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  1. Virtual PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  2. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2005-05-17

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  3. PCR thermocycler

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  4. Reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR).

    PubMed

    Bachman, Julia

    2013-01-01

    RT-PCR is commonly used to test for genetic diseases and to characterize gene expression in various tissue types, cell types, and over developmental time courses. This serves as a form of expression profiling, but typically as a candidate approach. RT-PCR is also commonly used to clone cDNAs for further use with other molecular biology techniques (e.g., see Oligo(dT)-primed RT-PCR isolation of polyadenylated RNA degradation intermediates and Circularized RT-PCR (cRT-PCR): analysis of RNA 5' ends, 3' ends, and poly(A) tails).

  5. Sex Determination Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kima, Peter E.; Rasche, Madeline E.

    2004-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can…

  6. Sex determination using PCR.

    PubMed

    Kima, Peter E; Rasche, Madeline E

    2004-03-01

    PCR has revolutionized many aspects of biochemistry and molecular biology research. In the following exercise, students learn PCR by isolating their own DNA, amplifying specific segments of the X and Y chromosomes, and estimating the sizes of the PCR products using agarose gel electrophoresis. Based on the pattern of PCR products, students can distinguish between male and female samples and determine the gender of an unknown DNA donor. The exercise is presented for upper division undergraduate majors in microbiology, biochemistry, and molecular biology, but can be adapted to different academic levels and disciplines. The use of student samples in the exercise can enhance learning of these techniques by making PCR and agarose gel electrophoresis directly relevant to the students.

  7. In silico PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bing; Zhang, Changbin

    2011-01-01

    In silico PCR analysis is a useful and efficient complementary method to ensure primer specificity for an extensive range of PCR applications from gene discovery, molecular diagnosis, and pathogen detection to forensic DNA typing. In silico PCR, SNPCheck, and Primer-BLAST are commonly used web-based in silico PCR tools. Their applications are discussed here in stepwise detail along with several examples, which aim to make it easier for the intended users to apply the tools. This virtual PCR method can assist in the selection of newly designed primers, identify potential mismatches in the primer binding sites due to known SNPs, and avoid the amplification of unwanted amplicons so that potential problems can be prevented before any "wet bench" experiment.

  8. Real-Time PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, A.; Boulle, N.; Lutfalla, G. S.

    Over the past few years there has been a considerable development of DNA amplification by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and real-time PCR has now superseded conventional PCR techniques in many areas, e.g., the quantification of nucleic acids and genotyping. This new approach is based on the detection and quantification of a fluorescent signal proportional to the amount of amplicons generated by PCR. Real-time detection is achieved by coupling a thermocycler with a fluorimeter. This chapter discusses the general principles of quantitative real-time PCR, the different steps involved in implementing the technique, and some examples of applications in medicine. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provides a way of obtaining a large number of copies of a double-stranded DNA fragment of known sequence. This DNA amplification technique, developed in 1985 by K. Mullis (Cetus Corporation), saw a spectacular development over the space of a few years, revolutionising the methods used up to then in molecular biology. Indeed, PCR has many applications, such as the detection of small amounts of DNA, cloning, and quantitative analysis (assaying), each of which will be discussed further below.

  9. Overlap extension PCR cloning.

    PubMed

    Bryksin, Anton; Matsumura, Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Rising demand for recombinant proteins has motivated the development of efficient and reliable cloning methods. Here we show how a beginner can clone virtually any DNA insert into a plasmid of choice without the use of restriction endonucleases or T4 DNA ligase. Chimeric primers encoding plasmid sequence at the 5' ends and insert sequence at the 3' ends are designed and synthesized. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is utilized to amplify the desired insert by PCR. The double-stranded product is subsequently employed as a pair of mega-primers in a PCR-like reaction with circular plasmids. The original plasmids are then destroyed in restriction digests with Dpn I. The product of the overlap extension PCR is used to transform competent Escherichia coli cells. Phusion(®) DNA polymerase is used for both the amplification and fusion reactions, so both steps can be monitored and optimized in the same way. PMID:23996437

  10. Explanatory chapter: PCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Fernández, Rubén

    2013-01-01

    This chapter is intended as a guide on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primer design (for information on PCR, see General PCR and Explanatory Chapter: Troubleshooting PCR). In the next section, general guidelines will be provided, followed by a discussion on primer design for specific applications. A list of recommended software tools is shown at the end.

  11. QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) held a workshop in January 2003 on the detection of viruses in water using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Speakers were asked to address a series of specific questions, including whether a single standard method coul...

  12. QUALITY CONTROLS FOR PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this presentation is to present an overview of the quality control (QC) sections of a draft EPA document entitled, "Quality Assurance/Quality Control Guidance for Laboratories Performing PCR Analyses on Environmental Samples." This document has been prepared by th...

  13. MAMMALIAN DNA IN PCR REAGENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high- cycle PCR amplification t...

  14. Digital droplet PCR on disk.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Friedrich; Trotter, Martin; Geltman, Marcel; Schwemmer, Frank; Wadle, Simon; Domínguez-Garrido, Elena; López, María; Cervera-Acedo, Cristina; Santibáñez, Paula; von Stetten, Felix; Zengerle, Roland; Paust, Nils

    2016-01-01

    Existing systems for digital droplet PCR (ddPCR) either suffer from low integration or are difficult to introduce to mass fabrication. Here we present an integrated system that is compatible to mass fabrication and combines emulsification, PCR, and fluorescence readout in a single chamber within a disposable cartridge (disk). Droplets are generated by injecting the sample into fluorinated oil via centrifugal step emulsification. The resulting emulsion is aligned in the PCR and readout zone by capillary action. During thermocycling, gas bubbles generated by degassing are removed by capillary driven transport through tapered regions in the PCR chamber. Thereby, the positioning of the emulsion within the readout zone of the PCR chamber is ensured at any time and no bubbles are present during readout. Manual handling of the disk solely requires pipetting of oil and PCR mix into the inlet structures, placing the disk into the thermocycler and subsequently into a microarray scanner. The functionality of the ddPCR process chain is demonstrated by quantitative detection of the cystic fibrosis causing mutation p.Phe508del, which is of interest for non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT). The mutation was detected in a concentration range spanning four orders of magnitude. We envision that this work will lay the base for the development of highly integrated sample-to-digital-answer PCR systems that can be employed in routine clinical diagnosis. PMID:26610263

  15. Nanoliter high throughput quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Tom; Hurley, James; Garcia, Javier; Yoder, Karl; Katz, Arrin; Roberts, Douglas; Cho, Jamie; Kanigan, Tanya; Ilyin, Sergey E.; Horowitz, Daniel; Dixon, James M.; Brenan, Colin J.H.

    2006-01-01

    Understanding biological complexity arising from patterns of gene expression requires accurate and precise measurement of RNA levels across large numbers of genes simultaneously. Real time PCR (RT-PCR) in a microtiter plate is the preferred method for quantitative transcriptional analysis but scaling RT-PCR to higher throughputs in this fluidic format is intrinsically limited by cost and logistic considerations. Hybridization microarrays measure the transcription of many thousands of genes simultaneously yet are limited by low sensitivity, dynamic range, accuracy and sample throughput. The hybrid approach described here combines the superior accuracy, precision and dynamic range of RT-PCR with the parallelism of a microarray in an array of 3072 real time, 33 nl polymerase chain reactions (RT-PCRs) the size of a microscope slide. RT-PCR is demonstrated with an accuracy and precision equivalent to the same assay in a 384-well microplate but in a 64-fold smaller reaction volume, a 24-fold higher analytical throughput and a workflow compatible with standard microplate protocols. PMID:17000636

  16. [Genotyping of ABO loci in para-Bombay type individuals].

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Qiang; Luo, Guang-Ping

    2004-08-01

    To study the molecular genetic basis of ABO alleles in para-Bombay type individuals, samples from five para-Bombay type individuals identified by serologic tests including absorption-elution tests, saliva neutralizing or inhibitor substances tests, were genotyped by using PCR-SSP based ABO genotyping. Exon 6 and exon 7 at the ABO locus for all 5 samples were sequenced. The results showed that the ABO genotypes of five para-Bombay samples were A102B1, A102B1, A102O1, A102B1, B1O1 respectively, the direct DNA sequencing results were in accordance with the results genotyped by PCR-SSP method, No novel nucleotide mutation was found at the exon 6 and exon 7 of ABO gene. In conclusion, the ABO genotyping assay by PCR-SSP provide a simple, rapid and accurate method for determining the ABO type of para-Bombay cases.

  17. Design and experiment of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2002-04-01

    There are considerable interests in integrating Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip can have much fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occur particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Design study and experiment of silicon PCR chips are presented with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make a significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. Different solutions to reduce PCR chip failure have been proposed. One of the solutions was implemented in the experiment, confirming the design study results. Silicon PCR chips have been fabricated. Thermal cycling and initial DNA amplification results are presented.

  18. PALATAL DYSMORPHOGENESIS: QUANTITATIVE RT-PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Palatal Dysmorphogenesis : Quantitative RT-PCR

    Gary A. Held and Barbara D. Abbott

    Reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is a very sensitive method for detecting mRNA in tissue samples. However, as it is usually performed it is does not yield quantitativ...

  19. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control. PMID:23513039

  20. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control.

  1. Comparison of next-generation droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) with quantitative PCR (qPCR) for enumeration of Cryptosporidium oocysts in faecal samples.

    PubMed

    Yang, Rongchang; Paparini, Andrea; Monis, Paul; Ryan, Una

    2014-12-01

    Clinical microbiology laboratories rely on quantitative PCR for its speed, sensitivity, specificity and ease-of-use. However, quantitative PCR quantitation requires the use of a standard curve or normalisation to reference genes. Droplet digital PCR provides absolute quantitation without the need for calibration curves. A comparison between droplet digital PCR and quantitative PCR-based analyses was conducted for the enteric parasite Cryptosporidium, which is an important cause of gastritis in both humans and animals. Two loci were analysed (18S rRNA and actin) using a range of Cryptosporidium DNA templates, including recombinant plasmids, purified haemocytometer-counted oocysts, commercial flow cytometry-counted oocysts and faecal DNA samples from sheep, cattle and humans. Each method was evaluated for linearity, precision, limit of detection and cost. Across the same range of detection, both methods showed a high degree of linearity and positive correlation for standards (R(2)⩾0.999) and faecal samples (R(2)⩾0.9750). The precision of droplet digital PCR, as measured by mean Relative Standard Deviation (RSD;%), was consistently better compared with quantitative PCR, particularly for the 18S rRNA locus, but was poorer as DNA concentration decreased. The quantitative detection of quantitative PCR was unaffected by DNA concentration, but droplet digital PCR quantitative PCR was less affected by the presence of inhibitors, compared with quantitative PCR. For most templates analysed including Cryptosporidium-positive faecal DNA, the template copy numbers, as determined by droplet digital PCR, were consistently lower than by quantitative PCR. However, the quantitations obtained by quantitative PCR are dependent on the accuracy of the standard curve and when the quantitative PCR data were corrected for pipetting and DNA losses (as determined by droplet digital PCR), then the sensitivity of both methods was comparable. A cost analysis based on 96 samples revealed that

  2. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  3. Electrothermal modeling of silicon PCR chips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Zheng; Zhao, Zhan; Xia, Shanhong

    2001-04-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) on a microchip has drawn considerable attention in recent years. Although a microchip can have must fast heating and cooling rate, the delicacy in its structure makes the PCR experiment difficult and cracks often occurs particularly for the thin membrane type of PCR chips. Electrothermal modeling of PCR chips is presented using commercial MEMS software tool IntelliSuiteTM, with the aim of identifying the problems encountered in experiment and finding an optimum chip structure. Heating characteristics of four different heater designs have been compared, so have the PCR chambers with fixed frame and with suspended frame. The thermal stress analysis has shown that the structure and heater design can make significant difference in heating characteristics and in reducing the failure of PCR chips. The computer simulation has confirmed what has been found in experiment the reason of membrane cracks. Improvement in PCR chip design has been proposed.

  4. Multiplexed Primer Prediction for PCR

    SciTech Connect

    2007-07-23

    MPP predicts sets of multiplex-compatible primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), finding a near minimal set of primers such that at least one amplicon will be generated from every target sequence in the input file. The code finds highly conserved oligos that are suitable as primers, according to user-specified desired primer characteristics such as length, melting temperature, and amplicon length. The primers are predicted not to form unwanted dimer or hairpin structures. The target sequences used as input can be diverse, since no multiple sequence alighment is required. The code is scalable, taking up to tens of thousands of sequences as input, and works, for example, to find a "universal primer set" for all viral genomes provided as a single input file. The code generates a periodic check-point file, thus in the event of premature execution termination, the application can be restarted from the last check-point file.

  5. Multiplexed Primer Prediction for PCR

    2007-07-23

    MPP predicts sets of multiplex-compatible primers for Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR), finding a near minimal set of primers such that at least one amplicon will be generated from every target sequence in the input file. The code finds highly conserved oligos that are suitable as primers, according to user-specified desired primer characteristics such as length, melting temperature, and amplicon length. The primers are predicted not to form unwanted dimer or hairpin structures. The target sequencesmore » used as input can be diverse, since no multiple sequence alighment is required. The code is scalable, taking up to tens of thousands of sequences as input, and works, for example, to find a "universal primer set" for all viral genomes provided as a single input file. The code generates a periodic check-point file, thus in the event of premature execution termination, the application can be restarted from the last check-point file.« less

  6. Application of Reverse Transcription-PCR and Real-Time PCR in Nanotoxicity Research

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yiqun; Wan, Rong; Zhang, Qunwei

    2016-01-01

    Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) is a relatively simple and inexpensive technique to determine the expression level of target genes and is widely used in biomedical science research including nanotoxicology studies for semiquantitative analysis. Real-time PCR allows for the detection of PCR amplification in the exponential growth phase of the reaction and is much more quantitative than traditional RT-PCR. Although a number of kits and reagents for RT-PCR and real-time PCR are commercially available, the basic principles are the same. Here, we describe the procedures for total RNA isolation by using TRI Reagent, for reverse transcription (RT) by M-MLV reverse transcriptase, and for PCR by GoTaq® DNA Polymerase. And real-time PCR will be performed on an iQ5 multicolor real-time PCR detection system by using iQ™ SYBR Green Supermix. PMID:22975959

  7. [Detection of cytomegalovirus by real-time PCR in HIV-positive plasm].

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Tachiquín, Martha Eugenia; Gómez-Delgado, Alejandro; Valdez-Salazar, Hilda Alicia; Aguilera, Penélope

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: el citomegalovirus es responsable de infecciones persistentes, generalmente asintomáticas en personas sanas pero que en ausencia de una respuesta inmune efectiva puede causar enfermedad severa, por ello es muy importante su detección temprana en los individuos con trastornos de la inmunidad. El objetivo de esta investigación fue hacer un análisis del límite de detección, sensibilidad y concordancia de la reacción en cadena de la polimerasa (PCR) en punto final con los obtenidos con la PCR en tiempo real. MÉTODOS: se realizó un estudio transversal con 43 muestras de plasma humano positivas al virus de la inmunodeficiencia humano, provenientes de individuos de 18 o más años de edad, de uno u otro sexo. Todas las muestras tuvieron una carga viral-VIH mayor a 100 000 copias/mL. Para la PCR en punto final se empleó un método comercial para identificar UL54 (gen viral blanco) y para la PCR en tiempo real se amplificaron fragmentos de los genes UL54 (gen temprano) y UL83 (gen tardío) del citomegalovirus humano.

  8. The polymerase chain reaction (PCR): general methods.

    PubMed

    Waters, Daniel L E; Shapter, Frances M

    2014-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) converts very low quantities of DNA into very high quantities and is the foundation of many specialized techniques of molecular biology. PCR utilizes components of the cellular machinery of mitotic cell division in vitro which respond predictably to user inputs. This chapter introduces the principles of PCR and discusses practical considerations from target sequence definition through to optimization and application.

  9. Pitfalls in PCR troubleshooting: Expect the unexpected?

    PubMed

    Schrick, Livia; Nitsche, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    PCR is a well-understood and established laboratory technique often used in molecular diagnostics. Huge experience has been accumulated over the last years regarding the design of PCR assays and their set-up, including in-depth troubleshooting to obtain the optimal PCR assay for each purpose. Here we report a PCR troubleshooting that came up with a surprising result never observed before. With this report we hope to sensitize the reader to this peculiar problem and to save troubleshooting efforts in similar situations, especially in time-critical and ambitious diagnostic settings.

  10. Pitfalls in PCR troubleshooting: Expect the unexpected?

    PubMed Central

    Schrick, Livia; Nitsche, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    PCR is a well-understood and established laboratory technique often used in molecular diagnostics. Huge experience has been accumulated over the last years regarding the design of PCR assays and their set-up, including in-depth troubleshooting to obtain the optimal PCR assay for each purpose. Here we report a PCR troubleshooting that came up with a surprising result never observed before. With this report we hope to sensitize the reader to this peculiar problem and to save troubleshooting efforts in similar situations, especially in time-critical and ambitious diagnostic settings. PMID:27077041

  11. Propidium monoazide reverse transcriptase PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus.

    PubMed

    Karim, Mohammad R; Fout, G Shay; Johnson, Clifford H; White, Karen M; Parshionikar, Sandhya U

    2015-07-01

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the public health significance of positive findings are limited. In this study, PMA RT-PCR and RT-qPCR assays were evaluated for selective detection of infectious poliovirus, murine norovirus (MNV-1), and Norwalk virus. Viruses were inactivated using heat, chlorine, and ultraviolet light (UV). Infectious and non-infectious viruses were treated with PMA before RT-PCR and RT-qPCR. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and heat and chlorine inactivated poliovirus. PMA RT-PCR was able to differentiate selectively between infectious and noninfectious murine norovirus only when inactivated by chlorine. However, PMA RT-PCR could not differentiate infectious Norwalk virus from virus particles rendered non-infectious by any treatment. PMA RT-PCR assay was not able to differentiate between infectious and UV inactivated viruses suggesting that viral capsid damage may be necessary for PMA to enter and bind to the viral genome. PMA RT-PCR on naked MNV-1 and Norwalk virus RNA suggest that PMA RT-PCR can be used to detect intact, potentially infectious MNV-1 and Norwalk viruses and can be used to exclude the detection of free viral RNA by PCR assay. PMID:25796356

  12. Testing for Genetically Modified Foods Using PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Ann; Sajan, Samin

    2005-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a Nobel Prize-winning technique that amplifies a specific segment of DNA and is commonly used to test for the presence of genetic modifications. Students use PCR to test corn meal and corn-muffin mixes for the presence of a promoter commonly used in genetically modified foods, the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S…

  13. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  14. COLD-PCR: Applications and Advantages.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhuang; Jabbar, Kausar J

    2016-01-01

    Co-amplification at lower denaturation temperature-based polymerase chain reaction (COLD-PCR) is a single-step amplification method that results in the enhancement of both known and unknown minority alleles during PCR, irrespective of mutation type and position. This method is based on exploitation of the critical temperature, Tc, at which mutation-containing DNA is preferentially melted over wild type. COLD-PCR can be a good strategy for mutation detection in specimens with high nonneoplastic cell content, small specimens in which neoplastic cells are difficult to micro-dissect and therefore enrich, and whenever a mutation is suspected to be present but is undetectable using conventional PCR and sequencing methods. We describe in this chapter our COLD-PCR-based pyrosequencing method for KRAS mutation detection in various clinical samples using DNA extracted from either fresh or fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens.

  15. A new PCR method: one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guang; Mitsuda, Yoko; Ezaki, Takayuki; Hamajima, Nobuyuki

    2012-10-01

    Polymerase chain reaction with confronting two-pair primers (PCR-CTPP) is a convenient method for genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms, saving time, and costs. It uses four primers for PCR; F1 and R1 for one allele, and F2 and R2 for the other allele, by which three different sizes of DNA are amplified; between F1 and R1, between F2 and R2, and between F1 and R2. To date, we have applied PCR-CTPP successfully for genotyping more than 60 polymorphisms. However, it is not rare that PCR does not produce balanced amplification of allele specific bands. Accordingly, the method was modified by attaching a common sequence at the 5' end of two-pair primers and adding another primer with the common sequence in PCR, in total five different primers in a tube for PCR. The modification allowed one primer amplification for the products of initial PCR with confronting two-pair primers, named as one primer amplification of PCR-CTPP products (OPA-CTPP). This article demonstrates an example for an A/G polymorphism of paraoxonase 1 (PON1) Gln192Arg (rs662). PCR-CTPP failed clear genotyping for the polymorphism, while OPA-CTPP successfully produced PCR products corresponding to the allele. The present example indicated that the OPA-CTPP would be useful in the case that PCR-CTPP failed to produce balanced PCR products specific to each allele.

  16. Single-molecule PCR: an artifact-free PCR approach for the analysis of somatic mutations.

    PubMed

    Kraytsberg, Yevgenya; Khrapko, Konstantin

    2005-09-01

    A critical review of the clone-by-clone approach to the analysis of complex spectra of somatic mutations is presented. The study of a priori unknown somatic mutations requires painstaking analysis of complex mixtures of multiple mutant and non-mutant DNA molecules. If mutant fractions are sufficiently high, these mixtures can be dissected by the cloning of individual DNA molecules and scanning of the individual clones for mutations (e.g., by sequencing). Currently, the majority of such cloning is performed using PCR fragments. However, post-PCR cloning may result in various PCR artifacts - PCR errors and jumping PCR - and preferential amplification of certain mutations. This review argues that single-molecule PCR is a simple alternative that promises to evade the disadvantages inherent to post-PCR cloning and enhance mutational analysis in the future. PMID:16149882

  17. Real-time PCR detection chemistry.

    PubMed

    Navarro, E; Serrano-Heras, G; Castaño, M J; Solera, J

    2015-01-15

    Real-time PCR is the method of choice in many laboratories for diagnostic and food applications. This technology merges the polymerase chain reaction chemistry with the use of fluorescent reporter molecules in order to monitor the production of amplification products during each cycle of the PCR reaction. Thus, the combination of excellent sensitivity and specificity, reproducible data, low contamination risk and reduced hand-on time, which make it a post-PCR analysis unnecessary, has made real-time PCR technology an appealing alternative to conventional PCR. The present paper attempts to provide a rigorous overview of fluorescent-based methods for nucleic acid analysis in real-time PCR described in the literature so far. Herein, different real-time PCR chemistries have been classified into two main groups; the first group comprises double-stranded DNA intercalating molecules, such as SYBR Green I and EvaGreen, whereas the second includes fluorophore-labeled oligonucleotides. The latter, in turn, has been divided into three subgroups according to the type of fluorescent molecules used in the PCR reaction: (i) primer-probes (Scorpions, Amplifluor, LUX, Cyclicons, Angler); (ii) probes; hydrolysis (TaqMan, MGB-TaqMan, Snake assay) and hybridization (Hybprobe or FRET, Molecular Beacons, HyBeacon, MGB-Pleiades, MGB-Eclipse, ResonSense, Yin-Yang or displacing); and (iii) analogues of nucleic acids (PNA, LNA, ZNA, non-natural bases: Plexor primer, Tiny-Molecular Beacon). In addition, structures, mechanisms of action, advantages and applications of such real-time PCR probes and analogues are depicted in this review.

  18. Gene amplification and qRT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Jones, Cerith; Filloux, Alain

    2014-01-01

    This chapter includes methods for the use of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with Pseudomonas, and several specific tips for their successful application in this organism. The first part of the chapter includes methods for purifying genomic DNA from, and amplifying genes from, Pseudomonas, in addition to methods which describe how to prepare a cell lysate from Pseudomonas species for colony PCR reactions. The chapter continues with a switch in focus from DNA to RNA, describing methods for RNA isolation from Pseudomonas, cDNA generation, and finally q-RT-PCR to investigate relative changes in gene expression. PMID:24818925

  19. Recent advances in quantitative PCR (qPCR) applications in food microbiology.

    PubMed

    Postollec, Florence; Falentin, Hélène; Pavan, Sonia; Combrisson, Jérôme; Sohier, Danièle

    2011-08-01

    Molecular methods are being increasingly applied to detect, quantify and study microbial populations in food or during food processes. Among these methods, PCR-based techniques have been the subject of considerable focus and ISO guidelines have been established for the detection of food-borne pathogens. More particularly, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is considered as a method of choice for the detection and quantification of microorganisms. One of its major advantages is to be faster than conventional culture-based methods. It is also highly sensitive, specific and enables simultaneous detection of different microorganisms. Application of reverse-transcription-qPCR (RT-qPCR) to study population dynamics and activities through quantification of gene expression in food, by contrast with the use of qPCR, is just beginning. Provided that appropriate controls are included in the analyses, qPCR and RT-qPCR appear to be highly accurate and reliable for quantification of genes and gene expression. This review addresses some important technical aspects to be considered when using these techniques. Recent applications of qPCR and RT-qPCR in food microbiology are given. Some interesting applications such as risk analysis or studying the influence of industrial processes on gene expression and microbial activity are reported.

  20. [Identification of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex by PCR of AIDS and disseminated mycobacteriosis].

    PubMed

    García-Elorriaga, Guadalupe; Degollado-Estrada, Edgar; Villagómez-Ruiz, Alfredo; Cortés-Torres, Nancy; Arreguín-Reséndiz, Lilián; Del Rey-Pineda, Guillermo; González-Bonilla, César

    2016-01-01

    Introducción: el objetivo de este artículo es Identificar y diferenciar el complejo MAC por PCR en pacientes con SIDA y micobacteriosis diseminada. Métodos: se llevó a cabo un estudio transversal para identificar MAC por biología molecular. Se sintetizaron dos conjuntos de iniciadores: MAV y MIN, para M. avium y M. intracellulare, respectivamente. El ADN total de células obtenidas de 29 aislados clínicos y muestras de suero de otros 24 pacientes con SIDA e infección micobacteriana diseminada fue extraído y se amplificó por PCR con los iniciadores MAV y MIN. Cada uno de los iniciadores MAV y MIN amplificó un segmento altamente específico de 1.3 kb del ADN homólogo, respectivamente. Resultados: veintinueve ADN de los aislados clínicos de MAC identificadas por Gen-Probe AccuProbes se amplificaron con los iniciadores MAV (M. avium). De las 24 muestras clínicas, 3 fueron positivas para M. avium y 6 para M. tuberculosis. Conclusiones: nuestros resultados demostraron que la técnica de PCR se puede aplicar para la diferenciación de M. avium y M. intracellulare por iniciadores específicos 16S rRNA. En pacientes con estadio avanzado de SIDA y en quienes se sospecha micobacteriosis diseminada, la presencia de anemia (incluso con cultivos negativos) fosfatasa alcalina elevada y una mediana de CD4 de 15.9/ml, se debe considerar seriamente el diagnóstico de infección por MAC; sugerimos que, de acuerdo con nuestros resultados, se justifica una estratificación más precisa de los pacientes en términos de sus recuentos de células T CD4.

  1. A naked-eye colorimetric "PCR developer"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentini, Paola; Pompa, Pier Paolo

    2016-04-01

    Despite several advances in molecular biology and diagnostics, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) is currently the gold standard for nucleic acids amplification and detection, due to its versatility, low-cost and universality, with estimated <10 billion reactions per year and a worldwide market of several billion dollars/year. Nevertheless, PCR still relies on the laborious, time-consuming, and multi-step gel electrophoresis-based detection, which includes gel casting, electrophoretic run, gel staining, and gel visualization. In this work, we propose a "PCR developer", namely a universal one-step, one-tube method, based on controlled aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), to detect PCR products by naked eye in few minutes, with no need for any instrumentation. We demonstrated the specificity and sensitivity of the PCR developer on different model targets, suitable for a qualitative detection in real-world diagnostics (i.e., gene rearrangements, genetically modified organisms, and pathogens). The PCR developer proved to be highly specific and ultra-sensitive, discriminating down to few copies of HIV viral DNA, diluted in an excess of interfering human genomic DNA, which is a clinically relevant viral load. Hence, it could be a valuable tool for both academic research and clinical applications.

  2. A systematic analysis of PCR contamination.

    PubMed

    Scherczinger, C A; Ladd, C; Bourke, M T; Adamowicz, M S; Johannes, P M; Scherczinger, R; Beesley, T; Lee, H C

    1999-09-01

    In light of the strict legal scrutiny surrounding DNA typing at this time, it has become necessary to systematically address the issue of PCR contamination. To precisely define the parameters affecting PCR contamination under casework analysis conditions, PCR amplification reactions were intentionally compromised by employing sub-standard laboratory technique and by introducing secondary sources of DNA. The PCR parameters considered for potential sources of contamination include amplification set-up, amplification product handling, aerosol DNA and storage. In addition, analyst technique was evaluated by modifying or eliminating standard safeguards. Under the circumstances normally encountered during casework analysis, PCR contamination was never noted. Significantly, using the dot blot detection method, contamination was never observed when nanogram quantities of genomic DNA were mishandled or aerosolized. Contamination occurred only when amplification product was carelessly manipulated or purposefully sprayed near or directly into open tubes containing water or genomic DNA. Although standard precautions should be employed during PCR-based DNA typing, our data indicates that contamination during amplification procedures is not prevalent when detected by dot blot analysis. PMID:10486955

  3. Para-aortic lymphocyst.

    PubMed

    Helmkamp, B F; Krebs, H B; Isikoff, M B; Poliakoff, S R; Averette, H E

    1980-10-15

    Although numerous articles regarding the etiology, incidence, complications, and management of pelvic lymphocysts have been published in the American literature since 1958, there has been no mention of para-aortic lymphocyst as a complication of para-aortic node dissection. Two recent cases of symptomatic para-aortic lymphocyst have prompted a review of our para-aortic node dissection technique when this procedure is not combined with a more extensive pelvic lymphadenectomy. Our modification in technique is to use retroperitoneal para-aortic drainage by constant pressure-controlled suction following closure of the posterior parietal peritoneum, and the results in our first 15 patients are presented. There were no complications related to the drainage technique. Abdominal ultrasound and intravenous urography have proved to be excellent diagnostic tools in the initial evaluation and subsequent follow-up of para-aortic lymphocytes.

  4. Specific PCR and real-time PCR assays for detection and quantitation of 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'.

    PubMed

    Jawhari, Maan; Abrahamian, Peter; Sater, Ali Abdel; Sobh, Hana; Tawidian, Patil; Abou-Jawdah, Yusuf

    2015-02-01

    Almond witches' broom (AlmWB) is a fast-spreading lethal disease of almond, peach and nectarine associated with 'Candidatus Phytoplasma phoenicium'. The development of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays for the sensitive and specific detection of the phytoplasma is of prime importance for early detection of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and for epidemiological studies. The developed qPCR assay herein uses a TaqMan(®) probe labeled with Black Hole Quencher Plus. The specificity of the PCR and that of the qPCR detection protocols were tested on 17 phytoplasma isolates belonging to 11 phytoplasma 16S rRNA groups, on samples of almond, peach, nectarine, native plants and insects infected or uninfected with the phytoplasma. The developed assays showed high specificity against 'Ca. P. phoenicium' and no cross-reactivity against any other phytoplasma, plant or insect tested. The sensitivity of the developed PCR and qPCR assays was similar to the conventional nested PCR protocol using universal primers. The qPCR assay was further validated by quantitating AlmWB phytoplasma in different hosts, plant parts and potential insect vectors. The highest titers of 'Ca. P. phoenicium' were detected in the phloem tissues of stems and roots of almond and nectarine trees, where they averaged from 10(5) to 10(6) genomic units per nanogram of host DNA (GU/ng of DNA). The newly developed PCR and qPCR protocols are reliable, specific and sensitive methods that are easily applicable to high-throughput diagnosis of AlmWB in plants and insects and can be used for surveys of potential vectors and alternative hosts.

  5. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample. PMID:27393656

  6. Rational primer design greatly improves differential display-PCR (DD-PCR).

    PubMed Central

    Graf, D; Fisher, A G; Merkenschlager, M

    1997-01-01

    Since its conception in 1992, differential display PCR (DD-PCR) has attracted widespread interest. Theoretically an attractive cloning approach, it combines the comparative analysis of several samples with the sensitivity of PCR. Although a large number of studies embracing this technology have been initiated, few novel genes of interest have been identified, suggesting that the method has not realised its potential. The present report shows that by modifying primer design, sampling of differentially expressed genes can be greatly enhanced and relevant genes can be isolated. Using our modified conditions DD-PCR efficiently screens a wide range of gene expression levels, in which differences are represented on a linear scale. PMID:9153330

  7. A method for amplification of unknown flanking sequences based on touchdown PCR and suppression-PCR.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; He, Dan; Li, Guangquan; Zhang, Yanhua; Lv, Huiying; Wang, Li

    2016-09-15

    Thermal asymmetric staggered PCR is the most widely used technique to obtain the flanking sequences. However, it has some limitations, including a low rate of positivity, and complex operation. In this study, a improved method of it was made based on suppression-PCR and touchdown PCR. The PCR fragment obtained by the amplification was used directly for sequencing after gel purification. Using this improved method, the positive rate of amplified flanking sequences of the ATMT mutants reached 99%. In addition, the time from DNA extraction to flanking sequence analysis was shortened to 2 days with about 6 dollars each sample.

  8. PCR+ In Diesel Fuels and Emissions Research

    SciTech Connect

    McAdams, H.T.

    2002-04-15

    In past work for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), PCR+ was developed as an alternative methodology for building statistical models. PCR+ is an extension of Principal Components Regression (PCR), in which the eigenvectors resulting from Principal Components Analysis (PCA) are used as predictor variables in regression analysis. The work was motivated by the observation that most heavy-duty diesel (HDD) engine research was conducted with test fuels that had been ''concocted'' in the laboratory to vary selected fuel properties in isolation from each other. This approach departs markedly from the real world, where the reformulation of diesel fuels for almost any purpose leads to changes in a number of interrelated properties. In this work, we present new information regarding the problems encountered in the conventional approach to model-building and how the PCR+ method can be used to improve research on the relationship between fuel characteristics and engine emissions. We also discuss how PCR+ can be applied to a variety of other research problems related to diesel fuels.

  9. PCR-based diagnostics for anaerobic infections.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuli

    2005-01-01

    Conventional methods to identify anaerobic bacteria have often relied on unique clinical findings, isolation of organisms, and laboratory identification by morphology and biochemical tests (phenotypic tests). Although these methods are still fundamental, there is an increasing move toward molecular diagnostics of anaerobes. In this review, some of the molecular approaches to anaerobic diagnostics based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are discussed. This includes several technological advances in PCR-based methods for the detection, identification, and quantitation of anaerobes including real-time PCR which has been successfully used to provide rapid, quantitative data on anaerobic species on clinical samples. Since its introduction in the mid-1980s, PCR has provided many molecular diagnostic tools, some of which are discussed within this review. With the advances in micro-array technology and real-time PCR methods, the future is bright for the development of accurate, quantitative diagnostic tools that can provide information not only on individual anaerobic species but also on whole communities.

  10. Direct chromatin PCR (DC-PCR): hypotonic conditions allow differentiation of chromatin states during thermal cycling.

    PubMed

    Vatolin, Sergei; Khan, Shahper N; Reu, Frederic J

    2012-01-01

    Current methods to study chromatin configuration are not well suited for high throughput drug screening since they require large cell numbers and multiple experimental steps that include centrifugation for isolation of nuclei or DNA. Here we show that site specific chromatin analysis can be achieved in one step by simply performing direct chromatin PCR (DC-PCR) on cells. The basic underlying observation was that standard hypotonic PCR buffers prevent global cellular chromatin solubilization during thermal cycling while more loosely organized chromatin can be amplified. Despite repeated heating to >90 °C, 41 of 61 tested 5' sequences of silenced genes (CDKN2A, PU.1, IRF4, FOSB, CD34) were not amplifiable while 47 could be amplified from expressing cells. Two gene regions (IRF4, FOSB) even required pre-heating of cells in isotonic media to allow this differentiation; otherwise none of 19 assayed sequences yielded PCR products. Cells with baseline expression or epigenetic reactivation gave similar DC-PCR results. Silencing during differentiation of CD34 positive cord blood cells closed respective chromatin while treatment of myeloma cells with an IRF4 transcriptional inhibitor opened a site to DC-PCR that was occupied by RNA polymerase II and NFκB as determined by ChIP. Translation into real-time PCR can not be achieved with commercial real-time PCR buffers which potently open chromatin, but even with simple ethidium bromide addition to standard PCR mastermix we were able to identify hits in small molecules screens that suppressed IRF4 expression or reactivated CDKN2A in myeloma cells using densitometry or visual inspection of PCR plates under UV light. While need in drug development inspired this work, application to genome-wide analysis appears feasible using phi29 for selective amplification of open cellular chromatin followed by library construction from supernatants since such supernatants yielded similar results as gene specific DC-PCR.

  11. [DNA amplification using PCR with abutting primers].

    PubMed

    Garafutdinov, R R; Galimova, A A; Sakhabutdinova, A R; Vakhitov, V A; Chemeris, A V

    2015-01-01

    DNA analysis of ñîmplex biological objects (wastewater, soil, archaeological and forensic samples, etc.) is currently of great interest. DNA of these objects is characterized by low suitability for research due to the violation of its integrity and chemical structure; thus, the detection of specific nucleic acid fragments can be achieved by PCR with contiguous primers. In this paper, we present the results that clarify the specific characteristics of PCR with abutting primers. The 3'-ends of these primers are annealed at adjacent nucleotides of complementary chains of DNA target. It has been shown that the proximity of primers enables the formation of specific reaction products with a higher sensitivity and less reaction time. Using artificially damaged DNA and DNA from the soil we demonstrated that the abutting primers provide assured detection of specific DNA fragments. The results of this work may be taken into account in PCR with degraded (fragmented) DNA.

  12. Propidium monoazide reverse transcription PCR and RT-qPCR for detecting infectious enterovirus and norovirus

    EPA Science Inventory

    Presently there is no established cell line or small animal model that allows for the detection of infectious human norovirus. Current methods based on RT-PCR and RT-qPCR detect both infectious and non-infectious virus and thus the conclusions that may be drawn regarding the publ...

  13. [A novel quantitative PCR with fluorogenic probe].

    PubMed

    Isono, K

    1997-03-01

    The polymerase chain reaction(PCR) is a powerful tool to amplify small amounts of DNA or RNA for various molecular analysis. However, in these analyses, PCR only provides qualitative results. The availability of quantitative PCR provides valuable additional information in various applications. It is difficult to establish absolute quantitation, because PCR amplification is a complicated reaction process of exponential growth. To trace the amplification process, the initial amount of template and the efficiency of amplification in each cycle, has to be determined. Conventional methods have not achieved absolute quantitative analysis. The ABI PRISM 7700 Sequence Detection System has solved these problems with real-time monitoring of the PCR process. The real-time detection system provides essential information to quantify the initial target copy number, because it can draw an amplification curve. Using the 5' nuclease assay, a specific fluorescent signal is generated and measured at every cycle during a run. This system can perform a variety of applications including, quantitation, allele discrimination, PCR optimization and viral screening. Using the ABI PRISM 7700 Sequence Detection System, the rice genome has been quantitatively analyzed. To monitor maturation of the chloroplast genome from proplastid during germ development, 5' nuclease assay set up for Cab and rbcL genes which are located in the nuclear genome and chloroplast genome, respectively. Cab was used as an internal standard for normalization of cell numbers. The maturation process of chloroplast was estimated using the ratio of gene dosage, [rbcL]/[Cab]. After development of cotyledon, a significant increase in copy numbers of the chloroplast was observed. These results indicate that a light-induced chloroplast maturation process is coupled with an increase in chloroplast genome copy numbers.

  14. The Power of Real-Time PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valasek, Mark A.; Repa, Joyce J.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has emerged as a robust and widely used methodology for biological investigation because it can detect and quantify very small amounts of specific nucleic acid sequences. As a research tool, a major application of this technology is the rapid and accurate assessment of changes in gene…

  15. Modeling PCR in Natural Convection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfman, Kevin; Yariv, Ehud; Ben Dov, Guy

    2007-03-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a biochemical protocol for making many copies of a DNA template by thermal cycling between a hot temperature (where the strands are separated) and a cool temperature (where primers are annealed). In natural convection PCR, the requisite thermal cycling is provided by a buoyancy-driven circulating flow of the carrying buffer between a lower hot plate (at the denaturing temperature) and an upper cold plate (at the annealing temperature). We present a multi-component convection-diffusion-reaction model for natural convection-driven PCR when both primers and PCR enzyme are in excess. The evolution of the DNA population achieves a stationary state, wherein the problem is recast as an eigenvalue problem for computing the exponential amplification rate. With a realistic choice of parameters, the model predicts a doubling time on the order of two minutes, in agreement with experiments and much slower than the fluid cycling time. In contrast to what might be expected, the doubling time increases monotonically with the diffusion coefficient.

  16. [Mutation detection by PCR-TGGE].

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, T; Nishiyama, K; Matsuo, M

    1995-07-01

    The variants in enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) heat-labile toxin (LT) gene were detected by temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE). 15 clinical strains isolated from patients and a wild type strain (B2C) were analyzed after the conventional PCR. Although all PCR products (707bp) corresponded to A-subunit of LT, three strains were the different electrophoretic patterns after silver staining as compared to the wild type. For further electrophoretic analyses, the 707bp region was divided into 4 parts. The different ones were localized in the downstream part (183bp), but each those DNA bands was not so clear than DNA bands in 707bp. The clearer patterns were obtained by using a primer attached GC-clamp. The hetero-duplex assays in TGGE were proceeded by a series of procedures in mixing with the equal quantity of PCR products derived from a variant and a wild type, heat-denaturation and then annealing. TGGE of those mixed samples had 4 bands that were 2 front bands as homo-duplex and 2 slower migration bands as hetero-duplex. To Confirm the site of the mutations, the nucleotide sequences in each 183bp PCR products were decided by dideoxynucleotide-fluorescent dye method. Indeed, two variants were recognized four one-base substitutions without deletions and the one was five. Thus, the difference of migration in TGGE depended on the number and the localization in mutation sites.

  17. DNA profiles from fingernails using direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Ottens, Renée; Taylor, Duncan; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    We report on the successful routine amplification of DNA profiles from small sections of fingernails using direct PCR. The data are from 40 nail clippings from eight donors where approximately 4 mm(2) of nail is added directly to the PCR. The NGM™ kit was used that amplifies 15 STR loci plus amelogenin. No increase in cycle number was used and no enrichment of the PCR products was performed. Full DNA profiles were observed in 17 of the 40 profiles with 21 generating partial DNA profiles. The process omits the DNA extraction process, and hence there is no opportunity to quantify the DNA prior to amplifying the STRs, but by not performing a DNA extraction step, the amount of DNA available for PCR is maximized. Single source DNA profiles were observed in 29 of the 38 profiles obtained. The source of the DNA is assumed to be adhering to the underside of the nail. This simple method offers a significant reduction in time to generate DNA profiles from nail clippings, such as those taken from victims of mass disasters, and should be included into a forensic process relatively easily as it requires no change to manufacturer's instructions for amplification.

  18. How Many Microorganisms Are Present? Quantitative Reverse Transcription PCR (qRT-PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Andy; Álvarez, Laura Acuña; Whitby, Corinne; Larsen, Jan

    Quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is a variation of conventional quantitative or real-time PCR, whereby mRNA is first converted into the complementary DNA (cDNA) by reverse transcription, the cDNA is then subsequently quantified by qPCR. The use of mRNA as the initial template allows the quantification of gene transcripts, rather than gene copy numbers. mRNA is only produced by actively metabolising cells and is produced by its corresponding gene to provide a 'blueprint' in order for a cell to manufacture a specific protein. Conventional qPCR detects not only DNA present in actively metabolising cells but also inactive and dead cells. qRT-PCR has the advantage that only actively metabolising cells are detected, hence provides a more reliable measure of microbial activity in oilfield samples. When qRT-PCR is combined with primers and probes for specific genes, the activity of microbial processes important in the oilfield, such as sulphate reduction, methanogenesis and nitrate reduction can be monitored.

  19. Real-time PCR (qPCR) primer design using free online software.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most commonly used fluorescent chemistries are SYBR® Green dyes and TaqMan®, Molecular Beacon or Scorpion probes. SYBR® Green is very simple to use and cost efficient. As SYBR® Green dye binds to any double-stranded DNA product, its success depends greatly on proper primer design. Many types of online primer design software are available, which can be used free of charge to design desirable SYBR® Green-based qPCR primers. This laboratory exercise is intended for those who have a fundamental background in PCR. It addresses the basic fluorescent chemistries of real-time PCR, the basic rules and pitfalls of primer design, and provides a step-by-step protocol for designing SYBR® Green-based primers with free, online software.

  20. Multiplex digital PCR: breaking the one target per color barrier of quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Qun; Bhattacharya, Smiti; Kotsopoulos, Steven; Olson, Jeff; Taly, Valérie; Griffiths, Andrew D; Link, Darren R; Larson, Jonathan W

    2011-07-01

    Quantitative polymerase chain reactions (qPCR) based on real-time PCR constitute a powerful and sensitive method for the analysis of nucleic acids. However, in qPCR, the ability to multiplex targets using differently colored fluorescent probes is typically limited to 4-fold by the spectral overlap of the fluorophores. Furthermore, multiplexing qPCR assays requires expensive instrumentation and most often lengthy assay development cycles. Digital PCR (dPCR), which is based on the amplification of single target DNA molecules in many separate reactions, is an attractive alternative to qPCR. Here we report a novel and easy method for multiplexing dPCR in picolitre droplets within emulsions-generated and read out in microfluidic devices-that takes advantage of both the very high numbers of reactions possible within emulsions (>10(6)) as well as the high likelihood that the amplification of only a single target DNA molecule will initiate within each droplet. By varying the concentration of different fluorogenic probes of the same color, it is possible to identify the different probes on the basis of fluorescence intensity. Adding multiple colors increases the number of possible reactions geometrically, rather than linearly as with qPCR. Accurate and precise copy numbers of up to sixteen per cell were measured using a model system. A 5-plex assay for spinal muscular atrophy was demonstrated with just two fluorophores to simultaneously measure the copy number of two genes (SMN1 and SMN2) and to genotype a single nucleotide polymorphism (c.815A>G, SMN1). Results of a pilot study with SMA patients are presented.

