBs (OH-PCBs) and the remaining chlorinated pesticides. Of the PCBs, PCB 153 was detected in highest concentrations, whereas 4-OH-PCB187 was present in highest concentration of the selected OH-PCBs. The ratio of ΣOH-PCB to ΣPCB varied between 0.06 and 0.77 ng/L and were significantly lower in individuals with higher ΣPCB concentration. PCP did not co-vary with the other contaminants, indicating a different route of exposure. No clear food cluster was positively associated with PCP exposure; however intake of marine food was negatively linked to PCP concentration and age and being a non-smoker were positive predictors of PCP. The other investigated contaminants co-varied and were positively associated with age, plasma concentrations of marine derived omega-3 fatty acids and a traditional Norwegian fish and bread based diet. The difference in contaminant concentration between high, medium and low consumers of total marine food were however marginal for the dominating PCBs and chlorinated pesticides. The current results indicate however that marine food in itself could be a source of some of

  20. Optimization of enrichment processes of pentachlorophenol (PCP) from water samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Liu, Jun-xin

    2004-01-01

    The method of enriching PCP(pentachlorophenol) from aquatic environment by solid phase extraction(SPE) was studied. Several factors affecting the recoveries of PCP, including sample pH, eluting solvent, eluting volume and flow rate of water sample, were optimized by orthogonal array design(OAD). The optimized results were sample pH 4; eluting solvent, 100% methanol; eluting solvent volume, 2 ml and flow rate of water sample, 4 ml/min. A comparison is made between SPE and liquid-liquid extraction(LLE) method. The recoveries of PCP were in the range of 87.6%-133.6% and 79%-120.3% for SPE and LLE, respectively. Important advantages of the SPE compared with the LLE include the short extraction time and reduced consumption of organic solvents. SPE can replace LLE for isolating and concentrating PCP from water samples.

  1. HNU-HANBY PCP IMMUNOASSAY TEST KIT - INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HNU-Hanby pentachlorophenol (PCP) test kit rapidly analyzes for PCP in soil samples. The test kit can only detect those PCP carriers that contain aromatic compounds. The test kit estimates PCP concentrations in soil samples indirectly by measuring petroleum hydrocarbon carrie...

  2. Direct synthesis of dicarbonyl PCP-iron hydride complexes and catalytic dehydrogenative borylation of styrene.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shi; Quintero-Duque, Samuel; Roisnel, Thierry; Dorcet, Vincent; Grellier, Mary; Sabo-Etienne, Sylviane; Darcel, Christophe; Sortais, Jean-Baptiste

    2016-07-01

    A new and efficient method based on the simple metalating reagent Fe(CO)5 has been developed for the straightforward synthesis of well defined cyclometalled PCP iron carbonyl pincer complexes. The reaction proceeds cleanly under mild conditions at 30 °C and UV irradiation. Four hydride pincer complexes are synthesized and fully characterized as well as an intermediate dinuclear species. The new iron complexes are active and selective catalytic precursors for the dehydrogenative borylation of styrene with HBpin. PMID:27327604

  3. Developing a qPCR method to quantify AhR-PCP-DNA complex for detection of environmental trace-level PCP.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xiaoxiang; Pang, Xiaoqian; Chaisuwan, Nuanapa

    2011-07-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP), a widely-used aseptic or biocide, is known as an environmental toxicant involved in endocrine disruption even at a trace level. In order to reliably and efficiently quantify environmental trace-quantity PCP, this study developed a novel PCP detection method using the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and fluorescence quantitative PCR (qPCR). DNA probe with AhR binding sites was synthesized by PCR before added into AhR-PCP complex. After AhR-PCP-DNA complex was digested with exonuclease, copy number of DNA probe was determined using fluorescence qPCR. To calculate PCP concentration in samples, a standard curve (PCP concentration versus Ct value) was constructed and the detection range was 10(-13) to 10(-9) M. PCP detection limit was 0.0089 ppt for the AhR-PCP-DNA complex assay and 8.8780 ppm for high performance liquid chromatography, demonstrating that the method developed in this study is more sensitive. These results suggest that AhR-PCP-DNA complex method may be successfully applicable in detection and quantification of environmental trace-level PCP. PMID:21503612

  4. Central phencyclidine (PCP) receptor binding is glutamate dependent: evidence for a PCP/excitatory amino acid receptor (EAAR) complex

    SciTech Connect

    Loo, P.; Braunwalder, A.; Lehmann, J.; Williams, M.

    1986-03-01

    PCP and other dissociative anesthetica block the increase in neuronal firing rate evoked by the EAAR agonist, N-methyl-Daspartate. NMDA and other EAAs such as glutamate (glu) have not been previously shown to affect PCP ligand binding. In the present study, using once washed rat forebrain membranes, 10 ..mu..M-glu was found to increase the binding of (/sup 3/H)TCP, a PCP analog, to defined PCP recognition sites by 20%. Removal of glu and aspartate (asp) by extensive washing decreased TCP binding by 75-90%. In these membranes, 10 ..mu..M L-glu increased TCP binding 3-fold. This effect was stereospecific and evoked by other EAAs with the order of activity, L-glu > D-asp > L- asp > NMDA > D-glu > quisqualate. Kainate, GABA, NE, DA, 5-HT, 2-chloroadenosine, oxotremorine and histamine had no effect on TCP binding at concentrations up to 100 ..mu..M. The effects of L-glu were attenuated by the NMDA-type receptor antagonist, 2-amino-7--phosphonoheptanoate (AP7; 10 ..mu..M-1 mM). These findings indicate that EAAS facilitate TCP binding, possibly through NMDA-type receptors. The observed interaction between the PCP receptor and EAARs may reflect the existence of a macromolecular receptor complex similar to that demonstrated for the benzodiazepines and GABA.

  5. Regulation of PCP by the Fat signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Matis, Maja; Axelrod, Jeffrey D.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelia, orthogonal to the apical–basal axis, is essential for numerous developmental events and physiological functions. Drosophila model systems have been at the forefront of studies revealing insights into mechanisms regulating PCP and have revealed distinct signaling modules. One of these, involving the atypical cadherins Fat and Dachsous and the ectokinase Four-jointed, appears to link the direction of cell polarization to the tissue axes. We discuss models for the function of this signaling module as well as several unanswered questions that may guide future investigations. PMID:24142873

  6. Evidence of apoptosis in some cell types due to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Heteropneustes fossilis

    PubMed Central

    Niamat Ali, Mohammad; Nazam, Nazia; Lone, Mohammad Iqbal; Shaikh, Sibhghatulla; Ahmad, Waseem

    2012-01-01

    The study aimed to clarify the role of apoptosis in pentachlorophenol (PCP) induced testicular, ovarian and renal cell genotoxicity of Heteropneustes fossilis. It was further intended to find the target germ cell type and assess the cellular and nuclear damage. Treatment of PCP was used for multiduration on the germinal tissues and they were processed to detect structural changes by light and electron microscopic evaluation and kidney cells for subsequent detection of DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. Findings suggest functional and morphological changes in the tissues are due to apoptosis, as evidenced by some biochemical and cytological signs. Histological observation on germinal epithelium reveals cell suicidal symptoms such as vacuolization, liquefied regions in the cytoplasm of oocytes, margination of nuclei, clumping of chromatin, and compaction of cytoplasmic organelle. Biochemical manifestation concurrent to this, is; cleavage of kidney cell DNA into low molecular weight fragments confirming apoptosis. Subsequently, it is further cleaved into nucleosome size fragments or its multiples. Ultra-structural histopathology and DNA studies conclusively lead to the PCP induced apoptosis in the exposed cell types. Results further support the usefulness of this assay in the related studies and its feasibility in generating a base line data. PMID:23961218

  7. Evaluation of natural and enhanced PCP biodegradation at a former pesticide manufacturing plant.

    PubMed

    Kao, C M; Chai, C T; Liu, J K; Yeh, T Y; Chen, K F; Chen, S C

    2004-02-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used in the past as a pesticide, herbicide, antifungal agent, bactericide, and wood preservative. Thus, PCP is among the most ubiquitous chlorinated compounds found in groundwater contamination. A former pesticide manufacturing plant located in southern Taiwan has been identified as a PCP spill site. In this study, groundwater samples collected from the PCP site were analyzed to assess the occurrence of natural PCP biodegradation. Microcosm experiments were conducted to (1) evaluate the feasibility of biodegrading PCP by indigenous microbial consortia under aerobic and cometabolic conditions, and (2) determine the potential of enhancing PCP biodegradation using cane molasses and biological sludge cake as the substitute primary substrates under cometabolic conditions. The inocula used in this microcosm study were aquifer sediments collected from the PCP site and activated sludges collected from the municipal and industrial wastewater treatment plants. Results from this field investigation indicate that the natural biodegradation of PCP is occurring and causing the decrease in PCP concentration. Microcosm results show that the indigenous microorganisms can biodegrade PCP under both aerobic and aerobic cometabolism conditions. A PCP-degrading bacterium was isolated from the collected aquifer sediments and identified as Pseudomonas mendocina NSYSU via some biochemical tests and further conformation of DNA sequencing. In batch cultures, P. mendocina NSYSU used PCP as its sole source of carbon and energy. The isolated bacterium, P. mendocina NSYSU, was capable of completely degrading PCP as indicated by the increase in biomass formation with the decrease in PCP concentrations occurred in the carbon-free medium simultaneously. Results indicate that the in situ or on-site aerobic bioremediation using indigenous microorganisms or inoculated bacteria would be a feasible technology to clean up the studied PCP-contaminated site. Results from

  8. WASHING STUDIES FOR PCP AND CREOSOTE-CONTAMINATED SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Protection Agency has conducted a series of bench-scale and pilot-scale studies to evaluate the feasibility of washing pentachlorophenol (PCP) and creosote from the soil at an abandoned wood-treatment Superfund site in Pensacola, FL. The high sand content and lo...

  9. Project W-320, WRSS PCP: Procedure implementation verification

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, J.W.

    1998-07-25

    This document provides verification that the methodology for the safe retrieval of high-heat waste from Tank 241-C-106 as specified in the WRSS Process Control Plan HNF-SD-PCP-013, Revision 1, has been adequately implemented into the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) operational procedures. Tank 241-C-106 is listed on the High Heat Load Watch List.

  10. Feasibility of white-rot fungi for biodegradation of PCP-treated ammunition boxes. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Scholze, R.J.; Lamar, R.T.; Bolduc, J.; Dietrich, D.

    1995-01-01

    Millions of pounds of wood ammunition boxes treated with the wood preservative pentachiorophenol (PCP) are being stockpiled at military installations, primarily depots, because cost-effective disposal is not readily available. The Army needs cost-effective and environmentally benign treatment methods for destruction and disposal of PCP-treated wood products. This research investigated the use of white-rot fungi to biodegrade PCP-treated wood. Results showed that white-rot fungi effectively decreased the PCP concentration in contaminated hardwood and softwood chips. Under ideal laboratory conditions the fungi reduced the PCP concentration by 80 percent; a field study showed only a 30 percent decrease in PCP concentration. Despite this disparity, this study demonstrated the feasibility of using white-rot fungi to reduce PCP in treated wood.

  11. Constraining PCP Violating Varying Alpha Theory through Laboratory Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Maity, Debaprasad; Chen, Pisin; /NCTS, Taipei /Taiwan, Natl. Taiwan U. /KIPAC, Menlo Park /SLAC

    2012-06-06

    In this report we have studied the implication of a parity and charge-parity (PCP) violating interaction in varying alpha theory. Due to this interaction, the state of photon polarization can change when it passes through a strong background magnetic field. We have calculated the optical rotation and ellipticity of the plane of polarization of an electromagnetic wave and tested our results against different laboratory experiments. Our model contains a PCP violating parameter {beta} and a scale of alpha variation {omega}. By analyzing the laboratory experimental data, we found the most stringent constraints on our model parameters to be 1 {le} {omega} {le} 10{sup 13} GeV{sup 2} and -0.5 {le} {beta} {le} 0.5. We also found that with the existing experimental input parameters it is very difficult to detect the ellipticity in the near future.

  12. Microtubules provide directional information for core PCP function

    PubMed Central

    Matis, Maja; Russler-Germain, David A; Hu, Qie; Tomlin, Claire J; Axelrod, Jeffrey D

    2014-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling controls the polarization of cells within the plane of an epithelium. Two molecular modules composed of Fat(Ft)/Dachsous(Ds)/Four-jointed(Fj) and a ‘PCP-core’ including Frizzled(Fz) and Dishevelled(Dsh) contribute to polarization of individual cells. How polarity is globally coordinated with tissue axes is unresolved. Consistent with previous results, we find that the Ft/Ds/Fj-module has an effect on a MT-cytoskeleton. Here, we provide evidence for the model that the Ft/Ds/Fj-module provides directional information to the core-module through this MT organizing function. We show Ft/Ds/Fj-dependent initial polarization of the apical MT-cytoskeleton prior to global alignment of the core-module, reveal that the anchoring of apical non-centrosomal MTs at apical junctions is polarized, observe that directional trafficking of vesicles containing Dsh depends on Ft, and demonstrate the feasibility of this model by mathematical simulation. Together, these results support the hypothesis that Ft/Ds/Fj provides a signal to orient core PCP function via MT polarization. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02893.001 PMID:25124458

  13. Pharmacological specificity of some psychotomimetic and antipsychotic agents for the sigma and PCP binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Itzhak, Y.

    1988-01-01

    The pharmacological specificity of representative psychotomimetic agents such a phencyclidine (PCP) analogs, opiate benzomorphans and several antipsychotic agents was assessed for the sigma and PCP binding sites. In a series of binding experiments, in rat brain membranes, sigma and PCP binding sites were labeled with (/sup 3/H)-1-(1-(3-hydroxyphenyl) cyclohexyl) piperidine ((/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH), (+)(/sup 3/H)-N-allylnormetazocine ((+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047) and (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-(3-hydroxy-phenyl)-N-(1-propyl) piperidine and ((+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP). PCP analogs inhibit potently high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding and (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 binding, moderately the low affinity binding component of (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and very weakly (+) (/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding. (+)SKF 10047 and cyclazocine are potent to moderate inhibitors of (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047, high affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH and (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PCP-3-OH binding. The antipsychotic agents display high affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)-3-PPP binding sites, moderate affinity for (+)(/sup 3/H)SKF 10047 sites and have no effect on either the high or low affinity (/sup 3/H)PCP-3-OH binding. 20 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  14. Fatal Intoxication Involving 3-MeO-PCP: A Case Report and Validated Method.

    PubMed

    Bakota, Erica; Arndt, Crystal; Romoser, Amelia A; Wilson, Stephen K

    2016-09-01

    We present in this case report a validated method for accurate quantitative analysis of 3-methoxy phencyclidine (3-MeO-PCP) to determine postmortem blood concentrations of this PCP analog. A 29-year-old male with a history of illicit drug use was found unresponsive in his bed with a bag of white powder next to him. Resuscitation efforts were unsuccessful and the individual was pronounced dead 9 minutes after arrival to the hospital. Initial ELISA screening suggested the presence of PCP in the decedent's blood. However, confirmatory testing revealed no detectable PCP. Instead, a large peak corresponding to a m/z 274.218 species with retention time similar to PCP was present on a LC-TOF-MS drug screen, suggesting a possible PCP analog. This mass corresponds specifically to a methoxy-PCP analog, several of which are available for purchase online. Standards for 3-MeO-PCP and 4-MeO-PCP were obtained and injected on the same instrument. Although the 3- and 4-MeO-PCP analogs have identical masses and retention times, they are still distinguishable through their mass spectra. The peak from the decedent's sample matched both the mass spectrum and the retention time of 3-MeO-PCP. A quantitative LC-MS-MS method was subsequently developed and validated for casework. Analysis using this method revealed a concentration of 139 ± 41 µg/L 3-MeO-PCP in the decedent's blood. Diphenhydramine (4.1 ± 0.7 mg/L), marijuana metabolite (presumptive positive, confirmation not performed) and a small amount of amphetamine (<0.10 mg/L) were also found in the decedent's blood. The cause of death was determined to be combined 3-MeO-PCP, diphenhydramine and amphetamine toxicity. The manner of death was certified as an accident. PMID:27339479

  15. Appetite for danger - genetic potential for PCP degradation at historically polluted groundwater sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikkonen, Anu; Yläranta, Kati; Tiirola, Marja; Romantschuk, Martin; Sinkkonen, Aki

    2016-04-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a priority pollutant of exclusively anthropogenic origin. Formerly used commonly in timber preservatives, PCP has persisted at polluted groundwater sites decades after its use was banned, typically as the last detectable contaminant component. Notorious for its toxicity and poor biodegradability, little is known about the genetic potential and pathways for PCP degradation in the environment. The only fully characterized mineralization pathway is initiated by the enzyme coded by chromosomal pcpB gene, previously detected in PCP degrading Sphingomonadaceae bacteria isolated at two continents. However, there is no information about the abundance or diversity of any PCP degradation related gene at contaminated sites in situ. Our aim was to assess whether pcpB and/or sphingomonads seem to play a role in in situ degradation of PCP, by studying whether pcpB i) is detectable at chlorophenol-polluted groundwater sediments, ii) responds to PCP concentration changes, and iii) shows correlation with the abundance of sphingomonads or a specific sphingomonad genus. Novel protocols for quantification and profiling of pcpB, with primers covering full known diversity, were developed and tested at two sites in Finland with well-documented long-term chlorophenol contamination history: Kärkölä and Pursiala. High throughput sequencing complemented characterization of the total bacterial community and pcpB gene pool. The relative abundance of pcpB in bacterial community was associated with spatial variability in groundwater PCP concentration in Pursiala, and with temporal differences in groundwater PCP concentration in Kärkölä. T-RFLP fingerprinting results indicated and Ion Torrent PGM and Sanger sequencing confirmed the presence of a single phylotype of pcpB at both geographically distant, historically contaminated sites, matching the one detected previously in Canadian bioreactor clones and Kärkölä bioreactor isolates. Sphingomonad abundance

  16. (1-3)-beta-D-glucan in association with lactate dehydrogenase as biomarkers of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) in HIV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Lee, C-H; de Sousa, B; Badura, R; Seringa, M; Fernandes, C; Gaspar, J F; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2014-07-01

    Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP) is a major HIV-related illness caused by Pneumocystis jirovecii. Definitive diagnosis of PcP requires microscopic detection of P. jirovecii in pulmonary specimens. The objective of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of two serum markers in the diagnosis of PcP. Serum levels of (1-3)-beta-d-glucan (BG) and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were investigated in 100 HIV-positive adult patients and 50 healthy blood donors. PcP cases were confirmed using indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal anti-Pneumocystis antibodies and nested-PCR to amplify the large subunit mitochondrial rRNA gene of P. jirovecii in pulmonary specimens. BG and LDH levels in serum were measured using quantitative microplate-based assays. BG and LDH positive sera were statistically associated with PcP cases (P ≤ 0.001). Sensitivity, specificity, positive/negative predictive values (PPV/NPV), and positive/negative likelihood ratios (PLR/NLR) were 91.3 %, 61.3 %, 85.1 %, 79.2 %, 2.359, and 0.142, respectively, for the BG kit assay, and 91.3 %, 35.5 %, 75.9 %, 64.7 %, 1.415 and 0.245, respectively, for the LDH test. Serologic markers levels combined with the clinical diagnostic criteria for PcP were evaluated for their usefulness in diagnosis of PcP. The most promising cutoff levels for diagnosis of PcP were determined to be 400 pg/ml of BG and 350 U/l of LDH, which combined with clinical data presented 92.8 % sensitivity, 83.9 % specificity, 92.8 % PPV, 83.9 % NPV, 5.764 PLR and 0.086 NLR (P < 0.001). This study confirmed that BG is a reliable indicator for detecting P. jirovecii infection. The combination between BG/LDH levels and clinical data is a promising alternative approach for PcP diagnosis.

  17. Controlling a toxic shock of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to anaerobic digestion using activated carbon addition.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yeyuan; De Araujo, Cecilia; Sze, Chun Chau; Stuckey, David C

    2015-04-01

    Several powdered and granular activated carbons (PACs and GACs) were tested for adsorption of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in bench-scale anaerobic digestion reactors to control the toxicity of PCP to acetoclastic methanogenesis. Results showed that the adsorption capacities of PAC were reduced by 21-54%, depending on the PAC addition time, in the presence of the methanogenic sludge compared to the controls without sludge. As a preventive measure, PAC at a low dose of 20% (mass ratio to the VSS) added 24 h prior to, or simultaneously with, the addition of PCP could completely eliminate the toxic effects of PCP. At the same dose, PAC also enabled methanogenesis to recover immediately after the sludge had been exposed to PCP for 24h. GAC was not effective in enabling the recovery of methanogenesis due to its slow adsorption kinetics; however, at a dose of 80% it could partially ameliorate the toxic shock of PCP. PMID:25665874

  18. Sensorimotor enhancement in mouse mutants lacking the Purkinje cell-specific Gi/o modulator, Pcp2(L7)

    PubMed Central

    Iscru, Emilia; Serinagaoglu, Yelda; Schilling, Karl; Tian, Jinbin; Bowers-Kidder, Stephanie L.; Zhang, Rui; Morgan, James I.; DeVries, A. Courtney; Nelson, Randy J.; Zhu, Michael X.; Oberdick, John

    2009-01-01

    Pcp2(L7) is a GoLoco domain protein specifically and abundantly expressed in cerebellar Purkinje cells. It has been hypothesized to “tune” Gi/o-coupled receptor modulation of physiological effectors, including the P-type Ca2+ channel. We have analyzed a mouse mutant in which the Pcp2(L7) gene was inactivated and find significant anatomical, behavioral and electrophysiological changes. Anatomically, we observed mild cerebellar hypoplasia. Behaviorally, the mutants were altered in modalities atypical for a traditional cerebellar mutant, and oddly, all of these changes could be considered functional enhancements. This includes increased asymptotic performance in gross motor learning, increased rate of acquisition in tone-conditioned fear, and enhanced pre-pulse inhibition of the acoustic startle response. Electrophysiological analysis of Purkinje cells in the mutants reveals depression of the complex spike waveform that may underlie the behavioral changes. Based on these observations we suggest that the Pcp2(L7) protein acts as a sensorimotor damper that modulates time- and sense-dependent changes in motor responses. PMID:18930827

  19. Bioremediation of soil contaminated with pentachlorophenol (PCP) using humic acids bound on zeolite.

    PubMed

    Dercová, Katarína; Sejáková, Zuzana; Skokanová, Marianna; Barancíková, Gabriela; Makovníková, Jaroslava

    2007-01-01

    We determined the toxicity of various chlorophenols, especially pentachlorophenol (PCP), on five bacterial strains and studied PCP biodegradation in soils amended with an organomineral complex (OMC) prepared from humic acids (organic part) bound on zeolite (inorganic part). Both components of OMC have excellent sorption properties and are of natural origin and therefore suitable to be used in the environment. Toxicity of chlorophenols depends not only on the number of chlorine atoms but also on their position on aromatic ring, and is thus regiospecific. Biodegradation of PCP was studied in three real completely characterized soil samples, Chernozem, Fluvisol, and Regosol, with and without the addition of OMC. The soils were sterilized and bioaugmented with the bacterial isolate Comamonas testosteroni CCM 7530. The immobilization effect of OMC in relation to PCP depends on the concentration of humic acids (HAs), the PCP concentration, and the content of organic carbon in soil. The microbial activity and the simulated action of acid rains led to the gradual release and biodegradation of the reversibly bound PCP without no initial toxic effect on indigenous or bioaugmented microorganisms. OMC appeared to be a good trap for PCP with potential applications in remediation technology because it reduces the potential toxicity of PCP to microbial community by lowering its bioavailability and thus facilitates its biodegradation.

  20. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: HNU-HANBY PCP IMMUNOASSAY TEST KIT - HNU - SYSTEMS, INC.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The HNU-Hanby test kit rapidly analyzes for petroleum hydrocarbons in soil and water samples. The test kit can be used to estimate pentachlorophenol (PCP) concentrations in samples when the carrier solvent is a petroleum hydrocarbon. The test kit estimates PCP concentrations in ...

  1. Effect of chronic nicotine pre-treatment on phencyclidine (PCP) disposition in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1983-09-01

    Disposition of [3H] phencyclidine (5 mg kg-1 i.p.) in brain, liver and plasma of rats treated chronically with 0.9% saline or nicotine (1 mg kg-1 s.c. twice a day for 11 days) was studied using a method possessing high sensitivity and specificity for PCP. No significant differences were observed in the values of PCP in plasma and tissues and in brain or liver to plasma PCP concentration ratios in the 2 groups 0.5, 1, 2 hr after [3H] PCP injection. With the exception of the value of PCP metabolites in plasma at 0.5 hr, the PCP metabolites concentrations were also not significantly different in the 2 groups. Data suggested that chronic nicotine pretreatment of rats did not affect the disposition of PCP and the potentiation of PCP-induced locomotor stimulant effects by nicotine possibly involves the additive pharmacodynamic interaction of 2 compounds at the level of the central nervous system. PMID:6651404

  2. Roles of noncanonical Wnt/PCP pathway genes in neuronal migration and neurulation in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hironori; Okamoto, Hitoshi

    2009-03-01

    Noncanonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathways regulate oriented cell movement during development in both Drosophila and vertebrates. Recent studies have revealed similarities and differences between these pathways in the tissues on which they act. In zebrafish, PCP pathway genes regulate the directional migration of a specific population of motor neurons in the hindbrain, as well as morphogenesis of the neuroepithelium. In the present review, neuronal and neuroepithelial defects in zebrafish PCP pathway mutants are compared, and the possible cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying these phenotypes are discussed. Future analyses of zebrafish PCP mutants will reveal the general mechanisms underlying the development of the neuroepithelium and provide novel insights into both conserved and diverse functions of PCP pathway genes in vertebrate development.

  3. Increased impulsive choice for saccharin during PCP withdrawal in female monkeys: influence of menstrual cycle phase

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Marilyn E.; Kohl, Emily A.; Johnson, Krista M.; LaNasa, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    Background In previous studies with male and female rhesus monkeys withdrawal of access to oral phencyclidine (PCP) self administration reduced responding for food under a high fixed-ratio (FR) schedule more in males than females and with a delay discounting (DD) task with saccharin (SACC) as the reinforcer. Impulsive choice for SACC increased during PCP withdrawal more than females. Objectives The goal of the present study was to examine the effect of PCP (0.25 or 0.5 mg/ml) withdrawal on impulsive choice for SACC in females during the follicular and luteal phases of the menstrual cycle. Materials and methods In Component 1 PCP and water were available from 2 drinking spouts for 1.5 h sessions under concurrent FR 16 schedules. In Component 2 a SACC solution was available for 45 min under a DD schedule. Monkeys had a choice of one immediate SACC delivery (0.6 ml) or 6 delayed SACC deliveries, and the delay was increased by 1 sec after a response on the delayed lever and decreased by 1 sec after a response on the immediate lever. There was then a 10-day water substitution phase, or PCP-withdrawal, that occurred during the mid-folllicular phase (Days 7–11) or the late-luteal (Days 24–28) phase of the menstrual cycle. Access to PCP and concurrent water was then restored, and the PCP withdrawal procedure was repeated over several follicular and luteal menstrual phases. Results PCP deliveries were higher during the luteal vs the follicular phase. Impulsive choice was greater during the luteal (vs follicular) phase during withdrawal of the higher PCP concentration. Conclusions PCP withdrawal was associated with elevated impulsive choice for SACC, especially in the luteal (vs follicular) phase of the menstrual cycle in female monkeys. PMID:23344553

  4. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  5. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  6. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  7. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  8. 49 CFR 40.137 - On what basis does the MRO verify test results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? 40.137 Section 40.137 Transportation Office of the... results involving marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, or PCP? (a) As the MRO, you must verify a confirmed positive test result for marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, and/or PCP unless the employee presents...

  9. Drosophila CK1-γ, gilgamesh, controls PCP-mediated morphogenesis through regulation of vesicle trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Gault, William J.; Olguin, Patricio; Weber, Ursula

    2012-01-01

    Cellular morphogenesis, including polarized outgrowth, promotes tissue shape and function. Polarized vesicle trafficking has emerged as a fundamental mechanism by which protein and membrane can be targeted to discrete subcellular domains to promote localized protrusions. Frizzled (Fz)/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling orchestrates cytoskeletal polarization and drives morphogenetic changes in such contexts as the vertebrate body axis and external Drosophila melanogaster tissues. Although regulation of Fz/PCP signaling via vesicle trafficking has been identified, the interplay between the vesicle trafficking machinery and downstream terminal PCP-directed processes is less established. In this paper, we show that Drosophila CK1-γ/gilgamesh (gish) regulates the PCP-associated process of trichome formation through effects on Rab11-mediated vesicle recycling. Although the core Fz/PCP proteins dictate prehair formation broadly, CK1-γ/gish restricts nucleation to a single site. Moreover, CK1-γ/gish works in parallel with the Fz/PCP effector multiple wing hairs, which restricts prehair formation along the perpendicular axis to Gish. Our findings suggest that polarized Rab11-mediated vesicle trafficking regulated by CK1-γ is required for PCP-directed processes. PMID:22391037

  10. Drosophila CK1-γ, gilgamesh, controls PCP-mediated morphogenesis through regulation of vesicle trafficking.

    PubMed

    Gault, William J; Olguin, Patricio; Weber, Ursula; Mlodzik, Marek

    2012-03-01

    Cellular morphogenesis, including polarized outgrowth, promotes tissue shape and function. Polarized vesicle trafficking has emerged as a fundamental mechanism by which protein and membrane can be targeted to discrete subcellular domains to promote localized protrusions. Frizzled (Fz)/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling orchestrates cytoskeletal polarization and drives morphogenetic changes in such contexts as the vertebrate body axis and external Drosophila melanogaster tissues. Although regulation of Fz/PCP signaling via vesicle trafficking has been identified, the interplay between the vesicle trafficking machinery and downstream terminal PCP-directed processes is less established. In this paper, we show that Drosophila CK1-γ/gilgamesh (gish) regulates the PCP-associated process of trichome formation through effects on Rab11-mediated vesicle recycling. Although the core Fz/PCP proteins dictate prehair formation broadly, CK1-γ/gish restricts nucleation to a single site. Moreover, CK1-γ/gish works in parallel with the Fz/PCP effector multiple wing hairs, which restricts prehair formation along the perpendicular axis to Gish. Our findings suggest that polarized Rab11-mediated vesicle trafficking regulated by CK1-γ is required for PCP-directed processes. PMID:22391037

  11. The Drosophila Homologue of the Amyloid Precursor Protein Is a Conserved Modulator of Wnt PCP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Soldano, Alessia; Okray, Zeynep; Janovska, Pavlina; Tmejová, Kateřina; Reynaud, Elodie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; De Strooper, Bart; Dura, Jean-Maurice; Bryja, Vítězslav; Hassan, Bassem A.

    2013-01-01

    Wnt Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling is a universal regulator of polarity in epithelial cells, but it regulates axon outgrowth in neurons, suggesting the existence of axonal modulators of Wnt-PCP activity. The Amyloid precursor proteins (APPs) are intensely investigated because of their link to Alzheimer's disease (AD). APP's in vivo function in the brain and the mechanisms underlying it remain unclear and controversial. Drosophila possesses a single APP homologue called APP Like, or APPL. APPL is expressed in all neurons throughout development, but has no established function in neuronal development. We therefore investigated the role of Drosophila APPL during brain development. We find that APPL is involved in the development of the Mushroom Body αβ neurons and, in particular, is required cell-autonomously for the β-axons and non-cell autonomously for the α-axons growth. Moreover, we find that APPL is a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway required for axonal outgrowth, but not cell polarity. Molecularly, both human APP and fly APPL form complexes with PCP receptors, thus suggesting that APPs are part of the membrane protein complex upstream of PCP signaling. Moreover, we show that APPL regulates PCP pathway activation by modulating the phosphorylation of the Wnt adaptor protein Dishevelled (Dsh) by Abelson kinase (Abl). Taken together our data suggest that APPL is the first example of a modulator of the Wnt-PCP pathway specifically required for axon outgrowth. PMID:23690751

  12. Reduced birthweight and length in the offspring of females exposed to PCDFs, PCP, and lindane.

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, W; Wolf, N

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate a broad range of adverse health outcomes and their potential association to wood preservative used in daycare centers. This article focuses on reproductive effects. A sample of 221 exposed teachers was provided by the employer's liability insurers. A comparison group (n = 189) insured by the same two organizations was recruited from nonexposed daycare centers. In a face-to-face interview, job history and reproductive history of 398 female teachers were ascertained. Data on exposure were provided, including measurements on concentration of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and lindane in wood panels, and of PCP, lindane, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans in indoor air. An exposure matrix based on individual job history, independent exposure information from each center, and reproductive history was set up with regard to the vulnerable time windows for each pregnancy. Using this approach, 49 exposed and 507 nonexposed pregnancies were identified, including 32 exposed and 386 nonexposed live births. For subgroup analyses the observations were restricted to independent pregnancies, excluding multiple and consecutive births. The data were analyzed with linear regression techniques, taking confounders into account. The crude median difference between exposed and nonexposed was 175 g in birthweight and 2 cm in length. Controlling for confounders, the results show a significantly reduced but weight (p = 0.04) and length (p = 0.02) in exposed pregnancies, even after restricting the data to independent pregnancies and pregnancies for which data could be validated from the mother's health cards. These differences were not explained by differences in gestational age indicating that a toxic effect, which could cause small-for date newborns, might have affected the fetus. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8747018

  13. Dishevelled genes mediate a conserved mammalian PCP pathway to regulate convergent extension during neurulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Hamblet, Natasha S; Mark, Sharayne; Dickinson, Mary E; Brinkman, Brendan C; Segil, Neil; Fraser, Scott E; Chen, Ping; Wallingford, John B; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony

    2006-05-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is conserved throughout evolution, but it mediates distinct developmental processes. In Drosophila, members of the PCP pathway localize in a polarized fashion to specify the cellular polarity within the plane of the epithelium, perpendicular to the apicobasal axis of the cell. In Xenopus and zebrafish, several homologs of the components of the fly PCP pathway control convergent extension. We have shown previously that mammalian PCP homologs regulate both cell polarity and polarized extension in the cochlea in the mouse. Here we show, using mice with null mutations in two mammalian Dishevelled homologs, Dvl1 and Dvl2, that during neurulation a homologous mammalian PCP pathway regulates concomitant lengthening and narrowing of the neural plate, a morphogenetic process defined as convergent extension. Dvl2 genetically interacts with Loop-tail, a point mutation in the mammalian PCP gene Vangl2, during neurulation. By generating Dvl2 BAC (bacterial artificial chromosome) transgenes and introducing different domain deletions and a point mutation identical to the dsh1 allele in fly, we further demonstrated a high degree of conservation between Dvl function in mammalian convergent extension and the PCP pathway in fly. In the neuroepithelium of neurulating embryos, Dvl2 shows DEP domain-dependent membrane localization, a pre-requisite for its involvement in convergent extension. Intriguing, the Loop-tail mutation that disrupts both convergent extension in the neuroepithelium and PCP in the cochlea does not disrupt Dvl2 membrane distribution in the neuroepithelium, in contrast to its drastic effect on Dvl2 localization in the cochlea. These results are discussed in light of recent models on PCP and convergent extension.

  14. Co(II) PCP Pincer Complexes as Catalysts for the Alkylation of Aromatic Amines with Primary Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Mastalir, Matthias; Tomsu, Gerald; Pittenauer, Ernst; Allmaier, Günter; Kirchner, Karl

    2016-07-15

    Efficient alkylations of amines by alcohols catalyzed by well-defined Co(II) complexes are described that are stabilized by a PCP ligand (N,N'-bis(diisopropylphosphino)-N,N'-dimethyl-1,3-diaminobenzene) based on the 1,3-diaminobenzene scaffold. This reaction is an environmentally benign process implementing inexpensive, earth-abundant nonprecious metal catalysts and is based on the acceptorless alcohol dehydrogenation concept. A range of primary alcohols and aromatic amines were efficiently converted into mono-N-alkylated amines in good to excellent isolated yields. PMID:27356282

  15. Embalming fluid-soaked marijuana: new high or new guise for PCP?

    PubMed

    Holland, J A; Nelson, L; Ravikumar, P R; Elwood, W N

    1998-01-01

    A growing trend of smoking marijuana soaked in what is purported to be embalming fluid has been reported in the literature since the mid-1980s. This article describes several cases of intoxication, gives regional epidemiological data on this phenomenon, and includes current nomenclature. The authors also analyze a sample of fluid said to be embalming fluid and discover PCP (phencyclidine) and multiple congeners and by-products of PCP manufacture. The implications of this finding are discussed, and the hypothesis that most embalming fluid-soaked marijuana likely contains PCP is considered.

  16. PCP-induced deficits in murine nest building activity: employment of an ethological rodent behavior to mimic negative-like symptoms of schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Christian Spang; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Parachikova, Anna I; Plath, Niels

    2014-10-15

    Schizophrenia is a severe psychiatric disorder characterized by three symptom domains, positive (hallucinations, obsession), negative (social withdrawal, apathy, self-neglect) and cognitive (impairment in attention, memory and executive function). Whereas current medication ameliorates positive symptomatology, negative symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunctions remain untreated. The development of improved therapies for negative symptoms has proven particularly difficult, in part due to the inability of mimicking these in rodents. Here, we address the predictive validity of combining an ethologically well preserved behavior in rodents, namely nest building activity, with an established animal model of schizophrenia, the sub-chronic PCP model, for negative symptoms. Decline in rodent nesting activity has been suggested to mirror domains of negative symptoms of schizophrenia, including social withdrawal, anhedonia and self-neglect, whereas repeated treatment with the NMDAR antagonist PCP induces and exacerbates schizophrenia-like symptoms in rodents and human subjects. Using a back-translational approach of pharmacological validation, we tested the effects of two agents targeting the nicotinic α7 receptor (EVP-6124 and TC-5619) that were reported to exert some beneficial effect on negative symptoms in schizophrenic patients. Sub-chronic PCP treatment resulted in a significant nest building deficit in mice and treatment with EVP-6124 and TC-5619 reversed this PCP-induced deficit. In contrast, the atypical antipsychotic drug risperidone remained ineffective in this assay. In addition, EVP-6124, TC-5619 and risperidone were tested in the Social Interaction Test (SIT), an assay suggested to address negative-like symptoms. Results obtained in SIT were comparable to results in the nest building test (NEST). Based on these findings, we propose nest building in combination with the sub-chronic PCP model as a novel approach to assess negative-like symptoms of schizophrenia

  17. The PCP pathway regulates Baz planar distribution in epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Aigouy, Benoit; Le Bivic, André

    2016-01-01

    The localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins along the Z-axis of epithelial cells is well understood while their distribution in the plane of the epithelium is poorly characterised. Here we provide a systematic description of the planar localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins in the Drosophila ommatidial epithelium. We show that the adherens junction proteins Shotgun and Armadillo, as well as the baso-lateral complexes, are bilateral, i.e. present on both sides of cell interfaces. In contrast, we report that other key adherens junction proteins, Bazooka and the myosin regulatory light chain (Spaghetti squash) are unilateral, i.e. present on one side of cell interfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate that planar cell polarity (PCP) and not the apical determinants Crumbs and Par-6 control Bazooka unilaterality in cone cells. Altogether, our work unravels an unexpected organisation and combination of apico-basal, cytoskeletal and planar polarity proteins that is different on either side of cell-cell interfaces and unique for the different contacts of the same cell. PMID:27624969

  18. The PCP pathway regulates Baz planar distribution in epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Aigouy, Benoit; Le Bivic, André

    2016-01-01

    The localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins along the Z-axis of epithelial cells is well understood while their distribution in the plane of the epithelium is poorly characterised. Here we provide a systematic description of the planar localisation of apico-basal polarity proteins in the Drosophila ommatidial epithelium. We show that the adherens junction proteins Shotgun and Armadillo, as well as the baso-lateral complexes, are bilateral, i.e. present on both sides of cell interfaces. In contrast, we report that other key adherens junction proteins, Bazooka and the myosin regulatory light chain (Spaghetti squash) are unilateral, i.e. present on one side of cell interfaces. Furthermore, we demonstrate that planar cell polarity (PCP) and not the apical determinants Crumbs and Par-6 control Bazooka unilaterality in cone cells. Altogether, our work unravels an unexpected organisation and combination of apico-basal, cytoskeletal and planar polarity proteins that is different on either side of cell-cell interfaces and unique for the different contacts of the same cell. PMID:27624969

  19. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: FIELD ANALYTICAL SCREENING PROGRAM: PCP METHOD - U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Superfund Innovative Technology Evaluation (SITE) Program evaluates new technologies to assess their effectiveness. This bulletin summarizes results from the 1993 SITE demonstration of the Field Analytical Screening Program (FASP) Pentachlorophenol (PCP) Method to determine P...

  20. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? You should first make a list of ...

  1. Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): A Guide for Young Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Nutrition & Fitness Emotional Health Choosing a Primary Health Care Provider (PCP): General Information Posted under Health Guides . ... needs. How do I find the names of health care providers? Here are some ways to find a ...

  2. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's NRMRL conducted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. Formulations developed during these studies wer...

  3. LOW COST SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION TREATMENT FOR SOILS CONTAMINATED WITH DIOXIN, PCP, AND CREOSOTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The USEPA's National Risk Management Research Laboratory condcuted successful treatability tests of innovative solidification/stablization (S/S) formulations to treat soils contaminated with dioxins, pentachlorophenol (PCP), and creosote from four wood preserving sites. For one o...

  4. Ret-PCP2 colocalizes with PKC in a subset of primate ON cone bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Sulaiman, Pyroja; Fina, Marie; Feddersen, Rod; Vardi, Noga

    2010-01-01

    Purkinje cell protein 2 (PCP2), a member of the family of guanine dissociation inhibitors and a strong interactor with the G-protein subunit Gαo, localizes to retinal ON bipolar cells. The retina-specific splice variant of PCP2, Ret-PCP2, accelerates the light response of rod bipolar cells by modulating the mGluR6 transduction cascade. All ON cone bipolar cells express mGluR6 and Gα o, but only a subset expresses Ret-PCP2. Here we test the hypothesis that Ret-PCP2 contributes to shaping the various temporal bandwidths of ON cone bipolar cells in monkey retina. We found that the retinal splice variants in monkey and mouse are similar and longer than the cerebellar variants. Ret-PCP2 is strongly expressed by diffuse cone bipolar type 4 cells (DB4; marked with anti-PKCα), and weakly expressed by midget bipolar dendrites (labeled by antibodies against Gα o, Gγ13, or mGluR6). Ret-PCP2 is absent from diffuse cone bipolar type 6 (DB6; marked with anti-CD15) and blue cone bipolar cells (marked with anti-CCK precursor). Thus, cone bipolar cells that terminate in stratum 3 of the inner plexiform layer (DB4) express more Ret-PCP2 than those that terminate in stratum 3+4 (midget bipolar cells), and these in turn express more than those that terminate in stratum 5 (DB6 and blue cone bipolar cells). This expression pattern approximates the arborization of ganglion cells (GC) with different temporal band-widths: parasol GCs stratifying near stratum 3 are faster than midget GCs stratifying in strata 3+4, and these are probably faster than the sluggish GCs that arborize in stratum 5. PMID:20127818

  5. Combover/CG10732, a Novel PCP Effector for Drosophila Wing Hair Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fagan, Jeremy K.; Dollar, Gretchen; Lu, Qiuheng; Barnett, Austen; Pechuan Jorge, Joaquin; Schlosser, Andreas; Pfleger, Cathie; Adler, Paul; Jenny, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The polarization of cells is essential for the proper functioning of most organs. Planar Cell Polarity (PCP), the polarization within the plane of an epithelium, is perpendicular to apical-basal polarity and established by the non-canonical Wnt/Fz-PCP signaling pathway. Within each tissue, downstream PCP effectors link the signal to tissue specific readouts such as stereocilia orientation in the inner ear and hair follicle orientation in vertebrates or the polarization of ommatidia and wing hairs in Drosophila melanogaster. Specific PCP effectors in the wing such as Multiple wing hairs (Mwh) and Rho Kinase (Rok) are required to position the hair at the correct position and to prevent ectopic actin hairs. In a genome-wide screen in vitro, we identified Combover (Cmb)/CG10732 as a novel Rho kinase substrate. Overexpression of Cmb causes the formation of a multiple hair cell phenotype (MHC), similar to loss of rok and mwh. This MHC phenotype is dominantly enhanced by removal of rok or of other members of the PCP effector gene family. Furthermore, we show that Cmb physically interacts with Mwh, and cmb null mutants suppress the MHC phenotype of mwh alleles. Our data indicate that Cmb is a novel PCP effector that promotes to wing hair formation, a function that is antagonized by Mwh. PMID:25207969

  6. Expression of a novel splicing variant of Pcp2 in closely related laboratory rodents.

    PubMed

    Przybyła, M A; Nowacka-Chmielewska, M M; Barski, J J

    2016-01-01

    Purkinje cell protein-2 (PCP2), also known as L7, is a member of the GoLoco protein family with highly cell-specific expression, being restricted to cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons in various species. However, its function in these tissues is unknown. Previous studies have suggested that PCP2 is a guanine nucleotide dissociation inhibitor, or a guanine nucleotide exchange factor. The Pcp2 gene is known to have many splice variants in both cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a novel Pcp2 splice variant is conserved in closely related laboratory rodents (mice, rats, and hamsters). After analyzing alternative splicing of this gene in the Purkinje cells and retinas of these rodent species, we confirmed the presence of the novel longer transcript in mice. However, assessment of Pcp2 transcripts using polymerase chain reaction amplification of complementary DNA revealed this long splice variant containing the additional exon 3B to be absent from rats and hamsters. Thus, the novel Pcp2 transcript is particular to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells and retinal bipolar neurons. It is likely to have arisen in this species, as a result of spontaneous mutation or de novo rearrangements. This gene presumably serves a very specific and, as yet, unknown function in the eyes and/or Purkinje cells of mice. PMID:27525924

  7. Effect of a NAPL on migration of PCP in soil columns

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, J.; Wang, J.M.; Banerji, S.K.

    1995-12-31

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a widely used wood-treating chemical that is applied to wood under pressure in the form of concentrated solution in solvents that are nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPL). As a result, any spill at a wood-treating site using PCP results in soil contamination with PCP in the presence of a NAPL. Hence, a study of migration of PCP was conducted in presence of kerosene as a NAPL in unsaturated soils. Addition of kerosene to soil caused a change in the effective size of soil particles; the porosity, pore velocity, and dispersion coefficients, all changed (as measured by bromide breakthrough) in soil columns contaminated with kerosene. Moisture content of soil was found to be a key parameter determining the residual NAPL content in the soils. PCP/kerosene breakthrough experiments showed that the organic phase penetrated deeper and faster into soils with higher moisture content, and the residual kerosene acted as a sorptive phase that retarded the migration of PCP.

  8. Postnatal Phencyclidine (PCP) as a Neurodevelopmental Animal Model of Schizophrenia Pathophysiology and Symptomatology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Grayson, B; Barnes, S A; Markou, A; Piercy, C; Podda, G; Neill, J C

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms of schizophrenia remain an unmet clinical need. Therefore, it is essential that new treatments and approaches are developed to recover the cognitive and social impairments that are seen in patients with schizophrenia. These may only be discovered through the use of carefully validated, aetiologically relevant and translational animal models. With recent renewed interest in the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, postnatal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) has been proposed as a model that can mimic aspects of schizophrenia pathophysiology. The purpose of the current review is to examine the validity of this model and compare it with the adult subchronic PCP model. We review the ability of postnatal PCP administration to produce behaviours (specifically cognitive deficits) and neuropathology of relevance to schizophrenia and their subsequent reversal by pharmacological treatments. We review studies investigating effects of postnatal PCP on cognitive domains in schizophrenia in rats. Morris water maze and delayed spontaneous alternation tasks have been used for working memory, attentional set-shifting for executive function, social novelty discrimination for selective attention and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle for sensorimotor gating. In addition, we review studies on locomotor activity and neuropathology. We also include two studies using dual hit models incorporating postnatal PCP and two studies on social behaviour deficits following postnatal PCP. Overall, the evidence we provide supports the use of postnatal PCP to model cognitive and neuropathological disturbances of relevance to schizophrenia. To date, there is a lack of evidence to support a significant advantage of postnatal PCP over the adult subchronic PCP model and full advantage has not been taken of its neurodevelopmental component. When thoroughly characterised, it is likely

  9. Postnatal Phencyclidine (PCP) as a Neurodevelopmental Animal Model of Schizophrenia Pathophysiology and Symptomatology: A Review.

    PubMed

    Grayson, B; Barnes, S A; Markou, A; Piercy, C; Podda, G; Neill, J C

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive dysfunction and negative symptoms of schizophrenia remain an unmet clinical need. Therefore, it is essential that new treatments and approaches are developed to recover the cognitive and social impairments that are seen in patients with schizophrenia. These may only be discovered through the use of carefully validated, aetiologically relevant and translational animal models. With recent renewed interest in the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia, postnatal administration of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) has been proposed as a model that can mimic aspects of schizophrenia pathophysiology. The purpose of the current review is to examine the validity of this model and compare it with the adult subchronic PCP model. We review the ability of postnatal PCP administration to produce behaviours (specifically cognitive deficits) and neuropathology of relevance to schizophrenia and their subsequent reversal by pharmacological treatments. We review studies investigating effects of postnatal PCP on cognitive domains in schizophrenia in rats. Morris water maze and delayed spontaneous alternation tasks have been used for working memory, attentional set-shifting for executive function, social novelty discrimination for selective attention and prepulse inhibition of acoustic startle for sensorimotor gating. In addition, we review studies on locomotor activity and neuropathology. We also include two studies using dual hit models incorporating postnatal PCP and two studies on social behaviour deficits following postnatal PCP. Overall, the evidence we provide supports the use of postnatal PCP to model cognitive and neuropathological disturbances of relevance to schizophrenia. To date, there is a lack of evidence to support a significant advantage of postnatal PCP over the adult subchronic PCP model and full advantage has not been taken of its neurodevelopmental component. When thoroughly characterised, it is likely

  10. Structures of the inducer-binding domain of pentachlorophenol-degrading gene regulator PcpR from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Robert P; Moural, Timothy W; Lewis, Kevin M; Onofrei, David; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    PcpR is a LysR-type transcription factor from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum L-1 that is responsible for the activation of several genes involved in polychlorophenol degradation. PcpR responds to several polychlorophenols in vivo. Here, we report the crystal structures of the inducer-binding domain of PcpR in the apo-form and binary complexes with pentachlorophenol (PCP) and 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP). Both X-ray crystal structures and isothermal titration calorimetry data indicated the association of two PCP molecules per PcpR, but only one 2,4,6-TCP molecule. The hydrophobic nature and hydrogen bonds of one binding cavity allowed the tight association of both PCP (Kd = 110 nM) and 2,4,6-TCP (Kd = 22.8 nM). However, the other cavity was unique to PCP with much weaker affinity (Kd = 70 μM) and thus its significance was not clear. Neither phenol nor benzoic acid displayed any significant affinity to PcpR, indicating a role of chlorine substitution in ligand specificity. When PcpR is compared with TcpR, a LysR-type regulator controlling the expression of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol degradation in Cupriavidus necator JMP134, most of the residues constituting the two inducer-binding cavities of PcpR are different, except for their general hydrophobic nature. The finding concurs that PcpR uses various polychlorophenols as long as it includes 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, as inducers; whereas TcpR is only responsive to 2,4,6-trichlorophenol. PMID:25397598

  11. Phytoremediation efficiency of a pcp-contaminated soil using four plant species as mono- and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Hechmi, Nejla; Aissa, Nadhira Ben; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation of soil polluted by pentachlorophenol (PCP) is of great importance due to the persistence and carcinogenic properties of PCP. Phytoremediation has long been recognized as a promising approach for removal of PCP from soil. The present study was conducted to investigate the capability of four plant species; white clover, ryegrass, alfalfa, and rapeseed grown alone and in combination to remediate pentachlorophenol contaminated soil. After 60 days cultivation, white clover, raygrass, alfalfa, and rapeseed all significantly enhanced the degradation of PCP in soils. Alfalfa showed highest efficiency for the removal of PCP in single cropping flowed by rapeseed and ryegrass. Mixed cropping significantly enhanced the remediation efficiencies as compared to single cropping; about 89.84% of PCP was removed by mixed cropping of rapeseed and alfalfa, and 72.01% of PCP by mixed cropping of rape and white clover. Mixed cropping of rapeseed with alfalfa was however far better for the remediation of soil PCP than single cropping. An evaluation of soil biological activities as a monitoring mechanism for the bioremediation process of a PCP-contaminated soil was made using measurements of microbial counts and dehydrogenase activity.

  12. Phytoremediation efficiency of a pcp-contaminated soil using four plant species as mono- and mixed cultures.

    PubMed

    Hechmi, Nejla; Aissa, Nadhira Ben; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2014-01-01

    Bioremediation of soil polluted by pentachlorophenol (PCP) is of great importance due to the persistence and carcinogenic properties of PCP. Phytoremediation has long been recognized as a promising approach for removal of PCP from soil. The present study was conducted to investigate the capability of four plant species; white clover, ryegrass, alfalfa, and rapeseed grown alone and in combination to remediate pentachlorophenol contaminated soil. After 60 days cultivation, white clover, raygrass, alfalfa, and rapeseed all significantly enhanced the degradation of PCP in soils. Alfalfa showed highest efficiency for the removal of PCP in single cropping flowed by rapeseed and ryegrass. Mixed cropping significantly enhanced the remediation efficiencies as compared to single cropping; about 89.84% of PCP was removed by mixed cropping of rapeseed and alfalfa, and 72.01% of PCP by mixed cropping of rape and white clover. Mixed cropping of rapeseed with alfalfa was however far better for the remediation of soil PCP than single cropping. An evaluation of soil biological activities as a monitoring mechanism for the bioremediation process of a PCP-contaminated soil was made using measurements of microbial counts and dehydrogenase activity. PMID:24933915

  13. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates.

  14. Transcriptional changes induced by in vivo exposure to pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Chironomus riparius (Diptera) aquatic larvae.

    PubMed

    Morales, Mónica; Martínez-Paz, Pedro; Martín, Raquel; Planelló, Rosario; Urien, Josune; Martínez-Guitarte, José Luis; Morcillo, Gloria

    2014-12-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been extensively used worldwide as a pesticide and biocide and is frequently detected in the aquatic environment. In the present work, the toxicity of PCP was investigated in Chironomus riparius aquatic larvae. The effects following short- and long-term exposures were evaluated at the molecular level by analyzing changes in the transcriptional profile of different endocrine genes, as well as in genes involved in the stress response and detoxification. Interestingly, although no differences were found after 12- and 24-h treatments, at 96-h exposures PCP was able to induce significant increases in transcripts from the ecdysone receptor gene (EcR), the early ecdysone-inducible E74 gene, the estrogen-related receptor gene (ERR), the Hsp70 gene and the CYP4G gene. In contrast, the Hsp27 gene appeared to be downregulated, while the ultraspiracle gene (usp) (insect ortholog of the retinoid X receptor) was not altered in any of the conditions assayed. Moreover, Glutathione-S-Transferase (GST) activity was not affected. The results obtained show the ability of PCP to modulate transcription of different biomarker genes from important cellular metabolic activities, which could be useful in genomic approaches to monitoring. In particular, the significant upregulation of hormonal genes represents the first evidence at the genomic level of the potential endocrine disruptive effects of PCP on aquatic invertebrates. PMID:25306060

  15. The emerging role of Wnt/PCP signaling in organ formation.

    PubMed

    Dale, Rodney M; Sisson, Barbara E; Topczewski, Jacek

    2009-03-01

    Over the last two decades zebrafish has been an excellent model organism to study vertebrate development. Mutant analysis combined with gene knockdown and other manipulations revealed an essential role of Wnt signaling, independent of beta-catenin, during development. Especially well characterized is the function of Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) signaling in the regulation of gastrulation movements and neurulation, described in other reviews within this special issue. Here, we set out to highlight some of the new and exciting research that is being carried out in zebrafish to elucidate the role that Wnt/PCP signaling plays in the formation of specific organs, including the lateral line, craniofacial development, and regeneration. We also summarized the emerging connection of the Wnt/PCP pathway with primary cilia function, an essential organelle in several organ activities.

  16. Wnt/PCP signaling: a veritable polar star in establishing patterns of polarity in embryonic tissues.

    PubMed

    Barrow, Jeffery R

    2006-04-01

    Embryonic patterning has traditionally been viewed as the establishment of spatially significant gene expression in response to secreted signals. Recent work has highlighted the role of the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway in patterning tissues. Rather than establishing characteristic arrays of gene expression, however, this pathway functions to institute uniform polarity of cells within a tissue. Cells thus polarized can undergo directed migrations, cell divisions, etc., which are essential for normal morphogenesis. In this review, I will highlight the similarities between mechanisms that establish patterns of polarity between Drosophila and vertebrates. Further, I will discuss recent advances with regard to Wnt/PCP signaling in vertebrates.

  17. Numerical simulation of a steam-injection pilot study for a PCP-contaminated aquifer.

    PubMed

    Tse, Ken K C; Liou, Tai-Sheng; Lo, Shang-Lien

    2006-07-01

    The following study was focused on the simulation of a steam-injection field pilottest conducted in our past research. The scope of research contained two main subjects: heat transfer and contaminant transport when steam was injected into a pentachlorophenol (PCP)-contaminated aquifer. Numerical simulation of the heat transfer during the field test showed that vertical permeability is more influential to the distribution of water temperature than the horizontal permeability. If the vertical permeability is relatively high, the steam in the aquifer has a higher tendency to migrate upward and cause the aquifer temperature to rise faster. The simulation results also showed that heat convection is very sensitive to the soil permeability. Therefore, high permeability media makes the effect of heat convection more important on applying the steam-injection method. Heat conduction dominates the heat transfer within the hot aqueous zone. However, the hot aqueous zone is relatively smaller than the steam zone when steam is injected into the aquifer. Therefore, heat conduction is not as important as heat convection within the steam zone, which is the same result observed in the field test. Specific heat of soil media is also a sensitive factor. A numerical simulator, T2VOC, was utilized to simulate the PCP transport in the aquifer when steam was injected into the aquifer. The results showed that the shape of PCP distribution was identical to that of steam. It illustrated thatthe steam carried PCP upward and laterally. The high vertical soil permeability causes the steam to migrate upward with PCP easily. A low partitioning coefficient allows PCP to be desorbed easier, also an important factor. A majority of the PCP in the soil was transferred to the aqueous phase as the water temperature increased, showing similar results to those observed in the field test. According to the sensitivity analysis, PCP transport is more sensitive to the vertical permeability than the

  18. PcpA Promotes Higher Levels of Infection and Modulates Recruitment of Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells during Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Walker, Melissa M; Novak, Lea; Widener, Rebecca; Grubbs, James Aaron; King, Janice; Hale, Joanetha Y; Ochs, Martina M; Myers, Lisa E; Briles, David E; Deshane, Jessy

    2016-03-01

    We used two different infection models to investigate the kinetics of the PcpA-dependent pneumococcal disease in mice. In a bacteremic pneumonia model, we observed a PcpA-dependent increase in bacterial burden in the lungs, blood, liver, bronchoalveolar lavage, and spleens of mice at 24 h postinfection. This PcpA-dependent effect on bacterial burden appeared earlier (within 12 h) in the focal pneumonia model, which lacks bacteremia or sepsis. Histological changes show that the ability of pneumococci to make PcpA was associated with unresolved inflammation in both models of infection. Using our bacteremic pneumonia model we further investigated the effects of PcpA on recruitment of innate immune regulatory cells. The presence of PcpA was associated with increased IL-6 levels, suppressed production of TRAIL, and reduced infiltration of polymorphonuclear cells. The ability of pneumococci to make PcpA negatively modulated both the infiltration and apoptosis of macrophages and the recruitment of myeloid-derived suppressor-like cells. The latter have been shown to facilitate the clearance and control of bacterial pneumonia. Taken together, the ability to make PcpA was strongly associated with increased bacterial burden, inflammation, and negative regulation of innate immune cell recruitment to the lung tissue during bacteremic pneumonia.

  19. Developmental molecular and functional cerebellar alterations induced by PCP4/PEP19 overexpression: implications for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouton-Liger, François; Sahún, Ignasi; Collin, Thibault; Lopes Pereira, Patricia; Masini, Debora; Thomas, Sophie; Paly, Evelyne; Luilier, Sabrina; Même, Sandra; Jouhault, Quentin; Bennaï, Soumia; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hérault, Yann; Dierssen, Mara; Créau, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    PCP4/PEP19 is a modulator of Ca(2+)-CaM signaling. In the brain, it is expressed in a very specific pattern in postmitotic neurons. In particular, Pcp4 is highly expressed in the Purkinje cell, the sole output neuron of the cerebellum. PCP4, located on human chromosome 21, is present in three copies in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). In a previous study using a transgenic mouse model (TgPCP4) to evaluate the consequences of 3 copies of this gene, we found that PCP4 overexpression induces precocious neuronal differentiation during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we report combined analyses of the cerebellum at postnatal stages (P14 and adult) in which we identified age-related molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral alterations in the TgPCP4 mouse. While Pcp4 overexpression at P14 induces an earlier neuronal maturation, at adult stage it induces increase in cerebellar CaMK2alpha and in cerebellar LTD, as well as learning impairments. We therefore propose that PCP4 contributes significantly to the development of Down syndrome phenotypes through molecular and functional changes.

  20. Developmental molecular and functional cerebellar alterations induced by PCP4/PEP19 overexpression: implications for Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mouton-Liger, François; Sahún, Ignasi; Collin, Thibault; Lopes Pereira, Patricia; Masini, Debora; Thomas, Sophie; Paly, Evelyne; Luilier, Sabrina; Même, Sandra; Jouhault, Quentin; Bennaï, Soumia; Beloeil, Jean-Claude; Bizot, Jean-Charles; Hérault, Yann; Dierssen, Mara; Créau, Nicole

    2014-03-01

    PCP4/PEP19 is a modulator of Ca(2+)-CaM signaling. In the brain, it is expressed in a very specific pattern in postmitotic neurons. In particular, Pcp4 is highly expressed in the Purkinje cell, the sole output neuron of the cerebellum. PCP4, located on human chromosome 21, is present in three copies in individuals with Down syndrome (DS). In a previous study using a transgenic mouse model (TgPCP4) to evaluate the consequences of 3 copies of this gene, we found that PCP4 overexpression induces precocious neuronal differentiation during mouse embryogenesis. Here, we report combined analyses of the cerebellum at postnatal stages (P14 and adult) in which we identified age-related molecular, electrophysiological, and behavioral alterations in the TgPCP4 mouse. While Pcp4 overexpression at P14 induces an earlier neuronal maturation, at adult stage it induces increase in cerebellar CaMK2alpha and in cerebellar LTD, as well as learning impairments. We therefore propose that PCP4 contributes significantly to the development of Down syndrome phenotypes through molecular and functional changes. PMID:24291518

  1. IFT88 plays a cilia- and PCP-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions during vertebrate embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Borovina, Antonia; Ciruna, Brian

    2013-10-17

    The role for cilia in establishing planar cell polarity (PCP) is contentious. Although knockdown of genes known to function in ciliogenesis has been reported to cause PCP-related morphogenesis defects in zebrafish, genetic mutations affecting intraflagellar transport (IFT) do not show PCP phenotypes despite the requirement for IFT in cilia formation. This discrepancy has been attributed to off-target effects of antisense morpholino oligonucleotide (MO) injection, confounding maternal effects in zygotic mutant embryos, or an inability to distinguish between cilia-dependent versus cilia-independent protein functions. To determine the role of cilia in PCP, we generated maternal + zygotic IFT88 (MZift88) mutant zebrafish embryos, which never form cilia. We clearly demonstrate that cilia are not required to establish PCP. Rather, IFT88 plays a cilia-independent role in controlling oriented cell divisions at gastrulation and neurulation. Our results have important implications for the interpretation of cilia gene function in normal development and in disease.

  2. EXTRACTION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL (PCP) FROM SOILS USING ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN ACID SOLUTIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presence of organic contaminants like PCP in soil is a major environmental concern. Various remediation methods have been used of which soil washing is a common procedure. Many different solvents like surfactants, ionic liquids and cyclodextrins have been studied. the pres...

  3. The PCP pathway instructs the planar orientation of ciliated cells in the Xenopus larval skin.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Brian; Stubbs, Jennifer L; Huisman, Fawn; Taborek, Peter; Yu, Clare; Kintner, Chris

    2009-06-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is a property of epithelial tissues where cellular structures coordinately orient along a two-dimensional plane lying orthogonal to the axis of apical-basal polarity. PCP is particularly striking in tissues where multiciliate cells generate a directed fluid flow, as seen, for example, in the ciliated epithelia lining the respiratory airways or the ventricles of the brain. To produce directed flow, ciliated cells orient along a common planar axis in a direction set by tissue patterning, but how this is achieved in any ciliated epithelium is unknown. Here, we show that the planar orientation of Xenopus multiciliate cells is disrupted when components in the PCP-signaling pathway are altered non-cell-autonomously. We also show that wild-type ciliated cells located at a mutant clone border reorient toward cells with low Vangl2 or high Frizzled activity and away from those with high Vangl2 activity. These results indicate that the PCP pathway provides directional non-cell-autonomous cues to orient ciliated cells as they differentiate, thus playing a critical role in establishing directed ciliary flow. PMID:19427216

  4. RESULTS OF A METHOD VERIFICATION STUDY FOR ANALYSES OF PCP IN SOIL

    EPA Science Inventory

    As a prelude to a field demonstration of the fungal treatment technology by the SITE Program, a field treatability study was performed to select optimal fungal species and loading rates.using the site-specific soil matrix contaminated with Wood preserving wastes: PCP and PAHS. ur...

  5. The PCP effector Fuzzy controls cilial assembly and signaling by recruiting Rab8 and Dishevelled to the primary cilium

    PubMed Central

    Zilber, Yulia; Babayeva, Sima; Seo, Jung Hwa; Liu, Jia Jia; Mootin, Steven; Torban, Elena

    2013-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway controls multiple cellular processes during vertebrate development. Recently the PCP pathway was implicated in ciliogenesis and in ciliary function. The primary cilium is an apically projecting solitary organelle that is generated via polarized intracellular trafficking. Because it acts as a signaling nexus, defects in ciliogenesis or cilial function cause multiple congenital anomalies in vertebrates. Loss of the PCP effector Fuzzy affects PCP signaling and formation of primary cilia; however, the mechanisms underlying these processes are largely unknown. Here we report that Fuzzy localizes to the basal body and ciliary axoneme and is essential for ciliogenesis by delivering Rab8 to the basal body and primary cilium. Fuzzy appears to control subcellular localization of the core PCP protein Dishevelled, recruiting it to Rab8-positive vesicles and to the basal body and cilium. We show that loss of Fuzzy results in inhibition of PCP signaling and hyperactivation of the canonical WNT pathway. We propose a mechanism by which Fuzzy participates in ciliogenesis and affects both canonical WNT and PCP signaling. PMID:23303251

  6. PCP Signaling between Migrating Neurons and their Planar-Polarized Neuroepithelial Environment Controls Filopodial Dynamics and Directional Migration

    PubMed Central

    Moens, Cecilia B.

    2016-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is a cell-contact mediated mechanism for transmitting polarity information between neighboring cells. PCP “core components” (Vangl, Fz, Pk, Dsh, and Celsr) are essential for a number of cell migratory events including the posterior migration of facial branchiomotor neurons (FBMNs) in the plane of the hindbrain neuroepithelium in zebrafish and mice. While the mechanism by which PCP signaling polarizes static epithelial cells is well understood, how PCP signaling controls highly dynamic processes like neuronal migration remains an important outstanding question given that PCP components have been implicated in a range of directed cell movements, particularly during vertebrate development. Here, by systematically disrupting PCP signaling in a rhombomere-restricted manner we show that PCP signaling is required both within FBMNs and the hindbrain rhombomere 4 environment at the time when they initiate their migration. Correspondingly, we demonstrate planar polarized localization of PCP core components Vangl2 and Fzd3a in the hindbrain neuroepithelium, and transient localization of Vangl2 at the tips of retracting FBMN filopodia. Using high-resolution timelapse imaging of FBMNs in genetic chimeras we uncover opposing cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous functions for Fzd3a and Vangl2 in regulating FBMN protrusive activity. Within FBMNs, Fzd3a is required to stabilize filopodia while Vangl2 has an antagonistic, destabilizing role. However, in the migratory environment Fzd3a acts to destabilize FBMN filopodia while Vangl2 has a stabilizing role. Together, our findings suggest a model in which PCP signaling between the planar polarized neuroepithelial environment and FBMNs directs migration by the selective stabilization of FBMN filopodia. PMID:26990447

  7. Analysis of a Population-Based Pneumocystis carinii Pneumonia Index as an Outcome Measure of Access and Quality of Care for the Treatment of HIV Disease

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Peter S.; Gourevitch, Marc N.; Drucker, Ernest; Fang, Jing; Goldberg, Clara; Memmott, Margaret; Bonuck, Karen; Deb, Nandini; Schoenbaum, Ellie

    2002-01-01

    Objectives. A population-based Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) Index was developed in New York City to identify geographic areas and subpopulations at increased risk for PCP. Methods. A zip code–level PCP Index was created from AIDS surveillance and hospital discharge records and defined as (number of PCP-related hospitalizations)/(number of persons living with AIDS). Results. In 1997, there were 2262 hospitalizations for PCP among 39 740 persons living with AIDS in New York City (PCP Index = .05691). PCP Index values varied widely across neighborhoods with high AIDS prevalence (West Village = .02532 vs Central Harlem = .08696). Some neighborhoods with moderate AIDS prevalence had strikingly high rates (Staten Island = .14035; northern Manhattan = .08756). Conclusions. The PCP Index highlights communities in particular need of public health interventions to improve HIV-related service delivery. (Am J Public Health. 2002;92:395–398) PMID:11867318

  8. The planar cell polarity (PCP) protein Diversin translocates to the nucleus to interact with the transcription factor AF9

    SciTech Connect

    Haribaskar, Ramachandran; Puetz, Michael; Schupp, Birte; Skouloudaki, Kassiani; Bietenbeck, Andreas; Walz, Gerd; Schaefer, Tobias

    2009-09-11

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, a {beta}-catenin-independent branch of the Wnt signaling pathway, orients cells and their appendages with respect to the body axes. Diversin, the mammalian homolog of the Drosophila PCP protein Diego, acts as a molecular switch that blocks {beta}-catenin-dependent and promotes {beta}-catenin-independent Wnt signaling. We report now that Diversin, containing several nuclear localization signals, translocates to the nucleus, where it interacts with the transcription factor AF9. Both Diversin and AF9 block canonical Wnt signaling; however, this occurs independently of each other, and does not require nuclear Diversin. In contrast, AF9 strongly augments the Diversin-driven activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK)-dependent gene expression in the nucleus, and this augmentation largely depends on the presence of nuclear Diversin. Thus, our findings reveal that components of the PCP cascade translocate to the nucleus to participate in transcriptional regulation and PCP signaling.

  9. DEMONSTRATION BULLETIN: PCP IMMUNOASSAY TECHNOLOGIES - PENTA RISC BY ENSYS INC., PENTA RAPID BY OHMICRON CORP., ENVIROGARD BY MILLIPORE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The objectives of this demonstration were to test these field screening technologies for accuracy and precision in detecting Pentachlorophenol (PCP) levels in soil and water by comparing their results with those of a confirmatory laboratory. The three immunoassay technologies ...

  10. Rspo3 binds syndecan 4 and induces Wnt/PCP signaling via clathrin-mediated endocytosis to promote morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ohkawara, Bisei; Glinka, Andrei; Niehrs, Christof

    2011-03-15

    The R-Spondin (Rspo) family of secreted Wnt modulators is involved in development and disease and holds therapeutic promise as stem cell growth factors. Despite growing biological importance, their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Here, we show that Rspo3 binds syndecan 4 (Sdc4) and that together they activate Wnt/PCP signaling. In Xenopus embryos, Sdc4 and Rspo3 are essential for two Wnt/PCP-driven processes-gastrulation movements and head cartilage morphogenesis. Rspo3/PCP signaling during gastrulation requires Wnt5a and is transduced via Fz7, Dvl, and JNK. Rspo3 functions by inducing Sdc4-dependent, clathrin-mediated endocytosis. We show that this internalization is essential for PCP signal transduction, suggesting that endocytosis of Wnt-receptor complexes is a key mechanism by which R-spondins promote Wnt signaling.

  11. Wnt/PCP proteins regulate stereotyped axon branch extension in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Ng, Julian

    2012-01-01

    Branching morphology is a hallmark feature of axons and dendrites and is essential for neuronal connectivity. To understand how this develops, I analyzed the stereotyped pattern of Drosophila mushroom body (MB) neurons, which have single axons branches that extend dorsally and medially. I found that components of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) pathway control MB axon branching. frizzled mutant animals showed a predominant loss of dorsal branch extension, whereas strabismus (also known as Van Gogh) mutants preferentially lost medial branches. Further results suggest that Frizzled and Strabismus act independently. Nonetheless, branching fates are determined by complex Wnt/PCP interactions, including interactions with Dishevelled and Prickle that function in a context-dependent manner. Branching decisions are MB-autonomous but non-cell-autonomous as mutant and non-mutant neurons regulate these decisions collectively. I found that Wnt/PCP components do not need to be asymmetrically localized to distinct branches to execute branching functions. However, Prickle axonal localization depends on Frizzled and Strabismus.

  12. PRE-084, a sigma selective PCP derivative, attenuates MK-801-induced impairment of learning in mice.

    PubMed

    Maurice, T; Su, T P; Parish, D W; Nabeshima, T; Privat, A

    1994-12-01

    We investigated the effect of the sigma selective PCP derivative PRE-084 on the impairment of learning induced in mice by the noncompetitive NMDA antagonist MK-801. Learning capacities were evaluated using the spontaneous alternation in a Y-maze test for spatial working memory, the step-down passive avoidance and the elevated plus-maze test for long-term memory. At doses about 1 mg/kg IP, PRE-084 significantly attenuated MK-801 (0.2 mg/kg IP) induced impairment of learning. The dose-response curve was bell-shaped which is typical for cognition enhancers. The effect of PRE-084 was antagonized by BMY-14802 (10 mg/kg IP) and suppressed by a chronic treatment with haloperidol (4 mg/kg/day SC for 7 days). Furthermore, PRE-084 did not affect scopolamine (1 mg/kg SC) induced amnesia but significantly attenuated mecamylamine (10 mg/kg IP) induced amnesia. These results show that sigma sites mediate a modulation of the NMDA receptor complex-dependent learning processes and may similarly affect the cholinergic nicotinic memory processes. Moreover, the PCP derivative PRE-084, acting selectively at sigma sites, reverses the amnesia induced by a drug acting at the PCP site.

  13. Dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solution on novel Pd-loaded electrode modified with PPy-SDBS composite film.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhirong; Wei, Xuefeng; Zhang, Huan; Hu, Xiang

    2015-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a persistent pollutant and a suspected human carcinogen. It can be found in the air, water, and soil and enters the environment through evaporation from treated wood surfaces, industrial spills, and disposal at uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. Ecotoxicity of PCP necessitates the development of rapid and reliable remediation techniques. Electrocatalytic hydrogenolysis (ECH) has been proven as a promising method for detoxification of halogenated wastes, due to its rapid reaction rate, low apparatus cost, mild reaction conditions, and absence of secondary contaminants. Challenge for the application of ECH is to prepare a Pd-coated cathode with high stability, high catalytic activity, and low Pd loading level. In this work, Pd/polypyrrole-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate/meshed Ti (Pd/PPy-SDBS/Ti) electrode was prepared and was characterized by cyclic voltammetry, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. Electrochemically reductive dechlorination of PCP on the Pd/PPy-SDBS/Ti electrode in aqueous solution was investigated. Pd microparticles were uniformly dispersed on PPy-SDBS film which was previously electrodeposited on the meshed Ti supporting electrode. The loading of Pd on the electrode was 0.72 mg cm(-2). Electrocatalytic dechlorination of PCP was performed in a two-compartment cell separated by cation-exchange membrane. The PCP removal on the Pd/PPy-SDBS/Ti electrode could reach 100 % within 70 min with dechlorination current 3 mA when PCP initial concentration was 10 mg L(-1) and initial pH was 2.4. Conversion of PCP on the Pd/PPy-SDBS/Ti electrode followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, and the apparent activation energy was 13.0 kJ mol(-1). The removal of PCP still kept 100 % after 70 min dechlorination when the Pd/PPy-SDBS/Ti cathode was reused ten times. The electrode exhibited promising dechlorination potential with high electrocatalytic activity, good stability

  14. A multiplexed nucleic acid microsystem for point-of-care detection of HIV co-infection with MTB and PCP.

    PubMed

    Xu, Lingjia; Kong, Jilie

    2013-12-15

    Many individuals infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), especially children in African countries, die of co-infections with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) (coinfection rate: 50%) or Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) (coinfection rate: 81%). The present proposal describes a rapid, portable, low-cost, multiplexed point-of-care diagnostic technique for simultaneously detecting HIV, MTB, and PCP. This technique incorporates a creative micro-device (hardware) and a loop-mediated isothermal amplification strategy (software). PMID:24209377

  15. A one-dimensional model of PCP signaling: polarized cell behavior in the notochord of the ascidian Ciona

    PubMed Central

    Kourakis, Matthew J.; Reeves, Wendy; Newman-Smith, Erin; Maury, Benoit; Abdul-Wajid, Sarah; Smith, William C.

    2014-01-01

    Despite its importance in development and physiology the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway remains one of the most enigmatic signaling mechanisms. The notochord of the ascidian Ciona provides a unique model for investigating the PCP pathway. Interestingly, the notochord appears to be the only embryonic structure in Ciona activating the PCP pathway. Moreover, the Ciona notochord as a single-file array of forty polarized cells is a uniquely tractable system for the study of polarization dynamics and the transmission of the PCP pathway. Here, we test models for propagation of a polarizing signal, interrogating temporal, spatial and signaling requirements. A simple cell-cell relay cascading through the entire length of the notochord is not supported; instead a more complex mechanism is revealed, with interactions influencing polarity between neighboring cells, but not distant ones. Mechanisms coordinating notochord-wide polarity remain elusive, but appear to entrain general (i.e., global) polarity even while local interactions remain important. However, this global polarizer does not appear to act as a localized, spatially-restricted determinant. Coordination of polarity along the long axis of the notochord requires the PCP pathway, a role we demonstrate is temporally distinct from this pathway’s earlier role in convergent extension and intercalation. We also reveal polarity in the notochord to be dynamic: a cell’s polarity state can be changed and then restored, underscoring the Ciona notochord’s amenability for in vivo studies of PCP. PMID:25173874

  16. Comparative effects of phencyclidine (PCP) and. delta. /sup 9/-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) on glucose oxidation in the rat testis

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, S.; Bauer, V.

    1986-03-05

    Glucose and fructose are important fuels of cellular energetics in organs like testis and brain. The previous in-vitro studies indicated that THC may disrupt many gonadal functions by inhibiting energy metabolism in the testis. PCP is sold on the street as any one of a variety of psychoactive drugs. Most commonly it is misrepresented as THC. Therefore, to compare the effects of PCP and THC on glucose utilization, in-vitro radiorespirometric experiments were conducted in rat testicular tissues. The /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production from 5.5 mM radiolabelled glucose was followed in the presence and absence of 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.0025 mM PCP. PCP produced a dose-dependent biphasic effect, stimulating /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production by 6.2, 17 and 5.8% and then inhibiting it by 13.2, 15.4 and 8.9% with respective concentrations of PCP. This is in contrast to THC which produced a dose-related inhibition of 15.2, 18.1, 20.1 and 25.3% in /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ production with 0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.4 mM THC. These observations are significant due to the possible abuse of PCP together with THC either deliberately or by misrepresentation.

  17. Effect of acute and chronic ethanol pre-treatment on the disposition of phencyclidine (PCP) in the rat.

    PubMed

    Vadlamani, N L; Pontani, R B; Misra, A L

    1982-05-01

    Disposition of [H] Phencyclidine in brain, plasma and adipose tissue of rats acutely and chronically-treated with ethanol was studied using a method possessing high sensitivity and specificity for PCP. In rats acutely-treated with ethanol (5 g/kg PO dose) and PCP (10 mg/kg IP dose), dispositional factors did not play a role in the intensifies pharmacological and behavioral effects of PCP. However in rats chronically-treated with 2.5 g/kg PO dose of ethanol twice a day for 19 days, the disposition of PCP (5 mg/kg IP dose) was significantly altered and the values of PCP in brain, plasma and adipose tissue were significantly higher than those in the control group. Although inhibition of PCP metabolism and a comparatively slower rate of its elimination appear to account for the potentiation of drug effects in animals chronically-treated with ethanol, interaction of drugs at the level of the central nervous system cannot be ruled out. PMID:7089042

  18. Probing the core-mantle boundary beneath Europe and Western Eurasia: A detailed study using PcP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gassner, Alexandra; Thomas, Christine; Krüger, Frank; Weber, Michael

    2015-09-01

    We use PcP (the core reflected P phase) recordings of deep earthquakes and nuclear explosions from the Gräfenberg (Germany) and NORSAR (Norway) arrays to investigate the core-mantle boundary region beneath Europe and western Eurasia. We find evidence for a previously unknown ultra-low velocity zone 600 km south-east of Moscow, located at the edge of a middle-size low shear- velocity region imaged in seismic tomography that is located beneath the Volga river region. The observed amplitude variations of PcP can be modelled by velocity reductions of P and S-waves of -5% and -15%, respectively, with a density increase of +15%. Travel time delays of pre-and postcursors are indicating a thickness of about 13 km for this ultra-low velocity region (ULVZ). However, our modelling also reveals highly ambiguous amplitude variations of PcP and a reflection off the top of the anomaly for various ULVZs and topography models. Accordingly, large velocity contrasts of up to -10% in VP and -20% in VS cannot be excluded. In general, the whole Volga river region shows a complex pattern of PcP amplitudes caused most likely by CMB undulations. Further PcP probes beneath Paris, Kiev and northern Italy indicate likely normal CMB conditions, whereas the samples below Finland and the Hungary-Slovakia border yield strongly amplified PcP signals suggesting strong CMB topography effects. We evaluate the amplitude behaviour of PcP as a function of distance and several ULVZ models using the 1D reflectivity and the 2D Gauss beam method. The influence of the velocity and density perturbations is analysed as well as the anomaly thickness, the dominant period of the source wavelet and interface topographies. Strong variation of the PcP amplitude are obtained as a function of distance and of the impedance contrast. We also consider two types of topographies: undulations atop the CMB in the presence of flat ULVZs and vice versa. Where a broad range of CMB topography dimensions lead to large PcP

  19. Effects of dopamine agonists and antagonists on PCP-induced stereotyped behaviour and social isolation in the rat social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Sams-Dodd, F

    1998-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) can induce a model psychosis in humans that resembles an acute schizophrenic psychosis. In animal models of schizophrenia, PCP induces locomotor hyperactivity, stereotyped behaviour and social isolation, and the purpose of the present study was to describe the ability of dopamine agonists and antagonists to mimic or interact with these PCP-induced behaviours in rats. The compounds were administered daily for 3 days in combination with vehicle or 2.0 mg/kg PCP and the rats were tested in the social interaction test on the last day of drug administration. The study showed that D1-agonists with relative differences in efficacy at the DA-stimulated adenylate cyclase had limited effects on the PCP-induced behaviours, whereas the D1-antagonist SCH 23391 could alleviate the PCP-induce social isolation following daily treatment for 3 days. However, following long-term treatment for 21 days, the rats develop tolerance to this effect. These data thus suggested that the D1-receptor system only had a modulatory effect on PCP. In contrast, the D2-receptor family may be more directly involved, because the D2/D3/D4-agonist quinpirole could mimic and potentiate the PCP-induced deficits in social behaviour, and the D2/D3-antagonist (-)sulpiride could alleviate the PCP-induced stereotyped behaviour and social isolation. However, a D4-antagonist did not affect the behaviour of vehicle- and PCP-treated rats, suggesting that this system plays a less direct role in the behavioural effects of PCP. In general, however, the effects of SCH 23391, quinpirole and (-)sulpiride on the PCP-induced behaviours were mirrored in the vehicle-treated control groups and it is therefore possible that non-specific effects may have been important.

  20. Catalytic dehydrogenation of cycloalkanes to arenes by a dihydrido iridium P-C-P pincer complex

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, M.; Hagen, C.; Cramer, R.E.; Jensen, C.M.; Kaska, W.C.

    1997-01-29

    We recently found that the iridium P-C-P pincer complex IrH{sub 2}[C{sub 6}H{sub 3}-2,6-(CH{sub 2}-PBu{sup T}{sub 2}){sub 2}] (1) is a highly active, homogeneous catalyst for the transfer dehydrogenation of cyclooctane with unusual long-term stability at temperatures as high as 200 {degree}C. This reactivity has now been extended to the catalytic transfer dehydrogenation of cycloalkanes to arenes. We report this novel catalytic activity as well as the results of an X-ray structure determination of 1. 15 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  1. The apical/basal-polarity determinant Scribble cooperates with the PCP core factor Stbm/Vang and functions as one of its effectors.

    PubMed

    Courbard, Jean-Remy; Djiane, Alexandre; Wu, Jun; Mlodzik, Marek

    2009-09-01

    Most tissues display several features of cellular polarization. Besides the ubiquitous epithelial polarization in the Apical-Basal (A/B) axis, many epithelia (and associated organs) display a Planar Cell Polarization (PCP). Recently, a crosstalk between the PCP and A/B polarity determinants has been suggested, i.e. the activity or stability of the PCP factor Frizzled is regulated by the A/B determinants aPKC and Bazooka in the Drosophila eye. We have systematically investigated genetic and physical interactions between the Drosophila A/B factors and the core PCP component Strabismus (Stbm)/Van Gogh (Vang). The A/B determinant Scribble was found to interact both genetically and physically with Stbm/Vang. We demonstrate that Scribble binds Stbm/Vang through its PDZ domain 3 and that it cooperates with Stbm/Vang in PCP establishment. Our data indicate that Scribble, in addition to its role in A/B polarity, has a distinct requirement in PCP establishment in the Drosophila eye and wing. We define a scribble allele that is largely PCP specific. Our data show that Scribble is part of the Stbm/Vang PCP complex and further suggest that it might act as an effector of Stbm/Vang during PCP establishment.

  2. Drosophila Furrowed/Selectin is a homophilic cell adhesion molecule stabilizing Frizzled and intercellular interactions during PCP establishment

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Mei-Ling; Mlodzik, Marek

    2013-01-01

    Summary Establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) in a tissue requires coordination of directional signals from cell to cell. It is thought that this is mediated by the core PCP factors, which include cell adhesion molecules. Here, we demonstrate that furrowed, the Drosophila Selectin, is required for PCP generation. Disruption of PCP in furrowed-deficient flies results from a primary defect in Fz levels and cell adhesion. Furrowed localizes at/near apical junctions, largely co-localizing with Frizzled and Flamingo (Fmi). It physically interacts with and stabilizes Frizzled, and further, it mediates intercellular Frizzled-Van Gogh (Vang)/Strabismus interactions, similarly to Fmi. Furrowed does so through a homophilic cell adhesion role that is distinct from its known carbohydrate-binding function described during vertebrate blood-cell/endothelial cell interactions. Importantly, the carbohydrate function is dispensable for PCP establishment. In vivo studies suggest that Furrowed functions partially redundantly with Fmi, mediating intercellular Frizzled-Vang interactions between neighboring cells. PMID:23973164

  3. Frizzled-Induced Van Gogh Phosphorylation by CK1ε Promotes Asymmetric Localization of Core PCP Factors in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Lindsay K; Wu, Jun; Yanfeng, Wang A; Mlodzik, Marek

    2016-07-12

    Epithelial tissues are polarized along two axes. In addition to apical-basal polarity, they are often polarized within the plane of the epithelium, so-called Planar Cell Polarity (PCP). PCP depends upon Wnt/Frizzled (Fz) signaling factors, including Fz itself and Van Gogh (Vang/Vangl). We sought to understand how Vang interaction with other core PCP factors affects Vang function. We find that Fz induces Vang phosphorylation in a cell-autonomous manner. Vang phosphorylation occurs on conserved N-terminal serine/threonine residues, is mediated by CK1ε/Dco, and is critical for polarized membrane localization of Vang and other PCP proteins. This regulatory mechanism does not require Fz signaling through Dishevelled and thus represents a cell-autonomous upstream interaction between Fz and Vang. Furthermore, this signaling event appears to be related to Wnt5a-mediated Vangl2 phosphorylation during mouse limb patterning and may thus be a general mechanism underlying Wnt-regulated PCP establishment.

  4. CTHRC1 promotes human colorectal cancer cell proliferation and invasiveness by activating Wnt/PCP signaling

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiao-Mei; You, Hai-Yan; Li, Qing; Ma, Hong; Wang, Ya-Hui; Zhang, Yan-Li; Zhu, Lei; Nie, Hui-Zhen; Qin, Wen-Xin; Zhang, Zhi-Gang; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Collagen triple helix repeats containing 1 (CTHRC1) participates in vascular remodeling, bone formation, and developmental morphogenesis. Recently, CTHRC1 has been found up-regulated in many solid tumors and contributes to tumorigenesis, but its role in the progression of human colorectal cancer (CRC), remains unclear. In this study, CTHRC1 expression in human CRC cell lines was evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. The role of CTHRC1 in CRC cell proliferation and extracellular matrix invasion in vitro was analyzed by gene over-expression and recombinant protein. Reporter luciferase assay was used to reveal key relevant signaling pathways involved in CRC cells. The results show that CTHRC1 is secreted both by colorectal epithelia cells and stromal fibroblasts. Recombinant CTHRC1 promotes CRC cell migration and invasion dose-dependently. CTHRC1 overexpression promotes CRC cell migration, invasion and proliferation in vitro. Wnt/PCP signaling but not Wnt/catenin signaling was activates by CTHRC1 in CRC cells. Together, CTHRC1 promotes CRC cell proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, which is possibly mediated by activating Wnt/PCP pathway. PMID:26722469

  5. PCP METHODOLOGY FOR DETERMINING DOSE RATES FOR SMALL GRAM QUANTITIES IN SHIPPING PACKAGINGS

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan, S.

    2011-08-23

    The Small Gram Quantity (SGQ) concept is based on the understanding that small amounts of hazardous materials, in this case radioactive materials, are significantly less hazardous than large amounts of the same materials. This study describes a methodology designed to estimate an SGQ for several neutron and gamma emitting isotopes that can be shipped in a package compliant with 10 CFR Part 71 external radiation level limits regulations. These regulations require packaging for the shipment of radioactive materials perform, under both normal and accident conditions, the essential functions of material containment, subcriticality, and maintain external radiation levels within regulatory limits. 10 CFR 71.33(b)(1)(2)&(3) state radioactive and fissile materials must be identified and their maximum quantity, chemical and physical forms be included in an application. Furthermore, the U.S. Federal Regulations require application contain an evaluation demonstrating the package (i.e., the packaging and its contents) satisfies the external radiation standards for all packages (10 CFR 71.31(2), 71.35(a), & 71.47). By placing the contents in a He leak-tight containment vessel, and limiting the mass to ensure subcriticality, the first two essential functions are readily met. Some isotopes emit sufficiently strong photon radiation that small amounts of material can yield a large external dose rate. Quantifying of the dose rate for a proposed content is a challenging issue for the SGQ approach. It is essential to quantify external radiation levels from several common gamma and neutron sources that can be safely placed in a specific packaging, to ensure compliance with federal regulations. The Packaging Certification Program (PCP) Methodology for Determining Dose Rate for Small Gram Quantities in Shipping Packagings described in this report provides bounding mass limits for a set of proposed SGQ isotopes. Methodology calculations were performed to estimate external radiation levels

  6. Structural characterization of 2,6-dichloro-p-hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase (PcpA) from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum, a new type of aromatic ring-cleavage enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Robert P.; Green, Abigail R.; Nissen, Mark S.; Lewis, Kevin M.; Xun, Luying; Kang, ChulHee

    2014-01-01

    Summary PcpA (2,6-dichloro-p-hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenase) from Sphingobium chlorophenolicum, a non-haem Fe(II) dioxygenase capable of cleaving the aromatic ring of p-hydroquinone and its substituted variants, is a member of the recently discovered p-hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenases. Here we report the 2.6 Å structure of PcpA, which consists of four βαβββ motifs, a hallmark of the vicinal oxygen chelate superfamily. The secondary co-ordination sphere of the Fe(II) centre forms an extensive hydrogen-bonding network with three solvent exposed residues, linking the catalytic Fe(II) to solvent. A tight hydrophobic pocket provides p-hydroquinones access to the Fe(II) centre. The p-hydroxyl group is essential for the substrate-binding, thus phenols and catechols, lacking a p-hydroxyl group, do not bind to PcpA. Site-directed mutagenesis and kinetic analysis confirm the critical catalytic role played by the highly conserved His10, Thr13, His226 and Arg259. Based on these results, we propose a general reaction mechanism for p-hydroquinone 1,2-dioxygenases. PMID:23489289

  7. Wdpcp, a PCP Protein Required for Ciliogenesis, Regulates Directional Cell Migration and Cell Polarity by Direct Modulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lozito, Thomas P.; Zhang, Zhen; Francis, Richard J.; Yagi, Hisato; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Sanker, Subramaniam; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Chatterjee, Tania; Tansey, Terry; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kelley, Matthew W.; Spiliotis, Elias T.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Tuan, Rocky; Pazour, Gregory J.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates cell alignment required for collective cell movement during embryonic development. This requires PCP/PCP effector proteins, some of which also play essential roles in ciliogenesis, highlighting the long-standing question of the role of the cilium in PCP. Wdpcp, a PCP effector, was recently shown to regulate both ciliogenesis and collective cell movement, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show Wdpcp can regulate PCP by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. These studies were made possible by recovery of a Wdpcp mutant mouse model. Wdpcp-deficient mice exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of Bardet–Biedl/Meckel–Gruber ciliopathy syndromes, including cardiac outflow tract and cochlea defects associated with PCP perturbation. We observed Wdpcp is localized to the transition zone, and in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2, Nphp1, and Mks1 were lost from the transition zone, indicating Wdpcp is required for recruitment of proteins essential for ciliogenesis. Wdpcp is also found in the cytoplasm, where it is localized in the actin cytoskeleton and in focal adhesions. Wdpcp interacts with Sept2 and is colocalized with Sept2 in actin filaments, but in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2 was lost from the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting Wdpcp is required for Sept2 recruitment to actin filaments. Significantly, organization of the actin filaments and focal contacts were markedly changed in Wdpcp-deficient cells. This was associated with decreased membrane ruffling, failure to establish cell polarity, and loss of directional cell migration. These results suggest the PCP defects in Wdpcp mutants are not caused by loss of cilia, but by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, Wdpcp mutant cochlea has normal kinocilia and yet exhibits PCP defects. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that a PCP component required for ciliogenesis can directly modulate the actin cytoskeleton to

  8. AMERICAN CREOSOTE SITE CASE STUDY: SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF DIOXINS, PCP, AND CREOSOTE FOR $64 PER CUBIC YARD

    EPA Science Inventory

    This case study describes the development of solidification/stabilization (S/S) formulas and their application to rededicate the American Creosote site in Jackson, Tennessee. During 1998 and 1999, 45,000 cubic yards of soil contaminated with Creosote, PCP, and Dioxins were treat...

  9. The Use of Fry (Embalming Fluid and PCP-Laced Cigarettes or Marijuana Sticks) among Crack Cocaine Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Ronald J.; Williams, Mark; Ross, Michael W.; Atkinson, John; McCurdy, Sherly A.

    2009-01-01

    Statistics show that the prevalence of crack cocaine use and embalming fluid and phencyclidine (PCP)-laced cigarettes or marijuana sticks, commonly referred to on the street as "fry" or "wet" is a problem; however, the relationship between these substances of abuse and concurrent polydrug use is unknown. In the present study, a cross-sectional…

  10. The effect of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway during embryogenesis as reflected in the developing mouse eye.

    PubMed

    López-Escobar, Beatriz; Cano, David A; Rojas, Anabel; de Felipe, Beatriz; Palma, Francisco; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; Henderson, Deborah; Ybot-González, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Embryopathies that develop as a consequence of maternal diabetes have been studied intensely in both experimental and clinical scenarios. Accordingly, hyperglycaemia has been shown to downregulate the expression of elements in the non-canonical Wnt-PCP pathway, such as the Dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (Daam1) and Vangl2. Daam1 is a formin that is essential for actin polymerization and for cytoskeletal reorganization, and it is expressed strongly in certain organs during mouse development, including the eye, neural tube and heart. Daam1(gt/gt) and Daam1(gt/+) embryos develop ocular defects (anophthalmia or microphthalmia) that are similar to those detected as a result of hyperglycaemia. Indeed, studying the effects of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway demonstrated that there was strong association with the Daam1 genotype, whereby the embryopathy observed in Daam1(gt/+) mutant embryos of diabetic dams was more severe. There was evidence that embryonic exposure to glucose in vitro diminishes the expression of genes in the Wnt-PCP pathway, leading to altered cytoskeletal organization, cell shape and cell polarity in the optic vesicle. Hence, the Wnt-PCP pathway appears to influence cell morphology and cell polarity, events that drive the cellular movements required for optic vesicle formation and that, in turn, are required to maintain the fate determination. Here, we demonstrate that the Wnt-PCP pathway is involved in the early stages of mouse eye development and that it is altered by diabetes, provoking the ocular phenotype observed in the affected embryos. PMID:25540130

  11. The effect of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway during embryogenesis as reflected in the developing mouse eye.

    PubMed

    López-Escobar, Beatriz; Cano, David A; Rojas, Anabel; de Felipe, Beatriz; Palma, Francisco; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A; Henderson, Deborah; Ybot-González, Patricia

    2015-02-01

    Embryopathies that develop as a consequence of maternal diabetes have been studied intensely in both experimental and clinical scenarios. Accordingly, hyperglycaemia has been shown to downregulate the expression of elements in the non-canonical Wnt-PCP pathway, such as the Dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (Daam1) and Vangl2. Daam1 is a formin that is essential for actin polymerization and for cytoskeletal reorganization, and it is expressed strongly in certain organs during mouse development, including the eye, neural tube and heart. Daam1(gt/gt) and Daam1(gt/+) embryos develop ocular defects (anophthalmia or microphthalmia) that are similar to those detected as a result of hyperglycaemia. Indeed, studying the effects of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway demonstrated that there was strong association with the Daam1 genotype, whereby the embryopathy observed in Daam1(gt/+) mutant embryos of diabetic dams was more severe. There was evidence that embryonic exposure to glucose in vitro diminishes the expression of genes in the Wnt-PCP pathway, leading to altered cytoskeletal organization, cell shape and cell polarity in the optic vesicle. Hence, the Wnt-PCP pathway appears to influence cell morphology and cell polarity, events that drive the cellular movements required for optic vesicle formation and that, in turn, are required to maintain the fate determination. Here, we demonstrate that the Wnt-PCP pathway is involved in the early stages of mouse eye development and that it is altered by diabetes, provoking the ocular phenotype observed in the affected embryos.

  12. The effect of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway during embryogenesis as reflected in the developing mouse eye

    PubMed Central

    López-Escobar, Beatriz; Cano, David A.; Rojas, Anabel; de Felipe, Beatriz; Palma, Francisco; Sánchez-Alcázar, José A.; Henderson, Deborah; Ybot-González, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Embryopathies that develop as a consequence of maternal diabetes have been studied intensely in both experimental and clinical scenarios. Accordingly, hyperglycaemia has been shown to downregulate the expression of elements in the non-canonical Wnt-PCP pathway, such as the Dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (Daam1) and Vangl2. Daam1 is a formin that is essential for actin polymerization and for cytoskeletal reorganization, and it is expressed strongly in certain organs during mouse development, including the eye, neural tube and heart. Daam1gt/gt and Daam1gt/+ embryos develop ocular defects (anophthalmia or microphthalmia) that are similar to those detected as a result of hyperglycaemia. Indeed, studying the effects of maternal diabetes on the Wnt-PCP pathway demonstrated that there was strong association with the Daam1 genotype, whereby the embryopathy observed in Daam1gt/+ mutant embryos of diabetic dams was more severe. There was evidence that embryonic exposure to glucose in vitro diminishes the expression of genes in the Wnt-PCP pathway, leading to altered cytoskeletal organization, cell shape and cell polarity in the optic vesicle. Hence, the Wnt-PCP pathway appears to influence cell morphology and cell polarity, events that drive the cellular movements required for optic vesicle formation and that, in turn, are required to maintain the fate determination. Here, we demonstrate that the Wnt-PCP pathway is involved in the early stages of mouse eye development and that it is altered by diabetes, provoking the ocular phenotype observed in the affected embryos. PMID:25540130

  13. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of Co(II) and Ni(II) PCP Pincer Borohydride Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The 15e square-planar complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (2a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)Cl] (2b), respectively, react readily with NaBH4 to afford complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Co(PCP-tBu)(η2-BH4)] (4b) in high yields, as confirmed by IR spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography, and elemental analysis. The borohydride ligand is symmetrically bound to the cobalt center in η2-fashion. These compounds are paramagnetic with effective magnetic moments of 2.0(1) and 2.1(1) μB consistent with a d7 low-spin system corresponding to one unpaired electron. None of these complexes reacted with CO2 to give formate complexes. For structural and reactivity comparisons, we prepared the analogous Ni(II) borohydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) via two different synthetic routes. One utilizes [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (3) and NaBH4, the second one makes use of the hydride complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3·THF. In both cases, 5 is obtained in high yields. In contrast to 4a and 4b, the borohydride ligand is asymmetrically bound to the nickel center but still in an η2-mode. [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) loses readily BH3 at elevated temperatures in the presence of NEt3 to form 6. Complexes 5 and 6 are both diamagnetic and were characterized by a combination of 1H, 13C{1H}, and 31P{1H} NMR, IR spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. Additionally, the structure of these compounds was established by X-ray crystallography. Complexes 5 and 6 react with CO2 to give the formate complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(OC(C=O)H] (7). The extrusion of BH3 from [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (4a) and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(η2-BH4)] (5) with the aid of NH3 to yield the respective hydride complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)H] and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)H] (6) and BH3NH3 was investigated by DFT calculations showing that formation of the Ni hydride is thermodynamically favorable, whereas the formation of the Co(II) hydride, in agreement with the experiment, is unfavorable. The electronic structures and the bonding of the borohydride ligand in [Co

  14. Identification and preliminary analysis of a new PCP promoter from Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Huizhi; Cao, Jiashu

    2008-12-01

    The promoter of Brassica campestris Male Fertile 5 (BcMF5), a pollen coat protein member, class A (PCP-A) gene family, was isolated from Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis Makino (Chinese cabbage-pak-choi) by Thermal Asymmetric Interlaced Polymerase Chain Reaction (TAIL-PCR). Sequence analysis suggested that the 605-bp promoter of BcMF5 appears to be a pollen promoter. In an attempt to confirm the promoter activity of BcMF5 promoter, -609 to +3 bp and -377 to +3 bp fragments of the upstream sequence of BcMF5 were inserted at the site upstream of the coding region of the uidA gene in the sense orientation to construct two deletion expression vectors. Transient expression analysis in onion epidermal cells by particle bombardment showed that both -609 to +3 bp and -377 to +3 bp fragments of BcMF5 promoter were capable of driving beta-glucuronidase gene expression. Furthermore, by Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation method, Arabidopsis transgenic Kan(R) plants were obtained. GUS assay analysis revealed that the promoter of BcMF5 induced gene expression at the early stage of anther development and drove high levels of GUS expression in anther walls, upper regions of petals, pollen, and pollen tubes in the middle and late stage of anther development, but did not drive any expression in sepals and pistils.

  15. AEG-1 activates Wnt/PCP signaling to promote metastasis in tongue squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shan; Lei, Yiyan; Lin, Millicent; Wang, Liantang; Feng, Chongjin; Ke, Zunfu

    2016-01-01

    Despite advances in therapy, survival among patients with locally advanced squamous cell carcinoma of tongue (TSCC) and cervical lymph node metastasis remains dismal. Here, we estimated the functional effect of AEG-1 on TSCC metastasis and explored the molecular mechanism by which AEG-1 stimulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We initially found that AEG-1 mRNA levels were much higher in metastatic TSCC than in non-metastatic TSCC and that AEG-1 expression strongly correlates with EMT status. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed that the combined AEG-1 and EMT statuses are predictive of the survival rate among TSCC patients. In addition, AEG-1 knockdown inhibited EMT in cultured TSCC cell lines and in a xenograft-mouse model. Recombinant AEG-1 activated Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, and its stimulatory effects on TSCC cell invasiveness and EMT were reversed by an anti-Wnt5a neutralizing antibody or by inhibition of Rac1 or ROCK. These results highlight the critical stimulatory effect of AEG-1 on cancer cell invasiveness and EMT and indicate that AEG-1 may be a useful prognostic biomarker for TSCC patients. PMID:26689985

  16. Acute toxicity of chromate, DDT, PCP, TPBS, and zinc to Daphnia magna cultured in hard and soft water

    SciTech Connect

    Berglind, R.; Dave, G.

    1984-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the toxicity of five chemicals to water fleas (Daphnia magna) cultured in either hard to soft water. The toxicity tests were made in reconstituted waters and the five chemicals to be tested were, p,p'-DDT, pentachlorophenol (PCP), tetrapropylenbenzyl sulfonate (TPBS), potassium bichromate (K/sub 2/Cr/sub 2/O/sub 7/) and zincsulfate (ZnSO/sub 4/ x 7H/sub 2/O).

  17. PLD1 regulates Xenopus convergent extension movements by mediating Frizzled7 endocytosis for Wnt/PCP signal activation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyeyoon; Lee, Seung Joon; Kim, Gun-Hwa; Yeo, Inchul; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2016-03-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) is involved in the regulation of receptor-associated signaling, cell movement, cell adhesion and endocytosis. However, its physiological role in vertebrate development remains poorly understood. In this study, we show that PLD1 is required for the convergent extension (CE) movements during Xenopus gastrulation by activating Wnt/PCP signaling. Xenopus PLD1 protein is specifically enriched in the dorsal region of Xenopus gastrula embryo and loss or gain-of-function of PLD1 induce defects in gastrulation and CE movements. These defective phenotypes are due to impaired regulation of Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. Biochemical and imaging analysis using Xenopus tissues reveal that PLD1 is required for Fz7 receptor endocytosis upon Wnt11 stimulation. Moreover, we show that Fz7 endocytosis depends on dynamin and regulation of GAP activity of dynamin by PLD1 via its PX domain is crucial for this process. Taken together, our results suggest that PLD1 acts as a new positive mediator of Wnt/PCP signaling by promoting Wnt11-induced Fz7 endocytosis for precise regulation of Xenopus CE movements.

  18. In vivo labeling of phencyclidine (PCP) receptors with sup 3 H-TCP in the mouse brain

    SciTech Connect

    Maurice, T.; Vignon, J. )

    1990-07-01

    The phencyclidine (PCP) derivative N-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-piperidine (3H-TCP) was used to label in vivo the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-associated ionic channel in the mouse brain. After the injection of a tracer dose of 3H-TCP, a spread labeling throughout the brain was observed, but was the highest in the cerebellum. Preadministration of unlabeled TCP (30 mg/kg) resulted in a 90% reduction of 3H-TCP binding. PCP, TCP, MK-801, dexoxadrol, ketamine, and SKF 10,047 isomers dose-dependently prevented the in vivo 3H-TCP binding. ID50 determined in the cerebrum and the cerebellum were respectively correlated with K0.5 for 3H TCP high (rat cortex) and low affinity (rat cerebellum) sites in vitro. The pharmacological specificity of the 3H-TCP binding site in the cerebellum was significantly different from that in the cerebrum. ID50 values were generally higher than in the cerebrum and, particularly, MK-801, the most potent drug in the cerebrum, was without significant effect in the cerebellum, at any time and at doses as high as 30 mg/kg. N-(1-(2-benzo(b) thiophenyl)cyclohexyl)piperidine (BTCP), desipramine, and atropine showed a more efficient prevention of 3H-TCP binding in the cerebellum than in the cerebrum. The prevention of the binding by TCP or PCP, at doses close to their ID50 values, was rapid and then decreased slowly. The effect of MK-801 was long-lasting. This study confirm previous in vitro studies: 3H-TCP is an efficient tool for the labeling of the NMDA receptor-associated ionic channel.

  19. Differential Responses to Wnt and PCP Disruption Predict Expression and Developmental Function of Conserved and Novel Genes in a Cnidarian

    PubMed Central

    Lapébie, Pascal; Ruggiero, Antonella; Barreau, Carine; Chevalier, Sandra; Chang, Patrick; Dru, Philippe; Houliston, Evelyn; Momose, Tsuyoshi

    2014-01-01

    We have used Digital Gene Expression analysis to identify, without bilaterian bias, regulators of cnidarian embryonic patterning. Transcriptome comparison between un-manipulated Clytia early gastrula embryos and ones in which the key polarity regulator Wnt3 was inhibited using morpholino antisense oligonucleotides (Wnt3-MO) identified a set of significantly over and under-expressed transcripts. These code for candidate Wnt signaling modulators, orthologs of other transcription factors, secreted and transmembrane proteins known as developmental regulators in bilaterian models or previously uncharacterized, and also many cnidarian-restricted proteins. Comparisons between embryos injected with morpholinos targeting Wnt3 and its receptor Fz1 defined four transcript classes showing remarkable correlation with spatiotemporal expression profiles. Class 1 and 3 transcripts tended to show sustained expression at “oral” and “aboral” poles respectively of the developing planula larva, class 2 transcripts in cells ingressing into the endodermal region during gastrulation, while class 4 gene expression was repressed at the early gastrula stage. The preferential effect of Fz1-MO on expression of class 2 and 4 transcripts can be attributed to Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) disruption, since it was closely matched by morpholino knockdown of the specific PCP protein Strabismus. We conclude that endoderm and post gastrula-specific gene expression is particularly sensitive to PCP disruption while Wnt-/β-catenin signaling dominates gene regulation along the oral-aboral axis. Phenotype analysis using morpholinos targeting a subset of transcripts indicated developmental roles consistent with expression profiles for both conserved and cnidarian-restricted genes. Overall our unbiased screen allowed systematic identification of regionally expressed genes and provided functional support for a shared eumetazoan developmental regulatory gene set with both predicted and previously

  20. FZD7 drives in vitro aggressiveness in Stem-A subtype of ovarian cancer via regulation of non-canonical Wnt/PCP pathway.

    PubMed

    Asad, M; Wong, M K; Tan, T Z; Choolani, M; Low, J; Mori, S; Virshup, D; Thiery, J P; Huang, R Y-J

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer (OC) can be classified into five biologically distinct molecular subgroups: epithelial-A (Epi-A), Epi-B, mesenchymal (Mes), Stem-A and Stem-B. Among them, Stem-A expresses genes relating to stemness and is correlated with poor clinical prognosis. In this study, we show that frizzled family receptor 7 (FZD7), a receptor for Wnt signalling, is overexpressed in the Stem-A subgroup. To elucidate the functional roles of FZD7, we used an RNA interference gene knockdown approach in three Stem-A cell lines: CH1, PA1 and OV-17R. Si-FZD7 OC cells showed reduced cell proliferation with an increase in the G0/G1 sub-population, with no effect on apoptosis. The cells also displayed a distinctive morphologic change by colony compaction to become more epithelial-like and polarised with smaller internuclear distances and increased z-axis height. Immunofluorescence (IF) staining patterns of pan-cadherin and β-catenin suggested an increase in cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion in si-FZD7 cells. We also observed a significant rearrangement in the actin cytoskeleton and an increase in tensile contractility in si-FZD7 OC cells, as evident by the loss of stress fibres and the redistribution of phospho-myosin light chain (pMLC) from the sites of cell-cell contacts to the periphery of cell colonies. Furthermore, there was reciprocal regulation of RhoA (Ras homolog family member A) and Rac1 (Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rho family, small GTP-binding protein Rac1)) activities upon FZD7 knockdown, with a significant reduction in RhoA activity and a concomitant upregulation in Rac1 activity. These changes in pMLC and RhoA, as well as the increased TopFlash reporter activities in si-FZD7 cells, suggested involvement of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Selected PCP pathway genes (cadherin EGF LAG seven-pass G-type receptor 3 (CELSR3), prickle homolog 4 (Drosophila) (PRICKLE4), dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 1 (DAAM1

  1. Correlation between imaging features of Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonitis (PCP), CD4+ T lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load: A study in 50 consecutive AIDS patients

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Ying-Ying; Liu, Shui-Teng; Liu, Yan; Liu, Ying-Xia; Wang, Yi-Xiang J; Zhu, Wen-Ke; Le, Xiao-Hua; Yu, Wei-Ye; Zhou, Bo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the imaging manifestations of Pneumocystis Jiroveci Pneumonitis (PCP) in AIDS patients, and the correlation between imaging features, CD4+ lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load. Materials and methods A total of consecutive 50 AIDS patients with PCP were reviewed retrospectively. Chest CT manifestations, CD4+ lymphocyte count, and plasma HIV viral load were analyzed to investigate their correlation. Results PCP chest CT manifestations included ground-glass opacities dominated in 28 cases (28/50, 56%), lung cysts dominated in 10 cases (10/50, 20%), consolidation dominated in 6 cases (6/50, 12%), interstitial lesion dominated in 3 cases (3/50, 6%), and mixed lesions in 3 cases (3/50, 6%). In these 50 patients, CD4+ lymphocyte count ranged from 2 to 373 cells/µL. Plasma HIV viral load ranged from 500 to 5.28×107 copies/mL. CD4+ lymphocyte count in ground-glass opacities dominated patients was higher than that of lung cyst dominated patients (P<0.05). Plasma virus load of lung cysts dominated PCP patients was higher than that of consolidation dominated patients (P<0.05). Conclusions The typical chest imaging features of PCP in AIDS patients included lung ground-glass opacities and lung cysts. The chest imaging features were correlated with CD4+ T lymphocyte count and plasma HIV viral load. PMID:23256070

  2. Jarid2 Coordinates Nanog Expression and PCP/Wnt Signaling Required for Efficient ESC Differentiation and Early Embryo Development

    PubMed Central

    Landeira, David; Bagci, Hakan; Malinowski, Andrzej R.; Brown, Karen E.; Soza-Ried, Jorge; Feytout, Amelie; Webster, Zoe; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Cantone, Irene; Asenjo, Helena G.; Brockdorff, Neil; Carroll, Thomas; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Jarid2 is part of the Polycomb Repressor complex 2 (PRC2) responsible for genome-wide H3K27me3 deposition. Unlike other PRC2-deficient embryonic stem cells (ESCs), however, Jarid2-deficient ESCs show a severe differentiation block, altered colony morphology, and distinctive patterns of deregulated gene expression. Here, we show that Jarid2−/− ESCs express constitutively high levels of Nanog but reduced PCP signaling components Wnt9a, Prickle1, and Fzd2 and lowered β-catenin activity. Depletion of Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 from wild-type ESCs or overexpression of Nanog largely phenocopies these cellular defects. Co-culture of Jarid2−/− with wild-type ESCs restores variable Nanog expression and β-catenin activity and can partially rescue the differentiation block of mutant cells. In addition, we show that ESCs lacking Jarid2 or Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 or overexpressing Nanog induce multiple ICM formation when injected into normal E3.5 blastocysts. These data describe a previously unrecognized role for Jarid2 in regulating a core pluripotency and Wnt/PCP signaling circuit that is important for ESC differentiation and for pre-implantation development. PMID:26190104

  3. Jarid2 Coordinates Nanog Expression and PCP/Wnt Signaling Required for Efficient ESC Differentiation and Early Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Landeira, David; Bagci, Hakan; Malinowski, Andrzej R; Brown, Karen E; Soza-Ried, Jorge; Feytout, Amelie; Webster, Zoe; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Cantone, Irene; Asenjo, Helena G; Brockdorff, Neil; Carroll, Thomas; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2015-07-28

    Jarid2 is part of the Polycomb Repressor complex 2 (PRC2) responsible for genome-wide H3K27me3 deposition. Unlike other PRC2-deficient embryonic stem cells (ESCs), however, Jarid2-deficient ESCs show a severe differentiation block, altered colony morphology, and distinctive patterns of deregulated gene expression. Here, we show that Jarid2(-/-) ESCs express constitutively high levels of Nanog but reduced PCP signaling components Wnt9a, Prickle1, and Fzd2 and lowered β-catenin activity. Depletion of Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 from wild-type ESCs or overexpression of Nanog largely phenocopies these cellular defects. Co-culture of Jarid2(-/-) with wild-type ESCs restores variable Nanog expression and β-catenin activity and can partially rescue the differentiation block of mutant cells. In addition, we show that ESCs lacking Jarid2 or Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 or overexpressing Nanog induce multiple ICM formation when injected into normal E3.5 blastocysts. These data describe a previously unrecognized role for Jarid2 in regulating a core pluripotency and Wnt/PCP signaling circuit that is important for ESC differentiation and for pre-implantation development. PMID:26190104

  4. Jarid2 Coordinates Nanog Expression and PCP/Wnt Signaling Required for Efficient ESC Differentiation and Early Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Landeira, David; Bagci, Hakan; Malinowski, Andrzej R; Brown, Karen E; Soza-Ried, Jorge; Feytout, Amelie; Webster, Zoe; Ndjetehe, Elodie; Cantone, Irene; Asenjo, Helena G; Brockdorff, Neil; Carroll, Thomas; Merkenschlager, Matthias; Fisher, Amanda G

    2015-07-28

    Jarid2 is part of the Polycomb Repressor complex 2 (PRC2) responsible for genome-wide H3K27me3 deposition. Unlike other PRC2-deficient embryonic stem cells (ESCs), however, Jarid2-deficient ESCs show a severe differentiation block, altered colony morphology, and distinctive patterns of deregulated gene expression. Here, we show that Jarid2(-/-) ESCs express constitutively high levels of Nanog but reduced PCP signaling components Wnt9a, Prickle1, and Fzd2 and lowered β-catenin activity. Depletion of Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 from wild-type ESCs or overexpression of Nanog largely phenocopies these cellular defects. Co-culture of Jarid2(-/-) with wild-type ESCs restores variable Nanog expression and β-catenin activity and can partially rescue the differentiation block of mutant cells. In addition, we show that ESCs lacking Jarid2 or Wnt9a/Prickle1/Fzd2 or overexpressing Nanog induce multiple ICM formation when injected into normal E3.5 blastocysts. These data describe a previously unrecognized role for Jarid2 in regulating a core pluripotency and Wnt/PCP signaling circuit that is important for ESC differentiation and for pre-implantation development.

  5. High-resolution mapping of D16led-1, Gart, Gas-4, Cbr, Pcp-4, and Erg on distal mouse chromosome 16.

    PubMed

    Mjaatvedt, A E; Citron, M P; Reeves, R H

    1993-08-01

    More than 500 backcross progeny from four intersubspecific backcrosses were typed for six markers on distal mouse chromosome 16. Five of these represented genes that mapped within the Sod-1 to Ets-2 interval, which was shown previously to contain the weaver (wv) gene. The map order, including previously mapped reference markers, is (cen)-D16H21S16-D16Led-1-App-Sod-1-Gart-Gas-4-Cbr++ +-wv-Pcp-4-Erg-Ets-2. This gene order recapitulates the order of the genes on human chromosome 21 where known. Two of these markers further define the region containing the weaver gene to a 3.9-cM segment between Cbr and Pcp-4. In addition, Pcp-4 was localized to human chromosome 21 by the presence of a human-specific restriction fragment in WAV-17, a mouse-human somatic cell hybrid with human chromosome 21 as the only human contribution.

  6. SEC14 and Spectrin Domains 1 (Sestd1) and Dapper Antagonist of Catenin 1 (Dact1) Scaffold Proteins Cooperatively Regulate the Van Gogh-like 2 (Vangl2) Four-pass Transmembrane Protein and Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) Pathway during Embryonic Development in Mice* ♦

    PubMed Central

    Yang, XiaoYong; Cheyette, Benjamin N. R.

    2013-01-01

    The planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway is a conserved non-canonical (β-catenin-independent) branch of Wnt signaling crucial to embryogenesis, during which it regulates cell polarity and polarized cell movements. Disruption of PCP components in mice, including Vangl2 and Dact1, results in defective neural tube closure and other developmental defects. Here, we show that Sestd1 is a novel binding partner of Vangl2 and Dact1. The Sestd1-Dact1 interface is formed by circumscribed regions of Sestd1 (the carboxyl-terminal region) and Dact1 (the amino-terminal region). Remarkably, we show that loss of Sestd1 precisely phenocopies loss of Dact1 during embryogenesis in mice, leading to a spectrum of birth malformations, including neural tube defects, a shortened and/or curly tail, no genital tubercle, blind-ended colons, hydronephrotic kidneys, and no bladder. Moreover, as with Dact1, a knock-out mutation at the Sestd1 locus exhibits reciprocal genetic rescue interactions during development with a semidominant mutation at the Vangl2 locus. Consistent with this, examination of Wnt pathway activities in Sestd1 mutant mouse embryonic tissue reveals disrupted PCP pathway biochemistry similar to that characterized in Dact1 mutant embryos. The Sestd1 protein is a divergent member of the Trio family of GTPase regulatory proteins that lacks a guanine nucleotide exchange factor domain. Nonetheless, in cell-based assays the Sestd1-Dact1 interaction can induce Rho GTPase activation. Together, our data indicate that Sestd1 cooperates with Dact1 in Vangl2 regulation and in the PCP pathway during mammalian embryonic development. PMID:23696638

  7. LGR4 and LGR5 are R-spondin receptors mediating Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/PCP signalling.

    PubMed

    Glinka, Andrei; Dolde, Christine; Kirsch, Nadine; Huang, Ya-Lin; Kazanskaya, Olga; Ingelfinger, Dierk; Boutros, Michael; Cruciat, Cristina-Maria; Niehrs, Christof

    2011-10-01

    R-spondins are secreted Wnt signalling agonists, which regulate embryonic patterning and stem cell proliferation, but whose mechanism of action is poorly understood. Here we show that R-spondins bind to the orphan G-protein-coupled receptors LGR4 and LGR5 by their Furin domains. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mammalian cells and Xenopus embryos indicate that LGR4 and LGR5 promote R-spondin-mediated Wnt/β-catenin and Wnt/PCP signalling. R-spondin-triggered β-catenin signalling requires Clathrin, while Wnt3a-mediated β-catenin signalling requires Caveolin-mediated endocytosis, suggesting that internalization has a mechanistic role in R-spondin signalling.

  8. Effects of diazepam, citalopram, methadone and naloxone on PCP-induced stereotyped behaviour and social isolation in the rat social interaction test.

    PubMed

    Sams-Dodd, F

    1998-01-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) can induce a model psychosis in humans that mimics the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia. In the social interaction test PCP induces stereotyped behaviour and social isolation in rats, and these behaviours can be inhibited by antipsychotic drugs. In order to further evaluate the predictive validity of this model of schizophrenia the anxiolytic diazepam (0.02-17.5 micromol/kg; 0.005-5.0 mg/kg), the antidepressant citalopram (0.62-19.8 micromol/kg; 0.3-4.0 mg/kg), the opioid agonist methadone (0.36-5.8 micromol/kg; 0.13-2.0 mg/kg) and the opioid antagonist naloxone (0.34-22.0 micromol/kg; 0.13-8.0 mg/kg) were tested as examples of drugs without antipsychotic activity. The experiments demonstrated that these compounds did not specifically inhibit the behavioural effects of PCP. So far only antipsychotic drugs have been able to specifically inhibit the PCP-induced behaviours.

  9. BcMF5, a pollen coat protein gene (PCP), from Brassica rapa. ssp. chinensis, involved in the transcription of different lengths of 3'-UTRs of PCPs.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Cao, Jiashu; Huang, Li; Xiang, Xun; Yu, Xiaolin

    2008-09-01

    Two transcript-derived fragments (GenBank accession number DN237907.1 and DN237908.1) with high homology accumulated in the wild-type flower buds of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa L. ssp. chinensis Makino) are isolated and investigated. By rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), the full length cDNA of the two fragments were obtained. The alignment of their cDNA sequence showed that they are identical except for differences in a few nucleotides and should belong to the same gene, namely, B rassica rapa M ale F ertile 5 (BcMF5). The BcMF5 gene consists of 252 bp encoding a protein of 83 amino acids and is interrupted by an intron of 256 bp. Sequence blast analysis revealed that BcMF5 is a member of the pollen coat protein (PCP) gene family and shared a high homology to SLR-BP. In the process of 3'RACE, eight different lengths of 3'-UTR sequence are found from the wild type of the mmc mutant. Southern blot analysis showed that BcMF5 could be a single-copy gene in the Chinese cabbage genome, implying that eight different lengths of 3'-UTR sequences might come from the same gene and could be a result of multiple sites polyadenylation of 3'-UTRs of BcMF5. Based on sequence analysis, southern hybridization combined with RT-PCR, and northern hybridization, it was discovered that 3'-UTRs of BcMF5 contained some functional elements and their temporal and spatial expression patterns were different, but all strongly expressed in the stage IV and stage V flower buds of wild type. This indicate that different lengths of 3'-UTR may be involved in a regulation mechanism during the transcription of BcMF5.

  10. Using seismic array-processing to enhance observations of PcP waves to constrain lowermost mantle structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, S.; Romanowicz, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    The topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the structure and composition of the D" region are essential to understand the interaction between the earth's mantle and core. A variety of seismic data-processing techniques have been used to detect and measure travel-times and amplitudes of weak short-period teleseismic body-waves phases that interact with CMB and D", which is crucial to constrain properties of the lowermost mantle at short wavelengths. Major challenges in enhancing these observations are: (1) increasing signal-to-noise ratio of target phases and (2) isolating them from unwanted neighboring phases. Seismic array-processing can address these problems by combining signals from groups of seismometers and exploiting information that allows to separate the coherent signals from the noise. Here, we focus on the study of the Pacific large-low shear-velocity province (LLSVP) and surrounding areas using differential travel-times and amplitude ratios of the P and PcP phases, and their depth phases. We particularly design scale-dependent slowness filters that do not compromise time-space resolution. This is a local delay-and-sum (i.e. slant-stack) approach implemented in the time-scale domain using the wavelet transform to enhance time-space resolution (i.e. reduce array aperture). We group stations from USArray and other nearby networks, and from Hi-Net and F-net in Japan, to define many overlapping local arrays. The aperture of each array varies mainly according (1) to the space resolution target and (2) to the slowness resolution required to isolate the target phases at each period. Once the target phases are well separated, we measure their differential travel-times and amplitude ratios, and we project these to the CMB. In this process, we carefully analyze and, when possible and significant, correct for the main sources of bias, i.e., mantle heterogeneities, earthquake mislocation and intrinsic attenuation. We illustrate our approach in a series of

  11. THE USE OF FRY (EMBALMING FLUID AND PCP-LACED CIGARETTES OR MARIJUANA STICKS) AMONG CRACK COCAINE SMOKERS

    PubMed Central

    PETERS, RONALD J.; WILLIAMS, MARK; ROSS, MICHAEL W.; ATKINSON, JOHN; McCURDY, SHERLY A.