  1. Identification of bacterial plant pathogens using multilocus PCR and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    PCR/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS, previously known as “TIGER”) utilizes PCR with broad range primers to amplify products from wide array of organisms within a taxonomic group, followed by analysis of PCR amplicons using mass spectrometry. Computer analysis of precise masses ...

  2. A quadruplex PCR (qxPCR) assay for adulteration in dairy products.

    PubMed

    Agrimonti, Caterina; Pirondini, Andrea; Marmiroli, Marta; Marmiroli, Nelson

    2015-11-15

    This study describes the development of a quadruplex quantitative Real Time PCR (qxPCR) based on SYBR®GreenER chemistry, for rapid identification of DNA of cow, goat, sheep and buffalo in dairy products, and for quantification of cow DNA in these products. The platform was applied to: (i) mixes of milks at fixed percentages; (ii) cheeses prepared with the same mixes; (iii) commercial dairy products. The methodology enabled the detection of DNA from cow in mixes of milk and cheeses with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.1%. When applied to commercial dairy products the qxPCR gave results comparable with each single-plex Real Time PCR. A good correlation (R(2)>0.9) between peaks' area of derivative of melting curves of amplicons and percentages of cow milk in milk mixes and cheeses, allows for an estimation of cow DNA in a dynamic range varying from 0.1-5% to 1-25%.

  3. The Next-Generation PCR-Based Quantification Method for Ambient Waters: Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiping; Griffith, John F; Weisberg, Stephen B

    2016-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) is increasingly being used for ambient water monitoring, but development of digital polymerase chain reaction (digital PCR) has the potential to further advance the use of molecular techniques in such applications. Digital PCR refines qPCR by partitioning the sample into thousands to millions of miniature reactions that are examined individually for binary endpoint results, with DNA density calculated from the fraction of positives using Poisson statistics. This direct quantification removes the need for standard curves, eliminating the labor and materials associated with creating and running standards with each batch, and removing biases associated with standard variability and mismatching amplification efficiency between standards and samples. Confining reactions and binary endpoint measurements to small partitions also leads to other performance advantages, including reduced susceptibility to inhibition, increased repeatability and reproducibility, and increased capacity to measure multiple targets in one analysis. As such, digital PCR is well suited for ambient water monitoring applications and is particularly advantageous as molecular methods move toward autonomous field application. PMID:27460373

  4. A nanofluidic system for massively parallel PCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenan, Colin; Morrison, Tom; Roberts, Douglas; Hurley, James

    2008-02-01

    Massively parallel nanofluidic systems are lab-on-a-chip devices where solution phase biochemical and biological analyses are implemented in high density arrays of nanoliter holes micro-machined in a thin platen. Polymer coatings make the interior surfaces of the holes hydrophilic and the exterior surface of the platen hydrophobic for precise and accurate self-metered loading of liquids into each hole without cross-contamination. We have created a "nanoplate" based on this concept, equivalent in performance to standard microtiter plates, having 3072 thirty-three nanoliter holes in a stainless steel platen the dimensions of a microscope slide. We report on the performance of this device for PCR-based single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping or quantitative measurement of gene expression by real-time PCR in applications ranging from plant and animal diagnostics, agricultural genetics and human disease research.

  5. Replaceable Microfluidic Cartridges for a PCR Biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, Kevin; Sullivan, Ron

    2005-01-01

    The figure depicts a replaceable microfluidic cartridge that is a component of a miniature biosensor that detects target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences. The biosensor utilizes (1) polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) to multiply the amount of DNA to be detected, (2) fluorogenic polynucleotide probe chemicals for labeling the target DNA sequences, and (3) a high-sensitivity epifluorescence-detection optoelectronic subsystem. Microfluidics is a relatively new field of device development in which one applies techniques for fabricating microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) to miniature systems for containing and/or moving fluids. Typically, microfluidic devices are microfabricated, variously, from silicon or polymers. The development of microfluidic devices for applications that involve PCR and fluorescence-based detection of PCR products poses special challenges

  6. [Indications for PCR in travel medicine].

    PubMed

    Chappuis, F

    2011-05-11

    The use of PCR-based molecular diagnosis in travel medicine remains limited to specific indications such as clinical suspicion of some of the viral hemorrhagic fevers (e.g. Ebola, Marburg), differential diagnosis between Entamoeba histolytica (pathogen) and E. dispar (non pathogen) in the stools, and parasitological diagnosis of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The scope of indications is likely to expand in the coming years with the development of techniques (e.g. multiplex PCR) able to identify several pathogens from a single sample. Simplification and cost-reduction of molecular techniques, which would allow for more equitable access to these diagnostic tools in countries where the targeted diseases are highly prevalent, pose major technological and ethical challenges.

  7. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  8. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and Quantitative PCR Assays for Quantitative Detection of Xanthomonas citri Subsp. citri.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yun; Xia, Qingyan; Yin, Youping; Wang, Zhongkang

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel molecular biology technique providing absolute quantification of target nucleic acids without the need for an external calibrator. Despite its emerging applications in medical diagnosis, there are few reports of its use for the detection of plant pathogens. This work was designed to assess the diagnosis potential of the ddPCR for absolute quantitative detection of Xanthomonas citri subsp. citri, a quarantine plant pathogenic bacterium that causes citrus bacterial canker in susceptible Citrus species. We transferred an established quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for citrus bacterial canker diagnosis directly to the ddPCR format and compared the performance of the two methods. The qPCR assay has a broader dynamic range compared to the ddPCR assay and the ddPCR assay has a significantly higher degree of sensitivity compared to the qPCR assay. The influence of PCR inhibitors can be reduced considerably in the ddPCR assay because the collection of end-point fluorescent signals and the counting of binomial events (positive or negative droplets) are associated with a Poisson algorithm. The ddPCR assay also shows lower coefficient of variation compared to the qPCR assay especially in low target concentration. The linear association of the measurements by ddPCR and qPCR assays is strong (Pearson correlation = 0.8633; P<0.001). Receiver operating characteristic analysis indicates the ddPCR methodology is a more robust approach for diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker. In summary, the results demonstrated that the ddPCR assay has the potential for the quantitative detection of X. citri subsp. citri with high precision and accuracy as compared with the results from qPCR assay. Further studies are required to evaluate and validate the value of ddPCR technology in the diagnosis of plant disease and quarantine applications. PMID:27427975

  9. Digital PCR analysis of circulating nucleic acids.

    PubMed

    Hudecova, Irena

    2015-10-01

    Detection of plasma circulating nucleic acids (CNAs) requires the use of extremely sensitive and precise methods. The commonly used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) poses certain technical limitations in relation to the precise measurement of CNAs whereas the costs of massively parallel sequencing are still relatively high. Digital PCR (dPCR) now represents an affordable and powerful single molecule counting strategy to detect minute amounts of genetic material with performance surpassing many quantitative methods. Microfluidic (chip) and emulsion (droplet)-based technologies have already been integrated into platforms offering hundreds to millions of nanoliter- or even picoliter-scale reaction partitions. The compelling observations reported in the field of cancer research, prenatal testing, transplantation medicine and virology support translation of this technology into routine use. Extremely sensitive plasma detection of rare mutations originating from tumor or placental cells among a large background of homologous sequences facilitates unraveling of the early stages of cancer or the detection of fetal mutations. Digital measurement of quantitative changes in plasma CNAs associated with cancer or graft rejection provides valuable information on the monitoring of disease burden or the recipient's immune response and subsequent therapy treatment. Furthermore, careful quantitative assessment of the viral load offers great value for effective monitoring of antiviral therapy for immunosuppressed or transplant patients. The present review describes the inherent features of dPCR that make it exceptionally robust in precise and sensitive quantification of CNAs. Moreover, I provide an insight into the types of potential clinical applications that have been developed by researchers to date. PMID:25828047

  10. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotypes in Calves, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Stämpfli, Henry R.; Duffield, Todd; Peregrine, Andrew S.; Trotz-Williams, Lise A.; Arroyo, Luis G.; Brazier, Jon S.; Weese, J. Scott

    2006-01-01

    We investigated Clostridium difficile in calves and the similarity between bovine and human C. difficile PCR ribotypes by conducting a case-control study of calves from 102 dairy farms in Canada. Fecal samples from 144 calves with diarrhea and 134 control calves were cultured for C. difficile and tested with an ELISA for C. difficile toxins A and B. C. difficile was isolated from 31 of 278 calves: 11 (7.6%) of 144 with diarrhea and 20 (14.9%) of 134 controls (p = 0.009). Toxins were detected in calf feces from 58 (56.8%) of 102 farms, 57 (39.6%) of 144 calves with diarrhea, and 28 (20.9%) of 134 controls (p = 0.0002). PCR ribotyping of 31 isolates showed 8 distinct patterns; 7 have been identified in humans, 2 of which have been associated with outbreaks of severe disease (PCR types 017 and 027). C. difficile may be associated with calf diarrhea, and cattle may be reservoirs of C. difficile for humans. PMID:17283624

  11. A PCR amplification method without DNA extraction.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongwei; Xu, Haiyue; Zhao, Chunjiang; Sulaiman, Yiming; Wu, Changxin

    2011-02-01

    To develop a simple and inexpensive method for direct PCR amplification of animal DNA from tissues, we optimized different components and their concentration in lysis buffer systems. Finally, we acquired the optimized buffer system composed of 10 mmol tris(hydroxymethyl)aminomethane (Tris)-Cl (pH 8.0), 2 mmol ethylene diamine tetraacetic (EDTA) (pH 8.0), 0.2 mol NaCl and 200 μg/mL Proteinase K. Interestingly, the optimized buffer is also very effective when working with common human sample types, including blood, buccal cells and hair. The direct PCR method requires fewer reagents (Tris-Cl, EDTA, Protease K and NaCl) and less incubation time (only 35 min). The cost of treating every sample is less than $0.02, and all steps can be completed on a thermal cycler in a 96-well format. So, the proposed method will significantly improve high-throughput PCR-based molecular assays in animal systems and in common human sample types.

  12. Recent Developments in Miniaturized PCR-Microchips, Microarrays and Microdroplets

    PubMed Central

    Pollak, Eleanor S; Fortina, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Microminiaturization of assays and lab-on-a-chip devices hold considerable promise for the future of analysis, especially in point-of-care testing. This article focuses on developments that have occurred during the last five years in the specific area of microchip PCR and miniaturized PCR in arrays of reaction vessels and droplets. Although, this area continues to be an active focus of research and development and the variety and ingenuity of microchip PCR and integrated microchip PCR devices continue to increase, commercialization lags behind the progress being made in digital PCR and arrays for real-time PCR.

  13. Overcoming inhibition in real-time diagnostic PCR.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Rådström, Peter

    2013-01-01

    PCR is an important and powerful tool in several fields, including clinical diagnostics, food analysis, and forensic analysis. In theory, PCR enables the detection of one single cell or DNA molecule. However, the presence of PCR inhibitors in the sample affects the amplification efficiency of PCR, thus lowering the detection limit, as well as the precision of sequence-specific nucleic acid quantification in real-time PCR. In order to overcome the problems caused by PCR inhibitors, all the steps leading up to DNA amplification must be optimized for the sample type in question. Sampling and sample treatment are key steps, but most of the methods currently in use were developed for conventional diagnostic methods and not for PCR. Therefore, there is a need for fast, simple, and robust sample preparation methods that take advantage of the accuracy of PCR. In addition, the thermostable DNA polymerases and buffer systems used in PCR are affected differently by inhibitors. During recent years, real-time PCR has developed considerably and is now widely used as a diagnostic tool. This technique has greatly improved the degree of automation and reduced the analysis time, but has also introduced a new set of PCR inhibitors, namely those affecting the fluorescence signal. The purpose of this chapter is to view the complexity of PCR inhibition from different angles, presenting both molecular explanations and practical ways of dealing with the problem. Although diagnostic PCR brings together scientists from different diagnostic fields, end-users have not fully exploited the potential of learning from each other. Here, we have collected knowledge from archeological analysis, clinical diagnostics, environmental analysis, food analysis, and forensic analysis. The concept of integrating sampling, sample treatment, and the chemistry of PCR, i.e., pre-PCR processing, will be addressed as a general approach to overcoming real-time PCR inhibition and producing samples optimal for PCR

  14. Microfluidic gradient PCR (MG-PCR): a new method for microfluidic DNA amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunsun; Xing, Da

    2010-02-01

    This study develops a new microfluidic DNA amplification strategy for executing parallel DNA amplification in the microfluidic gradient polymerase chain reaction (MG-PCR) device. The developed temperature gradient microfluidic system is generated by using an innovative fin design. The device mainly consists of modular thermally conductive copper flake which is attached onto a finned aluminum heat sink with a small fan. In our microfluidic temperature gradient prototype, a non-linear temperature gradient is produced along the gradient direction. On the copper flake of length 45 mm, width 40 mm and thickness 4 mm, the temperature gradient easily spans the range from 97 to 52 degrees Celsius. By making full use of the hot (90-97 degrees Celsius) and cold (60-70 degrees Celsius) regions on the temperature gradient device, the parallel, two-temperature MG-PCR amplification is feasible. As a demonstration, the MG-PCR from three parallel reactions of 112-bp Escherichia coli DNA fragment is performed in a continuous-flow format, in which the flow of the PCR reagent in the closed loop is induced by the buoyancy-driven nature convection. Although the prototype is not optimized, the MG-PCR amplification can be completed in less than 45 min. However, the MG-PCR thermocycler presented herein can be further scaled-down, and thus the amplification times and reagent consumption can be further reduced. In addition, the currently developed temperature gradient technology can be applied onto other continuous-flow MG-PCR systems or used for other analytical purposes such as parallel and combination measurements, and fluorescent melting curve analysis.

  15. Comparative detection of rabies RNA by NASBA, real-time PCR and conventional PCR.

    PubMed

    Wacharapluesadee, Supaporn; Phumesin, Patta; Supavonwong, Pornpun; Khawplod, Pakamatz; Intarut, Nirun; Hemachudha, Thiravat

    2011-08-01

    Five methods for the RNA detection of rabies virus were directly compared in this study. These included conventional nucleic acid sequence-based amplification with electrochemiluminescence (NASBA-ECL) assay, reverse transcription (RT)-heminested (hn) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and TaqMan real-time RT-PCR using protocols as described previously. The first two methods have been routinely utilised for ante-mortem diagnosis of human rabies in Thailand and other rabies-endemic Asian and African countries. In addition, two real-time NASBA assays based on the use of a NucliSens EasyQ analyser (NASBA-Beacon-EQ) and LightCycler real-time PCR machine (NASBA-Beacon-LC) were studied in parallel. All methods target the N gene, whereas the L gene is used for RT-hnPCR. Using serial dilutions of purified RNA from rabies-infected dog brain tissue to assess sensitivity, all five methods had comparable degrees of sensitivities of detection. However, both real-time NASBA assays had slightly lower sensitivities by 10-fold than the other three assays. This finding was also true (except for TaqMan real-time RT-PCR due to a mismatch between the target and probe sequences) when laboratory-adapted (challenge virus standard-11) virus was used in the assays. Testing on previously NASBA-ECL positive clinical samples from 10 rabies patients (saliva [6] and brain [4]) and 10 rabies-infected dog brain tissues, similar results were obtained among the five methods; real-time NASBA assays yielded false-negative results on 2 saliva samples. None of the assays showed positive results on cerebrospinal fluid specimens of 10 patients without rabies encephalitis. Due to the unavailability of the NASBA-ECL assay, the results show that TaqMan real-time RT-PCR and RT-hnPCR can be useful for ante- and post-mortem diagnosis of rabies.

  16. TqPCR: A Touchdown qPCR Assay with Significantly Improved Detection Sensitivity and Amplification Efficiency of SYBR Green qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qian; Wang, Jing; Deng, Fang; Yan, Zhengjian; Xia, Yinglin; Wang, Zhongliang; Ye, Jixing; Deng, Youlin; Zhang, Zhonglin; Qiao, Min; Li, Ruifang; Denduluri, Sahitya K.; Wei, Qiang; Zhao, Lianggong; Lu, Shun; Wang, Xin; Tang, Shengli; Liu, Hao; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Jiang, Li

    2015-01-01

    The advent of fluorescence-based quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has revolutionized the quantification of gene expression analysis in many fields, including life sciences, agriculture, forensic science, molecular diagnostics, and medicine. While SYBR Green-based qPCR is the most commonly-used platform due to its inexpensive nature and robust chemistry, quantifying the expression of genes with low abundance or RNA samples extracted from highly restricted or limited sources can be challenging because the detection sensitivity of SYBR Green-based qPCR is limited. Here, we develop a novel and effective touchdown qPCR (TqPCR) protocol by incorporating a 4-cycle touchdown stage prior to the quantification amplification stage. Using the same cDNA templates, we find that TqPCR can reduce the average Cq values for Gapdh, Rps13, and Hprt1 reference genes by 4.45, 5.47, and 4.94 cycles, respectively, when compared with conventional qPCR; the overall average Cq value reduction for the three reference genes together is 4.95. We further find that TqPCR can improve PCR amplification efficiency and thus increase detection sensitivity. When the quantification of Wnt3A-induced target gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells is analyzed, we find that, while both conventional qPCR and TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the relatively abundant target Axin2, only TqPCR can detect the up-regulation of the lowly-expressed targets Oct4 and Gbx2. Finally, we demonstrate that the MRQ2 and MRQ3 primer pairs derived from mouse reference gene Tbp can be used to validate the RNA/cDNA integrity of qPCR samples. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that TqPCR may increase detection sensitivity and PCR amplification efficiency. Overall, TqPCR should be advantageous over conventional qPCR in expression quantification, especially when the transcripts of interest are lowly expressed, and/or the availability of total RNA is highly restricted or limited. PMID:26172450

  17. Tiempo para un cambio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woltjer, L.

    1987-06-01

    En la reunion celebrada en diciembre dei ano pasado informe al Consejo de mi deseo de terminar mi contrato como Director General de la ESO una vez que fuera aprobado el proyecto dei VLT, que se espera sucedera hacia fines de este aAo. Cuando fue renovada mi designacion hace tres aAos, el Consejo conocia mi intencion de no completar los cinco aAos dei contrato debido a mi deseo de disponer de mas tiempo para otras actividades. Ahora, una vez terminada la fase preparatoria para el VLT, Y habiendose presentado el proyecto formalmente al Consejo el dia 31 de marzo, y esperando su muy probable aprobacion antes dei termino de este ano, me parece que el 10 de enero de 1988 presenta una excelente fecha para que se produzca un cambio en la administracion de la ESO.

  18. Species identification and quantification in meat and meat products using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR).

    PubMed

    Floren, C; Wiedemann, I; Brenig, B; Schütz, E; Beck, J

    2015-04-15

    Species fraud and product mislabelling in processed food, albeit not being a direct health issue, often results in consumer distrust. Therefore methods for quantification of undeclared species are needed. Targeting mitochondrial DNA, e.g. CYTB gene, for species quantification is unsuitable, due to a fivefold inter-tissue variation in mtDNA content per cell resulting in either an under- (-70%) or overestimation (+160%) of species DNA contents. Here, we describe a reliable two-step droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay targeting the nuclear F2 gene for precise quantification of cattle, horse, and pig in processed meat products. The ddPCR assay is advantageous over qPCR showing a limit of quantification (LOQ) and detection (LOD) in different meat products of 0.01% and 0.001%, respectively. The specificity was verified in 14 different species. Hence, determining F2 in food by ddPCR can be recommended for quality assurance and control in production systems.

  19. Lab-on-a-chip PCR: real time PCR in miniaturized format for HLA diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaertner, Claudia; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Klemm, Richard; Moche, Christian; Sewart, René; Frank, Rainer; Willems, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In case of transplantation or the identification of special metabolic diseases like coeliac disease, HLA typing has to be done fast and reliably with easy-to-handle devices by using limited amount of sample. Against this background a lab-on-a-chip device was realized enabling a fast HLA typing via miniaturized Real-time PCR. Hereby, two main process steps were combined, namely the extraction of DNA from whole blood and the amplification of the target DNA by Real-time PCR giving rise-to a semi-quantitative analysis. For the implementation of both processes on chip, a sample preparation and a real-time module were used. Sample preparation was carried out by using magnetic beads that were stored directly on chip as dry powder, together with all lysis reagents. After purification of the DNA by applying a special buffer regime, the sample DNA was transferred into the PCR module for amplification and detection. Coping with a massively increased surface-to-volume ratio, which results in a higher amount of unspecific binding on the chip surface, special additives needed to be integrated to compensate for this effect. Finally the overall procedure showed a sensitivity comparable to standard Real-time PCR but reduced the duration of analysis to significantly less than one hour. The presented work demonstrates that the combination of lab-on-a-chip PCR with direct optical read-out in a real-time fashion is an extremely promising tool for molecular diagnostics.

  20. mRNA profiling for body fluid identification by reverse transcription endpoint PCR and realtime PCR.

    PubMed

    Haas, C; Klesser, B; Maake, C; Bär, W; Kratzer, A

    2009-03-01

    mRNA profiling is a promising new method for the identification of body fluids from biological stains. Major advantages of mRNA profiling are the possibility of detecting several body fluids in one multiplex reaction and of simultaneously isolating DNA without loss of material. A reverse transcription endpoint polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method and a realtime PCR assay were established for the identification of blood, saliva, semen, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood, and were compared to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests. The results for specificity, sensitivity and suitability to biological stains were satisfying and mRNA stability was demonstrated for up to 2-year-old stains. Two novel multiplex assays were created with the endpoint PCR primers: multiplex 1 amplifies two markers for each of the above mentioned body fluids and is suited for screening; multiplex 2 was designed for the detection of blood, vaginal secretions and menstrual blood. The results demonstrate that both endpoint PCR and realtime PCR are suitable for the identification of body fluids in forensic stains and represent an effective alternative to conventional enzymatic and immunologic tests.

  1. Optimized PCR-based detection of mycoplasma.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolny, Paige L; Bess, Dan

    2011-06-20

    The maintenance of contamination-free cell lines is essential to cell-based research. Among the biggest contaminant concerns are mycoplasma contamination. Although mycoplasma do not usually kill contaminated cells, they are difficult to detect and can cause a variety of effects on cultured cells, including altered metabolism, slowed proliferation and chromosomal aberrations. In short, mycoplasma contamination compromises the value of those cell lines in providing accurate data for life science research. The sources of mycoplasma contamination in the laboratory are very challenging to completely control. As certain mycoplasma species are found on human skin, they can be introduced through poor aseptic technique. Additionally, they can come from contaminated supplements such as fetal bovine serum, and most importantly from other contaminated cell cultures. Once mycoplasma contaminates a culture, it can quickly spread to contaminate other areas of the lab. Strict adherence to good laboratory practices such as good aseptic technique are key, and routine testing for mycoplasma is highly recommended for successful control of mycoplasma contamination. PCR-based detection of mycoplasma has become a very popular method for routine cell line maintenance. PCR-based detection methods are highly sensitive and can provide rapid results, which allows researchers to respond quickly to isolate and eliminate contamination once it is detected in comparison to the time required using microbiological techniques. The LookOut Mycoplasma PCR Detection Kit is highly sensitive, with a detection limit of only 2 genomes per μl. Taking advantage of the highly specific JumpStart Taq DNA Polymerase and a proprietary primer design, false positives are greatly reduced. The convenient 8-tube format, strips pre-coated with dNTPs, and associated primers helps increase the throughput to meet the needs of customers with larger collections of cell lines. Given the extreme sensitivity of the kit, great

  2. Determining Fungi rRNA Copy Number by PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this project is to improve the quantification of indoor fungal pollutants via the specific application of quantitative PCR (qPCR). Improvement will be made in the controls used in current qPCR applications. This work focuses on the use of two separate controls within ...

  3. Multiplex PCR serogrouping of Listeria monocytogenes isolated in Japan

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOJIMA, Yukako; IDA, Miki; NISHINO, Yukari; ISHITSUKA, Rie; KURODA, Sumiyo; HIRAI, Akihiko; SADAMASU, Kenji; NAKAMA, Akiko; KAI, Akemi

    2015-01-01

    PCR serogrouping methods were used to examine strains of L. monocytogenes isolated in Japan. Among 187 strains, 99.5% were classified into 4 PCR serogroups corresponding to conventional serotypes. Only one isolate had a new PCR profile, which may be a variant of serogroup IVb. PMID:26537550

  4. An Efficient Multistrategy DNA Decontamination Procedure of PCR Reagents for Hypersensitive PCR Applications

    PubMed Central

    Pruvost, Mélanie; Bennett, E. Andrew; Grange, Thierry; Geigl, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Background PCR amplification of minute quantities of degraded DNA for ancient DNA research, forensic analyses, wildlife studies and ultrasensitive diagnostics is often hampered by contamination problems. The extent of these problems is inversely related to DNA concentration and target fragment size and concern (i) sample contamination, (ii) laboratory surface contamination, (iii) carry-over contamination, and (iv) contamination of reagents. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we performed a quantitative evaluation of current decontamination methods for these last three sources of contamination, and developed a new procedure to eliminate contaminating DNA contained in PCR reagents. We observed that most current decontamination methods are either not efficient enough to degrade short contaminating DNA molecules, rendered inefficient by the reagents themselves, or interfere with the PCR when used at doses high enough to eliminate these molecules. We also show that efficient reagent decontamination can be achieved by using a combination of treatments adapted to different reagent categories. Our procedure involves γ- and UV-irradiation and treatment with a mutant recombinant heat-labile double-strand specific DNase from the Antarctic shrimp Pandalus borealis. Optimal performance of these treatments is achieved in narrow experimental conditions that have been precisely analyzed and defined herein. Conclusions/Significance There is not a single decontamination method valid for all possible contamination sources occurring in PCR reagents and in the molecular biology laboratory and most common decontamination methods are not efficient enough to decontaminate short DNA fragments of low concentration. We developed a versatile multistrategy decontamination procedure for PCR reagents. We demonstrate that this procedure allows efficient reagent decontamination while preserving the efficiency of PCR amplification of minute quantities of DNA. PMID:20927390

  5. Heterozygote PCR product melting curve prediction.

    PubMed

    Dwight, Zachary L; Palais, Robert; Kent, Jana; Wittwer, Carl T

    2014-03-01

    Melting curve prediction of PCR products is limited to perfectly complementary strands. Multiple domains are calculated by recursive nearest neighbor thermodynamics. However, the melting curve of an amplicon containing a heterozygous single-nucleotide variant (SNV) after PCR is the composite of four duplexes: two matched homoduplexes and two mismatched heteroduplexes. To better predict the shape of composite heterozygote melting curves, 52 experimental curves were compared with brute force in silico predictions varying two parameters simultaneously: the relative contribution of heteroduplex products and an ionic scaling factor for mismatched tetrads. Heteroduplex products contributed 25.7 ± 6.7% to the composite melting curve, varying from 23%-28% for different SNV classes. The effect of ions on mismatch tetrads scaled to 76%-96% of normal (depending on SNV class) and averaged 88 ± 16.4%. Based on uMelt (www.dna.utah.edu/umelt/umelt.html) with an expanded nearest neighbor thermodynamic set that includes mismatched base pairs, uMelt HETS calculates helicity as a function of temperature for homoduplex and heteroduplex products, as well as the composite curve expected from heterozygotes. It is an interactive Web tool for efficient genotyping design, heterozygote melting curve prediction, and quality control of melting curve experiments. The application was developed in Actionscript and can be found online at http://www.dna.utah.edu/hets/.

  6. Prediction of neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia using PCR.

    PubMed

    Marshall, L R; Jones, C; Munro, T E

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT) is a potentially fatal condition and in the majority of cases is associated with maternal antibodies to the HPA-1a (PLA1) haplotype. Early diagnosis in utero can enhance survival rates. The application of DNA genomic analysis and PCR technology for the determination of the HPA-1a/HPA-1b (PLA1/PLA2) locus is described and applied in a family study where the fetus was diagnosed to have NAIT. This rapid technique differentiated between the 3 haplotypes HPA-1a/HPA-1a, HPA-1b/HPA-1b and HPA-1a/HPA-1b using the polymorphism at base 196 of the GPIIIa gene. This is the first Australian report on the establishment of this technology for platelet genotype typing and the application in the diagnosis of NAIT. This technique can be performed on DNA extracted from any nucleated cells and avoids the difficulty of requiring fetal platelets for serological typing when NAIT is suspected. The PCR technique of genomic DNA analysis has an important application in the prediction and management of this potentially severe condition.

  7. A Guide to Using STITCHER for Overlapping Assembly PCR Applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping PCR is commonly used in many molecular applications that include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping assembly PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online. PMID:27671928

  8. A Guide to Using STITCHER for Overlapping Assembly PCR Applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2017-01-01

    Overlapping PCR is commonly used in many molecular applications that include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping assembly PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online.

  9. DNA fingerprinting of medically important microorganisms by use of PCR.

    PubMed Central

    van Belkum, A

    1994-01-01

    Selected segments of any DNA molecule can be amplified exponentially by PCR. This technique provides a powerful tool to detect and identify minimal numbers of microorganisms. PCR is applicable both in diagnosis and in epidemiology. By amplification of hypervariable DNA domains, differences can be detected even among closely related strains. PCR fingerprinting is a valuable tool for medical microbiologists, epidemiologists, and microbial taxonomists. The current state of PCR-mediated genotyping is reviewed, and a comparison with conventional molecular typing methods is included. Because of its speed and versatility, PCR fingerprinting will play an important role in microbial genetics, epidemiology, and systematics. Images PMID:8055466

  10. Application of real time PCR for diagnosis of Swine Dysentery.

    PubMed

    Akase, Satoru; Uchitani, Yumi; Sohmura, Yoshiko; Tatsuta, Keikichi; Sadamasu, Kenji; Adachi, Yoshikazu

    2009-03-01

    Evaluation of a genetic diagnostic technique using real time PCR of Swine Dysentery (SD) was performed using nox primers. Culture, ordinary PCR and real time PCR were compared in this experiment. Sixty-seven specimens from pigs with clinical signs of SD brought to a slaughterhouse in Shibaura, Tokyo, were used. B. hyodysenteriae was isolated from 49 of the pigs, was detected by ordinary PCR in 49 of the pigs and was detected by real time PCR in 54 of the pigs. Furthermore, we were able to determine the numbers of B. hyodysenteriae cells in all positive specimens by real time PCR. The rapid diagnostic technique established in this experiment was useful for detection of B. hyodysenteriae because it was more effective than ordinary PCR and culture.

  11. PDMS-based micro PCR chip with Parylene coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Young Shik; Cho, Keunchang; Lim, Sun Hee; Chung, Seok; Park, Sung-Jin; Chung, Chanil; Han, Dong-Chul; Chang, Jun Keun

    2003-09-01

    We have developed a microchip for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). PDMS has good characteristics: it is cheap, transparent, easy to fabricate and biocompatible. But in micro PCR, the porosity of PDMS causes several critical problems such as bubble formation, sample evaporation and protein adsorption. To solve those problems, we coated the micro PCR chips with Parylene film, which has low permeability to moisture and long-term stability. We investigated the influence of low thermal conductivity of PDMS and Parylene on the thermal characteristics of the PCR chips with numerical analysis. The thermal responses of micro PCR chips were compared for three materials: silicon, glass and PDMS. From the results, we identified appropriate thermal responses of the PDMS-based micro PCR chips by heating both the top and bottom sides. We could successfully amplify the angiotensin converting enzyme gene with as small a volume as 2 mul on the PDMS-based micro PCR chips without any additives.

  12. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens. PMID:26610309

  13. PCR and real-time PCR assays to detect fungi of Alternaria alternata species.

    PubMed

    Kordalewska, Milena; Brillowska-Dąbrowska, Anna; Jagielski, Tomasz; Dworecka-Kaszak, Bożena

    2015-01-01

    Fungi of the Alternaria genus are mostly associated with allergic diseases. However, with a growing number of immunocompromised patients, these fungi, with A. alternata being the most prevalent one, are increasingly recognized as etiological agents of infections (phaeohyphomycoses) in humans. Nowadays, identification of Alternaria spp. requires their pure culture and is solely based on morphological criteria. Clinically, Alternaria infections may be indistinguishable from other fungal diseases. Therefore, a diagnostic result is often delayed or even not achieved at all. In this paper we present easy to perform and interpret PCR and real-time PCR assays enabling detection of A. alternata species. On the basis of alignment of β-tubulin gene sequences, A. alternata-specific primers were designed. DNA from fungal isolates, extracted in a two-step procedure, were used in PCR and real-time PCR assays followed by electrophoresis or melting temperature analysis, respectively. The assays specificity was confirmed, since positive results were obtained for all A. alternata isolates, and no positive results were obtained neither for other molds, dermatophytes, yeast-like fungi, nor human DNA. The assays developed here enable fast and unambiguous identification of A. alternata pathogens.

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Ricin and Abrin DNA by Real-Time PCR (qPCR)

    PubMed Central

    Felder, Eva; Mossbrugger, Ilona; Lange, Mirko; Wölfel, Roman

    2012-01-01

    Ricin and abrin are two of the most potent plant toxins known and may be easily obtained in high yield from the seeds using rather simple technology. As a result, both toxins are potent and available toxins for criminal or terrorist acts. However, as the production of highly purified ricin or abrin requires sophisticated equipment and knowledge, it may be more likely that crude extracts would be used by non-governmental perpetrators. Remaining plant-specific nucleic acids in these extracts allow the application of a real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and identification of abrin or ricin genomic material. Therefore, we have developed a duplex real-time PCR assays for simultaneous detection of ricin and abrin DNA based on the OmniMix HS bead PCR reagent mixture. Novel primers and hybridization probes were designed for detection on a SmartCycler instrument by using 5′-nuclease technology. The assay was thoroughly optimized and validated in terms of analytical sensitivity. Evaluation of the assay sensitivity by probit analysis demonstrated a 95% probability of detection at 3 genomes per reaction for ricin DNA and 1.2 genomes per reaction for abrin DNA. The suitability of the assays was exemplified by detection of ricin and abrin contaminations in a food matrix. PMID:23105972

  15. Rapid micro-PCR system for hepatitis C virus amplification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Ming-Yuan; Young, Kung-Chia; Chang, Ting-Tsung; Wu, Ching-Yi

    2000-08-01

    A rapid micro-polymerase chain reaction ((mu) -PCR) system was integrated to amplify the complementary DNA (cDNA) molecules of hepatitis C virus (HCV). This system consists of a rapid thermal cycling system and a (mu) PCR chip fabricated by MEMS fabrication techniques. This rapid (mu) PCR system is verified by using serum samples from patients with chronic hepatitis C. The HCV amplicon of the rapid (mu) PCR system was analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA marker in parallel. The (mu) PCR chip was fabricated on silicon wafer and Pyrex glass using photolithography, wet etching, and anodic bonding methods. Using silicon material to fabricate the raction well improves the temperature uniformity of sample and helps to reach the desired temperature faster. The rapid close loop thermal cycling system comprises power supplies, a thermal generator, a computer control PID controller, and a data acquisition subsystem. The thermoelectric (T.E.) cooler is used to work as the thermal generator and a heat sink by controlling the polarity of supplied power. The (mu) PCR system was verified with traditional PCR equipment by loading the same PCR mixture with HCV cDNA and running the same cycle numbers, then comparing both HCV amplicon slab gel electrophoresis. The HCV amplicon from the (mu) PCR system shows a DNA fragment with an expected size of 145 base pairs. The background is lower with the (mu) PCR system than that with the tradional PCR equipment. Comparing the traditional PCR equipment which spends 5.5 hours for 30 cycles to gain the detectable amount of HCV amplicon in slab gel separation, this (mu) PCR system takes 30 minutes to finish the 30 thermal cycles. This work has demonstrated that this rapid (mu) PCR system can provide rapid heat generation and dissipation, improved temperature uniformity in DNA amplification.

  16. STS-102 MPLM Leonardo moves into PCR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, Fla. -- In the payload changeout room on the Rotating Service Structure, Launch Pad 39B, workers move the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Leonardo out of the payload canister. From the PCR Leonardo then will be transferred into Space Shuttle Discovery'''s payload bay. One of Italy'''s major contributions to the International Space Station program, Leonardo is a reusable logistics carrier. It is the primary delivery system used to resupply and return Station cargo requiring a pressurized environment. Leonardo is the primary payload on mission STS-102 and will deliver up to 10 tons of laboratory racks filled with equipment, experiments and supplies for outfitting the newly installed U.S. Laboratory Destiny. STS-102 is scheduled to launch March 8 at 6:45 a.m. EST.

  17. PCR detection of uncultured rumen bacteria.

    PubMed

    Rosero, Jaime A; Strosová, Lenka; Mrázek, Jakub; Fliegerová, Kateřina; Kopečný, Jan

    2012-07-01

    16S rRNA sequences of ruminal uncultured bacterial clones from public databases were phylogenetically examined. The sequences were found to form two unique clusters not affiliated with any known bacterial species: cluster of unidentified sequences of free floating rumen fluid uncultured bacteria (FUB) and cluster of unidentified sequences of bacteria associated with rumen epithelium (AUB). A set of PCR primers targeting 16S rRNA of ruminal free uncultured bacteria and rumen epithelium adhering uncultured bacteria was designed based on these sequences. FUB primers were used for relative quantification of uncultured bacteria in ovine rumen samples. The effort to increase the population size of FUB group has been successful in sulfate reducing broth and culture media supplied with cellulose.

  18. Sensitivity of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; Zorzenon, Denielly Christina Rodrigues; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Cunha, Rodrigo; Andreotti, Renato; Matos, Maria de Fatima Cepa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood samples. Methods DNA extraction was performed using Promega Wizard® Genomic kits. PCR employing RV1/RV2 primers yielded 145-bp amplicons. Real-time PCR was performed with the same primers and SYBR Green ROX Plus mix. These techniques were used to analyze 100 peripheral blood samples from patients with clinical signs of the disease. Results The sensitivity and specificity levels were 91,3%% and 29,6%, respectively, for real-time PCR and 97.78% and 61.82%, respectively, for PCR. Conclusions Real-time PCR proved to be a satisfactory method for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis.

  19. [Arson and (para-) suicide].

    PubMed

    Lange, E; Kirsch, M

    1988-11-01

    There have been forensic-psychiatric observations from 1963 to 1983 concerning the offenders responsibility in case of deliberate arson with 12 out of 147 suits being closely related to (para-)suicide. According the variety of relations we distinguish between fire as pure means of suicide, fire used to take along the living space or people, suicide committed in consequence of arson, furthermore arson as a symbolic suicide, and finally acting alternately with both arson as well as parasuicide.

  20. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; To, Shing shun Tony; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-11-24

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation.

  1. IDH1 mutation detection by droplet digital PCR in glioma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Zhao, Yi-ying; Li, Jian-feng; Guo, Cheng-cheng; Chen, Fu-rong; Su, Hong-kai; Zhao, Hua-fu; Long, Ya-kang; Shao, Jian-yong; Tony To, Shing-shun; Chen, Zhong-ping

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most frequent central nervous system tumor in adults. The overall survival of glioma patients is disappointing, mostly due to the poor prognosis of glioblastoma (Grade IV glioma). Isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) is a key factor in metabolism and catalyzes the oxidative decarboxylation of isocitrate. Mutations in IDH genes are observed in over 70% of low-grade gliomas and some cases of glioblastoma. As the most frequent mutation, IDH1(R132H) has been served as a predictive marker of glioma patients. The recently developed droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) technique generates a large amount of nanoliter-sized droplets, each of which carries out a PCR reaction on one template. Therefore, ddPCR provides high precision and absolute quantification of the nucleic acid target, with wide applications for both research and clinical diagnosis. In the current study, we collected 62 glioma tissue samples (Grade II to IV) and detected IDH1 mutations by Sanger direct sequencing, ddPCR, and quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). With the results from Sanger direct sequencing as the standard, the characteristics of ddPCR were compared with qRT-PCR. The data indicated that ddPCR was much more sensitive and much easier to interpret than qRT-PCR. Thus, we demonstrated that ddPCR is a reliable and sensitive method for screening the IDH mutation. Therefore, ddPCR is able to applied clinically in predicting patient prognosis and selecting effective therapeutic strategies. Our data also supported that the prognosis of Grade II and III glioma was better in patients with an IDH mutation than in those without mutation. PMID:26485760

  2. Diagnostic utility of droplet digital PCR for HIV reservoir quantification.

    PubMed

    Trypsteen, Wim; Kiselinova, Maja; Vandekerckhove, Linos; De Spiegelaere, Ward

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is implemented in many molecular laboratories worldwide for the quantification of viral nucleic acids. However, over the last two decades, there has been renewed interest in the concept of digital PCR (dPCR) as this platform offers direct quantification without the need for standard curves, a simplified workflow and the possibility to extend the current detection limit. These benefits are of great interest in terms of the quantification of low viral levels in HIV reservoir research because changes in the dynamics of residual HIV reservoirs will be important to monitor HIV cure efforts. Here, we have implemented a systematic literature screening and text mining approach to map the use of droplet dPCR (ddPCR) in the context of HIV quantification. In addition, several technical aspects of ddPCR were compared with qPCR: accuracy, sensitivity, precision and reproducibility, to determine its diagnostic utility. We have observed that ddPCR was used in different body compartments in multiple HIV-1 and HIV-2 assays, with the majority of reported assays focusing on HIV-1 DNA-based applications (i.e. total HIV DNA). Furthermore, ddPCR showed a higher accuracy, precision and reproducibility, but similar sensitivity when compared to qPCR due to reported false positive droplets in the negative template controls with a need for standardised data analysis (i.e. threshold determination). In the context of a low level of detection and HIV reservoir diagnostics, ddPCR can offer a valid alternative to qPCR-based assays but before this platform can be clinically accredited, some remaining issues need to be resolved. PMID:27482456

  3. COMPARISON OF 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR AND OmpL1-PCR METHODS IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF LEPTOSPIROSIS

    PubMed Central

    GÖKMEN, Tülin GÜVEN; SOYAL, Ayben; KALAYCI, Yıldız; ÖNLEN, Cansu; KÖKSAL, Fatih

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Leptospirosis is still one of the most important health problems in developing countries located in humid tropical and subtropical regions. Human infections are generally caused by exposure to water, soil or food contaminated with the urine of infected wild and domestic animals such as rodents and dogs. The clinical course of leptospirosis is variable and may be difficult to distinguish from many other infectious diseases. The dark-field microscopy (DFM), serology and nucleic acid amplification techniques are used to diagnose leptospirosis, however, a distinctive standard reference method is still lacking. Therefore, in this study, we aimed to determine the presence of Leptospira spp., to differentiate the pathogenic L. interrogans and the non-pathogenic L. biflexa, and also to determine the sensitivity and specificity values of molecular methods as an alternative to conventional ones. A total of 133 serum samples, from 47 humans and 86 cattle were evaluated by two conventional tests: the Microagglutination Test (MAT) and the DFM, as well as three molecular methods, the 16S rRNA-PCR followed by Restriction Fragment Lenght Polymorphism (RFLP) of the amplification products 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP, LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR. In this study, for L. interrogans, the specificity and sensitivity rates of the 16S rRNA-PCR and the LipL32-PCR were considered similar (100% versus 98.25% and 100% versus 98.68%, respectively). The OmpL1-PCR was able to classify L. interrogans into two intergroups, but this PCR was less sensitive (87.01%) than the other two PCR methods. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP could detect L. biflexa DNA, but LipL32-PCR and OmpL1-PCR could not. The 16S rRNA-PCR-RFLP provided an early and accurate diagnosis and was able to distinguish pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira species, hence it may be used as an alternative method to the conventional gold standard techniques for the rapid disgnosis of leptospirosis. PMID:27680169

  4. Posttreatment Follow-Up of Brucellosis by PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Morata, Pilar; Queipo-Ortuño, María Isabel; Reguera, José María; García-Ordoñez, Miguel Angel; Pichardo, Cristina; Colmenero, Juan de Dios

    1999-01-01

    In order to evaluate the usefulness of a peripheral blood PCR assay in the posttreatment follow-up of brucellosis, a cohort of 30 patients was studied by means of blood cultures, rose Bengal, seroagglutination, Coombs' antibrucella tests, and PCR assay at the time of diagnosis, at the end of treatment, and 2, 4, and 6 months later. Of the 29 patients whose PCR assays were initially positive, 28 (96.5%) were negative at the conclusion of the treatment. PCR was positive for the two patients who had relapses and negative for another four who had suspected but unconfirmed relapses. PCR was negative for 98.3% of the follow-up samples from those patients who had a favorable evolution. In conclusion, PCR appears to be a very useful technique, not only for the initial diagnosis of the disease, but also for posttreatment follow-up and the early detection of relapses. PMID:10565954

  5. [Development of PCR methods for detection of EAV infection].

    PubMed

    Brunner; Santschi; Gerber; Burger; Zanoni

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this work was the development of suitable (real-time) RT-PCR techniques for fast and sensitive diagnosis of EAV and for molecular-epidemiological characterisation of viral strains, as an alternative to virus isolation. To this purpose two conventional RT-PCR methods and one real-time RT-PCR were adapted to detect the broadest possible spectrum of viral strains. Several dilutions with Bucyrus strain showed a 100-fold higher sensitivity of real-time RT-PCR and heminested RT-PCR compared to simple RT-PCR. Making use of 11 cell culture supernatants of different EAV isolates and 7 semen samples of positive stallions, the suitability of the techniques could be shown. Phylogenetic analysis of sequences of the newly analysed samples compared with known sequences indicated that more EAV-lineages exist than presently described.

  6. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described. PMID:26843050

  7. Direct PCR Improves the Recovery of DNA from Various Substrates.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Jennifer E L; Taylor, Duncan; Handt, Oliva; Skuza, Pawel; Linacre, Adrian

    2015-11-01

    This study reports on the comparison of a standard extraction process with the direct PCR approach of processing low-level DNA swabs typical in forensic investigations. Varying concentrations of control DNA were deposited onto three commonly encountered substrates, brass, plastic, and glass, left to dry, and swabbed using premoistened DNA-free nylon FLOQswabs(™) . Swabs (n = 90) were either processed using the DNA IQ(™) kit or, for direct PCR, swab fibers (~2 mm(2) ) were added directly to the PCR with no prior extraction. A significant increase in the height of the alleles (p < 0.005) was observed when using the direct PCR approach over the extraction methodology when controlling for surface type and mass of DNA deposited. The findings indicate the potential use of direct PCR for increasing the PCR product obtained from low-template DNA samples in addition to minimizing contamination and saving resources.

  8. Misuse of PCR assay for diagnosis of mollusc protistan infections.

    PubMed

    Burreson, Eugene M

    2008-06-19

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assays are useful tools for pathogen surveillance, but they are only proxy indications of pathogen presence in that they detect a DNA sequence. To be useful for detection of actual infections, PCR assays must be thoroughly tested for sensitivity and specificity, and ultimately validated against a technique, typically histology, which allows visualization of the parasite in host tissues. There is growing use of PCR assays for pathogen surveillance, but too often the assumption is made that a positive PCR result verifies an infection in a tested host. This assumption is valid only if the assay has been properly validated for the geographic area and for the hosts examined. Researchers should interpret unvalidated PCR assay results with caution, and editors and reviewers should insist that robust validations support all assertions that PCR results confirm infections.

  9. Microfluidics-Based PCR for Fusion Transcript Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui

    2016-01-01

    The microfluidic technology allows the production of network of submillimeter-size fluidic channels and reservoirs in a variety of material systems. The microfluidic-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) allows automated multiplexing of multiple samples and multiple assays simultaneously within a network of microfluidic channels and chambers that are co-ordinated in controlled fashion by the valves. The individual PCR reaction is performed in nanoliter volume, which allows testing on samples with limited DNA and RNA. The microfluidics devices are used in various types of PCR such as digital PCR and single molecular emulsion PCR for genotyping, gene expression, and miRNA expression. In this chapter, the use of a microfluidics-based PCR for simultaneous screening of 14 known fusion transcripts in patients with leukemia is described.

  10. Influence of reagents formulation on real-time PCR parameters.

    PubMed

    Burgos, J S; Ramírez, C; Tenorio, R; Sastre, I; Bullido, M J

    2002-08-01

    Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques are increasingly used to quantify target sequences for diagnostic and research purposes. Due to its 'quantitative' character, it is very important to determine the variability of this technique correlating with several experimental conditions. The objective of this study was to analyse the effect of manufacturing lots of PCR reagents on two main PCR parameters, specificity and sensitivity. For this study, we used four different amplicons, using either mouse genomic DNA or viral DNA. Although a PCR product could be obtained in any of the conditions, we observed that there are relevant variations in sensitivity depending on the reagents formulation. We conclude that different lots of reagents may determine the analytical performance of PCR assays indicating that reagents testing are of special importance when the PCR protocol is used for quantitative purposes.

  11. Real-time PCR using mycobacteriophage DNA for rapid phenotypic drug susceptibility results for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pholwat, Suporn; Ehdaie, Beeta; Foongladda, Suporn; Kelly, Kimberly; Houpt, Eric

    2012-03-01

    Managing drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis requires drug susceptibility testing, yet conventional drug susceptibility testing is slow, and molecular testing does not yield results for all antituberculous drugs. We addressed these challenges by utilizing real-time PCR of mycobacteriophage D29 DNA to evaluate the drug resistance of clinical M. tuberculosis isolates. Mycobacteriophages infect and replicate in viable bacterial cells faster than bacterial cells replicate and have been used for detection and drug resistance testing for M. tuberculosis either by using reporter cells or phages with engineered reporter constructs. Our primary protocol involved culturing M. tuberculosis isolates for 48 h with and without drugs at critical concentrations, followed by incubation with 10(3) PFU/ml of D29 mycobacteriophage for 24 h and then real-time PCR. Many drugs could be incubated instantly with M. tuberculosis and phage for 24 h alone. The change in phage DNA real-time PCR cycle threshold (C(T)) between control M. tuberculosis and M. tuberculosis treated with drugs was calculated and correlated with conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility results. Specifically, 9 susceptible clinical isolates, 22 multidrug-resistant (MDR), and 1 extensively drug-resistant (XDR) M. tuberculosis strains were used and C(T) control-C(T) drug cutoffs of between +0.3 and -6.0 yielded 422/429 (98%) accurate results for isoniazid, rifampin, streptomycin, ethambutol, amikacin, kanamycin, capreomycin, ofloxacin, moxifloxacin, ethionamide, para-aminosalicylic acid, cycloserine, and linezolid. Moreover, the ΔC(T) values correlated with isolate MIC for most agents. This D29 quantitative PCR assay offers a rapid, accurate, 1- to 3-day phenotypic drug susceptibility test for first- and second-line drugs and may suggest an approximate MIC.

  12. A comparison of DNA methylation specific droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) and real time qPCR with flow cytometry in characterizing human T cells in peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Wiencke, John K; Bracci, Paige M; Hsuang, George; Zheng, Shichun; Hansen, Helen; Wrensch, Margaret R; Rice, Terri; Eliot, Melissa; Kelsey, Karl T

    2014-01-01

    Quantitating the copy number of demethylated CpG promoter sites of the CD3Z gene can be used to estimate the numbers and proportions of T cells in human blood and tissue. Quantitative methylation specific PCR (qPCR) is useful for studying T cells but requires extensive calibration and is imprecise at low copy numbers. Here we compared the performance of a new digital PCR platform (droplet digital PCR or ddPCR) to qPCR using bisulfite converted DNA from 157 blood specimens obtained from ambulatory care controls and patients with primary glioma. We compared both ddPCR and qPCR with conventional flow cytometry (FACS) evaluation of CD3 positive T cells. Repeated measures on the same blood sample revealed ddPCR to be less variable than qPCR. Both qPCR and ddPCR correlated significantly with FACS evaluation of peripheral blood CD3 counts and CD3/total leukocyte values. However, statistical measures of agreement showed that linear concordance was stronger for ddPCR than for qPCR and the absolute values were closer to FACS for ddPCR. Both qPCR and ddPCR could distinguish clinically significant differences in T cell proportions and performed similarly to FACS. Given the higher precision, greater accuracy, and technical simplicity of ddPCR, this approach appears to be a superior DNA methylation based method than conventional qPCR for the assessment of T cells. PMID:25437051

  13. Chimerism testing by quantitative PCR using Indel markers.

    PubMed

    Gendzekhadze, Ketevan; Gaidulis, Laima; Senitzer, David

    2013-01-01

    Engraftment monitoring is critical for patients after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT). Complete donor chimerism is the goal; therefore, early detection of rejection and relapse is crucial for guiding the patient post HSCT treatment. Quantitative PCR for chimerism testing has been reported to be highly sensitive. In this chapter we discuss the quantitative PCR (qPCR) method using 34 Indel (Insertion and Deletion) genetic markers spread over 20 different chromosomes.

  14. [PCR-ELISA technology and its application in biomedical fields].

    PubMed

    Yan, Lin; Wang, Xiaoying; Guo, Yunchang

    2011-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (PCR- ELISA) technology is created by the use of the high sensitivity of PCR, nucleic acid probes of the specificity, microplate reader of objectivity; since its establishment, it has received wide attention. In this paper, a basic description of the technology was introduced, and the application of PCR-ELISA in biomedical field in recent years were reviewed.

  15. A simple, universal, efficient PCR-based gene synthesis method: sequential OE-PCR gene synthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Pingping; Ding, Yingying; Liao, Wenting; Chen, Qiuli; Zhang, Huaqun; Qi, Peipei; He, Ting; Wang, Jinhong; Deng, Songhua; Pan, Tianyue; Ren, Hao; Pan, Wei

    2013-07-25

    Herein we present a simple, universal, efficient gene synthesis method based on sequential overlap extension polymerase chain reactions (OE-PCRs). This method involves four key steps: (i) the design of paired complementary 54-mer oligonucleotides with 18 bp overlaps, (ii) the utilisation of sequential OE-PCR to synthesise full-length genes, (iii) the cloning and sequencing of four positive T-clones of the synthesised genes and (iv) the resynthesis of target genes by OE-PCR with correct templates. Mispriming and secondary structure were found to be the principal obstacles preventing successful gene synthesis and were easily identified and solved in this method. Compensating for the disadvantages of being laborious and time-consuming, this method has many attractive advantages, such as the ability to guarantee successful gene synthesis in most cases and good allowance for Taq polymerase, oligonucleotides, PCR conditions and a high error rate. Thus, this method provides an alternative tool for individual gene synthesis without strict needs of the high-specialised experience. PMID:23597923

  16. Loop-linker PCR: an advanced PCR technique for genome walking.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we developed a novel PCR method, termed loop-linker PCR, to isolate flanking sequences in transgenic crops. The novelty of this approach is its use of a stem-loop structure to design a loop-linker adapter. The adapter is designed to form a nick site when ligated with restricted DNA. This modification not only can prevent the self-ligation of adapters but also promotes the elongation of the 3' end of the loop-linker adapter to generate a stem-loop structure in the ligation products. Moreover, the suppressive effect of the stem-loop structure decreases nonspecific amplification and increases the success rate of the approach; all extension products will suppress exponential amplification except from the ligation product that contains the specific primer binding site. Using this method, 442, 1830, 107, and 512 bp left border flanking sequences were obtained from the transgenic maizes LY038, DAS-59122-7, Event 3272, and the transgenic soybean MON89788, respectively. The experimental results demonstrated that loop-linker PCR is an efficient, reliable, and cost-effective method for identifying flanking sequences in transgenic crops and could be applied for other genome walking applications.

  17. Buoyancy-Driven Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Devices

    SciTech Connect

    Ness, K D; Wheeler, E K; Benett, W; Stratton, P; Christian, A; Chen, A; Ortega, J; Weisgraber, T H; Goodson, K E

    2004-09-28

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) facilitates DNA detection by significantly increasing the concentration of specific DNA segments. A new class of PCR instruments uses a buoyancy-driven re-circulating flow to thermally cycle the DNA sample and benefits from reduced cycle times, low sample volumes, a miniaturized format, and low power consumption. This paper analyzes a specific buoyancy PCR device in a micro-channel ''race-track'' geometry to determine key parameters about PCR cycle times and other figures of merit as functions of device dimensions. The 1-D model balances the buoyancy driving force with frictional losses. A hydrostatic pressure imbalance concept is used between the left and right sides of the fluid loop to calculate the buoyancy driving force. Velocity and temperature distributions within the channels are determined from two-dimensional analysis of the channel section, with developing region effects included empirically through scaled values of the local Nusselt number. Good agreement between four independent verification steps validate the 1-D simulation approach: (1) analytical expressions for the thermal entrance length are compared against, (2) comparison with a full 3-D finite element simulation, (3) comparison with an experimental flow field characterization, and (4) calculation of the minimum PCR runtime required to get a positive PCR signal from the buoyancy-driven PCR device. The 1-D approach closely models an actual buoyancy-driven PCR device and can further be used as a rapid design tool to simulate buoyancy PCR flows and perform detailed design optimizations studies.

  18. Detection and quantification of chimerism by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    George, David; Czech, Juliann; John, Bobby; Yu, Min; Jennings, Lawrence J

    2013-01-01

    Accurate quantification of chimerism and microchimerism is proving to be increasingly valuable for hematopoietic cell transplantation as well as non-transplant conditions. However, methods that are available to quantify low-level chimerism lack accuracy. Therefore, we developed and validated a method for quantifying chimerism based on digital PCR technology. We demonstrate accurate quantification that far exceeds what is possible with analog qPCR down to 0.01% with the potential to go even lower. Also, this method is inherently more informative than qPCR. We expect the advantages of digital PCR will make it the preferred method for chimerism analysis.

  19. Evaluation of Digital PCR for Absolute RNA Quantification

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Rebecca; Mason, Deborah J.; Foy, Carole A.; Huggett, Jim F.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression measurements detailing mRNA quantities are widely employed in molecular biology and are increasingly important in diagnostic fields. Reverse transcription (RT), necessary for generating complementary DNA, can be both inefficient and imprecise, but remains a quintessential RNA analysis tool using qPCR. This study developed a Transcriptomic Calibration Material and assessed the RT reaction using digital (d)PCR for RNA measurement. While many studies characterise dPCR capabilities for DNA quantification, less work has been performed investigating similar parameters using RT-dPCR for RNA analysis. RT-dPCR measurement using three, one-step RT-qPCR kits was evaluated using single and multiplex formats when measuring endogenous and synthetic RNAs. The best performing kit was compared to UV quantification and sensitivity and technical reproducibility investigated. Our results demonstrate assay and kit dependent RT-dPCR measurements differed significantly compared to UV quantification. Different values were reported by different kits for each target, despite evaluation of identical samples using the same instrument. RT-dPCR did not display the strong inter-assay agreement previously described when analysing DNA. This study demonstrates that, as with DNA measurement, RT-dPCR is capable of accurate quantification of low copy RNA targets, but the results are both kit and target dependent supporting the need for calibration controls. PMID:24073259

  20. Detection and identification of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages by PCR.

    PubMed

    Zago, Miriam; Rossetti, Lia; Reinheimer, Jorge; Carminati, Domenico; Giraffa, Giorgio

    2008-05-01

    A PCR protocol for detection of Lactobacillus helveticus bacteriophages was optimized. PCR was designed taking into account the sequence of the lys gene of temperate bacteriophage Phi-0303 and optimized to obtain a fragment of 222 bp using different Lb. helveticus phages from our collection. PCR was applied to total phage DNA extracted from 53 natural whey starters used for the production of Grana cheese and all gave the expected fragment. The presence of actively growing phages in the cultures was verified by traditional tests. Several PCR products of the lys gene were sequenced and aligned. The resulting sequences showed variable heterogeneity between the phages. PMID:18474137

  1. Quantifying RNA allelic ratios by microfluidic multiplex PCR and sequencing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rui; Li, Xin; Ramaswami, Gokul; Smith, Kevin S; Turecki, Gustavo; Montgomery, Stephen B; Li, Jin Billy

    2014-01-01

    We developed a targeted RNA sequencing method that couples microfluidics-based multiplex PCR and deep sequencing (mmPCR-seq) to uniformly and simultaneously amplify up to 960 loci in 48 samples independently of their gene expression levels and to accurately and cost-effectively measure allelic ratios even for low-quantity or low-quality RNA samples. We applied mmPCR-seq to RNA editing and allele-specific expression studies. mmPCR-seq complements RNA-seq for studying allelic variations in the transcriptome.

  2. Variation in copy number of the 28S rDNA of Aspergillus fumigatus measured by droplet digital PCR and analog quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Alanio, Alexandre; Sturny-Leclère, Aude; Benabou, Marion; Guigue, Nicolas; Bretagne, Stéphane

    2016-08-01

    Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) after DNA digestion yielded a 28S rDNA copy number of 61 to 86 copies/genome when testing 10 unrelated Aspergillus fumigatus isolates, higher than with quantitative PCR. Unfortunately, ddPCR after DNA digestion did not improve the sensitivity of our PCR assay when testing serum patients with invasive aspergillosis. PMID:27316653

  3. Global RT-PCR and RT-qPCR Analysis of the mRNA Expression of the Human PTPome.

    PubMed

    Nunes-Xavier, Caroline E; Pulido, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive comparative gene expression analysis of the tyrosine phosphatase superfamily members (PTPome) under cell- or tissue-specific growth conditions may help to define their individual and specific role in physiology and disease. Semi-quantitative and quantitative PCR are commonly used methods to analyze and measure gene expression. Here, we describe technical aspects of PTPome mRNA expression analysis by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). We provide a protocol for each method consisting in reverse transcription followed by PCR using a global platform of specific PTP primers. The chapter includes aspects from primer validation to the setup of the PTPome RT-qPCR platform. Examples are given of PTP-profiling gene expression analysis using a human breast cancer cell line upon long-term or short-term treatment with cell signaling-activation agents. PMID:27514798

  4. Monitoring gene expression: quantitative real-time rt-PCR.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Elke M

    2013-01-01

    Two-step quantitative real-time RT-PCR (RT-qPCR), also known as real-time RT-PCR, kinetic RT-PCR, or quantitative fluorescent RT-PCR, has become the method of choice for gene expression analysis during the last few years. It is a fast and convenient PCR method that combines traditional RT-PCR with the phenomenon of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorogenic primers. The detection of changes in fluorescence intensity during the reaction enables the user to follow the PCR reaction in real time.RT-qPCR comprises several steps: (1) RNA is isolated from target tissue/cells; (2) mRNA is reverse-transcribed to cDNA; (3) modified gene-specific PCR primers are used to amplify a segment of the cDNA of interest, following the reaction in real time; and (4) the initial concentration of the selected transcript in a specific tissue or cell type is calculated from the exponential phase of the reaction. Relative quantification or absolute quantification compared to standards that are run in parallel can be performed.This chapter describes the entire procedure from isolation of total RNA from liver and fatty tissues/cells to the use of RT-qPCR to study gene expression in these tissues. We perform relative quantification of transcripts to calculate the fold-difference of a certain mRNA level between different samples. In addition, tips for choosing primers and performing analyses are provided to help the beginner in understanding the technique.

  5. [Fut1 gene mutation for para-bombay blood type individual in Fujian Province of China].

    PubMed

    Huang, Hao-Bou; Fan, Li-Ping; Wai, Shi-Jin; Zeng, Feng; Lin, Hai-Yan; Zhang, Rong

    2010-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay blood type individual in Fujian Province of China. The para-Bombay blood type of this individual was identified by routine serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1,2) fucosyltransferase (FUT1) gene of this individual was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), then the PCR product was cloned into T vector. The mutation in coding region of fut1 gene was identified by TA cloning, so as to explore the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay blood type individual. The results indicated that the full coding region of fut1 gene was successfully amplified by PCR. AG deletion at position 547-552 on 2 homologous chromosomes was detected by TA cloning method, leading to a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. It is concluded that genetic mutation of fut1 gene in this para-bombay blood type individual was h1h1 homozygotic type.

  6. Two unusual occurrences of trichomoniasis: rapid species identification by PCR.

    PubMed

    Bellanger, A P; Cabaret, O; Costa, J M; Foulet, F; Bretagne, S; Botterel, F

    2008-09-01

    PCR analysis in two unusual occurrences of trichomoniasis, trichomonal empyema due to Trichomonas tenax and Trichomonas vaginalis in an infant urine sample, allowed us to obtain rapid and accurate trichomonad species identification. The weak sensitivity of wet preparations and the low viability of the flagellates can be remedied by the PCR method. PMID:18632901

  7. Interlaboratory Comparison of Quantitative PCR Test Results for Dehalococcoides

    EPA Science Inventory

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques have been widely used to measure Dehalococcoides (Dhc) DNA in the groundwater at field sites for several years. Interpretation of these data may be complicated when different laboratories using alternate methods conduct the analysis. An...

  8. Comparison between ICT and PCR for diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis.

    PubMed

    Khan, E R; Hossain, M A; Paul, S K; Mahmud, C; Hasan, M M; Rahman, M M; Nahar, K; Kubayashi, N

    2012-04-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular gram-negative bacterium which is the most prevalent cause of bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STI). The present study was carried to diagnose genital Chlamydia trachomatis infection among women of reproductive age, attending Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, during July 2009 to June 2010 by Immunochromatographic test (ICT) and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A total of 70 females were included in this study. Out of 70 cases 56 were symptomatic and 14 asymptomatic. Endocervical swabs were collected from each of the cases and examined by Immunochromatographic test (ICT) for antigen detection and Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of endogenous plasmid-based nucleic acid. A total 29(41.4%) of the cases were found positive for C. trachomatis either by ICT or PCR. Of the 56 symptomatic cases, 19(33.9%) were found ICT positive and 17(30.4%) were PCR positive. Among 14 asymptomatic females, 2(14.3%) were ICT positive and none were PCR positive. Though PCR is highly sensitive but a total of twelve cases were found ICT positive but PCR negative. It may be due to presence of plasmid deficient strain of C trachomatis which could be amplified by ompA based (Chromosomal gene) multiplex PCR.

  9. DNA probes and PCR for diagnosis of parasitic infections.

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, J B

    1995-01-01

    DNA probe and PCR-based assays to identify and detect parasites are technically complex; however, they have high sensitivity, directly detect parasites independent of the immunocompetence or previous clinical history of the patient, and can distinguish between organisms that are morphologically similar. Diagnosis of parasites is often based on direct detection by microscopy, which is insensitive and laborious and can lack specificity. Most PCR-based assays were more sensitive than DNA probe assays. The development of PCR-based diagnostic assays requires multiple steps following the initial selection of oligonucleotide primers and reporter probe. Generally, the ability to detect the DNA of one parasite was attained by PCR; however, advances in the preparation of samples for PCR (extraction of DNA while removing PCR inhibitors) will be required to achieve that sensitivity with human specimens. Preliminary PCR systems have been developed for many different parasites, yet few have been evaluated with a large number of clinical specimens and/or under field conditions. Those evaluations are essential for determination of clinical and field utility and performance and of the most appropriate application of the assay. Several situations in which PCR-based diagnosis will result in epidemiologic, medical, or public health advances have been identified. PMID:7704890

  10. PCR detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-degrading mycobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, R.F.; Luneau, A.; Cao, W.W.; Cerniglia, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods based on the 16S rRNA genes of Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1 and Mycobacterium sp. PAH135, known PAH-degrading bacteria, were developed. An efficient mycobacterial cell lysis procedure was used for the PCR assay. The PCR methods were positive with the target species, but negative for the other 45 bacterial species tested including other Mycobacterium spp. The PCR sensitivity for pure cultures was 20 cells for Mycobacterium sp. PAH135 and 200 cells for Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1. The PCR with a simple sample preparation procedure was used to monitor Mycobacterium sp. PYR-1 cell concentrations in soil slurries amended with [{sup 14}C]pyrene. The pyrene mineralization correlated with the Mycobacterium PYR-1 cell concentrations in the soil slurries. When the PCR titer (the maximum dilution for positive PCR results) reached 10{sup -4}-10{sup -5} at 5-1O days incubation, approximately 50% of the [{sup 14}C]pyrene had been mineralized to {sup 14}CO{sub 2}. However, without inoculation with Mycobacterium PYR-1 cells, both the sterile and nonsterile soils had negative PCR results and no pyrene mineralization. 25 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. ANIMAL DNA IN PCR REAGENTS PLAGUES ANCIENT DNA RESEARCH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ancient DNA analysis is becoming widespread. These studies use polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify minute quantities of heavily damaged template. Unusual steps are taken to achieve the sensitivity necessary to detect ancient DNA, including high-cycle PCR amplification targ...

  12. Validation of kinetics similarity in qPCR.

    PubMed

    Bar, Tzachi; Kubista, Mikael; Tichopad, Ales

    2012-02-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the method of choice for specific and sensitive quantification of nucleic acids. However, data validation is still a major issue, partially due to the complex effect of PCR inhibition on the results. If undetected PCR inhibition may severely impair the accuracy and sensitivity of results. PCR inhibition is addressed by prevention, detection and correction of PCR results. Recently, a new family of computational methods for the detection of PCR inhibition called kinetics outlier detection (KOD) emerged. KOD methods are based on comparison of one or a few kinetic parameters describing a test reaction to those describing a set of reference reactions. Modern KOD can detect PCR inhibition reflected by shift of the amplification curve by merely half a cycle with specificity and sensitivity >90%. Based solely on data analysis, these tools complement measures to improve and control pre-analytics. KOD methods do not require labor and materials, do not affect the reaction accuracy and sensitivity and they can be automated for fast and reliable quantification. This review describes the background of KOD methods, their principles, assumptions, strengths and limitations. Finally, the review provides recommendations how to use KOD and how to evaluate its performance.

  13. Diagnostic multiplex PCR for toxin genotyping of Clostridium perfringens isolates.

    PubMed

    Baums, Christoph G; Schotte, Ulrich; Amtsberg, Gunter; Goethe, Ralph

    2004-05-20

    In this study we provide a protocol for genotyping Clostridium perfringens with a new multiplex PCR. This PCR enables reliable and specific detection of the toxin genes cpa, cpb, etx, iap, cpe and cpb2 from heat lysed bacterial suspensions. The efficiency of the protocol was demonstrated by typing C. perfringens reference strains and isolates from veterinary bacteriological routine diagnostic specimens.

  14. Quantitative PCR Method for Diagnosis of Citrus Bacterial Canker†

    PubMed Central

    Cubero, J.; Graham, J. H.; Gottwald, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    For diagnosis of citrus bacterial canker by PCR, an internal standard is employed to ensure the quality of the DNA extraction and that proper requisites exist for the amplification reaction. The ratio of PCR products from the internal standard and bacterial target is used to estimate the initial bacterial concentration in citrus tissues with lesions. PMID:11375206

  15. Genetic relationships among strains of Xanthomonas fragariae based on random amplified polymorphic DNA PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus PCR data and generation of multiplexed PCR primers useful for the identification of this phytopathogen.

    PubMed Central

    Pooler, M R; Ritchie, D F; Hartung, J S

    1996-01-01

    Genetic relationships among 25 isolates of Xanthomonas fragariae from diverse geographic regions were determined by three PCR methods that rely on different amplification priming strategies: random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) PCR, repetitive extragenic palindromic (REP) PCR, and enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus (ERIC) PCR. The results of these assays are mutually consistent and indicate that pathogenic strains are very closely related to each other. RAPD, ERIC, and REP PCR assays identified nine, four, and two genotypes, respectively, within X. fragariae isolates. A single nonpathogenic isolate of X. fragariae was not distinguishable by these methods. The results of the PCR assays were also fully confirmed by physiological tests. There was no correlation between DNA amplification product patterns and geographic sites of isolation, suggesting that this bacterium has spread largely through exchange of infected plant germ plasm. Sequences identified through the RAPD assays were used to develop three primer pairs for standard PCR assays to identify X. fragariae. In addition, we developed a stringent multiplexed PCR assay to identify X. fragariae by simultaneously using the three independently derived sets of primers specific for pathogenic strains of the bacteria. PMID:8795198

  16. Is real-time PCR-based diagnosis similar in performance to routine parasitological examination for the identification of Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica from stool samples? Evaluation of a new commercial multiplex PCR assay and literature review.

    PubMed

    Laude, A; Valot, S; Desoubeaux, G; Argy, N; Nourrisson, C; Pomares, C; Machouart, M; Le Govic, Y; Dalle, F; Botterel, F; Bourgeois, N; Cateau, E; Leterrier, M; Le Pape, P; Morio, F

    2016-02-01

    Microscopy is the reference standard for routine laboratory diagnosis in faecal parasitology but there is growing interest in alternative methods to overcome the limitations of microscopic examination, which is time-consuming and highly dependent on an operator's skills and expertise. Compared with microscopy, DNA detection by PCR is simple and can offer a better turnaround time. However, PCR performances remain difficult to assess as most studies have been conducted on a limited number of positive clinical samples and used in-house PCR methods. Our aim was to evaluate a new multiplex PCR assay (G-DiaParaTrio; Diagenode Diagnostics), targeting Giardia intestinalis, Cryptosporidium parvum/Cryptosporidium hominis and Entamoeba histolytica. To minimize the turnaround time, PCR was coupled with automated DNA extraction (QiaSymphony; Qiagen). The PCR assay was evaluated using a reference panel of 185 samples established by routine microscopic examination using a standardized protocol including Ziehl-Neelsen staining and adhesin detection by ELISA (E. histolytica II; TechLab). This panel, collected from 12 French parasitology laboratories, included 135 positive samples for G. intestinalis (n = 38), C. parvum/C. hominis (n = 26), E. histolytica (n = 5), 21 other gastrointestinal parasites, together with 50 negative samples. In all, the G-DiaParaTrio multiplex PCR assay identified 38 G. intestinalis, 25 C. parvum/C. hominis and five E. histolytica leading to sensitivity/specificity of 92%/100%, 96%/100% and 100%/100% for G. intestinalis, C. parvum/C. hominis and E. histolytica, respectively. This new multiplex PCR assay offers fast and reliable results, similar to microscopy-driven diagnosis for the detection of these gastrointestinal protozoa, allowing its implementation in routine clinical practice.

  17. Comparison of droplet digital PCR and quantitative real-time PCR for examining population dynamics of bacteria in soil.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Gwan; Jeong, So-Yeon; Cho, Kyung-Suk

    2014-07-01

    The newly developed droplet digital PCR (DD-PCR) has shown promise as a DNA quantification technology in medical diagnostic fields. This study evaluated the applicability of DD-PCR as a quantitative tool for soil DNA using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) as a reference technology. Cupriavidus sp. MBT14 and Sphingopyxis sp. MD2 were used, and a primer/TaqMan probe set was designed for each (CupMBT and SphMD2, respectively). Standard curve analyses on tenfold dilution series showed that both qRT-PCR and DD-PCR exhibited excellent linearity (R (2) = 1.00) and PCR efficiency (≥92 %) across their detectable ranges. However, DD-PCR showed a tenfold greater sensitivity than qRT-PCR. MBT14 and MD2 were added to non-sterile soil at 0 ~ 5 × 10(8) and 0 ~ 5 × 10(7) cells per gram of soil, respectively (n = 5). This bacterial load test indicated that DD-PCR was more sensitive and discriminating than qRT-PCR. For instance, DD-PCR showed a gradual DNA increase from 14 to 141,160 MBT14 rDNA copies μL DNA extract(-1) as the bacterial load increased, while qRT-PCR could quantify the DNA (6,432 copies μL DNA(-1)) at ≥5 × 10(5) MBT14 per gram of soil. When temporal DNA changes were monitored for 3 weeks in the amended soils, the two technologies exhibited nearly identical changes over time. Linearity tests (y = a · x) revealed excellent quantitative agreement between the two technologies (a = 0.98, R (2) = 0.97 in the CupMBT set and a = 0.90, R (2) = 0.94 in the SphMD2 set). These results suggest that DD-PCR is a promising tool to examine temporal dynamics of microorganisms in complex environments.

  18. Teaching PCR Through Inquiry in an Undergraduate Biology Laboratory Course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorighi, K. M.; Betancourt, J.; Sapp, J.; Quan, T. K.; Lee, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this paper, we describe the design and implementation of an inquiry-based laboratory unit on the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). This unit was designed and taught for the undergraduate Eukaryotic Genetics Laboratory class (Bio105L) at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Our activity utilizes an authentic molecular biology research question to teach the underlying molecular mechanisms and experimental technique of PCR, as well as fundamental scientific process skills such as planning experiments, making predictions and interpreting data. In particular, the activity prompts students to use PCR to determine which gene has been deleted in a region of the Drosophila genome. During this activity, students also gained technical experience in common molecular biology techniques, learned about additional applications of PCR and used a hands-on approach to model each step of PCR.

  19. Engineered DNA polymerase improves PCR results for plastid DNA1

    PubMed Central

    Schori, Melanie; Appel, Maryke; Kitko, AlexaRae; Showalter, Allan M.

    2013-01-01

    • Premise of the study: Secondary metabolites often inhibit PCR and sequencing reactions in extractions from plant material, especially from silica-dried and herbarium material. A DNA polymerase that is tolerant to inhibitors improves PCR results. • Methods and Results: A novel DNA amplification system, including a DNA polymerase engineered via directed evolution for improved tolerance to common plant-derived PCR inhibitors, was evaluated and PCR parameters optimized for three species. An additional 31 species were then tested with the engineered enzyme and optimized protocol, as well as with regular Taq polymerase. • Conclusions: PCR products and high-quality sequence data were obtained for 96% of samples for rbcL and 79% for matK, compared to 29% and 21% with regular Taq polymerase. PMID:25202519

  20. Is real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) more useful than a conventional PCR for the clinical management of leishmaniasis?

    PubMed

    Antinori, Spinello; Calattini, Sara; Piolini, Roberta; Longhi, Erika; Bestetti, Giovanna; Cascio, Antonio; Parravicini, Carlo; Corbellino, Mario

    2009-07-01

    It is currently unknown if the use of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) adds value to the diagnosis and follow-up prognosis of patients affected by leishmaniasis. We performed a study using a real-time PCR directed against the alpha-polymerase gene and a semiquantitative PCR that target the SSU ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene as control for the diagnosis and quantification of parasites in patients with visceral (VL) and cutaneous (CL) leishmaniasis. Our single copy real-time PCR missed one diagnosis of VL compared with the conventional PCR, whereas both PCR methods were able to detect Leishmania parasites in CL. Under anti-leishmania treatment the kinetics of parasitemia were comparable with the two methods. The real-time PCR directed against alpha-polymerase of Leishmania despite being able to make a more accurate quantification of parasites does not add to the decision-making management compared with a semiquantitative PCR, and it is comparatively expensive.

  1. How good is a PCR efficiency estimate: Recommendations for precise and robust qPCR efficiency assessments.

    PubMed

    Svec, David; Tichopad, Ales; Novosadova, Vendula; Pfaffl, Michael W; Kubista, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the imprecision in the estimation of PCR efficiency by means of standard curves based on strategic experimental design with large number of technical replicates. In particular, how robust this estimation is in terms of a commonly varying factors: the instrument used, the number of technical replicates performed and the effect of the volume transferred throughout the dilution series. We used six different qPCR instruments, we performed 1-16 qPCR replicates per concentration and we tested 2-10 μl volume of analyte transferred, respectively. We find that the estimated PCR efficiency varies significantly across different instruments. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we find the uncertainty in the PCR efficiency estimation may be as large as 42.5% (95% CI) if standard curve with only one qPCR replicate is used in 16 different plates. Based on our investigation we propose recommendations for the precise estimation of PCR efficiency: (1) one robust standard curve with at least 3-4 qPCR replicates at each concentration shall be generated, (2) the efficiency is instrument dependent, but reproducibly stable on one platform, and (3) using a larger volume when constructing serial dilution series reduces sampling error and enables calibration across a wider dynamic range. PMID:27077029

  2. How good is a PCR efficiency estimate: Recommendations for precise and robust qPCR efficiency assessments.

    PubMed

    Svec, David; Tichopad, Ales; Novosadova, Vendula; Pfaffl, Michael W; Kubista, Mikael

    2015-03-01

    We have examined the imprecision in the estimation of PCR efficiency by means of standard curves based on strategic experimental design with large number of technical replicates. In particular, how robust this estimation is in terms of a commonly varying factors: the instrument used, the number of technical replicates performed and the effect of the volume transferred throughout the dilution series. We used six different qPCR instruments, we performed 1-16 qPCR replicates per concentration and we tested 2-10 μl volume of analyte transferred, respectively. We find that the estimated PCR efficiency varies significantly across different instruments. Using a Monte Carlo approach, we find the uncertainty in the PCR efficiency estimation may be as large as 42.5% (95% CI) if standard curve with only one qPCR replicate is used in 16 different plates. Based on our investigation we propose recommendations for the precise estimation of PCR efficiency: (1) one robust standard curve with at least 3-4 qPCR replicates at each concentration shall be generated, (2) the efficiency is instrument dependent, but reproducibly stable on one platform, and (3) using a larger volume when constructing serial dilution series reduces sampling error and enables calibration across a wider dynamic range.

  3. An investigation of PCR inhibition using Plexor(®) -based quantitative PCR and short tandem repeat amplification.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Robyn E; Duncan, George; McCord, Bruce R

    2014-11-01

    A common problem in forensic DNA typing is PCR inhibition resulting in allele dropout and peak imbalance. In this paper, we have utilized the Plexor(®) real-time PCR quantification kit to evaluate PCR inhibition. This is performed by adding increasing concentrations of various inhibitors and evaluating changes in melt curves and PCR amplification efficiencies. Inhibitors examined included calcium, humic acid, collagen, phenol, tannic acid, hematin, melanin, urea, bile salts, EDTA, and guanidinium thiocyanate. Results were plotted and modeled using mathematical simulations. In general, we found that PCR inhibitors that bind DNA affect melt curves and CT takeoff points while those that affect the Taq polymerase tend to affect the slope of the amplification curve. Mixed mode effects were also visible. Quantitative PCR results were then compared with subsequent STR amplification using the PowerPlex(®) 16 HS System. The overall results demonstrate that real-time PCR can be an effective method to evaluate PCR inhibition and predict its effects on subsequent STR amplifications.

  4. Field effect sensors for PCR applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taing, Meng-Houit; Sweatman, Denis R.

    2004-03-01

    The use of field effect sensors for biological and chemical sensing is widely employed due to its ability to make detections based on charge and surface potential. Because proteins and DNA almost always carry a charge [1], silicon can be used to micro fabricate such a sensor. The EIS structure (Electrolyte on Insulator on Silicon) provides a novel, label-free and simple to fabricate way to make a field effect DNA detection sensor. The sensor responds to fluctuating capacitance caused by a depletion layer thickness change at the surface of the silicon substrate through DNA adsorption onto the dielectric oxide/PLL (Poly-L-Lysine) surface. As DNA molecules diffuse to the sensor surface, they are bound to their complimentary capture probes deposited on the surface. The negative charge exhibited by the DNA forces negative charge carriers in the substrate to move away from the surface. This causes an n-type depletion layer substrate to thicken and a p-type to thin. The depletion layer thickness can be measured by its capacitance using an LCR meter. This experiment is conducted using the ConVolt (constant voltage) approach. Nucleic acids are amplified by an on chip PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) system and then fed into the sensor. The low ionic solution strength will ensure that counter-ions do not affect the sensor measurements. The sensor surface contains capture probes that bind to the pathogen. The types of pathogens we"ll be detecting include salmonella, campylobacter and E.Coli DNA. They are held onto the sensor surface by the positively charged Poly-L-Lysine layer. The electrolyte is biased through a pseudo-reference electrode. Pseudo reference electrodes are usually made from metals such as Platinum or Silver. The problem associated with "floating" biasing electrodes is they cannot provide stable biasing potentials [2]. They drift due to surface charging effects and trapped charges on the surface. To eliminate this, a differential system consisting of 2 sensors

  5. Heat-activatable primers for hot-start PCR and hot-start one-step RT-PCR: endpoint and real-time experiments.

    PubMed

    Ashrafi, Elena Hidalgo; Paul, Natasha

    2009-10-01

    Hot-start PCR is a technique that improves PCR performance by reducing nonspecific amplification during the initial setup stages of the PCR. This unit describes hot-start PCR protocols which utilize primers containing temperature-sensitive modifications. The introduction of 4-oxo-tetradecyl (OXT) phosphotriester groups onto the 3' end of the primer allows for primer-based hot-start PCR that is amenable for use in a number of PCR-based applications. The protocols described in this unit utilize OXT-modified primers in applications such as standard thermal cycling PCR, fast thermal cycling PCR, multiplex PCR, and one-step reverse-transcription PCR. This method is also advantageous for instances where improved PCR specificity is desired and a hot-start polymerase suitable for your application is not available.

  6. Interaction of quantitative PCR components with polymeric surfaces.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Asensio; Grimes, Ronan; Walsh, Edmond J; Dalton, Tara; Davies, Mark

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the effect of exposing a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture to capillary tubing of different materials and lengths, at different contact times and flow rates and the adsorption of major reaction components into the tubing wall. Using 0.5 mm ID tubing, lengths of 40 cm and residence times up to 45 min, none of the tested polymeric materials was found to affect subsequent PCR amplification. However, after exposure of the mixture to tubing lengths of 3 m or reduction of sample volume, PCR inhibition occurred, increasing with the volume to length ratio. Different flow velocities did not affect PCR yield. When the adsorption of individual PCR components was studied, significant DNA adsorption and even more significant adsorption of the fluorescent dye Sybr Green I was found. The results indicate that PCR inhibition in polymeric tubing results from adsorption of reaction components to wall surfaces, increasing substantially with tubing length or sample volume reduction, but not with contact time or flow velocities typical in dynamic PCR amplification. The data also highlight that chemical compatibility of polymeric capillaries with DNA dyes should be carefully considered for the design of quantitative microfluidic devices. PMID:17180709

  7. Nanogold-assisted multi-round polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Pan, Jiakui; Li, Haikuo; Cao, Xueyan; Huang, Jiehuan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Fan, Chunhai; Hu, Jun

    2007-12-01

    We have previously demonstrated that nanogold effectively enhances the specificity and yield of error-prone two-round polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Here we reported that, with the assistance of nanogold, we could perform multi-round PCR. In the presence of appropriate amount of 10 nm nanogold, we could obtain the target product even after six rounds of PCR, as manifested by a single bright band in gel electrophoresis (1% agarose). In fact, we could still observe the target band even at the 7th round of PCR, which nevertheless was accompanied by smearing bands (non-specific amplification). In contrast, in the absence of nanogold, the target band was completely lost only after four rounds of amplification. This marked difference in the performance of multi-round PCR clearly showed that nanogold was a powerful enhancer for PCR. More importantly, with this nanogold-assisted multi-round PCR, it might be possible to produce a large amount of target DNA, or to amply very low copies of genomic DNA from rare sources.

  8. Rapid and simple method of qPCR primer design.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is a powerful tool for analysis and quantification of gene expression. It is advantageous compared to traditional gel-based method of PCR, as gene expression can be visualized "real-time" using a computer. In qPCR, a reporter dye system is used which intercalates with DNA's region of interest and detects DNA amplification. Some of the popular reporter systems used in qPCR are the following: Molecular Beacon(®), SYBR Green(®), and Taqman(®). However, success of qPCR depends on the optimal primers used. Some of the considerations for primer design are the following: GC content, primer self-dimer, or secondary structure formation. Freely available software could be used for ideal qPCR primer design. Here we have shown how to use some freely available web-based software programs (such as Primerquest(®), Unafold(®), and Beacon designer(®)) to design qPCR primers.

  9. [Real time PCR methodology for quantification of nucleic acids].

    PubMed

    Tse, C; Capeau, J

    2003-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become an essential tool for molecular biologists and its introduction into nucleic acids detection systems has revolutionized the quantitative analysis of DNA and RNA. The technique has rapidly evolved over the last few years and the growing interest in quantitative applications of the PCR has favoured the development of real-time quantitative PCR. In this paper, we review, after presentation of the theorical aspects of PCR, the basic principles of real-time PCR with the introduction of the concept of threshold cycle. More precisely, we describe the novel assay formats that greatly simplify the protocols used for the detection of specific nucleic acids. We focus on the actual four technologies that enable sequence detection in a closed tube and that are SYBR Green I, TaqMan probes, Hybridization probes and Molecular Beacon probes. We then discuss the different quantification strategies in real time PCR and compare the competiting instruments on the market. The most important real-time PCR applications in clinical biology are also described.

  10. Evaluation of Roche Amplicor PCR assay for Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Wobeser, W L; Krajden, M; Conly, J; Simpson, H; Yim, B; D'costa, M; Fuksa, M; Hian-Cheong, C; Patterson, M; Phillips, A; Bannatyne, R; Haddad, A; Brunton, J L; Krajden, S

    1996-01-01

    The Roche Amplicor Mycobacterium tuberculosis PCR test (RMtb-PCR) was compared with mycobacterial culture, with the BACTEC 460 system and inoculation on Lowenstein-Jensen media. Results were interpreted with an adjusted "gold standard" incorporating clinical diagnosis. A total of 1,480 clinical specimens from 1,155 patients, including tissues and fluids, as well as 141 specimens which demonstrated a positive growth index on the BACTEC 460 system were assessed. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of RMtb-PCR compared with the adjusted gold standard for clinical specimens were 79, 99, 93, and 98%, respectively. In smear-positive specimens, the sensitivity of RMtb-PCR was 98% versus 53% for smear-negative specimens. When RMtb-PCR was performed two times per week, PCR results were available an average of 21 days before the culture results. For specimens demonstrating a positive growth index on the BACTEC 460 system, RMtb-PCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 98 and 100%, respectively. This study demonstrates the value of a commercial nucleic acid amplification kit for rapid diagnosis of M. tuberculosis, particularly in smear-positive specimens or BACTEC culture-positive specimens. PMID:8748289

  11. Development and Validation of a HPV-32 Specific PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Herrel, Nicholas R; Johnson, Nadia L; Cameron, Jennifer E; Leigh, Janet; Hagensee, Michael E

    2009-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus-32 (HPV-32) has traditionally been associated with focal-epithelial-hyperplasia (FEH). It is also present in 58% of oral warts of HIV-positive individuals whose prevalence is increasing. Current methods for the detection of HPV-32 are labor-intensive and insensitive so the goal of this work was to develop a highly sensitive and easy to use specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Materials and methods An HPV-32 L1 specific PCR assay was developed and optimized. The sensitivity and specificity was compared to previous assays utilized for detection (PGMY and MY09/11 PCR with dot blot hybridization) using cloned HPV-32 L1, the closely related HPV-42 L1 as well as clinical samples (oral swabs and fluids from 89 HIV-positive subjects). Results The HPV-32 specific PCR assay showed improved sensitivity to 5 copies of HPV-32 as compared to the PGMY PCR, MY09/11 PCR and dot blot which had a limit of detection of approximately 3,000 copies. Using the HPV-32 dot blot hybridization assay as the gold standard, the HPV-32 specific PCR assay has a sensitivity of 95.8% and 88.9% by sample and subject, respectively, and specificity was 87.8% and 58.8% by sample and subject, respectively. The low sensitivity is due to the HPV-32 specific PCR assays ability to detect more HPV-32 positive samples and may be the new gold standard. Conclusion Due to the ease, sensitivity, and specificity the HPV-32 specific PCR assay is superior to previous assays and is ideal for detection of HPV-32 in large cohorts. This assay provides an excellent tool to study the natural history of HPV-32 infection and the development of oral warts. PMID:19558697

  12. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (PCR) outperforms real-time PCR in the detection of environmental DNA from an invasive fish species.