    2010-01-01

    Statistics show that the prevalence of crack cocaine use and embalming fluid and phencyclidine (PCP)-laced cigarettes or marijuana sticks, commonly referred to on the street as “fry” or “wet” is a problem; however, the relationship between these substances of abuse and concurrent polydrug use is unknown. In the present study, a cross-sectional survey was conducted among 426 African-American crack users in Houston, Texas, to investigate the difference between those who concurrently reported lifetime (defined as at least one usage of fry in life) fry use and those who stated they never used fry. The data were analyzed using chi-square and logistic regression analyses. Fry users were significantly more likely than non-users to not have a casual sex partner (92% users vs. 84% non-users, p ≤ 0.05) and were more likely to have been diagnosed with gonorrhea in the past 12 months (9% users vs. 2% non-users, p ≤ 0.05). In addition fry users had significantly higher odds of currently trading sex for drugs (OR = 2.30, p ≤ 0.05), marijuana use (OR = 12.11, p ≤ 0.05), and codeine (syrup) use (OR = 8.10, p ≤ 0.05). These findings are important in determining the “cultural novelties” relative to crack and fry use among younger African Americans. PMID:19157045

  12. Repeated potentiation of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 and the alpha 7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor modulates behavioural and GABAergic deficits induced by early postnatal phencyclidine (PCP) treatment.

    PubMed

    Kjaerby, Celia; Bundgaard, Christoffer; Fejgin, Kim; Kristiansen, Uffe; Dalby, Nils Ole

    2013-09-01

    The underlying mechanism of the GABAergic deficits observed in schizophrenia has been proposed to involve NMDA receptor hypofunction. An emerging treatment strategy therefore aims at enhancing GABAergic signalling by increasing the excitatory transmission onto interneurons. We wanted to determine whether behavioural and GABAergic functional deficits induced by the NMDA receptor channel blocker, phencyclidine (PCP), could be reversed by repeated administration of two drugs known to enhance GABAergic transmission: the positive allosteric modulator (PAM) of the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5), ADX47273, and the partial agonist of the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α7 nAChR), SSR180711. Adolescent rats (4-5 weeks) subjected to PCP treatment during the second postnatal week displayed a consistent deficit in prepulse inhibition (PPI), which was reversed by a one-week treatment with ADX47273 or SSR180711. We examined GABAergic transmission by whole cell patch-clamp recordings of miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mIPSC) in pyramidal neurons in layer II/III of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and by activation of extrasynaptic δ-containing GABAA receptors by THIP. Following PCP treatment, pyramidal neurons displayed a reduced mIPSC frequency and up-regulation of extrasynaptic THIP-induced current. ADX47273 treatment restored this up-regulation of THIP-induced current. Reduced receptor function seems to be the underlying cause of the reported changes, since repeated treatment with ADX47273 and SSR180711 decreased the induction of spontaneous inhibitory current caused by acute and direct agonism of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs in slices. These results show that repeated administration of ADX47273 or SSR180711 reverses certain behavioural and functional deficits induced by PCP, likely through down-regulation or desensitisation of mGluR5s and α7 nAChRs, respectively. PMID:23643744

  13. Dopamine D1 receptor activation improves PCP-induced performance disruption in the 5C-CPT by reducing inappropriate responding.

    PubMed

    Barnes, S A; Young, J W; Bate, S T; Neill, J C

    2016-03-01

    Attentional deficits contribute significantly to the functional disability of schizophrenia patients. The 5-choice continuous performance test (5C-CPT) measures attention in mice, rats, and humans, requiring the discrimination of trial types that either require a response or the inhibition of a response. The 5C-CPT, one version of human continuous performance tests (CPT), enables attentional testing in rodents in a manner consistent with humans. Augmenting the prefrontal cortical dopaminergic system has been proposed as a therapeutic target to attenuate the cognitive disturbances associated with schizophrenia. Using translational behavioural tasks in conjunction with inducing conditions relevant to schizophrenia pathophysiology enable the assessment of pro-attentive properties of compounds that augment dopaminergic activity. Here, using a repeated phencyclidine (PCP) treatment regimen and the 5C-CPT paradigm, we assess the pro-attentive properties of SKF 38393, a dopamine D1 receptor agonist, in rats. We show that repeated PCP treatment induces robust deficits in 5C-CPT performance indicative of impaired attention. Pre-treatment with SKF 38393 partially attenuates the PCP-induced deficits in 5C-CPT performance by reducing false alarm responding and increasing response accuracy. Impaired target detection was still evident in SKF 38393-treated rats however. Thus, augmentation of the dopamine D1 system improves PCP-induces deficits in 5C-CPT performance by selectively reducing aspects of inappropriate responding. These findings provide evidence to support the hypothesis that novel therapies targeting the dopamine D1 receptor system could improve aspects of attentional deficits in schizophrenia patients. PMID:26658514

  14. CTHRC1 Acts as a Prognostic Factor and Promotes Invasiveness of Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumors by Activating Wnt/PCP-Rho Signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Ming-Ze; Zhuang, Chun; Yang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Zi-Zhen; Ma, Hong; Zhang, Wen-Ming; You, Haiyan; Qin, Wenxin; Gu, Jianren; Yang, Shengli; Cao, Hui; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) are the major gastrointestinal mesenchymal tumors with a variable malignancy ranging from a curable disorder to highly malignant sarcomas. Metastasis and recurrence are the main causes of death in GIST patients. To further explore the mechanism of metastasis and to more accurately estimate the recurrence risk of GISTs after surgery, the clinical significance and functional role of collagen triple helix repeat containing-1 (CTHRC1) in GIST were investigated. We found that CTHRC1 expression was gradually elevated as the risk grade of NIH classification increased, and was closely correlated with disease-free survival and overall survival in 412 GIST patients. In vitro experiments showed that recombinant CTHRC1 protein promoted the migration and invasion capacities of primary GIST cells. A luciferase reporter assay and pull down assay demonstrated that recombinant CTHRC1 protein activated noncanonical Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling but inhibited canonical Wnt signaling. The pro-motility effect of CTHRC1 on GIST cells was reversed by using a Wnt5a neutralizing antibody and inhibitors of Rac1 or ROCK. Taken together, these data indicate that CTHRC1 may serve as a new predictor of recurrence risk and prognosis in post-operative GIST patients and may play an important role in facilitating GIST progression. Furthermore, CTHRC1 promotes GIST cell migration and invasion by activating Wnt/PCP-Rho signaling, suggesting that the CTHRC1-Wnt/PCP-Rho axis may be a new therapeutic target for interventions against GIST invasion and metastasis. PMID:24726140

  15. The effects of phencyclidine (PCP) on anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark exploration test are age dependent, sexually dimorphic, and task dependent.

    PubMed

    Turgeon, Sarah M; Kim, Daniel; Pritchard, Melissa; Salgado, Sanjay; Thaler, Alison

    2011-11-01

    Previous research in our laboratory revealed sexually dimorphic effects of prior exposure to phencyclidine (PCP) on elevated plus maze behavior. In an attempt to examine the developmental time course of this effect and determine the extent to which it generalizes to other anxiety paradigms, young adult (61-64 days old) and adult (96-107 days old) male and female rats were treated with PCP (15 mg/kg) or saline. Following a two week withdrawal period, animals were tested in either the elevated plus maze (EPM) or a light-dark exploration (LD) test. In adults, both tests revealed a sexually dimorphic effect driven by PCP-induced decreases in anxiety in females as indicated by increased time spent in the open arms of the EPM and in the lit compartment of the LD test and increased anxiety in males as indicated by decreased time spent in the lit compartment of the LD. In young animals, PCP pretreatment decreased open arm exploration in the elevated plus maze, indicating increased anxiety. However, PCP increased time spent in the light compartment in the light-dark exploration test, indicating decreased anxiety. Corticosterone levels measured 15 min after the onset of the EPM failed to reveal an association between the behavioral effects of PCP and corticosterone levels. The results in adults substantiate the previously observed sexually dimorphic effect of PCP on elevated plus maze behavior in adults and indicate that the effect generalizes to another anxiety paradigm. The results in the younger animals suggest an age dependent effect of PCP on anxiety in general and indicate that behaviors in the elevated plus maze and the light-dark exploration test reflect dissociable psychobiological states.

  16. Substance use - phencyclidine (PCP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... drugs called hallucinogens. These are substances that cause hallucinations . These are things that you see, hear, or ... up, excited, tense, confused, or irritable ( agitation ), having hallucinations Physical reactions may include muscle breakdown or twitching, ...

  17. Dickkopf-1 regulates gastrulation movements by coordinated modulation of Wnt/βcatenin and Wnt/PCP activities, through interaction with the Dally-like homolog Knypek

    PubMed Central

    Caneparo, Luca; Huang, Ya-Lin; Staudt, Nicole; Tada, Masasumi; Ahrendt, Reiner; Kazanskaya, Olga; Niehrs, Christof; Houart, Corinne

    2007-01-01

    Dickkopf-1 (Dkk1) is a secreted protein that negatively modulates the Wnt/βcatenin pathway. Lack of Dkk1 function affects head formation in frog and mice, supporting the idea that Dkk1 acts as a “head inducer” during gastrulation. We show here that lack of Dkk1 function accelerates internalization and rostral progression of the mesendoderm and that gain of function slows down both internalization and convergence extension, indicating a novel role for Dkk1 in modulating these movements. The motility phenotype found in the morphants is not observed in embryos in which the Wnt/βcatenin pathway is overactivated, and that dominant-negative Wnt proteins are not able to rescue the gastrulation movement defect induced by absence of Dkk1. These data strongly suggest that Dkk1 is acting in a βcatenin independent fashion when modulating gastrulation movements. We demonstrate that the glypican 4/6 homolog Knypek (Kny) binds to Dkk1 and that they are able to functionally interact in vivo. Moreover, Dkk1 regulation of gastrulation movements is kny dependent. Kny is a component of the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. We found that indeed Dkk1 is able to activate this pathway in both Xenopus and zebrafish. Furthermore, concomitant alteration of the βcatenin and PCP activities is able to mimic the morphant accelerated cell motility phenotype. Our data therefore indicate that Dkk1 regulates gastrulation movement through interaction with LRP5/6 and Kny and coordinated modulations of Wnt/βcatenin and Wnt/PCP pathways. PMID:17322405

  18. Nicotine and clozapine selectively reverse a PCP-induced deficit of PPI in BALB/cByJ but not NMRI mice: comparison with risperidone.

    PubMed

    Andreasen, J T; Andersen, K K; Nielsen, E Ø; Mathiasen, L; Mirza, N R

    2006-02-15

    Schizophrenic patients have deficits in prepulse inhibition (PPI) that may be alleviated by smoking/nicotine. The effect of nicotinic agents on PPI in rodents is equivocal and few studies in mice have been reported. Thus, we assessed nicotine's (0.03-1mg/kg) effect on PPI in five mouse strains with no effects. We next determined if nicotine would reverse a phencyclidine (PCP)-induced deficit of PPI in BALB/cByJ and NMRI mice. BALB/cByJ mice have a low density of [(125)I]alpha-bungaratoxin binding in the hippocampus and poor inhibitory gating of auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), a model related to PPI. At 1mg/kg, nicotine selectively reversed the PCP-induced deficit of PPI in BALB/cByJ mice. The pharmacokinetic profile of nicotine (T(1/2), C(max), T(max) and AUC) was identical in both strains, obviating this as a factor for the strain-dependent effect observed. Moreover, 1mg/kg nicotine inhibited in vivo [(3)H]epibatidine binding with the same time-course in both strains, indicating no difference in brain "kinetics". Since high doses of nicotine were effective in BALB/cByJ mice a role for low-affinity nicotinic receptors, e.g. alpha(7) receptors, is plausible. Clozapine, but not risperidone, also only reversed the PCP deficit of PPI in BALB/cByJ. Clozapine and nicotine also enhance inhibitory gating of AEPs in DBA/2 mice, and clozapine's effect is antagonized by an alpha(7) antagonist. Our data and previous evidence possibly suggest a role for low-affinity nicotinic receptors in the effects of clozapine and nicotine. Furthermore, BALB/cByJ mice may represent a model to test the effects of nicotinic agents acting at low-affinity nicotinic receptors.

  19. Synthesis and Reactivity of Four- and Five-Coordinate Low-Spin Cobalt(II) PCP Pincer Complexes and Some Nickel(II) Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous CoCl2 or [NiCl2(DME)] reacts with the ligand PCPMe-iPr (1) in the presence of nBuLi to afford the 15e and 16e square planar complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (2) and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (3), respectively. Complex 2 is a paramagnetic d7 low-spin complex, which is a useful precursor for a series of Co(I), Co(II), and Co(III) PCP complexes. Complex 2 reacts readily with CO and pyridine to afford the five-coordinate square-pyramidal 17e complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)Cl] (4) and [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(py)Cl] (5), respectively, while in the presence of Ag+ and CO the cationic complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)2]+ (6) is afforded. The effective magnetic moments μeff of all Co(II) complexes were derived from the temperature dependence of the inverse molar magnetic susceptibility by SQUID measurements and are in the range 1.9 to 2.4 μB. This is consistent with a d7 low-spin configuration with some degree of spin–orbit coupling. Oxidation of 2 with CuCl2 affords the paramagnetic Co(III) PCP complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl2] (7), while the synthesis of the diamagnetic Co(I) complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)2] (8) was achieved by stirring 2 in toluene with KC8 in the presence of CO. Finally, the cationic 16e Ni(II) PCP complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)]+ (10) was obtained by reacting complex 3 with 1 equiv of AgSbF6 in the presence of CO. The reactivity of CO addition to Co(I), Co(II), and Ni(II) PCP square planar complexes of the type [M(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)]n (n = +1, 0) was investigated by DFT calculations, showing that formation of the Co species, 6 and 8, is thermodynamically favorable, while Ni(II) maintains the 16e configuration since CO addition is unfavorable in this case. X-ray structures of most complexes are provided and discussed. A structural feature of interest is that the apical CO ligand in 4 deviates significantly from linearity, with a Co–C–O angle of 170.0(1)°. The DFT-calculated value is 172°, clearly showing that this is not a packing but an electronic effect.

  20. Attenuation of short-period P, PcP, ScP, and pP waves in the earth's mantle

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, G.; Clements, J.R.

    1982-05-10

    The parameter t* (ratio of body wave travel time to the average quality factor Q) was estimated under various assumptions of the nature of the earthquake sources for short-period P, PcP, and ScP phases originating from earthquakes in the Fiji-Tonga region and recorded at the Warramunga Seismic Array at Tennant Creek (Northern Territory, Australia). Spectral ratios were calculated for the amplitudes of PcP to P and of pP to P. The data reveal a laterally varying Q structure in the Fiji-Tonga region. The high-Q lithosphere descending beneath the Tonga Island arc is overlain above 350 km depth by a wedgelike zone of high attenuation with an average Q/sub ..cap alpha../ between 120 and 200 at short periods. The upper mantle farther to the west of the Tonga island arc is less attenuating, with Q/sub ..cap alpha../, between 370 and 560. Q/sub ..cap alpha../ is about 500 in the upper mantle on the oceanic side of the subduction zone. The t* estimates of this study are much smaller than estimates from the free oscillation model SL8. This can be partly explained by regional variations of Q in the upper mantle. If no lateral Q variations occur in the lower mantle, a frequency-dependent Q can make the PcP and ScP observations consistent with model SL8. Adopting the absorption band model to describe the frequency dependence of Q, the parameter tau/sub 2/, the cut-off period of the high-frequency end of the absorption band, was determined. For different source models with finite corner frequencies, the average tau/sub 2/ for the mantle is between 0.01 and 0.10 s (corresponding to frequencies between 16 and 1.6 Hz) as derived from the PcP data, and between 0.06 and 0.12 s (2.7 and 1.3 Hz), as derived from the ScP data.

  1. Synthesis and Reactivity of Four- and Five-Coordinate Low-Spin Cobalt(II) PCP Pincer Complexes and Some Nickel(II) Analogues

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Anhydrous CoCl2 or [NiCl2(DME)] reacts with the ligand PCPMe-iPr (1) in the presence of nBuLi to afford the 15e and 16e square planar complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (2) and [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)Cl] (3), respectively. Complex 2 is a paramagnetic d7 low-spin complex, which is a useful precursor for a series of Co(I), Co(II), and Co(III) PCP complexes. Complex 2 reacts readily with CO and pyridine to afford the five-coordinate square-pyramidal 17e complexes [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)Cl] (4) and [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(py)Cl] (5), respectively, while in the presence of Ag+ and CO the cationic complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)2]+ (6) is afforded. The effective magnetic moments μeff of all Co(II) complexes were derived from the temperature dependence of the inverse molar magnetic susceptibility by SQUID measurements and are in the range 1.9 to 2.4 μB. This is consistent with a d7 low-spin configuration with some degree of spin–orbit coupling. Oxidation of 2 with CuCl2 affords the paramagnetic Co(III) PCP complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)Cl2] (7), while the synthesis of the diamagnetic Co(I) complex [Co(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)2] (8) was achieved by stirring 2 in toluene with KC8 in the presence of CO. Finally, the cationic 16e Ni(II) PCP complex [Ni(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)]+ (10) was obtained by reacting complex 3 with 1 equiv of AgSbF6 in the presence of CO. The reactivity of CO addition to Co(I), Co(II), and Ni(II) PCP square planar complexes of the type [M(PCPMe-iPr)(CO)]n (n = +1, 0) was investigated by DFT calculations, showing that formation of the Co species, 6 and 8, is thermodynamically favorable, while Ni(II) maintains the 16e configuration since CO addition is unfavorable in this case. X-ray structures of most complexes are provided and discussed. A structural feature of interest is that the apical CO ligand in 4 deviates significantly from linearity, with a Co–C–O angle of 170.0(1)°. The DFT-calculated value is 172°, clearly showing that this is not a packing but an electronic effect. PMID:27642210

  2. The Comparative Photodegradation Activities of Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs) Using UV Alone and TiO2-Derived Photocatalysts in Methanol Soil Washing Solution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zeyu; Zhang, Yaxin; Wang, Hongtao; Chen, Tan; Lu, Wenjing

    2014-01-01

    Photochemical treatment is increasingly being applied to remedy environmental problems. TiO2-derived catalysts are efficiently and widely used in photodegradation applications. The efficiency of various photochemical treatments, namely, the use of UV irradiation without catalyst or with TiO2/graphene-TiO2 photodegradation methods was determined by comparing the photodegadation of two main types of hydrophobic chlorinated aromatic pollutants, namely, pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Results show that photodegradation in methanol solution under pure UV irradiation was more efficient than that with either one of the catalysts tested, contrary to previous results in which photodegradation rates were enhanced using TiO2-derived catalysts. The effects of various factors, such as UV light illumination, addition of methanol to the solution, catalyst dosage, and the pH of the reaction mixture, were examined. The degradation pathway was deduced. The photochemical treatment in methanol soil washing solution did not benefit from the use of the catalysts tested. Pure UV irradiation was sufficient for the dechlorination and degradation of the PCP and PCBs. PMID:25254664

  3. Xenopus Pkdcc1 and Pkdcc2 Are Two New Tyrosine Kinases Involved in the Regulation of JNK Dependent Wnt/PCP Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Vitorino, Marta; Silva, Ana Cristina; Inácio, José Manuel; Ramalho, José Silva; Gur, Michal; Fainsod, Abraham; Steinbeisser, Herbert; Belo, José António

    2015-01-01

    Protein Kinase Domain Containing, Cytoplasmic (PKDCC) is a protein kinase which has been implicated in longitudinal bone growth through regulation of chondrocytes formation. Nevertheless, the mechanism by which this occurs remains unknown. Here, we identified two new members of the PKDCC family, Pkdcc1 and Pkdcc2 from Xenopus laevis. Interestingly, our knockdown experiments revealed that these two proteins are both involved on blastopore and neural tube closure during gastrula and neurula stages, respectively. In vertebrates, tissue polarity and cell movement observed during gastrulation and neural tube closure are controlled by Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) molecular pathway. Our results showed that Pkdcc1 and Pkdcc2 promote the recruitment of Dvl to the plasma membrane. But surprisingly, they revealed different roles in the induction of a luciferase reporter under the control of Atf2 promoter. While Pkdcc1 induces Atf2 expression, Pkdcc2 does not, and furthermore inhibits its normal induction by Wnt11 and Wnt5a. Altogether our data show, for the first time, that members of the PKDCC family are involved in the regulation of JNK dependent Wnt/PCP signaling pathway. PMID:26270962

  4. A PCP Pincer Ligand for Coordination Polymers with Versatile Chemical Reactivity: Selective Activation of CO2 Gas over CO Gas in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    He, Junpeng; Waggoner, Nolan W; Dunning, Samuel G; Steiner, Alexander; Lynch, Vincent M; Humphrey, Simon M

    2016-09-26

    A tetra(carboxylated) PCP pincer ligand has been synthesized as a building block for porous coordination polymers (PCPs). The air- and moisture-stable PCP metalloligands are rigid tetratopic linkers that are geometrically akin to ligands used in the synthesis of robust metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, the design principle is demonstrated by cyclometalation with Pd(II) Cl and subsequent use of the metalloligand to prepare a crystalline 3D MOF by direct reaction with Co(II) ions and structural resolution by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Pd-Cl groups inside the pores are accessible to post-synthetic modifications that facilitate chemical reactions previously unobserved in MOFs: a Pd-CH3 activated material undergoes rapid insertion of CO2 gas to give Pd-OC(O)CH3 at 1 atm and 298 K. However, since the material is highly selective for the adsorption of CO2 over CO, a Pd-N3 modified version resists CO insertion under the same conditions. PMID:27532740

  5. A PCP Pincer Ligand for Coordination Polymers with Versatile Chemical Reactivity: Selective Activation of CO2 Gas over CO Gas in the Solid State.

    PubMed

    He, Junpeng; Waggoner, Nolan W; Dunning, Samuel G; Steiner, Alexander; Lynch, Vincent M; Humphrey, Simon M

    2016-09-26

    A tetra(carboxylated) PCP pincer ligand has been synthesized as a building block for porous coordination polymers (PCPs). The air- and moisture-stable PCP metalloligands are rigid tetratopic linkers that are geometrically akin to ligands used in the synthesis of robust metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Here, the design principle is demonstrated by cyclometalation with Pd(II) Cl and subsequent use of the metalloligand to prepare a crystalline 3D MOF by direct reaction with Co(II) ions and structural resolution by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The Pd-Cl groups inside the pores are accessible to post-synthetic modifications that facilitate chemical reactions previously unobserved in MOFs: a Pd-CH3 activated material undergoes rapid insertion of CO2 gas to give Pd-OC(O)CH3 at 1 atm and 298 K. However, since the material is highly selective for the adsorption of CO2 over CO, a Pd-N3 modified version resists CO insertion under the same conditions.

  6. Localized double-array stacking analysis of PcP: D″ and ULVZ structure beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, central Pacific, and north Pacific

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutko, Alexander R.; Lay, Thorne; Revenaugh, Justin

    2009-01-01

    A large, high quality P-wave data set comprising short-period and broadband signals sampling four separate regions in the lowermost mantle beneath the Cocos plate, Mexico, the central Pacific, and the north Pacific is analyzed using regional one-dimensional double-array stacking and modelling with reflectivity synthetics. A data-screening criterion retains only events with stable PcP energy in the final data stacks used for modelling and interpretation. This significantly improves the signal stacks relative to including unscreened observations, allows confident alignment on the PcP arrival and allows tight bounds to be placed on P-wave velocity structure above the core–mantle boundary (CMB). The PcP reflections under the Cocos plate are well modelled without any ultra-low velocity zone from 5 to 20°N. At latitudes from 15 to 20°N, we find evidence for two P-wave velocity discontinuities in the D″ region. The first is ∼182 km above the CMB with a δln Vp of +1.5%, near the same depth as a weaker discontinuity (<+0.5%) observed from 5 to 15°N in prior work. The other reflector is ∼454 km above the CMB, with a δln Vp of +0.4%; this appears to be a shallower continuation of the joint P- and S-wave discontinuity previously detected south of 15° N, which is presumed to be the perovskite to post-perovskite phase transition. The data stacks for paths bottoming below Mexico have PcP images that are well matched with the simple IASP91 structure, contradicting previous inferences of ULVZ presence in this region. These particular data are not very sensitive to any D″ discontinuities, and simply bound them to be <∼2%, if present. Data sampling the lowermost mantle beneath the central Pacific confirm the presence of a ∼15-km thick ultra-low velocity zone (ULVZ) just above the CMB, with δln Vp and δln Vs of around −3 to −4% and −4 to −8%, respectively. The ULVZ models predict previous S-wave data stacks well. The data for this region

  7. Contrasting mechanisms of action and sensitivity to antipsychotics of phencyclidine versus amphetamine: importance of nucleus accumbens 5-HT2A sites for PCP-induced locomotion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Millan, M J; Brocco, M; Gobert, A; Joly, F; Bervoets, K; Rivet, J; Newman-Tancredi, A; Audinot, V; Maurel, S

    1999-12-01

    In the present study, the comparative mechanisms of action of phencyclidine (PCP) and amphetamine were addressed employing the parameter of locomotion in rats. PCP-induced locomotion (PLOC) was potently blocked by the selective serotonin (5-HT)2A vs. D2 antagonists, SR46349, MDL100,907, ritanserin and fananserin, which barely affected amphetamine-induced locomotion (ALOC). In contrast, the selective D2 vs. 5-HT2A antagonists, eticlopride, raclopride and amisulpride, preferentially inhibited ALOC vs. PLOC. The potency of these drugs and 12 multireceptorial antipsychotics in inhibiting PLOC vs. ALOC correlated significantly with affinities at 5-HT2A vs. D2 receptors, respectively. Amphetamine and PCP both dose dependently increased dialysate levels of dopamine (DA) and 5-HT in the nucleus accumbens, striatum and frontal cortex (FCX) of freely moving rats, but PCP was proportionally more effective than amphetamine in elevating levels of 5-HT vs. DA in the accumbens. Further, whereas microinjection of PCP into the accumbens elicited locomotion, its introduction into the striatum or FCX was ineffective. The action of intra-accumbens PCP, but not intra-accumbens amphetamine, was abolished by SR46349 and clozapine. Parachloroamphetamine, which depleted accumbens pools of 5-HT but not DA, likewise abolished PLOC without affecting ALOC. In contrast, intra-accumbens 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), which depleted DA but not 5-HT, abolished ALOC but only partially attenuated PLOC. In conclusion, PLOC involves (indirect) activation of accumbens-localized 5-HT2A receptors by 5-HT. PLOC is, correspondingly, more potently blocked than ALOC by antipsychotics displaying marked affinity at 5-HT2A receptors.

  8. An oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer: Development and in vitro evaluation.

    PubMed

    Martien, Ronny; Hoyer, Herbert; Perera, Glen; Schnürch, Andreas Bernkop

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and evaluate an oral oligonucleotide delivery system based on a thiolated polymer/reduced glutathione (GSH) system providing a protective effect toward nucleases and permeation enhancement. A polycarbophil-cysteine conjugate (PCP-Cys) was synthesized. Enzymatic degradation of a model oligonucleotide by DNase I and within freshly collected intestinal fluid was investigated in the absence and presence of PCP-Cys. Permeation studies with PCP-Cys/GSH versus control were performed in vitro on Caco-2 cell monolayers and ex vivo on rat intestinal mucosa. PCP-Cys displayed 223 ± 13.8 μmol thiol groups per gram polymer. After 4h, 61% of the free oligonucleotides were degraded by DNase I and 80% within intestinal fluid. In contrast, less than 41% (DNase I) and 60% (intestinal fluid) were degraded in the presence of 0.02% (m/v) PCP-Cys. Permeation studies revealed an 8-fold (Caco-2) and 10-fold (intestinal mucosa) increase in apparent permeability compared to buffer control. Hence, this PCP-Cys/GSH system might be a promising tool for the oral administration of oligonucleotides as it allows a significant protection toward degrading enzymes and facilitates their transport across intestinal membranes.

  9. Recent advances in visible-light-responsive photocatalysts for hydrogen production and solar energy conversion--from semiconducting TiO2 to MOF/PCP photocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Horiuchi, Yu; Toyao, Takashi; Takeuchi, Masato; Matsuoka, Masaya; Anpo, Masakazu

    2013-08-28

    The present perspective describes recent advances in visible-light-responsive photocatalysts intended to develop novel and efficient solar energy conversion technologies, including water splitting and photofuel cells. Water splitting is recognized as one of the most promising techniques to convert solar energy as a clean and abundant energy resource into chemical energy in the form of hydrogen. In recent years, increasing concern is directed to not only the development of new photocatalytic materials but also the importance of technologies to produce hydrogen and oxygen separately. Photofuel cells can convert solar energy into electrical energy by decomposing bio-related compounds and livestock waste as fuels. The advances of photocatalysts enabling these solar energy conversion technologies have been going on since the discovery of semiconducting titanium dioxide materials and have extended to organic-inorganic hybrid materials, such as metal-organic frameworks and porous coordination polymers (MOF/PCP).

  10. Formation of a "Pre-mouth Array" from the Extreme Anterior Domain Is Directed by Neural Crest and Wnt/PCP Signaling.

    PubMed

    Jacox, Laura; Chen, Justin; Rothman, Alyssa; Lathrop-Marshall, Hillary; Sive, Hazel

    2016-08-01

    The mouth arises from the extreme anterior domain (EAD), a region where the ectoderm and endoderm are directly juxtaposed. Here, we identify a "pre-mouth array" in Xenopus that forms soon after the cranial neural crest has migrated to lie on either side of the EAD. Initially, EAD ectoderm comprises a wide and short epithelial mass that becomes narrow and tall with cells and nuclei changing shape, a characteristic of convergent extension. The resulting two rows of cells-the pre-mouth array-later split down the midline to surround the mouth opening. Neural crest is essential for convergent extension and likely signals to the EAD through the Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Fzl7 receptor is locally required in EAD ectoderm, while Wnt11 ligand is required more globally. Indeed, heterologous cells expressing Wnt11 can elicit EAD convergent extension. The study reveals a precise cellular mechanism that positions and contributes to the future mouth. PMID:27425611

  11. Evaluation of the information and support services in the voluntary sector using a new P-C-P (pivotal-core-peripheral) attributes model.

    PubMed

    Philip, G; Stewart, J

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a modified SERVQUAL research instrument for measuring the service quality of voluntary organizations from the perspective of their 'customers'. A series of focus group meetings were run with providers and users of the services to identify the appropriate dimensions of service quality. These were structured meetings led by the researchers addressing set questions in a group setting. The meeting enabled the identification of six different dimensions of service quality which neatly mapped on to the pivotal-core-peripheral (P-C-P attributes model [Philip and Hazlett, 1997]), which was developed after extensive research of existing models such as SERVQUAL. These dimensions were used to develop a questionnaire to assess service quality within the voluntary sector. The questionnaire was distributed to 2005 service users, representing eight voluntary organizations from across Northern Ireland. The research resulted in the development of a methodology and research instrument suitable for measuring service quality in the voluntary sector.

  12. Comparison of ( sup 3 H)Phencyclidine (( sup 3 H)PCP) and ( sup 3 H) N-(1-(2-thienyl) cyclohexyl)piperidine (( sup 3 H)TCP) binding properties to rat and human brain membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Vignon, J.; Chaudieu, I.; Allaoua, H.; Journod, L.; Javoy-Agid, F.; Agid, Y.; Chicheportiche, R.

    1989-01-01

    The investigation of ({sup 3}H)PCP and ({sup 3}H)TCP binding properties to rat cerebrum and cerebellum resulted in the demonstration of multiple binding sites for the two drugs. In the two tissue preparations PCP had a lower affinity than TCP. In membranes from the cerebrum an equal number of high affinity binding sites were present for ({sup 3}H)PCP and ({sup 3}H)TCP. However, low affinity binding sites were two times more numerous for ({sup 3}H)PCP than for ({sup 3}H)TCP. In the cerebellum, the number of high and low affinity sites labeled by the two radioligands was identical, but the number of high affinity sites was about 7 fold lower than in cerebrum. In human cerebral cortex samples ({sup 3}H)TCP also bound to two different sites. The number of high and low affinity sites were 12 and 3 times, respectively, less abundant than in the rat cerebrum. Low affinity sites were of higher affinity than corresponding sites in the rat brain. In the human cerebellum ({sup 3}H)TCP binding parameters were identical to those measured in the same region in the rat.

  13. Genomic Insights into a New Citrobacter koseri Strain Revealed Gene Exchanges with the Virulence-Associated Yersinia pestis pPCP1 Plasmid.

    PubMed

    Armougom, Fabrice; Bitam, Idir; Croce, Olivier; Merhej, Vicky; Barassi, Lina; Nguyen, Ti-Thien; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The history of infectious diseases raised the plague as one of the most devastating for human beings. Far too often considered an ancient disease, the frequent resurgence of the plague has led to consider it as a reemerging disease in Madagascar, Algeria, Libya, and Congo. The genetic factors associated with the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, involve the acquisition of the pPCP1 plasmid that promotes host invasion through the expression of the virulence factor Pla. The surveillance of plague foci after the 2003 outbreak in Algeria resulted in a positive detection of the specific pla gene of Y. pestis in rodents. However, the phenotypic characterization of the isolate identified a Citrobacter koseri. The comparative genomics of our sequenced C. koseri URMITE genome revealed a mosaic gene structure resulting from the lifestyle of our isolate and provided evidence for gene exchanges with different enteric bacteria. The most striking was the acquisition of a continuous 2 kb genomic fragment containing the virulence factor Pla of the Y. pestis pPCP1 plasmid; however, the subcutaneous injection of the CKU strain in mice did not produce any pathogenic effect. Our findings demonstrate that fast molecular detection of plague using solely the pla gene is unsuitable and should rather require Y. pestis gene marker combinations. We also suggest that the evolutionary force that might govern the expression of pathogenicity can occur through the acquisition of virulence genes but could also require the loss or the inactivation of resident genes such as antivirulence genes. PMID:27014253

  14. Genomic Insights into a New Citrobacter koseri Strain Revealed Gene Exchanges with the Virulence-Associated Yersinia pestis pPCP1 Plasmid

    PubMed Central

    Armougom, Fabrice; Bitam, Idir; Croce, Olivier; Merhej, Vicky; Barassi, Lina; Nguyen, Ti-Thien; La Scola, Bernard; Raoult, Didier

    2016-01-01

    The history of infectious diseases raised the plague as one of the most devastating for human beings. Far too often considered an ancient disease, the frequent resurgence of the plague has led to consider it as a reemerging disease in Madagascar, Algeria, Libya, and Congo. The genetic factors associated with the pathogenicity of Yersinia pestis, the causative agent of the plague, involve the acquisition of the pPCP1 plasmid that promotes host invasion through the expression of the virulence factor Pla. The surveillance of plague foci after the 2003 outbreak in Algeria resulted in a positive detection of the specific pla gene of Y. pestis in rodents. However, the phenotypic characterization of the isolate identified a Citrobacter koseri. The comparative genomics of our sequenced C. koseri URMITE genome revealed a mosaic gene structure resulting from the lifestyle of our isolate and provided evidence for gene exchanges with different enteric bacteria. The most striking was the acquisition of a continuous 2 kb genomic fragment containing the virulence factor Pla of the Y. pestis pPCP1 plasmid; however, the subcutaneous injection of the CKU strain in mice did not produce any pathogenic effect. Our findings demonstrate that fast molecular detection of plague using solely the pla gene is unsuitable and should rather require Y. pestis gene marker combinations. We also suggest that the evolutionary force that might govern the expression of pathogenicity can occur through the acquisition of virulence genes but could also require the loss or the inactivation of resident genes such as antivirulence genes. PMID:27014253

  15. Population-Based Versus Practice-Based Recall for Childhood Immunizations: A Randomized Controlled Comparative Effectiveness Trial

    PubMed Central

    Saville, Alison; Dickinson, L. Miriam; Eisert, Sheri; Reynolds, Joni; Herrero, Diana; Beaty, Brenda; Albright, Karen; Dibert, Eva; Koehler, Vicky; Lockhart, Steven; Calonge, Ned

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We compared the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of population-based recall (Pop-recall) versus practice-based recall (PCP-recall) at increasing immunizations among preschool children. Methods. This cluster-randomized trial involved children aged 19 to 35 months needing immunizations in 8 rural and 6 urban Colorado counties. In Pop-recall counties, recall was conducted centrally using the Colorado Immunization Information System (CIIS). In PCP-recall counties, practices were invited to attend webinar training using CIIS and offered financial support for mailings. The percentage of up-to-date (UTD) and vaccine documentation were compared 6 months after recall. A mixed-effects model assessed the association between intervention and whether a child became UTD. Results. Ten of 195 practices (5%) implemented recall in PCP-recall counties. Among children needing immunizations, 18.7% became UTD in Pop-recall versus 12.8% in PCP-recall counties (P < .001); 31.8% had documented receipt of 1 or more vaccines in Pop-recall versus 22.6% in PCP-recall counties (P < .001). Relative risk estimates from multivariable modeling were 1.23 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.10, 1.37) for becoming UTD and 1.26 (95% CI = 1.15, 1.38) for receipt of any vaccine. Costs for Pop-recall versus PCP-recall were $215 versus $1981 per practice and $17 versus $62 per child brought UTD. Conclusions. Population-based recall conducted centrally was more effective and cost-effective at increasing immunization rates in preschool children. PMID:23237154

  16. Extraction of weak PcP phases using the slant-stacklet transform - II: constraints on lateral variations of structure near the core-mantle boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ventosa, Sergi; Romanowicz, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Resolving the topography of the core-mantle boundary (CMB) and the structure and composition of the D″ region is key to improving our understanding of the interaction between the Earth's mantle and core. Observations of traveltimes and amplitudes of short-period teleseismic body waves sensitive to lowermost mantle provide essential constraints on the properties of this region. Major challenges are low signal-to-noise ratio of the target phases and interference with other mantle phases. In a previous paper (Part I), we introduced the slant-stacklet transform to enhance the signal of the core-reflected (PcP) phase and to isolate it from stronger signals in the coda of the P wave. Then we minimized a linear misfit between P and PcP waveforms to improve the quality of PcP-P traveltime difference measurements as compared to standard cross-correlation methods. This method significantly increases the quantity and the quality of PcP-P traveltime observations available for the modelling of structure near the CMB. Here we illustrate our approach in a series of regional studies of the CMB and D″ using PcP-P observations with unprecedented resolution from high-quality dense arrays located in North America and Japan for events with magnitude Mw>5.4 and distances up to 80°. In this process, we carefully analyse various sources of errors and show that mantle heterogeneity is the most significant. We find and correct bias due to mantle heterogeneities that is as large as 1 s in traveltime, comparable to the largest lateral PcP-P traveltime variations observed. We illustrate the importance of accurate mantle corrections and the need for higher resolution mantle models for future studies. After optimal mantle corrections, the main signal left is relatively long wavelength in the regions sampled, except at the border of the Pacific large-low shear velocity province (LLSVP). We detect the northwest border of the Pacific LLSVP in the western Pacific from array observations in

  17. High average daily intake of PCDD/Fs and serum levels in residents living near a deserted factory producing pentachlorophenol (PCP) in Taiwan: influence of contaminated fish consumption.

    PubMed

    Lee, C C; Lin, W T; Liao, P C; Su, H J; Chen, H L

    2006-05-01

    An abandoned pentachlorophenol plant and nearby area in southern Taiwan was heavily contaminated by dioxins, impurities formed in the PCP production process. The investigation showed that the average serum PCDD/Fs of residents living nearby area (62.5 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) was higher than those living in the non-polluted area (22.5 and 18.2 pg WHO-TEQ/g lipid) (P<0.05). In biota samples, average PCDD/F of milkfish in sea reservoir (28.3 pg WHO-TEQ/g) was higher than those in the nearby fish farm (0.15 pg WHO-TEQ/g), and Tilapia and shrimp showed the similar trend. The average daily PCDD/Fs intake of 38% participants was higher than 4 pg WHO-TEQ/kg/day suggested by the world health organization. Serum PCDD/F was positively associated with average daily intake (ADI) after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, and smoking status. In addition, a prospective cohort study is suggested to determine the long-term health effects on the people living near factory. PMID:16213641

  18. Evaluation of the information and support services in the voluntary sector using a new P-C-P (pivotal-core-peripheral) attributes model.

    PubMed

    Philip, G; Stewart, J

    2000-11-01

    This paper describes the development and use of a modified SERVQUAL research instrument for measuring the service quality of voluntary organizations from the perspective of their 'customers'. A series of focus group meetings were run with providers and users of the services to identify the appropriate dimensions of service quality. These were structured meetings led by the researchers addressing set questions in a group setting. The meeting enabled the identification of six different dimensions of service quality which neatly mapped on to the pivotal-core-peripheral (P-C-P attributes model [Philip and Hazlett, 1997]), which was developed after extensive research of existing models such as SERVQUAL. These dimensions were used to develop a questionnaire to assess service quality within the voluntary sector. The questionnaire was distributed to 2005 service users, representing eight voluntary organizations from across Northern Ireland. The research resulted in the development of a methodology and research instrument suitable for measuring service quality in the voluntary sector. PMID:11142071

  19. Structural and Temporal Requirements of Wnt/PCP Protein Vangl2 Function for Convergence and Extension Movements and Facial Branchiomotor Neuron Migration in Zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiufang; Sittaramane, Vinoth; Gurung, Suman; Chandrasekhar, Anand

    2014-01-01

    Van gogh-like 2 (Vangl2), a core component of the Wnt/Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) signaling pathway, is a four-pass transmembrane protein with N-terminal and C-terminal domains located in the cytosol, and is structurally conserved from flies to mammals. In vertebrates, Vangl2 plays an essential role in convergence and extension (CE) movements during gastrulation and in facial branchiomotor (FBM) neuron migration in the hindbrain. However, the roles of specific Vangl2 domains, of membrane association, and of specific extracellular and intracellular motifs have not been examined, especially in the context of FBM neuron migration. Through heat shock-inducible expression of various Vangl2 transgenes, we found that membrane associated functions of the N-terminal and C-terminal domains of Vangl2 are involved in regulating FBM neuron migration. Importantly, through temperature shift experiments, we found that the critical period for Vangl2 function coincides with the initial stages of FBM neuron migration out of rhombomere 4. Intriguingly, we have also uncovered a putative nuclear localization motif in the C-terminal domain that may play a role in regulating CE movements. PMID:24333599

  20. Current internal exposure to pesticides in children and adolescents in Germany: blood plasma levels of pentachlorophenol (PCP), lindane (gamma-HCH), and dichloro(diphenyl)ethylene (DDE), a biostable metabolite of dichloro(diphenyl)trichloroethane (DDT).

    PubMed

    Heudorf, U; Angerer, J; Drexler, H

    2003-10-01

    Pesticides are widely used throughout the world in agriculture to protect crops, and in public health to control diseases transmitted by animal vectors or intermediate hosts. After the prohibition of organochlorines such as DDT internal exposure of the general population to the organochlorines has been reduced markedly. Herein, current internal exposure of children and adolescents in an urban area in Germany to PCP, lindane, and DDT/E is reported. One hundred and thirty children and adolescents took part in this voluntary investigation. All of them stated they had never used pesticides in their homes or for medical reasons. Blood plasma was analysed for pentachlorophenol (PCP), lindane (gamma-HCH), and dichloro(diphenyl)ethylene (DDE), a biostable metabolite of dichloro(diphenyl)trichloroethane (DDT), using gas chromatography/electron capture detection according to well established methods approved by the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft. Median (and 95th percentiles) in the age groups < 6, 6- < 12, and 12- < 18 years of age were (microgram/l): DDE: 0.75 (4.45), 0.95 (5.04), 0.89 (8.77); DDT: < 0.1 (0.22), < 0.1 (0.25), < 0.1 (0.30); PCP: 2.48 (17.32), 2.69 (5.85), 2.08 (8.04); lindane: < 0.1 (0.12, < 0.1 (0.08), < 0.1 (0.09). High levels of internal exposure to DDT in two girls were probably obtained during a holiday stay in India; high PCP-levels in two other girls were caused by a leather jacket impregnated with PCP, and a holiday abroad, respectively. Current background levels of internal exposure to organochlorine insecticides in children and adolescents in Germany are quantified. Exposure to these substances in the general population is thought to occur mainly via residues in food, which are low in general, today. In special cases, however, individual exposures may be dominated by other sources, i.e. impregnated leather clothes. PMID:14626896

  1. Rapid fluorescence-based measurement of toxicity in anaerobic digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Ortiz, Raphael; Xiao, Yeyuan; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2015-05-15

    A rapid fluorescence measurement based on resazurin reduction was developed and applied for the detection of toxicants/inhibitors to anaerobic digestion metabolism. By initially using a pure facultative anaerobic strain, Enterococcus faecalis as a model organism, this technique proved to be fast and sensitive when detecting the model toxicant, pentachlorophenol (PCP). The technique revealed significant metabolic changes in Enterococcus faecalis with a PCP spike ranging from 0.05 to 100 mg/L, and could detect PCP's toxicity to E. faecalis at a concentration of only 0.05 mg/L in 8 min. Furthermore, by extending this technique to a mixed anaerobic sludge, not only could the effect of 0.05-100 mg/L PCP be determined on anaerobic digestion metabolism within 10 min, but also its rate of biogas production. These results suggest that a resazurin-based fluorescence measurement can potentially be incorporated into a microfluidic system to develop a biosensor for the real-time monitoring, control and early warning of toxicant/inhibitor loads in the influent to an anaerobic digestion system.

  2. Development of a novel, bioluminescence-based, fungal bioassay for toxicity testing.

    PubMed

    Weitz, Hedda J; Campbell, Colin D; Killham, Ken

    2002-07-01

    Naturally bioluminescent fungi, Armillaria mellea and Mycena citricolor, were used to develop a novel, bioluminescence-based bioassay for toxicity testing. Bioassays were carried out to assess the toxicity of 3,5-dichlorophenol (3,5-DCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), copper and zinc. The results suggested that 60 min was a suitable exposure time for the bioassay. Light reduction was observed in response to 3,5-DCP, PCP and Cu for both A. mellea and M. citricolor, but to Zn only for A. mellea. Armillaria mellea was significantly less sensitive to 3,5-DCP and PCP than M. citricolor. The EC50 values for A. mellea and M. citricolor were similar to EC50 values for 3,5-DCP, PCP and Cu (but not Zn) of bioluminescence-based bacterial biosensors. They were also similar to EC50 values for Cu and Zn of a bioluminescence-based yeast biosensor. The results highlighted the importance of using both prokaryotic and eukaryotic biosensors. The novel bioassay provides a rapid and sensitive method to assess bioavailability of pollutants as well as a method to determine their toxicity to filamentous fungi. It also expands the range of organisms that can be used for bioluminescence-based toxicity testing by complementing existing biosensors.

  3. Effects of calcium-based sorbents on PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol combustion process.

    PubMed

    Lu, S Y; Chen, T; Yan, J H; Li, X D; Ni, Y L M J; Cen, K F

    2007-08-17

    Calcium-based sorbents are widely employed to reduce the acidic gases emission from combustion processes, and also have effects on trace organic pollutants formation and emission. Batch experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of calcium-based sorbents on pentachlorophenol (PCP) forming PCDDs/Fs during high temperature combustion processes. The results indicated that highly chlorinated PCDD/F homologues were the predominant dioxin products from PCP thermo decomposition, and only minor increasing of PCDDs happened when Ca/Cl ratio was lower than 1, while a major jump occurred when Ca/Cl ratio increased from 1 to 2. The CaO addition clearly promoted the production of all chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins homologue and 4-7DFs homologue. Comparison of total PCDD/F emission and its I-TEQ for three different calcium-based sorbents addition (CaO, CaCO3, basic fly ash) indicated that CaO and fly ash containing CaO had almost the same promotion effects on PCDDs/Fs originated from PCP, while CaCO3 inhibit PCDD/F formation greatly with inhibition efficiency up to 70%. Such effects may be partly proved by the observed clearly different micro-surface structures of their reaction residues. The mechanism of CaO on condensation and dechlorination reactions for PCP forming PCDDs and acid-base interaction were proposed to speculate the promotion effects of CaO, and the reaction precedence was used to speculate the inhibition effects of CaCO3 on PCDDs/Fs originated from PCP. The results of the present paper might be useful for the industrial application of calcium-based sorbents to control PCDD/F emission.

  4. Development and evaluation of buccoadhesive tablet for selegiline hydrochloride based on thiolated polycarbophil.

    PubMed

    Wasnik, Mangesh N; Godse, Rutika D; Nair, Hema A

    2014-05-01

    Selegiline hydrochloride (SHCl), a monoamine oxidase B inhibitor, is used as an adjunct in the therapy of Parkinson's disease. This study is concerned with the preparation and evaluation of mucoadhesive buccal tablet for controlled systemic delivery of SHCl. Buccal absorption of selegiline can bypass its first-pass metabolism and improve bioavailability accompanied by greatly reduced metabolite formation, which is potentially of enhanced therapeutic value in patients with Parkinson's disease. Polycarbophil-cysteine (PCP-cys) conjugate, which is a thiolated derivative of the mucoadhesive polymer polycarbophil, was synthesized by 1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide hydrochloride-mediated amide bond coupling. Tablets of SHCl based on native and thiolated polycarbophil were prepared. The prepared tablets were evaluated for drug content, swelling behavior, mucoadhesive strength, in vitro drug release, ex vivo permeation and in vitro cytotoxicity. PCP-cys tablets showed enhanced mucoadhesion and retarded drug release compared to polycarbophil tablets. Permeation data of SHCl from matrices prepared using the PCP-cys polymer revealed a significantly higher value of apparent permeability in comparison to polycarbophil, which supported the information in literature that thiolation imparts permeation enhancing properties to mucoadhesive polymers. In vitro cytotoxicity studies on PCP-cys using L-929 mouse fibroblast cell line indicated that conjugation with cysteine does not impart any apparent toxicity to polycarbophil. The results from the study indicate that the buccal delivery of SHCl using thiolated polycarbophil tablet could provide a way for improved therapy of Parkinson's disease.

  5. Co2+-dependent gene expression in Streptococcus pneumoniae: opposite effect of Mn2+ and Co2+ on the expression of the virulence genes psaBCA, pcpA, and prtA

    PubMed Central

    Manzoor, Irfan; Shafeeq, Sulman; Kloosterman, Tomas G.; Kuipers, Oscar P.

    2015-01-01

    Manganese (Mn2+)-, zinc (Zn2+)- and copper (Cu2+) play significant roles in transcriptional gene regulation, physiology, and virulence of Streptococcus pneumoniae. So far, the effect of the important transition metal ion cobalt (Co2+) on gene expression of S. pneumoniae has not yet been explored. Here, we study the impact of Co2+ stress on the transcriptome of S. pneumoniae strain D39. BLAST searches revealed that the genome of S. pneumoniae encodes a putative Co2+-transport operon (cbi operon), the expression of which we show here to be induced by a high Co2+ concentration. Furthermore, we found that Co2+, as has been shown previously for Zn2+, can cause derepression of the genes of the PsaR virulence regulon, encoding the Mn2+-uptake system PsaBCA, the choline binding protein PcpA and the cell-wall associated serine protease PrtA. Interestingly, although Mn2+ represses expression of the PsaR regulon and Co2+ leads to derepression, both metal ions stimulate interaction of PsaR with its target promoters. These data will be discussed in the light of previous studies on similar metal-responsive transcriptional regulators. PMID:26257722

  6. Pentachlorophenol toxicity. August 1970-February 1990 (a Bibliography from the NTIS data base). Report for August 1970-February 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-03-01

    This bibliography contains citations concerning toxicology studies of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and its effects on humans, and aquatic and laboratory animals. Topics include PCP determination and analysis methods, water quality criteria, and health risk assessments of PCP pesticides and insecticides. Human exposure in the workplace and hazard assessment, and techniques of PCP degradation and destruction are also discussed. Reports by EPA on PCP wood preservatives are also included. (This updated bibliography contains 90 citations, 29 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

  7. Development of Global Consensus of Dengue Virus Envelope Glycoprotein for Epitopes Based Vaccine Design.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Mazhar; Idrees, Muhammad; Afzal, Samia

    2015-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is the member of Flaviviridae and causative agent of Dengue Haemorrhagic Fever and Dengue Shock Syndrome. Every year, around 70% of the world population is at risk, due to epidemic episodes orchestrated by one or more of its serotypes. So, a tetravalent DENV vaccine is needed which may induce the immune response against all four DENV serotypes. In this study, B-cell and T-cell epitopes have been predicted from the DENV envelope glycoprotein (Eg) using a consensus based approach in complement with the physico-chemical property (PCP) conservancy analysis. Through DENV-Eg analysis, a total of 7 PCP conserved, water soluble, in vitro and in vivo stable epitopes were predicted which may induce the B-cell and T-cell mediated anti-viral immune response.

  8. A context for the 1930's Dust Bowl Drought in the Northern Great Plains, U.S. based on a rainfall reconstruction using H-isotopes of terrestrial leaf waxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toney, J. L.; Fritz, S. C.; Grimm, E. C.; Baker, P. A.; Nyren, P. E.; Huang, Y.

    2010-12-01

    Existing records of drought from Northern Great Plains (NGP) are based on pollen or on lake-water ion concentration (salinity) reconstructions from fossil assemblages (diatom-inferred salinity) and trace-elements (ostracode Mg/Ca) that reflect lake response to hydrological variability (precipitation (PCP) minus evaporation). In this study, we show that H-isotopes of terrestrial leaf waxes (n-acids) are a proxy for growing season PCP in the region. With this proxy we reconstruct growing season PCP at Lake George, ND at 35-yr resolution over the past 9.4 ka, at 8-yr resolution over the past 1.8 ka, and at nearly annual resolution for the past 150 years. Our PCP proxy is calibrated against the instrumental record for the past 100-yrs and validated at three regional lakes sites. We show low PCP during the early Holocene beginning at 9.1 ka, with peak drought at 8.4 ka, The H-isotopes (dD) suggest that PCP was highly variable from 8.2 ka to 3.5 ka, with alternating wet-dry periods. This variability is not evident in prior lake studies, which had lower temporal resolution in the mid-Holocene. The dD also indicates generally low rainfall but high-amplitude variation from 6.0 to 3.5 ka and low and less variable rainfall from 2.3 to 0.3 ka. The dD suggest that the 1930’s Dust Bowl Drought is one of only seven drought events throughout the past 9.4 ka to reach that severity, and only three events were more severe (8.1, 2.4, and 0.6 ka). Within the past 1.8 ka, the low rainfall events generally coincide with phases inferred to be dry in regional lakes by in-lake proxies (Rice Lake, ND, Coldwater Lake, ND, Moon Lake, ND, and Elk Lake, MN), although the decreased PCP events are abrupt and less prolonged than the inferred lake response to P-E. Spectral analysis of the H-isotope rainfall proxy does not support the 400-yr spacing of dry lake phases in the region observed in some paleosalinity records, which suggests that this spacing may be strongly affected by temperature

  9. What's a Primary Care Physician (PCP)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with your schedule. Ask for recommendations from friends, neighbors, relatives, and doctors or nurses you already know ... see if he or she seems like a good fit for your child. And remember, although it's ...

  10. Radioimmunoassy for phencyclidine (PCP) in serum. [Dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, S.M.; Woodworth, J.; Mayersohn, M.

    1982-07-01

    This accurate, sensitive radioimmunoassay for determining phencyclidine concentrations in serum specimens involves the use of anti-phencyclidine sera, 0.1 mL of serum specimen, an iodinated tracer, and a solid-phase separation. Phencyclidine metabolities do not show significant cross reactivity, but several phencyclidine analogs do cross react. Within-run coefficients of variation for human and dog serum ranged from 2.5 to 13% for concentrations from 2.0 to 500 ..mu..g/L. Day-to-day coefficients of variation for human and dog serum ranged from 4.3 to 16.7% for concentrations ranging from 2.0 to 09.0 ..mu..g/L. The sensitivity of the radioimmunoassay is <0.5 ..mu..g/L. Thirty serum specimens from two dogs given 1 mg of phencyclidine per kilogram body weight were analyzed by radioimmunoassay and a gas-chromatographic method. Nonparametris statistical comparison and linear regression showed that results from the two procedures correlate well (r/sup 2/ = 0.952). Concentration-time data from the two dogs are presented to illustrate the utility of the radioimmunoassay for examining phencyclidine disposition.

  11. A case study of a team-based, quality-focused compensation model for primary care providers.

    PubMed

    Greene, Jessica; Hibbard, Judith H; Overton, Valerie

    2014-06-01

    In 2011, Fairview Health Services began replacing their fee-for-service compensation model for primary care providers (PCPs), which included an annual pay-for-performance bonus, with a team-based model designed to improve quality of care, patient experience, and (eventually) cost containment. In-depth interviews and an online survey of PCPs early after implementation of the new model suggest that it quickly changed the way many PCPs practiced. Most PCPs reported a shift in orientation toward quality of care, working more collaboratively with their colleagues and focusing on their full panel of patients. The majority reported that their quality of care had improved because of the model and that their colleagues' quality had to. The comprehensive change did, however, result in lower fee-for-service billing and reductions in PCP satisfaction. While Fairview's compensation model is still a work in progress, their early experiences can provide lessons for other delivery systems seeking to reform PCP compensation.

  12. A residue-based toxicokinetic model for pulse-exposure toxicity in aquatic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hickie, B.E.; McCarty, L.S.; Dixon, D.G.

    1995-12-01

    This pulse-exposure model (PULSETOX) is based on the simple one-compartment first-order kinetics (1CFOK) equation. It tracks the accumulation of waterborne organic chemicals by fish and predicts acute toxicity by means of previously established relationships between whole-body residues and lethality. The predictive capabilities of the model were tested with a data set of 27 acute pulse-exposure lethality tests with larval fathead minnows (Pimephales promelas) exposed to pentachlorophenol (PCP). Tests included eight single exposures (2 to 96 h) and 19 multiple exposures, which varied in the number (2 to 15) and duration (2 to 24 h) of pulses, and time interval between pulses (6 to 24 h). Experimental work included determination of 1CFOK kinetics parameters from [{sup 14}C]PCP uptake and clearance, and from time-toxicity curves. Lethality was expected in any exposure regime where the fish reaches or exceeds the critical body residue (CBR) of 0.30 mmol PCP/kg fish (SD, {+-} 0.02; n = 11). Using the CBR endpoint, the model accounted for between 90 and 93% of variability in the observed lethality data, depending on the toxicokinetic parameters employed. Predictive power of the model was optimized by using kinetics parameters derived from the toxicity curve for pulse-toxicity tests as shown by the regression: predicted LC50 = 1.04 {center_dot} (observed LC50) + 0.01 (p < 0.001, r{sup 2} = 0.94, n = 27).

  13. Inner-ear sound pressures near the base of the cochlea in chinchilla: Further investigation

    PubMed Central

    Ravicz, Michael E.; Rosowski, John J.

    2013-01-01

    The middle-ear pressure gain GMEP, the ratio of sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV to sound pressure at the tympanic membrane PTM, is a descriptor of middle-ear sound transfer and the cochlear input for a given stimulus in the ear canal. GMEP and the cochlear partition differential pressure near the cochlear base ΔPCP, which determines the stimulus for cochlear partition motion and has been linked to hearing ability, were computed from simultaneous measurements of PV, PTM, and the sound pressure in scala tympani near the round window PST in chinchilla. GMEP magnitude was approximately 30 dB between 0.1 and 10 kHz and decreased sharply above 20 kHz, which is not consistent with an ideal transformer or a lossless transmission line. The GMEP phase was consistent with a roughly 50-μs delay between PV and PTM. GMEP was little affected by the inner-ear modifications necessary to measure PST. GMEP is a good predictor of ΔPCP at low and moderate frequencies where PV ⪢ PST but overestimates ΔPCP above a few kilohertz where PV ≈ PST. The ratio of PST to PV provides insight into the distribution of sound pressure within the cochlear scalae. PMID:23556590

  14. Inner-ear sound pressures near the base of the cochlea in chinchilla: further investigation.

    PubMed

    Ravicz, Michael E; Rosowski, John J

    2013-04-01

    The middle-ear pressure gain GMEP, the ratio of sound pressure in the cochlear vestibule PV to sound pressure at the tympanic membrane PTM, is a descriptor of middle-ear sound transfer and the cochlear input for a given stimulus in the ear canal. GMEP and the cochlear partition differential pressure near the cochlear base ΔPCP, which determines the stimulus for cochlear partition motion and has been linked to hearing ability, were computed from simultaneous measurements of PV, PTM, and the sound pressure in scala tympani near the round window PST in chinchilla. GMEP magnitude was approximately 30 dB between 0.1 and 10 kHz and decreased sharply above 20 kHz, which is not consistent with an ideal transformer or a lossless transmission line. The GMEP phase was consistent with a roughly 50-μs delay between PV and PTM. GMEP was little affected by the inner-ear modifications necessary to measure PST. GMEP is a good predictor of ΔPCP at low and moderate frequencies where PV > PST but overestimates ΔPCP above a few kilohertz where PV ≈ PST. The ratio of PST to PV provides insight into the distribution of sound pressure within the cochlear scalae.

  15. Examination of an amphibian-based assay using the larvae of Xenopus laevis and Ambystoma mexicanum.

    PubMed

    Saka, Masahiro

    2003-05-01

    Semistatic acute toxicity tests of amphibian larvae (Xenopus laevis and Ambystoma mexicanum) were conducted at different developmental stages and by different methods to establish a simple amphibian-based assay. Test substance was pentachlorophenol sodium salt (PCP-Na). The endpoint was mortality and the 24-, 48-, 72-, and 96-h LC50 values were calculated by probit analysis. Interspecific differences in larval responses were not clear. Larval sensitivity tended to increase with larval age. Newly hatched larvae were most resistant to PCP-Na. During the tests of well-developed larvae, concentrations of dissolved oxygen and PCP-Na in the test solutions greatly dropped owing to uptake by the larvae. Therefore, middle-developed (2-week-old) larvae were most suitable for the test. Toxicity tests for volatile substances would be also possible using 2-week-old larvae in closed vessels. Test individuals should be kept individually to avoid the effects of poisonous skin secretions released from dead larvae. PMID:12706392

  16. Clinical Relevance of Multiple Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia: Development of a Multiplex PCR-Single-Base-Extension Methodology▿

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, F.; Gaspar, J.; De Sousa, B.; Antunes, F.; Mansinho, K.; Matos, O.