    PubMed

    Doi, Hideyuki; Takahara, Teruhiko; Minamoto, Toshifumi; Matsuhashi, Saeko; Uchii, Kimiko; Yamanaka, Hiroki

    2015-05-01

    Environmental DNA (eDNA) has been used to investigate species distributions in aquatic ecosystems. Most of these studies use real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect eDNA in water; however, PCR amplification is often inhibited by the presence of organic and inorganic matter. In droplet digital PCR (ddPCR), the sample is partitioned into thousands of nanoliter droplets, and PCR inhibition may be reduced by the detection of the end-point of PCR amplification in each droplet, independent of the amplification efficiency. In addition, real-time PCR reagents can affect PCR amplification and consequently alter detection rates. We compared the effectiveness of ddPCR and real-time PCR using two different PCR reagents for the detection of the eDNA from invasive bluegill sunfish, Lepomis macrochirus, in ponds. We found that ddPCR had higher detection rates of bluegill eDNA in pond water than real-time PCR with either of the PCR reagents, especially at low DNA concentrations. Limits of DNA detection, which were tested by spiking the bluegill DNA to DNA extracts from the ponds containing natural inhibitors, found that ddPCR had higher detection rate than real-time PCR. Our results suggest that ddPCR is more resistant to the presence of PCR inhibitors in field samples than real-time PCR. Thus, ddPCR outperforms real-time PCR methods for detecting eDNA to document species distributions in natural habitats, especially in habitats with high concentrations of PCR inhibitors.

  13. Predicting Gene Structures from Multiple RT-PCR Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, Jakub; Vinař, Tomáš; Brejová, Broňa

    It has been demonstrated that the use of additional information such as ESTs and protein homology can significantly improve accuracy of gene prediction. However, many sources of external information are still being omitted from consideration. Here, we investigate the use of product lengths from RT-PCR experiments in gene finding. We present hardness results and practical algorithms for several variants of the problem and apply our methods to a real RT-PCR data set in the Drosophila genome. We conclude that the use of RT-PCR data can improve the sensitivity of gene prediction and locate novel splicing variants.

  14. Real-Time PCR for Gene Expression Quantification in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Sánchez, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become the reference technique for studying gene expression in recent years. The application of qPCR to the study of asthma provides very useful information regarding the gene expression mechanisms. The quantification of RNA from cDNA can be performed by using fluorescent dyes or specific sequence probes. Here, we describe the protocol to quantify gene expression levels using SYBR Green as fluorescent dye. The protocol starts with the RNA extraction, followed by reverse transcription to obtain cDNA, quantification and finally data analysis.

  15. Quantification of transcript levels with quantitative RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Carleton, Karen L

    2011-01-01

    Differential gene expression is a key factor driving phenotypic divergence. Determining when and where gene expression has diverged between organisms requires a quantitative method. While large-scale approaches such as microarrays or high-throughput mRNA sequencing can identify candidates, quantitative RT-PCR is the definitive method for confirming gene expression differences. Here, we describe the steps for performing qRT-PCR including extracting total RNA, reverse-transcribing it to make a pool of cDNA, and then quantifying relative expression of a few candidate genes using real-time or quantitative PCR.

  16. Real-Time PCR for Gene Expression Quantification in Asthma.

    PubMed

    Segundo-Val, Ignacio San; García-Solaesa, Virginia; García-Sánchez, Asunción

    2016-01-01

    The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) has become the reference technique for studying gene expression in recent years. The application of qPCR to the study of asthma provides very useful information regarding the gene expression mechanisms. The quantification of RNA from cDNA can be performed by using fluorescent dyes or specific sequence probes. Here, we describe the protocol to quantify gene expression levels using SYBR Green as fluorescent dye. The protocol starts with the RNA extraction, followed by reverse transcription to obtain cDNA, quantification and finally data analysis. PMID:27300530

  17. Preparation of DNA-containing extract for PCR amplification

    DOEpatents

    Dunbar, John M.; Kuske, Cheryl R.

    2006-07-11

    Environmental samples typically include impurities that interfere with PCR amplification and DNA quantitation. Samples of soil, river water, and aerosol were taken from the environment and added to an aqueous buffer (with or without detergent). Cells from the sample are lysed, releasing their DNA into the buffer. After removing insoluble cell components, the remaining soluble DNA-containing extract is treated with N-phenacylthiazolium bromide, which causes rapid precipitation of impurities. Centrifugation provides a supernatant that can be used or diluted for PCR amplification of DNA, or further purified. The method may provide a DNA-containing extract sufficiently pure for PCR amplification within 5–10 minutes.

  18. PCR amplification on microarrays of gel immobilized oligonucleotides

    SciTech Connect

    Strizhkov, Boris; Tillib, Sergei; Mikhailovich, Vladimir; Mirzabekov, Andrei

    2003-11-04

    The invention relates two general methods for performing PCR amplification, combined with the detection and analysis of the PCR products on a microchip. In the first method, the amplification occurs both outside and within a plurality of gel pads on a microchip, with at least one oligonucleotide primer immobilized in a gel pad. In the second method, PCR amplification also takes place within gel pads on a microchip, but the pads are surrounded by a hydrophobic liquid such as that which separates the individual gel pads into environments which resemble micro-miniaturized test tubes.

  19. Identification and quantification of ice nucleation active microorganisms by digital droplet PCR (ddPCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linden, Martin; Pöschl, Ulrich; Fröhlich-Nowoisky, Janine

    2015-04-01

    Several bioaerosol types, including bacteria, fungi, pollen and lichen, have been identified as sources of biological ice nucleators (IN) which induce ice formation already at temperatures as high as -10 °C or above. Accordingly, they potentially contribute widely to environmental ice nucleation in the atmosphere and are of great interest in the study of natural heterogenous ice nucleation processes. Ice nucleation active microorganisms have been found and studied among bacteria (Proteobacteria) and fungi (phyla Basidiomycota and Ascomycota). The mechanisms enabling the microorganisms to ice nucleation are subject to ongoing research. While it has been demonstrated that whole cells can act as ice nucleators in the case of bacteria due to the presence of specific membrane proteins, cell-free ice nucleation active particles seem to be responsible for this phenomenon in fungi and lichen. The identification and quantification of these ice nucleation active microorganisms and their IN in atmospheric samples is crucial to understand their contribution to the pool of atmospheric IN. This is not a trivial task since the respective microorganisms are often prevalent in lowest concentrations and a variety of states, be it viable cells, spores or cell debris from dead cells. Molecular biology provides tools to identify and quantify ice nucleation active microorganisms independent of their state by detecting genetic markers specific for the organism of interest. Those methods are not without their drawbacks in terms of sample material concentration required or reliable standardization. Digital Droplet Polymerase Chain Reaction (ddPCR) was chosen for our demands as a more elegant, quick and specific method in the investigation of ice nucleation active microorganisms in atmospheric samples. The advantages of ddPCR lie in the simultaneous detection and quantification of genetic markers and their original copy numbers in a sample. This is facilitated by the fractionation of the

  20. Oligoribonucleotide (ORN) interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR): a simple method for suppressing PCR amplification of specific DNA sequences using ORNs.

    PubMed

    Tanigawa, Naoki; Fujita, Toshitsugu; Fujii, Hodaka

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of multiple templates using common primers is used in a wide variety of molecular biological techniques. However, abundant templates sometimes obscure the amplification of minor species containing the same primer sequences. To overcome this challenge, we used oligoribonucleotides (ORNs) to inhibit amplification of undesired template sequences without affecting amplification of control sequences lacking complementarity to the ORNs. ORNs were effective at very low concentrations, with IC50 values for ORN-mediated suppression on the order of 10 nM. DNA polymerases that retain 3'-5' exonuclease activity, such as KOD and Pfu polymerases, but not those that retain 5'-3' exonuclease activity, such as Taq polymerase, could be used for ORN-mediated suppression. ORN interference-PCR (ORNi-PCR) technology should be a useful tool for both molecular biology research and clinical diagnosis.

  1. COMplementary Primer ASymmetric PCR (COMPAS-PCR) Applied to the Identification of Salmo salar, Salmo trutta and Their Hybrids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Avoiding complementarity between primers when designing a PCR assay constitutes a central rule strongly anchored in the mind of the molecular scientist. 3’-complementarity will extend the primers during PCR elongation using one another as template, consequently disabling further possible involvement in traditional target amplification. However, a 5’-complementarity will leave the primers unchanged during PCR cycles, albeit sequestered to one another, therefore also suppressing target amplification. We show that 5’-complementarity between primers may be exploited in a new PCR method called COMplementary-Primer-Asymmetric (COMPAS)-PCR, using asymmetric primer concentrations to achieve target PCR amplification. Moreover, such a design may paradoxically reduce spurious non-target amplification by actively sequestering the limiting primer. The general principles were demonstrated using 5S rDNA direct repeats as target sequences to design a species-specific assay for identifying Salmo salar and Salmo trutta using almost fully complementary primers overlapping the same target sequence. Specificity was enhanced by using 3’-penultimate point mutations and the assay was further developed to enable identification of S. salar x S. trutta hybrids by High Resolution Melt analysis in a 35 min one-tube assay. This small paradigm shift, using highly complementary primers for PCR, should help develop robust assays that previously would not be considered. PMID:27783658

  2. Sensitive simultaneous detection of seven sexually transmitted agents in semen by multiplex-PCR and of HPV by single PCR.

    PubMed

    Gimenes, Fabrícia; Medina, Fabiana Soares; Abreu, André Luelsdorf Pimenta de; Irie, Mary Mayumi Taguti; Esquiçati, Isis Baroni; Malagutti, Natália; Vasconcellos, Vinícius Rodrigo Bulla; Discacciati, Michele Garcia; Bonini, Marcelo Gialluisi; Maria-Engler, Silvya Stuchi; Consolaro, Marcia Edilaine Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) may impair sperm parameters and functions thereby promoting male infertility. To date limited molecular studies were conducted to evaluate the frequency and type of such infections in semen Thus, we aimed at conceiving and validating a multiplex PCR (M-PCR) assay for the simultaneous detection of the following STD pathogens in semen: Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Mycoplasma genitalium, Trichomonas vaginalis, Herpes virus simplex (HSV) -1 and -2, and Treponema pallidum; We also investigated the potential usefulness of this M-PCR assay in screening programs for semen pathogens. In addition, we aimed: to detect human Papillomavirus (HPV) and genotypes by single PCR (sPCR) in the same semen samples; to determine the prevalence of the seven STDs, HPV and co-infections; to assess the possibility that these infections affect semen parameters and thus fertility. The overall validation parameters of M-PCR were extremely high including agreement (99.2%), sensitivity (100.00%), specificity (99.70%), positive (96.40%) and negative predictive values (100.00%) and accuracy (99.80%). The prevalence of STDs was very high (55.3%). Furthermore, associations were observed between STDs and changes in semen parameters, highlighting the importance of STD detection in semen. Thus, this M-PCR assay has great potential for application in semen screening programs for pathogens in infertility and STD clinics and in sperm banks.

  3. Whole blood Nested PCR and Real-time PCR amplification of Talaromyces marneffei specific DNA for diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lu, Sha; Li, Xiqing; Calderone, Richard; Zhang, Jing; Ma, Jianchi; Cai, Wenying; Xi, Liyan

    2016-02-01

    Talaromyces marneffei is a dimorphic pathogenic fungus, which is a life-threatening invasive mycosis in the immunocompromised host. Prompt diagnosis of T. marneffei infection remains difficult although there has been progress in attempts to expedite the diagnosis of this infection. We previously demonstrated the value of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to detect T. marneffei in paraffin embedded tissue samples with high sensitivity and specificity. In this study, this assay was used to detect the DNA of T. marneffei in whole blood samples. Real-time PCR assay was also evaluated to identify T. marneffei in the same samples. Twenty out of 30 whole blood samples (67%) collected from 23 patients were found positive by using the nested PCR assay, while 23/30 (77%) samples were found positive by using the real-time PCR assay. In order to express accurately the fungal loads, we used a normalized linearized plasmid as an internal control for real-time PCR. The assay results were correlated as the initial quantity (copies/μl) with fungal burden. These data indicate that combination of nested PCR and real-time PCR assay provides an attractive alternative for identification of T. marneffei DNA in whole blood samples of HIV-infected patients.

  4. Species identification of Cannabis sativa using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher E; Premasuthan, Amritha; Satkoski Trask, Jessica; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2013-03-01

    Most narcotics-related cases in the United States involve Cannabis sativa. Material is typically identified based on the cystolithic hairs on the leaves and with chemical tests to identify of the presence of cannabinoids. Suspect seeds are germinated into a viable plant so that morphological and chemical tests can be conducted. Seed germination, however, causes undue analytical delays. DNA analyses that involve the chloroplast and nuclear genomes have been developed for identification of C. sativa materials, but they require several nanograms of template DNA. Using the trnL 3' exon-trnF intragenic spacer regions within the C. sativa chloroplast, we have developed a real-time quantitative PCR assay that is capable of identifying picogram amounts of chloroplast DNA for species determination of suspected C. sativa material. This assay provides forensic science laboratories with a quick and reliable method to identify an unknown sample as C. sativa.

  5. Clinical Performance of Aspergillus PCR for Testing Serum and Plasma: a Study by the European Aspergillus PCR Initiative.

    PubMed

    White, P Lewis; Barnes, Rosemary A; Springer, Jan; Klingspor, Lena; Cuenca-Estrella, Manuel; Morton, C Oliver; Lagrou, Katrien; Bretagne, Stéphane; Melchers, Willem J G; Mengoli, Carlo; Donnelly, J Peter; Heinz, Werner J; Loeffler, Juergen

    2015-09-01

    Aspergillus PCR testing of serum provides technical simplicity but with potentially reduced sensitivity compared to whole-blood testing. With diseases for which screening to exclude disease represents an optimal strategy, sensitivity is paramount. The associated analytical study confirmed that DNA concentrations were greater in plasma than those in serum. The aim of the current investigation was to confirm analytical findings by comparing the performance of Aspergillus PCR testing of plasma and serum in the clinical setting. Standardized Aspergillus PCR was performed on plasma and serum samples concurrently obtained from hematology patients in a multicenter retrospective anonymous case-control study, with cases diagnosed according to European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Invasive Fungal Infections Cooperative Group and the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases Mycoses Study Group (EORTC/MSG) consensus definitions (19 proven/probable cases and 42 controls). Clinical performance and clinical utility (time to positivity) were calculated for both kinds of samples. The sensitivity and specificity for Aspergillus PCR when testing serum were 68.4% and 76.2%, respectively, and for plasma, they were 94.7% and 83.3%, respectively. Eighty-five percent of serum and plasma PCR results were concordant. On average, plasma PCR was positive 16.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in 13 cases, combined with other biomarkers in five cases. On average, serum PCR was positive 10.8 days before diagnosis and was the earliest indicator of infection in six cases, combined with other biomarkers in three cases. These results confirm the analytical finding that the sensitivity of Aspergillus PCR using plasma is superior to that using serum. PCR positivity occurs earlier when testing plasma and provides sufficient sensitivity for the screening of invasive aspergillosis while maintaining methodological simplicity.

  6. Quantitative PCR for Genetic Markers of Human Fecal Pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantificationapproach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for quantification of two recently described human-...

  7. Quantitative PCR for genetic markers of human fecal pollution

    EPA Science Inventory

    Assessment of health risk and fecal bacteria loads associated with human fecal pollution requires reliable host-specific analytical methods and a rapid quantification approach. We report the development of quantitative PCR assays for enumeration of two recently described hum...

  8. Nanodroplet real-time PCR system with laser assisted heating.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hanyoup; Dixit, Sanhita; Green, Christopher J; Faris, Gregory W

    2009-01-01

    We report the successful application of low-power (approximately 30 mW) laser radiation as an optical heating source for high-speed real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of DNA in nanoliter droplets dispersed in an oil phase. Light provides the heating, temperature measurement, and Taqman real-time readout in nanoliter droplets on a disposable plastic substrate. A selective heating scheme using an infrared laser appears ideal for driving PCR because it heats only the droplet, not the oil or plastic substrate, providing fast heating and completing the 40 cycles of PCR in 370 seconds. No microheaters or microfluidic circuitry were deposited on the substrate, and PCR was performed in one droplet without affecting neighboring droplets. The assay performance was quantitative and its amplification efficiency was comparable to that of a commercial instrument.

  9. Evaluation of PCR-based beef sexing methods.

    PubMed

    Zeleny, Reinhard; Bernreuther, Alexander; Schimmel, Heinz; Pauwels, Jean

    2002-07-17

    Analysis of the sex of beef meat by fast and reliable molecular methods is an important measure to ensure correct allocation of export refunds, which are considerably higher for male beef meat. Two PCR-based beef sexing methods have been optimized and evaluated. The amelogenin-type method revealed excellent accuracy and robustness, whereas the bovine satellite/Y-chromosome duplex PCR procedure showed more ambiguous results. In addition, an interlaboratory comparison was organized to evaluate currently applied PCR-based sexing methods in European customs laboratories. From a total of 375 samples sent out, only 1 false result was reported (female identified as male). However, differences in the performances of the applied methods became apparent. The collected data contribute to specify technical requirements for a common European beef sexing methodology based on PCR. PMID:12105941

  10. Rapid PCR amplification of DNA utilizing Coriolis effects.

    PubMed

    Mårtensson, Gustaf; Skote, Martin; Malmqvist, Mats; Falk, Mats; Asp, Allan; Svanvik, Nicke; Johansson, Arne

    2006-08-01

    A novel polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method is presented that utilizes Coriolis and centrifugal effects, produced by rotation of the sample disc, in order to increase internal circulatory rates, and with them temperature homogenization and mixing speeds. A proof of concept has been presented by testing a rapid 45-cycle PCR DNA amplification protocol. During the repeated heating and cooling that constitutes a PCR process, the 100 microL samples were rotated at a speed equivalent to an effective acceleration of gravity of 7,000 g. A cycle time of 20.5 s gave a total process time of 15 min to complete the 45 cycles. A theoretical and numerical analysis of the resulting flow, which describes the increased mixing and temperature homogenization, is presented. The device gives excellent reaction speed efficiency, which is beneficial for rapid PCR.

  11. Application of PCR-ELISA in Molecular Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Sue, Mei Jean; Yeap, Swee Keong; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Tan, Sheau Wei

    2014-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (PCR-ELISA) is an immunodetection method that can quantify PCR product directly after immobilization of biotinylated DNA on a microplate. This method, which detects nucleic acid instead of protein, is a much more sensitive method compared to conventional PCR method, with shorter analytical time and lower detection limit. Its high specificity and sensitivity, together with its semiquantitative ability, give it a huge potential to serve as a powerful detection tool in various industries such as medical, veterinary, and agricultural industries. With the recent advances in PCR-ELISA, it is envisaged that the assay is more widely recognized for its fast and sensitive detection limit which could improve overall diagnostic time and quality. PMID:24971343

  12. Rapid Multiplex Nested PCR for Detection of Respiratory Viruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Lam, W. Y.; Yeung, Apple C. M.; Tang, Julian W.; Ip, Margaret; Chan, Edward W. C.; Hui, Mamie; Chan, Paul K. S.

    2007-01-01

    Respiratory tract infections can be caused by a heterogeneous group of viruses and bacteria that produce similar clinical presentations. Specific diagnosis therefore relies on laboratory investigation. This study developed and evaluated five groups of multiplex nested PCR assays that could simultaneously detect 21 different respiratory pathogens: influenza A virus (H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1); influenza B virus; parainfluenza virus types 1, 2, 3, 4a, and 4b; respiratory syncytial virus A and B; human rhinoviruses; human enteroviruses; human coronaviruses OC43 and 229E; severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus; human metapneumoviruses; Mycoplasma pneumoniae; Chlamydophila pneumoniae; Legionella pneumophila; and adenoviruses (A to F). These multiplex nested PCRs adopted fast PCR technology. The high speed of fast PCR (within 35 min) greatly improved the efficiency of these assays. The results show that these multiplex nested PCR assays are specific and more sensitive (100- to 1,000-fold) than conventional methods. Among the 303 clinical specimens tested, the multiplex nested PCR achieved an overall positive rate of 48.5% (95% confidence interval [CI], 42.9 to 54.1%), which was significantly higher than that of virus isolation (20.1% [95% CI, 15.6 to 24.6%]) and that of direct detection by immunofluorescence assay (13.5% [95% CI, 9.7 to 17.4%]). The improved sensitivity was partly due to the higher sensitivity of multiplex nested PCR than that of conventional methods in detecting cultivatable viruses. Moreover, the ability of the multiplex nested PCR to detect noncultivatable viruses, particularly rhinoviruses, coronavirus OC43, and metapneumoviruses, contributed a major gain (15.6%) in the overall positive rate. In conclusion, rapid multiplex nested PCR assays can improve the diagnostic yield for respiratory infections to allow prompt interventive actions to be taken. PMID:17804659

  13. DNA microarray-based PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Schneeberg, Alexander; Ehricht, Ralf; Slickers, Peter; Baier, Vico; Neubauer, Heinrich; Zimmermann, Stefan; Rabold, Denise; Lübke-Becker, Antina; Seyboldt, Christian

    2015-02-01

    This study presents a DNA microarray-based assay for fast and simple PCR ribotyping of Clostridium difficile strains. Hybridization probes were designed to query the modularly structured intergenic spacer region (ISR), which is also the template for conventional and PCR ribotyping with subsequent capillary gel electrophoresis (seq-PCR) ribotyping. The probes were derived from sequences available in GenBank as well as from theoretical ISR module combinations. A database of reference hybridization patterns was set up from a collection of 142 well-characterized C. difficile isolates representing 48 seq-PCR ribotypes. The reference hybridization patterns calculated by the arithmetic mean were compared using a similarity matrix analysis. The 48 investigated seq-PCR ribotypes revealed 27 array profiles that were clearly distinguishable. The most frequent human-pathogenic ribotypes 001, 014/020, 027, and 078/126 were discriminated by the microarray. C. difficile strains related to 078/126 (033, 045/FLI01, 078, 126, 126/FLI01, 413, 413/FLI01, 598, 620, 652, and 660) and 014/020 (014, 020, and 449) showed similar hybridization patterns, confirming their genetic relatedness, which was previously reported. A panel of 50 C. difficile field isolates was tested by seq-PCR ribotyping and the DNA microarray-based assay in parallel. Taking into account that the current version of the microarray does not discriminate some closely related seq-PCR ribotypes, all isolates were typed correctly. Moreover, seq-PCR ribotypes without reference profiles available in the database (ribotype 009 and 5 new types) were correctly recognized as new ribotypes, confirming the performance and expansion potential of the microarray.

  14. Quantification of HEV RNA by Droplet Digital PCR

    PubMed Central

    Nicot, Florence; Cazabat, Michelle; Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Sauné, Karine; Chiabrando, Julie; Dubois, Martine; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of real-time PCR for hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA quantification differs greatly among techniques. Standardized tools that measure the real quantity of virus are needed. We assessed the performance of a reverse transcription droplet digital PCR (RT-ddPCR) assay that gives absolute quantities of HEV RNA. Analytical and clinical validation was done on HEV genotypes 1, 3 and 4, and was based on open reading frame (ORF)3 amplification. The within-run and between-run reproducibilities were very good, the analytical sensitivity was 80 HEV RNA international units (IU)/mL and linearities of HEV genotype 1, 3 and 4 were very similar. Clinical validation based on 45 samples of genotype 1, 3 or 4 gave results that correlated well with a validated reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay (Spearman rs = 0.89, p < 0.0001). The RT-ddPCR assay is a sensitive method and could be a promising tool for standardizing HEV RNA quantification in various sample types. PMID:27548205

  15. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates

    PubMed Central

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10–90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content. PMID:27271574

  16. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    PubMed

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  17. Quantification of HEV RNA by Droplet Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Nicot, Florence; Cazabat, Michelle; Lhomme, Sébastien; Marion, Olivier; Sauné, Karine; Chiabrando, Julie; Dubois, Martine; Kamar, Nassim; Abravanel, Florence; Izopet, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    The sensitivity of real-time PCR for hepatitis E virus (HEV) RNA quantification differs greatly among techniques. Standardized tools that measure the real quantity of virus are needed. We assessed the performance of a reverse transcription droplet digital PCR (RT-ddPCR) assay that gives absolute quantities of HEV RNA. Analytical and clinical validation was done on HEV genotypes 1, 3 and 4, and was based on open reading frame (ORF)3 amplification. The within-run and between-run reproducibilities were very good, the analytical sensitivity was 80 HEV RNA international units (IU)/mL and linearities of HEV genotype 1, 3 and 4 were very similar. Clinical validation based on 45 samples of genotype 1, 3 or 4 gave results that correlated well with a validated reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay (Spearman rs = 0.89, p < 0.0001). The RT-ddPCR assay is a sensitive method and could be a promising tool for standardizing HEV RNA quantification in various sample types. PMID:27548205

  18. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and qPCR for the Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Bovine Feces.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Verstraete, Karen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-05-18

    Cattle are considered to be the main reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and are often the direct or indirect source of STEC outbreaks in humans. Accurate measurement of the concentration of shed STEC in cattle feces could be a key answer to questions concerning transmission of STEC, contamination sources and efficiency of treatments at farm level. Infected animals can be identified and the contamination level quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has its specific limitations. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been proposed as a method to overcome many of the drawbacks of qPCR. This end-point amplification PCR is capable of absolute quantification independent from any reference material and is less prone to PCR inhibition than qPCR. In this study, the qPCR-based protocol described by Verstraete et al. (2014) for Shiga toxin genes stx1 and stx2 and the intimin gene eae quantification was optimized for ddPCR analysis. The properties of ddPCR and qPCR using two different mastermixes (EMM: TaqMan(®) Environmental Master Mix 2.0; UMM: TaqMan(®) Universal PCR Master Mix) were evaluated, using standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples. In addition, the susceptibility of these assays to PCR-inhibitors was investigated. Evaluation of the standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples suggested a very good agreement between qPCR using EMM and ddPCR. Furthermore, similar sensitivities and no PCR inhibition were recorded for both assays. On the other hand, qPCR using UMM was clearly prone to PCR inhibition. In conclusion, the ddPCR technique shows potential for the accurate absolute quantification of STEC on the farms, without relying on standardized reference material.

  19. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and qPCR for the Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Bovine Feces

    PubMed Central

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Verstraete, Karen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are considered to be the main reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and are often the direct or indirect source of STEC outbreaks in humans. Accurate measurement of the concentration of shed STEC in cattle feces could be a key answer to questions concerning transmission of STEC, contamination sources and efficiency of treatments at farm level. Infected animals can be identified and the contamination level quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has its specific limitations. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been proposed as a method to overcome many of the drawbacks of qPCR. This end-point amplification PCR is capable of absolute quantification independent from any reference material and is less prone to PCR inhibition than qPCR. In this study, the qPCR-based protocol described by Verstraete et al. (2014) for Shiga toxin genes stx1 and stx2 and the intimin gene eae quantification was optimized for ddPCR analysis. The properties of ddPCR and qPCR using two different mastermixes (EMM: TaqMan® Environmental Master Mix 2.0; UMM: TaqMan® Universal PCR Master Mix) were evaluated, using standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples. In addition, the susceptibility of these assays to PCR-inhibitors was investigated. Evaluation of the standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples suggested a very good agreement between qPCR using EMM and ddPCR. Furthermore, similar sensitivities and no PCR inhibition were recorded for both assays. On the other hand, qPCR using UMM was clearly prone to PCR inhibition. In conclusion, the ddPCR technique shows potential for the accurate absolute quantification of STEC on the farms, without relying on standardized reference material. PMID:27213452

  20. Comparison of Droplet Digital PCR and qPCR for the Quantification of Shiga Toxin-Producing Escherichia coli in Bovine Feces.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Bavo; De Reu, Koen; De Zutter, Lieven; Verstraete, Karen; Heyndrickx, Marc; Van Coillie, Els

    2016-01-01

    Cattle are considered to be the main reservoir for Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and are often the direct or indirect source of STEC outbreaks in humans. Accurate measurement of the concentration of shed STEC in cattle feces could be a key answer to questions concerning transmission of STEC, contamination sources and efficiency of treatments at farm level. Infected animals can be identified and the contamination level quantified by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR), which has its specific limitations. Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has been proposed as a method to overcome many of the drawbacks of qPCR. This end-point amplification PCR is capable of absolute quantification independent from any reference material and is less prone to PCR inhibition than qPCR. In this study, the qPCR-based protocol described by Verstraete et al. (2014) for Shiga toxin genes stx1 and stx2 and the intimin gene eae quantification was optimized for ddPCR analysis. The properties of ddPCR and qPCR using two different mastermixes (EMM: TaqMan(®) Environmental Master Mix 2.0; UMM: TaqMan(®) Universal PCR Master Mix) were evaluated, using standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples. In addition, the susceptibility of these assays to PCR-inhibitors was investigated. Evaluation of the standard curves and both artificial and natural contaminated cattle fecal samples suggested a very good agreement between qPCR using EMM and ddPCR. Furthermore, similar sensitivities and no PCR inhibition were recorded for both assays. On the other hand, qPCR using UMM was clearly prone to PCR inhibition. In conclusion, the ddPCR technique shows potential for the accurate absolute quantification of STEC on the farms, without relying on standardized reference material. PMID:27213452

  1. Absolute quantification of olive oil DNA by droplet digital-PCR (ddPCR): Comparison of isolation and amplification methodologies.

    PubMed

    Scollo, Francesco; Egea, Leticia A; Gentile, Alessandra; La Malfa, Stefano; Dorado, Gabriel; Hernandez, Pilar

    2016-12-15

    Olive oil is considered a premium product for its nutritional value and health benefits, and the ability to define its origin and varietal composition is a key step towards ensuring the traceability of the product. However, isolating the DNA from such a matrix is a difficult task. In this study, the quality and quantity of olive oil DNA, isolated using four different DNA isolation protocols, was evaluated using the qRT-PCR and ddPCR techniques. The results indicate that CTAB-based extraction methods were the best for unfiltered oil, while Nucleo Spin-based extraction protocols showed greater overall reproducibility. The use of both qRT-PCR and ddPCR led to the absolute quantification of the DNA copy number. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the choice of DNA-isolation protocol, which should take into consideration the qualitative aspects of DNA and the evaluation of the amplified DNA copy number. PMID:27451195

  2. Absolute quantification of olive oil DNA by droplet digital-PCR (ddPCR): Comparison of isolation and amplification methodologies.

    PubMed

    Scollo, Francesco; Egea, Leticia A; Gentile, Alessandra; La Malfa, Stefano; Dorado, Gabriel; Hernandez, Pilar

    2016-12-15

    Olive oil is considered a premium product for its nutritional value and health benefits, and the ability to define its origin and varietal composition is a key step towards ensuring the traceability of the product. However, isolating the DNA from such a matrix is a difficult task. In this study, the quality and quantity of olive oil DNA, isolated using four different DNA isolation protocols, was evaluated using the qRT-PCR and ddPCR techniques. The results indicate that CTAB-based extraction methods were the best for unfiltered oil, while Nucleo Spin-based extraction protocols showed greater overall reproducibility. The use of both qRT-PCR and ddPCR led to the absolute quantification of the DNA copy number. The results clearly demonstrate the importance of the choice of DNA-isolation protocol, which should take into consideration the qualitative aspects of DNA and the evaluation of the amplified DNA copy number.

  3. [Formation of para-Bombay phenotype caused by homozygous or heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jin-Ping; Zheng, Yan; Sun, Dong-Ni

    2014-02-01

    This study was aimed to explore the molecular mechanisms for para-Bombay phenotype formation. The H antigen of these individuals were identified by serological techniques. The full coding region of alpha (1, 2) fucosyltransferase (FUT1) gene of these individuals was amplified by high-fidelity polymerase chain reaction (PCR). PCR product was identified by TOPO cloning sequencing. Analysis and comparison were used to explore the mechanisms of para-bombay phenotype formation in individuals. The results indicated that the full coding region of FUT1 DNA was successfully amplified by PCR and gel electrophoresis. DNA sequencing and analysis found that h1 (547-552delAG) existed in one chromosome and h4 (35C > T) existed in the other chromosome of NO.1 individual. Meantime, h1 (547-552delAG) was found in two chromosomes of NO.2 and NO.3 individual. It also means that FUT1 gene of NO.1 individual was h1h4 heterozygote, FUT1 gene of NO.2 and NO.3 individuals were h1h1 homozygote. It is concluded that homozygous and heterozygous mutation of FUT1 gene can lead to the formation of para-Bombay phenotype.

  4. RT-PCR detection of HIV in Republic of Macedonia.

    PubMed

    Bosevska, Golubinka; Panovski, Nikola; Dokić, Eleni; Grunevska, Violeta

    2008-11-01

    The aim of the study was to detect HIV RNA in seropositive patients using RT-PCR method and thus, to establish PCR methodology in the routine laboratory works. The total of 33 examined persons were divided in two groups: 1) 13 persons seropositive for HIV; and 2) 20 healthy persons - randomly selected blood donors that made the case control group. The subjects age was between 25 and 52 years (average 38,5). ELFA test for combined detection of HIV p24 antigen and anti HIV-1+2 IgG and ELISA test for detection of antibodies against HIV-1 and HIV-2, were performed for each examined person. RNA from the whole blood was extracted using a commercial kit based on salt precipitation. Detection of HIV RNA was performed using RT-PCR kit. Following nested PCR, the product was separated by electrophoresis in 1,5 % agarose gel. The result was scored positive if the band of 210bp was visible regardless of intensity. Measures of precaution were taken during all the steps of the work and HIV infected materials were disposed of accordingly. In the group of blood donors ELFA, ELISA and RT-PCR were negative. Assuming that prevalence of HIV infection is zero, the clinical specificity of RT-PCR is 100 %. The analytical specificity of RT-PCR method was tested against Hepatitis C and B, Human Papiloma Virus, Cytomegalovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Rubella Virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Chlamydia trachomatis. None of these templates yielded amplicon. In the group of 13 seropositive persons, 33 samples were analyzed. HIV RNA was detected in 15 samples. ELISA and ELFA test were positive in all samples. Different aliquots of the samples were tested independently and showed the same results. After different periods of storing the RNA samples at -70 masculineC, RT-PCR reaction was identical to the one performed initially. The obtained amplicons were maintained frozen at -20 masculineC for a week and the subsequently performed electrophoresis was identical to the previous one. The reaction is

  5. A strategy for detection of viruses in groundwater by PCR.

    PubMed

    Abbaszadegan, M; Stewart, P; LeChevallier, M

    1999-02-01

    We evaluated the use of the PCR for detection of enteric viruses in groundwater. To do this, we used an improved sample-processing technique and a large-volume amplification protocol. The objective of this study was to use advanced molecular techniques to develop a rapid and simple method which can be used by the water industry for detection of viral contamination in a variety of water samples. The strategy described here fulfills the water industry's need for a rapid, reliable, easily performed method for analyzing groundwater for virus contamination. Viruses were detected after concentration from at least 400 gallons (1,512 liters) of water by a filter adsorption and elution method, which resulted in a concentrate containing viruses. A total of 150 samples were analyzed by performing cell culture assays for enteroviruses and by performing reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses for enteroviruses, hepatitis A virus, and rotavirus. Thirteen samples (8.7%) produced cellular cytopathic effects when the Buffalo green monkey cell line was used. When primers specific for enteroviruses were used in RT-PCR, 40 of 133 samples (30.1%) tested positive for the presence of enterovirus RNA. When hepatitis A virus-specific primers were used, 12 of 139 samples (8.6%) were considered positive for the presence of hepatitis A viral RNA. The RT-PCR analysis performed with rotavirus-specific primers identified 18 of 130 samples (13.8%) that were positive for rotavirus RNA sequences. Our sample-processing technique and large-volume PCR protocol (reaction volume, 300 microliter) resulted in sufficient removal or dilution of inhibitors so that more than 95% of the samples could be assayed by PCR. Because of its sensitivity for detecting viral nucleic acid sequences, PCR analysis should produce more positive results than cell culture analysis. Since either cell culture analysis or PCR can reveal only a "snapshot" of the quality of the groundwater being sampled, PCR seems to be a

  6. A survey of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification studies of unicellular protists using single-cell PCR.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Denis H; Pinheiro, Marcel

    2009-01-01

    We surveyed a variety of studies that have used single-cell polymerase chain reaction (SC-PCR) to examine the gene sequences of a diversity of unicellular protists. Representatives of all the Super-Groups of eukaryotes have been subjected to SC-PCR with ciliates and dinoflagellates being most commonly examined. The SC-PCR was carried out either by directly amplifying a single lysed cell or by first extracting DNA and following this with amplification of the DNA extract. Cell lysis methods included heating, freezing, mechanical rupture, and enzyme digestion. Cells fixed or preserved with ethanol, methanol, and Lugol's have also been used successfully. Heminested or seminested PCR might follow the initial PCR, whose products were then directly sequenced or cloned and then sequenced. The methods are not complicated. This should encourage protistologists to use SC-PCR in the description of new or revised taxa, especially rare and unculturable forms, and it should also enable the probing of gene expression in relation to life history stages.

  7. Droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhi-Xin; Luo, Rong; Lü, Shu-Hai; Xu, Ai-Dong; Yang, Yong-Jun

    2005-08-01

    Polymerase chain reactions (PCR), thermally activated chemical reactions which are widely used for nucleic acid amplification, have recently received much attention in microelectromechanical systems and micro total analysis systems because a wide variety of DNA/RNA molecules can be enriched by PCR for further analyses. In the present work, a droplet-based micro oscillating-flow PCR chip was designed and fabricated by the silicon microfabrication technique. Three different temperature zones, which were stable at denaturation, extension and annealing temperatures and isolated from each other by a thin-wall linkage, were integrated with a single, simple and straight microchannel to form the chip's basic functional structure. The PCR mixture was injected into the chip as a single droplet and flowed through the three temperature zones in the main microchannel in an oscillating manner to achieve the temperature maintenance and transitions. The chip's thermal performance was theoretically analyzed and numerically simulated. The results indicated that the time needed for the temperature of the droplet to change to the target value is less than 1 s, and the root mean square error of temperature is less than 0.2 °C. A droplet of 1 µl PCR mixture with standard HPV (Human Papilloma Virus)-DNA sample inside was amplified by the present chip and the results were analyzed by slab gel electrophoresis with separation of DNA markers in parallel. The electrophoresis results demonstrated that the micro oscillating-flow PCR chip successfully amplified the HPV-DNA, with a processing time of about 15 min which is significantly reduced compared to that for the conventional PCR instrument.

  8. The methylation status of plant genomic DNA influences PCR efficiency.

    PubMed

    Kiselev, K V; Dubrovina, A S; Tyunin, A P

    2015-03-01

    During the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), which is a versatile and widely used method, certain DNA sequences are rapidly amplified through thermocycling. Although there are numerous protocols of PCR optimization for different applications, little is known about the effect of DNA modifications, such as DNA methylation, on PCR efficiency. Recent studies show that cytosine methylation alters DNA mechanical properties and suggest that DNA methylation may directly or indirectly influence the effectiveness of DNA amplification during PCR. In the present study, using plant DNA, we found that highly methylated plant DNA genomic regions were amplified with lower efficiencies compared to that for the regions methylated at a lower level. The correlation was observed when amplifying stilbene synthase (STS1, STS10) genes of Vitis amurensis, the Actin2 gene of Arabidopsis thaliana, the internal transcribed spacer (AtITS), and tRNAPro of A. thaliana. The level of DNA methylation within the analyzed DNA regions has been analyzed with bisulfite sequencing. The obtained data show that efficient PCRs of highly methylated plant DNA regions can be hampered. Proteinase K treatment of the plant DNA prior to PCR and using HotTaq DNA polymerase improved amplification of the highly methylated plant DNA regions. We suggest that increased DNA denaturation temperatures of the highly methylated DNA and contamination with DNA-binding proteins contribute to the hampered PCR amplification of highly methylated DNA. The data show that it is necessary to use current DNA purification protocols and commercial kits with caution to ensure appropriate PCR product yield and prevent bias toward unmethylated DNA amplification in PCRs.

  9. [Evaluation of minimal residual disease using allele (mutation) -specific PCR].

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Kazuyuki

    2014-06-01

    For patients with hematological malignancies, monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) provides useful information to evaluate the therapeutic response and risk of relapse. The currently available quantitative MRD assays are fluorescence in situ hybridization of chromosomal aberrations, multiparameter flow cytometry of leukemia-associated immunophenotypes, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) analysis of fusion genes, immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements, genetic alterations, or over-expressed genes. Single nucleotide mutations associated with leukemogenesis can be considered as applicable MRD markers. Allele-specific qPCR (AS-qPCR) using primers including mismatched bases and locked nucleic acids (LNA) can quantify not only the insertion and duplication of several nucleotides, but also single nucleotide mutation in the presence of an excess amount of wild-type nucleotides. The AS-qPCR for analyzing single nucleotide mutations contributes to the monitoring of MRD in patients without recurrent fusion genes throughout the clinical course and, thus, broadens the spectrum of patients in whom MRD can be monitored. In addition to the evaluation of MRD, AS-qPCR can provide insight into the development of leukemia and the sequential acquisition of gene mutations.

  10. Optimizing methods for PCR-based analysis of predation

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Daniela; Raso, Lorna; Kaufmann, Rüdiger; Traugott, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Molecular methods have become an important tool for studying feeding interactions under natural conditions. Despite their growing importance, many methodological aspects have not yet been evaluated but need to be considered to fully exploit the potential of this approach. Using feeding experiments with high alpine carabid beetles and lycosid spiders, we investigated how PCR annealing temperature affects prey DNA detection success and how post-PCR visualization methods differ in their sensitivity. Moreover, the replicability of prey DNA detection among individual PCR assays was tested using beetles and spiders that had digested their prey for extended times postfeeding. By screening all predators for three differently sized prey DNA fragments (range 116–612 bp), we found that only in the longest PCR product, a marked decrease in prey detection success occurred. Lowering maximum annealing temperatures by 4 °C resulted in significantly increased prey DNA detection rates in both predator taxa. Among the three post-PCR visualization methods, an eightfold difference in sensitivity was observed. Repeated screening of predators increased the total number of samples scoring positive, although the proportion of samples testing positive did not vary significantly between different PCRs. The present findings demonstrate that assay sensitivity, in combination with other methodological factors, plays a crucial role to obtain robust trophic interaction data. Future work employing molecular prey detection should thus consider and minimize the methodologically induced variation that would also allow for better cross-study comparisons. PMID:21507208

  11. PCR Assay for Species-Specific Identification of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Lee-Jene; Hsueh, Po-Ren; Tsai, Jui-Chang; Chiang, Feng-Lin; Chen, Ching-Yi; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2000-01-01

    Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron is the second most frequently encountered species of the anaerobes isolated from clinical specimens. We developed a PCR-based assay for the rapid identification of B. thetaiotaomicron. Specific primers were based on shared amplicons of about 1.2 kb generated from B. thetaiotaomicron by randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. This 1.2-kb fragment was sequenced and then used to design a set of PCR amplification primers. This PCR generated an amplification product of 721 bp, which was unique to all 65 isolates of B. thetaiotaomicron tested. There was no amplification with isolates of other bacterial species. Restriction enzyme digestion of the amplification product and dot blot hybridization further verified the specificity of the assay. These results suggest that this PCR assay targets a nucleotide sequence that is strongly conserved in B. thetaiotaomicron. This simple and rapid PCR assay provides a rapid and accurate method for identification of B. thetaiotaomicron and shows promise for the detection of B. thetaiotaomicron in clinical samples. PMID:10747167

  12. Multiplex PCR Tests for Detection of Pathogens Associated with Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms including culture, biochemical identification, immunoassay and microscopic examination are time consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have as allowed its use as clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex PCR based testing has made its way to gastroenterology diagnostic arena in recent years. In this article we present a review of recent laboratory developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. We will focus on two FDA cleared commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG GPP and Biofire FimArray GI test. These multiplex tests can detect and identify multiple enteric pathogens in one test and provide results within hours. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. The high negative predictive value of these multiplex tests has led to the suggestion that they be used as screening tools especially in outbreaks. Although the clinical utility and benefit of multiplex PCR test are to be further investigated, implementing these multiplex PCR tests in gastroenterology diagnostic algorithm has the potential to improve diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. PMID:26004652

  13. Multiplex PCR: Optimization and Application in Diagnostic Virology

    PubMed Central

    Elnifro, Elfath M.; Ashshi, Ahmed M.; Cooper, Robert J.; Klapper, Paul E.