    2011-01-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of respiratory illness in patients with AIDS. The identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three distinct P. jirovecii loci encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was achieved using multiplex-PCR (MPCR) followed by direct sequencing and two single-base extension (SBE) techniques. Four SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215, and SOD110), correlated previously with parameters of disease, were amplified and genotyped simultaneously. The concordance of results between the standard sequencing technique (direct sequencing) and SBE analysis was 96.9% for the acrylamide gel electrophoresis and 98.4% for the capillary electrophoresis. The cross-genetic analysis established several statistical associations among the SNPs studied: mt85C-SOD110T, SOD110T-SOD215C, and SOD110C-SOD215T. These results were confirmed by cluster analysis. Data showed that among the isolates with low to moderate parasite burden, the highest percentages of DHFR312C, mt85C, SOD110T, and SOD215C were detected, whereas for high parasite burden cases the highest frequencies were observed among isolates with DHFR312T, mt85T, SOD110C, and SOD215T. The polymorphisms studied were shown to be suitable genetic targets potentially correlated with PcP clinical data that can be used as predictors of outcome in further studies to help clinical decision-making in the management of PcP. The MPCR/SBE protocol described for the first time in the present study was shown to be a rapid, highly accurate method for genotyping P. jirovecii SNPs encoded by different loci that could be used for epidemiological studies and as an additional procedure for the prognostic classification and diagnosis of PcP. PMID:21389160

  17. Clinical relevance of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii Pneumonia: development of a multiplex PCR-single-base-extension methodology.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; De Sousa, B; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2011-05-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PcP) is a major cause of respiratory illness in patients with AIDS. The identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at three distinct P. jirovecii loci encoding dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) was achieved using multiplex-PCR (MPCR) followed by direct sequencing and two single-base extension (SBE) techniques. Four SNPs (DHFR312, mt85, SOD215, and SOD110), correlated previously with parameters of disease, were amplified and genotyped simultaneously. The concordance of results between the standard sequencing technique (direct sequencing) and SBE analysis was 96.9% for the acrylamide gel electrophoresis and 98.4% for the capillary electrophoresis. The cross-genetic analysis established several statistical associations among the SNPs studied: mt85C-SOD110T, SOD110T-SOD215C, and SOD110C-SOD215T. These results were confirmed by cluster analysis. Data showed that among the isolates with low to moderate parasite burden, the highest percentages of DHFR312C, mt85C, SOD110T, and SOD215C were detected, whereas for high parasite burden cases the highest frequencies were observed among isolates with DHFR312T, mt85T, SOD110C, and SOD215T. The polymorphisms studied were shown to be suitable genetic targets potentially correlated with PcP clinical data that can be used as predictors of outcome in further studies to help clinical decision-making in the management of PcP. The MPCR/SBE protocol described for the first time in the present study was shown to be a rapid, highly accurate method for genotyping P. jirovecii SNPs encoded by different loci that could be used for epidemiological studies and as an additional procedure for the prognostic classification and diagnosis of PcP.

  18. Upper gastrointestinal symptoms, psychosocial co-morbidity and health care seeking in general practice: population based case control study

    PubMed Central

    Bröker, Linda E; Hurenkamp, Gerard JB; ter Riet, Gerben; Schellevis, François G; Grundmeijer, Hans G; van Weert, Henk C

    2009-01-01

    Background The pathophysiology of upper gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms is still poorly understood. Psychological symptoms were found to be more common in patients with functional gastrointestinal complaints, but it is debated whether they are primarily linked to GI symptoms or rather represent motivations for health-care seeking. Purpose of our study was to compare co-morbidity, in particular psychological and social problems, between patients with and without upper GI symptoms. In addition, we investigated whether the prevalence of psychological and social problems is part of a broader pattern of illness related health care use. Methods Population based case control study based on the second Dutch National Survey of general practice (conducted in 2001). Cases (adults visiting their primary care physician (PCP) with upper GI symptoms) and controls (individuals not having any of these complaints), matched for gender, age, PCP-practice and ethnicity were compared. Main outcome measures were contact frequency, prevalence of somatic as well as psychosocial diagnoses, prescription rate of (psycho)pharmacological agents, and referral rates. Data were analyzed using odds ratios, the Chi square test as well as multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results Data from 13,389 patients with upper GI symptoms and 13,389 control patients were analyzed. Patients with upper GI symptoms visited their PCP twice as frequently as controls (8.6 vs 4.4 times/year). Patients with upper GI symptoms presented not only more psychological and social problems, but also more other health problems to their PCP (odds ratios (ORs) ranging from 1.37 to 3.45). Patients with upper GI symptoms more frequently used drugs of any ATC-class (ORs ranging from 1.39 to 2.90), including psychotropic agents. The observed differences were less pronounced when we adjusted for non-attending control patients. In multivariate regression analysis, contact frequency and not psychological or social co

  19. A randomized pragmatic trial of primary care based pharmacist-physician collaborative medication therapy management for hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Jan D.; Steers, Neil; Adler, David S.; Kuo, Grace M.; Morello, Candis M.; Lang, Megan; Singh, Renu F.; Wood, Yelena; Kaplan, Robert M.; Mangione, Carol M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose A collaborative pharmacist-physician (PharmD-MD) team approach to medication therapy management (MTM), with pharmacists initiating and changing medications at separate office visits, holds promise for cost-effective management of blood pressure (BP), but has not been evaluated in many systematic trials. The primary objective of this study was to examine BP control for hypertensive patients managed by a newly formed PharmD-MD MTM team vs. versus usual care (UC) in a university primary care clinic. Methods This was a randomized, pragmatic, clinical trial of hypertensive patients randomly selected for the PharmD-MD MTM team or UC. In the PharmD-MD MTM group pharmacists managed drug therapy initiation, monitoring, medication adjustments, biometric assessments, laboratory tests, and patient education. In the UC group, patients continued to see their primary care provider (PCP). Participants were age 18 years or over, diagnosed with hypertension, most recent BP ≥140/90 mmHg or ≥130/80 mmHg if co-diagnosed with diabetes mellitus, on at least one anti-hypertensive medication, and English speaking. Primary outcome was the difference in mean change in systolic BP (SBP) at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included percent achieving therapeutic BP goal, mean change in diastolic BP, LDL and HDL cholesterol. Findings A total of 75 patients were in the PharmD-PCP MTM group and 91 in the UC group. Mean reduction in SBP was significantly greater in the PharmD-PCP MTM group at 6 months [−7.1 (SD=19.4) vs. +1.6 (SD=21.0) mm Hg, (p=0.008)] but the difference was no longer statistically significant at 9 months [−5.2 (SD=16.9) vs. −1.7 (SD=17.7) mmHg, (p=0.22)] based on intent to treat analysis. In the intervention group, a greater percentage of patients who continued to see the MTM pharmacist vs. those who returned to their PCP were at goal at 6 months (88.5% vs. 63.6%) and 9 months (78.9% vs. 47.4%). No significant difference in change of LDL or HDL was detected at 6 or

  20. Kernel-based variance component estimation and whole-genome prediction of pre-corrected phenotypes and progeny tests for dairy cow health traits

    PubMed Central

    Morota, Gota; Boddhireddy, Prashanth; Vukasinovic, Natascha; Gianola, Daniel; DeNise, Sue

    2014-01-01

    Prediction of complex trait phenotypes in the presence of unknown gene action is an ongoing challenge in animals, plants, and humans. Development of flexible predictive models that perform well irrespective of genetic and environmental architectures is desirable. Methods that can address non-additive variation in a non-explicit manner are gaining attention for this purpose and, in particular, semi-parametric kernel-based methods have been applied to diverse datasets, mostly providing encouraging results. On the other hand, the gains obtained from these methods have been smaller when smoothed values such as estimated breeding value (EBV) have been used as response variables. However, less emphasis has been placed on the choice of phenotypes to be used in kernel-based whole-genome prediction. This study aimed to evaluate differences between semi-parametric and parametric approaches using two types of response variables and molecular markers as inputs. Pre-corrected phenotypes (PCP) and EBV obtained for dairy cow health traits were used for this comparison. We observed that non-additive genetic variances were major contributors to total genetic variances in PCP, whereas additivity was the largest contributor to variability of EBV, as expected. Within the kernels evaluated, non-parametric methods yielded slightly better predictive performance across traits relative to their additive counterparts regardless of the type of response variable used. This reinforces the view that non-parametric kernels aiming to capture non-linear relationships between a panel of SNPs and phenotypes are appealing for complex trait prediction. However, like past studies, the gain in predictive correlation was not large for either PCP or EBV. We conclude that capturing non-additive genetic variation, especially epistatic variation, in a cross-validation framework remains a significant challenge even when it is important, as seems to be the case for health traits in dairy cows. PMID:24715901

  1. Classification epitopes in groups based on their protein family

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The humoral immune system response is based on the interaction between antibodies and antigens for the clearance of pathogens and foreign molecules. The interaction between these proteins occurs at specific positions known as antigenic determinants or B-cell epitopes. The experimental identification of epitopes is costly and time consuming. Therefore the use of in silico methods, to help discover new epitopes, is an appealing alternative due the importance of biomedical applications such as vaccine design, disease diagnostic, anti-venoms and immune-therapeutics. However, the performance of predictions is not optimal been around 70% of accuracy. Further research could increase our understanding of the biochemical and structural properties that characterize a B-cell epitope. Results We investigated the possibility of linear epitopes from the same protein family to share common properties. This hypothesis led us to analyze physico-chemical (PCP) and predicted secondary structure (PSS) features of a curated dataset of epitope sequences available in the literature belonging to two different groups of antigens (metalloproteinases and neurotoxins). We discovered statistically significant parameters with data mining techniques which allow us to distinguish neurotoxin from metalloproteinase and these two from random sequences. After a five cross fold validation we found that PCP based models obtained area under the curve values (AUC) and accuracy above 0.9 for regression, decision tree and support vector machine. Conclusions We demonstrated that antigen's family can be inferred from properties within a single group of linear epitopes (metalloproteinases or neurotoxins). Also we discovered the characteristics that represent these two epitope groups including their similarities and differences with random peptides and their respective amino acid sequence. These findings open new perspectives to improve epitope prediction by considering the specific antigen

  2. How University Students View Online Study: A PCP Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    With the ever-increasing impact of information technology (IT) on society, universities are pushed to deliver the courses through the Internet by the format of Web course or online study. There are relatively few studies of how students construe this new mode of delivery and study. This study aimed to better understanding of how students construe…

  3. Noncanonical Wnt/PCP signaling during vertebrate gastrulation.

    PubMed

    Tada, Masazumi; Kai, Masatake

    2009-03-01

    The branch of the Wnt pathway, related to planar cell polarity signaling in Drosophila, is fundamental not only to the establishment of tissue polarity but also to a variety of morphogenetic processes in vertebrates. The genetic pathway has been noted for its similarity as well as divergence of between vertebrates and Drosophila. This review focuses on issues related to the complexity of the output of the planar cell polarity pathway during gastrulation in zebrafish and Xenopus and, to a lesser extent, during gastrulation/neurulation in mice.

  4. Chemical dehalogenation treatment: Base-catalyzed decomposition process (BCDP). Tech data sheet

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-07-01

    The Base-Catalyzed Decomposition Process (BCDP) is an efficient, relatively inexpensive treatment process for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). It is also effective on other halogenated contaminants such as insecticides, herbicides, pentachlorophenol (PCP), lindane, and chlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans. The heart of BCDP is the rotary reactor in which most of the decomposition takes place. The contaminated soil is first screened, processed with a crusher and pug mill, and stockpiled. Next, in the main treatment step, this stockpile is mixed with sodium bicarbonate (in the amount of 10% of the weight of the stockpile) and heated for about one hour at 630 F in the rotary reactor. Most (about 60% to 90%) of the PCBs in the soil are decomposed in this step. The remainder are volatilized, captured, and decomposed.

  5. Plant uptake of pentachlorophenol from sludge-amended soils

    SciTech Connect

    Bellin, C.A.; O'Connor, G.A.

    1990-01-01

    A greenhouse study was conducted to determine the effects of sludge on plant uptake of {sup 14}C-pentachlorophenol (PCP). Plants included tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea Schreb.), lettuce (Latuca sativa L.), carrot (Daucus carota L.), and chile pepper (Capsicum annum L.). Minimal intact PCP was detected in the fescue and lettuce by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. No intact PCP was detected in the carrot tissue extracts. Chile pepper was not analyzed for intact PCP because methylene chloride extracts contained minimal {sup 14}C. The GC/MS analysis of soil extracts at harvest suggests a half-life of PCP of about 10 d independent of sludge rate or PCP loading rate. Rapid degradation of PCP in the soil apparently limited PCP availability to the plant. Bioconcentration factors (dry plant wt./initial soil PCP concentration) based on intact PCP were <0.01 for all crops, suggesting little PCP uptake. Thus, food-chain crop PCP uptake in these alkaline soils should not limit land application of sludge.

  6. Modeling and Application of a Rapid Fluorescence-Based Assay for Biotoxicity in Anaerobic Digestion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian Lin; Steele, Terry W J; Stuckey, David C

    2015-11-17

    The sensitivity of anaerobic digestion metabolism to a wide range of solutes makes it important to be able to monitor toxicants in the feed to anaerobic digesters to optimize their operation. In this study, a rapid fluorescence measurement technique based on resazurin reduction using a microplate reader was developed and applied for the detection of toxicants and/or inhibitors to digesters. A kinetic model was developed to describe the process of resazurin reduced to resorufin, and eventually to dihydroresorufin under anaerobic conditions. By modeling the assay results of resazurin (0.05, 0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 mM) reduction by a pure facultative anaerobic strain, Enterococcus faecalis, and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge, with or without 10 mg L(-1) spiked pentachlorophenol (PCP), we found it was clear that the pseudo-first-order rate constant for the reduction of resazurin to resorufin, k1, was a good measure of "toxicity". With lower biomass density and the optimal resazurin addition (0.1 mM), the toxicity of 10 mg L(-1) PCP for E. faecalis and fresh anaerobic sludge was detected in 10 min. By using this model, the toxicity differences among seven chlorophenols to E. faecalis and fresh mixed anaerobic sludge were elucidated within 30 min. The toxicity differences determined by this assay were comparable to toxicity sequences of various chlorophenols reported in the literature. These results suggest that the assay developed in this study not only can quickly detect toxicants for anaerobic digestion but also can efficiently detect the toxicity differences among a variety of similar toxicants.

  7. A survey of benthic sediment contaminants in reaches of the Columbia River Estuary based on channel sedimentation characteristics.

    PubMed

    Counihan, Timothy D; Waite, Ian R; Nilsen, Elena B; Hardiman, Jill M; Elias, Edwin; Gelfenbaum, Guy; Zaugg, Steven D

    2014-06-15

    While previous studies have documented contaminants in fish, sediments, water, and wildlife, few specifics are known about the spatial distribution of contaminants in the Columbia River Estuary (CRE). Our study goal was to characterize sediment contaminant detections and concentrations in reaches of the CRE that were concurrently being sampled to assess contaminants in water, invertebrates, fish, and osprey (Pandion haliaetus) eggs. Our objectives were to develop a survey design based on sedimentation characteristics and then assess whether sediment grain size, total organic carbon (TOC), and contaminant concentrations and detections varied between areas with different sedimentation characteristics. We used a sediment transport model to predict sedimentation characteristics of three 16km river reaches in the CRE. We then compartmentalized the modeled change in bed mass after a two week simulation to define sampling strata with depositional, stable, or erosional conditions. We collected and analyzed bottom sediments to assess whether substrate composition, organic matter composition, and contaminant concentrations and detections varied among strata within and between the reaches. We observed differences in grain size fractions between strata within and between reaches. We found that the fine sediment fraction was positively correlated with TOC. Contaminant concentrations were statistically different between depositional vs. erosional strata for the industrial compounds, personal care products and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons class (Indus-PCP-PAH). We also observed significant differences between strata in the number of detections of Indus-PCP-PAH (depositional vs. erosional; stable vs. erosional) and for the flame retardants, polychlorinated biphenyls, and pesticides class (depositional vs. erosional, depositional vs. stable). When we estimated mean contaminant concentrations by reach, we observed higher contaminant concentrations in the furthest downstream

  8. A touch-screen based paired-associates learning (PAL) task for the rat may provide a translatable pharmacological model of human cognitive impairment.

    PubMed

    Talpos, John C; Aerts, Nancy; Fellini, Laetitia; Steckler, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The use of touch-screen equipped operant boxes is an increasingly popular approach for modeling human cognition in the rodent. However little data is currently available describing the effects of pharmacological manipulations on touch-screen based tasks. Owing to the relationship between performance on visual-spatial paired associates learning (PAL) with schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease one task of specific interest is the touch-screen PAL task developed for rodents (J. Talpos et al., 2009). The goal of this study was to profile a range of the commonly used pharmacological models of schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease to investigate the sensitivity of PAL to these models of disease. Male Lister hooded rats were trained on PAL until stable performance was obtained. The effects of PCP, ketamine, amphetamine, LSD, scopolamine, and biperiden (recently proposed as an alternative to scopolamine) were then tested on animals performing the PAL task. While all compounds influenced responding during PAL, only PCP and amphetamine impaired performance with minimal changes in secondary measures (response latencies, trials completed). Surprisingly ketamine did not cause a change in percent correct despite being an NMDA antagonist, indicating that not all NMDA antagonists are equal in the touch-screen platform. This finding is in agreement with existing literature showing differential effects of NMDA antagonists on a wide variety of behavioral assays include tasks of attention, memory, and cognitive flexibility (Gilmour et al., 2009; Dix et al., 2010; Smith et al., 2011). Moreover biperiden showed no benefit when compared to scopolamine, highlighting the current lack of an effective pharmacological model of cholinergic dysfunction in the touch-screen platform. These data demonstrate that performance on PAL can be disrupted by common pharmacological disease models, suggesting that PAL may have the sensitivity to serve as a translational test for the study of cognition in

  9. Pentachlorophenol exposure causes Warburg-like effects in zebrafish embryos at gastrulation stage

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Ping; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Hongchang; Yin, Daqiang; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a prevalent pollutant in the environment and has been demonstrated to be a serious toxicant to humans and animals. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying its toxic effects on vertebrate early development. To explore the impacts and underlying mechanisms of PCP on early development, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to PCP at concentrations of 0, 20 and 50 μg/L, and microscopic observation and cDNA microarray analysis were subsequently conducted at gastrulation stage. The morphological observations revealed that PCP caused a developmental delay of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner. Transcriptomic data showed that 50 μg/L PCP treatment resulted in significant changes in gene expression level, and the genes involved in energy metabolism and cell behavior were identified based on gene functional enrichment analysis. The energy production of embryos was influenced by PCP via the activation of glycolysis along with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The results suggested that PCP acts as an inhibitor of OXPHOS at 8 hpf (hours postfertilization). Consistent with the activated glycolysis, the cell cycle activity of PCP-treated embryos was higher than the controls. These characteristics are similar to the Warburg effect, which occurs in human tumors. The microinjection of exogenous ATP confirmed that an additional energy supply could rescue PCP-treated embryos from the developmental delay due to the energy deficit. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PCP causes a Warburg-like effect on zebrafish embryos during gastrulation, and the affected embryos had the phenotype of developmental delay. - Highlights: • We treat zebrafish embryos with PCP at gastrula stage. • PCP acts as an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, not an uncoupler, in gastrulation. • Exogenous ATP injection will rescue the development of effected embryos. • The transcriptome of PCP

  10. Chlorophenols, chlorocatechols and chloroguaiacols induce DNA base oxidation in human lymphocytes (in vitro).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Majsterek, Ireneusz

    2010-02-01

    Phenolic compounds are strong environmental toxicants, which are found in food, drinking water as well as in the indoor and outdoor air environment. In this work we investigated the effect of low concentrations of 0.2, 1 and 5 microg/ml of 2,4,5-trichlorophenol (2,4,5-TCP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), 4,6-dichloroguaiacol (4,6-DCG), tetrachloroguaiacol (TeCG), 4,5-dichlorocatechol (4,5-DCC) and tetrachlorocatechol (TeCC) on DNA bases oxidation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The analysis was performed using alkaline single cell gel electrophoresis (the comet assay). To detect oxidized pyrimidynes and purines we used the repair enzymes such as endonuclease III and formamidopyrimidine-DNA glycosylase. DNA oxidation was expressed as a percentage of comet tail, which was formed after the xenobiotics treatment. The obtained results showed that all the compounds examined were able to oxidize DNA bases in human lymphocytes. It was also observed that pyrimidine bases were more strongly oxidized in comparison to purine ones. Finally, it was found that chlorinated catechols and TeCC in particular, revealed a higher oxidative potential in comparison to chlorophenols and chloroguaiacols, and a rise in the number of chlorine atoms in the compound from each group examined led to an increase in DNA bases damage.

  11. Photochemical Reduction of Low Concentrations of CO2 in a Porous Coordination Polymer with a Ruthenium(II)-CO Complex.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Takashi; Fujii, Machiko; Tsujimoto, Masahiko; Kobayashi, Katsuaki; Higuchi, Masakazu; Tanaka, Koji; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2016-02-18

    Direct use of low pressures of CO2 as a C1 source without concentration from gas mixtures is of great interest from an energy-saving viewpoint. Porous heterogeneous catalysts containing both adsorption and catalytically active sites are promising candidates for such applications. Here, we report a porous coordination polymer (PCP)-based catalyst, PCP-Ru(II) composite, bearing a Ru(II) -CO complex active for CO2 reduction. The PCP-Ru(II) composite showed improved CO2 adsorption behavior at ambient temperature. In the photochemical reduction of CO2 the PCP-Ru(II) composite produced CO, HCOOH, and H2 . Catalytic activity was comparable with the corresponding homogeneous Ru(II) catalyst and ranks among the highest of known PCP-based catalysts. Furthermore, catalytic activity was maintained even under a 5 % CO2 /Ar gas mixture, revealing a synergistic effect between the adsorption and catalytically active sites within the PCP-Ru(II) composite.

  12. Disposition of pentachlorophenol in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri ): Effect of inhibition of metabolism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Hayton, W.L.

    1989-01-01

    The accumulation kinetics of pentachlorophenol (PCP) were investigated in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri ) in the absence and presence of 25 mg/l salicylamide, an inhibitor of PCP metabolism. After exposure to 5 mu g/l PCP over 1-96 h, the amount of PCP in the whole fish, its concentration in water and the total amount of metabolites (water, whole fish and bile) were measured. Equations for these variables, based on a two compartment pharmacokinetic model, were fitted simultaneously to the data using the computer program NONLIN, which uses an iterative nonlinear least squares technique. Salicylamide decreased the metabolic clearance of PCP, which resulted in an increase in the bioconcentration factor (BCF); this increase was partially offset by a salicylamide-induced decrease in the apparent volume of distribution of PCP. A clearance-volume compartment model permitted partitioning of the BCF in terms of the underlying physiologic and biochemical processes (uptake clearance, metabolic clearance and apparent volume of distribution).

  13. Kermit Interacts with Gαo, Vang, and Motor Proteins in Drosophila Planar Cell Polarity

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen; Katanaev, Vladimir L.

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the ubiquitous apical-basal polarity, epithelial cells are often polarized within the plane of the tissue – the phenomenon known as planar cell polarity (PCP). In Drosophila, manifestations of PCP are visible in the eye, wing, and cuticle. Several components of the PCP signaling have been characterized in flies and vertebrates, including the heterotrimeric Go protein. However, Go signaling partners in PCP remain largely unknown. Using a genetic screen we uncover Kermit, previously implicated in G protein and PCP signaling, as a novel binding partner of Go. Through pull-down and genetic interaction studies, we find that Kermit interacts with Go and another PCP component Vang, known to undergo intracellular relocalization during PCP establishment. We further demonstrate that the activity of Kermit in PCP differentially relies on the motor proteins: the microtubule-based dynein and kinesin motors and the actin-based myosin VI. Our results place Kermit as a potential transducer of Go, linking Vang with motor proteins for its delivery to dedicated cellular compartments during PCP establishment. PMID:24204696

  14. The Urinary Bladder Transcriptome and Proteome Defined by Transcriptomics and Antibody-Based Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Habuka, Masato; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M.; Pontén, Fredrik; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Uhlen, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    To understand functions and diseases of urinary bladder, it is important to define its molecular constituents and their roles in urinary bladder biology. Here, we performed genome-wide deep RNA sequencing analysis of human urinary bladder samples and identified genes up-regulated in the urinary bladder by comparing the transcriptome data to those of all other major human tissue types. 90 protein-coding genes were elevated in the urinary bladder, either with enhanced expression uniquely in the urinary bladder or elevated expression together with at least one other tissue (group enriched). We further examined the localization of these proteins by immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays and 20 of these 90 proteins were localized to the whole urothelium with a majority not yet described in the context of the urinary bladder. Four additional proteins were found specifically in the umbrella cells (Uroplakin 1a, 2, 3a, and 3b), and three in the intermediate/basal cells (KRT17, PCP4L1 and ATP1A4). 61 of the 90 elevated genes have not been previously described in the context of urinary bladder and the corresponding proteins are interesting targets for more in-depth studies. In summary, an integrated omics approach using transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling has been used to define a comprehensive list of proteins elevated in the urinary bladder. PMID:26694548

  15. Distinct apical and basolateral mechanisms drive PCP-dependent convergent extension of the mouse neural plate

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Margot; Yen, Weiwei; Lu, Xiaowei; Sutherland, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms of tissue convergence and extension (CE) driving axial elongation in mammalian embryos, and in particular, the cellular behaviors underlying CE in the epithelial neural tissue, have not been identified. Here we show that mouse neural cells undergo mediolaterally biased cell intercalation and exhibit both apical boundary rearrangement and polarized basolateral protrusive activity. Planar polarization and coordination of these two cell behaviors is essential for neural CE, as shown by failure of mediolateral intercalation in embryos mutant for two proteins associated with planar cell polarity signaling: Vangl2 and Ptk7. Embryos with mutations in Ptk7 fail to polarize cell behaviors within the plane of the tissue, while Vangl2 mutant embryos maintain tissue polarity and basal protrusive activity, but are deficient in apical neighbor exchange. Neuroepithelial cells in both mutants fail to apically constrict, leading to craniorachischisis. These results reveal a cooperative mechanism for cell rearrangement during epithelial morphogenesis. PMID:24703875

  16. Possible Legal Barriers for PCP Access to Mental Health Treatment Records.

    PubMed

    Rothenberg, Leslie S; Ganz, David A; Wenger, Neil S

    2016-04-01

    Provider and payer groups have endorsed the goal of improving the integration of primary care and behavioral health across a variety of programs and settings. There is an interest in sharing patients' medical information, a goal that is permissible within HIPAA, but there are concerns about more restrictive state medical privacy laws. This article assesses whether a substantial number of state medical privacy laws are, or could be interpreted to be, more restrictive than HIPAA. Preliminary investigation found that in almost one third of the states (including large-population states such as Florida, Georgia, Massachusetts, New York, and Texas), primary care physicians (PCPs) may have difficulty accessing mental health treatment records without the patient's (or his/her guardian/conservator's) written consent. If a comprehensive legal analysis supports this conclusion, then those advocating integration of behavioral and primary care may need to consider seeking appropriate state legislative solutions.

  17. SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION FOR REMEDIATON OF WOOD PRESERVING SITES: TREATMENT FOR DIOXINS, PCP, CREOSOTE, AND METALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This article discusses the use of solidification/stabilization (S/S) to treat soils contaminated with organic and inorganic chemicals at wood preserving sites. Solidification is defined for this article as making a material into a free standing solid. Stabilization is defined as ...

  18. Pentachlorophenol degradation by Janibacter sp., a new actinobacterium isolated from saline sediment of arid land.

    PubMed

    Khessairi, Amel; Fhoula, Imene; Jaouani, Atef; Turki, Yousra; Cherif, Ameur; Boudabous, Abdellatif; Hassen, Abdennaceur; Ouzari, Hadda

    2014-01-01

    Many pentachlorophenol- (PCP-) contaminated environments are characterized by low or elevated temperatures, acidic or alkaline pH, and high salt concentrations. PCP-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and prosper in these environments, play an important role in the biological treatment of polluted extreme habitats. A PCP-degrading bacterium was isolated and characterized from arid and saline soil in southern Tunisia and was enriched in mineral salts medium supplemented with PCP as source of carbon and energy. Based on 16S rRNA coding gene sequence analysis, the strain FAS23 was identified as Janibacter sp. As revealed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis, FAS23 strain was found to be efficient for PCP removal in the presence of 1% of glucose. The conditions of growth and PCP removal by FAS23 strain were found to be optimal in neutral pH and at a temperature of 30 °C. Moreover, this strain was found to be halotolerant at a range of 1-10% of NaCl and able to degrade PCP at a concentration up to 300 mg/L, while the addition of nonionic surfactant (Tween 80) enhanced the PCP removal capacity. PMID:25313357

  19. The key microorganisms for anaerobic degradation of pentachlorophenol in paddy soil as revealed by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hui; Liu, Chengshuai; Li, Fangbai; Luo, Chunling; Chen, Manjia; Hu, Min

    2015-11-15

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a common residual persistent pesticide in paddy soil and has resulted in harmful effect on soil ecosystem. The anaerobic microbial transformation of PCP, therefore, has been received much attentions, especially the functional microbial communities for the reductive transformation. However, the key functional microorganisms for PCP mineralization in the paddy soil still remain unknown. In this work, DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) was applied to explore the key microorganisms responsible for PCP mineralization in paddy soil. The SIP results indicated that the dominant bacteria responsible for PCP biodegradation belonged to the genus Dechloromonas of the class β-Proteobacteria. In addition, the increased production of (13)CH4 and (13)CO2 indicated that the addition of lactate enhanced the rate of biodegradation and mineralization of PCP. Two archaea classified as the genera of Methanosaeta and Methanocella of class Methanobacteria were enriched in the heavy fraction when with lactate, whereas no archaea was detected in the absence of lactate. These findings provide direct evidence for the species of bacteria and archaea responsible for anaerobic PCP or its breakdown products mineralization and reveal a new insight into the microorganisms linked with PCP degradation in paddy soil.

  20. Molecular characterization of bacterial community in aerobic granular sludge stressed by pentachlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Liu, He; Li, Guangwei; Li, Xiufen; Chen, Jian

    2008-01-01

    To characterize the effects of pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the performance and microbial community of aerobic granular sludge in sequencing batch reactor (SBR), the web-based terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) techniques were used to explore the bacterial community structure. When PCP increased from 0 to 50 mg/L, the COD removal rate changed little, while the ammonia removal rate dropped from 100% to 64.9%. The results of molecular characterization showed that the quantity of ammonia oxidizing bacteria (AOB) kept constantly, although the number of bacteria species decreased with the increase of PCP concentration. Significant shift in bacterial community structure at different PCP stresses was observed within aerobic granular sludge. When the PCP was absent, there are 69 strains in aerobic granular sludge detected by T-RFLP method. With the increase of PCP, most of bacteria disappeared and only 19 bacteria existed at all five PCP concentrations. These results contributed to comprehensive understanding of the microbial community structure under the PCP stress and its relationship with the performance for wastewater treatment by aerobic granular sludge.

  1. Isolation and characterization of a chalcone isomerase gene promoter from potato cultivars.

    PubMed

    Chen, M; Zhu, W J; You, X; Liu, Y D; Kaleri, G M; Yang, Q

    2015-01-01

    Chalcone isomerase (CHI) is a key enzyme involved in anthocyanin metabolism. Previous research on CHI has mainly focused on cDNA cloning and gene expression. In the current study, the 1425-bp potato CHI promoter (PCP) was isolated from four potato cultivars (Heijingang, Zhongshu 7, Désirée, and Favorita) using PCR and DNA sequencing. The PCP contained many cis-regulatory elements (CREs) related to anthocyanin metabolism, tissue specificity, light response, stress, and hormone induction. Of the PCP CREs identified, 19 were common to those found in the higher plants examined, based on plant CRE databases. Multiple sequence alignment showed six single nucleotide variation sites in PCP among the potato cultivars examined, resulting in changes in the number of CREs connected with tissue specificity, anthocyanin metabolism, and light response. The 665-bp PCP fragments from Favorita and 1425-bp PCP fragments from Heijingang were used to construct plant expression vectors, which may be a useful tool for biological engineering. A transient expression assay demonstrated that the two PCP fragments from Heijingang could direct the expression of a green fluorescent protein gene in onion epidermis and a β-glucuronidase gene in all potato tuber tissues with different colors, suggesting that the single nucleotide variation in the PCP did not affect its activity, and that silencing of the CHI gene in Favorita may be attributed to other regulatory factors. PMID:26782538

  2. Mechanisms of planar cell polarity establishment in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Carvajal-Gonzalez, Jose Maria

    2014-01-01

    Correct patterning and polarization of epithelial and mesenchymal cells are essential for morphogenesis and function of all organs and organisms. Epithelial cells are generally polarized in two axes: (a) the ubiquitous apical-basal axis and (b) polarity within the plane of the epithelium. The latter is generally referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP) and also is found in several contexts of mesenchymal cell patterning. In Drosophila, all adult structures display PCP features, and two conserved molecular systems (the Fat [Ft]/Dachsous [Ds] system and the Frizzled [Fz]/PCP pathway) that regulate this process have been identified. Although significant progress has been made in dissecting aspects of PCP signaling within cells, much remains to be discovered about the mechanisms of long-range and local PCP cell-cell interactions. Here, we discuss the current models based on Drosophila studies and incorporate recent insights into this long-standing cell and developmental biology problem. PMID:25580252

  3. Development and validation of an LC-MS/MS method for determination of phencyclidine in human serum and its application to human drug abuse cases

    PubMed Central

    Chimalakonda, Krishna C.; Hailey, Chris; Black, Ryan; Beekman, Allison; Carlisle, Rebecca; Lowman-Smith, Elizabeth; Singletary, Heathe; Owens, S. Michael; Hendrickson, Howard

    2010-01-01

    A new analytical method was developed and validated for the rapid determination of phencyclidine (PCP) in human blood and serum. Rapid chromatographic separation decreased the analysis time relative to standard gas chromatography (GC)-based methodologies. The method involved the use of solid-phase extraction for sample preparation and cleanup followed by liquid chromatography tandem spectrometric (LC-MS/MS) analysis and an electrospray-ionization (ESI) interface. PCP was quantified using multiple-reaction-monitoring with deuterium labeled PCP (PCP-d5) as an internal standard. The method was validated for accuracy, precision, linearity, and recovery. The method was accurate with error <14% and precision with coefficient of variation (CV) <5.0%. The assay was linear over the entire range of calibration standards (r2 > 0.997). The recovery of PCP after solid-phase extraction was greater than 90% with the lower limit of detection (LLOD) for PCP in 500 µl of human serum after solid-phase extraction at 0.06 ng ml−1. This method was used to determine the levels of PCP in postmortem human blood samples. The LLOD in blood was 1 ng ml−1. Blood PCP concentrations were also determined separately using GC and flame ionization detection (FID). Blood calibration standards and serum calibration standards yielded similar concentrations when used to quantitate authentic human blood samples that tested positive for PCP under the GC-FID method. Extraction of PCP from serum required fewer steps and therefore could be used as a calibration matrix in place of blood. The LC-MS/MS methodology shown here was higher throughput compared with GC-based methods because of very short chromatographic run times. This was accomplished without sacrificing analytical sensitivity. PMID:20959870

  4. Pentachlorophenol exposure causes Warburg-like effects in zebrafish embryos at gastrulation stage.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing; Hu, Ping; Dong, Zhangji; Li, Jingyun; Zhang, Hongchang; Yin, Daqiang; Zhao, Qingshun

    2014-06-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a prevalent pollutant in the environment and has been demonstrated to be a serious toxicant to humans and animals. However, little is known regarding the molecular mechanism underlying its toxic effects on vertebrate early development. To explore the impacts and underlying mechanisms of PCP on early development, zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos were exposed to PCP at concentrations of 0, 20 and 50 μg/L, and microscopic observation and cDNA microarray analysis were subsequently conducted at gastrulation stage. The morphological observations revealed that PCP caused a developmental delay of zebrafish embryos in a concentration-dependent manner. Transcriptomic data showed that 50 μg/L PCP treatment resulted in significant changes in gene expression level, and the genes involved in energy metabolism and cell behavior were identified based on gene functional enrichment analysis. The energy production of embryos was influenced by PCP via the activation of glycolysis along with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS). The results suggested that PCP acts as an inhibitor of OXPHOS at 8 hpf (hours postfertilization). Consistent with the activated glycolysis, the cell cycle activity of PCP-treated embryos was higher than the controls. These characteristics are similar to the Warburg effect, which occurs in human tumors. The microinjection of exogenous ATP confirmed that an additional energy supply could rescue PCP-treated embryos from the developmental delay due to the energy deficit. Taken together, our results demonstrated that PCP causes a Warburg-like effect on zebrafish embryos during gastrulation, and the affected embryos had the phenotype of developmental delay. PMID:24642059

  5. Evaluating the phytoremediation potential of Phragmites australis grown in pentachlorophenol and cadmium co-contaminated soils.

    PubMed

    Hechmi, Nejla; Aissa, Nadhira Ben; Abdenaceur, Hassen; Jedidi, Naceur

    2014-01-01

    Pot-culture experiments were conducted to evaluate the phytoremediation potential of a wetland plant species, Phragmites australis in cadmium (Cd) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) co-contaminated soil under glasshouse conditions for 70 days. The treatments included Cd (0, 5 and 50 mg kg(-1)) without or with PCP (50 and 250 mg kg(-1)). The results showed that growth of P. australis was significantly influenced by interaction of Cd and PCP, decreasing with either Cd or PCP additions. Plant biomass was inhibited and reduced by the rate of 89 and 92% in the low and high Cd treatments and by 20 and 40% in the low and high PCP treatments compared to the control. The mixture of low Cd and low PCP lessened Cd toxicity to plants, resulting in improved plant growth (by 144%). Under the joint stress of the two contaminants, the ability of Cd uptake and translocation by P. australis was weak, and the BF and TF values were inferior to 1.0. A low proportion of the metal is found aboveground in comparison to roots, indicating a restriction on transport upwards and an excluding effect on Cd uptake. Thus, P. australis cannot be useful for phytoextraction. The removal rate of PCP increased significantly (70%) in planted soil. Significant positive correlations were found between the DHA and the removal of PCP in planted soils which implied that plant root exudates promote the rhizosphere microorganisms and enzyme activity, thereby improving biodegradation of PCP. Based on results, P. australis cannot be effective for phytoremediation of soil co-contaminated with Cd and PCP. Further, high levels of pollutant hamper and eventually inhibit plant growth. Therefore, developing supplementary methods (e.g. exploring the partnership of plant-microbe) for either enhancing (phytoextraction) or reducing the bioavailability of contaminants in the rhizosphere (phytostabilization) as well as plant growth promoting could significantly improve the process of phytoremediation in co-contaminated soil.

  6. An expanded genetic linkage map of Prunus based on an interspecific cross between almond and peach.

    PubMed

    Bliss, F A; Arulsekar, S; Foolad, M R; Becerra, V; Gillen, A M; Warburton, M L; Dandekar, A M; Kocsisne, G M; Mydin, K K

    2002-06-01

    The genetic linkage map of Prunus constructed earlier and based on an interspecific F2 population resulting from a cross between almond (Prunus dulcis D.A. Webb) and peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) was extended to include 8 isozyme loci, 102 peach mesocarp cDNAs, 11 plum genomic clones, 19 almond genomic clones, 7 resistance gene analogs (RGAs), 1 RGA-related sequence marker, 4 morphological trait loci, 3 genes with known function, 4 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci, 1 RAPD, and 1 cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAP) marker. This map contains 161 markers placed in eight linkage groups that correspond to the basic chromosome number of the genus (x = n = 8) with a map distance of 1144 centimorgans (cM) and an average marker density of 6.8 cM. Four more trait loci (Y, Pcp, D, and SK) and one isozyme locus (Mdh1) were assigned to linkage groups based on known associations with linked markers. The linkage group identification numbers correspond to those for maps published by the Arús group in Spain and the Dirlewanger group in France. Forty-five percent of the loci showed segregation distortion most likely owing to the interspecific nature of the cross and mating system differences between almond (obligate outcrosser) and peach (selfer). The Cat1 locus, known to be linked to the D locus controlling fruit acidity, was mapped to linkage group 5. A gene or genes controlling polycarpel fruit development was placed on linkage group 3, and control of senesced leaf color (in late fall season) (LFCLR) was mapped to linkage group 1 at a putative location similar to where the Y locus has also been placed. PMID:12033621

  7. How context affects electronic health record-based test result follow-up: a mixed-methods evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Shailaja; Smith, Michael W; Sittig, Dean F; Petersen, Nancy J; Hysong, Sylvia J; Espadas, Donna; Modi, Varsha; Singh, Hardeep

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Electronic health record (EHR)-based alerts can facilitate transmission of test results to healthcare providers, helping ensure timely and appropriate follow-up. However, failure to follow-up on abnormal test results (missed test results) persists in EHR-enabled healthcare settings. We aimed to identify contextual factors associated with facility-level variation in missed test results within the Veterans Affairs (VA) health system. Design, setting and participants Based on a previous survey, we categorised VA facilities according to primary care providers’ (PCPs’) perceptions of low (n=20) versus high (n=20) risk of missed test results. We interviewed facility representatives to collect data on several contextual factors derived from a sociotechnical conceptual model of safe and effective EHR use. We compared these factors between facilities categorised as low and high perceived risk, adjusting for structural characteristics. Results Facilities with low perceived risk were significantly more likely to use specific strategies to prevent alerts from being lost to follow-up (p=0.0114). Qualitative analysis identified three high-risk scenarios for missed test results: alerts on tests ordered by trainees, alerts ‘handed off’ to another covering clinician (surrogate clinician), and alerts on patients not assigned in the EHR to a PCP. Test result management policies and procedures to address these high-risk situations varied considerably across facilities. Conclusions Our study identified several scenarios that pose a higher risk for missed test results in EHR-based healthcare systems. In addition to implementing provider-level strategies to prevent missed test results, healthcare organisations should consider implementing monitoring systems to track missed test results. PMID:25387758

  8. Tinking Glutamatergically: Changing Concepts of Schizophrenia Based Upon Changing Neurochemical Models

    PubMed Central

    Kantrowitz, Joshua T.; Javitt, Daniel C.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical concepts of mental illness have always been modulated by underlying theoretical considerations. For the past fifty years, schizophrenia has been considered primarily a disease of dopaminergic neurotransmission. Although this conceptualization has helped greatly in explaining the clinical effects of psychostimulants and guiding the clinical use of both typical and atypical antipsychotics, it has nevertheless shaded how we look at the disorder from both a pathophysiological and therapeutic perspective. For example, most explanatory research in schizophrenia has focused on dopamine-rich regions of the brain, with little investigation of regions of the brain that are relatively dopamine poor. Starting approximately twenty years ago, an alternative formulation of schizophrenia was proposed based upon actions of the “dissociative anesthetic” class of psychotomimetic agents, including phencyclidine (PCP), ketamine and various designer drugs. These compounds induce psychosis by blocking neurotransmission at N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-type glutamate receptors, suggesting an alternative model for pathogenesis in schizophrenia. As opposed to dopamine, the glutamatergic system is widely distributed throughout the brain and plays a prominent role in sensory processing as well as in subsequent stages of cortical analysis. Glutamatergic theories of schizophrenia, thus, predict that cortical dysfunction will be regionally diffuse but process specific. In addition, NMDA receptors incorporate binding sites for specific endogenous brain compounds, including the amino acids glycine and D-serine and the redox modulator glutathione, and interact closely with dopaminergic, cholinergic and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic systems. Glutamatergic theories, thus, open new potential approaches for treatment of schizophrenia, most of which are only now entering clinical evaluation. PMID:20880830

  9. Impaired Limbic Cortico-Striatal Structure and Sustained Visual Attention in a Rodent Model of Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Samuel A.; Sawiak, Stephen J.; Caprioli, Daniele; Jupp, Bianca; Buonincontri, Guido; Mar, Adam C.; Harte, Michael K.; Fletcher, Paul C.; Robbins, Trevor W.; Neill, Jo C.

    2015-01-01

    Background: N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) dysfunction is thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of schizophrenia. Accordingly, NMDAR antagonists such as phencyclidine (PCP) are used widely in experimental animals to model cognitive impairment associated with this disorder. However, it is unclear whether PCP disrupts the structural integrity of brain areas relevant to the profile of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia. Methods: Here we used high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging and voxel-based morphometry to investigate structural alterations associated with sub-chronic PCP treatment in rats. Results: Sub-chronic exposure of rats to PCP (5mg/kg twice daily for 7 days) impaired sustained visual attention on a 5-choice serial reaction time task, notably when the attentional load was increased. In contrast, sub-chronic PCP had no significant effect on the attentional filtering of a pre-pulse auditory stimulus in an acoustic startle paradigm. Voxel-based morphometry revealed significantly reduced grey matter density bilaterally in the hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex, ventral striatum, and amygdala. PCP-treated rats also exhibited reduced cortical thickness in the insular cortex. Conclusions: These findings demonstrate that sub-chronic NMDA receptor antagonism is sufficient to produce highly-localized morphological abnormalities in brain areas implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia. Furthermore, PCP exposure resulted in dissociable impairments in attentional function. PMID:25552430

  10. The effect of a resident-led quality improvement project on improving communication between hospital-based and outpatient physicians.

    PubMed

    Kalanithi, Lucy; Coffey, Charles E; Mourad, Michelle; Vidyarthi, Arpana R; Hollander, Harry; Ranji, Sumant R

    2013-01-01

    This article reports on a resident-led quality improvement program to improve communication between inpatient internal medicine residents and their patients' primary care physicians (PCPs). The program included education on care transitions, standardization of documentation, audit and feedback of documented PCP communication rates with public reporting of performance, rapid-cycle data analysis and improvement projects, and a financial incentive. At baseline, PCP communication was documented in 55% of patients; after implementation of the intervention, communication was documented in 89.3% (2477 of 2772) of discharges during the program period. The program was associated with a significant increase in referring PCP satisfaction with communication at hospital admission (baseline, 27.7% "satisfied" or "very satisfied"; postintervention, 58.2%; P < .01) but not at discharge (baseline, 14.9%; postintervention, 21.8%; P = .41). Residents cited the importance of PCP communication for patient care and audit and feedback of their performance as the principal drivers of their engagement in the project.

  11. Coupling between Pentachlorophenol Dechlorination and Soil Redox As Revealed by Stable Carbon Isotope, Microbial Community Structure, and Biogeochemical Data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yan; He, Yan; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Jianming; Crowley, David

    2015-05-01

    Carbon isotopic analysis and molecular-based methods were used in conjunction with geochemical data sets to assess the dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) when coupled to biogeochemical processes in a mangrove soil having no prior history of anthropogenic contamination. The PCP underwent 96% dechlorination in soil amended with acetate, compared to 21% dehalogenation in control soil. Carbon isotope analysis of residual PCP demonstrated an obvious enrichment of 13C (εC, -3.01±0.1%). Molecular and statistical analyses demonstrated that PCP dechlorination and Fe(III) reduction were synergistically combined electron-accepting processes. Microbial community analysis further suggested that enhanced dechlorination of PCP during Fe(III) reduction was mediated by members of the multifunctional family of Geobacteraceae. In contrast, PCP significantly suppressed the growth of SO4(2-) reducers, which, in turn, facilitated the production of CH4 by diversion of electrons from SO4(2-) reduction to methanogenesis. The integrated data regarding stoichiometric alterations in this study gives direct evidence showing PCP, Fe(III), and SO4(2-) reduction, and CH4 production are coupled microbial processes during changes in soil redox. PMID:25853431

  12. Effects of pentachlorophenol on survival of earthworms (Lumbricus terrestris) and phagocytosis by their immunoactive coelomocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Giggleman, M.A.; Fitzpatrick, L.C.; Goven, A.J.; Venables, B.J.

    1998-12-01

    Earthworms, Lumbricus terrestris, exposed for 96 h to filter paper saturated with five nominal concentrations of pentachlorophenol, exhibited a 50% lethal concentration (LC50) of 25.0 {micro}g PCP/cm{sup 2} and corresponding whole worm body burden-based 50% lethal dose (LD50) of 877.7 {micro}g PCP/g dry mass. Linear regression modeling showed that worms increased body concentrations (BC = {micro}g PCP/g dry tissue mass) with increasing exposure concentrations (EC) according to BC = 113.5 + 29.5EC. Phagocytosis of yeast cells by immunoactive coelomocytes was suppressed only at body concentrations (863.3 {micro}g PCP/g dry mass) that approximated the calculated LD50 and overlapped those demonstrating lethality, indicating a sharp transition between sublethal and lethal toxicity. An exposure concentration of 15 {micro}g PCP/cm{sup 2} produced significant suppression of phagocytosis of yeast cells by immunoactive coelomocytes. However, the average measured body burden from this group approximated the estimated LD50, indicating a sharp toxic response slope. Exposure to 10 {micro}g PCP/cm{sup 2} with a corresponding body concentration of 501.3 {micro}g PCP/g dry mass did not affect phagocytosis. The importance of body burden data is emphasized.

  13. Visits to primary care physicians among persons who inject drugs at high risk of hepatitis C virus infection: room for improvement.

    PubMed

    Artenie, A A; Jutras-Aswad, D; Roy, É; Zang, G; Bamvita, J-M; Lévesque, A; Bruneau, J

    2015-10-01

    The role of primary care physicians (PCP) in hepatitis C virus (HCV) prevention is increasingly emphasized. Yet, little is known about the patterns of contacts with PCP among persons who inject drugs (PWID). We sought to assess the 6-month prevalence of PCP visiting among PWID at risk of HCV infection and to explore the associated factors. Baseline data were collected from HCV-seronegative PWID recruited in HEPCO, an observational Hepatitis Cohort study (2004-2011) in Montreal, Canada. An interviewer-administered questionnaire elicited information on socio-demographic factors, drug use patterns and healthcare services utilization. Blood samples were tested for HCV antibodies. Using the Gelberg-Andersen Behavioral Model, hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted to identify predisposing, need and enabling factors associated with PCP visiting. Of the 349 participants (mean age = 34; 80.8% male), 32.1% reported visiting a PCP. In the multivariate model, among predisposing factors, male gender [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 0.45 (0.25-0.83)], chronic homelessness [AOR = 0.08 (0.01-0.67)], cocaine injection [AOR = 0.46 (0.28-0.76)] and reporting greater illegal or semi-legal income [AOR = 0.48 (0.27-0.85)] were negatively associated with PCP visits. Markers of need were not associated with the outcome. Among enabling factors, contact with street nurses [AOR = 3.86 (1.49-9.90)] and food banks [AOR = 2.01 (1.20-3.37)] was positively associated with PCP visiting. Only one third of participating PWID reported a recent visit to a PCP. While a host of predisposing factors seems to hamper timely contacts with PCP among high-risk PWID, community-based support services may play an important role in initiating dialogue with primary healthcare services in this population. PMID:25586516

  14. Back to the roots: photodynamic inactivation of bacteria based on water-soluble curcumin bound to polyvinylpyrrolidone as a photosensitizer.

    PubMed

    Winter, Sandra; Tortik, Nicole; Kubin, Andreas; Krammer, Barbara; Plaetzer, Kristjan

    2013-10-01

    Photodynamic inactivation (PDI), the light-induced and photosensitizer-mediated overproduction of reactive oxygen species in microorganisms, represents a convincing approach to treat infections with (multi-resistant) pathogens. Due to its favourable photoactive properties combined with excellent biocompatibility, curcumin derived from the roots of turmeric (Curcuma longa) has been identified as an advantageous photosensitizer for PDI. To overcome the poor water solubility and the rapid decay of the natural substance at physiological pH, we examined the applicability of polyvinylpyrrolidone curcumin (PVP-C) in an acidified aqueous solution (solubility of PVP-C up to 2.7 mM) for photoinactivation of Gram(+) and Gram(-) bacteria. Five micromolar PVP-C incubated for 5 minutes and illuminated using a blue light LED array (435 ± 10 nm, 33.8 J cm(-2)) resulted in a >6 log10 reduction of the number of viable Staphylococcus aureus. At this concentration, longer incubation periods result in a lower phototoxicity, most likely due to degeneration of curcumin. Upon an increase of the PVP-C concentration to 50 μM (incubation for 15 or 25 min) a complete eradication of Staphylococcus aureus can be achieved. As expected for a non-cationic photosensitizer, cell wall permeabilization with CaCl2 prior to addition of 50 μM PVP-C for 15 min is necessary to induce a drop in the count of the Gram(-) Escherichia coli for more than 3 log10. As both constituents of the formulation, curcumin (E number E100) and polyvinylpyrrolidone (E1201), have been approved as food additives, a PDI based on PCP-C might allow for a very sparing clinical application (e.g. for disinfection of wounds) or even for employment in aseptic production of foodstuffs.

  15. The Drosophila neurogenin Tap functionally interacts with the Wnt-PCP pathway to regulate neuronal extension and guidance

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liqun; Hu, Shu; Okray, Zeynep; Ren, Xi; De Geest, Natalie; Claeys, Annelies; Yan, Jiekun; Bellefroid, Eric; Quan, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-01-01

    The neurogenin (Ngn) transcription factors control early neurogenesis and neurite outgrowth in mammalian cortex. In contrast to their proneural activity, their function in neurite growth is poorly understood. Drosophila has a single predicted Ngn homolog, Tap, of unknown function. Here we show that Tap is not a proneural protein in Drosophila but is required for proper axonal growth and guidance of neurons of the mushroom body, a neuropile required for associative learning and memory. Genetic and expression analyses suggest that Tap inhibits excessive axonal growth by fine regulation of the levels of the Wnt signaling adaptor protein Dishevelled. PMID:27385016

  16. Hallucinogens and Dissociative Drugs, Including LSD, PCP, Ketamine, Dextromethorphan. National Institute on Drug Abuse Research Report Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHHS/PHS), Rockville, MD.

    Research is developing a clearer picture of the dangers of mind-altering drugs. The goal of this report is to present the latest information to providers to help them strengthen their prevention and treatment efforts. A description is presented of dissociative drugs, and consideration is given as to why people take hallucinogens. The physical…

  17. TECHNOLOGY EVALUATION REPORT: SILICATE TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION - SOLIDIFICATION/STABILIZATION OF PCP AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN SOILS - SELMA, CA

    EPA Science Inventory

    This Technolgy Evaluation Report evaluates the solidification/stabilization process of Silicate Technology Corporation (STC) for the on-site treatment of contaminated soil The STC immobilization technology uses a proprietary product (FMS Silicate) to chemically stabilize and ...

  18. Enhanced phosphorescence emission by incorporating aromatic halides into an entangled coordination framework based on naphthalenediimide.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Martínez, Virginia; Sola Llano, Rebeca; Furukawa, Shuhei; Takashima, Yohei; López Arbeloa, Iñigo; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2014-08-25

    Phosphorescence emission at room temperature is turned on in an entangled porous coordination polymer (PCP) with naphthalenediimide (NDI) as chromophore, by incorporating halogenated guests into the pores. The phosphorescent efficiency is drastically increased by the incorporation of aromatic halide guests in comparison with the incorporation of nonaromatic derivatives. Aromatic halide guests trigger a structural transformation, which allows a strong interaction with the NDI ligand in the framework through charge-transfer complexation, and provides an extra population process of the triplet state. The long-lived photoinduced triplet states, with an emission wavelength in the red region of the visible spectrum, demonstrated by this PCP, may open the door for potential uses, for example, as singlet-oxygen generators or for bio-imaging applications. PMID:24953198

  19. Design and synthesis of procollagen C-proteinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Eric; Chow, Nicholas; Yang, Charles; Sosa, Sergio; Bauer, Udo; Brenner, Mitch; Solow-Cordero, David; Ho, Wen-Bin

    2012-12-15

    Non-peptidic inhibitors of procollagen C-proteinase (PCP) were designed from substrate leads. Compounds were optimized for potency and selectivity, with N-substituted aryl sulfonamide hydroxamates having the best combination of these properties. Compounds 89 and 60 have IC(50) values of 10 and 80 nM, respectively, against PCP; excellent selectivity over MMP's 1, 2, and 9; and activity in cell-based collagen deposition assays.

  20. Planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial for extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Su, Jie; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Qian; Dong, Chun-Ying; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-08-12

    A planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial (PGO-MILN) was synthesized. The prepared PGO-MILN was characterized by transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results of adsorption experiments showed that the PGO-MILN had great adsorption capacity for 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Based on the adsorption experimental data, a sensitive magnetic method for determination of the five CPs in environmental water samples was developed by an effective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effects of main MSPE parameters including the solution pH, extraction time, desorption time, and volume of desorption solution on the extraction efficiencies had been investigated in detail. The recoveries ranged from 85.3 to 99.3% with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9994 and the linear ranges were between 10 and 500ngL(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the five CPs ranged from 0.2 to 2.6ngL(-1) and 0.6 to 8.7ngL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter- day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range from 0.6% to 7.4% and from 0.7% to 8.4%, respectively. It was confirmed that the PGO-MILN was a kind of highly effective MSPE materials used for enrichment of trace CPs in the environmental water.

  1. Planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial for extraction of chlorophenols from environmental water samples coupled with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mei-Qiang; Su, Jie; Hu, Jian-Qiang; Wang, Qian; Dong, Chun-Ying; Pan, Sheng-Dong; Jin, Mi-Cong

    2016-08-12

    A planar graphene oxide-based magnetic ionic liquid nanomaterial (PGO-MILN) was synthesized. The prepared PGO-MILN was characterized by transmission electronmicroscopy (TEM) and Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR). The results of adsorption experiments showed that the PGO-MILN had great adsorption capacity for 2-chlorophenol (2-CP), 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP), 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), 2,3,4,6-tetrachlorophenol (2,3,4,6-TeCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). Based on the adsorption experimental data, a sensitive magnetic method for determination of the five CPs in environmental water samples was developed by an effective magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) procedure coupled with high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The effects of main MSPE parameters including the solution pH, extraction time, desorption time, and volume of desorption solution on the extraction efficiencies had been investigated in detail. The recoveries ranged from 85.3 to 99.3% with correlation coefficients (r) higher than 0.9994 and the linear ranges were between 10 and 500ngL(-1). The limits of detection (LODs) and limits of quantification (LOQs) of the five CPs ranged from 0.2 to 2.6ngL(-1) and 0.6 to 8.7ngL(-1), respectively. The intra- and inter- day relative standard deviations (RSDs) were in the range from 0.6% to 7.4% and from 0.7% to 8.4%, respectively. It was confirmed that the PGO-MILN was a kind of highly effective MSPE materials used for enrichment of trace CPs in the environmental water. PMID:27425762

  2. Sulfa use, dihydropteroate synthase mutations, and Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Cheryl R; Poole, Charles; Kazanjian, Powel; Meshnick, Steven R

    2004-10-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the associations in Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) patients between dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS) mutations and sulfa or sulfone (sulfa) prophylaxis and between DHPS mutations and sulfa treatment outcome. Selection criteria included study populations composed entirely of PCP patients and mutation or treatment outcome results for all patients, regardless of exposure status. Based on 13 studies, the risk of developing DHPS mutations is higher for PCP patients receiving sulfa prophylaxis than for PCP patients not receiving sulfa prophylaxis (p < 0.001). Results are too heterogeneous (p < 0.001) to warrant a single summary effect estimate. Estimated effects are weaker after 1996 and stronger in studies that included multiple isolates per patient. Five studies examined treatment outcome. The effect of DHPS mutations on treatment outcome has not been well studied, and the few studies that have been conducted are inconsistent even as to the presence or absence of an association.

  3. Bioconcentration of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl and pentachlorophenol in the midge, Chironomus riparius, as measured by a pharmacokinetic model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lydy, M.J.; Hayton, W.L.; Staubus, A.E.; Fisher, S.W.

    1994-01-01

    A two compartment pharmacokinetic model was developed which describes the uptake and elimination of 5,5',6-trichlorobiphenyl (TCB) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) in the midge, Chironomus riparius. C. riparius were exposed to nominal TCB (2 ??g L-1) and PCP (9 ??g L-1) concentrations during a 16 h static uptake phase. Depuration was determined over approximately 45 h using a flowthrough system without feeding. The uptake clearance (P) was 330 ?? 61 ml g-1 midge h-1 for TCB and 55 ?? 4 ml g-1 midge h-1 for PCP, while measured bioconcentration factors (BCF) were 35,900 and 458 for TCB and PCP, respectively. Overall, the clearance-volume- based pharmacokinetic model predicted BCF values that were consistent with published values as well as with BCF values obtained from the octanol-water partition coefficient (K(ow)).

  4. Simultaneous determination of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and pentachlorophenol based on poly(Rhodamine B)/graphene oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes composite film modified electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaolin; Zhang, Kexin; Lu, Nan; Yuan, Xing

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, a poly(Rhodamine B)/graphene oxide/multiwalled carbon nanotubes nanocomposite modified glass carbon electrode (PRhB/GO/MWCNTs/GCE) was developed for the simultaneous determination of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). The PRhB/GO/MWCNTs film was extensively characterized by emission scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical behaviors of 2,4,6-TCP and PCP were investigated by cyclic voltammetry, linear sweep voltammetry and differential pulse voltammetry. Due to the synergistic effect, the PRhB/GO/MWCNTs/GCE significantly facilitated the simultaneous electro-oxidation of 2,4,6-TCP and PCP with peak potential difference of 160 mV and enhanced oxidation currents. Under optimum conditions, the oxidation current of 2,4,6-TCP was linear to its concentration in the ranges of 4.0 × 10-9 to 1.0 × 10-7 M and 1.0 × 10-7 to 1.0 × 10-4 M with the detection limit (S/N = 3) of 8.0 × 10-10 M. And the linear concentration ranges for PCP were 2.0 × 10-9 to 1.0 × 10-7 M and 1.0 × 10-7 to 9.0 × 10-5 M with the detection limit of 5.0 × 10-10 M. Moreover, the proposed PRhB/GO/MWCNTs/GCE was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of 2,4,6-TCP and PCP in practical water samples.

  5. Bifunctional sensor of pentachlorophenol and copper ions based on nanostructured hybrid films of humic acid and exfoliated layered double hydroxide via a facile layer-by-layer assembly.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuang; Peng, Dinghua; Hu, Xianluo; Gong, Jingming

    2013-06-27

    A new, highly sensitive bifunctional electrochemical sensor for the simultaneous determination of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and copper ions (Cu(2+)) has been developed, where organic-inorganic hybrid ultrathin films were fabricated by alternate assembly of humic acid (HA) and exfoliated Mg-Al-layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets onto ITO substrates via a layer-by-layer (LBL) approach. The multilayer films were then characterized by means of UV-vis spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and atomic force microscope (AFM). These films were found to have a relatively smooth surface with almost equal amounts of HA incorporated in each cycle. Its electrochemical performance was systematically investigated. Our results demonstrate that such a newly designed (LDH/HA)n multilayer films, combining the individual properties of HA (dual recognition ability for organic herbicides and metal ions) together with LDH nanosheets (a rigid inorganic matrix), can be applied to the simultaneous analysis of PCP and Cu(II) without interference from each other. The LBL assembled nanoarchitectures were further investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared spectroscopy (IR), which provides insight for bifunctional sensing behavior. Under the optimized conditions, the detection limit was found to be as low as 0.4 nM PCP, well below the guideline value of PCP in drinking water (3.7 nM) set by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA), and 2.0 nM Cu(2+), much below the guideline value (2.0 mg L(-1), ~31.2 nM) from the World Health Organization (WHO), respectively. Toward the goal for practical applications, this simple and cost-effective probe was further evaluated by monitoring PCP and Cu(II) in water samples. PMID:23764441

  6. A New Pansharpening Method Based on Spatial and Spectral Sparsity Priors.

    PubMed

    He, Xiyan; Condat, Laurent; Bioucas-Diaz, Jose; Chanussot, Jocelyn; Xia, Junshi

    2014-06-27

    The development of multisensor systems in recent years has led to great increase in the amount of available remote sensing data. Image fusion techniques aim at inferring high quality images of a given area from degraded versions of the same area obtained by multiple sensors. This paper focuses on pansharpening, which is the inference of a high spatial resolution multispectral image from two degraded versions with complementary spectral and spatial resolution characteristics: a) a low spatial resolution multispectral image; and b) a high spatial resolution panchromatic image. We introduce a new variational model based on spatial and spectral sparsity priors for the fusion. In the spectral domain we encourage low-rank structure, whereas in the spatial domain we promote sparsity on the local differences. Given the fact that both panchromatic and multispectral images are integrations of the underlying continuous spectra using different channel responses, we propose to exploit appropriate regularizations based on both spatial and spectral links between panchromatic and the fused multispectral images. A weighted version of the vector Total Variation (TV) norm of the data matrix is employed to align the spatial information of the fused image with that of the panchromatic image. With regard to spectral information, two different types of regularization are proposed to promote a soft constraint on the linear dependence between the panchromatic and the fused multispectral images. The first one estimates directly the linear coefficients from the observed panchromatic and low resolution multispectral images by Linear Regression (LR) while the second one employs the Principal Component Pursuit (PCP) to obtain a robust recovery of the underlying low-rank structure. We also show that the two regularizers are strongly related. The basic idea of both regularizers is that the fused image should have low-rank and preserve edge locations. We use a variation of the recently proposed

  7. Primary care physician use across the breast cancer care continuum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Li; Lofters, Aisha; Moineddin, Rahim; Decker, Kathleen; Groome, Patti; Kendell, Cynthia; Krzyzanowska, Monika; Li, Dongdong; McBride, Mary L.; Mittmann, Nicole; Porter, Geoff; Turner, Donna; Urquhart, Robin; Winget, Marcy; Zhang, Yang; Grunfeld, Eva

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To describe primary care physician (PCP) use and continuity of PCP care across the breast cancer care continuum. Design Population-based, retrospective cohort study using provincial cancer registries linked to health administrative databases. Setting British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. Participants All women with incident invasive breast cancer from 2007 to 2012 in Manitoba and Ontario and from 2007 to 2011 in British Columbia. Main outcome measures The number and proportions of visits to PCPs were determined. Continuity of care was measured using the Usual Provider of Care index calculated as the proportion of visits to the most-often-visited PCP in the 6 to 30 months before a breast cancer diagnosis (baseline) and from 1 to 3 years following a breast cancer diagnosis (survivorship). Results More than three-quarters of patients visited their PCPs 2 or more times during the breast cancer diagnostic period, and more than 80% of patients had at least 1 PCP visit during breast cancer adjuvant treatment. Contact with the PCP decreased over time during breast cancer survivorship. Of the 3 phases, women appeared to be most likely to not have PCP contact during adjuvant treatment, with 10.7% (Ontario) to 18.7% (British Columbia) of women having no PCP visits during this phase. However, a sizable minority of women had at least monthly visits during the treatment phase, particularly in Manitoba and Ontario, where approximately a quarter of women saw a PCP at least monthly. We observed higher continuity of care with PCPs in survivorship (compared with baseline) in all provinces. Conclusion Primary care physicians were generally involved throughout the breast cancer care continuum, but the level of involvement varied across care phases and by province. Future interventions will aim to further integrate primary and oncology care. PMID:27737994

  8. Influence of Primary Care Physician Availability and Socioeconomic Deprivation on Breast Cancer from 1988 to 2008: A Spatio-Temporal Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chien, Lung-Chang; Deshpande, Anjali D.; Jeffe, Donna B.; Schootman, Mario

    2012-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer and the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the United States. It is unclear how county-level primary care physician (PCP) availability and socioeconomic deprivation affect the spatial and temporal variation of breast cancer incidence and mortality. Methods We used the 1988–2008 public-use county-based data from nine Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) programs to analyze the temporal and spatial disparity of PCP availability and socioeconomic deprivation on early-stage incidence, advanced-stage incidence and breast cancer mortality. The spatio-temporal analysis was implemented by a novel structural additive modeling approach. Results Greater PCP availability was significantly associated with higher early-stage incidence, advanced-stage incidence and mortality during the entire study period while socioeconomic deprivation was significantly negatively associated with early-stage incidence, advanced-stage incidence, and mortality up to 1992. However, the observed influence of PCP availability and socioeconomic deprivation varied by county. Conclusions We showed important associations of PCP availability and socioeconomic deprivation with the three breast cancer indicators. However, the effect of these associations varied over time and across counties. The association of PCP availability and socioeconomic deprivation was stronger in selected counties. PMID:22536433

  9. Evaluation of Inhibition Efficiency for the Detection of Captan, 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzodioxin, Pentachlorophenol and Carbosulfan in Water: An Electrochemical Approach.

    PubMed

    Nesakumar, Noel; Ramachandra, Bhat Lakshmishri; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Krishnan, Uma Maheswari; Rayappan, John Bosco Balaguru

    2016-02-01

    A novel bio-analytical method has been devised based on the change in catalytic activity of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) enzyme induced by captan, carbosulfan, 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (TCDD) and pentachlorophenol (PCP) for the investigation of inhibition efficiency and sensitivity using Pt/ZnO/AChE/Chitosan bioelectrode. The inhibition curves of captan, carbosulfan, TCDD and PCP were similar to Michaelis-Menten curve. TCDD held the minimum inhibitor Michaelis-Menten constant ([Formula: see text]) value (10.2 nM) in comparison with PCP (10.9 nM), carbosulfan (14.5 nM) and captan (7.9 × 10(3) nM). The maximum inhibition of AChE enzyme by captan was about 100 %, which was much higher than that of TCDD (72.7 %), PCP (68.1 %) and carbosulfan (47.7 %). The calculated theoretical sensitivity was in the order of TCDD > PCP > carbosulfan > captan. Comparing with TCDD (35.3 %), PCP (47.8 %) and carbosulfan (20.9 %), only the inhibition efficiency of captan (55.0 %) was the maximum. The developed bioelectrode exhibited high recovery and low relative standard deviation in local tap water samples.

  10. ECIL guidelines for the diagnosis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Cordonnier, Catherine; Maertens, Johan; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-09-01

    The Fifth European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) convened a meeting to establish evidence-based recommendations for using tests to diagnose Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in adult patients with haematological malignancies. Immunofluorescence assays are recommended as the most sensitive microscopic method (recommendation A-II: ). Real-time PCR is recommended for the routine diagnosis of PCP ( A-II: ). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid is recommended as the best specimen as it yields good negative predictive value ( A-II: ). Non-invasive specimens can be suitable alternatives ( B-II: ), acknowledging that PCP cannot be ruled out in case of a negative PCR result ( A-II: ). Detecting β-d-glucan in serum can contribute to the diagnosis but not the follow-up of PCP ( A-II: ). A negative serum β-d-glucan result can exclude PCP in a patient at risk ( A-II: ), whereas a positive test result may indicate other fungal infections. Genotyping using multilocus sequence markers can be used to investigate suspected outbreaks ( A-II: ). The routine detection of dihydropteroate synthase mutations in cases of treatment failure is not recommended ( B-II: ) since these mutations do not affect response to high-dose co-trimoxazole. The clinical utility of these diagnostic tests for the early management of PCP should be further assessed in prospective, randomized interventional studies. PMID:27550991

  11. Degradation of pentachlorophenol by hydroxyl radicals and sulfate radicals using electrochemical activation of peroxomonosulfate, peroxodisulfate and hydrogen peroxide.

    PubMed

    Govindan, Kadarkarai; Raja, Mohan; Noel, Michael; James, E J

    2014-05-15

    The present study is to investigate the reactivity of free radicals (SO4(-) and HO) generated from common oxidants (peroxomonosulfate (PMS), peroxodisulfate (PDS) and hydrogen peroxide (HP)) activated by electrochemically generated Fe(2+)/Fe(3+) ions which furthermore are evaluated to destroy pentachlorophenol (PCP) in aqueous solution. The effect of solution pH and amount of oxidants (PMS, PDS and HP) in electrocoagulation (EC) on PCP degradation is analyzed in detail. The experimental results reveal that, optimum initial solution pH is 4.5 and PMS is more efficient oxidant addition in EC. 75% PCP degradation is achieved at 60min electrolysis time from PMS assisted EC. According to the first order rate constant, faster PCP degradation rate is obtained by PMS assisted EC. The PCP degradation rate by oxidant assisted EC is observed in the following order: EC/PMS>EC/PDS>EC/HP>EC. Further to identify the influences of experimental factors involved in PCP degradation by oxidant assisted EC, an experimental design based on an orthogonal array (OA) L9 (3(3)) is proposed using Taguchi method. The factors that most significantly affect the process robustness are identified as A (oxidant) and B (pH) which together account for nearly 86% of the variance.

  12. Fabrication of nano-porous hydroxyapatite modified electrode and its application for determination of p-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Chu, Lin; Zhang, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Nano-porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) modified electrode was fabricated by simply electrodepositing HAp onto the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) from the electrolytes solution containing Ca(NO3)2 4H2O and NH4H2PO4, the resulting electrode (nano-HAp/GCE) was characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The electrochemical behavior of p-chlorophenol (p-CP) at nano-HAp/GCE was studied by cyclic voltammetry. The electrode displayed selective and enhanced electroanalytical response towards p-CP, obviously because p-CP is accumulated at the electrode. For the greater sensitivity, a semi-derivative technique was adopted to obtain the current signal. The results indicated that the nano-HAp/GCE exhibits substantial enhancement in electrochemical sensitivity for p-CP due to its large surface area and particular adsorbability. After accumulation of 4 min for p-CP on nano-HAp/GCE, the peak height was linearly related to the concentration of p-CP in the range of 1.0 x 10(-8) to 1.0 x 10(-7) mol L(-1). The detection limit was 4.0 x 10(-9) mol L-(1) at 3sigma level. Based on this, the modified electrode was successfully applied in water samples with low cost and high sensitivity.

  13. Prenatal exposure to phencyclidine produces abnormal behaviour and NMDA receptor expression in postpubertal mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lingling; Mamiya, Takayoshi; Lu, Ping; Toriumi, Kazuya; Mouri, Akihiro; Hiramatsu, Masayuki; Kim, Hyoung-Chun; Zou, Li-Bo; Nagai, Taku; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2010-08-01

    Several studies have shown the disruptive effects of non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists on neurobehavioural development. Based on the neurodevelopment hypothesis of schizophrenia, there is growing interest in animal models treated with NMDA antagonists at developing stages to investigate the pathogenesis of psychological disturbances in humans. Previous studies have reported that perinatal treatment with phencyclidine (PCP) impairs the development of neuronal systems and induces schizophrenia-like behaviour. However, the adverse effects of prenatal exposure to PCP on behaviour and the function of NMDA receptors are not well understood. This study investigated the long-term effects of prenatal exposure to PCP in mice. The prenatal PCP-treated mice showed hypersensitivity to a low dose of PCP in locomotor activity and impairment of recognition memory in the novel object recognition test at age 7 wk. Meanwhile, the prenatal exposure reduced the phosphorylation of NR1, although it increased the expression of NR1 itself. Furthermore, these behavioural changes were attenuated by atypical antipsychotic treatment. Taken together, prenatal exposure to PCP produced long-lasting behavioural deficits, accompanied by the abnormal expression and dysfunction of NMDA receptors in postpubertal mice. It is worth investigating the influences of disrupted NMDA receptors during the prenatal period on behaviour in later life.

  14. Solution phase and membrane immobilized iron-based free radical reactions: Fundamentals and applications for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Scott Romak

    Membrane-based separation processes have been used extensively for drinking water purification, wastewater treatment, and numerous other applications. Reactive membranes synthesized through functionalization of the membrane pores offer enhanced reactivity due to increased surface area at the polymer-solution interface and low diffusion limitations. Oxidative techniques utilizing free radicals have proven effective for both the destruction of toxic organics and non-environmental applications. Most previous work focuses on reactions in the homogeneous phase; however, the immobilization of reactants in membrane pores offers several advantages. The use of polyanions immobilized in a membrane or chelates in solution prevents ferric hydroxide precipitation at near-neutral pH, a common limitation of iron(Fe(II/III))-catalyzed hydrogen peroxide (H 2O2) decomposition. The objectives of this research are to develop a membrane-based platform for the generation of free radicals, degrade toxic organic compounds using this and similar solution-based reactions, degrade toxic organic compounds in droplet form, quantify hydroxyl radical production in these reactions, and develop kinetic models for both processes. In this study, a functionalized membrane containing poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) was used to immobilize iron ions and conduct free radical reactions by permeating H2O2 through the membrane. The membrane's responsive behavior to pH and divalent cations was investigated and modeled. The conversion of Fe(II) to Fe(III) in the membrane and its effect on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide were monitored and used to develop kinetic models for predicting H2O2 decomposition in these systems. The rate of hydroxyl radical production, and hence contaminant degradation can be varied by changing the residence time, H2O2 concentration, and/or iron loading. Using these membrane-immobilized systems, successful removal of toxic organic compounds, such as pentachlorophenol (PCP), from water

  15. Synthesis and characterization of carbazolide-based iridium PNP pincer complexes. Mechanistic and computational investigation of alkene hydrogenation: evidence for an Ir(III)/Ir(V)/Ir(III) catalytic cycle.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chen; Kim, Bong Gon; Guironnet, Damien; Brookhart, Maurice; Guan, Changjian; Wang, David Y; Krogh-Jespersen, Karsten; Goldman, Alan S

    2014-05-01

    New carbazolide-based iridium pincer complexes ((carb)PNP)Ir(C2H4), 3a, and ((carb)PNP)Ir(H)2, 3b, have been prepared and characterized. The dihydride, 3b, reacts with ethylene to yield the cis-dihydride ethylene complex cis-((carb)PNP)Ir(C2H4)(H)2. Under ethylene this complex reacts slowly at 70 °C to yield ethane and the ethylene complex, 3a. Kinetic analysis establishes that the reaction rate is dependent on ethylene concentration and labeling studies show reversible migratory insertion to form an ethyl hydride complex prior to formation of 3a. Exposure of cis-((carb)PNP)Ir(C2H4)(H)2 to hydrogen results in very rapid formation of ethane and dihydride, 3b. DFT analysis suggests that ethane elimination from the ethyl hydride complex is assisted by ethylene through formation of ((carb)PNP)Ir(H)(Et)(C2H4) and by H2 through formation of ((carb)PNP)Ir(H)(Et)(H2). Elimination of ethane from Ir(III) complex ((carb)PNP)Ir(H)(Et)(H2) is calculated to proceed through an Ir(V) complex ((carb)PNP)Ir(H)3(Et) which reductively eliminates ethane with a very low barrier to return to the Ir(III) dihydride, 3b. Under catalytic hydrogenation conditions (C2H4/H2), cis-((carb)PNP)Ir(C2H4)(H)2 is the catalyst resting state, and the catalysis proceeds via an Ir(III)/Ir(V)/Ir(III) cycle. This is in sharp contrast to isoelectronic (PCP)Ir systems in which hydrogenation proceeds through an Ir(III)/Ir(I)/Ir(III) cycle. The basis for this remarkable difference is discussed. PMID:24746026

  16. Effect of increasing the protein-to-fat ratio and reducing fat content on the chemical and physical properties of processed cheese product.

    PubMed

    Guinee, T P; O'Callaghan, D J

    2013-01-01

    Scientific studies indicate that the intake of dietary fat and saturated fats in the modern Western diet is excessive and contributes adversely to health, lifestyle, and longevity. In response, manufacturers of cheese and processed cheese products (PCP) are pursuing the development of products with reduced fat contents. The present study investigated the effect of altering the fat level (13.8, 18.2, 22.7, 27.9, and 32.5 g/100g) in PCP on their chemical and physical properties. The PCP were formulated in triplicate to different fat levels using Cheddar cheese, skim milk cheese, anhydrous milk fat, emulsifying salt (ES), NaCl, and water. The formulations were designed to give fixed moisture (~53 g/100g) and ES:protein ratio (0.105). The resultant PCP, and their water-soluble extracts (WSE), prepared from a macerated blend of PCP and water at a weight ratio of 1:2, were analyzed at 4d. Reducing the fat content significantly increased the firmness of the unheated PCP and reduced the flowability and maximum loss tangent (fluidity) of the melted PCP. These changes coincided with increases in the levels of total protein, water-soluble protein, water-insoluble protein, and water-soluble Ca, and a decrease in the molar ratio of water-soluble Ca to soluble P. However, both water-soluble Ca and water-soluble protein decreased when expressed as percentages of total protein and total Ca, respectively, in the PCP. The high level of protein was a major factor contributing to the deterioration in physical properties as the fat content of PCP was reduced. Diluting the protein content or reducing the potential of the protein to aggregate, and thereby form structures that contribute to rigidity, may provide a means for improving quality of reduced-fat PCP by using natural cheese with lower intact casein content and lower calcium:casein ratio, for example, or by decreasing the ratio of sodium phosphate to sodium citrate-based ES. PMID:23992974

  17. Effect of increasing the protein-to-fat ratio and reducing fat content on the chemical and physical properties of processed cheese product.

    PubMed

    Guinee, T P; O'Callaghan, D J

    2013-01-01

    Scientific studies indicate that the intake of dietary fat and saturated fats in the modern Western diet is excessive and contributes adversely to health, lifestyle, and longevity. In response, manufacturers of cheese and processed cheese products (PCP) are pursuing the development of products with reduced fat contents. The present study investigated the effect of altering the fat level (13.8, 18.2, 22.7, 27.9, and 32.5 g/100g) in PCP on their chemical and physical properties. The PCP were formulated in triplicate to different fat levels using Cheddar cheese, skim milk cheese, anhydrous milk fat, emulsifying salt (ES), NaCl, and water. The formulations were designed to give fixed moisture (~53 g/100g) and ES:protein ratio (0.105). The resultant PCP, and their water-soluble extracts (WSE), prepared from a macerated blend of PCP and water at a weight ratio of 1:2, were analyzed at 4d. Reducing the fat content significantly increased the firmness of the unheated PCP and reduced the flowability and maximum loss tangent (fluidity) of the melted PCP. These changes coincided with increases in the levels of total protein, water-soluble protein, water-insoluble protein, and water-soluble Ca, and a decrease in the molar ratio of water-soluble Ca to soluble P. However, both water-soluble Ca and water-soluble protein decreased when expressed as percentages of total protein and total Ca, respectively, in the PCP. The high level of protein was a major factor contributing to the deterioration in physical properties as the fat content of PCP was reduced. Diluting the protein content or reducing the potential of the protein to aggregate, and thereby form structures that contribute to rigidity, may provide a means for improving quality of reduced-fat PCP by using natural cheese with lower intact casein content and lower calcium:casein ratio, for example, or by decreasing the ratio of sodium phosphate to sodium citrate-based ES.

  18. Pneumocystis pneumonia in HIV-positive patients in Spain: epidemiology and environmental risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro-Meca, Alejandro; Palomares-Sancho, Ines; Diaz, Asuncion; Resino, Rosa; De Miguel, Angel Gil; Resino, Salvador

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Specific environmental factors may play a role in the development of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-positive patients. The aim of this study was to estimate the PCP incidence and mortality in hospitalized HIV-positive patients in Spain during the combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) era (1997 to 2011), as well as to analyze the climatological factors and air pollution levels in relation to hospital admissions and deaths. Methods We carried out a retrospective study. Data were collected from the National Hospital Discharge Database and the State Meteorological Agency of Spain. A case-crossover analysis was applied to identify environmental risk factors related to hospitalizations and deaths. For each patient, climatic factors and pollution levels were assigned based on readings from the nearest meteorological station to his or her postal code. Results There were 13,139 new PCP diagnoses and 1754 deaths in hospitalized HIV-positive patients from 1997 to 2011. The PCP incidence (events per 1000 person-years) dropped from 11.6 in 1997 to 2000, to 5.4 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). The mortality (events per 10,000 person-years) also decreased from 14.3 in 1997 to 2000, to 7.5 in 2004 to 2011 (p<0.001). Most hospital admissions and deaths occurred in the winter season and the fewest occurred in the summer, overlapping respectively with the lowest and highest temperatures of the year in Spain. Moreover, lower temperatures prior to PCP admission, as well as higher concentrations of NO2 and particulate matter up to 10 m in size (PM10) at the time of admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission due to PCP when two weeks, one month, 1.5 months or two months were used as controls (p<0.01). Furthermore, higher concentrations of ozone at one month (p=0.007), 1.5 months (p<0.001) and two months (p=0.006) prior to admission were associated with higher likelihoods of hospital admission with PCP. For PCP-related deaths, lower

  19. Effect of zidovudine and Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia prophylaxis on progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS. The Multicenter AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Graham, N M; Zeger, S L; Park, L P; Phair, J P; Detels, R; Vermund, S H; Ho, M; Saah, A J

    1991-08-01

    Although used widely, the effectiveness of zidovudine therapy and primary prophylaxis for Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (PCP) in HIV-1-infected individuals, has not been assessed in a large cohort. We have done an observational study between October, 1986, and October, 1990, of a cohort of 2145 HIV-1-seropositive men and 371 who seroconverted during the study. A Markov chain transitional analysis was used to examine the effect of zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis on the probability of progression of HIV-1 infection to AIDS (after 6, 12, 18, and 24 months) after follow-up visits categorised into one of six disease states. The six starting states were based on CD4+ lymphocyte counts and the presence of HIV-related symptoms. Use of pre-AIDS zidovudine and PCP prophylaxis was associated with significant reductions in rates of progression to AIDS at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months for participants starting with less than 350 CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter. For those starting with 350 or more CD4+ lymphocytes/microliter, non-significant protective trends were seen during 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. In multivariate log-linear models virtually all the treatment effect was due to zidovudine. However, after adjusting for the effects of zidovudine, PCP prophylaxis reduced significantly the probability of progression to a first episode of PCP during 6, 12, 18, and 24 month intervals. This study suggests that early primary PCP prophylaxis is effective in preventing first episodes of PCP, and that the efficacy of zidovudine demonstrated in clinical trials can be translated to the population level. PMID:1677108

  20. The spatio-temporal domains of Frizzled6 action in planar polarity control of hair follicle orientation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hao; Smallwood, Philip M; Williams, John; Nathans, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    In mammals, hair follicles cover most of the body surface and exhibit precise and stereotyped orientations relative to the body axes. Follicle orientation is controlled by the planar cell polarity (PCP; or, more generally, tissue polarity) system, as determined by the follicle mis-orientation phenotypes observed in mice with PCP gene mutations. The present study uses conditional knockout alleles of the PCP genes Frizzled6 (Fz6), Vangl1, and Vangl2, together with a series of Cre drivers to interrogate the spatio-temporal domains of PCP gene action in the developing mouse epidermis required for follicle orientation. Fz6 is required starting between embryonic day (E)11.5 and E12.5. Eliminating Fz6 in either the anterior or the posterior halves of the embryo or in either the feet or the torso leads to follicle mis-orientation phenotypes that are limited to the territories associated with Fz6 loss, implying either that PCP signaling is required for communicating polarity information on a local but not a global scale, or that there are multiple independent sources of global polarity information. Eliminating Fz6 in most hair follicle cells or in the inter-follicular epidermis at E15.5 suggests that PCP signaling in developing follicles is not required to maintain their orientation. The asymmetric arrangement of Merkel cells around the base of each guard hair follicle dependents on Fz6 expression in the epidermis but not in differentiating Merkel cells. These experiments constrain current models of PCP signaling and the flow of polarity information in mammalian skin.

  1. Diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia: evaluation of four serologic biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Calé, S S; Badura, R; de Boer, M G; Maltez, F; Calderón, E J; van der Reijden, T J; Márquez-Martín, E; Antunes, F; Matos, O

    2015-04-01

    The diagnosis of Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) relies on microscopic visualization of Pneumocystis jirovecii organisms or DNA detection in pulmonary specimens. This study aimed to assess the usefulness of (1-3)-β-d-glucan (BG), Krebs von den Lungen-6 antigen (KL-6), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and S-adenosyl methionine (SAM) as serologic biomarkers in the diagnosis of PCP. Serum levels of BG, KL-6, LDH and SAM were investigated in 145 Portuguese patients, 50 patients from the Netherlands, 25 Spanish patients and 40 Portuguese blood donors. Data on clinical presentation, chest imaging and gasometry tests were available. PCP cases were confirmed by microscopy and PCR techniques. A cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. BG was found to be the most reliable serologic biomarker for PCP diagnosis, followed by KL-6, LDH and SAM. The BG/KL-6 combination test was the most accurate serologic approach for PCP diagnosis, with 94.3% sensitivity and 89.6% specificity. Although less sensitive/specific than the reference standard classic methods based on bronchoalveolar lavage followed by microscopic or molecular detection of P. jirovecii organisms, the BG/KL-6 test may provide a less onerous procedure for PCP diagnosis, as it uses a minimally invasive and inexpensive specimen (blood), which may be also a major benefit for the patient's care. The BG/KL-6 combination test should be interpreted within the clinical context, and it may be used as a preliminary screening test in patients with primary suspicion of PCP, or as an alternative diagnostic procedure in patients with respiratory failure or in children, avoiding the associated risk of complications by the use of bronchoscopy.

  2. Immunodiagnosis of Citrus leprosis virus C using a polyclonal antibody to an expressed putative coat protein.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Nandlal; Roy, Avijit; Guillermo, Leon M; Picton, D D; Wei, G; Nakhla, M K; Levy, L; Brlansky, R H

    2013-11-01

    Citrus leprosis virus C (CiLV-C), a causal agent for citrus leprosis disease, is present in South and Central America and is a threat for introduction into the U.S. citrus industry. A specific, inexpensive and reliable antibody based detection system is needed for the rapid identification of CiLV-C. The CiLV-C is very labile and has not been purified in sufficient amount for antibody production. The p29 gene of CiLV-C genome that codes for the putative coat protein (PCP) was codon optimized for expression in Escherichia coli and synthesized in vitro. The optimized gene was sub-cloned into the bacterial expression vector pDEST17 and transferred into E. coli BL21AI competent cells. The expression of PCP containing N-terminal His-tag was optimized by induction with l-arabinose. Induced cells were disrupted by sonication and expressed PCP was purified by affinity chromatography using Ni-NTA agarose. The purified expressed PCP was then used as an immunogen for injections into rabbits to produce polyclonal antibody (PAb). The PAb specific to the expressed PCP was identified using Western blotting. The antibody was successfully used to detect CiLV-C in the symptomatic CiLV-C infected tissues using double antibody sandwich-enzyme-linked-immunosorbent (DAS-ELISA), indirect ELISA and dot-blot immunoassay (DBIA) formats.

  3. Enantiomeric and diastereomeric dioxadrols: behavioral, biochemical and chemical determination of the configuration necessary for phencyclidine-like properties.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, A E; Harrison, E A; Mattson, M V; Rafferty, M F; Rice, K C; Woods, J H; Winger, G; Solomon, R E; Lessor, R A; Silverton, J V

    1987-10-01

    Dioxadrol exists in four isomeric forms. alpha-(+)-Dioxadrol (dexoxadrol) showed phencyclidine (PCP)-like activity in rhesus monkeys trained to discriminate s.c. administration of ketamine, but neither alpha-(-)-dioxadrol (levoxadrol) nor beta-(+/-)-dioxadrol showed such activity. In addition, response-contingent i.v. dexoxadrol maintained higher rates of responding than either levoxadrol or beta-dioxadrol in monkeys experienced with ketamine self-administration. The order of potency in displacing bound 1-[1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl]piperidine from binding sites in rat brain homogenates was dexoxadrol much greater than levoxadrol = beta-(+/-)-dioxadrol. Viewed in the context of previous studies with stereochemical probes of the PCP receptor, these results extend and confirm the supposition that dexoxadrol and levoxadrol are the stereochemical probes of choice in the study of effects mediated through PCP receptors. The absolute configuration of dexoxadrol was determined to be 4S, 6S by X-ray crystallography, thus defining the optimum chirality necessary for receptor binding and PCP-like activity in the dioxadrol series. Based on these and other considerations, receptor-active conformations of dexoxadrol and PCP are proposed. PMID:2822892

  4. Burkholderiales participating in pentachlorophenol biodegradation in iron-reducing paddy soil as identified by stable isotope probing.

    PubMed

    Tong, Hui; Hu, Min; Li, Fangbai; Chen, Manjia; Lv, Yahui

    2015-07-01

    As the most prevalent preservative worldwide for many years, pentachlorophenol (PCP) has attracted much interest in the study of biodegradation in soil and aquatic ecosystems. However, the key microorganisms involved in anaerobic degradation are less well understood. Hence, we used DNA-based stable isotope probing (SIP) to identify the PCP-degrading microorganisms in iron-rich paddy soil under anaerobic conditions. (12)C- and (13)C-labeled PCP were almost completely degraded in 30 days under iron-reducing conditions. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) of 16S rRNA genes showed that 197 and 217 bp (HaeIII digests) restriction fragments (T-RFs) were enriched in heavy DNA fractions of (13)C-labeled samples, and the information from 16S rRNA gene clone libraries suggested that the microorganisms corresponding to these T-RF fragments, which increased in relative abundance during incubation, belonged to the order of Burkholderiales, in which 197 and 217 bp were classified as unclassified Burkholderiales and the genus Achromobacter, respectively. The results of the present study indicated that Burkholderiales-affiliated microorganisms were responsible for PCP degradation in anaerobic paddy soil and shed new light on in situ bioremediation in anaerobic PCP contaminated soil.

  5. The developmental effects of pentachlorophenol on zebrafish embryos during segmentation: A systematic view

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing; Xu, Zhifa; Pan, Ruijie; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-01-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a typical toxicant and prevailing pollutant whose toxicity has been broadly investigated. However, previous studies did not specifically investigate the underlying mechanisms of its developmental toxicity. Here, we chose zebrafish embryos as the model, exposed them to 2 different concentrations of PCP, and sequenced their entire transcriptomes at 10 and 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf). The sequencing analysis revealed that high concentrations of PCP elicited systematic responses at both time points. By combining the enrichment terms with single genes, the results were further analyzed using three categories: metabolism, transporters, and organogenesis. Hyperactive glycolysis was the most outstanding feature of the transcriptome at 10 hpf. The entire system seemed to be hypoxic, although hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) may have been suppressed by the upregulation of prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs). At 24 hpf, PCP primarily affected somitogenesis and lens formation probably resulting from the disruption of embryonic body plan at earlier stages. The proposed underlying toxicological mechanism of PCP was based on the crosstalk between each clue. Our study attempted to describe the developmental toxicity of environmental pollutants from a systematic view. Meanwhile, some features of gene expression profiling could serve as markers of human health or ecological risk. PMID:27181905

  6. Use of a {sup 15}N isotope dilution method to assess contaminant effects on soil nitrification

    SciTech Connect

    Nason, G.E.; Dinwoodie, G.D.

    1995-12-31

    Ecologically relevant bioassays are needed to assess effects of contaminants on soil processes such as decomposition and nutrient cycling. This study was conducted to assess the potential of a soil-based nitrification bioassay. Soil samples adjusted to 0.03 MPa moisture content were amended with 0.1, 1.0, 10 and 100 mg kg{sup {minus}1} PCP or PCB, and 0.05, 0.5, 5 and 50 mg kg{sup {minus}1} Hg and preincubated for 7 days. A 2-d incubation was then started by addition of 10 mg kg{sup {minus}1} {sup 15}NO{sub 3}-N. Diethyl ether used as a carrier for PCP addition had little effect on inorganic nitrogen concentrations during the incubation. Net nitrogen mineralization and nitrification were unaffected by PCB. Higher amendment levels of both PCP and Hg resulted in increases in ammonium concentrations and decreases in net nitrification. {sup 15}N-nitrate pool dilution was sensitive to contamination and showed some gross nitrification was occurring even when net nitrification had ceased. Recoveries of Hg and PCB at the end of the study were greater than 90%. Recovery of PCP was 5%. Incubations carried out under sterile and non-sterile conditions indicated that both sorption and biological degradation were factors in the low PCP recovery.

  7. Unraveling the Sex Chromosome Heteromorphism of the Paradoxical Frog Pseudis tocantins

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Kaleb Pretto; Busin, Carmen Silvia; Lourenço, Luciana Bolsoni

    2016-01-01

    The paradoxical frog Pseudis tocantins is the only species in the Hylidae family with known heteromorphic Z and W sex chromosomes. The Z chromosome is metacentric and presents an interstitial nucleolar organizer region (NOR) on the long arm that is adjacent to a pericentromeric heterochromatic band. In contrast, the submetacentric W chromosome carries a pericentromeric NOR on the long arm, which is adjacent to a clearly evident heterochromatic band that is larger than the band found on the Z chromosome and justify the size difference observed between these chromosomes. Here, we provide evidence that the non-centromeric heterochromatic bands in Zq and Wq differ not only in size and location but also in composition, based on comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) and an analysis of the anuran PcP190 satellite DNA. The finding of PcP190 sequences in P. tocantins extends the presence of this satellite DNA, which was previously detected among Leptodactylidae and Hylodidae, suggesting that this family of repetitive DNA is even older than it was formerly considered. Seven groups of PcP190 sequences were recognized in the genome of P. tocantins. PcP190 probes mapped to the heterochromatic band in Wq, and a Southern blot analysis indicated the accumulation of PcP190 in the female genome of P. tocantins, which suggests the involvement of this satellite DNA in the evolution of the sex chromosomes of this species. PMID:27214234

  8. Identification of relevant single-nucleotide polymorphisms in Pneumocystis jirovecii: relationship with clinical data.

    PubMed

    Esteves, F; Gaspar, J; Marques, T; Leite, R; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Matos, O

    2010-07-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii is a poorly understood pathogen that causes opportunistic pneumonia (Pneumocystis pneumonia (PcP)) in patients with AIDS. The present study was aimed at correlating genetic differences in P. jirovecii isolates and clinical patient data. A description of genetic diversity in P. jirovecii isolates from human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients, based on the identification of multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at five distinct loci encoding mitochondrial large-subunit rRNA (mtLSU rRNA), cytochrome b (CYB), superoxide dismutase (SOD), dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR), and dihydropteroate synthase (DHPS), was achieved using PCR with DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The statistical analysis revealed several interesting correlations among the four most relevant SNPs (mt85, SOD110, SOD215, and DHFR312) and specific clinical parameters: mt85C was associated with undiagnosed or atypical PcP episodes and favourable follow-up; SOD215C was associated with favourable follow-up; and DHFR312T was associated with PcP cases presenting moderate to high parasite burdens. The genotypes mt85C/SOD215C and SOD110T/SOD215C were found to be associated with less virulent P. jirovecii infections, whereas the genotype SOD110T/SOD215T was found to be related to more virulent PcP episodes. The present work demonstrated that potential P. jirovecii haplotypes may be related to the clinical data and outcome of PcP.

  9. The developmental effects of pentachlorophenol on zebrafish embryos during segmentation: A systematic view

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Ting; Zhao, Jing; Xu, Zhifa; Pan, Ruijie; Yin, Daqiang

    2016-05-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) is a typical toxicant and prevailing pollutant whose toxicity has been broadly investigated. However, previous studies did not specifically investigate the underlying mechanisms of its developmental toxicity. Here, we chose zebrafish embryos as the model, exposed them to 2 different concentrations of PCP, and sequenced their entire transcriptomes at 10 and 24 hours post-fertilization (hpf). The sequencing analysis revealed that high concentrations of PCP elicited systematic responses at both time points. By combining the enrichment terms with single genes, the results were further analyzed using three categories: metabolism, transporters, and organogenesis. Hyperactive glycolysis was the most outstanding feature of the transcriptome at 10 hpf. The entire system seemed to be hypoxic, although hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF1α) may have been suppressed by the upregulation of prolyl hydroxylase domain enzymes (PHDs). At 24 hpf, PCP primarily affected somitogenesis and lens formation probably resulting from the disruption of embryonic body plan at earlier stages. The proposed underlying toxicological mechanism of PCP was based on the crosstalk between each clue. Our study attempted to describe the developmental toxicity of environmental pollutants from a systematic view. Meanwhile, some features of gene expression profiling could serve as markers of human health or ecological risk.

  10. Electroencephalographic, behavioral and receptor binding correlates of phencyclinoids in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Mattia, A.; Marquis, K.L.; Leccese, A.P.; el-Fakahany, E.E.; Moreton, J.E.

    1988-08-01

    The pharmacology and structure-activity relationship of phencyclidine (PCP)-like drugs (phencyclinoids) were studied using electroencephalographic (EEG), behavioral and receptor binding techniques. The effects of PCP, 1-phenylcyclohexylamine HCl, N-methyl-1-phenycyclohexylamine HCl, N-ethyl-1-phenylcyclohexylamine HCl, N-(s-butyl)-1-phenylcyclohexylamine HCL, 1-(1-phenylcyclo-hexyl)-pyrrolidine HCl, 1-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl) piperidine HCl, 1-(1-(2-thienyl)cyclohexyl)-pyrrolidine HCl, ketamine and (+/-)-SKF 10047 were evaluated on the direct EEG and EEG spectra after acute i.v. injections (0.1-17.8 mg/kg). Similarities and differences were noted in the EEG dose-response curves. At lower doses of PCP and its analogs, low-amplitude theta waves predominated; however, at higher doses, high-amplitude, lower-frequency waves predominated. Qualitatively, the N-piperidine derivatives were similar to PCP and differed primarily in potency. The benzomorphan (+/-)-SKF 10047 produced only theta activity at doses up to 12.8 mg/kg. These EEG effects occurred in conjunction with overt behaviors including locomotion, stereotypy and ataxia, concurrently assessed via observer-based rating scales. A strong correlation (r = 0.98) was obtained between the EEG and behavioral effects and the IC50 values from (/sup 3/H)PCP displacement experiments using crude rat brain homogenates.

  11. c21orf59/kurly Controls Both Cilia Motility and Polarization.

    PubMed

    Jaffe, Kimberly M; Grimes, Daniel T; Schottenfeld-Roames, Jodi; Werner, Michael E; Ku, Tse-Shuen J; Kim, Sun K; Pelliccia, Jose L; Morante, Nicholas F C; Mitchell, Brian J; Burdine, Rebecca D

    2016-03-01

    Cilia are microtubule-based projections that function in the movement of extracellular fluid. This requires cilia to be: (1) motile and driven by dynein complexes and (2) correctly polarized on the surface of cells, which requires planar cell polarity (PCP). Few factors that regulate both processes have been discovered. We reveal that C21orf59/Kurly (Kur), a cytoplasmic protein with some enrichment at the base of cilia, is needed for motility; zebrafish mutants exhibit characteristic developmental abnormalities and dynein arm defects. kur was also required for proper cilia polarization in the zebrafish kidney and the larval skin of Xenopus laevis. CRISPR/Cas9 coupled with homologous recombination to disrupt the endogenous kur locus in Xenopus resulted in the asymmetric localization of the PCP protein Prickle2 being lost in mutant multiciliated cells. Kur also makes interactions with other PCP components, including Disheveled. This supports a model wherein Kur plays a dual role in cilia motility and polarization.

  12. Methodological approaches to population based research of screening procedures in the presence of selection bias and exposure measurement error: colonoscopy and colorectal cancer outcomes in Ontario

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The study describes the methodological challenges encountered in an observational study estimating the effectiveness of colonoscopy in reducing colorectal cancer (CRC) incidence and mortality. Methods Using Ontario provincial administrative data, we conducted a population-based retrospective cohort study to assess CRC incidence and mortality in a group of average-risk subjects aged 50–74 years who underwent colonoscopy between 1996–2000. We created two study cohorts; unselected and restricted. The unselected cohort consists of subjects aged 50–74 years who were eligible for CRC screening and who had the same primary care physician (PCP) during the period 1996–2000 with at least two years of follow-up. PCPs are general practioners/family physicians who are the main source of health care for Ontarians. The restricted cohort was a nested sample of unselected cohort who were alive and free of CRC as on January 1, 2001 and whose PCPs had at least 10 screen-eligible patients with a colonoscopy referral rate of more than 3%. We compared the outcomes in the two study cohorts; unselected vs. restricted. We then estimated the absolute risk reduction associated with colonoscopy in preventing CRC incidence and mortality in the restricted cohort, using traditional regression analysis, propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis. Results The unselected cohort (N = 1,341,612) showed that colonoscopy was associated with an increase in CRC incidence (1.61% vs. 4.61%) and mortality (0.36% vs. 1.16%), whereas the restricted cohort (N = 1,089,998) showed that colonoscopy was associated with a reduction in CRC incidence (1.36% vs. 0.84%) and mortality (0.23% vs. 0.15%). For CRC incidence, the absolute risk reduction (ARR) associated with colonoscopy use was 0.52% in an unadjusted model, 0.53% in a multivariate logistic regression model, 0.54% in a propensity score-weighted outcome model, 0.56% in propensity score-matched model, and 0

  13. Pax3 regulates morphogenetic cell behavior in vitro coincident with activation of a PCP/non-canonical Wnt-signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Wiggan, O'Neil; Hamel, Paul A

    2002-02-01

    Mutations to Pax3 and other Pax family genes in both mice and humans result in numerous tissue-specific morphological defects. Little is known, however, about the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which Pax genes regulate morphogenesis. We previously showed that Pax3 induces cell aggregation and a mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition in Saos-2 cells. We show here that Pax3-induced aggregates arise through the formation of distinct structures involving cell rearrangements and cell behaviors resembling those that occur during gastrulation and neurulation known as convergent extension. During these Pax3-induced processes, Dishevelled and Frizzled are localized to the actin cytoskeleton and both proteins coimmunoprecipitate focal adhesion components from detergent-insoluble cell fractions. We show further that these Pax3-induced cell movements are associated with activation of a Wnt-signaling cascade, resulting in induction and activation of c-Jun-N-terminal kinase/stress activated protein kinase (JNK/SAPK). All of these Wnt-signaling factors exhibit altered subcellular distribution in Pax3-expressing cells. In particular, we show the localization of JNK/SAPK to both the nucleus and to cytoplasmic multi-vesicular structures. These data show that Pax3 regulates morphogenetic cell behavior and that regulation of a conserved, planar cell polarity/noncanonical Wnt-signaling cascade entailing JNK activation is a function of Pax3 activity.

  14. Isolation, characterization, and genetics of pentachlorophenol-degrading Flavobacterium strains

    SciTech Connect

    Saber, D.L.

    1987-01-01

    Bacteria able to mineralize 100-200 ppm of pentachlorophenol (PCP) were isolated by selective enrichment from PCP-contaminated soil from 3 geographic areas in Minnesota. Sampling areas were separated from each other by up to 185 miles; history and level of contamination with a variety of compounds varied between sites. Pure cultures of bacteria were selected for further characterization based on growth properties, site of isolation, and return of radiolabeled PCP as /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ in initial serum bottle experiments. Although differing somewhat in their response to various biochemical and biophysical tests, all strains were Gram-negative, oxidase-, catalase-, and phosphatase-positive, not motile, grow as yellow colonies on solid medium, limited in their use of single carbon sources,and ranged in mol% G + C of DNA between 58.8-63,8%. All strains were assigned to the genus Flavobacterium.

  15. Foundation: Transforming data bases into knowledge bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purves, R. B.; Carnes, James R.; Cutts, Dannie E.

    1987-01-01

    One approach to transforming information stored in relational data bases into knowledge based representations and back again is described. This system, called Foundation, allows knowledge bases to take advantage of vast amounts of pre-existing data. A benefit of this approach is inspection, and even population, of data bases through an intelligent knowledge-based front-end.

  16. Tribromophenol and pentachlorophenol uptake from sawdust to horticultural products.

    PubMed

    Mardones, C; Von Baer, D; Silva, J; Ruff, A; Gutierrez, L; Berg, A

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents a study of the uptake of 2,4,6-tribromophenol (TBP), pentachlorophenol (PCP), and its metabolite pentachloroanisole (PCA) from contaminated sawdust from the forest industry in horticultural products such as apples, raspberries, and fodder maize for cattle feed. The samples were obtained from Bio-Bio Province in South Chile between 2002 and 2006. The analytical parameters of the methodology applied to the different matrices are presented and discussed. The chromatographic method was applied to determine the residues in 413 horticultural product samples. Eleven per cent of fodder maize samples showed detectable or quantifiable levels of PCP, TBP or PCA, 3% of samples presented quantifiable levels, although the concentrations surpassed the maximum allowed concentrations for vegetables (>10 microg kg(-1)) in only two samples. Traces of TBP were detected in eight samples, PCA was detected in 15, and PCP in 14 samples. Based on these results, a risk analysis was performed, indicating a low probability, 0.4% for PCA, 1.6% for TBP and 1.9% for PCP, to find concentrations higher than the allowed maximum. For apples and raspberries, no residues of these compounds were detected. These results indicate that those cultivars directly exposed to sawdust, like fodder maize, could contain detectable residues in several samples. To confirm this observation, a field assay was performed on fodder maize cultivated in the presence of sawdust artificially contaminated with 30 mg of TBP and/or PCP under controlled conditions. The results showed that under the experimental conditions used in the study, TBP can be transferred from sawdust to the plant, with an uptake rate of 0.04% from the TBP applied initially with sawdust but not to the corn ear. Also, the degradation of PCP to PCA was observed in the soil.

  17. Combined serotonin (5-HT)1A agonism, 5-HT(2A) and dopamine D₂ receptor antagonism reproduces atypical antipsychotic drug effects on phencyclidine-impaired novel object recognition in rats.

    PubMed

    Oyamada, Yoshihiro; Horiguchi, Masakuni; Rajagopal, Lakshmi; Miyauchi, Masanori; Meltzer, Herbert Y

    2015-05-15

    Subchronic administration of an N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) antagonist, e.g. phencyclidine (PCP), produces prolonged impairment of novel object recognition (NOR), suggesting they constitute a hypoglutamate-based model of cognitive impairment in schizophrenia (CIS). Acute administration of atypical, e.g. lurasidone, but not typical antipsychotic drugs (APDs), e.g. haloperidol, are able to restore NOR following PCP (acute reversal model). Furthermore, atypical APDs, when co-administered with PCP, have been shown to prevent development of NOR deficits (prevention model). Most atypical, but not typical APDs, are more potent 5-HT(2A) receptor inverse agonists than dopamine (DA) D2 antagonists, and have been shown to enhance cortical and hippocampal efflux and to be direct or indirect 5-HT(1A) agonists in vivo. To further clarify the importance of these actions to the restoration of NOR by atypical APDs, sub-effective or non-effective doses of combinations of the 5-HT(1A) partial agonist (tandospirone), the 5-HT(2A) inverse agonist (pimavanserin), or the D2 antagonist (haloperidol), as well as the combination of all three agents, were studied in the acute reversal and prevention PCP models of CIS. Only the combination of all three agents restored NOR and prevented the development of PCP-induced deficit. Thus, this triple combination of 5-HT(1A) agonism, 5-HT(2A) antagonism/inverse agonism, and D2 antagonism is able to mimic the ability of atypical APDs to prevent or ameliorate the PCP-induced NOR deficit, possibly by stimulating signaling cascades from D1 and 5-HT(1A) receptor stimulation, modulated by D2 and 5-HT(2A) receptor antagonism. PMID:25448429

  18. Source identification of PCDD/Fs in agricultural soils near to a Chinese MSWI plant through isomer-specific data analysis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Meng-Xia; Yan, Jian-Hua; Lu, Sheng-Yong; Li, Xiao-Dong; Chen, Tong; Ni, Ming-Jiang; Dai, Hui-Fen; Cen, Ke-Fa

    2008-04-01

    Isomer-specific data were investigated in order to identify the sources of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) in agricultural soils, including Fluvo-aquic and paddy soils, in the vicinity of a Chinese municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant. Homologue and isomer profiles of PCDD/Fs in soils were compared with those of potential sources, including combustion sources, i.e., MSWI flue gas and fly ash; and the impurities in agrochemicals, such as the pentachlorophenol (PCP), sodium pentachlorophenate (PCP-Na) and 1,3,5-trichloro-2-(4-nitrophenoxy) benzene (CNP). The results showed that the PCDD/F isomer profiles of combustion sources and agricultural soils were very similar, especially for PCDFs, although their homologue profiles varied, indicating that all the isomers within each homologue behave identically in the air and soil. Moreover, factor analysis of the isomer compositions among 33 soil samples revealed that the contamination of PCDD/Fs in agricultural soils near the MSWI plant were primarily influenced by the combustion sources, followed by the PCP/PCP-Na and CNP sources. This implication is consistent with our previous findings based on chemometric analysis of homologue profiles of soil and flue gas samples, and identifies PCP/PCP-Na as an additional important source of PCDD/Fs in the local area. This makes the similarities and differences of isomer profiles between Fluvo-aquic and paddy soils more explainable. It is, therefore, advisable to use isomer-specific data for PCDD/F source identifications where possible.

  19. [Studies on the molluscicidal and cercariacidal effects of various pesticides in liver fluke

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Man

    1965-12-01

    Clonorchiasis for which no specific therapy is available has been recognized as one of the serious public health problems in terms of waste of human productivity in Korea today and an urgent consideration must be given to its prevention and control. For past several years, the author has been finding that the infection rate of liver fluke in fish from the Kum-Ho river which has long been recognized as the world's notorious prevalent area of the disease, has been decreasing gradually. Here the author formulated the hypothesis that the decreasing of infection rate might be influenced by the common use of pesticide in plants along the river. Basing this hypothesis, the effective use of pesticide may contribute to the control of the disease by cutting the life cycle of liver fluke. To test above hypothesis, molluscicidal effect on Parafossarulus manchouricus and cercariacidal effect of various pesticides in liver fluke have been determined and the following results were obtained. 1. In molluscicidal effect, the most potent agent in low concentration was Bayer 73 which is 3 to 70 times stronger than other pesticides. When compared with NaPCP which has been widely used for the eradication of Onchomelania, Bayer 73 shows 5 to 10 times stronger effect. The order of pesticide in molluscicidal effect was: Bayer 73, Nicotin, NaPCP, Sevin, Parathion, Copper sulfate and Lindane. 2. In cercariacidal effect, the most potent agent was Parathion which had 2 to 5 times stronger effect than Bayer 73 or NaPCP. The order of pesticide in the cercariacidal effect was: Parathion, Bayer73, NaPCP, Lindane, Nicotin,Sevin, and Copper sulfate. 3. By applying the common used concentration of pesticides considering the toxicity to plants, Bayer 73 is most potent in molluscicidal effect and then Nicotin, NaPCP, Copper sulfate, Sevin, Parathion and Lindane in order. In cercariacidal effect, Parathion is the most potent and NaPCP, Bayer 73, Lindane, and Copper sulfate are followed. 4. Considering

  20. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of pentachlorophenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R S; Maronpot, R M; Bucher, J R; Haseman, J K; Toft, J D; Hejtmancik, M R

    1999-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used as an herbicide, algaecide, defoliant, wood preservative, germicide, fungicide, and molluscicide. A 28-day toxicity study of PCP in F344/N rats of both sexes was conducted to select dose levels for a carcinogenicity study. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were given 0, 200, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 ppm PCP in feed for 28 days. The incidences of minimal to mild hepatocyte degeneration in males and females exposed to 400 ppm or greater and the incidences of centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy in the 3200-ppm groups were increased. For carcinogenicity studies, groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats were fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 PCP for 2 years. A stop-exposure group of 60 male and 60 female rats received 1000 ppm of PCP in feed for 52 weeks and control feed thereafter for the remainder of the 2-year studies; 10 male and 10 female rats were evaluated at 7 months. Survival of 600-ppm males was significantly greater than that of the controls; survival of all other exposed groups was similar to that of the control groups. Mean body weights of the 400- and 600-ppm groups were generally less than those of the controls throughout the studies. There was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of PCP in male or female rats fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 ppm for 2 years. Stop-exposure study males and females regained a transitory body weight reduction by the end of the 2 year study, and males had better survival than the controls. At a 7-month interim evaluation, the incidences of centrilobular hypertrophy in stop-exposure males and females exceeded those in the controls. At 2 years, malignant mesothelioma originating from the tunica vaginalis was present in 9 1000-ppm males and 1 control male (p = 0.014). Nasal squamous cell carcinomas were present in five 1000-ppm males and 1 control male. This incidence was not significantly increased but exceeded the historical control range (0-4%). Based on the increased

  1. Toxicology and carcinogenesis studies of pentachlorophenol in rats.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, R S; Maronpot, R M; Bucher, J R; Haseman, J K; Toft, J D; Hejtmancik, M R

    1999-03-01

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used as an herbicide, algaecide, defoliant, wood preservative, germicide, fungicide, and molluscicide. A 28-day toxicity study of PCP in F344/N rats of both sexes was conducted to select dose levels for a carcinogenicity study. Groups of 10 male and 10 female rats were given 0, 200, 400, 800, 1600, or 3200 ppm PCP in feed for 28 days. The incidences of minimal to mild hepatocyte degeneration in males and females exposed to 400 ppm or greater and the incidences of centrilobular hepatocyte hypertrophy in the 3200-ppm groups were increased. For carcinogenicity studies, groups of 50 male and 50 female F344/N rats were fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 PCP for 2 years. A stop-exposure group of 60 male and 60 female rats received 1000 ppm of PCP in feed for 52 weeks and control feed thereafter for the remainder of the 2-year studies; 10 male and 10 female rats were evaluated at 7 months. Survival of 600-ppm males was significantly greater than that of the controls; survival of all other exposed groups was similar to that of the control groups. Mean body weights of the 400- and 600-ppm groups were generally less than those of the controls throughout the studies. There was no evidence of carcinogenic activity of PCP in male or female rats fed diets containing 200, 400, or 600 ppm for 2 years. Stop-exposure study males and females regained a transitory body weight reduction by the end of the 2 year study, and males had better survival than the controls. At a 7-month interim evaluation, the incidences of centrilobular hypertrophy in stop-exposure males and females exceeded those in the controls. At 2 years, malignant mesothelioma originating from the tunica vaginalis was present in 9 1000-ppm males and 1 control male (p = 0.014). Nasal squamous cell carcinomas were present in five 1000-ppm males and 1 control male. This incidence was not significantly increased but exceeded the historical control range (0-4%). Based on the increased

  2. p-Chlorophenol adsorption on activated carbons with basic surface properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenc-Grabowska, Ewa; Gryglewicz, Grażyna; Machnikowski, Jacek

    2010-05-01

    The adsorption of p-chlorophenol (PCP) from aqueous solution on activated carbons (ACs) with basic surface properties has been studied. The ACs were prepared by two methods. The first method was based on the modification of a commercial CWZ AC by high temperature treatment in an atmosphere of ammonia, nitrogen and hydrogen. The second approach comprised the carbonization followed by activation of N-enriched polymers and coal tar pitch using CO 2 and steam as activation agent. The resultant ACs were characterized in terms of porous structure, elemental composition and surface chemistry (pH PZC, acid/base titration, XPS). The adsorption of PCP was carried out from an aqueous solution in static conditions. Equilibrium adsorption isotherm was of L2 type for polymer-based ACs, whereas L3-type isotherm was observed for CWZ ACs series. The Langmuir monolayer adsorption capacity was related to the porous structure and the amount of basic sites. A good correlation was found between the adsorption capacity and the volume of micropores with a width < 1.4 nm for polymer-based ACs. Higher nitrogen content, including that in basic form, did not correspond to the enhanced adsorption of PCP from aqueous solution. The competitive effect of water molecule adsorption on the PCP uptake is discussed.

  3. Water-based Screenprinting.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kreneck, Lynwood

    1989-01-01

    Outlines the techniques for silkscreening using water-based inks, concentrating on the qualities of water-based printing that differ from oil-based printing. Includes a step-by-step description of the process illustrated with photographs. (LS)

  4. Porous Coordination Polymer Based on Bipyridinium Carboxylate Linkers with High and Reversible Ammonia Uptake.

    PubMed

    Leroux, Maxime; Mercier, Nicolas; Allain, Magali; Dul, Marie-Claire; Dittmer, Jens; Kassiba, Abdel Hadi; Bellat, Jean-Pierre; Weber, Guy; Bezverkhyy, Igor

    2016-09-01

    The zwitterionic bipyridinium carboxylate ligand 1,1'-bis(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4'-bipyridinium (pc1) in the presence of cadmium chloride affords novel porous coordination polymers (PCPs): [Cd4(pc1)3Cl6]·CdCl4·guest (1) crystallizing in the P3̅1c space group. In the structure, [Cd4Cl6(CO2)6] building units are linked together by six pc1 ligands, leading to a 3D high-symmetrical network exhibiting hexagonal channels along the c axis. The walls of this PCP consist of cationic electron-acceptor bipyridinium units. The PCP 1 reversibly adsorbs H2O and CH3OH up to about 0.1 g/g at saturation showing the adsorption isotherms characteristic of a moderately hydrophilic sorbent. Adsorption of ammonia (NH3) follows a different pattern, reaching an exceptional uptake of 0.39 g/g (22.3 mmol/g) after the first adsorption cycle. Although the crystalline structure of 1 collapses after the first adsorption, the solid can be regenerated and maintains the capacity of 0.29 g/g (17 mmol/g) in the following cycles. We found that the high NH3 uptake is due to a combination of pore filling taking place below 150 h·Pa and chemisorption occurring at higher pressures. The latter process was shown to involve two phenomena: (i) coordination of NH3 molecules to Cd(2+) cations as follows from (113)Cd NMR and (ii) strong donor-acceptor interactions between NH3 molecules and pc1 ligands. PMID:27500980

  5. Team-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michaelsen, Larry K.; Sweet, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Team-based learning (TBL), when properly implemented, includes many, if not all, of the common elements of evidence-based best practices. To explain this, a brief overview of TBL is presented. The authors examine the relationship between the best practices of evidence-based teaching and the principles that constitute team-based learning. (Contains…

  6. EPA site demonstration of the Biotrol Soil Washing Process

    SciTech Connect

    Stinson, M.K.; Skovronek, H.S.; Ellis, W.D.

    1992-01-01

    A pilot-scale soil washing process, patented by BioTrol, was demonstrated on soil that was contaminated by wood treating waste. The BioTrol Soil Washing was demonstrated in a treatment train sequence with two other pilot-scale units of BioTrol technologies for treatment of waste streams from the soil washer. The three technologies of the treatment train were: The BioTrol Soil Washer (BSW), the BioTrol Aqueous Treatment System (BATS), and the Slurry Bioreactor (SBR). The BioTrol processes were evaluated on pentachlorophenol (PCP) and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which were the primary soil contaminants at the site. The sandy site soil, consisting of less than 10% of fines, was well suited for treatment by soil washing. The BSW successfully separated the feed soil (100% by weight) into 83% of washed soil, 10% of woody residues, and 7% of fines. The soil washer achieved up to 89% removal of PCP and PAHs, based on the difference between their levels in the feed soil and in the washed soil. The BATS degraded up to 94% of PCP in the process water from soil washing. The SBR achieved over 90% removals of PCP and 70-90% removals of PAHs, respectively from the soil washing. Cost of a commercial-scale soil washing, assuming use of all three technologies, was estimated to be $168 per ton of treated soil.

  7. Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia: still a concern in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Cordonnier, Catherine; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Bretagne, Stéphane; Maertens, Johan

    2016-09-01

    Pneumocystis jirovecii can cause life-threatening pneumonia following treatment for haematological malignancies or after HSCT. The mortality rate of P. jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in these patients is 30%-60%, especially after HSCT. The clinical presentation of PCP in haematology differs from that associated with HIV infection, with the disease being acute and more often severe, having a lower fungal burden and being more frequently linked to treatment with corticosteroids. Most cases occur in patients not receiving adequate prophylaxis. The development of new therapies, including targeted treatments and monoclonal antibodies in various haematological diseases, justifies constant vigilance in order to identify new at-risk populations and give prophylaxis accordingly. The fifth and sixth European Conferences on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5 and ECIL-6) aimed to review risk factors for PCP in haematology patients and to establish evidence-based recommendations for PCP diagnosis, prophylaxis and treatment. This article focuses on the magnitude of the problem, the main differences in clinical presentation between haematology patients and other immunocompromised populations, especially HIV-infected patients, and the main risk factors. PMID:27550990

  8. Prickle1 stunts limb growth through alteration of cell polarity and gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tian; Bassuk, Alexander G.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    2014-01-01

    Background Wnt/PCP signaling plays a critical role in multiple developmental processes, including limb development. Wnt5a, a ligand of the PCP pathway, signals through the Ror2/Vangl2 or the Vangl2/Ryk complex to regulate limb development along the proximal-distal axis in mice. Based on the interaction between Van Gogh and Prickle in Drosophila, we hypothesized the vertebrate Prickle1 have similar function as Vangl2 in limb development. Results We show Prickle1 is expressed in the skeletal condensates that will differentiate into chondrocytes and later form bones. Disrupted Prickle1 function in Prickle1C251X/C251X mouse mutants alters expression of genes such as Bmp4, Fgf8, Vangl2 and Wnt5a. These expression changes correlate with shorter and wider bones in the limbs and loss of one phalangeal segment in digits 2-5 of Prickle1C251X mutants. These growth defects along the proximal-distal axis are also associated with increased cell death in the growing digit tip, reduced cell death in the interdigital membrane and disrupted chondrocyte polarity. Conclusions We suggest Prickle1 is part of the Wnt5a/PCP signaling, regulating cell polarity and affecting expression of multiple factors to stunt limb growth through altered patterns of gene expression, including the PCP genes Wnt5a and Vangl2. PMID:23913870

  9. Inhibition of bactericidal activity by pentachlorophenol in two phagocyte populations from Fundulus heteroclitus

    SciTech Connect

    Roszell, L.E.; Anderson, R.S.

    1994-12-31

    The effects of pentachlorophenol (PCP) on the bactericidal activity of pronephritic phagocytes were studied in an estuarine fish, Fundulus heteroclitus. Following in vitro exposure to sublethal doses of PCP, macrophages and eosinophils were challenged with Listonella anguillarum, the bacterium responsible for vibriosis in marine and freshwater fish. Quantification of surviving bacteria was based on the reduction of MTT (3-[4,5 dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide). Bacteridical activity was inhibited at PCP concentrations greater than 5 ppm in both leukocyte populations; at 20 ppm bactericidal activity was essentially eliminated. The primary cellular mechanisms of bactericidal activity in these cells are phagocytosis and the phagocytically induced production of reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) including superoxide (O{sub 2}{sup {minus}}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}). Previous experiments have shown that these activities are inhibited at similar concentrations of PCP. These results indicate that the suppression of phagocytosis and the subsequent oxidative burst is responsible for the reduced killing seen in the current experiments. Nonspecific immune activities of phagocytic cells such as macrophages and eosinophils act as a first line of defense against invading pathogens; the suppression of these functions could ultimately lead to decreased resistance to infectious disease.

  10. Wnt-Frizzled/planar cell polarity signaling: cellular orientation by facing the wind (Wnt).

    PubMed

    Yang, Yingzi; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    The establishment of planar cell polarity (PCP) in epithelial and mesenchymal cells is a critical, evolutionarily conserved process during development and organogenesis. Analyses in Drosophila and several vertebrate model organisms have contributed a wealth of information on the regulation of PCP. A key conserved pathway regulating PCP, the so-called core Wnt-Frizzled PCP (Fz/PCP) signaling pathway, was initially identified through genetic studies of Drosophila. PCP studies in vertebrates, most notably mouse and zebrafish, have identified novel factors in PCP signaling and have also defined cellular features requiring PCP signaling input. These studies have shifted focus to the role of Van Gogh (Vang)/Vangl genes in this molecular system. This review focuses on new insights into the core Fz/Vangl/PCP pathway and recent advances in Drosophila and vertebrate PCP studies. We attempt to integrate these within the existing core Fz/Vangl/PCP signaling framework.