    2000-01-01

    PCR has revolutionized the field of infectious disease diagnosis. To overcome the inherent disadvantage of cost and to improve the diagnostic capacity of the test, multiplex PCR, a variant of the test in which more than one target sequence is amplified using more than one pair of primers, has been developed. Multiplex PCRs to detect viral, bacterial, and/or other infectious agents in one reaction tube have been described. Early studies highlighted the obstacles that can jeopardize the production of sensitive and specific multiplex assays, but more recent studies have provided systematic protocols and technical improvements for simple test design. The most useful of these are the empirical choice of oligonucleotide primers and the use of hot start-based PCR methodology. These advances along with others to enhance sensitivity and specificity and to facilitate automation have resulted in the appearance of numerous publications regarding the application of multiplex PCR in the diagnosis of infectious agents, especially those which target viral nucleic acids. This article reviews the principles, optimization, and application of multiplex PCR for the detection of viruses of clinical and epidemiological importance. PMID:11023957

  14. Detection of adenovirus using PCR and molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Poddar, S K

    1999-09-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and a molecular beacon probe were used for the detection of Adenovirus. A 307 bp DNA fragment from a conserved region of the hexon gene was amplified. The specific molecular beacon was characterized with respect to its efficiency of quenching, and signal to noise ratio by spectrofluorometric analysis of its hybridization with virus specific complementary single stranded oligonucleotide target. Amplification was carried out in the presence of the molecular beacon probe, and the amplified target was detected by measurement of fluorescence signal in the post PCR sample. Separately, a 32P-labeled linear probe (having the same sequence as that of molecular beacon probe) was liquid-phase hybridized with the product of PCR performed in the absence of the molecular beacon. The virus specific target was then detected by electrophoresis of the hybridized product in a nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and subsequent autoradiographic analysis. The detection limit of adenovirus by PCR in the presence of the molecular beacon probe was found to be similar to that obtained by labeled linear probe hybridization following PCR.

  15. Real-Time Quantitative PCR for Human Herpesvirus 6 DNA

    PubMed Central

    Locatelli, Giuseppe; Santoro, Fabio; Veglia, Fabrizio; Gobbi, Alberto; Lusso, Paolo; Malnati, Mauro S.

    2000-01-01

    The diagnosis of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) infection represents a complex issue because the most widely used diagnostic tools, such as immunoglobulin G antibody titer determination and qualitative DNA PCR with blood cells, are unable to distinguish between latent (clinically silent) and active (often clinically relevant) infection. We have developed a new, highly sensitive, quantitative PCR assay for the accurate measurement of HHV-6 DNA in tissue-derived cell suspensions and body fluids. The test uses a 5′ nuclease, fluorogenic assay combined with real-time detection of PCR amplification products with the ABI PRISM 7700 sequence detector system. The sensitivity of this method is equal to the sensitivity of a nested PCR protocol (lower detection limit, 1 viral genome equivalent/test) for both the A and the B HHV-6 subgroups and shows a wider dynamic range of detection (from 1 to 106 viral genome equivalents/test) and a higher degree of accuracy, repeatability, and reproducibility compared to those of a standard quantitative-competitive PCR assay developed with the same reference DNA molecule. The novel technique is versatile, showing the same sensitivity and dynamic range with viral DNA extracted from different fluids (i.e., culture medium or plasma) or from tissue-derived cell suspensions. Furthermore, by virtue of its high-throughput format, this method is well suited for large epidemiological surveys. PMID:11060066

  16. Minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Fang, G; Zhu, G; Burger, H; Keithly, J S; Weiser, B

    1998-12-01

    Recent developments have made it possible to reverse transcribe RNA and amplify cDNA molecules of > 10 kb in length, including the HIV-1 genome. To use long reverse transcription combined with polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to best advantage, it is necessary to determine the frequency of recombination during the combined procedure and then take steps to reduce it. We investigated the requirements for minimizing DNA recombination during long RT-PCR of HIV-1 by experimenting with three different aspects of the procedure: conditions for RT, conditions for PCR, and the molar ratios of different templates. We used two distinct HIV-1 strains as templates and strain-specific probes to detect recombination. The data showed that strategies aimed at completing DNA strand synthesis and the addition of proofreading function to the PCR were most effective in reducing recombination during the combined procedure. This study demonstrated that by adjusting reaction conditions, the recombination frequency during RT-PCR can be controlled and greatly reduced.

  17. A comparative analysis of different molecular targets using PCR for diagnosis of old world leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Koltas, Ismail S; Eroglu, Fadime; Uzun, Soner; Alabaz, Derya

    2016-05-01

    The different sensitivity values were obtained in each study conducted for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis with the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). However, a standardized PCR target for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis does not exist. The aim of the current study, the most ideal PCR target was determined for diagnosis of leishmaniasis. A total of 72 smear and 48 bone marrow samples were analyzed with six different molecular targets to determine their potential as a tool for the specific molecular diagnosis of leishmaniasis using PCR. The positivity-negativity value and the sensitivity-specificity of each PCR targets were calculated. The positivity value of PCR targets were sequenced in different levels in the diagnosis of leishmaniasis from highest to lowest in the order of kDNA-PCR > SSU rRNA-PCR > ITS2-PCR > ITS1-PCR > ME-PCR > HSP70-PCR. The sensitivities of PCR targets except ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found to be 100% in cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and visceral leishmaniasis (VL) cases as compared to microscopic examination accepted as a gold standard. The sensitivities of ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found 96.6%, 90.0% and 86.6%, respectively, in CL-cases. In addition, the sensitivities of ITS1-PCR, ME-PCR and HSP70-PCR were found 90.0%, 70.0% and 60.0%, respectively, in VL-cases. The kDNA genomic region was the most sensitive for routine diagnosis of leishmaniasis. ITS1-PCR restriction fragment length polymorphism, the alternative method for the identification of Old World Leishmania species, did not require culturing of the parasites.

  18. Application of PCR and real-time PCR for monitoring cyanobacteria, Microcystis spp. and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii in Macau freshwater reservoir

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Weiying; Lou, Inchio; Ung, Wai Kin; Kong, Yijun; Mok, Kai Meng

    2014-06-01

    Freshwater algal blooms have become a growing concern world-wide. They are caused by a high level of cyanobacteria, predominantly Microcystis spp. and Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii, which can produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin, respectively. Longtime exposure to these cyanotoxins may affect public health, thus reliable detection, quantification, and enumeration of these harmful algae species has become a priority in water quality management. Traditional manual enumeration of algal bloom cells primarily involves microscopic identification which limited by inaccuracy and time-consumption.With the development of molecular techniques and an increasing number of microbial sequences available in the Genbank database, the use of molecular methods can be used for more rapid, reliable, and accurate detection and quantification. In this study, multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) techniques were developed and applied for monitoring cyanobacteria Microcystis spp. and C. raciborskii in the Macau Storage Reservoir (MSR). The results showed that the techniques were successful for identifying and quantifying the species in pure cultures and mixed cultures, and proved to be a potential application for water sampling in MSR. When the target species were above 1 million cells/L, similar cell numbers estimated by microscopic enumeration and qPCR were obtained. Further quantification in water samples indicated that the ratio of the estimated number of cell by microscopy and qPCR was 0.4-12.9 for cyanobacteria and 0.2-3.9 for C. raciborskii. However, Microcystis spp. was not observed by manual enumeration, while it was detected at low levels by qPCR, suggesting that qPCR is more sensitive and accurate. Thus the molecular approaches provide an additional reliable monitoring option to traditional microscopic enumeration for the ecosystems monitoring program.

  19. Using PCR to Target Misconceptions about Gene Expression †

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Leslie K.; Newman, Dina L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a PCR-based laboratory exercise that can be used with first- or second-year biology students to help overcome common misconceptions about gene expression. Biology students typically do not have a clear understanding of the difference between genes (DNA) and gene expression (mRNA/protein) and often believe that genes exist in an organism or cell only when they are expressed. This laboratory exercise allows students to carry out a PCR-based experiment designed to challenge their misunderstanding of the difference between genes and gene expression. Students first transform E. coli with an inducible GFP gene containing plasmid and observe induced and un-induced colonies. The following exercise creates cognitive dissonance when actual PCR results contradict their initial (incorrect) predictions of the presence of the GFP gene in transformed cells. Field testing of this laboratory exercise resulted in learning gains on both knowledge and application questions on concepts related to genes and gene expression. PMID:23858358

  20. [Application of rapid PCR to authenticate medicinal snakes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Li, Man

    2014-10-01

    To obtained an accurate, rapid and efficient method for authenticate medicinal snakes listed in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (Zaocysd humnades, Bungarus multicinctus, Agkistrodon acutus), a rapid PCR method for authenticate snakes and its adulterants was established based on the classic molecular authentication methods. DNA was extracted by alkaline lysis and the specific primers were amplified by two-steps PCR amplification method. The denatured and annealing temperature and cycle numbers were optimized. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product, strong green fluorescence was visualized under 365 nm UV whereas adulterants without. The whole process can complete in 30-45 minutes. The established method provides the technical support for authentication of the snakes on field.

  1. [PCR studies in laboratory diagnosis: problems of quality assurance].

    PubMed

    Tvorogova, M G; Gushchin, A E

    2006-12-01

    The determination of DNA and RNA of causative agents by the nucleic acid amplification techniques (NAT) presented in the Russian laboratory diagnosis of infections solely by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) have currently found the widest application in world practice and, in some cases, is a basic procedure for detecting an infectious agent, particularly in the diagnosis of infections caused by human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, cytomegalovirus, Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, and others. The paper presents the data available in the literature on the main reasons for false positive and false negative results in PCR studies, international and national programs for the outside quality control (OQC) of detection of causative agents for various diseases, by applying NAT. It is emphasized that the regular participation in OQC programs is likely to be useful in improving the quality of PCR studies.

  2. [Application of rapid PCR to authenticate medicinal snakes].

    PubMed

    Chen, Kang; Jiang, Chao; Yuan, Yuan; Huang, Lu-Qi; Li, Man

    2014-10-01

    To obtained an accurate, rapid and efficient method for authenticate medicinal snakes listed in Chinese Pharmacopoeia (Zaocysd humnades, Bungarus multicinctus, Agkistrodon acutus), a rapid PCR method for authenticate snakes and its adulterants was established based on the classic molecular authentication methods. DNA was extracted by alkaline lysis and the specific primers were amplified by two-steps PCR amplification method. The denatured and annealing temperature and cycle numbers were optimized. When 100 x SYBR Green I was added in the PCR product, strong green fluorescence was visualized under 365 nm UV whereas adulterants without. The whole process can complete in 30-45 minutes. The established method provides the technical support for authentication of the snakes on field. PMID:25612419

  3. Identification of neotropical felid faeces using RCP-PCR.

    PubMed

    Roques, S; Adrados, B; Chavez, C; Keller, C; Magnusson, W E; Palomares, F; Godoy, J A

    2011-01-01

    Faeces similarity among sympatric felid species has generally hampered their use in distributional, demographic and dietary studies. Here, we present a new and simple approach based on a set of species-specific primers, for the unambiguous identification of faeces from sympatric neotropical felids (i.e. puma, jaguar, jaguarundi and ocelot/ margay). This method, referred to as rapid classificatory protocol-PCR (RCP-PCR), consists of a single-tube multiplex PCR yielding species-specific banding patterns on agarose gel. The method was optimized with samples of known origin (14 blood and 15 fresh faeces) and validated in faecal samples of unknown origin (n = 138), for some of which (n = 40) we also obtained species identification based on mtDNA sequencing. This approach proved reliable and provides high identification success rates from faeces. Its simplicity and cost effectiveness should facilitate its application for routine surveys of presence and abundance of these species.

  4. Monitoring of geosmin producing Anabaena circinalis using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Hsiang-Wei; Michinaka, Atsuko; Yen, Hung-Kai; Giglio, Steven; Hobson, Peter; Monis, Paul; Lin, Tsair-Fuh

    2014-02-01

    Geosmin is one of the most commonly detected off-flavor chemicals present in reservoirs and drinking water systems. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is useful for quantifying geosmin-producers by focusing on the gene encoding geosmin synthase, which is responsible for geosmin synthesis. In this study, several primers and probes were designed and evaluated to detect the geosmin synthase gene in cyanobacteria. The specificity of primer and probe sets was tested using 21 strains of laboratory cultured cyanobacteria isolated from surface waters in Australia (18) and Taiwan (2), including 6 strains with geosmin producing ability. The results showed that the primers designed in this study could successfully detect all geosmin producing strains tested. The selected primers were used in a qPCR assay, and the calibration curves were linear from 5 × 10(1) to 5 × 10(5) copies mL(-1), with a high correlation coefficient (R(2) = 0.999). This method was then applied to analyze samples taken from Myponga Reservoir, South Australia, during a cyanobacterial bloom event. The results showed good correlations between qPCR techniques and traditional methods, including cell counts determined by microscopy and geosmin concentration measured using gas chromatography (GC) coupled with a mass selective detector (MSD). Results demonstrate that qPCR could be used for tracking geosmin-producing cyanobacteria in drinking water reservoirs. The qPCR assay may provide water utilities with the ability to properly characterize a taste and odor episode and choose appropriate management and treatment options.

  5. An improved, PCR-based strategy for the detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in human blood samples.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro-dos-Santos, G; Nishiya, A S; Sabino, E C; Chamone, D F; Saez-Alquézar, A

    1999-10-01

    Attempts were made to improve the PCR-based detection of Trypanosoma cruzi in blood samples, primarily for screening blood donors. Samples were obtained from candidate donors who were reactive in one or two of three serological tests for Chagas disease (and therefore considered 'indeterminate') or in all three tests (3+). Each sample was then examined using three different, PCR-based techniques: 'PCR-I' (in which the target DNA is a nuclear repetitive sequence); 'PCR-II' [amplifying a conserved region of the T. cruzi kinetoplast DNA (kDNA)]; and 'PCR-III' (a new strategy in which the target kDNA is amplified by 'nested' PCR). Among the samples from 3+ individuals, PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III amplified two (3.8%) out of 52, four (4.5%) out of 88, and 27 (25.7%) out of 105 samples tested, respectively. Seven, 69 and 70 samples from 'indeterminate' subjects were tested by PCR-I, PCR-II and PCR-III, respectively; there was not a single positive result by PCR-I or PCR-II, but three (4.3%) of the samples tested by PCR-III were positive. In a reconstruction experiment, in conditions in which PCR-I and PCR-II could not detect 10,000 parasites/ml, PCR-III was able to detect one parasite/ml. Although all three PCR-based strategies examined had rather poor sensitivities, PCR-III was far more sensitive than PCR-I or PCR-II. PMID:10715696

  6. Detection of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 using real time qRT-PCR and conventional RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Al Rwahnih, Maher; Osman, Fatima; Sudarshana, Mysore; Uyemoto, Jerry; Minafra, Angelantonio; Saldarelli, Pasquale; Martelli, Giovanni; Rowhani, Adib

    2012-02-01

    Nine isolates of Grapevine leafroll-associated virus 7 (GLRaV-7) from diverse geographical regions were sequenced to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. The coat protein (CP) and heat shock protein 70 homologue (HSP70h) genes of these nine isolates were sequenced. Sequences were then used to design more sensitive molecular diagnostic tools. Sequence identity among these isolates ranged between 90 to 100% at the nucleotide and amino acid levels. One RT-PCR and two qRT-PCR assays were used to survey 86 different grapevines from the University of California, Davis Grapevine Virus Collection, the Foundation Plant Services collection and the USDA National Clonal Germplasm Repository, Davis, CA with primers designed in conserved regions of the CP and HSP70h genes. Results revealed that qRT-PCR assays designed in the HSP70h gene was more sensitive (29.07% positives) than that designed in the CP gene (22.09% positives) and both qRT-PCR assays proved to be more sensitive than RT-PCR.

  7. Quantification of mRNA using real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR): trends and problems.

    PubMed

    Bustin, S A

    2002-08-01

    The fluorescence-based real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) is widely used for the quantification of steady-state mRNA levels and is a critical tool for basic research, molecular medicine and biotechnology. Assays are easy to perform, capable of high throughput, and can combine high sensitivity with reliable specificity. The technology is evolving rapidly with the introduction of new enzymes, chemistries and instrumentation. However, while real-time RT-PCR addresses many of the difficulties inherent in conventional RT-PCR, it has become increasingly clear that it engenders new problems that require urgent attention. Therefore, in addition to providing a snapshot of the state-of-the-art in real-time RT-PCR, this review has an additional aim: it will describe and discuss critically some of the problems associated with interpreting results that are numerical and lend themselves to statistical analysis, yet whose accuracy is significantly affected by reagent and operator variability.

  8. Role of real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in rapid diagnosis of tuberculous mycobacteria in different clinical samples.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    The study was aimed for molecular detection of mycobacterial DNA in different clinical samples using real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system and rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis. A total of 508 clinical specimens (blood 343, menstrual fluid 53, endometrial tissue 43, body fluid 36, pus from lymph nodes 18, sputum 8, urine 5 and semen 2) were included in this study. We extracted DNA using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit (QIAGEN, Germany) and performed real-time assay using Rotor-Gene Q machine from Corbett Research, Australia for specific amplification of IS6110 sequence of mycobacterial genome. The RT-PCR result was also compared with bacterial culture and acid-fast bacillus staining. RT-PCR assay showed positivity in 52 cases and negative in 456 cases. Corresponding positive results in culture and acid-fast bacillus staining methods were 49 cases and 24 cases respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis by RT-PCR were 93.87% and 98.69% respectively taking positive culture results as reference standards. The overall positive and negative predictive values were 88.46% and 99.34% respectively. RT-PCR is a useful diagnostic tool for rapid and sensitive detection of mycobacteria in different clinical samples. The easy processing, fast reporting and relative lack of contamination issues make it worthy as a possible replacement to time consuming culture techniques. Moreover, it has added advantage of quantification of mycobacterial DNA, hence bacterial load.

  9. Revealing the Diversity and Quantity of Peritrich Ciliates in Environmental Samples Using Specific Primer-based PCR and Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xihan; Gong, Jun

    2012-01-01

    Peritrichs are a diverse, ecologically important ciliate group usually with a complex life cycle. To date, the community of the peritrichs has been investigated by using morphology-based methods such as living observation and silver staining. Here we show a molecular approach for characterizing the diversity and quantity of free-living peritrichs in environmental samples. We newly designed four peritrich-specific primers targeting 18S rRNA genes that allow clone library construction, screening and analysis. A quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay was developed to quantify peritrichs in environmental samples by using rDNA copy number as an indicator. DNA extracted from four water samples of contrasting environmental gradients was analysed. The results showed that the peritrich community was differentiated among these samples, and that the diversity decreased with the increase of water salinity. The qPCR results are consistent with the library sequence analysis in terms of quantity variations from sample to sample. The development of peritrich-specific primers, for the first time, for conventional PCR and qPCR assays, provides useful molecular tools for revealing the diversity and quantity of peritrich ciliates in environmental samples. Also, our study illustrates the potential of these molecular tools to ecological studies of other ciliate groups in diverse environments. PMID:23100023

  10. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether theremore » are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.« less

  11. Real-time PCR in Food Science: Introduction.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    Food safety and quality control programmes are increasingly applied throughout the production food chain in order to guarantee added value products as well as to minimize the risk of infection for the consumer. The development of real-time PCR has represented one of the most significant advances in food diagnostics as it provides rapid, reliable and quantitative results. These aspects become increasingly important for the agricultural and food industry. Different strategies for real-time PCR diagnostics have been developed including unspecific detection independent of the target sequence using fluorescent dyes such as SYBR Green, or by sequence-specific fluorescent oligonucleotide probes such as TaqMan probes or molecular beacons.

  12. PCR Amplicon Prediction from Multiplex Degenerate Primer and Probe Sets

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, S. N.

    2013-08-08

    Assessing primer specificity and predicting both desired and off-target amplification products is an essential step for robust PCR assay design. Code is described to predict potential polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplicons in a large sequence database such as NCBI nt from either singleplex or a large multiplexed set of primers, allowing degenerate primer and probe bases, with target mismatch annotates amplicons with gene information automatically downloaded from NCBI, and optionally it can predict whether there are also TaqMan/Luminex probe matches within predicted amplicons.

  13. Gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of Japanese encephalitis virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Su-Hua; Yang, Tsuey-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Hong; Tsai, I.-Shou; Lu, Huang-Chih; Chuang, Pei-Hsin; Wan, Lei; Lin, Ying-Ju; Lai, Chih-Ho; Lin, Cheng-Wen

    2008-10-01

    Virus isolation and antibody detection are routinely used for diagnosis of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infection, but the low level of transient viremia in some JE patients makes JEV isolation from clinical and surveillance samples very difficult. We describe the use of gold nanoparticle-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays for detection of JEV from its RNA genome. We tested the effect of gold nanoparticles on four different PCR systems, including conventional PCR, reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR), and SYBR green real-time PCR and RT-PCR assays for diagnosis in the acute phase of JEV infection. Gold nanoparticles increased the amplification yield of the PCR product and shortened the PCR time compared to the conventional reaction. In addition, nanogold-based real-time RT-PCR showed a linear relationship between Ct and template amount using ten-fold dilutions of JEV. The nanogold-based RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR assays were able to detect low levels (1-10 000 copies) of the JEV RNA genomes extracted from culture medium or whole blood, providing early diagnostic tools for the detection of low-level viremia in the acute-phase infection. The assays described here were simple, sensitive, and rapid approaches for detection and quantitation of JEV in tissue cultured samples as well as clinical samples.

  14. Designing multiplex PCR system of Campylobacter jejuni for efficient typing by improving monoplex PCR binary typing method.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Ibata, Ami; Suzuki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the majority of Campylobacter infections. As the molecular epidemiological study of outbreaks, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is performed in general. But PFGE has several problems. PCR binary typing (P-BIT) method is a typing method for Campylobacter spp. that was recently developed, and was reported to have a similar discriminatory power and stability to those of PFGE. We modified the P-BIT method from 18 monoplex PCRs to two multiplex PCR systems (mP-BIT). The same results were obtained from monoplex PCRs using original primers and multiplex PCR in the representative isolates. The mP-BIT can analyze 48 strains at a time by using 96-well PCR systems and can identify C. jejuni because mP-BIT includes C. jejuni marker. The typing of the isolates by the mP-BIT and PFGE demonstrated generally concordant results and the mP-BIT method (D = 0.980) has a similar discriminatory power to that of PFGE with SmaI digest (D = 0.975) or KpnI digest (D = 0.987) as with original article. The mP-BIT method is quick, simple and easy, and comes to be able to perform it at low cost by having become a multiplex PCR system. Therefore, the mP-BIT method with two multiplex PCR systems has high potential for a rapid first-line surveillance typing assay of C. jejuni and can be used for routine surveillance and outbreak investigations of C. jejuni in the future.

  15. Critical appraisal of quantitative PCR results in colorectal cancer research: can we rely on published qPCR results?

    PubMed

    Dijkstra, J R; van Kempen, L C; Nagtegaal, I D; Bustin, S A

    2014-06-01

    The use of real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in cancer research has become ubiquitous. The relative simplicity of qPCR experiments, which deliver fast and cost-effective results, means that each year an increasing number of papers utilizing this technique are being published. But how reliable are the published results? Since the validity of gene expression data is greatly dependent on appropriate normalisation to compensate for sample-to-sample and run-to-run variation, we have evaluated the adequacy of normalisation procedures in qPCR-based experiments. Consequently, we assessed all colorectal cancer publications that made use of qPCR from 2006 until August 2013 for the number of reference genes used and whether they had been validated. Using even these minimal evaluation criteria, the validity of only three percent (6/179) of the publications can be adequately assessed. We describe common errors, and conclude that the current state of reporting on qPCR in colorectal cancer research is disquieting. Extrapolated to the study of cancer in general, it is clear that the majority of studies using qPCR cannot be reliably assessed and that at best, the results of these studies may or may not be valid and at worst, pervasive incorrect normalisation is resulting in the wholesale publication of incorrect conclusions. This survey demonstrates that the existence of guidelines, such as MIQE, is necessary but not sufficient to address this problem and suggests that the scientific community should examine its responsibility and be aware of the implications of these findings for current and future research.

  16. Designing multiplex PCR system of Campylobacter jejuni for efficient typing by improving monoplex PCR binary typing method.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Kazuhiro; Ibata, Ami; Suzuki, Masahiro; Matsumoto, Masakado; Yamashita, Teruo; Minagawa, Hiroko; Kurane, Ryuichiro

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is responsible for the majority of Campylobacter infections. As the molecular epidemiological study of outbreaks, pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) is performed in general. But PFGE has several problems. PCR binary typing (P-BIT) method is a typing method for Campylobacter spp. that was recently developed, and was reported to have a similar discriminatory power and stability to those of PFGE. We modified the P-BIT method from 18 monoplex PCRs to two multiplex PCR systems (mP-BIT). The same results were obtained from monoplex PCRs using original primers and multiplex PCR in the representative isolates. The mP-BIT can analyze 48 strains at a time by using 96-well PCR systems and can identify C. jejuni because mP-BIT includes C. jejuni marker. The typing of the isolates by the mP-BIT and PFGE demonstrated generally concordant results and the mP-BIT method (D = 0.980) has a similar discriminatory power to that of PFGE with SmaI digest (D = 0.975) or KpnI digest (D = 0.987) as with original article. The mP-BIT method is quick, simple and easy, and comes to be able to perform it at low cost by having become a multiplex PCR system. Therefore, the mP-BIT method with two multiplex PCR systems has high potential for a rapid first-line surveillance typing assay of C. jejuni and can be used for routine surveillance and outbreak investigations of C. jejuni in the future. PMID:25455748

  17. Comparison of PCR and quantitative real-time PCR methods for the characterization of ruminant and cattle fecal pollution sources.

    PubMed

    Raith, Meredith R; Kelty, Catherine A; Griffith, John F; Schriewer, Alexander; Wuertz, Stefan; Mieszkin, Sophie; Gourmelon, Michele; Reischer, Georg H; Farnleitner, Andreas H; Ervin, Jared S; Holden, Patricia A; Ebentier, Darcy L; Jay, Jennifer A; Wang, Dan; Boehm, Alexandria B; Aw, Tiong Gim; Rose, Joan B; Balleste, E; Meijer, W G; Sivaganesan, Mano; Shanks, Orin C

    2013-11-15

    The State of California has mandated the preparation of a guidance document on the application of fecal source identification methods for recreational water quality management. California contains the fifth highest population of cattle in the United States, making the inclusion of cow-associated methods a logical choice. Because the performance of these methods has been shown to change based on geography and/or local animal feeding practices, laboratory comparisons are needed to determine which assays are best suited for implementation. We describe the performance characterization of two end-point PCR assays (CF128 and CF193) and five real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays (Rum2Bac, BacR, BacCow, CowM2, and CowM3) reported to be associated with either ruminant or cattle feces. Each assay was tested against a blinded set of 38 reference challenge filters (19 duplicate samples) containing fecal pollution from 12 different sources suspected to impact water quality. The abundance of each host-associated genetic marker was measured for qPCR-based assays in both target and non-target animals and compared to quantities of total DNA mass, wet mass of fecal material, as well as Bacteroidales, and enterococci determined by 16S rRNA qPCR and culture-based approaches (enterococci only). Ruminant- and cow-associated genetic markers were detected in all filters containing a cattle fecal source. However, some assays cross-reacted with non-target pollution sources. A large amount of variability was evident across laboratories when protocols were not fixed suggesting that protocol standardization will be necessary for widespread implementation. Finally, performance metrics indicate that the cattle-associated CowM2 qPCR method combined with either the BacR or Rum2Bac ruminant-associated methods are most suitable for implementation.

  18. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in Testing of Ulcers for Diagnosis of Primary Syphilis1

    PubMed Central

    Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  19. Use of Treponema pallidum PCR in testing of ulcers for diagnosis of primary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Gayet-Ageron, Angèle; Sednaoui, Patrice; Lautenschlager, Stephan; Ferry, Tristan; Toutous-Trellu, Laurence; Cavassini, Matthias; Yassir, Fatima; Martinez de Tejada, Begoña; Emonet, Stéphane; Combescure, Christophe; Schrenzel, Jacques; Perneger, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Treponema pallidum PCR (Tp-PCR) has been noted as a valid method for diagnosing syphilis. We compared Tp-PCR to a combination of darkfield microscopy (DFM), the reference method, and serologic testing in a cohort of 273 patients from France and Switzerland and found the diagnostic accuracy of Tp-PCR was higher than that for DFM. PMID:25531672

  20. A comparative study of digital RT-PCR and RT-qPCR for quantification of Hepatitis A virus and Norovirus in lettuce and water samples.

    PubMed

    Coudray-Meunier, Coralie; Fraisse, Audrey; Martin-Latil, Sandra; Guillier, Laurent; Delannoy, Sabine; Fach, Patrick; Perelle, Sylvie

    2015-05-18

    Sensitive and quantitative detection of foodborne enteric viruses is classically achieved by quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR). Recently, digital PCR (dPCR) was described as a novel approach to genome quantification without need for a standard curve. The performance of microfluidic digital RT-PCR (RT-dPCR) was compared to RT-qPCR for detecting the main viruses responsible for foodborne outbreaks (human Noroviruses (NoV) and Hepatitis A virus (HAV)) in spiked lettuce and bottled water. Two process controls (Mengovirus and Murine Norovirus) were used and external amplification controls (EAC) were added to examine inhibition of RT-qPCR and RT-dPCR. For detecting viral RNA and cDNA, the sensitivity of the RT-dPCR assays was either comparable to that of RT-qPCR (RNA of HAV, NoV GI, Mengovirus) or slightly (around 1 log10) decreased (NoV GII and MNV-1 RNA and of HAV, NoV GI, NoV GII cDNA). The number of genomic copies determined by dPCR was always from 0.4 to 1.7 log10 lower than the expected numbers of copies calculated by using the standard qPCR curve. Viral recoveries calculated by RT-dPCR were found to be significantly higher than by RT-qPCR for NoV GI, HAV and Mengovirus in water, and for NoV GII and HAV in lettuce samples. The RT-dPCR assay proved to be more tolerant to inhibitory substances present in lettuce samples. This absolute quantitation approach may be useful to standardize quantification of enteric viruses in bottled water and lettuce samples and may be extended to quantifying other human pathogens in food samples.

  1. Comparative analysis of two broad-range PCR assays for pathogen detection in positive-blood-culture bottles: PCR-high-resolution melting analysis versus PCR-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Gaydos, Charlotte A; Blyn, Lawrence B; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Matthews, Heather; Toleno, Donna; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Carroll, Karen C; Hardick, Justin; Masek, Billy; Kecojevic, Alexander; Sampath, Rangarajan; Peterson, Stephen; Rothman, Richard E

    2012-10-01

    Detection of pathogens in bloodstream infections is important for directing antimicrobial treatment, but current culture-based approaches can be problematic. Broad-range PCR assays which target conserved genomic motifs for postamplification amplicon analysis permit detection of sepsis-causing pathogens. Comparison of different broad-range assays is important for informing future implementation strategies. In this study, we compared positive-blood-culture bottles processed by PCR coupled to high-resolution melting curve analysis (PCR/HRMA) and PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) to microbiology culture results. Genus-level concordance was 90% (confidence interval [CI], 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 94% (CI, 85 to 98%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Species-level concordance was 90% (CI, 80 to 96%) for PCR/HRMA and 86% (CI, 75 to 93%) for PCR/ESI-MS. Unlike PCR/HRMA, PCR/ESI-MS was able to resolve polymicrobial samples. Our results demonstrated that the two assays have similar overall concordance rates but may have different roles as potential adjunctive tests with standard blood culture, since each method has different capabilities, advantages, and disadvantages.

  2. Using qPCR for Water Microbial Risk Assessments

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microbial risk assessment (MRA) has traditionally utilized microbiological data that was obtained by culture-based techniques that are expensive and time consuming. With the advent of PCR methods there is a realistic opportunity to conduct MRA studies economically, in less time,...

  3. Screening ancient tuberculosis with qPCR: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Harkins, Kelly M.; Buikstra, Jane E.; Campbell, Tessa; Bos, Kirsten I.; Johnson, Eric D.; Krause, Johannes; Stone, Anne C.

    2015-01-01

    The field of ancient DNA (aDNA) has rapidly accelerated in recent years as a result of new methods in next-generation sequencing, library preparation and targeted enrichment. Such research is restricted, however, by the highly variable DNA preservation within different tissues, especially when isolating ancient pathogens from human remains. Identifying positive candidate samples via quantitative PCR (qPCR) for downstream procedures can reduce reagent costs, increase capture efficiency and maximize the number of sequencing reads of the target. This study uses four qPCR assays designed to target regions within the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC) to examine 133 human skeletal samples from a wide geographical and temporal range, identified by the presence of skeletal lesions typical of chronic disseminated tuberculosis. Given the inherent challenges working with ancient mycobacteria, strict criteria must be used and primer/probe design continually re-evaluated as new data from bacteria become available. Seven samples tested positive for multiple MTBC loci, supporting them as strong candidates for downstream analyses. Using strict and conservative criteria, qPCR remains a fast and effective screening tool when compared with screening by more expensive sequencing and enrichment technologies. PMID:25487341

  4. Identification of Staphylococcus spp. using (GTG)₅-PCR fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Svec, Pavel; Pantůček, Roman; Petráš, Petr; Sedláček, Ivo; Nováková, Dana

    2010-12-01

    A group of 212 type and reference strains deposited in the Czech Collection of Microorganisms (Brno, Czech Republic) and covering 41 Staphylococcus species comprising 21 subspecies was characterised using rep-PCR fingerprinting with the (GTG)₅ primer in order to evaluate this method for identification of staphylococci. All strains were typeable using the (GTG)₅ primer and generated PCR products ranging from 200 to 4500 bp. Numerical analysis of the obtained fingerprints revealed (sub)species-specific clustering corresponding with the taxonomic position of analysed strains. Taxonomic position of selected strains representing the (sub)species that were distributed over multiple rep-PCR clusters was verified and confirmed by the partial rpoB gene sequencing. Staphylococcus caprae, Staphylococcus equorum, Staphylococcus sciuri, Staphylococcus piscifermentans, Staphylococcus xylosus, and Staphylococcus saprophyticus revealed heterogeneous fingerprints and each (sub)species was distributed over several clusters. However, representatives of the remaining Staphylococcus spp. were clearly separated in single (sub)species-specific clusters. These results showed rep-PCR with the (GTG)₅ primer as a fast and reliable method applicable for differentiation and straightforward identification of majority of Staphylococcus spp.

  5. A Trio of Human Molecular Genetics PCR Assays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinking, Jeffrey L.; Waldo, Jennifer T.; Dinsmore, Jannett

    2013-01-01

    This laboratory exercise demonstrates three different analytical forms of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that allow students to genotype themselves at four different loci. Here, we present protocols to allow students to a) genotype a non-coding polymorphic Variable Number of Tandem Repeat (VNTR) locus on human chromosome 5 using conventional…

  6. Primer design for PCR reactions in forensic biology.

    PubMed

    Elkins, Kelly M

    2015-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a popular method to copy DNA in vitro. Its invention revolutionized fields ranging from clinical medicine to anthropology, molecular biology, and forensic biology. The method employs one of many available heat-stable DNA polymerases in a reaction that is repeated many times in situ. The DNA polymerase reads a template DNA strand and using the components of the reaction mix, catalyzes the addition of free 2'-deoxynucleotide triphosphate nitrogenous bases to short segment of DNA that forms a complement with the template via Watson-Crick base pairing. This short segment of DNA is referred to as a PCR primer and it is essential to the success of the reaction. The most widely used application of PCR in forensic labs is the amplification of short tandem repeat (STR) loci used in DNA typing. The STRs are routinely evaluated in concert with 16 or more reactions, a multiplex, run in one test tube simultaneously. In a multiplex, it is essential that the primers work specifically and accurately on the intended reactions without hindering the other reactions. The primers, which are very specific, also can be used to probe single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a DNA sequence of interest by single base extension. Primers are often designed using one of many available automated software packages. Here the process of manually designing PCR primers for forensic biology using no-cost software is described.

  7. MOLD SPECIFIC QUANTITATIVE PCR: THE EMERGING STANDARD IN MOLD ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Today I will talk about the use of quantitative or Real time PCR for the standardized identification and quantification of molds. There are probably at least 100,000 species of molds or fungi. But there are actually about 100 typically found indoors. Some pose a threat to human...

  8. A PCR test for avian malaria in Hawaiian birds.

    PubMed

    Feldman, R A; Freed, L A; Cann, R L

    1995-12-01

    The decline of native Hawaiian forest birds since European contact is attributed to factors ranging from habitat destruction to interactions with introduced species. Remaining populations of Hawaiian honeycreepers (Fringillidae: Drepanidinae) are most abundant and diverse in high elevation refuges above the normal range of disease-carrying mosquitoes. Challenge experiments suggest that honeycreepers are highly susceptible to avian malaria (Plasmodium sp.) but resistance exists in some species. In order to detect low levels of malarial infection and quantify prevalence of Plasmodium in high elevation natural populations of Hawaiian birds, a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based diagnostic test was developed that identifies rRNA genes of Plasmodium in avian blood samples. Quantitative competitive PCR (QC-PCR) experiments indicate that the detection limit of our test is an order of magnitude greater than that reported for human malaria DNA blot tests. Compared with standard histological methods, the PCR test detected a higher prevalence of diseased birds at mid-elevations. Malaria was detected in three species of native birds living in a high elevation wildlife refuge on the island of Hawaii and in four species from Maui. Our results show that avian malaria is more widespread in Hawaiian forests than previously thought, a finding that has important conservation implications for these threatened species.

  9. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots.

  10. Halal authenticity of gelatin using species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Shabani, Hessam; Mehdizadeh, Mehrangiz; Mousavi, Seyed Mohammad; Dezfouli, Ehsan Ansari; Solgi, Tara; Khodaverdi, Mahdi; Rabiei, Maryam; Rastegar, Hossein; Alebouyeh, Mahmoud

    2015-10-01

    Consumption of food products derived from porcine sources is strictly prohibited in Islam. Gelatin, mostly derived from bovine and porcine sources, has many applications in the food and pharmaceutical industries. To ensure that food products comply with halal regulations, development of valid and reliable analytical methods is very much required. In this study, a species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay using conserved regions of mitochondrial DNA (cytochrome b gene) was performed to evaluate the halal authenticity of gelatin. After isolation of DNA from gelatin powders with known origin, conventional PCR using species-specific primers was carried out on the extracted DNA. The amplified expected PCR products of 212 and 271 bp were observed for porcine and bovine gelatin, respectively. The sensitivity of the method was tested on binary gelatin mixtures containing 0.1%, 1%, 10%, and 100% (w/w) of porcine gelatin within bovine gelatin and vice versa. Although most of the DNA is degraded due to the severe processing steps of gelatin production, the minimum level of 0.1% w/w of both porcine and bovine gelatin was detected. Moreover, eight food products labeled as containing bovine gelatin and eight capsule shells were subjected to PCR examination. The results showed that all samples contained bovine gelatin, and the absence of porcine gelatin was verified. This method of species authenticity is very useful to verify whether gelatin and gelatin-containing food products are derived from halal ingredients.

  11. Multiplex PCR Method for Identifying Recombinant Vaccine-Related Polioviruses

    PubMed Central

    Kilpatrick, David R.; Ching, Karen; Iber, Jane; Campagnoli, Ray; Freeman, Christopher J.; Mishrik, Nada; Liu, Hong-Mei; Pallansch, Mark A.; Kew, Olen M.

    2004-01-01

    The recent discovery of recombinant circulating vaccine-derived poliovirus (recombinant cVDPV) has highlighted the need for enhanced global poliovirus surveillance to assure timely detection of any future cVDPV outbreaks. Six pairs of Sabin strain-specific recombinant primers were designed to permit rapid screening for VDPV recombinants by PCR. PMID:15365031

  12. QUANTITATIVE PCR OF SELECTED ASPERGILLUS, PENICILLIUM AND PAECILOMYCES SPECIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A total of 65 quantitative PCR (QPCR) assays, incorporating fluorigenic 5' nuclease (TaqMan®) chemistry and directed at the nuclear ribosomal RNA operon, internal transcribed spacer regions (ITS1 or ITS2) was developed and tested for the detection of Aspergillus, Penicillium and ...

  13. Introducing Undergraduate Students to Real-Time PCR

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hancock, Dale; Funnell, Alister; Jack, Briony; Johnston, Jill

    2010-01-01

    An experiment is conducted, which in four 3 h laboratory sessions, introduces third year undergraduate Biochemistry students to the technique of real-time PCR in a biological context. The model used is a murine erythroleukemia cell line (MEL cells). These continuously cycling, immature red blood cells, arrested at an early stage in erythropoiesis,…

  14. Novel real-time PCR detection assay for Brucella suis

    PubMed Central

    Hänsel, C.; Mertens, K.; Elschner, M. C.; Melzer, F.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Brucella suis is the causative agent of brucellosis in suidae and is differentiated into five biovars (bv). Biovars 1 and 3 possess zoonotic potential and can infect humans, whereas biovar 2 represents the main source of brucellosis in feral and domestic pigs in Europe. Both aspects, the zoonotic threat and the economic loss, emphasize the necessity to monitor feral and domestic pig populations. Available serological or PCR based methods lack sensitivity and specificity. Results Here a bioinformatics approach was used to identify a B. suis specific 17 bp repeat on chromosome II (BS1330_II0657 locus). This repeat is common for B. suis bv 1 to 4 and was used to develop a TaqMan probe assay. The average PCR efficiency was determined as 95% and the limit of detection as 12,5 fg/µl of DNA, equally to 3.7 bacterial genomes. This assay has the highest sensitivity of all previously described B. suis specific PCR assays, making it possible to detect 3-4 bacterial genomes per 1 µl of sample. The assay was tested 100% specific for B. suis and negative for other Brucella spp. and closely related non-Brucella species. Conclusions This novel qPCR assay could become a rapid, inexpensive and reliable screening method for large sample pools of B. suis 1 to 4. This method will be applicable for field samples after validation. PMID:26392898

  15. Nested PCR Assay for Detection of Granulocytic Ehrlichiae

    PubMed Central

    Massung, Robert F.; Slater, Kim; Owens, Jessica H.; Nicholson, William L.; Mather, Thomas N.; Solberg, Victoria B.; Olson, James G.

    1998-01-01

    A sensitive and specific nested PCR assay was developed for the detection of granulocytic ehrlichiae. The assay amplifies the 16S rRNA gene and was used to examine acute-phase EDTA-blood and serum samples obtained from seven humans with clinical presentations compatible with human granulocytic ehrlichiosis. Five of the seven suspected cases were positive by the PCR assay using DNA extracted from whole blood as the template, compared with a serologic assay that identified only one positive sample. The PCR assay using DNA extracted from the corresponding serum samples as the template identified three positive samples. The sensitivity of the assay on human samples was examined, and the limit of detection was shown to be fewer than 2 copies of the 16S rRNA gene. The application of the assay to nonhuman samples demonstrated products amplified from template DNA extracted from Ixodes scapularis ticks collected in Rhode Island and from EDTA-blood specimens obtained from white-tailed deer in Maryland. All PCR products were sequenced and identified as specific to granulocytic ehrlichiae. A putative variant granulocytic ehrlichia 16S rRNA gene sequence was detected among products amplified from both the ticks and the deer blood specimens. PMID:9542943

  16. PCR-mediated detection of acidophilic, bioleaching-associated bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    De Wulf-Durand, P; Bryant, L J; Sly, L I

    1997-01-01

    The detection of acidophilic microorganisms from mining environments by culture methods is time consuming and unreliable. Several PCR approaches were developed to amplify small-subunit rRNA sequences from the DNA of six bacterial phylotypes associated with acidic mining environments, permitting the detection of the target DNA at concentrations as low as 10 fg. PMID:9212441

  17. Internally controlled PCR system for detection of airborne microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Usachev, Evgeny V; Agranovski, Igor E

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we reported the outcomes of feasibility studies of a technological approach allowing rapid detection of a wide range of bioaerosols by combining a personal bioaerosol sampler with a real-time PCR technology. The protocol was found suitable for detection of targeted microorganisms within relatively short time periods. Considering the crucial importance of the PCR procedure quality control, the current paper reports the results of the development of an internally controlled PCR system for utilization by the above technology. The suggested strategy is based on utilization of only two fluorescent dyes, which are used respectively for target and internal amplification control (IAC) DNA amplification. A bacteriophage T4 and recombinant phage fd (M13) were used in this research as target and IAC, respectively. The constructed IAC was added directly to the collection liquid of the personal bioaerosol sampler enabling quality control to be present throughout the entire sampling-analysis procedures. For performance evaluation, serial ten-fold dilutions of T4 phage were aerosolized and sampled over a 10 minutes time period. The results showed that T4 phage could be reliably detected at the concentration of around 200 PFU per litre of air over the 10 minutes sampling period. The developed PCR assay demonstrated high specificity and no cross reaction. It is concluded that the recombinant phage fd is suitable for utilization as an internal control enabling to significantly minimize false negative results for bioaerosol detection procedures. PMID:22565862

  18. PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Rimbara, Emiko; Sasatsu, Masanori; Graham, David Y

    2013-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori is an important pathogen whose primary niche is the human stomach. H. pylori is etiologically associated with gastric inflammation (gastritis), peptic ulcer disease, and gastric cancer. Both noninvasive (e.g., urea breath and stool antigen tests) and invasive (gastric biopsy for histology, culture, or PCR) tests are used for diagnosis. PCR detection of H. pylori has been reported using a variety of clinical samples including gastric biopsy, gastric juice, saliva, dental plaque, and stools as well as environmental samples. Whenever possibly, noninvasive tests are preferred over invasive tests. H. pylori are excreted in the stool. Culture from stool is variable whereas stool antigen testing is widely used. Stool consists of a complicated mixture of commensal bacteria and chemicals and often includes inhibitors of PCR. Nevertheless, simple extraction methods are available to efficiently extract DNA from human stools and nested-PCR targeting the 23S rRNA gene have proven to be highly sensitive for the detection of H. pylori. Detection of clarithromycin susceptibility/resistance is important clinically and the mutation of the 23S rRNA gene responsible for resistance can also be detected using stool. This described method can be modified for other clinical samples such as gastric juice or biopsy material.