  11. Emergence and Dynamics of Polar Order in Developing Epithelia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhadifar, Reza

    2011-03-01

    Planar Cell Polarity (PCP) is a conserved process in many vertebrate and invertebrate tissues, and is fundamental for the coordination of cell behavior and patterning. A well-studied example is the orientational pattern of hairs in the wing of the adult fruit fly Drosophila, which is an important model organism in biology. The Drosophila wing is an epithelium, i.e., a two-dimensional sheet of cells, which grows from a few cells to thousands of cells during the course of development. In the wing epithelium, planar polarity is established by an anisotropic distribution of PCP proteins within cells. The distribution of these proteins in a given cell affects the polarity of neighboring cells, such that at the end of wing development a large-scale PCP orientational order emerges. Here we present a theoretical study of planar polarity in developing epithelia based on a vertex model, which takes into account cell mechanics, cell adhesion, and cell division, combined with experimental results obtained from time-lapse imaging of the wing development. We show that in experiment, polarity order does not develop de novo at the end of wing development, but rather cells are initially polarized at an angle with respect to their final polarity axis. During wing development, the polarity axes of cells reorient towards their final direction. We identify a basic mechanism to generate such a large-scale initial polarization, based on the growth of a small number of cells with an initially random PCP distribution. Finally, we study the effect of shear and oriented cell division on dynamics of PCP order, showing that these two processes can robustly reorient the polarity axes of cells.

  12. Relationship between Radiological Stages and Prognoses of Pneumocystis Pneumonia in Non-AIDS Immunocompromised Patients

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiang-Dong; Jia, Peng; Gao, Li; Su, Li; Zhang, Cheng; Wang, Ren-Gui; Wang, Guang-Fa

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although radiological features of pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) in non-Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) immunocompromised patients have been reported by other authors, there were no studies on the radiological stages of PCP previously. This study aimed to elucidate the radiological stages and prognoses of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients. Methods: Retrospective analysis of radiological manifestations and prognoses of 105 non-AIDS PCP immunocompromised patients from August 2009 to April 2016 was conducted. Chest radiograph was divided into three stages: early stage (normal or nearly normal chest radiograph), mid stage (bilateral pulmonary infiltrates), and late stage (bilateral pulmonary consolidations); chest high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was also divided into three stages: early stage (bilateral diffuse ground-glass opacity [GGO]), mid stage (bilateral diffuse GGO and patchy consolidations), and late stage (bilateral diffuse consolidations). Results: The case fatality rate (CFR) of all patients was 34.3% (36/105), all of them took routine chest X-ray (CXR), and 84 underwent chest CT examinations. According to the CXR most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 18 cases were at early stage and CFR was 0 (0/18, P < 0.01), 50 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 28.0% (14/50, P > 0.05), and 37 cases were at late stage and CFR was 59.5% (22/37, P < 0.01). According to the chest HRCT most near the beginning of anti-PCP therapy, 40 cases were at early stage and CFR was 20.0% (8/40, P > 0.05), 34 cases were at mid stage and CFR was 47.1% (16/34, P > 0.05), and 10 cases were at late stage and CFR was 80.0% (8/10, P < 0.05); barotrauma, including pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and pneumohypoderma, was found in 18 cases and the CFR was 77.8% (14/18, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Based on the radiological manifestations, the course of PCP in non-AIDS immunocompromised patients can be divided into three stages: early stage, mid stage

  13. Alterations of p75 neurotrophin receptor and Myelin transcription factor 1 in the hippocampus of perinatal phencyclidine treated rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Matosin, Natalie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal administration of phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents causes major disturbances to neurological processes resulting in severe modifications to normal behavioral traits into adulthood. It is routinely used to model psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, producing many of the dysfunctional processes in the brain that are present in this devastating disorder, including elevated levels of apoptosis during neurodevelopment and disruptions to myelin and plasticity processes. Lingo-1 (or Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein) is responsible for negatively regulating neurite outgrowth and the myelination of axons. Recent findings using a postmortem human brain cohort showed that Lingo-1 signaling partners in the Nogo receptor (NgR)/p75/TNF receptor orphan Y (TROY) signaling complex, and downstream signaling partners With No Lysine (K) (WNK1) and Myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), play a significant part in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here we have examined the implication of Lingo-1 and its signaling partners in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia using PCP to determine if these pathways are altered in the hippocampus throughout different stages of neurodevelopment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with PCP (10mg/kg) or saline solution on postnatal days (PN) 7, 9, and 11. Rats (n=6/group) were sacrificed at PN12, 5weeks, or 14weeks. Relative expression levels of Lingo-1 signaling proteins were examined in the hippocampus of the treated rats. p75 and Myt1 were decreased (0.001≤p≤0.011) in the PCP treated rats at PN12. There were no significant changes in any of the tested proteins at 5weeks (p>0.05). At 14weeks, p75, TROY, and Myt1 were increased in the PCP treated rats (0.014≤p≤0.022). This is the first report of an alteration in Lingo-1 signaling proteins in the rat hippocampus, both directly after PCP treatment in early development and in adulthood. Based on our results, we propose that

  14. Alterations of p75 neurotrophin receptor and Myelin transcription factor 1 in the hippocampus of perinatal phencyclidine treated rats.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Jessica L; Newell, Kelly A; Matosin, Natalie; Huang, Xu-Feng; Fernandez-Enright, Francesca

    2015-12-01

    Postnatal administration of phencyclidine (PCP) in rodents causes major disturbances to neurological processes resulting in severe modifications to normal behavioral traits into adulthood. It is routinely used to model psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia, producing many of the dysfunctional processes in the brain that are present in this devastating disorder, including elevated levels of apoptosis during neurodevelopment and disruptions to myelin and plasticity processes. Lingo-1 (or Leucine-rich repeat and immunoglobulin domain-containing protein) is responsible for negatively regulating neurite outgrowth and the myelination of axons. Recent findings using a postmortem human brain cohort showed that Lingo-1 signaling partners in the Nogo receptor (NgR)/p75/TNF receptor orphan Y (TROY) signaling complex, and downstream signaling partners With No Lysine (K) (WNK1) and Myelin transcription factor 1 (Myt1), play a significant part in schizophrenia pathophysiology. Here we have examined the implication of Lingo-1 and its signaling partners in a neurodevelopmental model of schizophrenia using PCP to determine if these pathways are altered in the hippocampus throughout different stages of neurodevelopment. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were injected subcutaneously with PCP (10mg/kg) or saline solution on postnatal days (PN) 7, 9, and 11. Rats (n=6/group) were sacrificed at PN12, 5weeks, or 14weeks. Relative expression levels of Lingo-1 signaling proteins were examined in the hippocampus of the treated rats. p75 and Myt1 were decreased (0.001≤p≤0.011) in the PCP treated rats at PN12. There were no significant changes in any of the tested proteins at 5weeks (p>0.05). At 14weeks, p75, TROY, and Myt1 were increased in the PCP treated rats (0.014≤p≤0.022). This is the first report of an alteration in Lingo-1 signaling proteins in the rat hippocampus, both directly after PCP treatment in early development and in adulthood. Based on our results, we propose that

  15. Community-Based Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Community-Based Care Basic Facts & Information A variety of ... Adult Day Care Adult day care is a community-based option that has become more common. It ...

  16. Carbon Based Nanotechnology: Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation reviews publicly available information related to carbon based nanotechnology. Topics covered include nanomechanics, carbon based electronics, nanodevice/materials applications, nanotube motors, nano-lithography and H2O storage in nanotubes.

  17. Stolen Base Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagan, David

    2013-05-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting,2-4 the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The predictions of the model show consistency with the skills needed for effective base stealing.

  18. Stolen Base Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kagan, David

    2013-01-01

    Few plays in baseball are as consistently close and exciting as the stolen base. While there are several studies of sprinting, the art of base stealing is much more nuanced. This article describes the motion of the base-stealing runner using a very basic kinematic model. The model will be compared to some data from a Major League game. The…

  19. Bright-field cell image segmentation by principal component pursuit with an Ncut penalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yuehuan; Wan, Justin W. L.

    2015-03-01

    Segmentation of cells in time-lapse bright-field microscopic images is crucial in understanding cell behaviours for oncological research. However, the complex nature of the cells makes it difficult to segment cells accurately. Furthermore, poor contrast, broken cell boundaries and the halo artifact pose additional challenges to this problem. Standard segmentation techniques such as edged-based methods, watershed, or active contours result in poor segmentation. Other existing methods for bright-field images cannot provide good results without localized segmentation steps. In this paper, we present two robust mathematical models to segment bright-field cells automatically for the entire image. These models treat cell image segmentation as a background subtraction problem, which can be formulated as a Principal Component Pursuit (PCP) problem. Our first segmentation model is formulated as a PCP with nonnegative constraints. We exploit the sparse component of the PCP solution for identifying the cell pixels. However, there is no control on the quality of the sparse component and the nonzero entries can scatter all over the image, resulting in a noisy segmentation. The second model is an improvement of the first model by combining PCP with spectral clustering. Seemingly unrelated approaches, we combine the two techniques by incorporating normalized-cut in the PCP as a measure for the quality of the segmentation. These two models have been applied to a set of C2C12 cells obtained from bright-field microscopy. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed models are effective in segmenting cells from bright-field images.

  20. Physicochemical property consensus sequences for functional analysis, design of multivalent antigens and targeted antivirals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Analysis of large sets of biological sequence data from related strains or organisms is complicated by superficial redundancy in the set, which may contain many members that are identical except at one or two positions. Thus a new method, based on deriving physicochemical property (PCP)-consensus sequences, was tested for its ability to generate reference sequences and distinguish functionally significant changes from background variability. Methods The PCP consensus program was used to automatically derive consensus sequences starting from sequence alignments of proteins from Flaviviruses (from the Flavitrack database) and human enteroviruses, using a five dimensional set of Eigenvectors that summarize over 200 different scalar values for the PCPs of the amino acids. A PCP-consensus protein of a Dengue virus envelope protein was produced recombinantly and tested for its ability to bind antibodies to strains using ELISA. Results PCP-consensus sequences of the flavivirus family could be used to classify them into five discrete groups and distinguish areas of the envelope proteins that correlate with host specificity and disease type. A multivalent Dengue virus antigen was designed and shown to bind antibodies against all four DENV types. A consensus enteroviral VPg protein had the same distinctive high pKa as wild type proteins and was recognized by two different polymerases. Conclusions The process for deriving PCP-consensus sequences for any group of aligned similar sequences, has been validated for sequences with up to 50% diversity. Ongoing projects have shown that the method identifies residues that significantly alter PCPs at a given position, and might thus cause changes in function or immunogenicity. Other potential applications include deriving target proteins for drug design and diagnostic kits. PMID:23320474

  1. Saturn base heating handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mullen, C. R.; Bender, R. L.; Bevill, R. L.; Reardon, J.; Hartley, L.

    1972-01-01

    A handbook containing a summary of model and flight test base heating data from the S-1, S-1B, S-4, S-1C, and S-2 stages is presented. A review of the available prediction methods is included. Experimental data are provided to make the handbook a single source of Saturn base heating data which can be used for preliminary base heating design predictions of launch vehicles.

  2. ARAC terrain data base

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, H.

    1982-11-01

    A terrain data base covering the continental United States at 500-meter resolution has been generated. Its function is to provide terrain data for input to mesoscale atmospheric models that are used as part of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL). The structure of the data base as it exists on the LLNL computer system is described. The data base has been written to tapes for transfer to other systems and the format of these tapes is also described.

  3. Action-Based Planning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lansky, Amy L.; Lum, Henry Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to domain representation and planning that is fundamentally different from traditional methods; an approach based strictly on actions and their interrelationships, rather than on state-based goals and preconditions. In particular, we focus on the action-based planner COLLAGE, describe its methods for plan-construction, and contrast them with more traditional approaches to planning. Experiences with COLLAGE in realistic domains have shown that the action-based approach is not only more natural to use, but can also be more cost-efficient than traditional planning methods.

  4. Understanding Acid Base Disorders.

    PubMed

    Gomez, Hernando; Kellum, John A

    2015-10-01

    The concentration of hydrogen ions is regulated in biologic solutions. There are currently 3 recognized approaches to assess changes in acid base status. First is the traditional Henderson-Hasselbalch approach, also called the physiologic approach, which uses the relationship between HCO3(-) and Pco2; the second is the standard base excess approach based on the Van Slyke equation. The third approach is the quantitative or Stewart approach, which uses the strong ion difference and the total weak acids. This article explores the origins of the current concepts framing the existing methods to analyze acid base balance.

  5. Synthetic Base Fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, M.; Fotheringham, J. D.; Hoyes, T. J.; Mortier, R. M.; Orszulik, S. T.; Randles, S. J.; Stroud, P. M.

    The chemical nature and technology of the main synthetic lubricant base fluids is described, covering polyalphaolefins, alkylated aromatics, gas-to-liquid (GTL) base fluids, polybutenes, aliphatic diesters, polyolesters, polyalkylene glycols or PAGs and phosphate esters.Other synthetic lubricant base oils such as the silicones, borate esters, perfluoroethers and polyphenylene ethers are considered to have restricted applications due to either high cost or performance limitations and are not considered here.Each of the main synthetic base fluids is described for their chemical and physical properties, manufacture and production, their chemistry, key properties, applications and their implications when used in the environment.

  6. XML-BASED REPRESENTATION

    SciTech Connect

    R. KELSEY

    2001-02-01

    For focused applications with limited user and use application communities, XML can be the right choice for representation. It is easy to use, maintain, and extend and enjoys wide support in commercial and research sectors. When the knowledge and information to be represented is object-based and use of that knowledge and information is a high priority, then XML-based representation should be considered. This paper discusses some of the issues involved in using XML-based representation and presents an example application that successfully uses an XML-based representation.

  7. Base Oils from Petroleum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prince, R. J.

    The source, composition and suitability of crude oils for base oil production are reviewed. The physical and chemical properties of alkanes, naphthenes and aromatics and their characteristics for lubricant applications are examined. Properties and applications of various base oils are defined and specified. Production of conventional mineral oils is described, including the various processes to remove wax and other deleterious substances, followed by increasingly severe hydrogenation to produce base oils of increased quality and performance. The API categorization of mineral base oils, either direct from the refinery or after hydrotreatment of increasing severity, is described, together with sub-categories.

  8. Soy-based polyols

    DOEpatents

    Suppes, Galen; Lozada, Zueica; Lubguban, Arnold

    2013-06-25

    The invention provides processes for preparing soy-based oligomeric polyols or substituted oligomeric polyols, as well as urethane bioelasteromers comprising the oligomeric polyols or substituted oligomeric polyols.

  9. Gasification-based biomass

    SciTech Connect

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The gasification-based biomass section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  10. Pneumocystis Pneumonia (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5 Things to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Pneumocystis Pneumonia KidsHealth > For Parents > Pneumocystis Pneumonia Print A A A Text Size What's in ... article? About PCP Diagnosing PCP Treating PCP Pneumocystis pneumonia (PCP) is an infection caused by Pneumocystis jiroveci , ...

  11. Scientifically Based Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beghetto, Ron

    2003-01-01

    Most principals are aware that the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 makes it mandatory for school leaders who depend on federal funding to select and implement programs that are based on scientific research. This publication reviews five documents that offer insights into what is meant by scientifically based research and help school leaders…

  12. Content-Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CATESOL Journal, 1992

    1992-01-01

    This English-as-a-Second Language (ESL) journal periodical devotes entire issues to specific issues. The theme of this issue is "Content-Base Instruction." Articles include: "Syllabus Design in Content-Based Instruction" (David E. Eskey); "How Relevant Is Relevance?: An Examination of Student Needs, Interests, and Motivation in the Content-Based…

  13. Medical Knowledge Bases.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Randolph A.; Giuse, Nunzia B.

    1991-01-01

    Few commonly available, successful computer-based tools exist in medical informatics. Faculty expertise can be included in computer-based medical information systems. Computers allow dynamic recombination of knowledge to answer questions unanswerable with print textbooks. Such systems can also create stronger ties between academic and clinical…

  14. Management Data Base Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dan, Robert L.

    1975-01-01

    A management data base is seen as essential for a management information system, program budgeting, program costing, management by objectives, program evaluation, productivity measures, and accountability in institutions of higher education. The necessity of a management data base is addressed, along with the benefits and limitations it may have…

  15. Propagation data bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-12-01

    Existing data bases accumulated as the result of experiments to gather propagation data on millimeter wave Earth-space links are described. The satellites used are described and results of the significant experiments conducted in the United States are summarized. The data bases consist primarily of cumulative attenuation statistics, though some depolarization measurements are included. Additional summaries of propagation data are cited.

  16. Content-Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DelliCarpini, M.; Alonso, O.

    2013-01-01

    DelliCarpini and Alonso's book "Content-Based Instruction" explores different approaches to teaching content-based instruction (CBI) in the English language classroom. They provide a comprehensive overview of how to teach CBI in an easy-to-follow guide that language teachers will find very practical for their own contexts. Topics…

  17. Red-based cumulus.

    PubMed

    Gedzelman, Stanley David

    2015-02-01

    Observations and model simulations of cumulus clouds whose bases are tinted red when the Sun is well above the horizon are presented. Conditions for seeing red bases include (1) a red underlying surface (which may consist of dust clouds, as from haboobs) with high albedo, (2) small fractional cloud cover when the Sun is far enough below the zenith for direct sunlight to illuminate much of the surface directly below and around cloud base, (3) optically thick clouds so that the bases are dark, and (4) clouds with bases that are near enough to the observer to appear high in the sky so that the admixture of scattered light from the intervening atmosphere is minimized.

  18. A comparison of two methods for fractionating complex mixtures in preparation for toxicity analysis.

    PubMed

    Cizmas, Leslie; Barhoumi, Rola; Burghardt, Robert C; Reeves, William R; He, Lingyu; McDonald, Thomas J; Donnelly, Kirby C

    2003-07-25

    Chemical fractionation is a widely used tool for the chemical and toxicological characterization of complex mixtures. The objective of this research was to compare two frequently employed methods for fractionating a wood preserving waste (WPW) containing polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and pentachlorophenol (PCP). The first method involved fractionation of the WPW into acid, base, and neutral fractions using a liquid-liquid acid/base/neutral (A/B/N) technique. The second method utilized alumina column chromatography to produce two fractions, A1 and A2. Gas chromatography and mass spectrometry were used to quantify the chemical components in all fractions. The alumina method recovered 473,338 mg of total PAHs (tPAHs) per kilogram crude, while the A/B/N method yielded only 193,379 mg tPAHs/kg crude. In contrast, the A/B/N method recovered 13.7 mg PCP/kg crude while the alumina method yielded only 0.5 mg PCP/kg crude. Three bioassays were used to determine the toxicity of the crude extract and fractions. The neutral and A1 fractions contained the highest levels of tPAHs and benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) but failed to induce a positive response in the Salmonella/microsome assay with concentrations containing as much as 1800 and 2500 ng BaP/plate, respectively. In the Escherichia coli prophage induction assay, the acid fraction, which contained 472 mg PCP/kg fraction, induced a positive response, as did the base fraction, which did not contain detectable PCP. Significant reduction of gap junctional intercellular communication in hepatic cells occurred with the crude extract and acid, base, and neutral fractions. Overall, the results of these bioassays suggest that PCP genotoxicity was expressed in the acid fraction, whereas the cumulative genotoxicity of genotoxic PAHs appeared to be masked in the isolates from either fractionation method. The optimal fractionation method for a mixture of chlorophenols and PAHs may involve a refined hybrid method.

  19. Skull Base Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Chirag R; Fernandez-Miranda, Juan C; Wang, Wei-Hsin; Wang, Eric W

    2016-02-01

    The anatomy of the skull base is complex with multiple neurovascular structures in a small space. Understanding all of the intricate relationships begins with understanding the anatomy of the sphenoid bone. The cavernous sinus contains the carotid artery and some of its branches; cranial nerves III, IV, VI, and V1; and transmits venous blood from multiple sources. The anterior skull base extends to the frontal sinus and is important to understand for sinus surgery and sinonasal malignancies. The clivus protects the brainstem and posterior cranial fossa. A thorough appreciation of the anatomy of these various areas allows for endoscopic endonasal approaches to the skull base.

  20. Data base management study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  1. Cyclodextrin-based molecular machines.

    PubMed

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Yamaguchi, Hiroyasu; Harada, Akira

    2014-01-01

    This chapter overviews molecular machines based on cyclodextrins (CDs). The categories of CD-based molecular machines, external stimuli for CD-based molecular machines, and typical examples of CD-based molecular machines are briefly described.

  2. Event-Based Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Russell G.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that an event-based science curriculum can provide the framework for deciding what to retain in an overloaded science curriculum. Provides examples of current events and the science concepts explored related to the event. (MDH)

  3. Navigating Value Based Care.

    PubMed

    Sorrel, Amy Lynn

    2015-12-01

    TMA is collaborating with TMF Health Quality Institute to connect Texas physicians to free TMF resources that will better position doctors for the rapid transition to value-based payment. PMID:26630238

  4. Benzimidazole Based Aerogel Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhine, Wendell E. (Inventor); Mihalcik, David (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides aerogel materials based on imidazoles and polyimidazoles. The polyimidazole based aerogel materials can be thermally stable up to 500 C or more, and can be carbonized to produce a carbon aerogel having a char yield of 60% or more, specifically 70% or more. The present invention also provides methods of producing polyimidazole based aerogel materials by reacting at least one monomer in a suitable solvent to form a polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution, casting the polybenzimidazole gel precursor solution into a fiber reinforcement phase, allowing the at least one gel precursor in the precursor solution to transition into a gel material, and drying the gel materials to remove at least a portion of the solvent, to obtain an polybenzimidazole-based aerogel material.

  5. Meditation-Based Training

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that training-based measures are effective in improving cognitive skills. Meditation-based training has produced lasting changes in brain and cognitive functions. This technique of mental training exhibits neuroplasticity in the attentional networks, exhibiting superior performance, especially in the domain of attention and executive control processing, which is impaired in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Although intervention techniques for ADHD are well researched, many individuals continue to experience significant functional impairment despite the symptom improvement. This emphasizes a need for a comprehensive approach that requires an effective behavioral intervention. The present paper provides a converging review of meditation-based effects on the brain, dysfunctions of ADHD, and suggestions for enhancement of cognitive abilities in patients with ADHD using meditational training combined with existing measures of intervention. The idea proposed herein should be considered a step for initiation of empirical studies on meditation-based training intervention and outcome effects. PMID:19727310

  6. Transformation based endorsement systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sudkamp, Thomas

    1988-01-01

    Evidential reasoning techniques classically represent support for a hypothesis by a numeric value or an evidential interval. The combination of support is performed by an arithmetic rule which often requires restrictions to be placed on the set of possibilities. These assumptions usually require the hypotheses to be exhausitive and mutually exclusive. Endorsement based classification systems represent support for the alternatives symbolically rather than numerically. A framework for constructing endorsement systems is presented in which transformations are defined to generate and update the knowledge base. The interaction of the knowledge base and transformations produces a non-monotonic reasoning system. Two endorsement based reasoning systems are presented to demonstrate the flexibility of the transformational approach for reasoning with ambiguous and inconsistent information.

  7. COMMUNITY BASED ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Community Based Environmental Protection intends to make environmental protection spring from the needs and values of the community of interest. Real community involvement in protecting the environment requires a process in which the environmental needs of communities and ecosyst...

  8. SLM based semiconductor maskwriter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diez, Steffen; Jehle, Achim

    2015-09-01

    The high-end semiconductor mask fabrication is dominated by e-beam technology. But still more than 50% of all semiconductor masks are produced by laser writers. The current laser writers are based on the same technology that was used 25 years ago. They are reliable and fast but not very economical. Heidelberg Instruments has developed a new economical and fast laser writer based on the latest technologies.

  9. New formaldehyde base disinfectants.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, R.; Lindell, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    Preparations of formaldehyde in various organic liquids - ethylene glycol, glycerol, and propylene glycol - serve as effective disinfectants towards microbial vegetative cells and spores. This disinfection is a temperature-dependent process and is manifest when these formaldehyde base disinfectants are dissolved in water. The irritating vapors associated with formaldehyde disinfection are not present in either of these new formaldehyde base disinfectants or in aqueous solutions of them.

  10. Pentachlorophenol toxicity. (Latest citations from Pollution Abstracts). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning toxicological studies of pentachlorophenol (PCP) and its effects on humans, aquatic and laboratory animals, and livestock. Topics include PCP determination and analysis methods, PCP accumulation in animals, assessment and control of PCP contamination in waters and soils, health risk assessment of pesticides and insecticides, and PCP degradation and decomposition techniques. Biochemical studies of occupational exposure and clinical reports are included. (Contains a minimum of 241 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  11. LDEF materials data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, Joan G.; Strickland, John W.; Davis, John M.

    1993-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) and the accompanying experiments were composed of and contained a wide variety of materials representing the largest collection of materials flown in low Earth orbit (LEO) and retrieved for ground based analysis to date. The results and implications of the mechanical, thermal, optical, and electrical data from these materials are the foundation on which future LEO space missions will be built. The LDEF Materials Special Investigation Group (MSIG) has been charged with establishing and developing data bases to document these materials and their performance to assure not only that the data are archived for future generations but also that the data are available to the spacecraft user community in an easily accessed, user-friendly form. This paper discusses the format and content of the three data bases developed or being developed to accomplish this task. The hardware and software requirements for each of these three data bases are discussed along with current availability of the data bases. This paper also serves as a user's guide to the MAPTIS LDEF Materials Data Base.

  12. Swarm-Based Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Oldenburg, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Occasionally, medical decisions have to be taken in the absence of evidence-based guidelines. Other sources can be drawn upon to fill in the gaps, including experience and intuition. Authorities or experts, with their knowledge and experience, may provide further input—known as “eminence-based medicine”. Due to the Internet and digital media, interactions among physicians now take place at a higher rate than ever before. With the rising number of interconnected individuals and their communication capabilities, the medical community is obtaining the properties of a swarm. The way individual physicians act depends on other physicians; medical societies act based on their members. Swarm behavior might facilitate the generation and distribution of knowledge as an unconscious process. As such, “swarm-based medicine” may add a further source of information to the classical approaches of evidence- and eminence-based medicine. How to integrate swarm-based medicine into practice is left to the individual physician, but even this decision will be influenced by the swarm. PMID:24052454

  13. Process Control Logic Modification to Mitigate Transient Following Tripping of a Primary Circulating Pump for a 540 MWe PHWR Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Contractor, Ankur D; Gaikwad, Avinash J.; Kumar, Rajesh; Chakraborty, G.; Vhora, S.F.

    2006-07-01

    The 540 MWe Indian Pressurised Heavy Water Reactor (PHWR) incorporates many new features as compared to the earlier 220 MWe PHWRs. To evaluate the new design features like Primary Heat Transport (PHT) system configuration with two loops, four Primary Circulating Pumps (PCPs) and four passes through core, addition of a Pressurizer (surge Tank) in the PHT system along with Feed/Bleed system and their safety related implications, simulation model have been developed. A reactor step-back is proposed following one PCP trip. The corresponding PCP in the healthy loop is tripped to avoid asymmetrical flow and pressure distribution in the two identical loops. In spite of such elaborate provisions, the margins from high/low PHT pressure are small following tripping of one PCP. Mathematical models for all the major components and sub-systems of the proposed 540 MWe PHWR were developed based on the conservation equations of mass, momentum, energy and equation of state. All the associated control systems are also modeled. The PHT system includes the reactor core with nuclear fuel, PCP, PHT system pressure controller with feed/bleed system and Pressurizer (Surge Tank). The secondary system includes mainly the Steam Generators (SGs), the SG level and pressure controllers, apart from the various steam cycle components. All these models are integrated together to form the Plant Transient Analysis Computer Code Dyna540. The scenario following one PCP trips leads to different states (high/low pressure in Reactor Outlet Header (ROH)) depending upon the banks in which the PCP trips. The pressurizer is connected to two ROHs on one side of the reactor. The system pressure is controlled based on average of four ROHs pressure. In the case of asymmetrical pump operation, this logic leads to a situation where individual ROH pressure goes very near the low/high PHT system pressure trip set point, even though the controlled average pressure is very close to the set pressure. The PHT high

  14. Pentachlorophenol contaminated groundwater bioremediation using immobilized Sphingomonas cells inoculation in the bioreactor system.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Fang; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2008-03-21

    Pentachlorophenol (PCP) has been used as a wood preservative for more than 100 years. The extensive use of PCP has widely contaminated soil and groundwater. PCP is toxic to living organisms. The main objective of this research was to inoculate the pure PCP-degrading bacterium strain Sphingomonas chlorophenolica PCP-1, isolated from PCP-contaminated soils, into PCP-contaminated groundwater for remediation purposes. The factors that influenced the bioremediation were explored with batch experiments using the inoculated immobilized and suspended cells as inoculation. A biological treatment system inoculated with immobilized cells was set up to estimate the microbial capability to degrade PCP. The results indicated that the suspended and immobilized cells could be inoculated into PCP-contaminated groundwater without adding other supplementary nitrogen and phosphate sources in batch conditions. Moreover, PCP decomposition was accompanied with released Cl- and decreasing pH value. The optimum HRT in the bioreactor system was 12.6h. PCP removal in the bioreactor remained stable and PCP removal efficiency was higher than 92% at this phase. Furthermore, PCP concentration in the biotreatment system effluent remained undetectable. It is possible to bioremediate PCP-contaminated groundwater using immobilized S. chlorophenolica PCP-1 cells in a bioreactor system. The proposed biological treatment system could be maintained for at least for 2 months.

  15. Plant based butters.

    PubMed

    Gorrepati, Kalyani; Balasubramanian, S; Chandra, Pitam

    2015-07-01

    During the last few years the popularity for the plant based butters (nut and seed butters) has increased considerably. Earlier peanut butter was the only alternative to the dairy butter, but over the years development in the technologies and also the consumer awareness about the plant based butters, has led the development of myriad varieties of butters with different nuts and seeds, which are very good source of protein, fiber, essential fatty acids and other nutrients. These days' different varieties of plant based butters are available in the market viz., peanut butter, soy butter, almond butter, pistachio butter, cashew butter and sesame butter etc. The form of butter is one of the healthy way of integrating nuts and seeds in to our regular diet. Nut and seed butters are generally prepared by roasting, grinding and refrigerated to consume it when it is still fresh. During this process it is imperative to retain the nutritional properties of these nuts and seeds in order to reap the benefits of the fresh nuts and seeds in the form of butter as well. Proper care is needed to minimize the conversion of healthful components in to unhealthy components during processing and further storage. Roasting temperature, temperatures during grinding and storage are the vital factors to be considered in order to have healthy and nutritious plant based butters. In this article, different plant based butters and their processing methods have been described. PMID:26139864

  16. Recognition and perception of elder abuse by prehospital and hospital-based care providers.

    PubMed

    Rinker, Austin G

    2009-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to evaluate the extent of exposure, knowledge and attitudes of prehospital care providers (PCPs) and hospital care providers (HCPs) to elder abuse and neglect. A 20-question survey was designed to determine the providers' perception, knowledge and ability to identify patients that were potential victims of elder abuse and/or neglect. The surveys were distributed at four Maryland statewide conferences during 2006. A total of 645 surveys were distributed at the start of the individual conferences and 400 completed surveys were returned. Of the respondents, 272 (68.2%) were PCP (emergency medical services=EMSs) and 127 (31.8%) were HCP. During the past 12 months, 51.3% of those surveyed did not have reason to suspect any patients were exposed to abuse or neglect, although 60.5% admitted little or no contact with the elderly. In an attempt to determine respondent's ability to recognize potential abuse and neglect patients, scenario-type questions were used. Respondents believed a decubital ulcer (bedsore) was a positive indicator (83.5%) of abuse/neglect and 92.8% indicated that the elderly could suffer from injuries similar to "shaken-baby syndrome". When questioned about skin bruises as a possible indicator of abuse, only 69.3% of the respondents identified it as a possible sign of abuse. Seventy-one percent of respondents indicated that burns are not common in the elderly and could be another sign of elder abuse. One-in-three providers indicated they would suspect other reasons (dementia, depression, etc.) for the report of a sexual assault in an elderly patient. Eighty-nine percent of providers were aware that healthcare providers in the State of Maryland are required to report suspected elder and vulnerable patient abuse and/or neglect to law enforcement or social services' agencies. When asked to define elder abuse as a medical or social problem, 25.0% of providers stated that it was a social problem. Over 95% of the providers

  17. Pediatric cardiothoracic program in Malaysia: a study based on the outcome of the program.

    PubMed

    Piros Kulandasamy Pillai, Cornelius; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Justin Lawrence, Patrick; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A; Hamajima1, Nobuyuki

    2016-02-01

    Vulnerable communities in Malaysia have been facing issues of accessibility and availability for pediatric cardiac services for years due to long waiting times, high costs and a lack of pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons. To ease this situation, the government has allocated a certain amount of funds, introduced through the Pediatric Cardiothoracic Program (PCP), in which the patients are transported to the Narayana Health Institute of Cardiac Science (NH) in India to receive a heart operation following an eligibility check at MediAssist4U Sdn Bhd in Selangor, Malaysia, a facility appointed by the NH. This study aimed to determine the demographic incidence of congenital heart diseases of patients in this program and to evaluate the outcome of the program in association with post-operative mortality rate and the beneficial factors of the program. In this study, 241 patients who participated in this program from August 2008 to September 2012 were reviewed. Fisher's exact tests were applied to calculate p-values of categorical data. Out of 241, 11 patients were rejected because of their poor health condition for flight transportation to India, leaving 230 patients for analysis. The majority of patients were 1 to 4 years of age (57.8%), Malays (61.7%), from families of monthly household income less than RM 1,500 (86.5%) and with primary school-educated parents (86.5%). Patients could apply from any government hospital in Malaysia, but 34.8% of the patients were from the state of Johor. The region (Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia) of patients seeking pediatric cardiac services was significantly associated with race (p<0.001), low household income (p<0.001) and low education background of parents (p=0.004). The associations between the age group and diagnosis group (p=0.010) and between duration of hospitalization and outcome of medical management (p=0.013) were significant. Post-operative mortality rate was 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5-4.4). In conclusion, the

  18. Pediatric cardiothoracic program in Malaysia: a study based on the outcome of the program

    PubMed Central

    Piros Kulandasamy Pillai, Cornelius; Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Justin Lawrence, Patrick; Yamamoto, Eiko; Reyer, Joshua A.; Hamajima1, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vulnerable communities in Malaysia have been facing issues of accessibility and availability for pediatric cardiac services for years due to long waiting times, high costs and a lack of pediatric cardiothoracic surgeons. To ease this situation, the government has allocated a certain amount of funds, introduced through the Pediatric Cardiothoracic Program (PCP), in which the patients are transported to the Narayana Health Institute of Cardiac Science (NH) in India to receive a heart operation following an eligibility check at MediAssist4U Sdn Bhd in Selangor, Malaysia, a facility appointed by the NH. This study aimed to determine the demographic incidence of congenital heart diseases of patients in this program and to evaluate the outcome of the program in association with post-operative mortality rate and the beneficial factors of the program. In this study, 241 patients who participated in this program from August 2008 to September 2012 were reviewed. Fisher’s exact tests were applied to calculate p-values of categorical data. Out of 241, 11 patients were rejected because of their poor health condition for flight transportation to India, leaving 230 patients for analysis. The majority of patients were 1 to 4 years of age (57.8%), Malays (61.7%), from families of monthly household income less than RM 1,500 (86.5%) and with primary school-educated parents (86.5%). Patients could apply from any government hospital in Malaysia, but 34.8% of the patients were from the state of Johor. The region (Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia) of patients seeking pediatric cardiac services was significantly associated with race (p<0.001), low household income (p<0.001) and low education background of parents (p=0.004). The associations between the age group and diagnosis group (p=0.010) and between duration of hospitalization and outcome of medical management (p=0.013) were significant. Post-operative mortality rate was 1.7% (95% confidence interval, 0.5–4.4). In

  19. Safety assessment of personal care products/cosmetics and their ingredients

    SciTech Connect

    Nohynek, Gerhard J.; Antignac, Eric; Re, Thomas; Toutain, Herve

    2010-03-01

    . However, current evidence suggests that these particles are non-toxic, do not penetrate into or through normal or compromised human skin and, therefore, pose no risk to human health. The increasing use of natural plant ingredients in personal care products raised new safety issues that require novel approaches to their safety evaluation similar to those of plant-derived food ingredients. For example, the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) is a promising tool to assess the safety of substances present at trace levels as well as minor ingredients of plant-derived substances. The potential human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients is increasingly estimated on the basis of in vitro skin penetration data. However, new evidence suggests that the in vitro test may overestimate human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients due to the absence of metabolism in cadaver skin or misclassification of skin residues that, in vivo, remain in the stratum corneum or hair follicle openings, i.e. outside the living skin. Overall, today's safety assessment of PCP and their ingredients is not only based on science, but also on their respective regulatory status as well as other issues, such as the ethics of animal testing. Nevertheless, the record shows that today's PCP are safe and offer multiple benefits to quality of life and health of the consumer. In the interest of all stakeholders, consumers, regulatory bodies and producers, there is an urgent need for an international harmonization on the status and safety requirements of these products and their ingredients.

  20. Safety assessment of personal care products/cosmetics and their ingredients.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Antignac, Eric; Re, Thomas; Toutain, Herve

    2010-03-01

    , current evidence suggests that these particles are non-toxic, do not penetrate into or through normal or compromised human skin and, therefore, pose no risk to human health. The increasing use of natural plant ingredients in personal care products raised new safety issues that require novel approaches to their safety evaluation similar to those of plant-derived food ingredients. For example, the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) is a promising tool to assess the safety of substances present at trace levels as well as minor ingredients of plant-derived substances. The potential human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients is increasingly estimated on the basis of in vitro skin penetration data. However, new evidence suggests that the in vitro test may overestimate human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients due to the absence of metabolism in cadaver skin or misclassification of skin residues that, in vivo, remain in the stratum corneum or hair follicle openings, i.e. outside the living skin. Overall, today's safety assessment of PCP and their ingredients is not only based on science, but also on their respective regulatory status as well as other issues, such as the ethics of animal testing. Nevertheless, the record shows that today's PCP are safe and offer multiple benefits to quality of life and health of the consumer. In the interest of all stakeholders, consumers, regulatory bodies and producers, there is an urgent need for an international harmonization on the status and safety requirements of these products and their ingredients.

  1. Safety assessment of personal care products/cosmetics and their ingredients.

    PubMed

    Nohynek, Gerhard J; Antignac, Eric; Re, Thomas; Toutain, Herve

    2010-03-01

    , current evidence suggests that these particles are non-toxic, do not penetrate into or through normal or compromised human skin and, therefore, pose no risk to human health. The increasing use of natural plant ingredients in personal care products raised new safety issues that require novel approaches to their safety evaluation similar to those of plant-derived food ingredients. For example, the Threshold of Toxicological Concern (TTC) is a promising tool to assess the safety of substances present at trace levels as well as minor ingredients of plant-derived substances. The potential human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients is increasingly estimated on the basis of in vitro skin penetration data. However, new evidence suggests that the in vitro test may overestimate human systemic exposure to PCP ingredients due to the absence of metabolism in cadaver skin or misclassification of skin residues that, in vivo, remain in the stratum corneum or hair follicle openings, i.e. outside the living skin. Overall, today's safety assessment of PCP and their ingredients is not only based on science, but also on their respective regulatory status as well as other issues, such as the ethics of animal testing. Nevertheless, the record shows that today's PCP are safe and offer multiple benefits to quality of life and health of the consumer. In the interest of all stakeholders, consumers, regulatory bodies and producers, there is an urgent need for an international harmonization on the status and safety requirements of these products and their ingredients. PMID:20005888

  2. Anterior skull base oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Vivanco, Blanca; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José L

    2013-03-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed of oncocytes (ie, epithelial cells with a large cytoplasm that is rich in mitochondria). Most cases are benign and originate from the salivary glands. Although there have been a few reported cases of oncocytomas being found in the sinonasal tract, most if not all cases seem not to involve the anterior skull base. We report a rare case of oncocytoma involving the anterior skull base occurring in a 44-year-old male patient. Preoperative carotid angiography and selective embolization was performed. The patient underwent an expanded endoscopic endonasal anterior craniofacial resection, which allowed complete resection of the tumor, with a low morbidity. The pathological diagnosis was oncocytoma. At 36 months after the initial treatment, the patient is free of disease. Based on our literature search, this may be the first such reported case. A brief review of the available literature examining the known body of knowledge regarding these neoplasms is presented.

  3. Lidar base specification

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heidemann, Hans Karl.

    2012-01-01

    Lidar is a fast evolving technology, and much has changed in the industry since the final draft of the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” was written. Lidar data have improved in accuracy and spatial resolution, geospatial accuracy standards have been revised by the American Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing (ASPRS), industry standard file formats have been expanded, additional applications for lidar have become accepted, and the need for interoperable data across collections has been realized. This revision to the “Lidar Base Specification Version 1.0” publication addresses those changes and provides continued guidance towards a nationally consistent lidar dataset.

  4. Protein based Block Copolymers

    PubMed Central

    Rabotyagova, Olena S.; Cebe, Peggy; Kaplan, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering have led to the synthesis of protein-based block copolymers with control of chemistry and molecular weight, resulting in unique physical and biological properties. The benefits from incorporating peptide blocks into copolymer designs arise from the fundamental properties of proteins to adopt ordered conformations and to undergo self-assembly, providing control over structure formation at various length scales when compared to conventional block copolymers. This review covers the synthesis, structure, assembly, properties, and applications of protein-based block copolymers. PMID:21235251

  5. Process-based costing.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert H; Bott, Marjorie J; Forbes, Sarah; Redford, Linda; Swagerty, Daniel L; Taunton, Roma Lee

    2003-01-01

    Understanding how quality improvement affects costs is important. Unfortunately, low-cost, reliable ways of measuring direct costs are scarce. This article builds on the principles of process improvement to develop a costing strategy that meets both criteria. Process-based costing has 4 steps: developing a flowchart, estimating resource use, valuing resources, and calculating direct costs. To illustrate the technique, this article uses it to cost the care planning process in 3 long-term care facilities. We conclude that process-based costing is easy to implement; generates reliable, valid data; and allows nursing managers to assess the costs of new or modified processes.

  6. Model based manipulator control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrosky, Lyman J.; Oppenheim, Irving J.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of using model based control (MBC) for robotic manipulators was investigated. A double inverted pendulum system was constructed as the experimental system for a general study of dynamically stable manipulation. The original interest in dynamically stable systems was driven by the objective of high vertical reach (balancing), and the planning of inertially favorable trajectories for force and payload demands. The model-based control approach is described and the results of experimental tests are summarized. Results directly demonstrate that MBC can provide stable control at all speeds of operation and support operations requiring dynamic stability such as balancing. The application of MBC to systems with flexible links is also discussed.

  7. Performance-Based Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ERIC Review, 1994

    1994-01-01

    "The ERIC Review" is published three times a year and announces research results, publications, and new programs relevant to each issue's theme topic. This issue explores performance-based assessment via two principal articles: "Performance Assessment" (Lawrence M. Rudner and Carol Boston); and "Alternative Assessment: Implications for Social…

  8. Protein Crystal Based Nanomaterials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Jeffrey A.; VanRoey, Patrick

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report on a NASA Grant. It concerns a description of work done, which includes: (1) Protein crystals cross-linked to form fibers; (2) Engineering of protein to favor crystallization; (3) Better knowledge-based potentials for protein-protein contacts; (4) Simulation of protein crystallization.

  9. Space based OTV servicing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcallister, J. G.

    1984-01-01

    Space based servicing of an orbit transfer vehicle (OTV) was previously outlined in sufficient detail to arrive at OTV and support system servicing requirements. Needed space station facilities and their functional requirements were identified. The impact of logistics and space serviceable design on the OTV design is detailed herein. RL10 derivative rocket engine inspection task times are enumerated.

  10. Developing Mobile Based Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Florence; Pastore, Raymond; Snider, Jean

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes an instructional design class's experience developing instruction for the mobile web. The class was taught at a southeastern university in the United States in a master's level computer based instruction course. Two example projects are showcased and student reflections on design issues are highlighted. Additionally,…

  11. Landscape-based Indicators

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report is based on data and experience gained through the GLNPO-funded Great Lakes Coastal Wetland Consortium (GLCWC) and the EPA-STAR funded Great Lakes Ecological Indicators Project (GLEI). EPA-MED author Trebitz and other MED personnel were collaborators on the GLEI proje...

  12. Drafting. Competency Based Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Everly, Al; And Others

    This competency based drafting curriculum is presented in seven specialization sections with units in each section containing a competency statement, performance objective, learning activities, evaluation, and quiz or problem sheets. Some units also contain answer sheets and/or handout sheets. Sections and number of units presented are (1) basic…

  13. Resource-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Sally, Ed.; Smith, Brenda, Ed.

    The selections in this book encompass a broad spectrum of resource-based learning experiences, and are intended to help teachers and administrators gain a better understanding of the concepts and devise effective and efficient ways to use these materials. Titles include: "Introducing Resources for Learning" (Sally Brown and Brenda Smith);…

  14. Lunar Base Sitting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staehle, Robert L.; Burke, James D.; Snyder, Gerald C.; Dowling, Richard; Spudis, Paul D.

    1993-01-01

    Speculation with regard to a permanent lunar base has been with us since Robert Goddard was working on the first liquid-fueled rockets in the 1920's. With the infusion of data from the Apollo Moon flights, a once speculative area of space exploration has become an exciting possibility. A Moon base is not only a very real possibility, but is probably a critical element in the continuation of our piloted space program. This article, originally drafted by World Space Foundation volunteers in conjuction with various academic and research groups, examines some of the strategies involved in selecting an appropriate site for such a lunar base. Site selection involves a number of complex variables, including raw materials for possible rocket propellant generation, hot an cold cycles, view of the sky (for astronomical considerations, among others), geological makeup of the region, and more. This article summarizes the key base siting considerations and suggests some alternatives. Availability of specific resources, including energy and certain minerals, is critical to success.

  15. "Comunidades de Base" Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ozar, Lorraine A.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the objectives of a proposal to create two Catholic "base community" schools in Hispanic communities in Chicago, which will allow parents full participation and infuse neighborhoods with hope. Discusses several broad assumptions about the role of the schools and steps to ensure schools are products of the community. (BCY)

  16. Team Based Work. Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This document contains three papers from a symposium on team-based work in human resource development (HRD). "Toward Transformational Learning in Organizations: Effects of Model-II Governing Variables on Perceived Learning in Teams" (Blair K. Carruth) summarizes a study that indicated that, regardless of which Model-II variable (valid information,…

  17. Service-based Solutions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cummings, Lynda; Winston, Michael

    1998-01-01

    Describes the Solutions model used at Shelley High School in Idaho which gives students the opportunity to gain practical experience while tackling community problems. This approach is built on the three fundamentals of an integrated curriculum, a problem-solving focus, and service-based learning. Sample problems include increasing certain trout…

  18. SUPERCONDUCTING VANADIUM BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Cleary, H.J.

    1958-10-21

    A new vanadium-base alloy which possesses remarkable superconducting properties is presented. The alloy consists of approximately one atomic percent of palladium, the balance being vanadium. The alloy is stated to be useful in a cryotron in digital computer circuits.

  19. Project-Based Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krajcik, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Project-based science is an exciting way to teach science that aligns with the "Next Generation Science Standards" ("NGSS"). By focusing on core ideas along with practices and crosscutting concepts, classrooms become learning environments where teachers and students engage in science by designing and carrying out…

  20. Concept-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schill, Bethany; Howell, Linda

    2011-01-01

    A major part of developing concept-based instruction is the use of an overarching idea to provide a conceptual lens through which students view the content of a particular subject. By using a conceptual lens to focus learning, students think at a much deeper level about the content and its facts (Erickson 2007). Therefore, the authors collaborated…

  1. WATERSHED BASED SURVEY DESIGNS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development of watershed-based design and assessment tools will help to serve the multiple goals for water quality monitoring required under the Clean Water Act, including assessment of regional condition to meet Section 305(b), identification of impaired water bodies or wate...

  2. Resource-Based Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Margie Klink

    1999-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of publications related to resource-based learning, which is defined as a student-centered learning environment grounded in learning theory in which the teacher and the library-media specialist collaborate to help students with information needs, information retrieval, analyzing and synthesizing the information,…

  3. Computer Based Library Orientation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machalow, Robert

    This document presents computer-based lessons used to teach basic library skills to college students at York College of the City University of New York. The information for library orientation has been entered on a disk which must be used in conjunction with a word processing program, the Applewriter IIe, and an Apple IIe microcomputer. The…

  4. A Mars base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soule, Veronique

    1989-01-01

    This study was initiated to provide an approach to the development of a permanently manned Mars base. The objectives for a permanently manned Mars base are numerous. Primarily, human presence on Mars will allow utilization of new resources for the improvement of the quality of life on Earth, allowing for new discoveries in technologies, the solar system, and human physiology. Such a mission would also encourage interaction between different countries, increasing international cooperation and leading to a stronger unification of mankind. Surface studies of Mars, scientific experiments in the multiple fields, the research for new minerals, and natural resource production are more immediate goals of the Mars mission. Finally, in the future, colonization of Mars will ensure man's perpetual presence in the universe. Specific objectives of this study were: (1) to design a Mars habitat that minimizes the mass delivered to the Mars surface, provides long-stay capability for the base crew, and accommodates future expansion and modification; (2) to develop a scenario of the construction of a permanently manned Mars base; and (3) to incorporate new and envisioned technologies.

  5. Acid-Base Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamm, L Lee; Nakhoul, Nazih; Hering-Smith, Kathleen S

    2015-12-01

    Acid-base homeostasis and pH regulation are critical for both normal physiology and cell metabolism and function. The importance of this regulation is evidenced by a variety of physiologic derangements that occur when plasma pH is either high or low. The kidneys have the predominant role in regulating the systemic bicarbonate concentration and hence, the metabolic component of acid-base balance. This function of the kidneys has two components: reabsorption of virtually all of the filtered HCO3(-) and production of new bicarbonate to replace that consumed by normal or pathologic acids. This production or generation of new HCO3(-) is done by net acid excretion. Under normal conditions, approximately one-third to one-half of net acid excretion by the kidneys is in the form of titratable acid. The other one-half to two-thirds is the excretion of ammonium. The capacity to excrete ammonium under conditions of acid loads is quantitatively much greater than the capacity to increase titratable acid. Multiple, often redundant pathways and processes exist to regulate these renal functions. Derangements in acid-base homeostasis, however, are common in clinical medicine and can often be related to the systems involved in acid-base transport in the kidneys.

  6. LOGO Based Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yusuf, Mian Muhammad

    Findings of a 1989 research study on LOGO-based instruction for teaching abstract concepts of geometry are reported in an effort to encourage mathematics teachers to use the LOGO language in computer-assisted instruction. Thirty-three ninth graders (19 males and 14 females) (6 white students and 27 black students) were involved in the controlled…

  7. Polymer based tunneling sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cui, Tianhong (Inventor); Wang, Jing (Inventor); Zhao, Yongjun (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A process for fabricating a polymer based circuit by the following steps. A mold of a design is formed through a lithography process. The design is transferred to a polymer substrate through a hot embossing process. A metal layer is then deposited over at least part of said design and at least one electrical lead is connected to said metal layer.

  8. Skull Base Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    In skull base tumors associated with a low radiosensitivity for conventional radiotherapy (RT), irradiation with proton or carbon ion beams facilitates a safe and accurate application of high tumor doses due to the favorable beam localization properties of these particle beams. Cranial nerves, the brain stem and normal brain tissue can at the same time be optimally spared.

  9. Space base antenna study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deerkoski, L. F.

    1971-01-01

    The field of view required of the space base antenna is defined for both the tracking and data relay satellite link and detached module links. The gain requirements are established and the feasibility of alternative antenna configurations using phased arrays and reflectors are considered. One recommended and one alternative configuration are presented for each of the required links.

  10. Risk Assessment: Evidence Base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson-Throop, Kathy A.

    2007-01-01

    Human systems PRA (Probabilistic Risk Assessment: a) Provides quantitative measures of probability, consequence, and uncertainty; and b) Communicates risk and informs decision-making. Human health risks rated highest in ISS PRA are based on 1997 assessment of clinical events in analog operational settings. Much work remains to analyze remaining human health risks identified in Bioastronautics Roadmap.

  11. Problem-Based Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Deborah E.; Donham, Richard S.; Bernhardt, Stephen A.

    2011-01-01

    In problem-based learning (PBL), students working in collaborative groups learn by resolving complex, realistic problems under the guidance of faculty. There is some evidence of PBL effectiveness in medical school settings where it began, and there are numerous accounts of PBL implementation in various undergraduate contexts, replete with…

  12. Performance-based ratemaking

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, P.S.

    1995-07-15

    Performance-based ratemaking (PBR) departs from the cost-of-service standard in setting just and reasonable utility rates, but that departure isn`t as easy as it looks. Up until now, cost-of-service ratemaking has provided relatively stable rates, while enabling utilities to attract enormous amounts of capital. Of late, however, regulators appear to be heeding the argument that changing markets warrant a second look. Throughout the country and across the utility industry, some regulators appear willing to abandon cost of service as a proxy for competition, instead favoring performance-based methods that would rely on competitive forces. These performance-based schemes vary in their details but generally afford utilities the opportunity to increase profits by exceeding targets for efficiency and cost savings. Moreover, these plans purport to streamline the regulatory process. Annual, accounting-type reviews replace rate hearings. Cost-of-service studies might not be required at all once initial rates are fixed. Nevertheless, these PBR plans rely on cost-based rates as a starting point and still contain safeguards to protect ratepayers. PBR falls short of true deregulation. As the Massachusetts Department of Public Utilities noted recently in an order approving a PBR variant known as price-cap regulation for New England Telephone and Telegraph Co., `price-cap regulation is not deregulation; it is merely another way for regulators to control the rates charged by a firm.`

  13. School Based Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Children's Aid Society, 2012

    2012-01-01

    School Based Health Centers (SBHC) are considered by experts as one of the most effective and efficient ways to provide preventive health care to children. Few programs are as successful in delivering health care to children at no cost to the patient, and where they are: in school. For many underserved children, The Children's Aid Society's…

  14. Seasonal dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations driven by cave ventilation: Implications for and modeling of speleothem paleoclimate records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wong, C.I.; Banner, J.L.; Musgrove, M.

    2011-01-01

    A 4-year study in a central Texas cave quantifies multiple mechanisms that control dripwater composition and how these mechanisms vary at different drip sites. We monitored cave-air compositions, in situ calcite growth, dripwater composition and drip rate every 4-6weeks. Three groups of drip sites are delineated (Groups 1-3) based on geochemical variations in dripwater composition. Quantitative modeling of mineral-solution reactions within the host carbonate rock and cave environments is used to identify mechanisms that can account for variations in dripwater compositions. The covariation of Mg/Ca (and Sr/Ca) and Sr isotopes is key in delineating whether Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations are dictated by water-rock interaction (i.e., calcite or dolomite recrystallization) or prior calcite precipitation (PCP). Group 1 dripwater compositions reflects a narrow range of the extent of water-rock interaction followed by varying amounts of prior calcite precipitation (PCP). Group 2 dripwater compositions are controlled by varying amounts of water-rock interaction with little to no PCP influence. Group 3 dripwater compositions are dictated by variable extents of both water-rock interaction and PCP. Group 1 drip sites show seasonal variations in dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, whereas the other drip sites do not. In contrast to the findings of most previous dripwater Mg/Ca-Sr/Ca studies, these seasonal variations (at Group 1 drip sites) are independent of changes in water flux (i.e., rainfall and/or drip rate), and instead significantly correlate with changes in cave-air CO2 concentrations. These results are consistent with lower cave-air CO2, related to cool season ventilation of the cave atmosphere, enhancing calcite precipitation and leading to dripwater geochemical evolution via PCP. Group 1 dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca seasonality and evidence for PCP as a mechanism that can account for that seasonality, have two implications for many other regions where seasonal ventilation of caves

  15. Pentachlorophenol and hydroxylated polychlorinated biphenyl metabolites in umbilical cord plasma of neonates from coastal populations in Québec.

    PubMed Central

    Sandau, Courtney D; Ayotte, Pierre; Dewailly, Eric; Duffe, Jason; Norstrom, Ross J

    2002-01-01

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hydroxylated metabolites of PCBs (HO-PCBs) and octachlorostyrene (4-HO-HpCS), and pentachlorophenol (PCP) were determined in umbilical cord plasma samples from three different regions of Québec. The regions studied included two coastal areas where exposure to PCBs is high because of marine-food-based diets--Nunavik (Inuit people) and the Lower North Shore of the Gulf of St. Lawrence (subsistence fishermen)--and a southern Québec urban center where PCB exposure is at background levels (Québec City). The main chlorinated phenolic compound in all regions was PCP. Concentrations of PCP were not significantly different among regions (geometric mean concentration 1,670 pg/g, range 628-7,680 pg/g wet weight in plasma). The ratio of PCP to polychlorinated biphenyl congener number 153 (CB153) concentration ranged from 0.72 to 42.3. Sum HO-PCB (sigma HO-PCBs) concentrations were different among regions, with geometric mean concentrations of 553 (range 238-1,750), 286 (103-788), and 234 (147-464) pg/g wet weight plasma for the Lower North Shore, Nunavik, and the southern Québec groups, respectively. Lower North Shore samples also had the highest geometric mean concentration of sum PCBs (sum of 49 congeners; sigma PCBs), 2,710 (525-7,720) pg/g wet weight plasma. sigma PCB concentrations for Nunavik samples and southern samples were 1,510 (309-6,230) and 843 (290-1,650) pg/g wet weight plasma. Concentrations (log transformed) of sigma HO-PCBs and sigma PCBs were significantly correlated (r = 0.62, p < 0.001), as were concentrations of all major individual HO-PCB congeners and individual PCB congeners. In Nunavik and Lower North Shore samples, free thyroxine (T4) concentrations (log transformed) were negatively correlated with the sum of quantitated chlorinated phenolic compounds (sum PCP and sigma HO-PCBs; r = -0.47, p = 0.01, n = 20) and were not correlated with any PCB congeners or sigma PCBs. This suggests that PCP and

  16. Seasonal dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations driven by cave ventilation: Implications for and modeling of speleothem paleoclimate records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Corinne I.; Banner, Jay L.; Musgrove, MaryLynn

    2011-06-01

    A 4-year study in a central Texas cave quantifies multiple mechanisms that control dripwater composition and how these mechanisms vary at different drip sites. We monitored cave-air compositions, in situ calcite growth, dripwater composition and drip rate every 4-6 weeks. Three groups of drip sites are delineated (Groups 1-3) based on geochemical variations in dripwater composition. Quantitative modeling of mineral-solution reactions within the host carbonate rock and cave environments is used to identify mechanisms that can account for variations in dripwater compositions. The covariation of Mg/Ca (and Sr/Ca) and Sr isotopes is key in delineating whether Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca variations are dictated by water-rock interaction (i.e., calcite or dolomite recrystallization) or prior calcite precipitation (PCP). Group 1 dripwater compositions reflects a narrow range of the extent of water-rock interaction followed by varying amounts of prior calcite precipitation (PCP). Group 2 dripwater compositions are controlled by varying amounts of water-rock interaction with little to no PCP influence. Group 3 dripwater compositions are dictated by variable extents of both water-rock interaction and PCP. Group 1 drip sites show seasonal variations in dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca, whereas the other drip sites do not. In contrast to the findings of most previous dripwater Mg/Ca-Sr/Ca studies, these seasonal variations (at Group 1 drip sites) are independent of changes in water flux (i.e., rainfall and/or drip rate), and instead significantly correlate with changes in cave-air CO 2 concentrations. These results are consistent with lower cave-air CO 2, related to cool season ventilation of the cave atmosphere, enhancing calcite precipitation and leading to dripwater geochemical evolution via PCP. Group 1 dripwater Mg/Ca and Sr/Ca seasonality and evidence for PCP as a mechanism that can account for that seasonality, have two implications for many other regions where seasonal ventilation of

  17. Porous organoclay composite for the sorption of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pentachlorophenol from groundwater.

    PubMed

    Ake, C L; Wiles, M C; Huebner, H J; McDonald, T J; Cosgriff, D; Richardson, M B; Donnelly, K C; Phillips, T D

    2003-06-01

    Complex mixtures of hazardous chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in contaminated soil and groundwater can have severe and long-lasting effects on health. The evidence that these contaminants can cause adverse health effects in animals and humans is rapidly expanding. The frequent and wide-spread occurrence of PAHs in groundwater makes appropriate intervention strategies for their remediation highly desirable. The core objective of this research was to assess the ability of a clay-based composite to sorb and remove toxic contaminants from groundwater at a wood-preserving chemical waste site. Treatment efficiencies were evaluated using either effluent from an oil-water separator (OWS) or a bioreactor (B2). The effluent water from these units was passed through fixed bed columns containing either an organoclay composite or granular activated carbon. The sorbent columns were placed in-line using existing sampling ports at the effluent of the OWS or B2. Individual one-liter samples of treated and untreated effluent were collected in Kimax bottles over the course of 78 h (total of 50 samples). Subsequently each sample was extracted by solid phase extraction methodology, and pentachlorophenol (PCP) and PAH concentrations were quantitated via GC/MS. Columns containing porous organoclay composite, i.e. sand-immobilized cetylpyridinium-exchanged low-pH montmorillonite clay (CP/LPHM), were shown to reduce the contaminant load from the OWS effluent stream by 97%. The concentrations of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) and PCP were considerably reduced (i.e. >99%). An effluent stream from the bioreactor was also filtered through columns packed with composite or an equivalent amount of GAC. Although the composite reduced the majority of contaminants (including BaP and PCP), it was less effective in diminishing the levels of lower ring versus higher ring PAHs. Conversely, GAC was more effective in removing the lower ring PAHs, except for naphthalene and PCP. The

  18. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseny, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry D.; Lindbergh, Charles

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar base subjected to 1-atm internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design (1) during construction, (2) under pressurization, and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the airtightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the Moon.

  19. Concrete lunar base investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, T. D.; Senseney, Jonathan A.; Arp, Larry Dean; Lindbergh, Charles

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents results of structural analyses and a preliminary design of a precast, prestressed concrete lunar based subjected to one atmosphere internal pressure. The proposed infrastructure measures 120 ft in diameter and 72 ft in height, providing 33,000 sq ft of work area for scientific and industrial operations. Three loading conditions were considered in the design: (1) during construction; (2) under pressurization; and (3) during an air-leak scenario. A floating foundation, capable of rigid body rotation and translation as the lunar soil beneath it yields, was developed to support the infrastructure and to ensure the air-tightness of the system. Results reveal that it is feasible to use precast, prestressed concrete for construction of large lunar bases on the moon.