  19. Facilitated Molecular Typing of Shigella Isolates Using ERIC-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kosek, Margaret; Yori, Pablo Peñataro; Gilman, Robert H.; Vela, Henry; Olortegui, Maribel Paredes; Chavez, Cesar Banda; Calderon, Maritza; Bao, Juan Perez; Hall, Eric; Maves, Ryan; Burga, Rosa; Sanchez, Graciela Meza

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of enterobacterial repetitive intergenic sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) typing versus the current standard for the typing of Shigella pulsed gel electrophoresis (PFGE), we typed 116 Shigella isolates from a village in an endemic setting over a 20-month period using both methods. PFGE identified 37 pulse types and had a discrimination index of 0.925 (95% confidence interval = 0.830–1.00), whereas ERIC-PCR identified 42 types and had a discrimination index of 0.961 (95% confidence interval = 0.886–1.00). PFGE and ERIC-PCR showed a 90.4% correlation in the designation of isolates as clonal or non-clonal in pairwise comparisons. Both systems were highly reproducible and provided highly similar and supplementary data compared with serotyping regarding the transmission dynamics of shigellosis in this community. ERIC-PCR is considerably more rapid and inexpensive than PFGE and may have a complementary role to PFGE for initial investigations of hypothesized outbreaks in resource-limited settings. PMID:22665611

  20. Qualitative PCR method for Roundup Ready soybean: interlaboratory study.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Takashi; Kasahara, Masaki; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Futo, Satoshi; Sawada, Chihiro; Watai, Masatoshi; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Kurosawa, Yasunori; Furui, Satoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative and qualitative methods based on PCR have been developed for genetically modified organisms (GMO). Interlaboratory studies were previously conducted for GMO quantitative methods; in this study, an interlaboratory study was conducted for a qualitative method for a GM soybean, Roundup Ready soy (RR soy), with primer pairs designed for the quantitative method of RR soy studied previously. Fourteen laboratories in Japan participated. Each participant extracted DNA from 1.0 g each of the soy samples containing 0, 0.05, and 0.10% of RR soy, and performed PCR with primer pairs for an internal control gene (Le1) and RR soy followed by agarose gel electrophoresis. The PCR product amplified in this PCR system for Le1 was detected from all samples. The sensitivity, specificity, and false-negative and false-positive rates of the method were obtained from the results of RR soy detection. False-negative rates at the level of 0.05 and 0.10% of the RR soy samples were 6.0 and 2.3%, respectively, revealing that the LOD of the method was somewhat below 0.10%. The current study demonstrated that the qualitative method would be practical for monitoring the labeling system of GM soy in kernel lots. PMID:21391499

  1. DETECTION OF FECAL ENTEROCOCCI USING A REAL TIME PCR METHOD

    EPA Science Inventory

    In spite of their importance in public health, the detection of fecal enterococci is performed via culturing methods that are time consuming and that are subject to inaccuracies that relate to their culturable status. In order to address these problems, a real time PCR (TaqMan) ...

  2. STITCHER: A web resource for high-throughput design of primers for overlapping PCR applications.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2015-06-01

    Overlapping PCR is routinely used in a wide number of molecular applications. These include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping by traditional PCR techniques and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online (http://ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER.html). STITCHER can handle both single sequence and multi-sequence input, and specific features facilitate numerous other PCR applications, including assembly PCR, adapter PCR, and primer walking. Field PCR, and in particular, LAMP, offers promise as an on site tool for pathogen detection in underdeveloped areas, and STITCHER includes off-target detection features for pathogens commonly targeted using LAMP technology.

  3. Methods for producing partially digested restriction DNA fragments and for producing a partially modified PCR product

    DOEpatents

    Wong, Kwong-Kwok

    2000-01-01

    The present invention is an improved method of making a partially modified PCR product from a DNA fragment with a polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In a standard PCR process, the DNA fragment is combined with starting deoxynucleoside triphosphates, a primer, a buffer and a DNA polymerase in a PCR mixture. The PCR mixture is then reacted in the PCR producing copies of the DNA fragment. The improvement of the present invention is adding an amount of a modifier at any step prior to completion of the PCR process thereby randomly and partially modifying the copies of the DNA fragment as a partially modified PCR product. The partially modified PCR product may then be digested with an enzyme that cuts the partially modified PCR product at unmodified sites thereby producing an array of DNA restriction fragments.

  4. Determination of DQB1 alleles using PCR amplification and allele-specific primers.

    PubMed

    Lepage, V; Ivanova, R; Loste, M N; Mallet, C; Douay, C; Naoumova, E; Charron, D

    1995-10-01

    Molecular genotyping of HLA class II genes is commonly carried out using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in combination with sequence-specific oligotyping (PCR-SSO) or a combination of the PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods (PCR-RFLP). However, the identification of the DQB1 type by PCR-SSO and PCR-RFLP is very time-consuming which is disadvantageous for the typing of cadaveric organ donors. We have developed a DQB1 typing method using PCR in combination with allele-specific amplification (PCR-ASA), which allows the identification of the 17 most frequent alleles in one step using seven amplification mixtures. PCR allele-specific amplification HLA-DQB1 typing is easy to perform, and the results are easy to interpret in routine clinical practice. The PCR-ASA method is therefore better suited to DQB1 typing for organ transplantation than other methods.

  5. Mensaje para alumnos y padres

    NASA Video Gallery

    El astronauta de la NASA José Hernández alienta a los estudiantes a que sigan sus sueños. Hernández también habla acerca del papel que juegan los padres para ayudar a que sus hijos hagan realidad s...

  6. Use of multiplex PCR and PCR restriction enzyme analysis for detection and exploration of the variability in the free-living amoeba Naegleria in the environment.

    PubMed

    Pélandakis, Michel; Pernin, Pierre

    2002-04-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed to simultaneously detect Naegleria fowleri and other Naegleria species in the environment. Multiplex PCR was also capable of identifying N. fowleri isolates with internal transcribed spacers of different sizes. In addition, restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the PCR product distinguished the main thermophilic Naegleria species from the sampling sites.

  7. PCR for bioaerosol monitoring: sensitivity and environmental interference.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, A J; Buttner, M P; Stetzenbach, L D

    1995-10-01

    The PCR technique has potential for use in detection of low concentrations of airborne microorganisms. In this study, the sensitivity of PCR and its susceptibility to environmental interference were assessed with Escherichia coli DH1 as the target organism. Air samples, containing environmental bioaerosols, were collected with AGI-30 samplers and seeded with E. coli DH1 cells. Parallel studies were performed with cells seeded into the sampler prior to collection of air samples to determine the effects of environmental inhibition and sampling stress on the PCR assay. Baseline studies were also performed without environmental challenge or sampling stress to compare two protocols for cell lysis, solid phase and freeze-thaw. Amplification of a plasmid target sequence resulted in a detection limit of a single bacterial cell by the freeze-thaw and solid-phase methods within 5 and 9 h, respectively. With a genomic target, the sensitivity of the solid-phase method was 10-fold lower than that of freeze-thaw. Samples which contained 10(3) to 10(4) CFU of environmental organisms per m3 inhibited amplification; however, a 1/10 dilution of these samples resulted in successful amplifications. No difference in sensitivity of the PCR assay was obtained as a result of sampling stress, although a 10-fold decrease in culturability was observed. A field validation of the protocol with genomic primers demonstrated the presence of airborne E. coli and/or Shigella spp. in outdoor samples. This study indicates that the PCR method for detection of airborne microorganisms is rapid and sensitive and can be used as an alternative method for air quality monitoring. PMID:7487000

  8. A Ribeiroia spp. (Class: Trematoda) - Specific PCR-based diagnostic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reinitz, D.M.; Yoshino, T.P.; Cole, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    Increased reporting of amphibian malformations in North America has been noted with concern in light of reports that amphibian numbers and species are declining worldwide. Ribeiroia ondatrae has been shown to cause a variety of types of malformations in amphibians. However, little is known about the prevalence of R. ondatrae in North America. To aid in conducting field studies of Ribeiroia spp., we have developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based diagnostic. Herein, we describe the development of an accurate, rapid, simple, and cost-effective diagnostic for detection of Ribeiroia spp. infection in snails (Planorbella trivolvis). Candidate oligonucleotide primers for PCR were designed via DNA sequence analyses of multiple ribosomal internal transcribed spacer-2 regions from Ribeiroia spp. and Echinostoma spp. Comparison of consensus sequences determined from both genera identified areas of sequence potentially unique to Ribeiroia spp. The PCR reliably produced a diagnostic 290-base pair (bp) product in the presence of a wide concentration range of snail or frog DNA. Sensitivity was examined with DNA extracted from single R. ondatrae cercaria. The single-tube PCR could routinely detect less than 1 cercariae equivalent, because DNA isolated from a single cercaria could be diluted at least 1:50 and still yield a positive result via gel electrophoresis. An even more sensitive nested PCR also was developed that routinely detected 100 fg of the 290-bp fragment. The assay did not detect furcocercous cercariae of certain Schistosomatidae, Echinostoma sp., or Sphaeridiotrema globulus nor adults of Clinostomum sp. or Cyathocotyle bushiensis. Field testing of 137 P. trivolvis identified 3 positives with no overt environmental cross-reactivity, and results concurred with microscopic examinations in all cases. ?? American Society of Parasitologists 2007.

  9. Band smearing of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes: dependence on initial PCR target diversity.

    PubMed

    Zrimec, Jan; Kopinč, Rok; Rijavec, Tomaž; Zrimec, Tatjana; Lapanje, Aleš

    2013-11-01

    Band smearing in agarose gels of PCR amplified bacterial 16S rRNA genes is understood to comprise amplicons of varying sizes arising from PCR errors, and requires elimination. We consider that with amplified heterogeneous DNA, delayed electro-migration is caused not by PCR errors but by dsDNA structures that arise from imperfect strand pairing. The extent of band smearing was found to be proportional to the sequence heterogeneity in 16S rRNA variable regions. Denaturing alkaline gels showed that all amplified DNA was of the correct size. A novel bioinformatic approach was used to reveal that band smearing occurred due to imperfectly paired strands of the amplified DNA. Since the smear is a structural fraction of the correct size PCR product, it carries important information on richness and diversity of the target DNA. For accurate analysis, the origin of the smear must first be identified before it is eliminated by examining the amplified DNA in denaturing alkaline gels.

  10. Nested-PCR and TaqMan real-time quantitative PCR assays for human adenoviruses in environmental waters.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wen-Chien; Chou, Yi-Pen; Kao, Po-Min; Hsu, Tsui-Kang; Su, Hung-Chang; Ho, Ying-Ning; Yang, Yi-Chun; Hsu, Bing-Mu

    2016-01-01

    Human adenovirus (HAdV) infections can occur throughout the year. Cases of HAdV-associated respiratory disease have been more common in the late winter, spring, and early summer. In this study, to provide viral pollution data for further epidemiological studies and governmental actions, the presence of HAdV in the aquatic environment was quantitatively surveyed in the summer. This study was conducted to compare the efficiencies of nested-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and qPCR (quantitative PCR) for detecting HAdV in environmental waters. A total of 73 water samples were collected from Puzi River in Taiwan and subjected to virus concentration methods. In the results, qPCR had much better efficiency for specifying the pathogen in river sample. HAdV41 was detected most frequently in the river water sample (10.9%). The estimated HAdV concentrations ranged between 6.75 × 10(2) and 2.04 × 10(9) genome copies/L. Significant difference was also found in heterotrophic plate counts, conductivity, water temperature, and water turbidity between presence/absence of HAdV. HAdV in the Puzi River may pose a significant health risk. PMID:27120637

  11. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) for Eimeria tenella replication — Implications for experimental refinement and animal welfare

    PubMed Central

    Nolan, Matthew J.; Tomley, Fiona M.; Kaiser, Pete; Blake, Damer P.

    2015-01-01

    The Eimeria species are highly pathogenic parasites of chickens. Research aimed at reducing their impact is hindered by a lack of non-subjective, quantitative, tools to measure parasite replication in the host. The time-consuming, and often time-sensitive, nature of existing approaches precludes their use in large-scale genetic, epidemiological, and evolutionary analyses. We have used quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to accurately quantify Eimeria tenella in chicken tissue and shown this to be more efficient and sensitive than traditional methodologies. We tested four chicken-specific reference qPCR assays and found beta-actin (actb) to be optimal for sample normalisation. In an experimental setting, chickens were inoculated with 500, 1500, or 4500 E. tenella oocysts and parasite replication and the impact of infection measured by i) qPCR analysis of DNA extracted from caecal tissues collected at five and eight days post-infection (dpi), ii) faecal oocyst counts (FOCs) on samples taken from six to eight dpi, and iii) lesion scoring on caeca collected post-mortem at five and eight dpi. Quantitative real-time PCR test results indicated a significant dose-dependent increase in parasite numbers among study groups for samples collected five dpi (i.e., prior to gametogony) (R2 = 0.994) (p < 0.002) but not in those from day eight (after most oocyst shedding) (R2 = 0.006) (p > 0.379). A strong dose-dependent increase in parasite replication and severity of infection was also revealed by FOC (R2 = 0.997) and lesion scoring. Importantly, qPCR offers substantial improvements for animal welfare via improved statistical power and reduced group sizes in experimental studies. The described qPCR method overcomes subjective limitations of coproscopic quantification, allows reproducible medium- to high-throughput examination of tissues, faeces, and oocysts, and is a valuable tool for determining the impact of Eimeria infections in both experimental and field settings

  12. Quantification of type II procollagen splice forms using Alternative Transcript-qPCR (AT-qPCR)

    PubMed Central

    McAlinden, Audrey; Shim, Kyu-Hwan; Wirthlin, Louisa; Ravindran, Soumya; Hering, Thomas M.

    2012-01-01

    During skeletal development, the onset of chondrogenic differentiation is marked by expression of the α1(II) procollagen Col2a1) gene. Exon 2 of Col2a1 codes for a cysteine-rich von Willebrand factor C-like domain. Chondroprogenitors express the exon 2-containing IIA and IID splice forms by utilizing adjacent 5′ splice sites separated by 3 base pairs. There is a shift to expression of the shorter, exon 2-lacking IIB splice form with further differentiation. Alternative splicing analysis of Col2a1 splice forms has often relied upon semi-quantitative PCR, using a single set of PCR primers to amplify multiple splice forms. We show that this widely used method is inaccurate due to mismatched amplification efficiency of different-sized PCR products. We have developed the TaqMan®-based AT-qPCR (Alternative Transcript-qPCR) assay to more accurately quantify alternatively spliced mRNA, and demonstrate the measurement of Col2a1 splice form expression in differentiating ATDC5 cells in vitro and in wild type mouse embryonic and postnatal cartilage in vivo. The AT-qPCR assay is based on the use of a multiple amplicon standard (MAS) plasmid, containing a chemically synthesized cluster of splice site-spanning PCR amplicons, to quantify alternative splice forms by standard curve-based qPCR. The MAS plasmid designed for Col2a1 also contained an 18S rRNA amplicon for sample normalization, and an amplicon corresponding to a region spanning exon 52-53 to measure total Col2a1 mRNA. In mouse E12.5 to P70 cartilage, we observed the expected switch between the IIA and IIB splice forms; no IID or IIC splice products were observed. However, in the ATDC5 cultures, predominant expression of the IIA and IID splice forms was found at all times in culture. Additionally, we observed that the sum of the IIA, IIB and IID splice forms comprises only a small fraction of Col2a1 transcripts containing the constitutive exon 52-53 junction. We conclude from our results that the majority of ATDC5

  13. Identification of weakly beta-hemolytic porcine spirochetes by biochemical reactions, PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and species-specific PCR.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Tatsuo; Araki, Hiroshi; Sueyoshi, Masuo

    2008-08-01

    We examined the usefulness of PCR-based restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) and species-specific PCR combined with a newly devised rapid biochemical test using microplates for identifying weakly beta-hemolytic intestinal spirochetes (WBHIS) isolated from pigs. WBHIS strains showing atypical biochemical characteristics were decisively identified at the species level by PCR-RFLP and species-specific PCR. Identification of WBHIS at the species level in routine diagnostic work will certainly contribute to clarifying the pathogenicity of WBHIS.

  14. PCR detection and characterization of type-2 porcine circovirus.

    PubMed Central

    Hamel, A L; Lin, L L; Sachvie, C; Grudeski, E; Nayar, G P

    2000-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed for detecting porcine circovirus (PCV). The assay readily detected type-2 PCV (PCV-2) and type-1 PCV (PCV-1). The PCR primers were designed based on DNA sequences conserved in all reported PCV genomes. Type 1 PCV and type 2 PCV both produced 438 bp amplification products, which were easily identified and differentiated from one another by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis. Porcine circovirus was detected in 55% (931/1693) of randomly tested pigs with various clinical signs and lesions, most of which were difficult to differentiate from those associated with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS). The PCR products from all positive clinical samples were identified by RFLP to be only PCV-2; DNA tested by PCR was extracted directly from one or more of lung, mesenteric or mediastinal lymph nodes, and tonsil. Type 2 PCV was also detected in 6% (2/34) of DNA extracted directly from semen of randomly chosen healthy boars. Positive PCR reactions from 554 diseased pigs were characterized by RFLP and categorized into 5 different profiles (A-E), of which 82.8% were PCV-2A (456/554), 3.0% were PCV-2B (17/554), 9.9% were PCV-2C (55/554), 1.1% were PCV-2D (6/554), and 3.2% were PCV-2E (18/554). The complete genomic nucleotide sequences of PCV-2A, B, C, D, and E were determined and found to have at least 95% homology compared with one another and with all other PCV-2 found in the GenBank database. All PCV-2 had less than 76% homology with PCV-1. This PCR assay will hopefully be useful to veterinary diagnostic laboratories for routine testing and surveillance of infection with PCV-2. The RFLP profiling system might be useful for preliminary characterization and identification of PCV isolates and might also benefit studies on the molecular epidemiology of PCV. Images Figure 1. PMID:10680656

  15. A testing scheme for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis in bovine feces utilizing the ESP para-JEM liquid culture system.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Sreekumari; Shulaw, William; Berghaus, Roy; Zhang, Yan; Byrum, Beverly

    2006-11-01

    A testing scheme for the detection of Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) in broth cultures of bovine fecal samples carried out in ESP para-JEM System was evaluated. The scheme included acid-fast staining (on signal-positive and signal-negative samples), and confirmation by PCR for 2 MAP-specific targets and subculture of all acid-fast positive PCR-negative samples. Two hundred and fifty bovine fecal samples were evaluated for the presence of MAP using this scheme. Thirty-seven (15%) of 250 fecal samples had a positive culture result when the proposed testing scheme was used, compared to 14 (6%) positive results when using the standard ESP para-JEM protocol (requiring samples to have a positive signal from the system, a positive acid-fast stain, and a positive IS900 PCR result), and 20 (8%) positives when conventional culture was performed on Herrold egg yolk (HEY) media. A preliminary comparison of real-time and conventional PCR on DNA extracted from 15 MAP-positive broth cultures by 3 different protocols suggested that conventional PCR may be a better choice for the confirmation of the presence of MAP in the liquid cultures than real-time PCR.

  16. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis

    PubMed Central

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru

    2015-01-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques—qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples. PMID:26025892

  17. Comparison of Quantitative PCR and Droplet Digital PCR Multiplex Assays for Two Genera of Bloom-Forming Cyanobacteria, Cylindrospermopsis and Microcystis.

    PubMed

    Te, Shu Harn; Chen, Enid Yingru; Gin, Karina Yew-Hoong

    2015-08-01

    The increasing occurrence of harmful cyanobacterial blooms, often linked to deteriorated water quality and adverse public health effects, has become a worldwide concern in recent decades. The use of molecular techniques such as real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) has become increasingly popular in the detection and monitoring of harmful cyanobacterial species. Multiplex qPCR assays that quantify several toxigenic cyanobacterial species have been established previously; however, there is no molecular assay that detects several bloom-forming species simultaneously. Microcystis and Cylindrospermopsis are the two most commonly found genera and are known to be able to produce microcystin and cylindrospermopsin hepatotoxins. In this study, we designed primers and probes which enable quantification of these genera based on the RNA polymerase C1 gene for Cylindrospermopsis species and the c-phycocyanin beta subunit-like gene for Microcystis species. Duplex assays were developed for two molecular techniques-qPCR and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). After optimization, both qPCR and ddPCR assays have high linearity and quantitative correlations for standards. Comparisons of the two techniques showed that qPCR has higher sensitivity, a wider linear dynamic range, and shorter analysis time and that it was more cost-effective, making it a suitable method for initial screening. However, the ddPCR approach has lower variability and was able to handle the PCR inhibition and competitive effects found in duplex assays, thus providing more precise and accurate analysis for bloom samples.

  18. Chemical properties of a para-benzyne.

    PubMed

    Amegayibor, F Sedinam; Nash, John J; Lee, Anna S; Thoen, Jason; Petzold, Christopher J; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I

    2002-10-16

    5,8-Didehydroisoquinolinium ion, a para benzyne analogue, was generated in a Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer, and its reactivity toward various neutral reagents was examined. A direct comparison of the reaction kinetics of the para benzyne, a meta isomer, and analogous monoradicals, indicates that the para benzyne is a poorer electrophile but a more reactive radical than its meta isomer.

  19. Sporulation properties and antimicrobial susceptibility in endemic and rare Clostridium difficile PCR ribotypes.

    PubMed

    Zidaric, Valerija; Rupnik, Maja

    2016-06-01

    Increased sporulation and antibiotic resistance have been proposed to be associated with certain Clostridium difficile epidemic strains such as PCR ribotype 027. In this study we examined these properties in another widespread PCR ribotype, 014/020, in comparison to prevalent PCR ribotype 002 and a group of rarely represented PCR ribotypes. Highest sporulation was observed in 014/020 strains at 24 h, while after 72 h PCR ribotype 002 and rare PCR ribotypes formed higher total number of spores. PCR ribotype 014/020 strains exhibited slightly higher resistance to tested antimicrobials, followed by group of rare PCR ribotypes and less common PCR ribotype 002. Neither sporulation properties nor antibiotic resistance clearly differed in endemic and rare strains.

  20. Zip nucleic acids are potent hydrolysis probes for quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Paris, Clément; Moreau, Valérie; Deglane, Gaëlle; Voirin, Emilie; Erbacher, Patrick; Lenne-Samuel, Nathalie

    2010-01-01

    Zip nucleic acids (ZNAs) are oligonucleotides conjugated with cationic spermine units that increase affinity for their target. ZNAs were recently shown to enable specific and sensitive reactions when used as primers for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and reverse-transcription. Here, we report their use as quantitative PCR hydrolysis probes. Ultraviolet duplex melting data demonstrate that attachment of cationic residues to the 3′ end of an oligonucleotide does not alter its ability to discriminate nucleotides nor the destabilization pattern relative to mismatch location in the oligonucleotide sequence. The stability increase provided by the cationic charges allows the use of short dual-labeled probes that significantly improve single-nucleotide polymorphism genotyping. Longer ZNA probes were shown to display reduced background fluorescence, therefore, generating greater sensitivity and signal level as compared to standard probes. ZNA probes thus provide broad flexibility in assay design and also represent an effective alternative to minor groove binder- and locked nucleic-acid-containing probes. PMID:20071749

  1. Species identification of cattle and buffalo fat through PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Vaithiyanathan, S; Kulkarni, V V

    2016-04-01

    A method was standardized to isolate quality DNA from cattle and buffalo fat for species identification using QIAamp DNA stool mini kit. The quality of the DNA was sufficient enough to amplify universal primers viz., mt 12S rRNA and mt 16S rRNA, and species specific D loop primers for cattle and buffalo. The sensitivity of the PCR assay in the species specific D loop primer amplification was with a detection level of 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.23 ng buffalo DNA in simplex and, 0. 47 ng cattle DNA and 0.12 ng buffalo DNA in duplex PCR. It is a potentially reliable method for DNA detection to authenticate animal fat. PMID:27413237

  2. Measuring Digital PCR Quality: Performance Parameters and Their Optimization.

    PubMed

    Lievens, A; Jacchia, S; Kagkli, D; Savini, C; Querci, M

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR is rapidly being adopted in the field of DNA-based food analysis. The direct, absolute quantification it offers makes it an attractive technology for routine analysis of food and feed samples for their composition, possible GMO content, and compliance with labelling requirements. However, assessing the performance of dPCR assays is not yet well established. This article introduces three straightforward parameters based on statistical principles that allow users to evaluate if their assays are robust. In addition, we present post-run evaluation criteria to check if quantification was accurate. Finally, we evaluate the usefulness of Poisson confidence intervals and present an alternative strategy to better capture the variability in the analytical chain. PMID:27149415

  3. PCR and blot hybridization for rapid identification of Haloferax species.

    PubMed

    Asker, Dalal; Ohta, Yoshiyuki

    2002-05-01

    Based on the amplification of a 16S rDNA, a PCR assay for the identification of species of Haloferax to genus level was performed. Two variable regions of the 16S rDNA in Haloferax spp. were selected as genus-specific primers for the PCR assay and hybridization probe. Five genera of halophilic Archaea and Escherichia coli were examined as outside groups. Using this approach, all strains of Haloferax spp. were positive. In contrast, all species belonging to the most closely related genera, including Natrinema, Halorubrum, Halobacterium, and Haloarcula, were negative. In addition, the mass bloom of halophilic Archaea that develops in the El-Mallahet saltern of Alexandria City was positive using the same approach. This assay, which does not require pure cultures of microorganisms, is a specific and rapid method for identifying Haloferax spp. in hypersaline environments.

  4. Measuring Digital PCR Quality: Performance Parameters and Their Optimization.

    PubMed

    Lievens, A; Jacchia, S; Kagkli, D; Savini, C; Querci, M

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR is rapidly being adopted in the field of DNA-based food analysis. The direct, absolute quantification it offers makes it an attractive technology for routine analysis of food and feed samples for their composition, possible GMO content, and compliance with labelling requirements. However, assessing the performance of dPCR assays is not yet well established. This article introduces three straightforward parameters based on statistical principles that allow users to evaluate if their assays are robust. In addition, we present post-run evaluation criteria to check if quantification was accurate. Finally, we evaluate the usefulness of Poisson confidence intervals and present an alternative strategy to better capture the variability in the analytical chain.

  5. pPCV, a versatile vector for cloning PCR products.

    PubMed

    Janner, Christiane R; Brito, Ana Lívia P; Moraes, Lidia Maria P; Reis, Viviane Cb; Torres, Fernando Ag

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of PCR product cloning depends on the nature of the DNA polymerase employed because amplicons may have blunt-ends or 3' adenosines overhangs. Therefore, for amplicon cloning, available commercial vectors are either blunt-ended or have a single 3' overhanging thymidine. The aim of this work was to offer in a single vector the ability to clone both types of PCR products. For that purpose, a minimal polylinker was designed to include restriction sites for EcoRV and XcmI which enable direct cloning of amplicons bearing blunt-ends or A-overhangs, respectively, still offering blue/white selection. When tested, the resulting vector, pPCV, presented high efficiency cloning of both types of amplicons. PMID:24058893

  6. Adaptive DNA Computing Algorithm by Using PCR and Restriction Enzyme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kon, Yuji; Yabe, Kaoru; Rajaee, Nordiana; Ono, Osamu

    In this paper, we introduce an adaptive DNA computing algorithm by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction enzyme. The adaptive algorithm is designed based on Adleman-Lipton paradigm[3] of DNA computing. In this work, however, unlike the Adleman- Lipton architecture a cutting operation has been introduced to the algorithm and the mechanism in which the molecules used by computation were feedback to the next cycle devised. Moreover, the amplification by PCR is performed in the molecule used by feedback and the difference concentration arisen in the base sequence can be used again. By this operation the molecules which serve as a solution candidate can be reduced down and the optimal solution is carried out in the shortest path problem. The validity of the proposed adaptive algorithm is considered with the logical simulation and finally we go on to propose applying adaptive algorithm to the chemical experiment which used the actual DNA molecules for solving an optimal network problem.

  7. Culture independent PCR: an alternative enzyme discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Lydolph, Magnus; Lange, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and glycosyl hydrolase family 45 though significant sequence divergence was observed. Glycosyl hydrolases from families 7 and 45 play a crucial role in biomass conversion to fuel ethanol. Research in this renewable energy source has two objectives: (i) To contribute to development of a renewable alternative to world's limited crude fossil oil reserves and (ii) to reduce air pollution. Amplification with 18S rDNA-specific primers revealed species within the ascomycetous orders Sordariales and Hypocreales as well as basidiomycetous order Agaricales to be present in these communities. Our study documents the value of culture-independent PCR in microbial diversity studies and could add to development of a new enzyme screening technology. PMID:15567226

  8. An improved PCR method for gender identification of eagles.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsueh-Wei; Chou, Ta-Ching; Gu, De-Leung; Cheng, Chun-An; Chang, Chia-Che; Yao, Cheng-Te; Chuang, Li-Yeh; Wen, Cheng-Hao; Chou, Yii-Cheng; Tan, Kock-Yee; Cheng, Chien-Chung

    2008-06-01

    Eagles are sexually monomorphic and therefore it is difficult to determine their gender, which is a crucial need for management purposes. In this study, we have developed an improved gender identification method by exploiting length differences between the Chromo-Helicase-DNA binding protein (CHD)-Z and CHD-W genes of Spilornis cheela hoya. By comparing DNA sequences for CHD-W and CHD-Z from 10 species of Falconiformes eagles we designed universal gender identification PCR primers that exploit differences in product size. Standard agarose gels were shown to easily distinguish between the 148-bp CHD-ZW and the 258-bp CHD-W PCR products. When used with 28 samples of S. cheela hoya, our improved universal primers provided a fast and precise gender identification assay. PMID:18385011

  9. Molecular beacon real-time PCR detection of swine viruses.

    PubMed

    McKillen, John; Hjertner, Bernt; Millar, Andrena; McNeilly, Francis; Belák, Sándor; Adair, Brian; Allan, Gordon

    2007-03-01

    Rapid and reliable detection of viral pathogens is critical for the management of the diseases threatening the economic competitiveness of the swine farming industry worldwide. Molecular beacon assays are one type of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology capable of fast, specific, sensitive, and reliable viral detection. In this paper, the development of molecular beacon assays as novel tools for the rapid detection of Aujeszky's disease virus, African swine fever virus, porcine circovirus type 2 and porcine parvovirus is described. The assays are capable of rapidly detecting 2 x 10(1) copies of target and are linear between 2 x 10(9) and 2 x 10(2) copies. They can detect virus specifically in clinical samples such as whole blood, serum and tissue. In comparison to conventional PCR they are either as sensitive or more sensitive. As such these molecular beacon assays represent a powerful tool for the detection of these viruses in swine.

  10. Measuring Digital PCR Quality: Performance Parameters and Their Optimization

    PubMed Central

    Lievens, A.; Jacchia, S.; Kagkli, D.; Savini, C.; Querci, M.

    2016-01-01

    Digital PCR is rapidly being adopted in the field of DNA-based food analysis. The direct, absolute quantification it offers makes it an attractive technology for routine analysis of food and feed samples for their composition, possible GMO content, and compliance with labelling requirements. However, assessing the performance of dPCR assays is not yet well established. This article introduces three straightforward parameters based on statistical principles that allow users to evaluate if their assays are robust. In addition, we present post-run evaluation criteria to check if quantification was accurate. Finally, we evaluate the usefulness of Poisson confidence intervals and present an alternative strategy to better capture the variability in the analytical chain. PMID:27149415

  11. Culture independent PCR: an alternative enzyme discovery strategy.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Lydolph, Magnus; Lange, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and glycosyl hydrolase family 45 though significant sequence divergence was observed. Glycosyl hydrolases from families 7 and 45 play a crucial role in biomass conversion to fuel ethanol. Research in this renewable energy source has two objectives: (i) To contribute to development of a renewable alternative to world's limited crude fossil oil reserves and (ii) to reduce air pollution. Amplification with 18S rDNA-specific primers revealed species within the ascomycetous orders Sordariales and Hypocreales as well as basidiomycetous order Agaricales to be present in these communities. Our study documents the value of culture-independent PCR in microbial diversity studies and could add to development of a new enzyme screening technology.

  12. Actuation method and apparatus, micropump, and PCR enhancement method

    SciTech Connect

    Ullakko, Kari; Mullner, Peter; Hampikian, Greg; Smith, Aaron

    2015-07-28

    An actuation apparatus includes at least one magnetic shape memory (MSM) element containing a material configured to expand and/or contract in response to exposure to a magnetic field. Among other things, the MSM element may be configured to pump fluid through a micropump by expanding and/or contracting in response to the magnetic field. The magnetic field may rotate about an axis of rotation and exhibit a distribution having a component substantially perpendicular to the axis of rotation. Further, the magnetic field distribution may include at least two components substantially orthogonal to one another lying in one or more planes perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The at least one MSM element may contain nickel, manganese, and gallium. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) may be enhanced by contacting a PCR reagent and DNA material with the MSM element.

  13. SNP genotyping using single-tube fluorescent bidirectional PCR.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-07-01

    SNP genotyping is a well-populatedfield with a large number of assay formats offering accurate allelic discrimination. However, there remains a discord between the ultimate goal of rapid, inexpensive assays that do not require complex design considerations and involved optimization strategies. We describe the first integration of bidirectional allele-specific amplification, SYBR Green I, and rapid-cycle PCR to provide a homogeneous SNP-typing assay. Wild-type, mutant, and heterozygous alleles were easily discriminated in a single tube using melt curve profiling of PCR products alone. We demonstrate the effectiveness and reliability of this assay with a blinded trial using clinical samples from individuals with sickle cell anemia, sickle cell trait, or unaffected individuals. The tests were completed in less than 30 min without expensive fluorogenic probes, prohibiting design rules, or lengthy downstream processing for product analysis.

  14. Milk adulteration: Detection of bovine milk in bulk goat milk produced by smallholders in northeastern Brazil by a duplex PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, N P A; Givisiez, P E N; Queiroga, R C R E; Azevedo, P S; Gebreyes, W A; Oliveira, C J B

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the adulteration of goat milk produced by smallholders in semiarid northeastern Brazil with bovine milk as an adulterant. The study was requested by the association of smallholder producers in the region to investigate and to inhibit adulteration practices as a need to ensure the quality and safety of goat milk. A duplex PCR assay has been developed and standardized. Further validation was performed in 160 fresh bulk goat milk samples. The detection limit of the duplex PCR was 0.5% bovine milk in goat milk and the results indicated that 41.2% of the goat milk presented to market was positive for bovine milk. Making the test available to the association of producers, together with extension activities, have been applied to reduce adulteration in goat milk sold to small-scale dairy plants and to ensure the species origin for goat milk in the state of Paraíba.

  15. Extraction of PCR-amplifiable genomic DNA from Bacillus anthracisspores

    SciTech Connect

    Torok, Tamas

    2003-05-19

    Bacterial endospore disruption and nucleic acid extractionresulting in DNA of PCR-amplifiable quality and quantity are not trivial.Responding to the needs of the Hazardous Materials Response Unit (HMRU),Laboratory Division, Federal Bureau of Investigation, protocols weredeveloped to close these gaps. Effectiveness and reproducibility of thetechniques were validated with laboratory grown pure spores of Bacillusanthracis and its close phylogenetic neighbors, and with spiked soils anddamaged samples.

  16. Monitoring Piscirickettsia salmonis by denaturant gel electrophoresis and competitive PCR.

    PubMed

    Heath, S; Pak, S; Marshall, S; Prager, E M; Orrego, C

    2000-05-25

    Reported strains of Piscirickettsia salmonis, a pathogen of salmonid fishes, were analyzed by amplifying part of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the ribosomal RNA (rRNA) operon followed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) of the amplicons. All amplified fragments differing in sequence were distinguished by migration during DGGE. A simpler format, constant denaturant gel electrophoresis (CDGE), allowed the same diagnostic distinctions among strains. Sampling during 1997 and 1998 of salmonids from 5 different sites on and near Chiloé Island in southern Chile displaying piscirickettsiosis revealed only P. salmonis resembling LF-89, the type strain first isolated in 1989. These observations are encouraging for control strategies, which might otherwise be compromised by unpredictable shifts of P. salmonis types in salmon farms. A competitive PCR assay offered insight about the power of PCR for quantification and about specific tissue invasiveness by this intracellular pathogen. This approach revealed that the PCR could amplify approximately 1 to 10 P. salmonis genome equivalents against a background of > 99.9% salmonid DNA. It also raised the possibility that the salmonid brain is an important site for P. salmonis survival, with its bacterial load in 1 individual having been about 100 times the loads observed in liver and kidney. Pathogen detection by competitive PCR in a surface seawater sample from a netpen in use indicated a density of about 3000 to 4000 P. salmonis cells (or their DNA remnants) 1(-1). Such quantitative estimates should aid decisions about disease prevention and management as, for example, choice of netpen sites following fallow periods and certification of ova, which are known conduits of infection.

  17. Single-tube nested PCR in the diagnosis of tuberculosis.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, C M; Yuen, K Y; Chan, K S; Yam, W C; Yim, K H; Ng, W F; Ng, M H

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the usefulness of a single-tube nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay in the diagnosis of tuberculosis in 1497 pulmonary and 536 extrapulmonary specimens. METHODS: A single-tube nested PCR, utilising two sets of primers with different melting temperatures (88 degrees C for external primers; 70 degrees C for internal primers) to augment sensitivity and specificity without increasing the risk of amplicon contamination, was evaluated. Specimens were initially tested for the repetitive IS6110 sequences and if negative, retested for the universal 38 kilodalton sequence and for inhibitors. dUTP/Uracil-N-glycosylase and Instagene treatment were used to minimise contamination and the effect of inhibitors, respectively. RESULTS: Using culture as the gold standard, the overall sensitivity of the assay was 89% for pulmonary and 42% for extrapulmonary specimens. Sensitivity varied greatly with respect to sample type (92% for follow up specimens from a chest hospital and 70% for non-follow up specimens from a general hospital). The smear positivity rates were 15% for extrapulmonary specimens, and 69% and 45%, respectively, for follow up and non-follow up specimens from pulmonary sites. Specificity was 99.7%. Inhibitors were present more frequently in extrapulmonary than in pulmonary specimens (13.4% v 2.7%). CONCLUSION: Despite the high sensitivity of the PCR assay for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in pulmonary specimens, it was less effective in the extrapulmonary samples. This is probably because of the lower bacterial load in extrapulmonary specimens, the presence of more inhibitors adversely affecting the PCR assay and the higher volume of specimens used for culture. Images PMID:8655703

  18. Performance of two real-time PCR assays for hepatitis B virus DNA detection and quantitation.

    PubMed

    Kania, Dramane; Ottomani, Laure; Meda, Nicolas; Peries, Marianne; Dujols, Pierre; Bolloré, Karine; Rénier, Wendy; Viljoen, Johannes; Ducos, Jacques; Van de Perre, Philippe; Tuaillon, Edouard

    2014-06-01

    In-house developed real-time PCR (qPCR) techniques could be useful conjunctives to the management of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in resource-limited settings with high prevalence. Two qPCR assays (qPCR1 and qPCR2), based on primers/probes targeting conserved regions of the X and S genes of HBV respectively, were evaluated using clinical samples of varying HBV genotypes, and compared to the commercial Roche Cobas AmpliPrep/Cobas TaqMan HBV Test v2.0. The lower detection limit (LDL) was established at 104 IU/ml for qPCR1, and 91 IU/ml for qPCR2. Good agreement and correlation were obtained between the Roche assay and both qPCR assays (r = 0.834 for qPCR1; and r = 0.870 for qPCR2). Differences in HBV DNA load of > 0.5 Log10 IU/ml between the Roche and the qPCR assays were found in 49/122 samples of qPCR1, and 35/122 samples of qPCR2. qPCR1 tended to underestimate HBV DNA quantity in samples with a low viral load and overestimate HBV DNA concentration in samples with a high viral load when compared to the Roche test. Both molecular tools that were developed, used on an open real-time PCR system, were reliable for HBV DNA detection and quantitation. The qPCR2 performed better than the qPCR1 and had the additional advantage of various HBV genotype detection and quantitation. This low cost quantitative HBV DNA PCR assay may be an alternative solution when implementing national programmes to diagnose, monitor and treat HBV infection in low- to middle-income countries where testing for HBV DNA is not available in governmental health programmes.

  19. Analytical Sensitivity Comparison between Singleplex Real-Time PCR and a Multiplex PCR Platform for Detecting Respiratory Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Jayme; Fowler, Nisha; Walmsley, Mary Louise; Schmidt, Terri; Scharrer, Jason; Kowaleski, James; Grimes, Teresa; Hoyos, Shanann; Chen, Jack

    2015-01-01

    Multiplex PCR methods are attractive to clinical laboratories wanting to broaden their detection of respiratory viral pathogens in clinical specimens. However, multiplexed assays must be well optimized to retain or improve upon the analytic sensitivity of their singleplex counterparts. In this experiment, the lower limit of detection (LOD) of singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting respiratory viruses is compared to an equivalent panel on a multiplex PCR platform, the GenMark eSensor RVP. LODs were measured for each singleplex real-time PCR assay and expressed as the lowest copy number detected 95–100% of the time, depending on the assay. The GenMark eSensor RVP LODs were obtained by converting the TCID50/mL concentrations reported in the package insert to copies/μL using qPCR. Analytical sensitivity between the two methods varied from 1.2–1280.8 copies/μL (0.08–3.11 log differences) for all 12 assays compared. Assays targeting influenza A/H3N2, influenza A/H1N1pdm09, influenza B, and human parainfluenza 1 and 2 were most comparable (1.2–8.4 copies/μL, <1 log difference). Largest differences in LOD were demonstrated for assays targeting adenovirus group E, respiratory syncytial virus subtype A, and a generic assay for all influenza A viruses regardless of subtype (319.4–1280.8 copies/μL, 2.50–3.11 log difference). The multiplex PCR platform, the GenMark eSensor RVP, demonstrated improved analytical sensitivity for detecting influenza A/H3 viruses, influenza B virus, human parainfluenza virus 2, and human rhinovirus (1.6–94.8 copies/μL, 0.20–1.98 logs). Broader detection of influenza A/H3 viruses was demonstrated by the GenMark eSensor RVP. The relationship between TCID50/mL concentrations and the corresponding copy number related to various ATCC cultures is also reported. PMID:26569120

  20. Improved sensitivity of PCR for Chlamydophila using pmp genes.

    PubMed

    Laroucau, K; Souriau, A; Rodolakis, A

    2001-09-20

    Primers targeting the conserved pmp gene family of Chlamydophila abortus were evaluated for their ability to improve the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) sensitivity. In purified DNA, specific pmp primers (named CpsiA and CpsiB) allowed at least a 10-fold increase of the PCR sensitivity compared to the specific ompA primers for C. abortus, but also for C. psittaci and C. caviae strains. No amplification was observed on C. felis, C. pecorum, C. pneumoniae and Chlamydia trachomatis strains. Tested on contaminated specimens such as genital swabs, the PCR sensitivity observed with CpsiA/CpsiB was also better than with the ompA primers. This study demonstrated that these specific pmp primers could serve as valuable, sensitive and common tools for a specific Chlamydophila diagnosis in ruminant, avian and human diseases. Digestion by AluI of the CpsiA/CpsiB fragments allowed a specific discrimination of the strains in function of their hosts and/or their serotypes.

  1. Monitoring infection: from blood culture to polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Book, Malte; Lehmann, Lutz Eric; Zhang, XiangHong; Stüber, Frank

    2013-06-01

    In patients with sepsis, diagnosis of blood stream infection (BSI) is a key concern to the therapist. Direct verification of pathogens in the blood stream executed by blood cultures (BC) still is regarded as the gold standard up to date. The quickest possible initiation of an appropriate antimicrobial therapy is a cornerstone of an effective therapy. Moreover, in this view BC can also serve to identify antimicrobial agents to target the pathogen. However, when employing BC the time needed until microbiological results are available ranges from 24 up to 72 h. Moreover, infections caused by multiple pathogens often remain undetected and concurrent antibiotic therapy may lower the overall sensitivity. Alternative pathogen characterization can be performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based amplification methods. Results using PCR can be obtained within 6-8 h. Therefore, the time delay until an appropriate therapy can be reduced enormously. Moreover, these methods have the potential to enhance the sensitivity in the diagnosis of blood stream infections. Therefore, PCR based methods might be a valuable adjunct to present procedures of diagnosing bacteraemia.

  2. Validation of chimerism in pediatric recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) a comparison between two methods: real-time PCR (qPCR) vs. variable number tandem repeats PCR (VNTR PCR).

    PubMed

    Kletzel, Morris; Huang, Wei; Olszewski, Marie; Khan, Sana

    2013-01-01

    Post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) chimerism monitoring is important to assess relapse and therapeutic intervention. The purpose of our study is to compare two methods variable number tandem repeats (VNTR) vs. quantitative real- time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) in terms of determining chimerism. 127 (peripheral blood n=112, bone marrow n=15) samples were simultaneously tested by VNTR using APO-B, D1S80, D1S111, D17S30, gene loci SRY and ZP3 and qPCR using 34 assays (CA001-CA034) that are designed to a bi-allelic insertion/deletion (indel) polymorphism in the human genome. Samples were separated in three subsets: total WBC, T-cell and Myeloid cells. Extraction of DNA was performed then quantified. We analyzed column statistics, paired t-test and regression analysis for both methods. There was complete correlation between the two methods. The simplicity and rapidity of the test results from the qPCR method is more efficient and accurate to assess chimerism.

  3. Electrochemiluminescence-PCR detection of genetically modified organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jinfeng; Xing, Da; Shen, Xingyan; Zhu, Debin

    2005-01-01

    The detection methods for genetically modified (GM) components in foods have been developed recently. But many of them are complicated and time-consuming; some of them need to use the carcinogenic substance, and can"t avoid false-positive results. In this study, an electrochemiluminescence polymerase chain reaction (ECL-PCR) method for detection GM tobaccos is proposed. The Cauliflower mosaic virus 35S (CaMV35S) promoter was amplified by PCR, Then hybridized with a Ru(bpy)32+ (TBR)-labeled and a biotinylated probe. The hybridization products were captured onto streptavidin-coated paramagnetic beads, and detected by measuring the electrochemiluminescence (ECL) signal of the TBR label. Whether the tobaccos contain GM components was discriminated by detecting the ECL signal of CaMV35S promoter. The experiment results show that the detection limit for CaMV35S promoter is 100 fmol, and the GM components can be clearly identified in GM tobaccos. The ECL-PCR method provide a new means in GMOs detection due to its safety, simplicity and high efficiency.

  4. Rat Gene Mapping Using Pcr-Analyzed Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Serikawa, T.; Kuramoto, T.; Hilbert, P.; Mori, M.; Yamada, J.; Dubay, C. J.; Lindpainter, K.; Ganten, D.; Guenet, J. L.; Lathrop, G. M.; Beckmann, J. S.

    1992-01-01

    One hundred and seventy-four rat loci which contain short tandem repeat sequences were extracted from the GenBank or EMBL data bases and used to define primers for amplification by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of the microsatellite regions, creating PCR-formatted sequence-tagged microsatellite sites (STMSs). One hundred and thirty-four STMSs for 118 loci, including 6 randomly cloned STMSs, were characterized: (i) PCR-analyzed loci were assigned to specific chromosomes using a panel of rat X mouse somatic cell hybrid clones. (ii) Length variation of the STMSs among 8 inbred rat strains could be visualized at 85 of 107 loci examined (79.4%). (iii) A genetic map, integrating biochemical, coat color, mutant and restriction fragment length polymorphism loci, was constructed based on the segregation of 125 polymorphic markers in seven rat backcrosses and in two F(2) crosses. Twenty four linkage groups were identified, all of which were assigned to a defined chromosome. As a reflection of the bias for coding sequences in the public data bases, the STMSs described herein are often associated with genes. Hence, the genetic map we report coincides with a gene map. The corresponding map locations of the homologous mouse and human genes are also listed for comparative mapping purposes. PMID:1628813

  5. Rapid diagnosis of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteremia by PCR.

    PubMed Central

    Folgueira, L; Delgado, R; Palenque, E; Aguado, J M; Noriega, A R

    1996-01-01

    A method based on DNA amplification and hybridization has been used for the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in blood samples from 38 hospitalized patients (15 human immunodeficiency virus [HIV] positive and 23 HIV negative) in whom localized or disseminated forms of tuberculosis were suspected. In 32 of these patients, the diagnosis of tuberculosis was eventually confirmed by conventional bacteriological or histological procedures. M. tuberculosis DNA was detected with the PCR technique in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells from 9 of 11 (82%) HIV-infected patients and in 7 of 21 (33%) HIV-negative patients (P < 0.01), while M. tuberculosis blood cultures were positive in 1 of 8 (12.5%) and 1 of 18 (5.5%) patients, respectively. PCR was positive in all cases with disseminated disease in both HIV-negative and HIV-positive patients and also in the HIV-positive patients with extrapulmonary tuberculosis. Seven samples from patients with documented illness other than tuberculosis and 12 specimens from healthy volunteers, including seven volunteers with a recent positive purified protein derivative test, were used as controls and had a negative PCR. These results suggest that detection of M. tuberculosis DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells may be a useful tool for rapid diagnosis of disseminated and extrapulmonary forms of tuberculosis, especially in an HIV-positive population. PMID:8904404

  6. Authentication of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) using real time PCR.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Beatriz; Madriñán, María; Vieites, Juan M; Espiñeira, Montserrat

    2010-04-28

    This work describes the development of a real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) system for the detection and identification of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua). Among the advantages of this technique, it is worth highlighting that this is reliable in terms of specificity and sensitivity. The TaqMan real-time PCR is the simplest, fastest testing process and has the highest potential for automation, therefore representing the currently most suitable method for screening, allowing the detection of fraudulent or unintentional mislabeling of this species. The method can be applied to all kinds of products, fresh, frozen, and processed products, including those undergoing intensive processes of transformation. The developed methodology using specific primer-probe set was validated and further applied to 40 commercial samples labeled as cod in order to determinate if the species used for their manufacturing corresponded to G. morhua, detecting 20% that were incorrectly labeled. A C(t) value of about 19 was obtained when G. morhua was present. In samples with a species mixture, all samples that had a fluorescence signal were positive (C(t) < 30) for the presence of G. morhua by conventional end-point RT-PCR, and the estimated limit of detection for these type of samples was of 20 pg of DNA. The methodology herein developed is useful to check the fulfilment of labeling regulations for seafood products and verify the correct traceability in commercial trade and for fisheries control.

  7. Microdroplet-based PCR amplification for large scale targeted sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Tewhey, Ryan; Warner, Jason; Nakano, Masakazu; Libby, Brian; Medkova, Martina; David, Patricia; Kotsopoulos, Steve; Samuels, Michael; Hutchison, J. Brian; Larson, Jonathan W.; Topol, Eric J.; Weiner, Michael P.; Harismendy, Olivier; Olson, Jeff; Link, Darren R.; Frazer, Kelly A.

    2009-01-01

    Targeted sequencing of specific loci of the human genome is a promising approach for maximizing the efficiency of second-generation sequencing technologies for population-based studies of genetic variation. Here we describe microdroplet PCR, which performs 1.5 million separate amplifications in parallel, as an approach for enriching targeted sequences in the human genome. We initially designed primers to 435 exons of 47 genes that were selected for having a broad spectrum of sequence characteristics. Using this primer set we amplified the same six samples by both microdroplet and traditional singleplex PCR and sequenced the products using the Illumina GAII demonstrating that both methods generate similarly high quality data; 84% of the uniquely mapping reads fell within the targeted sequences, uniform coverage of ~90% of the targeted bases, greater than 99% accuracy in sequence variant calls, and high reproducibility between different samples (r2=0.9). We next scaled the microdroplet PCR to 3976 amplicons totaling 1.49 Mb of sequence, sequenced the resulting sample on both the Illumina GAII and Roche 454 platforms, and obtained data with equally high specificity and sensitivity quality. Our results demonstrate that microdroplet technology is well suited for processing DNA for massively parallel amplification of specific subsets of the human genome for targeted sequencing. PMID:19881494

  8. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I.; Vega-Palas, Miguel A.

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  9. Ultrasensitive Antibody Detection by Agglutination-PCR (ADAP)

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Antibodies are widely used biomarkers for the diagnosis of many diseases. Assays based on solid-phase immobilization of antigens comprise the majority of clinical platforms for antibody detection, but can be undermined by antigen denaturation and epitope masking. These technological hurdles are especially troublesome in detecting antibodies that bind nonlinear or conformational epitopes, such as anti-insulin antibodies in type 1 diabetes patients and anti-thyroglobulin antibodies associated with thyroid cancers. Radioimmunoassay remains the gold standard for these challenging antibody biomarkers, but the limited multiplexability and reliance on hazardous radioactive reagents have prevented their use outside specialized testing facilities. Here we present an ultrasensitive solution-phase method for detecting antibodies, termed antibody detection by agglutination-PCR (ADAP). Antibodies bind to and agglutinate synthetic antigen–DNA conjugates, enabling ligation of the DNA strands and subsequent quantification by qPCR. ADAP detects zepto- to attomoles of antibodies in 2 μL of sample with a dynamic range spanning 5–6 orders of magnitude. Using ADAP, we detected anti-thyroglobulin autoantibodies from human patient plasma with a 1000-fold increased sensitivity over an FDA-approved radioimmunoassay. Finally, we demonstrate the multiplexability of ADAP by simultaneously detecting multiple antibodies in one experiment. ADAP’s combination of simplicity, sensitivity, broad dynamic range, multiplexability, and use of standard PCR protocols creates new opportunities for the discovery and detection of antibody biomarkers. PMID:27064772

  10. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed.

  11. Species identification in meat products using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Jonker, K M; Tilburg, J J H C; Hagele, G H; de Boer, E

    2008-05-01

    One of the most convenient methods for the identification of animal species in processed meat products is the examination of DNA sequences. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) techniques are particularly suitable because even small fragments of DNA formed during heat processing of the meat can be amplified and identified. A real-time PCR method has been developed and evaluated for the identification of processed meat products. In test mixtures containing beef, pork, horse, mutton, chicken and turkey, it was possible to identify these species down to a level of 0.05%. By adjusting the number of cycles, it was possible to detect levels as low as 0.01% of these species. Cross-reactivity between these species was not found, except for pure horsemeat (250 ng DNA) in the assay for turkey meat. Cross-reactivity of deer, roe, ostrich, kangaroo, goat, domestic duck, mallard, goose, pigeon, guinea fowl, quail and pheasant was also investigated and it was found that amounts as high as 250 ng DNA of these species in the reaction vial did not result in (false) positive signals except for amounts higher than 125 ng deer DNA and higher than 50 ng pigeon DNA in the determination of chicken and beef, respectively. More than 150 meat samples were examined using DNA hybridization and real-time PCR. A comparison of the results showed a better performance of the real-time procedure compared to DNA hybridization.

  12. Pure chromosome-specific PCR libraries from single sorted chromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    VanDevanter, D R; Choongkittaworn, N M; Dyer, K A; Aten, J; Otto, P; Behler, C; Bryant, E M; Rabinovitch, P S

    1994-01-01

    Chromosome-specific DNA libraries can be very useful in molecular and cytogenetic genome mapping studies. We have developed a rapid and simple method for the generation of chromosome-specific DNA sequences that relies on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of a single flow-sorted chromosome or chromosome fragment. Previously reported methods for the development of chromosome libraries require larger numbers of chromosomes, with preparation of pure chromosomes sorted by flow cytometry, generation of somatic cell hybrids containing targeted chromosomes, or a combination of both procedures. These procedures are labor intensive, especially when hybrid cell lines are not already available, and this has limited the generation of chromosome-specific DNA libraries from nonhuman species. In contrast, a single sorted chromosome is a pure source of DNA for library production even when flow cytometric resolution of chromosome populations is poor. Furthermore, any sorting cytometer may be used with this technique. Using this approach, we demonstrate the generation of PCR libraries suitable for both molecular and fluorescence in situ hybridization studies from individual baboon and canine chromosomes, separate human homologues, and a rearranged marker chromosome from a transformed cell line. PCR libraries specific to subchromosomal regions have also been produced by sorting a small chromosome fragment. This simple and rapid technique will allow generation of nonhuman linkage maps and probes for fluorescence in situ hybridization and the characterization of marker chromosomes from solid tumors. In addition, allele-specific libraries generated by this strategy may also be useful for mapping genetic diseases. Images PMID:8016078

  13. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I; Vega-Palas, Miguel A

    2014-07-02

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length.

  14. Widespread use of real-time PCR for rickettsial diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Renvoisé, Aurélie; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Socolovschi, Cristina; Raoult, Didier

    2012-02-01

    We report 2 years of experience with rickettsial molecular diagnosis using real-time PCR at the French National Reference Center. All Rickettsia genomes available were compared to discover specific sequences to design new sets of primers and probes. The specificity was verified in silico and against a panel of 30 rickettsial species. Sensitivity was determined using 10-fold serial dilutions. Finally, primers and probes that were both specific and sensitive were routinely used for the diagnosis of rickettsial infections from clinical specimens. We retained sets of primers and probes to detect spotted fever group Rickettsia, typhus group Rickettsia,Rickettsia conorii,Rickettsia slovaca,Rickettsia africae and Rickettsia australis; 643 clinical samples were screened for the presence of Rickettsia DNA. Overall, 45 positive samples were detected, including 15 Rickettsia africae, nine R. conorii, five Rickettsia sibirica mongolitimonae, four R. slovaca, two R. australis, four Rickettsia massiliae, one Rickettsia honei, one Rickettsia typhi and eight Rickettsia sp. Positive samples were detected mainly from cutaneous biopsies and swabs (31/45). Widespread use of real-time PCR is inexpensive and reduces delay in the diagnosis of rickettsial infections. These real-time PCR assays could be implemented easily in laboratories that have molecular facilities and may be added to existing molecular tools as a point-of-care strategy.

  15. Large scale multiplex PCR improves pathogen detection by DNA microarrays

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Medium density DNA microchips that carry a collection of probes for a broad spectrum of pathogens, have the potential to be powerful tools for simultaneous species identification, detection of virulence factors and antimicrobial resistance determinants. However, their widespread use in microbiological diagnostics is limited by the problem of low pathogen numbers in clinical specimens revealing relatively low amounts of pathogen DNA. Results To increase the detection power of a fluorescence-based prototype-microarray designed to identify pathogenic microorganisms involved in sepsis, we propose a large scale multiplex PCR (LSplex PCR) for amplification of several dozens of gene-segments of 9 pathogenic species. This protocol employs a large set of primer pairs, potentially able to amplify 800 different gene segments that correspond to the capture probes spotted on the microarray. The LSplex protocol is shown to selectively amplify only the gene segments corresponding to the specific pathogen present in the analyte. Application of LSplex increases the microarray detection of target templates by a factor of 100 to 1000. Conclusion Our data provide a proof of principle for the improvement of detection of pathogen DNA by microarray hybridization by using LSplex PCR. PMID:19121223

  16. PCR-based typing of DNA extracted from cigarette butts.

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M N; Budowle, B; Jung, J; Borer, U V; Comey, C T; Dirnhofer, R

    1991-01-01

    Limited genetic marker information can be obtained from saliva by typing by conventional serological means. Thus, the application of PCR-based DNA typing methods was investigated as a potential approach for typing genetic markers in saliva. DNA was isolated from 200 cigarettes smoked by 10 different individuals (20 cigarettes per individual) and from 3 cigarette butts recovered from 2 crime scenes (adjudicated cases) using a Chelex 100 extraction procedure. The amount of recovered human DNA was quantified by slot-blot analysis and ranged from approximately less than 2-160 ng DNA per cigarette butt for the 200 samples, and 8 ng, 50 ng, and 100 ng for the cigarette butts from the adjudicated cases. The DNA was successfully amplified by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the HLA-DQ alpha locus (99 out of 100 samples) as well as for the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) locus D1S80 (99 out of 100 samples). Amplification and typing of DNA was successful on all samples recovered from the crime scenes. The results suggest that PCR-based typing of DNA offers a potential method for genetically characterizing traces of saliva on cigarette butts.

  17. Diagnostic approaches for oculoglandular tularemia: advantages of PCR

    PubMed Central

    Kantardjiev, Todor; Padeshki, Plamen; Ivanov, Ivan N

    2007-01-01

    Aim The authors describe a diagnostic approach that proved to be particularly valuable in rare cases of ocular tularemia registered during the tularemia outbreak in 1997–2005 in Bulgaria. The authors describe the laboratory findings and diagnosis of four cases with an oculoglandular form of infection. Methods Several different specimens from each patient were analysed. Oculoglandular tularemia was diagnosed in four patients either by culture, immunofluorescent antibody analysis (IFA), serology or by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay. Results and Discussion Three F tularensis strains were isolated and characterised. One of these was isolated from a conjuctival swab specimen obtained from a seronegative patient. The authors report for the first time a successful application of diagnostic PCR performed directly on conjuctival swab specimen. From all analysed specimens IFA was diagnostically effective only in the case of lymph node aspirates and was not sensitive enough for conjuctival swabs or blood samples. The authors also describe the histological picture of a conjunctival granuloma in course of infection. All patients were successfully treated with ciprofloxacin. Conclusions Some of the proposed laboratory diagnostic strategies (swab PCR) are not invasive and could represent a new approach for resolving rare and hard‐to‐diagnose cases of oculoglandular tularemia. PMID:17475710

  18. Determination of Arabidopsis thaliana telomere length by PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaquero-Sedas, María I; Vega-Palas, Miguel A

    2014-01-01

    In humans, telomere length studies have acquired great relevance because the length of telomeres has been related to natural processes like disease, aging and cancer. However, very little is known about the influence of telomere length on the biology of wild type plants. The length of plant telomeres has been usually studied by Terminal Restriction Fragment (TRF) analyses. This technique requires high amounts of tissue, including multiple cell types, which might be the reason why very little is known about the influence of telomere length on plant natural processes. In contrast, many of the human telomere length studies have focused on homogenous cell populations. Most of these studies have been performed by PCR, using telomeric degenerated primers, which allow the determination of telomere length from small amounts of human cells. Here, we have adapted the human PCR procedure to analyze the length of Arabidopsis thaliana telomeres. This PCR approach will facilitate the analysis of telomere length from low amounts of tissue. We have used it to determine that CG and non CG DNA methylation positively regulates Arabidopsis telomere length. PMID:24986269

  19. An unusual presentation of herpes simplex encephalitis with negative PCR.

    PubMed

    Buerger, Kelly J; Zerr, Kayleigh; Salazar, Richard

    2015-01-01

    A 74-year-old man presented with acute right-sided hemiparesis and epilepsia partialis continua in association with fever and confusion. Initial workup revealed possible cerebritis in the left medial frontal lobe without involvement of the temporal lobes. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed minimal lymphocytic pleocytosis but negative real-time herpes simplex virus (HSV) PCR. Acyclovir was discontinued on day 5 due to a negative infectious workup and clinical improvement. On day 9 his condition deteriorated and he was transferred to a higher level of acuity for advanced supportive care. Worsening encephalopathy and refractory status epilepticus ensued despite medical care. Repeat CSF analysis showed mild lymphocytic pleocytosis with negative real-time HSV PCR. Brain MRI revealed progression of cortical enhancement. Immunosuppressive therapy and plasma exchange were attempted without clinical response. On day 24, another lumbar puncture showed only mild lymphocytic pleocytosis. Brain MRI showed involvement of the right medial temporal lobe. Subsequently, acyclovir was resumed. The HSV-1 PCR result was positive on day 30. Unfortunately, the patient expired.

  20. [Multiplex PCR for detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia].

    PubMed

    Wu, Jie-Ying; Liao, Can; Li, Jian; Huang, Yi-Ning

    2004-08-01

    To investigate the clinical application of multiplex PCR in detecting genotypes of deletional alpha-thalassemia in South China and observe the distribution frequency of alpha-globin gene deletion, 145 patients with silent carrier, alpha thalassemia trait or HbH were identified by M-PCR and 1.2% agarose gel electrophoresis. There are 1.3, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 kb bands which indicate --(SEA), -alpha(4.2), alphaalpha and -alpha(3.7), respectively. The results showed that among 145 patients, 100 patients with --(SEA)/alphaalpha (68.9%), 15 with -alpha(3.7)/alphaalpha (10.3%), 8 with -alpha(4.2)/alphaalpha (5.52%), 2 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%), 1 with -alpha(3.7)/-alpha(3.7) (0.69%), 1 with -alpha(4.2)/-alpha(4.2) (0.69%), 14 with --(SEA)/-alpha(3.7) (9.65%), 2 with --(SEA)/-alpha(4.2) (1.38%) were found. Two patients prenatal diagnosed were confirmed with Bart's hydrops fetuses. In conclusion, M-PCR analysis is a simple, rapid and accurate method for detection of alpha-thalassemia gene deletion. This technique is helpful in screening, carrier identification and prenatal diagnosis of deletional alpha-thalassemia.

  1. Simultaneous multiplex PCR detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ji Yeon; Hong, Jin Sung; Kim, Min Jea; Choi, Sun Hee; Min, Byeong Eun; Song, Eun Gyeong; Kim, Hyun Hee; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2014-09-01

    Two multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) systems using dual priming oligonucleotide (DPO) primers were developed for the simultaneous detection of seven cucurbit-infecting viruses. One system allows for the detection of papaya ringspot virus, watermelon mosaic virus, and zucchini yellow mosaic virus, whereas the other permits the detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, cucumber fruit mottle mosaic virus, kyuri green mottle mosaic virus, and zucchini green mottle mosaic virus. Viral species-specific DPO primers developed in this study detected as little as 10 fg/μl of viral RNA under monoplex conditions and 10 pg/μl of viral RNA under multiplex conditions. Multiplex PCR using the DPO primer sets was capable of amplifying viral genes at annealing temperatures ranging from 53 °C to 63 °C. Whereas the use of conventional primers gave rise to non-specific bands, the DPO primers detected target viral genes in the absence of non-specific amplification. When these DPO multiplex primer sets were applied to virus-infected cucurbit samples obtained in the field, multiple infection as well as single infection was accurately identified. This novel approach could also detect multiple viruses in infected seeds. The reliability of multiplex PCR systems using DPO primers for plant virus detection is discussed. PMID:24937806

  2. De novo DNA synthesis using single molecule PCR

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Linshiz, Gregory; Buaron, Hen; Kaplan, Shai; Shabi, Uri; Shapiro, Ehud

    2008-01-01

    The throughput of DNA reading (sequencing) has dramatically increased recently due to the incorporation of in vitro clonal amplification. The throughput of DNA writing (synthesis) is trailing behind, with cloning and sequencing constituting the main bottleneck. To overcome this bottleneck, an in vitro alternative for in vivo DNA cloning must be integrated into DNA synthesis methods. Here we show how a new single molecule PCR (smPCR)-based procedure can be employed as a general substitute to in vivo cloning thereby allowing for the first time in vitro DNA synthesis. We integrated this rapid and high fidelity in vitro procedure into our earlier recursive DNA synthesis and error correction procedure and used it to efficiently construct and error-correct a 1.8-kb DNA molecule from synthetic unpurified oligos completely in vitro. Although we demonstrate incorporating smPCR in a particular method, the approach is general and can be used in principle in conjunction with other DNA synthesis methods as well. PMID:18667587

  3. [Identification for genetically modified maize T14/T25 with real time fluorescent PCR method].

    PubMed

    Cao, Ji-Juan; Qin, Wen; Zhu, Shui-Fang; Cao, Yuan-Yin

    2004-09-01

    To identify genetically modified (GM) maize T14/T25 lines, a real-time fluorescent PCR (RTF PCR) assay was performed in this study. Primers and Taqman probes specific for inserted genes in the T14/T25 were used to conduct the real-time fluorescent (RTF) PCR and PCR assays. The RTF PCR method was established to detect and identify GM maize lines. The results show that the TaqMan probe could identify T14/T25 maize used, while other GM and NO-GM maize didn't be detected. The RTF PCR could be a new method for detecting other genetically modified organism.

  4. Development of Nested PCR, Multiplex PCR, and Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification Assays for Rapid Detection of Cylindrocladium scoparium on Eucalyptus

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Tian-Min; Zhang, Jing; Li, Shu-Jiang; Han, Shan; Zhu, Tian-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus dieback disease, caused by Cylindrocladium scoparium, has occurred in last few years in large Eucalyptus planting areas in China and other countries. Rapid, simple, and reliable diagnostic techniques are desired for the early detection of Eucalyptus dieback of C. scoparium prior to formulation of efficient control plan. For this purpose, three PCR-based methods of nested PCR, multiplex PCR, loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) were developed for detection of C. scoparium based on factor 1-alpha (tef1) and beta-tubulin gene in this study. All of the three methods showed highly specific to C. scoparium. The sensitivities of the nested PCR and LAMP were much higher than the multiplex PCR. The sensitivity of multiplex PCR was also higher than regular PCR. C. scoparium could be detected within 60 min from infected Eucalyptus plants by LAMP, while at least 2 h was needed by the rest two methods. Using different Eucalyptus tissues as samples for C. scoparium detection, all of the three PCR-based methods showed much better detection results than regular PCR. Base on the results from this study, we concluded that any of the three PCR-based methods could be used as diagnostic technology for the development of efficient strategies of Eucalyptus dieback disease control. Particularly, LAMP was the most practical method in field application because of its one-step and rapid reaction, simple operation, single-tube utilization, and simple visualization of amplification products. PMID:27721691

  5. Nucleic acid extraction from polluted estuarine water for detection of viruses and bacteria by PCR and RT-PCR analysis.

    PubMed

    Petit, F; Craquelin, S; Guespin-Michel, J; Buffet-Janvresse, C

    1999-03-01

    We describe an extraction protocol for genomic DNA and RNA of both viruses and bacteria from polluted estuary water. This procedure was adapted to the molecular study of microflora of estuarine water where bacteria and viruses are found free, forming low-density biofilms, or intimately associated with organo-mineral particles. The sensitivity of the method was determined with seeded samples for RT-PCR and PCR analysis of viruses (10 virions/mL), and bacteria (1 colony-forming unit mL). We report an example of molecular detection of both poliovirus and Salmonella in the Seine estuary (France) and an approach to studying their association with organo-mineral particles.

  6. Biofunctionalization of Polyoxometalates with DNA Primers, Their Use in the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) and Electrochemical Detection of PCR Products.

    PubMed

    Debela, Ahmed M; Ortiz, Mayreli; Beni, Valerio; Thorimbert, Serge; Lesage, Denis; Cole, Richard B; O'Sullivan, Ciara K; Hasenknopf, Bernold

    2015-12-01

    The bioconjugation of polyoxometalates (POMs), which are inorganic metal oxido clusters, to DNA strands to obtain functional labeled DNA primers and their potential use in electrochemical detection have been investigated. Activated monooxoacylated polyoxotungstates [SiW11 O39 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](8-) and [P2 W17 O61 {Sn(CH2 )2 CO}](6-) have been used to link to a 5'-NH2 terminated 21-mer DNA forward primer through amide coupling. The functionalized primer was characterized by using a battery of techniques, including electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, as well as IR and Raman spectroscopy. The functionality of the POM-labeled primers was demonstrated through hybridization with a surface-immobilized probe. Finally, the labeled primers were successfully used in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the PCR products were characterized by using electrophoresis.

  7. Selection of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real Time PCR (qPCR) Assays in Tissue from Human Ascending Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Rueda-Martínez, Carmen; Lamas, Oscar; Mataró, María José; Robledo-Carmona, Juan; Sánchez-Espín, Gemma; Jiménez-Navarro, Manuel; Such-Martínez, Miguel; Fernández, Borja

    2014-01-01

    Dilatation of the ascending aorta (AAD) is a prevalent aortopathy that occurs frequently associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV), the most common human congenital cardiac malformation. The molecular mechanisms leading to AAD associated with BAV are still poorly understood. The search for differentially expressed genes in diseased tissue by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is an invaluable tool to fill this gap. However, studies dedicated to identify reference genes necessary for normalization of mRNA expression in aortic tissue are scarce. In this report, we evaluate the qPCR expression of six candidate reference genes in tissue from the ascending aorta of 52 patients with a variety of clinical and demographic characteristics, normal and dilated aortas, and different morphologies of the aortic valve (normal aorta and normal valve n = 30; dilated aorta and normal valve n = 10; normal aorta and BAV n = 4; dilated aorta and BAV n = 8). The expression stability of the candidate reference genes was determined with three statistical algorithms, GeNorm, NormFinder and Bestkeeper. The expression analyses showed that the most stable genes for the three algorithms employed were CDKN1β, POLR2A and CASC3, independently of the structure of the aorta and the valve morphology. In conclusion, we propose the use of these three genes as reference genes for mRNA expression analysis in human ascending aorta. However, we suggest searching for specific reference genes when conducting qPCR experiments with new cohort of samples. PMID:24841551

  8. Single-step PCR in molecular diagnosis of hepatitis C virus infection.

    PubMed

    Farma, E; Boeri, E; Bettini, P; Repetto, C M; McDermott, J; Lillo, F B; Varnier, O E

    1996-12-01

    The diagnostic utility of two PCR systems and three PCR detection methods for hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA was evaluated in serum samples. A nested PCR was considered the reference assay and was compared with two single-step PCR methods: the first is based on the detection of PCR products by liquid hybridization with a 32P-end-labeled probe, and the second is the Roche Amplicor colorimetric assay using microwell plate hybridization with a specific nucleic acid probe. Using the Pelicheck HCV RNA Eurohep genotype 1 proficiency panel, our laboratory achieved medium-high levels of performance with all three methods. The highest sensitivity was, however, observed with the isotopic single-step PCR (ss-PCR) method. The analytical sensitivity of ss-PCR with isotopic detection and ss-PCR with colorimetric detection was identical to that of nested PCR, with a 100% result concordance. Comparison of ss-PCR with enzyme-linked immunosorbent and RIBA assays in the analysis of clinical samples showed a high concordance. ss-PCR methods appear more suitable for diagnostic application. Nevertheless, HCV RNA PCR cannot be considered a screening assay; it should be requested in the presence of reactive serology or specific clinical symptomatology with altered liver parameters, and it is a potential tool for the follow-up of patients with HCV infection.

  9. Comparison of standard, quantitative and digital PCR in the detection of enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Rachel V.; Pearson, John; Frizelle, Frank A.; Keenan, Jacqueline I.

    2016-01-01

    Gut colonization with enterotoxigenic Bacteroides fragilis (ETBF) appears to be associated with the development of colorectal cancer. However, differences in carriage rates are seen with various testing methods and sampling sites. We compared standard PCR, SYBR green and TaqMan quantitative PCR (qPCR) and digital PCR (dPCR) in detecting the B. fragilis toxin (bft) gene from cultured ETBF, and from matched luminal and faecal stool samples from 19 colorectal cancer patients. Bland-Altman analysis found that all three quantitative methods performed comparably in detecting bft from purified bacterial DNA, with the same limits of detection (<1 copy/μl). However, SYBR qPCR under-performed compared to TaqMan qPCR and dPCR in detecting bft in clinical stool samples; 13/38 samples were reported positive by SYBR, compared to 35 and 36 samples by TaqMan and dPCR, respectively. TaqMan qPCR and dPCR gave bft copy numbers that were 48-fold and 75-fold higher for the same samples than SYBR qPCR, respectively (p < 0.001). For samples that were bft-positive in both fecal and luminal stools, there was no difference in relative abundance between the sites, by any method tested. From our findings, we recommend the use of TaqMan qPCR as the preferred method to detect ETBF from clinical stool samples. PMID:27686415

  10. Rapid molecular typing of Prototheca zopfii by high resolution melting real-time PCR (PCR-HRM).

    PubMed

    Sobukawa, Hideto; Ibaraki, Masato; Kano, Rui; Ito, Takaaki; Suzuki, Kazuyuki; Kamata, Hiroshi; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Prototheca zopfii is an achlorophyllic alga that is ubiquitous around cow sheds. The alga is associated with bovine mastitis, which causes a reduction in milk production and secretion of thin watery milk containing white flakes. Isolates of P. zopfii from bovine mastitis were almost all identified as P. zopfii genotype 2, suggesting that it is the main causative agent of bovine protothecal mastitis. The ability to differentiate between genotype 1 and genotype 2 is therefore very important for preventing bovine mastitis. In this study, high resolution melting real-time PCR (PCR-HRM) analysis of the protothecal 18S rDNA domain successfully differentiated between genotypes of P. zopfii in less than 3 hours, while conventional sequence analysis requires more than 48 hours to differentiate between genotypes. PCR-HRM analysis clustered P. zopfii genotype 1 isolates separately from P. zopfii genotype 2 isolates, indicating that this molecular typing method is an effective tool for rapidly diagnosing bovine protothecal mastitis. PMID:24292136

  11. Senior Thai fecal microbiota comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ruengsomwong, Supatjaree; Korenori, Yuki; Sakamoto, Naoshige; Wannissorn, Bhusita; Nakayama, Jiro; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2014-08-01

    The fecal microbiotas were investigated in 13 healthy Thai subjects using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Among the 186 DNA bands detected on the polyacrylamide gel, 37 bands were identified as representing 11 species: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides ovatus, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Clostridium colicanis, Eubacterium eligenes, E. rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Megamonas funiformis, Prevotella copri, and Roseburia intestinalis, belonging mainly to the groups of Bacteroides, Prevotella, Clostridium, and F. prausnitzii. A dendrogram of the PCR-DGGE divided the subjects; vegetarians and non-vegetarians. The fecal microbiotas were also analyzed using a quantitative real-time PCR focused on Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Clostrium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, C. leptum, Lactobacillus, and Prevotella. The nonvegetarian and vegetarian subjects were found to have significant differences in the high abundance of the Bacteroides and Prevotella genera, respectively. No significant differences were found in the counts of Bifidabacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, C. leptum group, and Lactobacillus. Therefore, these findings on the microbiota of healthy Thais consuming different diets could provide helpful data for predicting the health of South East Asians with similar diets.

  12. Microbial Pollution Tracking of Dairy Farm with a Combined PCR-DGGE and qPCR Approach.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jiachao; Kwok, Laiyu; Huo, Dongxue; Feng, Shuzhen; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Tiansong

    2015-12-01

    Animal husbandry is a traditional industry with regional characteristic in the Inner Mongolia of China. Recent years, animal breeding has been one of the main pollution sources in this area, followed by domestic sewage and industrial wastewater. The pollution of livestock farm feces may accelerate the development of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes which pose health risks to humans and animals. In present research, culture-independent molecular ecological methods based on DGGE combined with qPCR were used to investigate the pollution to surrounding environment with different degrees of livestock farm. The cluster analysis of DGGE patterns showed that the livestock farm feces from point pollution source flowed with wastewater discharge has resulted in an impacted range of at least 3000 m, but it did not cause pollution to residential water delivered from upstream of sewage drain outlet. qPCR results revealed that 5 common pathogens (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella, and Salmonella) presented decreased trend as the sampled distance from point pollution source increased. Also, qPCR assays of 10 common antibiotic resistance genes (tetO, tetL, rpp, rpoB, sul2, sulA, floR, yidY, mphA, and ermC) which cause resistance to tetracycline, rifampicin, fluoroquinolone, quinolone, and erythromycin have been found in the environmental samples. This study clearly indicates the livestock farm discharge pollutants contaminated to the surrounding environment. Our data have provided important information to pollution control in the future. PMID:26341923

  13. Microbial Pollution Tracking of Dairy Farm with a Combined PCR-DGGE and qPCR Approach.

    PubMed

    Xi, Xiaoxia; Zhang, Jiachao; Kwok, Laiyu; Huo, Dongxue; Feng, Shuzhen; Zhang, Heping; Sun, Tiansong

    2015-12-01

    Animal husbandry is a traditional industry with regional characteristic in the Inner Mongolia of China. Recent years, animal breeding has been one of the main pollution sources in this area, followed by domestic sewage and industrial wastewater. The pollution of livestock farm feces may accelerate the development of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes which pose health risks to humans and animals. In present research, culture-independent molecular ecological methods based on DGGE combined with qPCR were used to investigate the pollution to surrounding environment with different degrees of livestock farm. The cluster analysis of DGGE patterns showed that the livestock farm feces from point pollution source flowed with wastewater discharge has resulted in an impacted range of at least 3000 m, but it did not cause pollution to residential water delivered from upstream of sewage drain outlet. qPCR results revealed that 5 common pathogens (Escherichia coli, Enterococcus, Staphylococcus aureus, Shigella, and Salmonella) presented decreased trend as the sampled distance from point pollution source increased. Also, qPCR assays of 10 common antibiotic resistance genes (tetO, tetL, rpp, rpoB, sul2, sulA, floR, yidY, mphA, and ermC) which cause resistance to tetracycline, rifampicin, fluoroquinolone, quinolone, and erythromycin have been found in the environmental samples. This study clearly indicates the livestock farm discharge pollutants contaminated to the surrounding environment. Our data have provided important information to pollution control in the future.

  14. Senior Thai fecal microbiota comparison between vegetarians and non-vegetarians using PCR-DGGE and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Ruengsomwong, Supatjaree; Korenori, Yuki; Sakamoto, Naoshige; Wannissorn, Bhusita; Nakayama, Jiro; Nitisinprasert, Sunee

    2014-08-01

    The fecal microbiotas were investigated in 13 healthy Thai subjects using polymerase chain reaction denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE). Among the 186 DNA bands detected on the polyacrylamide gel, 37 bands were identified as representing 11 species: Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, Bacteroides ovatus, Bacteroides uniformis, Bacteroides vulgatus, Clostridium colicanis, Eubacterium eligenes, E. rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii, Megamonas funiformis, Prevotella copri, and Roseburia intestinalis, belonging mainly to the groups of Bacteroides, Prevotella, Clostridium, and F. prausnitzii. A dendrogram of the PCR-DGGE divided the subjects; vegetarians and non-vegetarians. The fecal microbiotas were also analyzed using a quantitative real-time PCR focused on Bacteroides, Bifidobacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, Clostrium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, C. leptum, Lactobacillus, and Prevotella. The nonvegetarian and vegetarian subjects were found to have significant differences in the high abundance of the Bacteroides and Prevotella genera, respectively. No significant differences were found in the counts of Bifidabacterium, Enterobacteriaceae, C. coccoides-E. rectale group, C. leptum group, and Lactobacillus. Therefore, these findings on the microbiota of healthy Thais consuming different diets could provide helpful data for predicting the health of South East Asians with similar diets. PMID:24743571

  15. [Frequency of intestinal microsporidian infections in HIV-positive patients, as diagnosis by quick hot Gram chromotrope staining and PCR].

    PubMed

    Botero, Jorge H; Montoya, Martha Nelly; Vanegas, Adriana Lucía; Díaz, Abel; Navarro-i-Martínez, Luis; Bornay, Fernando Jorge; Izquierdo, Fernando; del Aguila, Carmen; Agudelo, Sonia del Pilar

    2004-12-01

    Microsporidia are intracellular obligate parasites, today mainly associated with diarrhea in AIDS patients. Microsporidia prevalence ranges from 8% to 52% in different countries, as evaluated by several diagnostic methods, such as the stain test and PCR. In Medellín, Colombia, its frequency is unknown, and hence, a study was undertaken to determine the frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis in HIV patients, by means of the quick-hot Gram chromotrope test and the PCR. A prospective and descriptive study of an intentional population of all HIV-positive patients was sent to the Grupo Interdisciplinario para el Estudio de las Parasitosis Intestinales laboratory by institutions treating the HIV-positive patients of Medellín between August 2001 and September 2002. The clinical-epidemiological survey included a serial stool test with direct concentration and special stains for coccidiae and intestinal microsporidia. In addition, counts of lymphocytes TCD4+ and viral load were requested. One hundred and three patients with ages ranging from 2-74 years were evaluated. Seventy percent presented with diarrhea--mostly in men (83.5%). The overall frequency of intestinal microsporidiosis was 3.9% and that of other intestinal parasitic infections was 39.8%. Three of the four patients positive for microsporida were infected with Enterocytozoon bieneusi and one with Encephalitozoon intestinalis. The microsporidiosis frequency was relatively low with 3 of the 4 cases associated with protracted diarrhea, counts of LTCD4+ below 100 cel/microl and viral loads up to 100,000 copies.

  16. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in extrapulmonary biopsy samples using PCR targeting IS6110, rpoB, and nested-rpoB PCR Cloning

    PubMed Central

    Meghdadi, Hossein; Khosravi, Azar D.; Ghadiri, Ata A.; Sina, Amir H.; Alami, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    Present study was aimed to examine the diagnostic utility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR techniques for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA in samples from patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). In total 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples comprising 70 samples with definite diagnosis of EPTB and 10 samples from known non- EPTB on the basis of histopathology examination, were included in the study. PCR amplification targeting IS6110, rpoB gene and nested PCR targeting the rpoB gene were performed on the extracted DNAs from 80 FFPE samples. The strong positive samples were directly sequenced. For negative samples and those with weak band in nested-rpoB PCR, TA cloning was performed by cloning the products into the plasmid vector with subsequent sequencing. The 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method. Fourteen (20%), 34 (48.6%), and 60 (85.7%) of the 70 positive samples confirmed by histopathology, were positive by rpoB-PCR, IS6110-PCR, and nested-rpoB PCR, respectively. By performing TA cloning on samples that yielded weak (n = 8) or negative results (n = 10) in the PCR methods, we were able to improve their quality for later sequencing. All samples with weak band and 7 out of 10 negative samples, showed strong positive results after cloning. So nested-rpoB PCR cloning revealed positivity in 67 out of 70 confirmed samples (95.7%). The sensitivity of these combination methods was calculated as 95.7% in comparison with histopathology examination. The CI for sensitivity of the PCR methods were calculated as 11.39–31.27% for rpoB-PCR, 36.44–60.83% for IS6110- PCR, 75.29–92.93% for nested-rpoB PCR, and 87.98–99.11% for nested-rpoB PCR cloning. The 10 true EPTB negative samples by histopathology, were negative by all tested methods including cloning and were used to calculate the specificity of the applied methods. The CI for 100

  17. A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction for determining flanking sequences by rescuing inverse PCR or thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR products.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Zhu, Pengyu; Shi, Hui; Xu, Wentao; Hao, Junran; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-12-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genome walking method has been extensively used to isolate unknown flanking sequences, whereas nonspecific products are always inevitable. To resolve these problems, we developed a new strategy to isolate the unknown flanking sequences by combining A-T linker adapter PCR with inverse PCR (I-PCR) or thermal asymmetric interlaced PCR (TAIL-PCR). The result showed that this method can be efficiently achieved with the flanking sequence from the Arabidopsis mutant and papain gene. Our study provides researchers with an additional method for determining genomic DNA flanking sequences to identify the target band from bulk of bands and to eliminate the cloning step for sequencing.

  18. Multiplex SYBR® green-real time PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and differentiation of Bartonella henselae and Bartonella clarridgeiae in cats.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Pilger, Diogo André; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Cantarelli, Vlademir Vicente

    2014-01-01

    A novel SYBR® green-real time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was developed to detect two Bartonella species, B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae, directly from blood samples. The test was used in blood samples obtained from cats living in animal shelters in Southern Brazil. Results were compared with those obtained by conventional PCR targeting Bartonella spp. Among the 47 samples analyzed, eight were positive using the conventional PCR and 12 were positive using qPCR. Importantly, the new qPCR detected the presence of both B. henselae and B. clarridgeiae in two samples. The results show that the qPCR described here may be a reliable tool for the screening and differentiation of two important Bartonella species.

  19. Real-Time PCR in Clinical Microbiology: Applications for Routine Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Espy, M. J.; Uhl, J. R.; Sloan, L. M.; Buckwalter, S. P.; Jones, M. F.; Vetter, E. A.; Yao, J. D. C.; Wengenack, N. L.; Rosenblatt, J. E.; Cockerill, F. R.; Smith, T. F.

    2006-01-01

    Real-time PCR has revolutionized the way clinical microbiology laboratories diagnose many human microbial infections. This testing method combines PCR chemistry with fluorescent probe detection of amplified product in the same reaction vessel. In general, both PCR and amplified product detection are completed in an hour or less, which is considerably faster than conventional PCR detection methods. Real-time PCR assays provide sensitivity and specificity equivalent to that of conventional PCR combined with Southern blot analysis, and since amplification and detection steps are performed in the same closed vessel, the risk of releasing amplified nucleic acids into the environment is negligible. The combination of excellent sensitivity and specificity, low contamination risk, and speed has made real-time PCR technology an appealing alternative to culture- or immunoassay-based testing methods for diagnosing many infectious diseases. This review focuses on the application of real-time PCR in the clinical microbiology laboratory. PMID:16418529

  20. FUNGAL-SPECIFIC PCR PRIMERS DEVELOPED FOR ANALYSIS OF THE ITS REGION OF ENVIRONMENTAL DNA EXTRACTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS) regions of fungal ribosomal DNA (rDNA) are highly variable sequences of great importance in distinguishing fungal species by PCR analysis. Previously published PCR primers available for amplifying these sequences from environmenta...

  1. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports.

  2. Comprehensive GMO detection using real-time PCR array: single-laboratory validation.

    PubMed

    Mano, Junichi; Harada, Mioko; Takabatake, Reona; Furui, Satoshi; Kitta, Kazumi; Nakamura, Kosuke; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Teshima, Reiko; Noritake, Hiromichi; Hatano, Shuko; Futo, Satoshi; Minegishi, Yasutaka; Iizuka, Tayoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a real-time PCR array method to comprehensively detect genetically modified (GM) organisms. In the method, genomic DNA extracted from an agricultural product is analyzed using various qualitative real-time PCR assays on a 96-well PCR plate, targeting for individual GM events, recombinant DNA (r-DNA) segments, taxon-specific DNAs, and donor organisms of the respective r-DNAs. In this article, we report the single-laboratory validation of both DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays constituting the real-time PCR array. We selected some DNA extraction methods for specified plant matrixes, i.e., maize flour, soybean flour, and ground canola seeds, then evaluated the DNA quantity, DNA fragmentation, and PCR inhibition of the resultant DNA extracts. For the component PCR assays, we evaluated the specificity and LOD. All DNA extraction methods and component PCR assays satisfied the criteria set on the basis of previous reports. PMID:22649939

  3. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation.

  4. Development and validation of two SYBR green PCR assays and a multiplex real-time PCR for the detection of Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in meat.