  20. WormBase 2007

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Anthony; Antoshechkin, Igor; Bieri, Tamberlyn; Blasiar, Darin; Bastiani, Carol; Canaran, Payan; Chan, Juancarlos; Chen, Wen J.; Davis, Paul; Fernandes, Jolene; Fiedler, Tristan J.; Han, Michael; Harris, Todd W.; Kishore, Ranjana; Lee, Raymond; McKay, Sheldon; Müller, Hans-Michael; Nakamura, Cecilia; Ozersky, Philip; Petcherski, Andrei; Schindelman, Gary; Schwarz, Erich M.; Spooner, Will; Tuli, Mary Ann; Van Auken, Kimberly; Wang, Daniel; Wang, Xiaodong; Williams, Gary; Yook, Karen; Durbin, Richard; Stein, Lincoln D.; Spieth, John; Sternberg, Paul W.

    2008-01-01

    WormBase (www.wormbase.org) is the major publicly available database of information about Caenorhabditis elegans, an important system for basic biological and biomedical research. Derived from the initial ACeDB database of C. elegans genetic and sequence information, WormBase now includes the genomic, anatomical and functional information about C. elegans, other Caenorhabditis species and other nematodes. As such, it is a crucial resource not only for C. elegans biologists but the larger biomedical and bioinformatics communities. Coverage of core areas of C. elegans biology will allow the biomedical community to make full use of the results of intensive molecular genetic analysis and functional genomic studies of this organism. Improved search and display tools, wider cross-species comparisons and extended ontologies are some of the features that will help scientists extend their research and take advantage of other nematode species genome sequences. PMID:17991679

  1. Space construction data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Construction of large systems in space is a technology requiring the development of construction methods to deploy, assemble, and fabricate the elements comprising such systems. A construction method is comprised of all essential functions and operations and related support equipment necessary to accomplish a specific construction task in a particular way. The data base objective is to provide to the designers of large space systems a compendium of the various space construction methods which could have application to their projects.

  2. [Evidence based medicine].

    PubMed

    Cuestas, Eduardo

    2005-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is a systematic method employed to secure the best scientific available evidence when making clinical decisions. Several steps are taken in these process, describing a clinical scenario, formulating a specific clinical question, searching the literature for the pertinent studies, selecting the relevant articles using rules of evidence, understanding and calculating measures of effect, and finally incorporating the evidence and patients preferences in the clinical decision process.

  3. Pavement base drain evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoffman, G. L.

    1981-06-01

    Portions of a highway drainage system design was revised. Essentially, the longitudinal drainage trench was moved closer to the pavement/shoulder joint, and the fine concrete sand layer was eliminated as a trench backfill material. The specified backfill material is a coarser crushed aggregate (pea gravel). An evaluation of the effects of these changes on pavement performance is given and the new pavement base drain system is compared to the older pipe foundation underdrain system at the same site.

  4. Graphene-based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A. A.; Davydov, V. Yu.; Novikov, S. N.; Litvin, D. P.; Makarov, Yu. N.; Klimovich, V. B.; Samoilovich, M. P.

    2016-07-01

    Results of developing and testing graphene-based sensors capable of detecting protein molecules are presented. The biosensor operation was checked using an immunochemical system comprising fluorescein dye and monoclonal antifluorescein antibodies. The sensor detects fluorescein concentration on a level of 1-10 ng/mL and bovine serum albumin-fluorescein conjugate on a level of 1-5 ng/mL. The proposed device has good prospects for use for early diagnostics of various diseases.

  5. Refrigerator Based on Chemisorption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Jack A.

    1987-01-01

    Reversible chemical reaction generates pressurized oxygen for cooling. Concept for cryogenic refrigerator based on chemical absorption of oxygen by praseodymium/cerium oxide (PCO) compound. Refrigerator produces cryogenic liquid for cooling infrared sensors. Also used for liquefying air and separating oxygen from nitrogen in air. In chemisorption refrigerator, PCO alternately absorbs and desorbs oxygen depending on whether cooled or heated. One pair of compressors accepts oxygen while others releases it. Compressed oxygen liquefied when precooked and expanded.

  6. Flock-based microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Hitzbleck, Martina; Lovchik, Robert D; Delamarche, Emmanuel

    2013-05-21

    Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  7. Space Based Communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, James; Denson, Erik; Valencia, Lisa; Birr, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Current space lift launches on the Eastern and Western Range require extensive ground-based real-time tracking, communications and command/control systems. These are expensive to maintain and operate and cover only limited geographical areas. Future spaceports will require new technologies to provide greater launch and landing opportunities, support simultaneous missions, and offer enhanced decision support models and simulation capabilities. These ranges must also have lower costs and reduced complexity while continuing to provide unsurpassed safety to the public, flight crew, personnel, vehicles and facilities. Commercial and government space-based assets for tracking and communications offer many attractive possibilities to help achieve these goals. This paper describes two NASA proof-of-concept projects that seek-to exploit the advantages of a space-based range: Iridium Flight Modem and Space-Based Telemetry and Range Safety (STARS). Iridium Flight Modem uses the commercial satellite system Iridium for extremely low cost, low rate two-way communications and has been successfully tested on four aircraft flights. A sister project at Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) using the Globalstar system has been tested on one rocket. The basic Iridium Flight Modem system consists of a L1 carrier Coarse/Acquisition (C/A)-Code Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, an on-board computer, and a standard commercial satellite modem and antennas. STARS uses the much higher data rate NASA owned Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS), a C/A-Code GPS receiver, an experimental low-power transceiver, custom built command and data handler processor, and digitized flight termination system (FTS) commands. STARS is scheduled to fly on an F-15 at Dryden Flight Research Center in the spring of 2003, with follow-on tests over the next several years.

  8. Granular loess classification based

    SciTech Connect

    Browzin, B.S.

    1985-05-01

    This paper discusses how loess might be identified by two index properties: the granulometric composition and the dry unit weight. These two indices are necessary but not always sufficient for identification of loess. On the basis of analyses of samples from three continents, it was concluded that the 0.01-0.5-mm fraction deserves the name loessial fraction. Based on the loessial fraction concept, a granulometric classification of loess is proposed. A triangular chart is used to classify loess.

  9. Evidence-Based Anatomy

    PubMed Central

    Yammine, Kaissar

    2014-01-01

    Anatomy is a descriptive basic medical science that is no longer considered a research-led discipline. Many publications in clinical anatomy are prevalence studies treating clinically relevant anatomical variations and reporting their frequencies and/or associations with variables such as age, sex, side, laterality, and ancestry. This article discusses the need to make sense of the available literature. A new concept, evidence-based anatomy (EBA), is proposed to find, appraise, and synthetize the results reported in such publications. It consists in applying evidence-based principles to the field of epidemiological anatomy research through evidence synthesis using systematic reviews and meta-analyses to generate weighted pooled results. Pooled frequencies and associations based on large pooled sample size are likely to be more accurate and to reflect true population statistics and associations more closely. A checklist of a typical systematic review in anatomy is suggested and the implications of EBA for practice and future research, along with its scope, are discussed. The EBA approach would have positive implications for the future preservation of anatomy as a keystone basic science, for sound knowledge of anatomical variants, and for the safety of medical practice. Clin. Anat. 27:847–852, 2014. PMID:24797314

  10. Incretin-based therapies.

    PubMed

    Neumiller, Joshua J

    2015-01-01

    Incretin-based therapies are steadily gaining clinical popularity, with many more products in the developmental pipeline. Current treatment recommendations incorporate GLP-1 RAs and DPP-4 inhibitors as important agents for consideration in the treatment of T2DM owing to their low hypoglycemia risk, ability to address postprandial hyperglycemia (DPP-4 inhibitors and short-acting GLP-1 RAs), and potential for weight reduction (GLP-1 RAs). These properties may likewise prove advantageous in older adults in whom hypoglycemia is particularly undesirable, although older adults may be more prone to the nausea and vomiting associated with GLP-1 RA therapy. Other safety issues for incretin-based therapies, such as pancreatitis, C-cell hyperplasia, and renal failure, should be considered when choosing an appropriate patient to receive such therapies. Ongoing CV outcome studies will further inform the health care community regarding the CV safety of incretin-based therapies. The availability of both short-acting and long-acting GLP-1 RAs currently allows practitioners to consider individualized blood glucose trends and therapeutic needs when choosing an optimal agent. PMID:25456646

  11. Example based lesion segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2014-03-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer's disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  12. Mobile lunar base project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, I. A.; Shevchenko, V. V.

    1995-01-01

    An explorer must possess maximal mobility on the Moon if he is to discover natural anomalies most interesting for investigation. The same problem arises in the case of utilization of lunar natural resources. Moreover, according to lunar ecology requirements we should not destroy lunar surface layers over a wide area. For mining processes, many small plots should be chosen far away from each other. The concept of a mobile lunar manned base is proposed. The base structure consists of three vertical cylindrical modules placed into triangular (top view) girder construction. Each module is 5 meters in diameter with a height of 7 meters. The space around the cylinders is filled by a one meter protective layer of lunar soil. The ends of three vertical tube-type supports are put on the separate chassis. Total volume of living and working space is about 350 cubic meters. These modules are sized for a crew of nine. The velocity of the mobile lunar base is about 8 km per hour on a horizontal surface.

  13. AFE base flow computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Palmer, Grant

    1991-01-01

    Hypersonic wake flows behind the Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE) geometry are analyzed using two Navier-Stokes flow solvers. Many of the AFE wake features observed in ballistic-range shadowgraphs are simulated using a simple, two-dimensional semicylinder geometry at moderate angles of attack. At free-stream conditions corresponding to a Hypersonic Free Flight Facility (HFFF) AFE experiment, the three-dimensional base flow for the AFE geometry is computed using an ideal-gas, Navier-Stokes solver. The computed results agree reasonably well with the shadowgraphs taken at the HFFF. An ideal-gas and a nonequilibrium Navier-Stokes solver have been coupled and applied to the complete flow around the AFE vehicle at the free-stream conditions corresponding to a nomial trajectory point. Limitations of the coupled ideal-gas and nonequilibrium solution are discussed. The nonequilibrium base flow solution is analyzed for the wake radiation and the radiation profiles along various lines of sight are compared. Finally, the wake unsteadiness is predicted using experimental correlations and the numerical solutions. An adaptive grid code, SAGE, has been used in all the simulations to enhance the solution accuracy. The grid adaptation is found to be necessary in obtaining base flow solutions with accurate flow features.

  14. Example Based Lesion Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Snehashis; He, Qing; Carass, Aaron; Jog, Amod; Cuzzocreo, Jennifer L.; Reich, Daniel S.; Prince, Jerry; Pham, Dzung

    2016-01-01

    Automatic and accurate detection of white matter lesions is a significant step toward understanding the progression of many diseases, like Alzheimer’s disease or multiple sclerosis. Multi-modal MR images are often used to segment T2 white matter lesions that can represent regions of demyelination or ischemia. Some automated lesion segmentation methods describe the lesion intensities using generative models, and then classify the lesions with some combination of heuristics and cost minimization. In contrast, we propose a patch-based method, in which lesions are found using examples from an atlas containing multi-modal MR images and corresponding manual delineations of lesions. Patches from subject MR images are matched to patches from the atlas and lesion memberships are found based on patch similarity weights. We experiment on 43 subjects with MS, whose scans show various levels of lesion-load. We demonstrate significant improvement in Dice coefficient and total lesion volume compared to a state of the art model-based lesion segmentation method, indicating more accurate delineation of lesions.

  15. RNA based evolutionary optimization.

    PubMed

    Schuster, P

    1993-12-01

    The notion of an RNA world has been introduced for a prebiotic scenario that is dominated by RNA molecules and their properties, in particular their capabilities to act as templates for reproduction and as catalysts for several cleavage and ligation reactions of polynucleotides and polypeptides. This notion is used here also for simple experimental assays which are well suited to study evolution in the test tube. In molecular evolution experiments fitness is determined in essence by the molecular structures of RNA molecules. Evidence is presented for adaptation to environment in cell-free media. RNA based molecular evolution experiments have led to interesting spin-offs in biotechnology, commonly called 'applied molecular evolution', which make use of Darwinian trial-and-error strategies in order to synthesize new pharmacological compounds and other advanced materials on a biological basis. Error-propagation in RNA replication leads to formation of mutant spectra called 'quasispecies'. An increase in the error rate broadens the mutant spectrum. There exists a sharply defined threshold beyond which heredity breaks down and evolutionary adaptation becomes impossible. Almost all RNA viruses studied so far operate at conditions close to this error threshold. Quasispecies and error thresholds are important for an understanding of RNA virus evolution, and they may help to develop novel antiviral strategies. Evolution of RNA molecules can be studied and interpreted by considering secondary structures. The notion of sequence space introduces a distance between pairs of RNA sequences which is tantamount to counting the minimal number of point mutations required to convert the sequences into each other. The mean sensitivity of RNA secondary structures to mutation depends strongly on the base pairing alphabet: structures from sequences which contain only one base pair (GC or AU are much less stable against mutation than those derived from the natural (AUGC) sequences

  16. Lunar base initiative 1992

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koelle, H. H.

    The return to the Moon is no longer a question of yes or no, but a question of when and how. The first landing of a human being on the lunar surface in 1969 was a purely national effort of the U.S.A. Building a lunar base and operating it in the next century is rather a task for all nations of this planet, even if one nation could do it alone. However, there are several alternatives to carry out such a program and these will and should be debated during the next years on an urgent basis. To do this, one has to take into account not only the historical accomplishments and the present trends of cooperation in space programs, but also recent geopolitical developments as well as the frame of reference established by international law. The case for an International Lunar Base (ILB) has been presented to the International Academy of Astronautics on 11 October 1987 by the IAA Ad Hoc Committee "Return-to-the-Moon". This draft of a position paper was subsequently published in Acta Astronautica Vol. 17, No. 5, (pp. 463-489) with the request of public debate particularly by the members of the Academy. Some 80 Academicians responded to this invitation by the President of the Academy and voiced their opinions on the questions and issues raised by this draft of a position paper. This led to a refinement of the arguments and assumptions made and it is now possible to prepare an improved position paper proposing concrete steps which may lead to an ILB. An issue of this proportion must start with a discussion of goals and objectives to be arranged in some kind of a ranked order. It also has to take note of the limitations existing at any time by the availability of suitable space transportation systems. These will determine the acquisition date and rate of growth of a lunar base. The logistics system will also greatly influence the base characteristics and layout. The availability of heavy lift launch vehicles would simplify the task and allow to concentrate the construction

  17. Paraffin-wax-coated plates as matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization sample support for high-throughput identification of proteins by peptide mass fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Tannu, Nilesh S; Wu, Jian; Rao, Vamshi K; Gadgil, Himanshu S; Pabst, Michael J; Gerling, Ivan C; Raghow, Rajendra

    2004-04-15

    We compared trysin-digested protein samples desalted by ZipTip(C18) reverse-phase microcolumns with on-plate washing of peptides deposited either on paraffin-coated plates (PCP), Teflon-based AnchorChip plates, or stainless steel plates, before analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Trypsinized bovine serum albumin and ovalbumin and 16 protein spots extracted from silver-stained two-dimensional gels of murine C(2)C(12) myoblasts or human leukocytes, prepared by the above two methods, were subjected to MALDI on PCP, AnchorChip plates, or uncoated stainless steel plates. Although most peptide mass peaks were identical regardless of the method of desalting and concentrating of protein samples, samples washed and concentrated by the PCP-based method had peptide peaks that were not seen in the samples prepared using the ZipTip(C18) columns. The mass spectra of peptides desalted and washed on uncoated stainless steel MALDI plates were consistently inferior due to loss of peptides. Some peptides of large molecular masses were apparently lost from samples desalted by ZipTip(C18) microcolumns, thus diminishing the quality of the fingerprint needed for protein identification. We demonstrate that the method of washing of protein samples on paraffin-coated plates provides an easy, reproducible, inexpensive, and high-throughput alternative to ZipTip(C18)-based purification of protein prior to MALDI-TOF-MS analysis.

  18. DOM Based XSS Detecting Method Based on Phantomjs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Ri-Zhan; Ling, Jie; Liu, Yi

    Because malicious code does not appear in html source code, DOM based XSS cannot be detected by traditional methods. By analyzing the causes of DOM based XSS, this paper proposes a detection method of DOM based XSS based on phantomjs. This paper uses function hijacking to detect dangerous operation and achieves a prototype system. Comparing with existing tools shows that the system improves the detection rate and the method is effective to detect DOM based XSS.

  19. When the drug of choice is a drug of confusion: embalming fluid use in inner city Hartford, CT.

    PubMed

    Singer, Merrill; Mirhej, Greg; Shaw, Susan; Saleheen, Hassan; Vivian, James; Hastings, Erica; Rohena, Lucy; Jennings, DeShawn; Navarro, Juhem; Santelices, Claudia; Wu, Alan H B; Smith, Andrew; Perez, Alberto

    2005-01-01

    This paper examines the use of a new illicit drug--embalming fluid mixtures--in Hartford, CT based on a recent assessment of drug consumption in an outreach-recruited sample of 242 not-in-treatment active drug users. Sociodemographic, drug use, and health and social problems of drug users who do and do not use embalming fluid mixture are presented, revealing some notable differences between these two groups of street drug users. Despite regular consumption, we report that embalming fluid mixture users are often uncertain about what is in this new drug, despite experiencing often powerful effects. Urine toxicology findings from a subsample of individuals who used embalming fluid mixtures in the last 48 hours, reveal the frequent presence of phencyclidine (PCP) as well as other drugs. The public health implications of this new wave of PCP use are assessed.

  20. Biodegradation potential of a pentachlorophenol-degrading microbial consortium

    SciTech Connect

    Panneton, C.; Ramsay, J.; Mayer, R.; Chavarie, C.; Bertrand, J.L.

    1995-12-31

    A pentachlorophenol (PCP)-degrading consortium was obtained from contaminated soil after acclimatization to the three monochlorophenol isomers individually and then to PCP. In batch cultures, the consortium completely degraded PCP up to concentrations of 800 mg/L. In biometric flasks studies, the consortium mineralized 70% of {sup 14}C-PCP in an aqueous environment and 60% in contaminated soil slurries in less than 66 h, whereas noninoculated suspensions required 280 h to achieve the same extent of mineralization. In batch culture, a lag phase was always observed before degradation. When PCP was the sole source of carbon, the lag phase increased with the initial PCP concentration, but the specific degradation rate was constant for concentrations of 50 to 500 mg/L. When the number of cells in the inoculum was increased using a mixture of glucose and PCP, the specific PCP degradation rate was lower than when the inoculum was prepared with PCP as the sole source of carbon.

  1. Polyolefin-Based Aerogels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Je Kyun; Gould, George

    2012-01-01

    An organic polybutadiene (PB) rubberbased aerogel insulation material was developed that will provide superior thermal insulation and inherent radiation protection, exhibiting the flexibility, resiliency, toughness, and durability typical of the parent polymer, yet with the low density and superior insulation properties associated with the aerogels. The rubbery behaviors of the PB rubber-based aerogels are able to overcome the weak and brittle nature of conventional inorganic and organic aerogel insulation materials. Additionally, with higher content of hydrogen in their structure, the PB rubber aerogels will also provide inherently better radiation protection than those of inorganic and carbon aerogels. Since PB rubber aerogels also exhibit good hydrophobicity due to their hydrocarbon molecular structure, they will provide better performance reliability and durability as well as simpler, more economic, and environmentally friendly production over the conventional silica or other inorganic-based aerogels, which require chemical treatment to make them hydrophobic. Inorganic aerogels such as silica aerogels demonstrate many unusual and useful properties. There are several strategies to overcoming the drawbacks associated with the weakness and brittleness of silica aerogels. Development of the flexible fiber-reinforced silica aerogel composite blanket has proven one promising approach, providing a conveniently fielded form factor that is relatively robust toward handling in industrial environments compared to silica aerogel monoliths. However, the flexible silica aerogel composites still have a brittle, dusty character that may be undesirable, or even intolerable, in certain applications. Although the cross-linked organic aerogels such as resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF), polyisocyanurate, and cellulose aerogels show very high impact strength, they are also very brittle with little elongation (i.e., less rubbery). Also, silica and carbon aerogels are less efficient

  2. Knowledge based programming at KSC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tulley, J. H., Jr.; Delaune, C. I.

    1986-01-01

    Various KSC knowledge-based systems projects are discussed. The objectives of the knowledge-based automatic test equipment and Shuttle connector analysis network projects are described. It is observed that knowledge-based programs must handle factual and expert knowledge; the characteristics of these two types of knowledge are examined. Applications for the knowledge-based programming technique are considered.

  3. Potential-Based Achievement Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, Andrew; Murayama, Kou; Kobeisy, Ahmed; Lichtenfeld, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-based achievement goals use one's own intrapersonal trajectory as a standard of evaluation, and this intrapersonal trajectory may be grounded in one's past (past-based goals) or one's future potential (potential-based goals). Potential-based goals have been overlooked in the literature to date. Aims: The primary aim of the present…

  4. Characteristics Data Base

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, E.D.; Moore, R.S. )

    1990-08-01

    The LWR Serial Numbers Database System (SNDB) contains detailed data about individual, historically discharged LWR spent fuel assemblies. This data includes the reactor where used, the year the assemblies were discharged, the pool where they are currently stored, assembly type, burnup, weight, enrichment, and an estimate of their radiological properties. This information is distributed on floppy disks to users in the nuclear industry to assist in planning for the permanent nuclear waste repository. This document describes the design and development of the SNDB. It provides a complete description of the file structures and an outline of the major code modules. It serves as a reference for a programmer maintaining the system, or for others interested in the technical detail of this database. This is the initial version of the SNDB. It contains historical data through December 31, 1987, obtained from the Energy Information Administration (EIA). EIA obtains the data from the utility companies via the RW-859 Survey Form. It evaluates and standardizes the data and distributes the resulting batch level database as a large file on magnetic tape. The Characteristics Data Base obtains this database for use in the LWR Quantities Data Base. Additionally, the CDB obtains the individual assembly level detail from EIA for use in the SNDB. While the Quantities Data Base retains only the level of detail necessary for its reporting, the SNDB does retain and use the batch level data to assist in the identification of a particular assembly serial number. We expect to update the SNDB on an annual basis, as new historical data becomes available.

  5. Internet Based Remote Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamberlain, James

    1999-01-01

    This is the Final Report for the Internet Based Remote Operations Contract, has performed payload operations research support tasks March 1999 through September 1999. These tasks support the GSD goal of developing a secure, inexpensive data, voice, and video mission communications capability between remote payload investigators and the NASA payload operations team in the International Space Station (ISS) era. AZTek has provided feedback from the NASA payload community by utilizing its extensive payload development and operations experience to test and evaluate remote payload operations systems. AZTek has focused on use of the "public Internet" and inexpensive, Commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Internet-based tools that would most benefit "small" (e.g., $2 Million or less) payloads and small developers without permanent remote operations facilities. Such projects have limited budgets to support installation and development of high-speed dedicated communications links and high-end, custom ground support equipment and software. The primary conclusions of the study are as follows: (1) The trend of using Internet technology for "live" collaborative applications such as telescience will continue. The GSD-developed data and voice capabilities continued to work well over the "public" Internet during this period. 2. Transmitting multiple voice streams from a voice-conferencing server to a client PC to be mixed and played on the PC is feasible. 3. There are two classes of voice vendors in the market: - Large traditional phone equipment vendors pursuing integration of PSTN with Internet, and Small Internet startups.The key to selecting a vendor will be to find a company sufficiently large and established to provide a base voice-conferencing software product line for the next several years.

  6. Covering all the bases

    SciTech Connect

    Reimers, R.F.; Gross, M.P.

    1996-04-01

    The use of silent discharge plasma technology (SDPT) to treat volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at McClellan Air Force Base during a two-month test is described. SDPT was developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory and licensed to High Mesa Technologies. SDPT was used at McClellan to treat off-gases from air strippers, vapor-extraction systems, and incinerators at flow rates up to 10.4 scfm; destruction and removal efficiencies up to 99.4% were achieved. SDPT can also treat organic liquids by adding a packaged-bed reactor to the first stage system.

  7. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, Arnold C.

    1995-01-01

    An improved base drive circuit (10) having a level shifter (24) for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays (30, 32). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors (100, 106) through a corresponding pair of buffer components (88, 94). The non-linear delays (30, 32) provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors (100, 106) while an associated pair of transistors (72, 80) shunt the non-linear delays (30, 32) during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor (100, 106).

  8. Ground based automated telescope

    SciTech Connect

    Colgate, S.A.; Thompson, W.

    1980-01-01

    Recommendation that a ground-based automated telescope of the 2-meter class be built for remote multiuser use as a natural facility. Experience dictates that a primary consideration is a time shared multitasking operating system with virtual memory overlayed with a real time priority interrupt. The primary user facility is a remote terminal networked to the single computer. Many users must have simultaneous time shared access to the computer for program development. The telescope should be rapid slewing, and hence a light weight construction. Automation allows for the closed loop pointing error correction independent of extreme accuracy of the mount.

  9. Mars base buildup scenarios

    SciTech Connect

    Blacic, J.D.

    1985-01-01

    Two surface base build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second scenario, early development of an infrastructure to exploite the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first, but once begun develops rapidly aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station.

  10. NICKEL-BASE ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Inouye, H.; Manly, W.D.; Roche, T.K.

    1960-01-19

    A nickel-base alloy was developed which is particularly useful for the containment of molten fluoride salts in reactors. The alloy is resistant to both salt corrosion and oxidation and may be used at temperatures as high as 1800 deg F. Basically, the alloy consists of 15 to 22 wt.% molybdenum, a small amount of carbon, and 6 to 8 wt.% chromium, the balance being nickel. Up to 4 wt.% of tungsten, tantalum, vanadium, or niobium may be added to strengthen the alloy.

  11. Evidence-based medicine

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dheeraj; Sachdev, HPS

    2007-01-01

    Evidence based medicine is the practice of solving the clinical problems in one's practice by judicious and systematic use of the medical literature. This includes framing questions rightly and searching the right kind of literature. Thereafter, the available evidence needs to be evaluated for the validity, strength and effect size. Finally, the results are examined for applicability to the current problem which requires a detailed knowledge of the clinical setting, patient profile and the issues related to cost and harm. The present communication deals with these issues in a step-wise manner in order to stimulate readers to practise this important art. PMID:21124675

  12. Mars base buildup scenarios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blacic, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    Two Mars surface based build-up scenarios are presented in order to help visualize the mission and to serve as a basis for trade studies. In the first scenario, direct manned landings on the Martian surface occur early in the missions and scientific investigation is the main driver and rationale. In the second senario, Earth development of an infrastructure to exploit the volatile resources of the Martian moons for economic purposes is emphasized. Scientific exploration of the surface is delayed at first in this scenario relative to the first, but once begun develops rapidly, aided by the presence of a permanently manned orbital station.

  13. Synchrotron based proton drivers

    SciTech Connect

    Weiren Chou

    2002-09-19

    Proton drivers are the proton sources that produce intense short proton bunches. They have a wide range of applications. This paper discusses the proton drivers based on high-intensity proton synchrotrons. It gives a review of the high-intensity proton sources over the world and a brief report on recent developments in this field in the U.S. high-energy physics (HEP) community. The Fermilab Proton Driver is used as a case study for a number of challenging technical design issues.

  14. Internet-Based Communication

    PubMed Central

    Gernsbacher, Morton Ann

    2015-01-01

    Google the question, “How is the Internet changing the way we communicate?,” and you will find no shortage of opinions, or fears, about the Internet altering the way we communicate. Although the Internet is not necessarily making communication briefer (neither is the Internet making communication less formal), the Internet is manifesting our preference for writing over speaking. I propose that our preference for communicating through Internet-based text derives from a fundamental feature of writing: In contrast to speech, which is most often synchronous, text is most often asynchronous. PMID:26330702

  15. Commonality based interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moulton, Christine L.; Hepp, Jared J.; Harrell, John

    2016-05-01

    What interoperability is and why the Army wants it between systems is easily understood. Enabling multiple systems to work together and share data across boundaries in a co-operative manner will benefit the warfighter by allowing for easy access to previously hard-to-reach capabilities. How to achieve interoperability is not as easy to understand due to the numerous different approaches that accomplish the goal. Commonality Based Interoperability (CBI) helps establish how to achieve the goal by extending the existing interoperability definition. CBI is not an implementation, nor is it an architecture; it is a definition of interoperability with a foundation of establishing commonality between systems.

  16. TUNGSTEN BASE ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Schell, D.H.; Sheinberg, H.

    1959-12-15

    A high-density quaternary tungsten-base alloy having high mechanical strength and good machinability composed of about 2 wt.% Ni, 3 wt.% Cu, 5 wt.% Pb, and 90wt.% W is described. This alloy can be formed by the powder metallurgy technique of hot pressing in a graphite die without causing a reaction between charge and the die and without formation of a carbide case on the final compact, thereby enabling re-use of the graphite die. The alloy is formable at hot- pressing temperatures of from about 1200 to about 1350 deg C. In addition, there is little component shrinkage, thereby eliminating the necessity of subsequent extensive surface machining.

  17. Base drive circuit

    DOEpatents

    Lange, A.C.

    1995-04-04

    An improved base drive circuit having a level shifter for providing bistable input signals to a pair of non-linear delays. The non-linear delays provide gate control to a corresponding pair of field effect transistors through a corresponding pair of buffer components. The non-linear delays provide delayed turn-on for each of the field effect transistors while an associated pair of transistors shunt the non-linear delays during turn-off of the associated field effect transistor. 2 figures.

  18. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases.

  19. Accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Kreiner, A J; Baldo, M; Bergueiro, J R; Cartelli, D; Castell, W; Thatar Vento, V; Gomez Asoia, J; Mercuri, D; Padulo, J; Suarez Sandin, J C; Erhardt, J; Kesque, J M; Valda, A A; Debray, M E; Somacal, H R; Igarzabal, M; Minsky, D M; Herrera, M S; Capoulat, M E; Gonzalez, S J; del Grosso, M F; Gagetti, L; Suarez Anzorena, M; Gun, M; Carranza, O

    2014-06-01

    The activity in accelerator development for accelerator-based BNCT (AB-BNCT) both worldwide and in Argentina is described. Projects in Russia, UK, Italy, Japan, Israel, and Argentina to develop AB-BNCT around different types of accelerators are briefly presented. In particular, the present status and recent progress of the Argentine project will be reviewed. The topics will cover: intense ion sources, accelerator tubes, transport of intense beams, beam diagnostics, the (9)Be(d,n) reaction as a possible neutron source, Beam Shaping Assemblies (BSA), a treatment room, and treatment planning in realistic cases. PMID:24365468

  20. Sustainability Base Construction Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mewhinney, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Construction of the new Sustainability Base Collaborative support facility, expected to become the highest performing building in the federal government continues at NASA's Ames Research Center, Moffet Field, Calif. The new building is designed to achieve a platinum rating under the leadership in Energy and Environment Design (LEED) new construction standards for environmentally sustainable construction developed by the U. S. Green Building Council, Washington, D. C. When completed by the end of 2011, the $20.6 million building will feature near zero net energy consumption, use 90 percent less potable water than conventionally build buildings of equivalent size, and will result in reduced building maintenance costs.

  1. Effects of Copper-phenanthroline on Pentachlorophenol-induced Adaptation and Cell Death of Escherichia coli1

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue-Wen; Li, Rong-Gui; Wang, Xin; Zhou, Shuan-Hu

    2009-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effects of copper-phenanthroline (CuOP) on pentachlorophenol (PCP)-induced adaptation and cell death of Escherichia coli. Methods Bacterial growth and adaptation to PCP were monitored spectrophotometrically at 600 nm. Inactivation of bacterial cells was determined from colony count on agar dishes. Cellular ATP content and accumulation of PCP were assessed by chemiluminescence and HPLC analysis respectively. The formation of PCP-Cu-OP complex was shown by UV-visible spectra. Results Escherichia coli (E. coli) could adapt to PCP, a wood preservative and insecticide used in agriculture. The adaptation of E. coli to PCP prevented its death to the synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP plus PCP and declined cellular accumulation and uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation of PCP. Furthermore, CuOP and PCP neither produced reactive oxygen species (ROS) nor had a synergistic effect on uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation in E. coli. The synergistic cytotoxicity of CuOP and PCP in E. coli might be due to the formation of lipophilic PCP-Cu-OP complex. Conclusion Our data suggested that adaptation of E. coli to PCP decreased the synergistic effects of CuOP and PCP on prokaryotic cell death due to the formation of lipophilic PCP-Cu-OP complex, but it had no effect on the uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation and production of reactive oxygen species in E. coli. PMID:17624183

  2. Model Based Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rowe, Sidney E.

    2010-01-01

    In September 2007, the Engineering Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) created the Design System Focus Team (DSFT). MSFC was responsible for the in-house design and development of the Ares 1 Upper Stage and the Engineering Directorate was preparing to deploy a new electronic Configuration Management and Data Management System with the Design Data Management System (DDMS) based upon a Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Product Data Management (PDM) System. The DSFT was to establish standardized CAD practices and a new data life cycle for design data. Of special interest here, the design teams were to implement Model Based Definition (MBD) in support of the Upper Stage manufacturing contract. It is noted that this MBD does use partially dimensioned drawings for auxiliary information to the model. The design data lifecycle implemented several new release states to be used prior to formal release that allowed the models to move through a flow of progressive maturity. The DSFT identified some 17 Lessons Learned as outcomes of the standards development, pathfinder deployments and initial application to the Upper Stage design completion. Some of the high value examples are reviewed.

  3. Model-Based Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisch, Harold P.

    2007-01-01

    Engineers, who design systems using text specification documents, focus their work upon the completed system to meet Performance, time and budget goals. Consistency and integrity is difficult to maintain within text documents for a single complex system and more difficult to maintain as several systems are combined into higher-level systems, are maintained over decades, and evolve technically and in performance through updates. This system design approach frequently results in major changes during the system integration and test phase, and in time and budget overruns. Engineers who build system specification documents within a model-based systems environment go a step further and aggregate all of the data. They interrelate all of the data to insure consistency and integrity. After the model is constructed, the various system specification documents are prepared, all from the same database. The consistency and integrity of the model is assured, therefore the consistency and integrity of the various specification documents is insured. This article attempts to define model-based systems relative to such an environment. The intent is to expose the complexity of the enabling problem by outlining what is needed, why it is needed and how needs are being addressed by international standards writing teams.

  4. SPACE BASED INTERCEPTOR SCALING

    SciTech Connect

    G. CANAVAN

    2001-02-01

    Space Based Interceptor (SBI) have ranges that are adequate to address rogue ICBMs. They are not overly sensitive to 30-60 s delay times. Current technologies would support boost phase intercept with about 150 interceptors. Higher acceleration and velocity could reduce than number by about a factor of 3 at the cost of heavier and more expensive Kinetic Kill Vehicles (KKVs). 6g SBI would reduce optimal constellation costs by about 35%; 8g SBI would reduce them another 20%. Interceptor ranges fall rapidly with theater missile range. Constellations increase significantly for ranges under 3,000 km, even with advanced interceptor technology. For distributed launches, these estimates recover earlier strategic scalings, which demonstrate the improved absentee ratio for larger or multiple launch areas. Constellations increase with the number of missiles and the number of interceptors launched at each. The economic estimates above suggest that two SBI per missile with a modest midcourse underlay is appropriate. The SBI KKV technology would appear to be common for space- and surface-based boost phase systems, and could have synergisms with improved midcourse intercept and discrimination systems. While advanced technology could be helpful in reducing costs, particularly for short range theater missiles, current technology appears adequate for pressing rogue ICBM, accidental, and unauthorized launches.

  5. Nanotechnology-Based Cosmeceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Lohani, Alka; Verma, Anurag; Joshi, Himanshi; Yadav, Niti; Karki, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Cosmeceuticals are the fastest growing segment of the personal care industry, and a number of topical cosmeceutical treatments for conditions such as photoaging, hyperpigmentation, wrinkles, and hair damage have come into widespread use. In the cosmeceutical arena nanotechnology has played an important role. Using new techniques to manipulate matter at an atomic or molecular level, they have been at the root of numerous innovations, opening up new perspectives for the future of cosmeceutical industry. Nanotechnology-based cosmeceuticals offer the advantage of diversity in products, and increased bioavailability of active ingredients and increase the aesthetic appeal of cosmeceutical products with prolonged effects. However increased use of nanotechnology in cosmeceuticals has raised concern about the possible penetration of nanoparticles through the skin and potential hazards to the human health. This review outlines the different nanoparticles used in various classes of cosmeceuticals, nanotechnology-based cosmeceutical products present in the market, and the potential risk caused by nanoparticles on exposure and recent regulatory steps taken to overcome them. PMID:24963412

  6. Data base simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Pack, D. J.

    1982-03-01

    This document describes the features of and input to a computer program written for the purpose of generating data bases whose data values contain deterministically known errors. The development of the computer program was motivated by the need to assess automatic data editing procedures for data validation of real data bases. The observed values in the simulated data are the sum of generated true values and generated error values. For a given variable, true data values may be generated by any of the following six methods: frequency distribution, conditional frequency distribution, analysis of variance model, multiple regression model, ARIMA time series model, membership within a defined constrained region. The error values for a given variable may be simulated from an independent distribution or from a distribution dependent upon the error values of other specified variables. The computer program described can be used to satisfy other needs in the area of data simulation beyond the specific need expressed above. Since the addition of errors to the true values is optional, one may readily simulate observed data for variables using one or more of the six previously listed methods.

  7. Soils based productivity evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Hooks, C.

    1998-12-31

    Since the passage of SMCRA, reclamation success on agricultural lands has been determined by long-term yield testing. This required a long bond release period lasting ten years or more. Recently, landowners, mine operators, and regulators have voiced a need for methods to expedite the bond release process. The financial burdens of annual cropping and field maintenance by mine operators and monitoring by regulators are of major concern. Landowners need to have the land returned to their production operations instead of being locked in the bond release process for a decade or more. A soils based formula could relieve these financial burdens and ensure the most efficient process to return the productive soil resource to the landowner. In addition, this method will also identify problem fields immediately after reclamation. Currently, some fields undergo ten years of testing before a problem becomes evident. Once a problem is identified and remediation occurs, another period of testing is required. A soils based productivity index, currently being developed in Illinois, will be presented. This will include the basic concepts and findings from earlier research. The needs, benefits, and limitations will also be discussed.

  8. Moon base reactor system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chavez, H.; Flores, J.; Nguyen, M.; Carsen, K.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of our reactor design is to supply a lunar-based research facility with 20 MW(e). The fundamental layout of this lunar-based system includes the reactor, power conversion devices, and a radiator. The additional aim of this reactor is a longevity of 12 to 15 years. The reactor is a liquid metal fast breeder that has a breeding ratio very close to 1.0. The geometry of the core is cylindrical. The metallic fuel rods are of beryllium oxide enriched with varying degrees of uranium, with a beryllium core reflector. The liquid metal coolant chosen was natural lithium. After the liquid metal coolant leaves the reactor, it goes directly into the power conversion devices. The power conversion devices are Stirling engines. The heated coolant acts as a hot reservoir to the device. It then enters the radiator to be cooled and reenters the Stirling engine acting as a cold reservoir. The engines' operating fluid is helium, a highly conductive gas. These Stirling engines are hermetically sealed. Although natural lithium produces a lower breeding ratio, it does have a larger temperature range than sodium. It is also corrosive to steel. This is why the container material must be carefully chosen. One option is to use an expensive alloy of cerbium and zirconium. The radiator must be made of a highly conductive material whose melting point temperature is not exceeded in the reactor and whose structural strength can withstand meteor showers.

  9. Ground based infrared astronomy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.

    1988-01-01

    Infrared spectroscopic instrumentation has been developed for ground-based measurements of astrophysical objects in the intermediate infrared. A conventional Michelson interferometer is limited for astronomical applications in the intermediate infrared by quantum noise fluctuations in the radiation form the source and/or background incident on the detector, and the multiplex advantage is no longer available. One feasible approach to recovering the multiplex advantage is post-dispersion. The infrared signal after passing through telescope and interferometer, is dispersed by a low resolution grating spectrometer onto an array of detectors. The feasibility of the post-dispersion system has been demonstrated with observations of astrophysical objects in the 5 and 10 micrometer atmospheric windows from ground-based telescopes. During FY87/88 the post-disperser was used at the Kitt Peak 4-meter telescope and McMath telescope with facility Fourier transform spectrometers. Jupiter, Saturn, Mars, and Venus were observed. On Jupiter, the resolution at 12 micrometer was 0.01/cm, considerably higher than had been acheived previously. The spectrum contains Jovian ethane and acetylene emission. Construction was begun on the large cryogenic grating spectrometer.

  10. GC/MS analysis of piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile (PCC) smoking products

    SciTech Connect

    Lue, L.P.; Scimeca, J.A.; Thomas, B.F.; Martin, B.R.

    1986-03-05

    Piperidinocyclohexanecarbonitrile (PCC), an intermediate in phencyclidine (PCP) synthesis, is a major contaminant of illicit PCP. Due to the frequent abuse of PCP by smoking, this study was conducted to determine the PCC pyrolysis products delivered in smoke. Marihuana placebo cigarettes were impregnated with /sup 3/H-piperidino-/sup 14/C-cyano-PCC (synthesized in the lab and recrystallized twice, m.p. 67/sup 0/C) and burned under conditions which simulated smoking. Mainstream smoke was passed through glass wool filters and H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and NaOH traps. Tritium and /sup 14/C were recovered as 83%, and 56%, respectively, of the starting material. Seventy-six percent of the recovered tritium was found in the glass wool trap followed by 13, 7 and 4% in the acid trap, base trap and in the ash/unburned butt, respectively. Seventy-three percent of the recovered /sup 14/C was found in the glass wool filter and 16 and 8% were found in the acid and base traps, respectively. GC/MS analysis revealed the presence of 1-piperidinocyclohexene (30%), PCC (24%), piperidine (7%), and 1-acetyl-piperidine (5%).

  11. ECIL guidelines for preventing Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia in patients with haematological malignancies and stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Maertens, Johan; Cesaro, Simone; Maschmeyer, Georg; Einsele, Hermann; Donnelly, J Peter; Alanio, Alexandre; Hauser, Philippe M; Lagrou, Katrien; Melchers, Willem J G; Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Matos, Olga; Bretagne, Stéphane; Cordonnier, Catherine

    2016-09-01

    The 5th European Conference on Infections in Leukaemia (ECIL-5) meeting aimed to establish evidence-based recommendations for the prophylaxis of Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia (PCP) in non-HIV-infected patients with an underlying haematological condition, including allogeneic HSCT recipients. Recommendations were based on the grading system of the IDSA. Trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole given 2-3 times weekly is the drug of choice for the primary prophylaxis of PCP in adults ( A-II: ) and children ( A-I: ) and should be given during the entire period at risk. Recent data indicate that children may benefit equally from a once-weekly regimen ( B-II: ). All other drugs, including pentamidine, atovaquone and dapsone, are considered second-line alternatives when trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole is poorly tolerated or contraindicated. The main indications of PCP prophylaxis are ALL, allogeneic HSCT, treatment with alemtuzumab, fludarabine/cyclophosphamide/rituximab combinations, >4 weeks of treatment with corticosteroids and well-defined primary immune deficiencies in children. Additional indications are proposed depending on the treatment regimen. PMID:27550992

  12. International data base.

    PubMed

    Quick, S

    1984-12-01

    The concept of the International Data Base (IDB) grew from recognition of the need for timely, high quality information on the demographic, social and economic characteristics of foreign countries. During the past 2 decades, the Bureau of the Census, US Department of Commerce, has been compiling, analyzing and evaluating international demographic data and, to a lesser extent, socioeconomic data with particular emphasis on developing countries. In 1979, at the request of the Office of Women in Development at the Agency for International Development, a computerized data base of demographic and socioeconomic statistics that could be used to assess the status of women in developing countries was established. The major categories of data now being included in IDB are as follows: population by age and sex; vital rates, infant mortality and life tables; health and nutrition; fertility and child survivorship; migration; provinces and cities; family planning; ethnic, religious and language groups; literacy and education; labor force, employment, income and gross national product; and household size and housing indicators. The Bureau, through its Center for International Reserch (CIR), developed a computerized central depository of demographic, social and economic data for all countries of the world to serve the needs of the public and private sectors. The initial emphasis was on demographic and social data, since these subject areas are those for which a vast amount of data has already been compiled, analyzed and evaluated by CIR staff. However, meetings are being planned with users to determine the additional types of data that are desired, particularly in the economic and health-related areas. IDB includes data for all countries of the world, by urban and rural residence. The time coverage is from 1950 to the present. Data sources include: population and industrial censuses and surveys, administrative records, population registers, statistical publications, research

  13. Thermoset-Based Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhembe, Pele

    2002-03-01

    The field of polymer-Clay nanocomposites has attracted considerable attention as a method of enhancing polymer properties and extending their utility, by using molecular or nanoscale reinforcements rather than conventional particulate field microcomposites. Layered silicates dispersed as a reinforcing phase in a polymer matrix are one of the most important forms of such inorganic-organic nanocomposites, making them the subject of intense research. While a significant amount of work has been published on thermoplastic based nanocomposites, however, comparatively few studies of thermoset-based systems have been published. Thus, our research is centered on elucidating the structure-property relationships of thermoset-based nanocomposites. We have developed a series of layered silicate/thermoset nanocomposites using several thermoset polymers (epoxies(di and tetrafunctional), cyanate esters and PMR-15 polyimide). Wide angle X-ray diffraction suggests that intercalated morphologies were obtained for the cases studied. The glass transition temperature has been found to vary as the organic modifier and its amount is varied. For difunctional epoxy samples dispersed with Cloisite 30B, a commercially available nanoclay, the Tg increased by twenty degrees upon addition of as little as 2viscoelastic behavior of these materials has also been investigated using dynamic mechanical analysis. A modest increase in the glassy storage modulus was obtained as the amount of nanoclay increased, with a significant increase in the plateau modulus. Additionally, master curves have been generated using time-temperature superposition, allowing further analysis of the effect of the nanoclay on the relaxation behavior. Activation energies calculated from Arrhenius plots increase as the clay contents increase. These effects will be discussed in the presentation. The fracture toughness increased upon addition of nanoclays while the CTE decreased. Interestingly, the onset of decomposition

  14. MS Based Metabonomics

    SciTech Connect

    Want, Elizabeth J.; Metz, Thomas O.

    2010-03-01

    Metabonomics is the latest and least mature of the systems biology triad, which also includes genomics and proteomics, and has its origins in the early orthomolecular medicine work pioneered by Linus Pauling and Arthur Robinson. It was defined by Nicholson and colleagues in 1999 as the quantitative measurement of perturbations in the metabolite complement of an integrated biological system in response to internal or external stimuli, and is often used today to describe many non-global types of metabolite analyses. Applications of metabonomics are extensive and include toxicology, nutrition, pharmaceutical research and development, physiological monitoring and disease diagnosis. For example, blood samples from millions of neonates are tested routinely by mass spectrometry (MS) as a diagnostic tool for inborn errors of metabolism. The metabonome encompasses a wide range of structurally diverse metabolites; therefore, no single analytical platform will be sufficient. Specialized sample preparation and detection techniques are required, and advances in NMR and MS technologies have led to enhanced metabonome coverage, which in turn demands improved data analysis approaches. The role of MS in metabonomics is still evolving as instrumentation and software becomes more sophisticated and as researchers realize the strengths and limitations of current technology. MS offers a wide dynamic range, high sensitivity, and reproducible, quantitative analysis. These attributes are essential for addressing the challenges of metabonomics, as the range of metabolite concentrations easily exceeds nine orders of magnitude in biofluids, and the diversity of molecular species ranges from simple amino and organic acids to lipids and complex carbohydrates. Additional challenges arise in generating a comprehensive metabolite profile, downstream data processing and analysis, and structural characterization of important metabolites. A typical workflow of MS-based metabonomics is shown in Figure

  15. Information-based clustering

    PubMed Central

    Slonim, Noam; Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Tkačik, Gašper; Bialek, William

    2005-01-01

    In an age of increasingly large data sets, investigators in many different disciplines have turned to clustering as a tool for data analysis and exploration. Existing clustering methods, however, typically depend on several nontrivial assumptions about the structure of data. Here, we reformulate the clustering problem from an information theoretic perspective that avoids many of these assumptions. In particular, our formulation obviates the need for defining a cluster “prototype,” does not require an a priori similarity metric, is invariant to changes in the representation of the data, and naturally captures nonlinear relations. We apply this approach to different domains and find that it consistently produces clusters that are more coherent than those extracted by existing algorithms. Finally, our approach provides a way of clustering based on collective notions of similarity rather than the traditional pairwise measures. PMID:16352721

  16. Fiber based optofluidic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lismont, M.; Vandewalle, N.; Joris, B.; Dreesen, L.

    2014-09-01

    Medicinal diagnosis requires the development of innovative devices allowing the detection of small amounts of biological species. Among the large variety of available biosensors, the ones based on fluorescence phenomenon are really promising. Here, we show a prototype of the basic unit of a multi-sensing biosensor combining optics and microfluidics benefits. This unit makes use of two crossed optical fibers: the first fiber is used to carry small probe molecules droplets and excite fluorescence, while the second one is devoted to target molecules droplets transport and fluorescence detection. Within this scheme, the interaction takes place in each fiber node. The main benefits of this detection setup are the absence of fibers functionalization, the use of microliter volumes of target and probe species, their separation before interaction, and a better detection limit compared to cuvettes setups.

  17. Liaison based assembly design

    SciTech Connect

    Ames, A.; Kholwadwala, D.; Wilson, R.H.

    1996-12-01

    Liaison Based Assembly Design extends the current information infrastructure to support design in terms of kinematic relationships between parts, or liaisons. These liaisons capture information regarding contact, degrees-of-freedom constraints and containment relationships between parts in an assembly. The project involved defining a useful collection of liaison representations, investigating their properties, and providing for maximum use of the data in downstream applications. We tested our ideas by implementing a prototype system involving extensions to Pro/Engineer and the Archimedes assembly planner. With an expanded product model, the design system is more able to capture design intent. When a product update is attempted, increased knowledge availability improves our ability to understand the effect of design changes. Manufacturing and analysis disciplines benefit from having liaison information available, so less time is wasted arguing over incomplete design specifications and our enterprise can be more completely integrated.

  18. Institutionally based videoconferencing.

    PubMed

    Caudill, Robert Lee; Sager, Zachary

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of psychiatric care via video-teleconferencing (VTC) technology is thought to have reached a tipping point. As a medical speciality with relatively few material or technical requirements for service delivery, psychiatry has been one of the earliest to embrace the possibility of providing evaluations and treatment at a distance. Such technical infrastructure as is necessary can often be found in the institutions already in existence. It was natural therefore that institutionally based telepsychiatry would lay the foundation for the development of the field. In this article we review the history and development of institutional VTC in a wide variety of clinically supervised settings such as hospitals, outpatient clinics, and forensic settings. We cite evidence supporting institutionally sponsored use and expand on key takeaways for the development and expansion of videoconferencing in these settings. We also speculate on the future direction and development of psychiatric care provided by these arrangements. PMID:26507786

  19. Base isolation: Fresh insight

    SciTech Connect

    Shustov, V.

    1993-07-15

    The objective of the research is a further development of the engineering concept of seismic isolation. Neglecting the transient stage of seismic loading results in a widespread misjudgement: The force of resistance associated with velocity is mostly conceived as a source of damping vibrations, though it is an active force at the same time, during an earthquake type excitation. For very pliant systems such as base isolated structures with relatively low bearing stiffness and with artificially added heavy damping mechanism, the so called `damping`` force may occur even the main pushing force at an earthquake. Thus, one of the two basic pillars of the common seismic isolation philosophy, namely, the doctrine of usefulness and necessity of a strong damping mechanism, is turning out to be a self-deception, sometimes even jeopardizing the safety of structures and discrediting the very idea of seismic isolation. There is a way out: breaking with damping dependancy.

  20. Covariant mutually unbiased bases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmeli, Claudio; Schultz, Jussi; Toigo, Alessandro

    2016-06-01

    The connection between maximal sets of mutually unbiased bases (MUBs) in a prime-power dimensional Hilbert space and finite phase-space geometries is well known. In this article, we classify MUBs according to their degree of covariance with respect to the natural symmetries of a finite phase-space, which are the group of its affine symplectic transformations. We prove that there exist maximal sets of MUBs that are covariant with respect to the full group only in odd prime-power dimensional spaces, and in this case, their equivalence class is actually unique. Despite this limitation, we show that in dimension 2r covariance can still be achieved by restricting to proper subgroups of the symplectic group, that constitute the finite analogues of the oscillator group. For these subgroups, we explicitly construct the unitary operators yielding the covariance.

  1. Endoscopic Skull Base Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Senior, Brent A

    2008-01-01

    Endoscopic skull base surgery has undergone rapid advancement in the past decade moving from pituitary surgery to suprasellar lesions and now to a myriad of lesions extending from the cribriform plate to C2 and laterally out to the infratemporal fossa and petrous apex. Evolution of several technological advances as well as advances in understanding of endoscopic anatomy and the development of surgical techniques both in resection and reconstruction have fostered this capability. Management of benign disease via endoscopic methods is largely accepted now but more data is needed before the controversy on the role of endoscopic management of malignant disease is decided. Continued advances in surgical technique, navigation systems, endoscopic imaging technology, and robotics assure continued brisk evolution in this expanding field. PMID:19434274

  2. Surface Plasmon Based Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wig, Andrew; Passian, Ali; Boudreaux, Philip; Ferrell, Tom

    2008-03-01

    A spectrometer that uses surface plasmon excitation in thin metal films to separate light into its component wavelengths is described. The use of surface plasmons as a dispersive medium sets this spectrometer apart from prism, grating, and interference based variants and allows for the miniaturization of this device. Theoretical and experimental results are presented for two different operation models. In the first case surface plasmon tunneling in the near field is used to provide transmission spectra of different broad band-pass, glass filters across the visible wavelength range with high stray-light rejection at low resolution as well as absorption spectra of chlorophyll extracted from a spinach leaf. The second model looks at the far field components of surface plasmon scattering.

  3. Race-based therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Yancy, Clyde W

    2008-08-01

    The issue of race in medicine is problematic. Race is not a physiologic grouping, and all persons of a given race do not necessarily share the same clinical phenotype or genetic substrate. Despite clear signals that certain risk factors and diseases vary as a function of race, translating those differences into race-based therapeutics has been awkward and has done little to change the natural history of cardiovascular disease as it affects special populations. Among the varied special populations, the African American population appears to have the most significant and adverse variances for cardiovascular disease as well as worrisome signals that drug responsiveness varies. Recent guideline statements have now acknowledged certain treatment options that are most appropriate for African Americans with cardiovascular disease, especially hypertension and heart failure. As more physiologic markers of disease and drug responsiveness become available, the need for racial designations in medicine may lessen, and therapies can be optimized for all patients without regard to race or ethnicity.

  4. 3. SOUTH SIDE. Edwards Air Force Base, South Base ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. SOUTH SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, South Base Sled Track, Firing & Control Blockhouse for 10,000-foot Track, South of Sled Track at midpoint of 20,000-foot track, Lancaster, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications.

  6. Electrical Percolation Based Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Bruck, Hugh Alan; Yang, Minghui; Kostov, Yordan; Rasooly, Avraham

    2013-01-01

    A new approach to label free biosensing has been developed based on the principle of “electrical percolation”. In electrical percolation, long-range electrical connectivity is formed in randomly oriented and distributed systems of discrete elements. By applying this principle to biological interactions, it is possible to measure biological components both directly and electronically. The main element for electrical percolation biosensor is the biological semiconductor (BSC) which is a multi-layer 3-D carbon nanotube-antibody network. In the BSC, molecular interactions, such as binding of antigens to the antibodies, disrupt the network continuity causing increased resistance of the network. BSCs can be fabricated by immobilizing conducting elements, such as pre-functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs)-antibody complex, directly onto a substrate, such as a Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) surface (also known as plexi-glass or Acrylic). BSCs have been demonstrated for direct (label-free) electronic measurements of antibody-antigen binding using SWNTs. If the concentration of the SWNT network is slightly above the electrical percolation threshold, then binding of a specific antigen to the pre-functionalized SWNT dramatically increases the electrical resistance due to changes in the tunneling between the SWNTs. Using anti-Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB) IgG as a “gate” and SEB as an “actuator”, it was demonstrated that the BSC was able to detect SEB at concentrations of 1 ng/ml. Based on this concept, an automated configuration for BSCs is described here that enables real time continuous detection. The new BSC configuration may permit assembly of multiple sensors on the same chip to create “Biological Central Processing Units (CPUs)” with multiple biological elements, capable of processing and sorting out information on multiple analytes simultaneously. PMID:24041756

  7. DNA-based machines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fuan; Willner, Bilha; Willner, Itamar

    2014-01-01

    The base sequence in nucleic acids encodes substantial structural and functional information into the biopolymer. This encoded information provides the basis for the tailoring and assembly of DNA machines. A DNA machine is defined as a molecular device that exhibits the following fundamental features. (1) It performs a fuel-driven mechanical process that mimics macroscopic machines. (2) The mechanical process requires an energy input, "fuel." (3) The mechanical operation is accompanied by an energy consumption process that leads to "waste products." (4) The cyclic operation of the DNA devices, involves the use of "fuel" and "anti-fuel" ingredients. A variety of DNA-based machines are described, including the construction of "tweezers," "walkers," "robots," "cranes," "transporters," "springs," "gears," and interlocked cyclic DNA structures acting as reconfigurable catenanes, rotaxanes, and rotors. Different "fuels", such as nucleic acid strands, pH (H⁺/OH⁻), metal ions, and light, are used to trigger the mechanical functions of the DNA devices. The operation of the devices in solution and on surfaces is described, and a variety of optical, electrical, and photoelectrochemical methods to follow the operations of the DNA machines are presented. We further address the possible applications of DNA machines and the future perspectives of molecular DNA devices. These include the application of DNA machines as functional structures for the construction of logic gates and computing, for the programmed organization of metallic nanoparticle structures and the control of plasmonic properties, and for controlling chemical transformations by DNA machines. We further discuss the future applications of DNA machines for intracellular sensing, controlling intracellular metabolic pathways, and the use of the functional nanostructures for drug delivery and medical applications. PMID:24647836

  8. Base Research Program

    SciTech Connect

    Everett Sondreal; John Hendrikson

    2009-03-31

    In June 2009, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) completed 11 years of research under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Base Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-98FT40320 funded through the Office of Fossil Energy (OFE) and administered at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL). A wide range of diverse research activities were performed under annual program plans approved by NETL in seven major task areas: (1) resource characterization and waste management, (2) air quality assessment and control, (3) advanced power systems, (4) advanced fuel forms, (5) value-added coproducts, (6) advanced materials, and (7) strategic studies. This report summarizes results of the 67 research subtasks and an additional 50 strategic studies. Selected highlights in the executive summary illustrate the contribution of the research to the energy industry in areas not adequately addressed by the private sector alone. During the period of performance of the agreement, concerns have mounted over the impact of carbon emissions on climate change, and new programs have been initiated by DOE to ensure that fossil fuel resources along with renewable resources can continue to supply the nation's transportation fuel and electric power. The agreement has addressed DOE goals for reductions in CO{sub 2} emissions through efficiency, capture, and sequestration while expanding the supply and use of domestic energy resources for energy security. It has further contributed to goals for near-zero emissions from highly efficient coal-fired power plants; environmental control capabilities for SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, fine respirable particulate (PM{sub 2.5}), and mercury; alternative transportation fuels including liquid synfuels and hydrogen; and synergistic integration of fossil and renewable resources (e.g., wind-, biomass-, and coal-based electrical generation).

  9. Loyalty-based management.

    PubMed

    Reichheld, F F

    1993-01-01

    Despite a flurry of activities aimed at serving customers better, few companies have systematically revamped their operations with customer loyalty in mind. Instead, most have adopted improvement programs ad hoc, and paybacks haven't materialized. Building a highly loyal customer base must be integral to a company's basic business strategy. Loyalty leaders like MBNA credit cards are successful because they have designed their entire business systems around customer loyalty--a self-reinforcing system in which the company delivers superior value consistently and reinvents cash flows to find and keep high-quality customers and employees. The economic benefits of high customer loyalty are measurable. When a company consistently delivers superior value and wins customer loyalty, market share and revenues go up, and the cost of acquiring new customers goes down. The better economics mean the company can pay workers better, which sets off a whole chain of events. Increased pay boosts employee moral and commitment; as employees stay longer, their productivity goes up and training costs fall; employees' overall job satisfaction, combined with their experience, helps them serve customers better; and customers are then more inclined to stay loyal to the company. Finally, as the best customers and employees become part of the loyalty-based system, competitors are left to survive with less desirable customers and less talented employees. To compete on loyalty, a company must understand the relationships between customer retention and the other parts of the business--and be able to quantify the linkages between loyalty and profits. It involves rethinking and aligning four important aspects of the business: customers, product/service offering, employees, and measurement systems.

  10. Oligomerization state and pigment binding strength of the peridinin-Chl a-protein.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Hao; Lu, Xun; Lu, Yue; Cuneo, Matthew J; O'Neill, Hugh M; Urban, Volker; Lo, Cynthia S; Blankenship, Robert E

    2015-09-14

    The peridinin-chlorophyll a-protein (PCP) is one of the major light harvesting complexes (LHCs) in photosynthetic dinoflagellates. We analyzed the oligomeric state of PCP isolated from the dinoflagellate Symbiodinium, which has received increasing attention in recent years because of its role in coral bleaching. Size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) and small angle neutron scattering (SANS) analysis indicated PCP exists as monomers. Native mass spectrometry (native MS) demonstrated two oligomeric states of PCP, with the monomeric PCP being dominant. The trimerization may not be necessary for PCP to function as a light-harvesting complex. PMID:26241331

  11. Organising cells into tissues: new roles for cell adhesion molecules in planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Saburi, Sakura; McNeill, Helen

    2005-10-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) is the coordinated organization of cells within the plane of the epithelium, first described in Drosophila. A Frizzled signalling pathway dedicated to PCP (the non-canonical Frizzled pathway) acts through Dishevelled and small G proteins, as does the classical Wnt pathway, but then diverges downstream of Dishevelled. Recent studies have demonstrated a crucial role for several atypical cadherin molecules (Fat, Dachsous and Flamingo) in controlling PCP signalling. Recent work has also indicated that the first sign of PCP during development is the polarized localization of PCP proteins (Frizzled, Flamingo, Dishevelled, etc). Exciting new data reveal that this PCP pathway is conserved to man.

  12. ASCOT data base management system

    SciTech Connect

    Barbieri, J.; Nyholm, R.; Castro, C.; Hill, K.

    1980-07-01

    The ASCOT data base management system is designed to handle the data produced by both the experimental and theoretical efforts of the DOE Atmospheric Studies in Complex Terrain (ASCOT) project. The data base envisioned is hierarchically structured, sparse, and compact. Information concerning any given data file is stored in a directory file. The data base management system uses a relational data management approach. Presently three management schema are being developed for use with the data base. 5 figures.

  13. Verification of knowledge bases based on containment checking

    SciTech Connect

    Levy. A.Y.; Rousset, M.C.

    1996-12-31

    Building complex knowledge based applications requires encoding large amounts of domain knowledge. After acquiring knowledge from domain experts, much of the effort in building a knowledge base goes into verifying that the knowledge is encoded correctly. We consider the problem of verifying hybrid knowledge bases that contain both Horn rules and a terminology in a description logic. Our approach to the verification problem is based on showing a close relationship to the problem of query containment. Our first contribution, based on this relationship, is presenting a thorough analysis of the decidability and complexity of the verification problem, for knowledge bases containing recursive rules and the interpreted predicates =, {le}, < and {ne}. Second, we show that important new classes of constraints on correct inputs and outputs can be expressed in a hybrid setting, in which a description logic class hierarchy is also considered, and we present the first complete algorithm for verifying such hybrid knowledge bases.

  14. Bio-based backsheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Stanley B.

    2008-08-01

    A primary goal of Photovoltaics is to generate electricity while reducing reliance on the world's petroleum supply. However, PV backsheets are produced from petro-based chemicals, which, to a certain extent, defeat the purpose of using solar energy. Materials from three sustainable resources were targeted for PV backsheet development: PLA made from corn, a cellulosic made from cotton, and a type of nylon made from castor beans. Some of these films were coated with various materials to lower the WVTR. Modules produced using these backsheets were subjected to rigorous testing, including the damp heat test and the wet Hypot test as outlined in UL 1703. As cast PLA film tends to be very brittle. This problem is solved with additives or biaxial orientation. PLA film is UV stable and highly transparent which would merit it for consideration as a front glazing as well as for a backsheet. However, its moisture resistance is not robust. A cellulosic film made from cotton was considered which has a continuous duty temperature rating of 105°C. This product had to be modified significantly to convert it from a hydrophilic film to a hydrophobic one. Additionally, this material has an RTI value of 90°C. Nylon 11, produced from castor beans, is very interesting because it is bio-sustainable, but not biodegradable. It has improved moisture properties over the more common nylons, and has an RTI value of 105°C.

  15. Lunar base construction requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jolly, Steve; Helleckson, Brent

    1990-01-01

    The following viewgraph presentation is a review of the Lunar Base Constructibility Study carried out in the spring and summer of 1990. The objective of the study was to develop a method for evaluating the constructibility of Phase A proposals to build facilities on orbit or on extraterrestrial surfaces. Space construction was broadly defined as all forms of assembly, disassembly, connection, disconnection, deployment, stowage, excavation, emplacement, activation, test, transportation, etc., required to create facilities in orbit and on the surfaces of other celestial bodies. It was discovered that decisions made in the face of stated and unstated assumptions early in the design process (commonly called Phase A) can lock in non-optimal construction methods. Often, in order to construct the design, alterations must be made to the design during much later phases of the project. Such 'fixes' can be very difficult, expensive, or perhaps impossible. Assessing constructibility should thus be a part of the iterative design process, starting with the Phase A studies and continuing through production. This study assumes that there exists a minimum set of key construction requirements (i.e., questions whose answers form the set of discriminators) that must be implied or specified in order to assess the constructibility of the design. This set of construction requirements constitutes a 'constructibility filter' which then becomes part of the iterative design process. Five inherently different, dichotomous design reference missions were used in the extraction of these requirements to assure the depth and breath of the list.

  16. Alphavirus-based vaccines.

    PubMed

    Lundstrom, Kenneth

    2014-06-01

    Alphavirus vectors have demonstrated high levels of transient heterologous gene expression both in vitro and in vivo and, therefore, possess attractive features for vaccine development. The most commonly used delivery vectors are based on three single-stranded encapsulated alphaviruses, namely Semliki Forest virus, Sindbis virus and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus. Alphavirus vectors have been applied as replication-deficient recombinant viral particles and, more recently, as replication-proficient particles. Moreover, in vitro transcribed RNA, as well as layered DNA vectors have been applied for immunization. A large number of highly immunogenic viral structural proteins expressed from alphavirus vectors have elicited strong neutralizing antibody responses in multispecies animal models. Furthermore, immunization studies have demonstrated robust protection against challenges with lethal doses of virus in rodents and primates. Similarly, vaccination with alphavirus vectors expressing tumor antigens resulted in prophylactic protection against challenges with tumor-inducing cancerous cells. As certain alphaviruses, such as Chikungunya virus, have been associated with epidemics in animals and humans, attention has also been paid to the development of vaccines against alphaviruses themselves. Recent progress in alphavirus vector development and vaccine technology has allowed conducting clinical trials in humans.

  17. Lunar base heat pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldman, Jeffrey H.; Tetreault, R.; Fischbach, D.; Walker, D.

    1994-01-01

    A heat pump is a device which elevates the temperature of a heat flow by a means of an energy input. By doing this, the heat pump can cause heat to transfer faster from a warm region to a cool region, or it can cause heat to flow from a cool region to a warmer region. The second case is the one which finds vast commercial applications such as air conditioning, heating, and refrigeration. Aerospace applications of heat pumps include both cases. The NASA Johnson Space Center is currently developing a Life Support Systems Integration Facility (LSSIF, previously SIRF) to provide system-level integration, operational test experience, and performance data that will enable NASA to develop flight-certified hardware for future planetary missions. A high lift heat pump is a significant part of the TCS hardware development associated with the LSSIF. The high lift heat pump program discussed here is being performed in three phases. In Phase 1, the objective is to develop heat pump concepts for a lunar base, a lunar lander, and for a ground development unit for the SIRF. In Phase 2, the design of the SIRF ground test unit is being performed, including identification and evaluation of safety and reliability issues. In Phase 3, the SIRF unit will be manufactured, tested, and delivered to the NASA Johnson Space Center.

  18. Mentalization-Based Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bateman, Anthony; Fonagy, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The concept of mentalizing has captured the interest and imagination of an astonishing range of people—from psychoanalysts to neuroscientists, from child development researchers to geneticists, from existential philosophers to phenomenologists—all of whom seem to have found it useful. According to the Thompson Reuter maintained Web of Science, the use of the term in titles and abstracts of scientific papers increased from 10 to 2,750 between 1991 and 2011. Clinicians in particular have enthusiastically embraced the idea, and have put it to innovative use in their practices. Mentalization-based treatment (MBT)—making mentalizing a core focus of therapy—was initially developed for the treatment of borderline personality disorder (BPD) in routine clinical services delivered in group and individual modalities. Therapy with mentalizing as a central component is currently being developed for treatment of numerous groups, including people with antisocial personality disorder, substance abuse, eating disorders, and at-risk mothers with infants and children (A. Bateman & Fonagy, 2011). It is also being used with families and adolescents, in schools, and in managing social groups (Asen & Fonagy, 2011; Fonagy et al., 2009; Twemlow, Fonagy, & Sacco, 2005a, 2005b). In this article, we focus on MBT in the treatment of BPD. PMID:26157198

  19. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocations for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its applications to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  20. Evidence-based management.

    PubMed

    Pfeffer, Jeffrey; Sutton, Robert I

    2006-01-01

    For the most part, managers looking to cure their organizational ills rely on obsolete knowledge they picked up in school, long-standing but never proven traditions, patterns gleaned from experience, methods they happen to be skilled in applying, and information from vendors. They could learn a thing or two from practitioners of evidence-based medicine, a movement that has taken the medical establishment by storm over the past decade. A growing number of physicians are eschewing the usual, flawed resources and are instead identifying, disseminating, and applying research that is soundly conducted and clinically relevant. It's time for managers to do the same. The challenge is, quite simply, to ground decisions in the latest and best knowledge of what actually works. In some ways, that's more difficult to do in business than in medicine. The evidence is weaker in business; almost anyone can (and many people do) claim to be a management expert; and a motley crew of sources--Shakespeare, Billy Graham,Jack Welch, Attila the Hunare used to generate management advice. Still, it makes sense that when managers act on better logic and strong evidence, their companies will beat the competition. Like medicine, management is learned through practice and experience. Yet managers (like doctors) can practice their craft more effectively if they relentlessly seek new knowledge and insight, from both inside and outside their companies, so they can keep updating their assumptions, skills, and knowledge.

  1. Nanowire-based detector

    DOEpatents

    Berggren, Karl K; Hu, Xiaolong; Masciarelli, Daniele

    2014-06-24

    Systems, articles, and methods are provided related to nanowire-based detectors, which can be used for light detection in, for example, single-photon detectors. In one aspect, a variety of detectors are provided, for example one including an electrically superconductive nanowire or nanowires constructed and arranged to interact with photons to produce a detectable signal. In another aspect, fabrication methods are provided, including techniques to precisely reproduce patterns in subsequently formed layers of material using a relatively small number of fabrication steps. By precisely reproducing patterns in multiple material layers, one can form electrically insulating materials and electrically conductive materials in shapes such that incoming photons are redirected toward a nearby electrically superconductive materials (e.g., electrically superconductive nanowire(s)). For example, one or more resonance structures (e.g., comprising an electrically insulating material), which can trap electromagnetic radiation within its boundaries, can be positioned proximate the nanowire(s). The resonance structure can include, at its boundaries, electrically conductive material positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire such that light that would otherwise be transmitted through the sensor is redirected toward the nanowire(s) and detected. In addition, electrically conductive material can be positioned proximate the electrically superconductive nanowire (e.g. at the aperture of the resonant structure), such that light is directed by scattering from this structure into the nanowire.

  2. Microsphere based saliva diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rissin, David M.; DiCesare, Christopher; Hayman, Ryan B.; Blicharz, Timothy M.; Walt, David R.

    2005-11-01

    Saliva presents a minimally invasive alternative medium to blood for performing diagnostics1. Microsphere sensors for ions, small organic molecules, and proteins are currently being developed and optical microarrays containing thousands of these sensors will be used for simultaneous multi-analyte analysis. The fiber bundle platform in use is 1mm in diameter and contains approximately 50,000 individually addressable 3.1μm fibers, each with an etched well capable of housing a single 3.1μm microsphere sensor. Micron-sized bead-based chemistries are produced in house, followed by deposition onto a fiber-optic bundle platform, allowing for multiplexed analysis. The ultimate goal is to develop a universal diagnostic system using saliva as the diagnostic medium. This platform will permit multiplexed analysis of a sample by integrating microfluidics with the optical arrays loaded with sensors capable of detecting relevant biomarkers associated with a wide range of disease states. Disease states that are currently under investigation include end stage renal disease (ESRD) and Sjoegrens Syndrome (SS).

  3. Holography based super resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Anwar; Mudassar, Asloob A.

    2012-05-01

    This paper describes the simulation of a simple technique of superresolution based on holographic imaging in spectral domain. The input beam assembly containing 25 optical fibers with different orientations and positions is placed to illuminate the object in the 4f optical system. The position and orientation of each fiber is calculated with respect to the central fiber in the array. The positions and orientations of the fibers are related to the shift of object spectrum at aperture plane. During the imaging process each fiber is operated once in the whole procedure to illuminate the input object transparency which gives shift to the object spectrum in the spectral domain. This shift of the spectrum is equal to the integral multiple of the pass band aperture width. During the operation of single fiber (ON-state) all other fibers are in OFF-state at that time. The hologram recorded by each fiber at the CCD plane is stored in computer memory. At the end of illumination process total 25 holograms are recorded by the whole fiber array and by applying some post processing and specific algorithm single super resolved image is obtained. The superresolved image is five times better than the band-limited image. The work is demonstrated using computer simulation only.

  4. Scintillator based beta batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rensing, Noa M.; Tiernan, Timothy C.; Shirwadkar, Urmila; O'Dougherty, Patrick; Freed, Sara; Hawrami, Rastgo; Squillante, Michael R.

    2013-05-01

    Some long-term, remote applications do not have access to conventional harvestable energy in the form of solar radiation (or other ambient light), wind, environmental vibration, or wave motion. Radiation Monitoring Devices, Inc. (RMD) is carrying out research to address the most challenging applications that need power for many months or years and which have undependable or no access to environmental energy. Radioisotopes are an attractive candidate for this energy source, as they can offer a very high energy density combined with a long lifetime. Both large scale nuclear power plants and radiothermal generators are based on converting nuclear energy to heat, but do not scale well to small sizes. Furthermore, thermo-mechanical power plants depend on moving parts, and RTG's suffer from low efficiency. To address the need for compact nuclear power devices, RMD is developing a novel beta battery, in which the beta emissions from a radioisotope are converted to visible light in a scintillator and then the visible light is converted to electrical power in a photodiode. By incorporating 90Sr into the scintillator SrI2 and coupling the material to a wavelength-matched solar cell, we will create a scalable, compact power source capable of supplying milliwatts to several watts of power over a period of up to 30 years. We will present the latest results of radiation damage studies and materials processing development efforts, and discuss how these factors interact to set the operating life and energy density of the device.

  5. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1991-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  6. Graphene based GHz detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyd, Anthony K.; El Fatimy, Abdel; Barbara, Paola; Nath, Anindya; Campbell, Paul M.; Myers-Ward, Rachael; Daniels, Kevin; Gaskill, D. Kurt

    Graphene demonstrates great promise as a detector over a wide spectral range especially in the GHz range. This is because absorption is enhanced due to the Drude contribution. In the GHz range there are viable detection mechanisms for graphene devices. With this in mind, two types of GHz detectors are fabricated on epitaxial graphene using a lift off resist-based clean lithography process to produce low contact resistance. Both device types use asymmetry for detection, consistent with recent thoughts of the photothermoelectric effect (PTE) mechanism. The first is an antenna coupled device. It utilizes two dissimilar contact metals and the work function difference produces the asymmetry. The other device is a field effect transistor constructed with an asymmetric top gate that creates a PN junction and facilitates tuning the photovoltaic response. The response of both device types, tested from 100GHz to 170GHz, are reported. This work was sponsored by the U.S. Office of Naval Research (Award Number N000141310865).

  7. Nanomembrane-based plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, Zoran; Vuković, Slobodan M.; Buha, Jelena; Matovic, Jovan

    2011-01-01

    This paper reviews the main properties and applications of nanomembrane-based plasmonic structures, including some results presented here for the first time. Artificial nanomembranes are a novel building block in micro- and nanosystems technologies. They represent quasi-two-dimensional (2D) freestanding structures thinner than 100 nm and with giant aspect ratios that often exceed 1,000,000. They may be fabricated as various quasi-2D metal-dielectric nanocomposites with tailorable properties; they are fully symmetric in an electromagnetic sense and support long-range surface plasmon polaritons. This makes nanomembranes a convenient platform for different plasmonic structures such as subwavelength plasmonic crystals and metamaterials and applications such as plasmon waveguides and ultrasensitive bio/chemical sensors. Among other advantages of nanomembrane plasmonics is the feasibility to fabricate flexible, transferable plasmonic guides applicable to different substrates and dynamically tunable through stretching. There are various approaches to multifunctionalization of nanomembranes for plasmonics, including the use of transparent conductive oxide nanoparticles, but also the incorporation of switchable ion channels. Since the natural counterpart of the artificial nanomembranes are cell membranes, the multifunctionalization of synthetic nanomembranes ensures the introduction of bionic principles into plasmonics, at the same time extending the toolbox of the available nanostructures, materials and functions.

  8. Constraint-based scheduling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1993-01-01

    The GERRY scheduling system developed by NASA Ames with assistance from the Lockheed Space Operations Company, and the Lockheed Artificial Intelligence Center, uses a method called constraint-based iterative repair. Using this technique, one encodes both hard rules and preference criteria into data structures called constraints. GERRY repeatedly attempts to improve schedules by seeking repairs for violated constraints. The system provides a general scheduling framework which is being tested on two NASA applications. The larger of the two is the Space Shuttle Ground Processing problem which entails the scheduling of all the inspection, repair, and maintenance tasks required to prepare the orbiter for flight. The other application involves power allocation for the NASA Ames wind tunnels. Here the system will be used to schedule wind tunnel tests with the goal of minimizing power costs. In this paper, we describe the GERRY system and its application to the Space Shuttle problem. We also speculate as to how the system would be used for manufacturing, transportation, and military problems.

  9. Ab initio molecular orbital study on the excited states of [2.2]-, [3.3]-, and siloxane-bridged paracyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Shirai, Soichi; Iwata, Suehiro; Maegawa, Yoshifumi; Tani, Takao; Inagaki, Shinji

    2012-10-18

    Paracyclophanes are simple idealized model molecules for the study of interacting π-stacking systems. In this study, the excited states of [2.2]paracyclophane ([2.2]PCP), [3.3]paracyclophane ([3.3]PCP), and siloxane-bridged paracyclophane (SiPCP) are systematically investigated using the multiconfiguration quasi-degenerated perturbation theory (MCQDPT) method. The excited states of the alkyl- and silyl-substituted benzene monomers and benzene dimer, which can be regarded as the building blocks of paracyclophanes, are also examined at the same level of theory for more detailed understanding. The accuracy of the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) method required for excited state geometry optimization of the paracyclophanes is confirmed from calculations of the benzene dimer. The equilibrium distances between the benzene rings of the paracyclophanes in the first excited states are shorter than those in the ground state, and the benzene rings at the excited state optimized geometries are in an almost eclipsed parallel configuration, which indicates excimer formation. The calculated transition energies and oscillator strengths are generally in good agreement with the corresponding experimental results. A clear correlation between the excited state properties and the molecular structures is systematically demonstrated based on the calculation results for the substituted benzene monomers and benzene dimer. The transition energies of SiPCP are close to the corresponding absorption and fluorescence energies of the experimentally studied phenylene-silica hybrids, which indicates that the electronic properties of organic-silica hybrids, which is a new class of material with potential in photofunctional applications, can be approximated by simple siloxane-bridged cyclophane derivatives.

  10. Pediatrician Identification of Latino Children at Risk for Autism Spectrum Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Mattox, Kimber; Donelan, Karen; Batbayar, Oyundari; Baghaee, Anita; Bethell, Christina

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Latino–white disparities in age at autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnosis may be modified by primary care pediatrician (PCP) practices and beliefs. The objectives of this study were to assess ASD and developmental screening practices, attitudes toward ASD identification in Latino children, and barriers to ASD identification for Latino children, in a sample of 267 California PCPs. METHODS: In mail-based PCP survey, we assessed rates of bilingual general developmental and ASD screening, perceptions of parent ASD knowledge in Latino and white families, reports of difficulty assessing for ASDs in Latino and white children, and perceptions of barriers to early ASD identification for Latinos. RESULTS: Although 81% of PCPs offered some form of developmental screening, 29% of PCPs offered Spanish ASD screening per American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines, and only 10% offered both Spanish general developmental and Spanish ASD screening per American Academy of Pediatrics guidelines. Most PCPs thought that Latino (English and Spanish primary family language) parents were less knowledgeable about ASDs than white parents. PCPs had more difficulty assessing ASD risk for Latino children with Spanish primary family language than for white children, even when the PCP conducted recommended ASD screening or had >25% Latino patients. The most frequent barrier to ASD identification in Latinos was access to developmental specialists. CONCLUSIONS: Multiple factors in the primary care setting may contribute to delayed ASD identification for Latinos. Promoting language-appropriate screening, disseminating culturally appropriate ASD materials to Latino families, improving the specialist workforce, and providing PCP support in screening and referral of Latino children may be important ways to reduce racial and ethnic differences in care. PMID:23958770

  11. Mechanistic analysis of the inactivation of cytochrome P450 2B6 by phencyclidine: effects on substrate binding, electron transfer, and uncoupling.

    PubMed

    Shebley, Mohamad; Kent, Ute M; Ballou, David P; Hollenberg, Paul F

    2009-04-01

    Phencyclidine (PCP) is a mechanism-based inactivator of cytochrome P450 (P450) 2B6. We have analyzed several steps in the P450 catalytic cycle to determine the mechanism of inactivation of P450 2B6 by PCP. Spectral binding studies show that binding of benzphetamine, a type I ligand, to P450 2B6 was significantly affected as a result of the inactivation, whereas binding of the inhibitor n-octylamine, a type II ligand, was not compromised. Binding of these ligands to P450 2B6 occurs in two phases. Stopped-flow spectral analysis of the binding kinetics of benzphetamine to PCP-inactivated 2B6 revealed a 15-fold decrease in the rate of binding during the second phase of the kinetics (k(1) = 5.0 s(-1), A(1) = 30%; k(2) = 0.02 s(-1), A(2) = 70%, where A(2) indicates the fractional magnitude of the second phase) compared with the native enzyme (k(1) = 8.0 s(-1), A(1) = 58%; k(2) = 0.3 s(-1), A(2) = 42%). Analysis of benzphetamine metabolism by the inactivated protein using liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry showed that the rates of formation of nor-benzphetamine and hydroxylated nor-benzphetamine were decreased by 75 and 69%, respectively, whereas the rates of formation for amphetamine, hydroxybenzphetamine, and methamphetamine showed slight but statistically insignificant decreases after the inactivation. The rate of reduction of P450 2B6 by NADPH and reductase was decreased by 6-fold as a result of the modification by PCP. In addition, the extent of uncoupling of NADPH oxidation from product formation, a process leading to futile production of H(2)O(2), increased significantly during the metabolism of ethylbenzene as a result of the inactivation.

  12. Synergetic inhibition of PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol by mixtures of urea and calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianqian; Li, Liewu; Su, Guijin; Huang, Xinchen; Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Binke; Miao, Xue; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-11-01

    Chlorophenols are structurally similar to PCDD/Fs and have been considered as highly potential precursors for PCDD/Fs formation. The suppressing effects of PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol (PCP) were investigated on various mass ratios of CaO and urea. The total concentration of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs, mostly dominated by OCDD, was determined to be 48.58-10186ng/mg in inhibitor-reaction systems, being much lower than that in blank reaction system (75654ng/mg). Interestingly, compared with pure CaO and urea reaction system, the concentration and TEQ of formed 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in mixed urea/CaO reaction system were lower, especially with 5-20% urea reaction systems being respectively at decrease by 96.5-99.4% and 99.2-99.7%. The suppression efficiency of TEQ in 5-20% urea reaction systems could be always approximately 100% under 250-350°C. These results suggested that mixed inhibitors, especially 5-20% urea inhibitors, have a synergetic inhibition effect for PCDD/Fs formation from PCP. Mixed inhibitor generated several intermediates, involving CO2, H2O, NH3, Ca(OH)2, CaCO3, HNCO, biuret and ammelide. The complex between PCP and Ca, N-doped species, lower chlorinated phenols and benzenediol, and organic acids were also determined. Synergetic inhibition mechanism may be attributed to accelerated facilitation of acid-base reaction and N doping. The decomposition of PCP itself also contributes to prevent PCDD/Fs formation.

  13. Proposed modifications to the RCRA post-closure permit for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime at the U.S. Department of Energy Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    This report presents proposed modifications to several conditions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Post-Closure Permit (PCP) for the Chestnut Ridge Hydrogeologic Regime (CRHR) (permit number TNHW-088, EPA ID No. TN3 89 009 0001). These permit conditions define the requirements for RCRA post-closure detection groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Sediment Disposal Basin (CRSDB) and Kerr Hollow Quarry (KHQ), and RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the Chestnut Ridge Security Pits (CRSPs). Modification of these PCP conditions is requested to: (1) clarify the planned integration of RCRA post-closure corrective action groundwater monitoring at the CRSPs with the monitoring program to be established in the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) record of decision (ROD), (2) revise several of the current technical requirements for groundwater monitoring based on implementation of the RCRA monitoring programs during 1996, (3) replace several of the technical procedures included in the PCP with updated versions recently issued by the Y-12 Plant Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP), and (4) correct inaccurate regulatory citations and references to permit conditions and permit attachments. With these modifications, the Y- 12 Plant will continue to meet the full intent of all regulatory obligations for post-closure care of these facilities. Section 2 provides the technical justification for each proposed permit modification. Section 3.0 contains proposed changes to Section II of the PCP. Modifications to site-specific permit conditions are presented in Section 4.0 (CRSDB), Section 5.0 (CRSPs), and Section 6.0 (KHQ). Sections 7.0 and 8.0 reference updated and revised procedures for groundwater sampling, and monitoring well plugging and abandonment, respectively. Appendix A includes all proposed revisions to the permit attachments.

  14. Critical body residues for pentachlorophenol in the zebra mussel under varying conditions of pH and temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S.W.; Hwang, H.; Atanasoff, M.; Landrum, P.F.

    1995-12-31

    The toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP), an ionizable phenol, is strongly dependent on environmental pH and temperature. Using the invertebrate species, the zebra mussel (Dreissena polymorpha), the authors tested whether CBRs could be used to resolve the differences in toxicity under varying conditions. The authors simultaneously measured acute toxicity and tissue concentrations of PCP under 9 different combinations of pH and temperature. CBRs were determined from tissue residues as LD{sub 50}, values and were also calculated from LC{sub 50}s in conjunction with toxicokinetic parameters determined under each set of conditions. The data show that when toxicity is based on aqueous concentrations of PCP needed to cause mortality (LC{sub 50}s), that the resulting LC{sub 50}s varied by a factor of 372 X across the range of conditions tested. However, when LD{sub 50}s were calculated from tissue residues in the mussel, the latter varied only by a factor of 12.7 across the range of conditions examined. When CBRs were determined toxicokinetically, instead of from direct measurement of tissue concentrations, these CBRs were both higher than the measured LD{sub 50}s and more variable. The authors believe this is a result of the animals having a higher filtering rate and a greater tolerance for PCP in the short-term exposures from which the toxicokinetic values were obtained. Their data generally support the utility of CBRs in minimizing variation attributable to environmental variables but also demonstrate that the method of determining a CBR will be critical.

  15. Preclinical pharmacology of mGlu2/3 receptor agonists: novel agents for schizophrenia?

    PubMed

    DD, Darryle D Schoepp; Marek, Gerard J

    2002-04-01

    Agonists for mGlu2/3 receptors decrease the evoked release of glutamate at certain (ie. forebrain / limbic) glutamatergic synapses, indicating that the functional role of mGlu2 and/or mGlu3 receptors is to suppress glutamate excitations. This offers a mechanism for dampening glutamate excitation under pathological states resulting from excessive glutamate release. Based, in part, on the psychotomimetic actions of phencyclidine (PCP)- like drugs, excessive or pathological glutamate release has been implicated in a number of clinical conditions including psychosis. With this in mind, the pharmacology of multiple mGlu2/3 receptor agonists have been investigated in PCP treated rats. Agonists for mGlu2/3 receptors such as LY354740 and LY379268 have been shown to block certain behavioral responses to PCP in rats. The effects of mGlu2/3 agonists on PCP-induced behaviors are blocked by a low doses of a selective mGlu2/3 receptor antagonist, indicating that these actions are mediated via mGlu2/3 receptors. In addition, mGlu2/3 agonists potently suppress glutamate release in rat prefrontal cortex, as reflected by excitatory post-synaptic potentials (EPSPs) induced by serotonin (5-HT) acting on 5HT(2A) receptors. These actions of LY354740 and LY379268 are also blocked by a selective mGlu2/3 antagonist. Atypical antipsychotic drugs such as clozapine also suppress 5-HT-induced EPSPs in this brain region, thus suggesting a common pathway for the actions of atypical antipsychotic drugs and mGlu2/3 receptor agonists. As glutamatergic dysfunction has been implicated in psychotic states and possibly in the etiology of schizophrenia, clinical studies with mGlu2/3 agonists may be warranted to further explore the validity of the glutamatergic hypothesis of schizophrenia. PMID:12769628

  16. Synergetic inhibition of PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol by mixtures of urea and calcium oxide.

    PubMed

    Li, Qianqian; Li, Liewu; Su, Guijin; Huang, Xinchen; Zhao, Yanhui; Li, Binke; Miao, Xue; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-11-01

    Chlorophenols are structurally similar to PCDD/Fs and have been considered as highly potential precursors for PCDD/Fs formation. The suppressing effects of PCDD/F formation from pentachlorophenol (PCP) were investigated on various mass ratios of CaO and urea. The total concentration of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs, mostly dominated by OCDD, was determined to be 48.58-10186ng/mg in inhibitor-reaction systems, being much lower than that in blank reaction system (75654ng/mg). Interestingly, compared with pure CaO and urea reaction system, the concentration and TEQ of formed 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in mixed urea/CaO reaction system were lower, especially with 5-20% urea reaction systems being respectively at decrease by 96.5-99.4% and 99.2-99.7%. The suppression efficiency of TEQ in 5-20% urea reaction systems could be always approximately 100% under 250-350°C. These results suggested that mixed inhibitors, especially 5-20% urea inhibitors, have a synergetic inhibition effect for PCDD/Fs formation from PCP. Mixed inhibitor generated several intermediates, involving CO2, H2O, NH3, Ca(OH)2, CaCO3, HNCO, biuret and ammelide. The complex between PCP and Ca, N-doped species, lower chlorinated phenols and benzenediol, and organic acids were also determined. Synergetic inhibition mechanism may be attributed to accelerated facilitation of acid-base reaction and N doping. The decomposition of PCP itself also contributes to prevent PCDD/Fs formation. PMID:27318736

  17. Image Data Bases on Campus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplan, Reid; Mathieson, Gordon

    1989-01-01

    A description of how image database technology was used to develop two prototypes for academic and administrative applications at Yale University, one using a video data base integration and the other using document-scanning data base technology, is presented. Technical underpinnings for the creation of data bases are described. (Author/MLW)

  18. PMIS: Data Base Design Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiddleman, Richard; Gorman, Michael M.

    1972-01-01

    PMIS is a computer-based planning and management information system for local school districts. This report centers on the PMIS data bases that contain school system data by reviewing the major phases involved in their creation, explaining the factors that caused the unique orientation of the data bases, reviewing the two tasks that comprise the…

  19. Performance-Based Funding Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Higher Education Coordinating Board, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A number of states have made progress in implementing performance-based funding (PFB) and accountability. This policy brief summarizes main features of performance-based funding systems in three states: Tennessee, Ohio, and Indiana. The brief also identifies key issues that states considering performance-based funding must address, as well as…

  20. Humin as an electron donor for enhancement of multiple microbial reduction reactions with different redox potentials in a consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Zhang, Chunfang; Xiao, Zhixing; Suzuki, Daisuke; Katayama, Arata

    2015-02-01

    A solid-phase humin, acting as an electron donor, was able to enhance multiple reductive biotransformations, including dechlorination of pentachlorophenol (PCP), dissimilatory reduction of amorphous Fe (III) oxide (FeOOH), and reduction of nitrate, in a consortium. Humin that was chemically reduced by NaBH4 served as an electron donor for these microbial reducing reactions, with electron donating capacities of 0.013 mmol e(-)/g for PCP dechlorination, 0.15 mmol e(-)/g for iron reduction, and 0.30 mmol e(-)/g for nitrate reduction. Two pairs of oxidation and reduction peaks within the humin were detected by cyclic voltammetry analysis. 16S rRNA gene sequencing-based microbial community analysis of the consortium incubated with different terminal electron acceptors, suggested that Dehalobacter sp., Bacteroides sp., and Sulfurospirillum sp. were involved in the PCP dechlorination, dissimilatory iron reduction, and nitrate reduction, respectively. These findings suggested that humin functioned as a versatile redox mediator, donating electrons for multiple respiration reactions with different redox potentials.

  1. Surface fluorescence studies of tissue mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused rat lungs.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Kevin; Audi, Said H; Sepehr, Reyhaneh; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Ranji, Mahsa

    2013-04-01

    We designed a fiber-optic-based optoelectronic fluorometer to measure emitted fluorescence from the auto-fluorescent electron carriers NADH and FAD of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC). The ratio of NADH to FAD is called the redox ratio (RR = NADH/FAD) and is an indicator of the oxidoreductive state of tissue. We evaluated the fluorometer by measuring the fluorescence intensities of NADH and FAD at the surface of isolated, perfused rat lungs. Alterations of lung mitochondrial metabolic state were achieved by the addition of rotenone (complex I inhibitor), potassium cyanide (KCN, complex IV inhibitor) and/or pentachlorophenol (PCP, uncoupler) into the perfusate recirculating through the lung. Rotenone- or KCN-containing perfusate increased RR by 21 and 30%, respectively. In contrast, PCP-containing perfusate decreased RR by 27%. These changes are consistent with the established effects of rotenone, KCN, and PCP on the redox status of the ETC. Addition of blood to perfusate quenched NADH and FAD signal, but had no effect on RR. This study demonstrates the capacity of fluorometry to detect a change in mitochondrial redox state in isolated perfused lungs, and suggests the potential of fluorometry for use in in vivo experiments to extract a sensitive measure of lung tissue health in real-time.

  2. Comparative toxicity of pentachlorophenol to three earthworm species in artificial soil

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzgerald, D.; Lanno, R.P.; Farwell, A.; Dixon, D.G.

    1994-12-31

    Although methods for standardized toxicity tests with earthworms exist, many of the test parameters and conditions have not been validated in actual tests and with different species of worms. This study evaluated the toxicity of pentachlorophenol (PCP) to three species of earthworms, Lumbricus terrestris, Eisenia fetida, and Eudrilus eugeniae using various methods of data analysis and body residues. Tests were conducted in artificial soil for a period of 28 days or until an Acute Lethality Threshold (ALT) was reached. An intensive temporal sampling regime was applied to generate sufficient data for the accurate estimation of ALTs using both LC50/time and time-to-death/soil concentration methods of data analysis. L. terrestris was tested at 15 C, E. eugeniae at 24 C, and E. fetida at both temperatures. Total body residues of PCP were measured by GC following cryogenic separation of the lipid fraction of the worm. ALTs were significantly different between E. fetida and the two larger species of worms. No effect of temperature on the ALT for E. fetida was observed, although the time taken to reach the ALT increased at the lower temperature. The relationship of PCP residues at mortality will be discussed in terms of the effects of species, body size and temperature. Limitations of the artificial soil based upon growth curves of worms will also be examined.

  3. Graphene based gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Liangzhu; Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Zhuang

    2011-03-01

    Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI-10k polymer. The positively charged GO-PEI complexes are able to further bind with plasmid DNA (pDNA) for intracellular transfection of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP) gene in HeLa cells. While EGFP transfection with PEI-1.2k appears to be ineffective, high EGFP expression is observed using the corresponding GO-PEI-1.2k as the transfection agent. On the other hand, GO-PEI-10k shows similar EGFP transfection efficiency but lower toxicity compared with PEI-10k. Our results suggest graphene to be a novel gene delivery nano-vector with low cytotoxicity and high transfection efficiency, promising for future applications in non-viral based gene therapy.Graphene as a star in materials research has been attracting tremendous attentions in the past few years in various fields including biomedicine. In this work, for the first time we successfully use graphene as a non-toxic nano-vehicle for efficient gene transfection. Graphene oxide (GO) is bound with cationic polymers, polyethyleneimine (PEI) with two different molecular weights at 1.2 kDa and 10 kDa, forming GO-PEI-1.2k and GO-PEG-10k complexes, respectively, both of which are stable in physiological solutions. Cellular toxicity tests reveal that our GO-PEI-10k complex exhibits significantly reduced toxicity to the treated cells compared to the bare PEI

  4. Base Excision Repair and Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Susan S.; Murphy, Drew L.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2012-01-01

    Base excision repair is the system used from bacteria to man to remove the tens of thousands of endogenous DNA damages produced daily in each human cell. Base excision repair is required for normal mammalian development and defects have been associated with neurological disorders and cancer. In this paper we provide an overview of short patch base excision repair in humans and summarize current knowledge of defects in base excision repair in mouse models and functional studies on short patch base excision repair germ line polymorphisms and their relationship to cancer. The biallelic germ line mutations that result in MUTYH-associated colon cancer are also discussed. PMID:22252118

  5. Military Bases and Conservation Markets

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Ankeny

    2007-09-01

    Over time, DoD is likely to be one of the largest buyers and sellers in a water quality trading market. The Department of Defense (DoD) operates military bases that resemble small cities in infrastructure. As units redeploy, bases are likely to find themselves well within their environmental limits at the originating base and potentially bumping against limits such as nitrate and phosphate loading at the destination base. Stricter rules and heavier loadings in growing watersheds also present challenges to local bases and municipalities as regulators clamp down on loadings from existing Waste Water Treatment Plants (WWTPs) to meet water quality standards.

  6. Telemetry-Based Ranging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamkins, Jon; Vilnrotter, Victor A.; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Shambayati, Shervin

    2011-01-01

    A telemetry-based ranging scheme was developed in which the downlink ranging signal is eliminated, and the range is computed directly from the downlink telemetry signal. This is the first Deep Space Network (DSN) ranging technology that does not require the spacecraft to transmit a separate ranging signal. By contrast, the evolutionary ranging techniques used over the years by NASA missions, including sequential ranging (transmission of a sequence of sinusoids) and PN-ranging (transmission of a pseudo-noise sequence) whether regenerative (spacecraft acquires, then regenerates and retransmits a noise-free ranging signal) or transparent (spacecraft feeds the noisy demodulated uplink ranging signal into the downlink phase modulator) relied on spacecraft power and bandwidth to transmit an explicit ranging signal. The state of the art in ranging is described in an emerging CCSDS (Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems) standard, in which a pseudo-noise (PN) sequence is transmitted from the ground to the spacecraft, acquired onboard, and the PN sequence is coherently retransmitted back to the ground, where a delay measurement is made between the uplink and downlink signals. In this work, the telemetry signal is aligned with the uplink PN code epoch. The ground station computes the delay between the uplink signal transmission and the received downlink telemetry. Such a computation is feasible because symbol synchronizability is already an integral part of the telemetry design. Under existing technology, the telemetry signal cannot be used for ranging because its arrival-time information is not coherent with any Earth reference signal. By introducing this coherence, and performing joint telemetry detection and arrival-time estimation on the ground, a high-rate telemetry signal can provide all the precision necessary for spacecraft ranging.

  7. Ferrocene-Based Nanoelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Lawrence R. Sita

    2006-02-15

    Ferrocene-based molecular components for nanoelectronics offer a number of distinct advantages relative to all carbon frameworks due to metal-centered molecular states that should be closer in energy to the Fermi levels of the metal electrodes in metal / molecule / metal heterojunctions. Given this, the overall goal of the project was to investigate the conduction physics of a variety of proposed ferrocene diode / transistor designs in order to address the fundamental question; can electron transport within nm-length scale structures be modulated in a controlled fashion? During the funded period, substantial progress towards achieving this goal was made by surmounting a number of scientific and technical obstacles. More specifically, a concise and general synthetic route to several mono- and diferrocene dithiols and monothiols was achieved that now allows for the directed and controlled assembly of a variety of metal / molecule /metal test structures for the single molecule conductance measurements and the fabrication of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) on Au(111) that are amenable to quantitative electrochemical characterization of electron-transfer rates. Most importantly, by using an electromigrated test structure, reproducible I/V data for one of the ferrocene dithiol molecules have been collected which exhibit surprisingly high conductance. Exceptional agreement of this result with theory serves to substantiate the original hypothesis that metal-centered states within a molecular bridge can indeed serve to establish higher conductance relative to all-organic molecular bridges. Overall, the successful demonstration of the ability of ferrocene-molecular frameworks to serve as exceptional molecular conductors will play an important role in the continued evolution in design of molecular components for nanoelectronic devices, which in turn, will have a positive impact on the science and potential technologies associated with these systems.

  8. Space-based detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sesana, A.; Weber, W. J.; Killow, C. J.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Robertson, D. I.; Ward, H.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Bryant, J.; Cruise, A. M.; Dixon, G.; Hoyland, D.; Smith, D.; Bogenstahl, J.; McNamara, P. W.; Gerndt, R.; Flatscher, R.; Hechenblaikner, G.; Hewitson, M.; Gerberding, O.; Barke, S.; Brause, N.; Bykov, I.; Danzmann, K.; Enggaard, A.; Gianolio, A.; Vendt Hansen, T.; Heinzel, G.; Hornstrup, A.; Jennrich, O.; Kullmann, J.; Møller-Pedersen, S.; Rasmussen, T.; Reiche, J.; Sodnik, Z.; Suess, M.; Armano, M.; Sumner, T.; Bender, P. L.; Akutsu, T.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    The parallel session C5 on Space-Based Detectors gave a broad overview over the planned space missions related to gravitational wave detection. Overviews of the revolutionary science to be expected from LISA was given by Alberto Sesana and Sasha Buchman. The launch of LISA Pathfinder (LPF) is planned for 2015. This mission and its payload "LISA Technology Package" will demonstrate key technologies for LISA. In this context, reference masses in free fall for LISA, and gravitational physics in general, was described by William Weber, laser interferometry at the pico-metre level and the optical bench of LPF was presented by Christian Killow and the performance of the LPF optical metrology system by Paul McNamara. While LPF will not yet be sensitive to gravitational waves, it may nevertheless be used to explore fundamental physics questions, which was discussed by Michele Armano. Some parts of the LISA technology that are not going to be demonstrated by LPF, but under intensive development at the moment, were presented by Oliver Jennrich and Oliver Gerberding. Looking into the future, Japan is studying the design of a mid-frequency detector called DECIGO, which was discussed by Tomotada Akutsu. Using atom interferometry for gravitational wave detection has also been recently proposed, and it was critically reviewed by Peter Bender. In the nearer future, the launch of GRACE Follow-On (for Earth gravity observation) is scheduled for 2017, and it will include a Laser Ranging Interferometer as technology demonstrator. This will be the first inter-spacecraft laser interferometer and has many aspects in common with the LISA long arm, as discussed by Andrew Sutton.

  9. Soy-based renoprotection

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Nancy J; Krul, Elaine S; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth; Parrish, Alan R

    2016-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem as risk factors such as advanced age, obesity, hypertension and diabetes rise in the global population. Currently there are no effective pharmacologic treatments for this disease. The role of diet is important for slowing the progression of CKD and managing symptoms in later stages of renal insufficiency. While low protein diets are generally recommended, maintaining adequate levels of intake is critical for health. There is an increasing appreciation that the source of protein may also be important. Soybean protein has been the most extensively studied plant-based protein in subjects with kidney disease and has demonstrated renal protective properties in a number of clinical studies. Soy protein consumption has been shown to slow the decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate and significantly improve proteinuria in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nephropathy. Soy’s beneficial effects on renal function may also result from its impact on certain physiological risk factors for CKD such as dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia. Soy intake is also associated with improvements in antioxidant status and systemic inflammation in early and late stage CKD patients. Studies conducted in animal models have helped to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms that may play a role in the positive effects of soy protein on renal parameters in polycystic kidney disease, metabolically-induced kidney dysfunction and age-associated progressive nephropathy. Despite the established relationship between soy and renoprotection, further studies are needed for a clear understanding of the role of the cellular and molecular target(s) of soy protein in maintaining renal function. PMID:27152261

  10. Lunar Base Heat Pump

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, D.; Fischbach, D.; Tetreault, R.

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this project was to investigate the feasibility of constructing a heat pump suitable for use as a heat rejection device in applications such as a lunar base. In this situation, direct heat rejection through the use of radiators is not possible at a temperature suitable for lde support systems. Initial analysis of a heat pump of this type called for a temperature lift of approximately 378 deg. K, which is considerably higher than is commonly called for in HVAC and refrigeration applications where heat pumps are most often employed. Also because of the variation of the rejection temperature (from 100 to 381 deg. K), extreme flexibility in the configuration and operation of the heat pump is required. A three-stage compression cycle using a refrigerant such as CFC-11 or HCFC-123 was formulated with operation possible with one, two or three stages of compression. Also, to meet the redundancy requirements, compression was divided up over multiple compressors in each stage. A control scheme was devised that allowed these multiple compressors to be operated as required so that the heat pump could perform with variable heat loads and rejection conditions. A prototype heat pump was designed and constructed to investigate the key elements of the high-lift heat pump concept. Control software was written and implemented in the prototype to allow fully automatic operation. The heat pump was capable of operation over a wide range of rejection temperatures and cooling loads, while maintaining cooling water temperature well within the required specification of 40 deg. C +/- 1.7 deg. C. This performance was verified through testing.

  11. Soy-based renoprotection.

    PubMed

    McGraw, Nancy J; Krul, Elaine S; Grunz-Borgmann, Elizabeth; Parrish, Alan R

    2016-05-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) is a significant public health problem as risk factors such as advanced age, obesity, hypertension and diabetes rise in the global population. Currently there are no effective pharmacologic treatments for this disease. The role of diet is important for slowing the progression of CKD and managing symptoms in later stages of renal insufficiency. While low protein diets are generally recommended, maintaining adequate levels of intake is critical for health. There is an increasing appreciation that the source of protein may also be important. Soybean protein has been the most extensively studied plant-based protein in subjects with kidney disease and has demonstrated renal protective properties in a number of clinical studies. Soy protein consumption has been shown to slow the decline in estimated glomerular filtration rate and significantly improve proteinuria in diabetic and non-diabetic patients with nephropathy. Soy's beneficial effects on renal function may also result from its impact on certain physiological risk factors for CKD such as dyslipidemia, hypertension and hyperglycemia. Soy intake is also associated with improvements in antioxidant status and systemic inflammation in early and late stage CKD patients. Studies conducted in animal models have helped to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms that may play a role in the positive effects of soy protein on renal parameters in polycystic kidney disease, metabolically-induced kidney dysfunction and age-associated progressive nephropathy. Despite the established relationship between soy and renoprotection, further studies are needed for a clear understanding of the role of the cellular and molecular target(s) of soy protein in maintaining renal function.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Based Light Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, russell A. (Inventor); Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A light sensor substrate comprises a base made from a semi-conductive material and topped with a layer of an electrically non-conductive material. A first electrode and a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors are positioned on the layer of electrically non-conductive material with the CNT-based conductors being distributed in a spaced apart fashion about a periphery of the first electrode. Each CNT-based conductor is coupled on one end thereof to the first electrode and extends away from the first electrode to terminate at a second free end. A second or gate electrode is positioned on the non-conductive material layer and is spaced apart from the second free end of each CNT-based conductor. Coupled to the first and second electrode is a device for detecting electron transfer along the CNT-based conductors resulting from light impinging on the CNT-based conductors.

  13. Case-based reasoning: The marriage of knowledge base and data base

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulaski, Kirt; Casadaban, Cyprian

    1988-01-01

    The coupling of data and knowledge has a synergistic effect when building an intelligent data base. The goal is to integrate the data and knowledge almost to the point of indistinguishability, permitting them to be used interchangeably. Examples given in this paper suggest that Case-Based Reasoning is a more integrated way to link data and knowledge than pure rule-based reasoning.

  14. Toxicity and tissue distribution of pentachlorophenol and permethrin in pipistrelle bats experimentally exposed to treated timber.

    PubMed

    Shore, R F; Myhill, D G; French, M C; Leach, D V; Stebbings, R E

    1991-01-01

    The dependence of bats in Britain on houses as roosts may result in them being exposed to pesticides used in remedial timber treatments. Pentachlorophenol (PCP) and permethrin are used as a fungicide and an insecticide for timber treatment, respectively. The present study investigated toxicity and distribution in body tissues of these two pesticides in pipistrelle bats. Four groups of nine to ten bats were kept in separate outdoor flight enclosures and were provided with roost boxes treated with either PCP only, permethrin, PCP/permethrin mixture or solvent only (control). At the start of the experiment, mean (+/-SE) PCP and permethrin concentrations on the surface of wooden blocks that had been treated in the same way as roost boxes were 69.32+/-6.76 mg g(-1) (n=6) and 3.3+/-1.6 mg g(-1) (n=3), respectively. All bats exposed to PCP and PCP/permethrin treated boxes died within 24 and 120 h, respectively; nine out of the ten controls survived the 32 day experimental period (P<0.001; both groups compared with control). Bats exposed to permethrin treated boxes survived as well as controls. Mean (+/-SE) carcass PCP concentration (excluding deposits on fur) of bats exposed to PCP and PCP/permethrin treated boxes was 13.11+/-2.52 microg g(-1)BW (n=20). PCP burdens on fur were positively correlated with total weight of PCP in the carcass (P<0.001). PCP was present in fat depots, liver, kidney and the remainder of the body which, despite containing low PCP concentrations, was the main PCP reservoir (66.4+/-5.0% of carcass PCP load; n=20). Total PCP in the carcass was significantly correlated with lipid weight (P<0.005). Permethrin was not detectable in body washes and tissues of bats exposed to PCP/permethrin mixture or permethrin. PMID:15092084

  15. Regulation of neuronal migration by Dchs1-Fat4 planar cell polarity.

    PubMed

    Zakaria, Sana; Mao, Yaopan; Kuta, Anna; Ferreira de Sousa, Catia; Gaufo, Gary O; McNeill, Helen; Hindges, Robert; Guthrie, Sarah; Irvine, Kenneth D; Francis-West, Philippa H

    2014-07-21

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the polarization of cell structures and behaviors within the plane of a tissue. PCP is essential for the generation of tissue architecture during embryogenesis and for postnatal growth and tissue repair, yet how it is oriented to coordinate cell polarity remains poorly understood [1]. In Drosophila, PCP is mediated via the Frizzled-Flamingo (Fz-PCP) and Dachsous-Fat (Fat-PCP) pathways [1-3]. Fz-PCP is conserved in vertebrates, but an understanding in vertebrates of whether and how Fat-PCP polarizes cells, and its relationship to Fz-PCP signaling, is lacking. Mutations in human FAT4 and DCHS1, key components of Fat-PCP signaling, cause Van Maldergem syndrome, characterized by severe neuronal abnormalities indicative of altered neuronal migration [4]. Here, we investigate the role and mechanisms of Fat-PCP during neuronal migration using the murine facial branchiomotor (FBM) neurons as a model. We find that Fat4 and Dchs1 are expressed in complementary gradients and are required for the collective tangential migration of FBM neurons and for their PCP. Fat4 and Dchs1 are required intrinsically within the FBM neurons and extrinsically within the neuroepithelium. Remarkably, Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP regulate FBM neuron migration along orthogonal axes. Disruption of the Dchs1 gradients by mosaic inactivation of Dchs1 alters FBM neuron polarity and migration. This study implies that PCP in vertebrates can be regulated via gradients of Fat4 and Dchs1 expression, which establish intracellular polarity across FBM cells during their migration. Our results also identify Fat-PCP as a novel neuronal guidance system and reveal that Fat-PCP and Fz-PCP can act along orthogonal axes. PMID:24998526

  16. Base pairing and base mis-pairing in nucleic acids

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, A. H. J.; Rich, A.

    1986-01-01

    In recent years we have learned that DNA is conformationally active. It can exist in a number of different stable conformations including both right-handed and left-handed forms. Using single crystal X-ray diffraction analysis we are able to discover not only additional conformations of the nucleic acids but also different types of hydrogen bonded base-base interactions. Although Watson-Crick base pairings are the predominant type of interaction in double helical DNA, they are not the only types. Recently, we have been able to examine mismatching of guanine-thymine base pairs in left-handed Z-DNA at atomic resolution (1A). A minimum amount of distortion of the sugar phosphate backbone is found in the G x T pairing in which the bases are held together by two hydrogen bonds in the wobble pairing interaction. Because of the high resolution of the analysis we can visualize water molecules which fill in to accommodate the other hydrogen bonding positions in the bases which are not used in the base-base interactions. Studies on other DNA oligomers have revealed that other types of non-Watson-Crick hydrogen bonding interactions can occur. In the structure of a DNA octamer with the sequence d(GCGTACGC) complexed to an antibiotic triostin A, it was found that the two central AT base pairs are held together by Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick base pairs. Similarly, the G x C base pairs at the ends are also Hoogsteen rather than Watson-Crick pairing. Hoogsteen base pairs make a modified helix which is distinct from the Watson-Crick double helix.

  17. XML-Based SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Mackey, Ryan; Tikidjian, Raffi

    2008-01-01

    The SHINE Knowledge Base Interchange Language software has been designed to more efficiently send new knowledge bases to spacecraft that have been embedded with the Spacecraft Health Inference Engine (SHINE) tool. The intention of the behavioral model is to capture most of the information generally associated with a spacecraft functional model, while specifically addressing the needs of execution within SHINE and Livingstone. As such, it has some constructs that are based on one or the other.

  18. Antioxidant property of water-soluble polysaccharides from Poria cocos Wolf using different extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Wang, Nani; Zhang, Yang; Wang, Xuping; Huang, Xiaowen; Fei, Ying; Yu, Yong; Shou, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Poria cocos Wolf is a popular traditional medicinal plant that has invigorating activity. Water-soluble polysaccharides (PCPs) are its main active components. In this study, four different methods were used to extract PCPs, which include hot water extraction (PCP-H), ultrasonic-assisted extraction (PCP-U), enzyme-assisted extraction (PCP-E) and microwave-assisted extraction (PCP-M). Their chemical compositions and structure characterizations were compared. In vitro antioxidant activities were studied on the basis of DPPH radical, hydroxyl radical, reducing power and metal chelating ability. The results showed that PCPs were composed of mannose, glucose, galactose, and arabinose, and had typical IR spectra characteristics of polysaccharides. Compared with other PCPs, PCP-M had lower neutral sugar content, higher mannose content and higher uronic acid content. The molecular weight were determined as PCP-E-H. PCP-M showed the strongest reducing power and highest scavenging abilities on hydroxyl and DPPH radicals, while PCP-U exhibited the lowest antioxidant activities. Response surface methodology was used to optimize the extraction yield of PCP-M by implementing the Box-Behnken design. Under the optimized conditions, the PCP-M yield was 9.95%, which was well in close agreement with the value predicted by the model. Overall, the microwave-assisted extraction was an effective and mild method for obtaining antioxidant polysaccharides from P. cocos Wolf.

  19. Computer-based and web-based radiation safety training

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, C., LLNL

    1998-03-01

    The traditional approach to delivering radiation safety training has been to provide a stand-up lecture of the topic, with the possible aid of video, and to repeat the same material periodically. New approaches to meeting training requirements are needed to address the advent of flexible work hours and telecommuting, and to better accommodate individuals learning at their own pace. Computer- based and web-based radiation safety training can provide this alternative. Computer-based and web- based training is an interactive form of learning that the student controls, resulting in enhanced and focused learning at a time most often chosen by the student.

  20. Game-based versus traditional case-based learning

    PubMed Central

    Telner, Deanna; Bujas-Bobanovic, Maja; Chan, David; Chester, Bob; Marlow, Bernard; Meuser, James; Rothman, Arthur; Harvey, Bart

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To evaluate family physicians’ enjoyment of and knowledge gained from game-based learning, compared with traditional case-based learning, in a continuing medical education (CME) event on stroke prevention and management. DESIGN An equivalence trial to determine if game-based learning was as effective as case-based learning in terms of attained knowledge levels. Game questions and small group cases were developed. Participants were randomized to either a game-based or a case-based group and took part in the event. SETTING Ontario provincial family medicine conference. PARTICIPANTS Thirty-two family physicians and 3 senior family medicine residents attending the conference. INTERVENTION Participation in either a game-based or a case-based CME learning group. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Scores on 40-item immediate and 3-month posttests of knowledge and a satisfaction survey. RESULTS Results from knowledge testing immediately after the event and 3 months later showed no significant difference in scoring between groups. Participants in the game-based group reported higher levels of satisfaction with the learning experience. CONCLUSION Games provide a novel way of organizing CME events. They might provide more group interaction and discussion, as well as improve recruitment to CME events. They might also provide a forum for interdisciplinary CME. Using games in future CME events appears to be a promising approach to facilitate participant learning. PMID:20841574

  1. Lead-based paint assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Lorie, C.; Cowdery, J.W.

    1994-12-31

    In 1977, The US consumer product safety commission banned the use of lead-based paint (LBP) in all industries, except the maritime industry which still has certain privileged uses. Unfortunately for property and building owners, the ban did not come soon enough. In response to this heightened awareness, several environmental market sectors addressing the issues have emerged. These include: residential; soil; commercial; water; and structures. The first and most important step in addressing the concerns posed by the existence of lead based contamination is to quantify the amount of lead-based product, to determine the location of the lead based product and the extent, if any, of lead based contamination, and to make recommendations for the remediation or abatement of the lead product and resultant contamination. In narrowing the focus of these issues, this paper discusses lead-based paint assessment; preparing and organizing the assessment, the regulatory considerations, assessment methodology, and presentation of results.

  2. Concurrent array-based queue

    SciTech Connect

    Heidelberger, Philip; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard

    2015-01-06

    According to one embodiment, a method for implementing an array-based queue in memory of a memory system that includes a controller includes configuring, in the memory, metadata of the array-based queue. The configuring comprises defining, in metadata, an array start location in the memory for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, an array size for the array-based queue, defining, in the metadata, a queue top for the array-based queue and defining, in the metadata, a queue bottom for the array-based queue. The method also includes the controller serving a request for an operation on the queue, the request providing the location in the memory of the metadata of the queue.

  3. dBASE IV basics

    SciTech Connect

    O`Connor, P.

    1994-09-01

    This is a user`s manual for dBASE IV. dBASE IV is a popular software application that can be used on your personal computer to help organize and maintain your database files. It is actually a set of tools with which you can create, organize, select and manipulate data in a simple yet effective manner. dBASE IV offers three methods of working with the product: (1) control center: (2) command line; and (3) programming.

  4. Principles of models based engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Dolin, R.M.; Hefele, J.

    1996-11-01

    This report describes a Models Based Engineering (MBE) philosophy and implementation strategy that has been developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory`s Center for Advanced Engineering Technology. A major theme in this discussion is that models based engineering is an information management technology enabling the development of information driven engineering. Unlike other information management technologies, models based engineering encompasses the breadth of engineering information, from design intent through product definition to consumer application.

  5. Evidence-Based Medicine: Rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew K; Most, Sam P

    2015-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine has become increasingly prominent in the climate of modern day healthcare. The practice of evidence-based medicine involves the integration of the best available evidence with clinical experience and expertise to help guide clinical decision-making. The essential tenets of evidence-based medicine can be applied to both functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty. Current outcome measures in functional and aesthetic rhinoplasty, including objective, subjective, and clinician-reported measures, is summarized and the current data is reviewed.

  6. Predictability of sacral base levelness based on iliac crest measurements.

    PubMed

    Dott, G A; Hart, C L; McKay, C

    1994-05-01

    A level sacral base plane is necessary to allow normalization of complex lumbosacral mechanics. Palpatory examinations are often used to evaluate for leg length discrepancy and pelvic obliquity despite improved accuracy and consistency of radiographic techniques. Treatment based on palpatory examinations suppose a direct and consistent relationship between the pelvic bones (innominates) and the sacral base. To evaluate the relationship between iliac crest levelness and sacral base levelness, a radiographic postural survey in the upright, weight-bearing position was performed on 358 men and women thought to have pelvic obliquity. Of these subjects, 293 demonstrated unlevel iliac crest heights or sacral base > or = 3/16 inch (4.76 mm), with iliac crest heights accurately predicting sacral base position 62% of the time. At > or = 3/8 inch (9.53 mm), 68% of the cases were accurately predicted. When the criterion for unlevelness was increased to > or = 1/2 inch (12.70 mm), the predictive accuracy improved to 83%. Radiographic findings in this study demonstrate a significant difference between iliac crest heights and sacral base position. In cases of mild to moderate short leg syndromes, the iliac crest height is an unreliable predictor of the direction or degree of sacral base levelness. PMID:8056627

  7. CCD Base Line Subtraction Algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Kotov, I.V.; OConnor, P.; Kotov, A.; Frank, J.; Perevoztchikov, V.; Takacs, P.

    2010-06-28

    High statistics astronomical surveys require photometric accuracy on a few percent level. The accuracy of sensor calibration procedures should match this goal. The first step in calibration procedures is the base line subtraction. The accuracy and robustness of different base line subtraction techniques used for Charge Coupled Device (CCD) sensors are discussed.

  8. Plasma-based accelerator structures

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, Carl B.

    1999-12-01

    Plasma-based accelerators have the ability to sustain extremely large accelerating gradients, with possible high-energy physics applications. This dissertation further develops the theory of plasma-based accelerators by addressing three topics: the performance of a hollow plasma channel as an accelerating structure, the generation of ultrashort electron bunches, and the propagation of laser pulses is underdense plasmas.

  9. Competency Based Education: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Helen, Ed.

    This bibliography is a sampling of the types of publications which have appeared recently on the subject of competency based education. Emphasis is given to current (1970-76) materials and to adult career-related competencies. Titles specifically naming some phase of competency-based education are preferred above titles that emphasize performance,…

  10. Problem-Based Learning Tools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chin, Christine; Chia, Li-Gek

    2008-01-01

    One way of implementing project-based science (PBS) is to use problem-based learning (PBL), in which students formulate their own problems. These problems are often ill-structured, mirroring complex real-life problems where data are often messy and inclusive. In this article, the authors describe how they used PBL in a ninth-grade biology class in…

  11. Problem Based Learning in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pepper, Coral

    2009-01-01

    Problem based learning (PBL) is a recognised teaching and learning strategy used to engage students in deep rather than surface learning. It is also viewed as a successful strategy to align university courses with the real life professional work students are expected to undertake on graduation (Biggs, 2003). Problem based learning is practised…

  12. Agent-Based Literacy Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEneaney, John E.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this theoretical essay is to explore the limits of traditional conceptualizations of reader and text and to propose a more general theory based on the concept of a literacy agent. The proposed theoretical perspective subsumes concepts from traditional theory and aims to account for literacy online. The agent-based literacy theory…

  13. Theory-Based Stakeholder Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Morten Balle; Vedung, Evert

    2010-01-01

    This article introduces a new approach to program theory evaluation called theory-based stakeholder evaluation or the TSE model for short. Most theory-based approaches are program theory driven and some are stakeholder oriented as well. Practically, all of the latter fuse the program perceptions of the various stakeholder groups into one unitary…

  14. Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects.

    PubMed

    Klatt-Cromwell, Cristine N; Thorp, Brian D; Del Signore, Anthony G; Ebert, Charles S; Ewend, Matthew G; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-02-01

    "Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has dramatically changed and expanded over recent years due to significant advancements in instrumentation, techniques, and anatomic understanding. With these advances, the need for more robust skull base reconstructive techniques was vital. In this article, reconstructive options ranging from acellular grafts to vascular flaps are described, including the strengths, weaknesses, and common uses."

  15. Evidence-Based Language Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollock, Eric J.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to examine evidence-based procedures in medicine and to demonstrate that the same protocols can be used in English language instruction. In the evidence-based methodology, studies are divided into those that address specific language problems. Integrated studies are presented as a systematic overview, meta-analysis,…

  16. Cloud-Based Data Storage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waters, John K.

    2011-01-01

    The vulnerability and inefficiency of backing up data on-site is prompting school districts to switch to more secure, less troublesome cloud-based options. District auditors are pushing for a better way to back up their data than the on-site, tape-based system that had been used for years. About three years ago, Hendrick School District in…

  17. Discipline Based Arts Education. [Videotape].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, Lori

    This 5-part video lesson deals with discipline-based art education in the elementary school. The video features a university professor who is a specialist in methods and the integration of art into the elementary classroom; each part of the video lesson is 30 minutes in length. First defining discipline-based art education as an approach, not a…

  18. Radiological Worker Computer Based Training

    2003-02-06

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed an interactive computer based training (CBT) version of the standardized DOE Radiological Worker training program. This CD-ROM based program utilizes graphics, animation, photographs, sound and video to train users in ten topical areas: radiological fundamentals, biological effects, dose limits, ALARA, personnel monitoring, controls and postings, emergency response, contamination controls, high radiation areas, and lessons learned.

  19. Using dBase III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Janet; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Four articles on dBASE III include three on library applications: a photocopy invoicing system for interlibrary loan, a vertical file subject headings list program, and a subject index to statistical resources. Another article explains the differences between interpreters and compilers and the advantages of the Clipper compiler for dBASE III. (EM)

  20. ANAEROBIC/AEROBIC BIODEGRADATION OF PENTACHLOROPHENOL USING GAC FLUIDIXED BED REACTORS: OPTIMIZATION OF THE EMPTY BED CONTACT TIME

    EPA Science Inventory

    An integrated reactor system has been developed to remediate pentachlorophenol (PCP) containing wastes using sequential anaerobic and aerobic biodegradation. Anaerobically, PCP was degraded to approximately equimolar concentrations (>99%) of chlorophenol (CP) in a granular activa...