    PubMed

    Brusa, Victoria; Galli, Lucía; Linares, Luciano H; Ortega, Emanuel E; Lirón, Juan P; Leotta, Gerardo A

    2015-12-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) are recognized as food-borne pathogens. We developed and validated two SYBR green PCR (SYBR-PCR) and a real-time multiplex PCR (RT-PCR) to detect stx1 and stx2 genes in meat samples, and compared these techniques in ground beef samples from retail stores. One set of primers and one hydrolysis probe were designed for each stx gene. For RT-PCR, an internal amplification control (IAC) was used. All PCR intra-laboratory validations were performed using pure strains and artificially contaminated ground beef samples. A total of 50 STEC and 30 non-STEC strains were used. Naturally contaminated ground beef samples (n=103) were obtained from retail stores and screened with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR, and stx-positive samples were processed for STEC isolation. In the intra-laboratory validation, each PCR obtained a 1×10(2) CFU mL(-1) limit of detection and 100% inclusivity and exclusivity. The same results were obtained when different laboratory analysts in alternate days performed the assay. The level of agreement obtained with SYBR-PCR and RT-PCR was kappa=0.758 and 0.801 (P<0.001) for stx1 and stx2 gene detection, respectively. Two PCR strategies were developed and validated, and excellent performance with artificially contaminated ground beef samples was obtained. However, the efforts made to isolate STEC from retail store samples were not enough. Only 11 STEC strains were isolated from 35 stx-positive ground beef samples identically detected by all PCRs. The combination of molecular approaches based on the identification of a virulence genotypic profile of STEC must be considered to improve isolation. PMID:26410309

  5. The PCR-GLOBWB global hydrological reanalysis product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierkens, M. F.; Wanders, N.; Sutanudjaja, E.; Van Beek, L. P.

    2013-12-01

    Accurate and long time series of hydrological data are important for understanding land surface water and energy budgets in many parts of the world, as well as for improving real-time hydrological monitoring and climate change anticipation. The ultimate goal of the present work is to produce a multi-decadal land surface hydrological reanalysis with retrospective and updated hydrological states and fluxes that are constrained to available in-situ river discharge measurements. Here we used PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), which is a large-scale hydrological model intended for global to regional studies. PCR-GLOBWB provides a grid-based representation of terrestrial hydrology with a typical spatial resolution of approximately 50×50 km (currently 0.5° globally) on a daily basis. For each grid cell, PCR-GLOBWB is basically a leaky bucket type of water balance model with a process-based simulation of moisture storage in two vertically stacked soil layers as well as the water exchange between the soil and the atmosphere and the underlying groundwater reservoir. Exchange to the atmosphere comprises precipitation, evaporation and transpiration, as well as snow accumulation and melt, which are all simulated by considering vegetation phenology and sub-grid distributions of elevation, land cover and soil saturation distribution. The model thus includes detailed schemes for runoff-infiltration partitioning, interflow, groundwater recharge and baseflow, as well as river routing of discharge. . By embedding the PCR-GLOBWB model in an Ensemble Kalman Filter framework, we calibrated the model parameters based on the discharge observations from the Global Runoff Data Centre. The parameters calibrated are related to snow module, runoff-infiltration partitioning, groundwater recharge, channel discharge and baseflow processes, as well as pre-factors to correct forcing precipitation fields due to local topographic and orographic effects. Results show that the model parameters can

  6. The PCR-GLOBWB global hydrological reanalysis product

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wanders, Niko; Bierkens, Marc; Sutanudjaja, Edwin; van Beek, Rens

    2014-05-01

    Accurate and long time series of hydrological data are important for understanding land surface water and energy budgets in many parts of the world, as well as for improving real-time hydrological monitoring and climate change anticipation. The ultimate goal of the present work is to produce a multi-decadal "land surface hydrological reanalysis" dataset with retrospective and updated hydrological states and fluxes that are constrained to available in-situ river discharge measurements. Here we use PCR-GLOBWB (van Beek et al., 2011), which is a large-scale hydrological model intended for global to regional studies. PCR-GLOBWB provides a grid-based representation of terrestrial hydrology with a typical spatial resolution of approximately 50×50 km (currently 0.5° globally) on a daily basis. For each grid cell, PCR-GLOBWB simulates moisture storage in two vertically stacked soil layers as well as the water exchange between the soil and the atmosphere and the underlying groundwater reservoir. Exchange to the atmosphere comprises precipitation, evaporation and transpiration, as well as snow accumulation and melt, which are all simulated by considering vegetation phenology and sub-grid variations of elevation, land cover and soil saturation distribution. The model includes improved schemes for runoff-infiltration partitioning, interflow, groundwater recharge and baseflow, as well as river routing of discharge. It also dynamically simulates water storage in reservoirs, water demand and the withdrawal, allocation and consumptive use of surface water and groundwater resources. By embedding the PCR-GLOBWB model in an Ensemble Kalman Filter framework, we calibrate the model parameters based on the discharge observations from the Global Runoff Data Centre. The parameters calibrated are related to snow accumulation and melt, runoff-infiltration partitioning, groundwater recharge, channel discharge and baseflow processes, as well as pre-factors to correct forcing precipitation

  7. PCR and Genotyping for HPV in Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Patne, Shashikant C U; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Mohan; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To devise nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NMPCR) protocol for detection of mucosal human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and typing of HPV-16 and -18 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of carcinoma cervix (CaCx). Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: NMPCR was done for simultaneous detection of HPV, targeting 134 bp L1 capsid gene employing GP+/mGP+ primers and typing of genotypes-16 and -18, targeting E6/E7 gene from 34 FFPE tissue blocks of CaCx and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Detection of 142 bp consensus sequence of L1 capsid gene was performed by nested PCR employing MY/GP+ primers. Sequencing of selected PCR amplicons of the later protocol obtained from control cell line DNA and 5 select samples were done for validation of the NMPCR protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Calculation of percentage from the Microsoft Excel Software. Results: Of 26 FFPE samples of CaCx, 17 (65.3%) samples were found positive for HPV by NMPCR. Amplicons of 142 bp L1 capsid gene employing MY/GP+ primers were observed in 11 (42.3%) samples of CaCx. Nearly 25% samples of CIN were positive for HPV. On sequence analysis, it was observed that the sample typed as HPV-16 by NMPCR was found to be the same on sequencing of amplicons obtained after MY/GP+ nested PCR. Conclusions: This study indicates the usefulness of our NMPCR protocol for detection of mucosal HPVs and typing of HPV-16 and -18 from FFPE tissue samples of CaCx. The NMPCR protocol may be used to detect HPV and type common genotypes-16 and -18 in fresh tissue of cervical biopsy or scrape samples for screening of CaCx. PMID:27621560

  8. PCR and Genotyping for HPV in Cervical Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Pradyot; Patne, Shashikant C U; Singh, Ashish Kumar; Kumar, Mohan; Mishra, Mukti Nath; Gulati, Anil Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To devise nested multiplex polymerase chain reaction (NMPCR) protocol for detection of mucosal human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and typing of HPV-16 and -18 in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissues of carcinoma cervix (CaCx). Settings and Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Materials and Methods: NMPCR was done for simultaneous detection of HPV, targeting 134 bp L1 capsid gene employing GP+/mGP+ primers and typing of genotypes-16 and -18, targeting E6/E7 gene from 34 FFPE tissue blocks of CaCx and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). Detection of 142 bp consensus sequence of L1 capsid gene was performed by nested PCR employing MY/GP+ primers. Sequencing of selected PCR amplicons of the later protocol obtained from control cell line DNA and 5 select samples were done for validation of the NMPCR protocol. Statistical Analysis Used: Calculation of percentage from the Microsoft Excel Software. Results: Of 26 FFPE samples of CaCx, 17 (65.3%) samples were found positive for HPV by NMPCR. Amplicons of 142 bp L1 capsid gene employing MY/GP+ primers were observed in 11 (42.3%) samples of CaCx. Nearly 25% samples of CIN were positive for HPV. On sequence analysis, it was observed that the sample typed as HPV-16 by NMPCR was found to be the same on sequencing of amplicons obtained after MY/GP+ nested PCR. Conclusions: This study indicates the usefulness of our NMPCR protocol for detection of mucosal HPVs and typing of HPV-16 and -18 from FFPE tissue samples of CaCx. The NMPCR protocol may be used to detect HPV and type common genotypes-16 and -18 in fresh tissue of cervical biopsy or scrape samples for screening of CaCx.

  9. [Detection of bacterial DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR)].

    PubMed

    Höfler, G

    1994-01-01

    Enzymatic amplification of DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a very sensitive and rapid way of detecting specific DNA sequences. Bacterial DNA can be detected in a wide variety of samples provided at least partial sequence information is available. For a great number of bacteria PCR detection methods have been published. Most important for the pathologist are mycobacteriae (M. tuberculosis, avium, etc.). Borellia burgdorferi, Listeria monozytogenes and chlamydiae (Ce. trachomatis, C. psittaci). Fresh or fixed paraffin embedded tissues, exfoliated cells, whole blood, serum, sputum, urine, ascites or pleural fluid etc. can be analyzed. The time needed to perform the analysis varies between 5 hours and 2 days mostly depending on the DNA extraction method. Several potential pitfalls have to be avoided. The most common problem is contamination of reagents with target DNA. Amplification of DNA from biological samples may be prevented by enzyme inhibitors (salts, proteins). This problem can at least partially be avoided by changing the DNA purification method. Several additional problems may arise if bacterial DNA has to be amplified. Bacterial walls may have to be disrupted using heat or detergent for accessibility of target DNA. Positive results have to be judged carefully. Unlike the situation in retroviral infections with the virus sometimes present in the absence of disease, in the majority of bacterial infections the presence of bacteria signals manifest disease. A possible exception may be the finding of mycobacterial DNA in sarcoidosis patients who can be treated with steroids without provoking tuberculosis. PCR is especially useful in situations where rapid results are necessary or only fixed tissue is available.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7533972

  10. Detection of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula by quantitative real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Jenny; Kämpfer, Peter; Jäckel, Udo

    2011-07-01

    The thermophilic actinomycete species Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula has been associated with the exogen allergic alveolitis (EAA). EAA is caused by the inhalation of high amounts of airborne spores that can be found for example in environments of agricultural production, compost facilities, mushroom cultivation rooms, or rooms with technical air moistening. Because of the medical relevance of S. rectivirgula, a reliable detection system is needed. Therefore, a quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) primer system was designed, targeting the 16S rRNA gene of the type strain S. rectivirgula DSM 43747(T) and six other S. rectivirgula reference strains. Our investigation showed that S. rectivirgula presumably own four operons of the 16S rRNA gene, which has to be considered for estimation of cell equivalents. Furthermore, the DNA recovery efficiency from these strains was tested in combination with bioaerosol or material sample as well as the influence of non-target DNA to the recovery rate. Results showed a recovery DNA efficiency of 7-55%. The recovery rate of DNA in a mixture with non-target DNA resulted in ∼87%. In summary, a high amplification efficiency using real-time PCR was found, for which estimated concentrations revealed cell numbers of 2.7 × 10(5) cells m(-3) in bioaerosol and 2.8 × 10(6) cells g(-1) fw(-1) in material samples from a duck house. The specificity of the new developed quantification system was shown by generation of two clone libraries from bioarosol samples, from a duck house, and from a composting plant. Totally, the results clearly show the specificity and practicability of the established qPCR assay for detection of S. rectivirgula.

  11. Comparative evaluation of the nested ITS PCR against the 18S PCR-RFLP in a survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in Kwale County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odongo, Steven; Delespaux, Vincent; Ngotho, Maina; Bekkele, Serkalem Mindaye; Magez, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We compared the nested internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment length polymorphism) pan-trypanosome assays in a cross-sectional survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in 358 cattle in Kwale County, Kenya. The prevalence of trypanosomiasis as determined by the nested ITS PCR was 19.6% (70/358) and by 18S PCR-RFLP was 16.8% (60/358). Of the pathogenic trypanosomes detected, the prevalence of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax was greater than that of Trypanosoma simiae The nested ITS PCR detected 83 parasite events, whereas the 18S PCR-RFLP detected 64; however, overall frequencies of infections and the parasite events detected did not differ between the assays (χ(2) = 0.8, df = 1, p > 0.05 and χ(2) = 2.5, df = 1, p > 0.05, respectively). The kappa statistic (0.8) showed good agreement between the tests. The nested ITS PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP had comparable sensitivity, although the nested ITS PCR was better at detecting mixed infections (χ(2) = 5.4, df = 1, p < 0.05). PMID:27423733

  12. Comparative evaluation of the nested ITS PCR against the 18S PCR-RFLP in a survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in Kwale County, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Odongo, Steven; Delespaux, Vincent; Ngotho, Maina; Bekkele, Serkalem Mindaye; Magez, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    We compared the nested internal transcribed spacer (ITS) PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP (restriction-fragment length polymorphism) pan-trypanosome assays in a cross-sectional survey of bovine trypanosomiasis in 358 cattle in Kwale County, Kenya. The prevalence of trypanosomiasis as determined by the nested ITS PCR was 19.6% (70/358) and by 18S PCR-RFLP was 16.8% (60/358). Of the pathogenic trypanosomes detected, the prevalence of Trypanosoma congolense and Trypanosoma vivax was greater than that of Trypanosoma simiae The nested ITS PCR detected 83 parasite events, whereas the 18S PCR-RFLP detected 64; however, overall frequencies of infections and the parasite events detected did not differ between the assays (χ(2) = 0.8, df = 1, p > 0.05 and χ(2) = 2.5, df = 1, p > 0.05, respectively). The kappa statistic (0.8) showed good agreement between the tests. The nested ITS PCR and the 18S PCR-RFLP had comparable sensitivity, although the nested ITS PCR was better at detecting mixed infections (χ(2) = 5.4, df = 1, p < 0.05).

  13. Performance of Droplet Digital PCR in Non-Invasive Fetal RHD Genotyping - Comparison with a Routine Real-Time PCR Based Approach

    PubMed Central

    Hořínek, Aleš; Novotná, Michaela; Calda, Pavel; Korabečná, Marie

    2015-01-01

    Detection and characterization of circulating cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) from maternal circulation requires an extremely sensitive and precise method due to very low cffDNA concentration. In our study, droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) was implemented for fetal RHD genotyping from maternal plasma to compare this new quantification alternative with real-time PCR (qPCR) as a golden standard for quantitative analysis of cffDNA. In the first stage of study, a DNA quantification standard was used. Clinical samples, including 10 non-pregnant and 35 pregnant women, were analyzed as a next step. Both methods’ performance parameters—standard curve linearity, detection limit and measurement precision—were evaluated. ddPCR in comparison with qPCR has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity for analysing of cffDNA and determination of fetal RhD status from maternal circulation, results of both methods strongly correlated. Despite the more demanding workflow, ddPCR was found to be slightly more precise technology, as evaluated using quantitative standard. Regarding the clinical samples, the precision of both methods equalized with decreasing concentrations of tested DNA samples. In case of cffDNA with very low concentrations, variance parameters of both techniques were comparable. Detected levels of fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma were slightly higher than expected and correlated significantly with gestational age as measured by both methods (ddPCR r = 0.459; qPCR r = 0.438). PMID:26562517

  14. The new LM-PCR/shifter method for the genotyping of microorganisms based on the use of a class IIS restriction enzyme and ligation mediated PCR.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Leibner-Ciszak, Justyna; Stojowska, Karolina; Kur, Józef

    2011-12-01

    This study details and examines a novel ligation-mediated polymerase chain reaction (LM-PCR) method. Named the LM-PCR/Shifter, it relies on the use of a Class IIS restriction enzyme giving restriction fragments with different 4-base, 5' overhangs, this being the Shifter, and the ligation of appropriate oligonucleotide adapters. A sequence of 4-base, 5' overhangs of the adapter and a 4- base sequence of the 3' end of the primer(s) determine a subset of the genomic restriction fragments, which are amplified by PCR. The method permits the differentiation of bacterial species strains on the basis of the different DNA band patterns obtained after electrophoresis in polyacrylamide gels stained with ethidium bromide and visualized in UV light. The usefulness of the LM-PCR/ Shifter method for genotyping is analyzed by a comparison with the restriction endonuclease analysis of chromosomal DNA by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (REA-PFGE) and PCR melting profile (PCR MP) methods for isolates of clinical origin. The clustering of the LM-PCR/Shifter fingerprinting data matched those of the REA-PFGE and PCR MP methods. We found that the LM-PCR/Shifter is rapid, and offers good discriminatory power and excellent reproducibility, making it a method that may be effectively applied in epidemiological studies.

  15. [Differentiation of geographic biovariants of smallpox virus by PCR].

    PubMed

    Babkin, I V; Babkina, I N

    2010-01-01

    Comparative analysis of amino acid and nucleotides sequences of ORFs located in extended segments of the terminal variable regions in variola virus genome detected a promising locus for viral genotyping according to the geographic origin. This is ORF O1L of VARV. The primers were calculated for synthesis of this ORF fragment by PCR, which makes it possible to distinguish South America-Western Africa genotype from other VARV strains. Subsequent RFLP analysis reliably differentiated Asian strains from African strains (except Western Africa isolates). This method has been tested using 16 VARV strains from various geographic regions. The developed approach is simple, fast and reliable.

  16. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2008-09-15

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available endonuclease sites, leading to limitations in the choice of the site of fusion between two genes and problems in maintaining protein secondary structure. We have developed a cloning strategy to get around these disadvantages that is based on a single round of PCR amplification followed by antibiotic-resistant gene complementation. PMID:18555003

  17. A PCR amplification strategy for unrestricted generation of chimeric genes.

    PubMed

    Vos, Michel J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2008-09-15

    For analyzing protein function, protein dynamics, or protein-protein interactions, the use of chimeric proteins has become an indispensable tool. The generation of DNA constructs coding for such fused proteins can, however, be a tedious process. Currently used strategies often make use of available endonuclease sites, leading to limitations in the choice of the site of fusion between two genes and problems in maintaining protein secondary structure. We have developed a cloning strategy to get around these disadvantages that is based on a single round of PCR amplification followed by antibiotic-resistant gene complementation.

  18. Whole genome amplification using single-primer PCR.

    PubMed

    Lao, Kaiqin; Xu, Nan Lan; Straus, Neil A

    2008-03-01

    Comprehensive genomic molecular analyses require relatively large DNA amounts that are often not available from forensic, clinical and other crucial biological samples. Numerous methods to amplify the whole genome have been proposed for cancer, forensic and taxonomic research. Unfortunately, when using truly random primers for the initial priming step, all of these procedures suffer from high background problems for sub-nanogram quantities of input DNA. Here we report an approach to eliminate this problem for PCR-based methods even at levels of DNA approaching that of a single cell.

  19. First Australian isolation of epidemic Clostridium difficile PCR ribotype 027.

    PubMed

    Riley, Thomas V; Thean, Sarah; Hool, Graham; Golledge, Clayton L

    2009-06-15

    We report the first isolation in Australia of a hypervirulent epidemic strain of Clostridium difficile, PCR ribotype 027. It was isolated from a 43-year-old woman with a permanent ileostomy, who appears to have been infected while travelling in the United States. The isolate was positive for toxin A, toxin B and binary toxin, and resistant to fluoroquinolone antimicrobials, and had characteristic deletions in the tcdC gene. All diagnostic laboratories and health care facilities in Australia should now be on high alert for this organism. PMID:19527210

  20. Novel primers and PCR protocols for the specific detection and quantification of Sphingobium suberifaciens in situ

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pathogen causing corky root on lettuce, Sphingobium suberifaciens, is recalcitrant to standard epidemiological methods. Primers were selected from 16S rDNA sequences useful for the specific detection and quantification of S. suberifaciens. Conventional (PCR) and quantitative (qPCR) PCR protocols...

  1. Inactivation conditions for human Norovirus measured by an in situ capture-qRT-PCR Method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are the major cause of epidemic non-bacterial gastroenteritis. Due to the inability to cultivate HuNoVs, it has been a challenge to determine their infectivity. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is widely used in detecting HuNoVs. However, qRT-PCR only detects the...

  2. Principles and applications of Ligation Mediated PCR methods for DNA-based typing of microbial organisms.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Kur, Józef; Stojowska-Swędrzyńska, Karolina; Śpibida, Marta

    2016-01-01

    A significant number of DNA-based techniques has been introduced into the field of microorganisms' characterization and taxonomy. These genomic fingerprinting methods were developed to detect DNA sequence polymorphisms by using general principles, such as restriction endonuclease analysis, molecular hybridization, and PCR amplification. In recent years, some alternative techniques based on ligation of oligonucleotide adapters before DNA amplification by PCR, known as Ligation-Mediated PCR methods (LM PCR), have been successfully applied for the typing of microorganisms below the species level. These molecular methods include: Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), Amplification of DNA fragments Surrounding Rare Restriction Sites (ADSRRS), PCR Melting Profiles (PCR MP), Ligation Mediated PCR/Shifter (LM PCR/Shifter), Infrequent-Restriction-Site Amplification (IRS PCR), double digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR (ddLMS PCR). These techniques are now applied more and more often because they involve less time, are comparably inexpensive, and require only standard lab equipment. Here, we present a general review of this group of methods showing their possibilities and limitations. We also identify questions and propose solutions which may be helpful in choosing a particular LM PCR method for the achievement of the required goal.

  3. Clinical evaluation of a type III secretion system real-time PCR assay for diagnosing melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Meumann, Ella M; Novak, Ryan T; Gal, Daniel; Kaestli, Mirjam E; Mayo, Mark; Hanson, Joshua P; Spencer, Emma; Glass, Mindy B; Gee, Jay E; Wilkins, Patricia P; Currie, Bart J

    2006-08-01

    A Burkholderia pseudomallei type III secretion system real-time PCR assay was evaluated on clinical specimens in a region where melioidosis is endemic. The PCR was positive in 30/33 (91%) patients with culture-confirmed melioidosis. All six patients with melioidosis septic shock were blood PCR positive, suggesting potential for rapid diagnosis and commencement of appropriate therapy.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF AN IMPROVED PCR-BASED TECHNIQUE FOR DETECTION OF PHYTOPHTHORA CACTORUM IN STRAWBERRY PLANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Specific and rapid plant pathogen detection methods can aid in strawberry disease management decisions. PCR-based diagnostics for Phytophthora cactorum and other strawberry pathogens are hindered by PCR inhibitors and lack of species-specific PCR primers. We developed a DNA extraction and purificati...

  5. Effects of prolonged chlorine exposures upon PCR detection of Helicobacter pylori DNA.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of low doses of free chlorine on the detection by qPCR of Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) cells by qPCR in tap water was monitored. H. pylori target sequences (within suspended, intact cells at densities of 102 to 103 cells /ml) were rendered undetectable by qPCR an...

  6. Principles and applications of Ligation Mediated PCR methods for DNA-based typing of microbial organisms.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, Beata; Kur, Józef; Stojowska-Swędrzyńska, Karolina; Śpibida, Marta

    2016-01-01

    A significant number of DNA-based techniques has been introduced into the field of microorganisms' characterization and taxonomy. These genomic fingerprinting methods were developed to detect DNA sequence polymorphisms by using general principles, such as restriction endonuclease analysis, molecular hybridization, and PCR amplification. In recent years, some alternative techniques based on ligation of oligonucleotide adapters before DNA amplification by PCR, known as Ligation-Mediated PCR methods (LM PCR), have been successfully applied for the typing of microorganisms below the species level. These molecular methods include: Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), Amplification of DNA fragments Surrounding Rare Restriction Sites (ADSRRS), PCR Melting Profiles (PCR MP), Ligation Mediated PCR/Shifter (LM PCR/Shifter), Infrequent-Restriction-Site Amplification (IRS PCR), double digestion Ligation Mediated Suppression PCR (ddLMS PCR). These techniques are now applied more and more often because they involve less time, are comparably inexpensive, and require only standard lab equipment. Here, we present a general review of this group of methods showing their possibilities and limitations. We also identify questions and propose solutions which may be helpful in choosing a particular LM PCR method for the achievement of the required goal. PMID:26885774

  7. Quantitative analysis of food and feed samples with droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Morisset, Dany; Štebih, Dejan; Milavec, Mojca; Gruden, Kristina; Žel, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the applicability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for routine analysis in food and feed samples was demonstrated with the quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently used for quantitative molecular analysis of the presence of GMOs in products. However, its use is limited for detecting and quantifying very small numbers of DNA targets, as in some complex food and feed matrices. Using ddPCR duplex assay, we have measured the absolute numbers of MON810 transgene and hmg maize reference gene copies in DNA samples. Key performance parameters of the assay were determined. The ddPCR system is shown to offer precise absolute and relative quantification of targets, without the need for calibration curves. The sensitivity (five target DNA copies) of the ddPCR assay compares well with those of individual qPCR assays and of the chamber digital PCR (cdPCR) approach. It offers a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude, greater than that of cdPCR. Moreover, when compared to qPCR, the ddPCR assay showed better repeatability at low target concentrations and a greater tolerance to inhibitors. Finally, ddPCR throughput and cost are advantageous relative to those of qPCR for routine GMO quantification. It is thus concluded that ddPCR technology can be applied for routine quantification of GMOs, or any other domain where quantitative analysis of food and feed samples is needed. PMID:23658750

  8. Quantitative analysis of food and feed samples with droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Morisset, Dany; Štebih, Dejan; Milavec, Mojca; Gruden, Kristina; Žel, Jana

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the applicability of droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for routine analysis in food and feed samples was demonstrated with the quantification of genetically modified organisms (GMOs). Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is currently used for quantitative molecular analysis of the presence of GMOs in products. However, its use is limited for detecting and quantifying very small numbers of DNA targets, as in some complex food and feed matrices. Using ddPCR duplex assay, we have measured the absolute numbers of MON810 transgene and hmg maize reference gene copies in DNA samples. Key performance parameters of the assay were determined. The ddPCR system is shown to offer precise absolute and relative quantification of targets, without the need for calibration curves. The sensitivity (five target DNA copies) of the ddPCR assay compares well with those of individual qPCR assays and of the chamber digital PCR (cdPCR) approach. It offers a dynamic range over four orders of magnitude, greater than that of cdPCR. Moreover, when compared to qPCR, the ddPCR assay showed better repeatability at low target concentrations and a greater tolerance to inhibitors. Finally, ddPCR throughput and cost are advantageous relative to those of qPCR for routine GMO quantification. It is thus concluded that ddPCR technology can be applied for routine quantification of GMOs, or any other domain where quantitative analysis of food and feed samples is needed.

  9. Insulated Isothermal Reverse Transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Classical Swine Fever Virus.

    PubMed

    Lung, O; Pasick, J; Fisher, M; Buchanan, C; Erickson, A; Ambagala, A

    2016-10-01

    Classical swine fever (CSF) is an OIE-listed disease that can have a severe impact on the swine industry. User-friendly, sensitive, rapid diagnostic tests that utilize low-cost field-deployable instruments for CSF diagnosis can be useful for disease surveillance and outbreak monitoring. In this study, we describe validation of a new probe-based insulated isothermal reverse transcriptase PCR (iiRT-PCR) assay for rapid detection of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) on a compact, user-friendly device (POCKIT(™) Nucleic Acid Analyzer) that does not need data interpretation by the user. The assay accurately detected CSFV RNA from a diverse panel of 33 CSFV strains representing all three genotypes plus an additional in vitro-transcribed RNA from cloned sequences representing a vaccine strain. No cross-reactivity was observed with a panel of 18 viruses associated with livestock including eight other pestivirus strains (bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 and type 2, border disease virus, HoBi atypical pestivirus), African swine fever virus, swine vesicular disease virus, swine influenza virus, porcine respiratory and reproductive syndrome virus, porcine circovirus 1, porcine circovirus 2, porcine respiratory coronavirus, vesicular exanthema of swine virus, bovine herpes virus type 1 and vesicular stomatitis virus. The iiRT-PCR assay accurately detected CSFV as early as 2 days post-inoculation in RNA extracted from serum samples of experimentally infected pigs, before appearance of clinical signs. The limit of detection (LOD95% ) calculated by probit regression analysis was 23 copies per reaction. The assay has a sample to answer turnaround time of less than an hour using extracted RNA or diluted or low volume of neat serum. The user-friendly, compact device that automatically analyses and displays results could potentially be a useful tool for surveillance and monitoring of CSF in a disease outbreak. PMID:25644051

  10. Analysis of PCR Thermocycling by Rayleigh-Bénard Convection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Ruchi; Ugaz, Victor

    2004-03-01

    In previous studies, we demonstrated a novel device employing the circulatory flow field established by Rayleigh-Bénard convection to perform amplification of a 295 base target region from a human genomic DNA template inside a 35 uL cylindrical cavity using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) [Krishnan, Ugaz & Burns, Science, Vol. 298, 2002, p. 793]. This design eliminates the need for dynamic external temperature control required in conventional thermocyclers that repeatedly heat and cool static sample volumes to denaturation, annealing, and extension temperatures. In this paper, we extend these studies by demonstrating the design and operation of a multiwell convective flow device capable of achieving amplification of a 191 base pair fragment associated with membrane channel proteins M1 and M2 of the influenza-A virus in as little as 15 minutes with performance comparable to a conventional thermocycler. We also study the effect of initial template concentration and observe no degradation in performance over four orders of magnitude of initial template loading dilution, consistent with conventional thermocycler results. These results illustrate the ability of convective flow PCR systems to achieve performance equal to or exceeding conventional thermocycling hardware, and demonstrate their suitability for use in rapid biodetection assays.

  11. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  12. Fast detection of deletion breakpoints using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Abildinova, Gulshara; Abdrakhmanova, Zhanara; Tuchinsky, Helena; Nesher, Elimelech; Pinhasov, Albert; Raskin, Leon

    2016-01-01

    The routine detection of large and medium copy number variants (CNVs) is well established. Hemizygotic deletions or duplications in the large Duchenne muscular dystrophy DMD gene responsible for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophies are routinely identified using multiple ligation probe amplification and array-based comparative genomic hybridization. These methods only map deleted or duplicated exons, without providing the exact location of breakpoints. Commonly used methods for the detection of CNV breakpoints include long-range PCR and primer walking, their success being limited by the deletion size, GC content and presence of DNA repeats. Here, we present a strategy for detecting the breakpoints of medium and large CNVs regardless of their size. The hemizygous deletion of exons 45-50 in the DMD gene and the large autosomal heterozygous PARK2 deletion were used to demonstrate the workflow that relies on real-time quantitative PCR to narrow down the deletion region and Sanger sequencing for breakpoint confirmation. The strategy is fast, reliable and cost-efficient, making it amenable to widespread use in genetic laboratories. PMID:27560363

  13. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-01

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one's diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  14. Sequetyping: serotyping Streptococcus pneumoniae by a single PCR sequencing strategy.

    PubMed

    Leung, Marcus H; Bryson, Kevin; Freystatter, Kathrin; Pichon, Bruno; Edwards, Giles; Charalambous, Bambos M; Gillespie, Stephen H

    2012-07-01

    The introduction of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines necessitates continued monitoring of circulating strains to assess vaccine efficacy and replacement serotypes. Conventional serological methods are costly, labor-intensive, and prone to misidentification, while current DNA-based methods have limited serotype coverage requiring multiple PCR primers. In this study, a computer algorithm was developed to interrogate the capsulation locus (cps) of vaccine serotypes to locate primer pairs in conserved regions that border variable regions and could differentiate between serotypes. In silico analysis of cps from 92 serotypes indicated that a primer pair spanning the regulatory gene cpsB could putatively amplify 84 serotypes and differentiate 46. This primer set was specific to Streptococcus pneumoniae, with no amplification observed for other species, including S. mitis, S. oralis, and S. pseudopneumoniae. One hundred thirty-eight pneumococcal strains covering 48 serotypes were tested. Of 23 vaccine serotypes included in the study, most (19/22, 86%) were identified correctly at least to the serogroup level, including all of the 13-valent conjugate vaccine and other replacement serotypes. Reproducibility was demonstrated by the correct sequetyping of different strains of a serotype. This novel sequence-based method employing a single PCR primer pair is cost-effective and simple. Furthermore, it has the potential to identify new serotypes that may evolve in the future.

  15. PCR Primers for Metazoan Mitochondrial 12S Ribosomal DNA Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Machida, Ryuji J.; Kweskin, Matthew; Knowlton, Nancy

    2012-01-01

    Background Assessment of the biodiversity of communities of small organisms is most readily done using PCR-based analysis of environmental samples consisting of mixtures of individuals. Known as metagenetics, this approach has transformed understanding of microbial communities and is beginning to be applied to metazoans as well. Unlike microbial studies, where analysis of the 16S ribosomal DNA sequence is standard, the best gene for metazoan metagenetics is less clear. In this study we designed a set of PCR primers for the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequence based on 64 complete mitochondrial genomes and then tested their efficacy. Methodology/Principal Findings A total of the 64 complete mitochondrial genome sequences representing all metazoan classes available in GenBank were downloaded using the NCBI Taxonomy Browser. Alignment of sequences was performed for the excised mitochondrial 12S ribosomal DNA sequences, and conserved regions were identified for all 64 mitochondrial genomes. These regions were used to design a primer pair that flanks a more variable region in the gene. Then all of the complete metazoan mitochondrial genomes available in NCBI's Organelle Genome Resources database were used to determine the percentage of taxa that would likely be amplified using these primers. Results suggest that these primers will amplify target sequences for many metazoans. Conclusions/Significance Newly designed 12S ribosomal DNA primers have considerable potential for metazoan metagenetic analysis because of their ability to amplify sequences from many metazoans. PMID:22536450

  16. One-step PCR amplification of complete arthropod mitochondrial genomes.

    PubMed

    Hwang, U W; Park, C J; Yong, T S; Kim, W

    2001-06-01

    A new PCR primer set which enables one-step amplification of complete arthropod mitochondrial genomes was designed from two conserved 16S rDNA regions for the long PCR technique. For this purpose, partial 16S rDNAs amplified with universal primers 16SA and 16SB were newly sequenced from six representative arthropods: Armadillidium vulgare and Macrobrachium nipponense (Crustacea), Anopheles sinensis (Insecta), Lithobius forficatus and Megaphyllum sp. (Myriapoda), and Limulus polyphemus (Chelicerata). The genomic locations of two new primers, HPK16Saa and HPK16Sbb, correspond to positions 13314-13345 and 12951-12984, respectively, in the Drosophila yakuba mitochondrial genome. The usefulness of the primer set was experimentally examined and confirmed with five of the representative arthropods, except for A. vulgare, which has a linearized mitochondrial genome. With this set, therefore, we could easily and rapidly amplify complete mitochondrial genomes with small amounts of arthropod DNA. Although the primers suggested here were examined only with arthropod groups, a possibility of successful application to other invertebrates is very high, since the high degree of sequence conservation is shown on the primer sites in other invertebrates. Thus, this primer set can serve various research fields, such as molecular evolution, population genetics, and molecular phylogenetics based on DNA sequences, RFLP, and gene rearrangement of mitochondrial genomes in arthropods and other invertebrates. PMID:11399145

  17. Digital PCR on an integrated self-priming compartmentalization chip.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Qiangyuan; Qiu, Lin; Yu, Bingwen; Xu, Yanan; Gao, Yibo; Pan, Tingting; Tian, Qingchang; Song, Qi; Jin, Wei; Jin, Qinhan; Mu, Ying

    2014-03-21

    An integrated on-chip valve-free and power-free microfluidic digital PCR device is for the first time developed by making use of a novel self-priming compartmentalization and simple dehydration control to realize 'divide and conquer' for single DNA molecule detection. The high gas solubility of PDMS is exploited to provide the built-in power of self-priming so that the sample and oil are sequentially sucked into the device to realize sample self-compartmentalization based on surface tension. The lifespan of its self-priming capability was about two weeks tested using an air-tight packaging bottle sealed with a small amount of petroleum jelly, which is significant for a practical platform. The SPC chip contains 5120 independent 5 nL microchambers, allowing the samples to be compartmentalized completely. Using this platform, three different abundances of lung cancer related genes are detected to demonstrate the feasibility and flexibility of the microchip for amplifying a single nucleic acid molecule. For maximal accuracy, within less than 5% of the measurement deviation, the optimal number of positive chambers is between 400 and 1250 evaluated by the Poisson distribution, which means one panel can detect an average of 480 to 4804 template molecules. This device without world-to-chip connections eliminates the constraint of the complex pipeline control, and is an integrated on-chip platform, which would be a significant improvement to digital PCR automation and more user-friendly.

  18. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for Legionella species.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Min; Jeong, Yoojung; Sohn, Jang Wook; Kim, Min Ja

    2015-12-01

    Legionella pneumophila serogroup 1 (sg1) accounts for the majority of infections in humans, but other Legionella species are also associated with human disease. In this study, a new SYBR Green I-based multiplex real-time PCR assay in a single reaction was developed to allow the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species by targeting specific gene sequences. Candidate target genes were selected, and primer sets were designed by referring to comparative genomic hybridization data of Legionella species. The Legionella species-specific groES primer set successfully detected all 30 Legionella strains tested. The xcpX and rfbA primers specifically detected L. pneumophila sg1-15 and L. pneumophila sg1, respectively. In addition, this assay was validated by testing clinical samples and isolates. In conclusion, this novel multiplex real-time PCR assay might be a useful diagnostic tool for the rapid detection and differentiation of Legionella species in both clinical and epidemiological studies.

  19. PCR-based identification of drowning: four case reports.

    PubMed

    Rácz, Evelin; Könczöl, Franciska; Tóth, Dénes; Patonai, Zoltán; Porpáczy, Zoltán; Kozma, Zsolt; Poór, Viktor S; Sipos, Katalin

    2016-09-01

    Proper diagnosis in drowning victims is often difficult due to the lack of signs specific to drowning. The diatom test is a widely used procedure for the diagnosis. Some types of water contain only minimal amounts of diatom cells which may provide false-negative results, while a negative diatom test result does not exclude drowning. In proving drowning, we used a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based biological method in addition to the conventional methods. DNA was extracted from postmortem spleen tissues and water of the drowning site. Samples were tested with algae (diatoms and small green algae)- and cyanobacteria (blue-green algae)-specific primers. We present here multiple drowning cases in which diatom tests of the postmortem tissue samples and the water were negative. In each case, the presence of phytoplanktonic DNA strengthened the autopsy diagnosis of drowning even in the absence of visible diatoms. In the future, the PCR method may be of consideration as a possible supplement of the diatom test in the examination of presumed drowning cases.

  20. PCR diagnostic methods for Ascosphaera infections in bees.

    PubMed

    James, R R; Skinner, J S

    2005-10-01

    Fungi in the genus Ascosphaera are the causative agents of chalkbrood, a major disease affecting bee larval viability. Identification of individual Ascosphaera species based on morphological features has been difficult due to a lack of distinguishing characteristics. Most identifications are based on the size and shape of the ascomata, spore balls and conidia. Unfortunately, much overlap occurs in the size of these structures, and some Ascosphaera species will not produce sexual structures in vitro. We report a quick and reliable diagnostic method for identifying Ascosphaera infections in Megachile bees (leafcutting bees) using PCR markers that employ genus-specific primers for Ascosphaera, and species-specific primers for species known to be associated with Megachile spp. Using these methods, species identifications can be performed directly on bees, including asymptomatic individuals. Furthermore, the PCR markers can detect co-infections of multiple Ascosphaera species in a single host. We also identified a marker for Ascosphaera apis, the predominant cause of chalkbrood in Apis mellifera, the honey bee. Our diagnostic methods eliminate the need for culturing samples, and could be used to process a large number of field collected bee larvae. PMID:16214164

  1. Monitoring the immune response using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Stordeur, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Induction of an immune response to a particular antigen is the basis of vaccination. This has been done for years to prevent infectious diseases, and has the potential for the treatment of cancer. The immune response is nowadays more precisely modulated rather than simply induced, like in case of immunotherapy of allergic diseases. Likewise, autoimmune diseases are associated with an inappropriate immune response, and many efforts are made for specifically inhibiting this unwanted response. A possible line of attack is the induction of an antigen-specific immune tolerance, which also has a use in the field of transplantation, where allogeneic responses are deleterious for the graft. In all of these fields of fundamental and clinical medicine, the modulation of immune response requires the assistance of laboratory tests, among which real-time PCR appears more and more helpful. This chapter describes a protocol to quantify immune-related mRNAs using reverse transcription-real-time PCR. The transcripts can be quantified in cultured cells or in cultured whole blood, after an incubation period in the presence of the antigen to which the immune response is analyzed. This is the typical approach to evaluate the efficacy of a vaccine. The transcripts can also be quantified directly in the biological sample, giving information about the in vivo immune status of the individual. The techniques to achieve these different methods are described, and are illustrated by the analysis of the response against the toxoid tetanus antigen.

  2. Identifying of meat species using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)

    SciTech Connect

    Foong, Chow Ming; Sani, Norrakiah Abdullah

    2013-11-27

    Meat has been widely consumed as an important protein source in daily life of human. Furthermore, with busy and intense urban lifestyle, processed food is now one of the main protein sources of one’s diet. Consumers rely on the food labeling to decide if the meat product purchased is safe and reliable. Therefore, it is important to ensure the food labeling is done in a correct manner to avoid consumer fraud. More consumers are now concern about the food quality and safety as compared to before. This study described the meat species identification and detection method using Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 8 types of meats (cattle, buffalo, goat, sheep, chicken, duck, pork and horse). The objective of this study is to decide on the specificity of oligonucleotide sequences obtained from previous study. There were 5 proposed oligonucleotide primer in this study. The main important finding in this work is the specificity of oligonucleotide primers to raw meats. It if found that the oligonucleotide primers proposed were not specific to the local raw meat species. Therefore, further study is needed to obtain a species-specific oligonucletide primers for PCR, in order to be applied in food product testing.

  3. Development of PCR and TaqMan PCR Assays to Detect Pseudomonas coronafaciens, a Causal Agent of Halo Blight of Oats

    PubMed Central

    An, Ji-Hye; Noh, Young-Hee; Kim, Yong-Eon; Lee, Hyok-In; Cha, Jae-Soon

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas coronafaciens causes halo blight on oats and is a plant quarantine bacterium in many countries, including the Republic of Korea. Using of the certificated seed is important for control of the disease. Since effective detection method of P. coronafaciens is not available yet, PCR and TaqMan PCR assays for specific detection of P. coronafaciens were developed in this study. PCR primers were designed from the draft genome sequence of P. coronafaciens LMG 5060 which was obtained by the next-generation sequencing in this study. The PCR primer set Pc-12-F/Pc-12-R specifically amplified 498 bp from the 13 strains of P. coronafaciens isolated in the seven different countries (Canada, Japan, United Kingdom, Zimbabwe, Kenya, Germany, and New Zealand) and the nested primer set Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R specifically amplified 298 bp from those strains. The target-size PCR product was not amplified from the non-target bacteria with the PCR and nested primer sets. TaqMan PCR with Pc-12-ne-F/Pc-12-ne-R and a TaqMan probe, Pc-taqman, which were designed inside of the nested PCR amplicon, generated Ct values which in a dose-dependent manner to the amount of the target DNA and the Ct values of all the P. coronafaciens strains were above the threshold Ct value for positive detection. The TaqMan PCR generated positive Ct values from the seed extracts of the artificially inoculated oat seeds above 10 cfu/ml inoculation level. PCR and TaqMan PCR assays developed in this study will be useful tools to detect and identify the plant quarantine pathogen, P. coronafaciens. PMID:25774107

  4. Comparison of the conventional multiplex RT-PCR, real time RT-PCR and Luminex xTAG® RVP fast assay for the detection of respiratory viruses.

    PubMed

    Choudhary, Manohar L; Anand, Siddharth P; Tikhe, Shamal A; Walimbe, Atul M; Potdar, Varsha A; Chadha, Mandeep S; Mishra, Akhilesh C

    2016-01-01

    Detection of respiratory viruses using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is sensitive, specific and cost effective, having huge potential for patient management. In this study, the performance of an in-house developed conventional multiplex RT-PCR (mRT-PCR), real time RT-PCR (rtRT-PCR) and Luminex xTAG(®) RVP fast assay (Luminex Diagnostics, Toronto, Canada) for the detection of respiratory viruses was compared. A total 310 respiratory clinical specimens predominantly from pediatric patients, referred for diagnosis of influenza A/H1N1pdm09 from August 2009 to March 2011 were tested to determine performance characteristic of the three methods. A total 193 (62.2%) samples were detected positive for one or more viruses by mRT-PCR, 175 (56.4%) samples by real time monoplex RT-PCR, and 138 (44.5%) samples by xTAG(®) RVP fast assay. The overall sensitivity of mRT-PCR was 96.9% (95% CI: 93.5, 98.8), rtRT-PCR 87.9% (95% CI: 82.5, 92.1) and xTAG(®) RVP fast was 68.3% (95% CI: 61.4, 74.6). Rhinovirus was detected most commonly followed by respiratory syncytial virus group B and influenza A/H1N1pdm09. The monoplex real time RT-PCR and in-house developed mRT-PCR are more sensitive, specific and cost effective than the xTAG(®) RVP fast assay.

  5. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)--based tool for detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris in soil.

    PubMed

    Saragih, Syaiful Amri; Takemoto, S; Hisamoto, Y; Fujii, M; Sato, H; Kamata, N

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR using a primer pair CM2946F/CM3160R was developed for specific detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris from soil. Standard curves were obtained for genomic DNA and DNA extracts from autoclaved soil with a certain dose of C. militaris suspension. C. militaris was detected from two forest soil samples out of ten that were collected when fruit bodies of C. militaris were found. This method seemed effective in detection of C. militaris in the soil and useful for rapid and reliable quantification of C. militaris in different ecosystems. PMID:25446034

  6. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR)--based tool for detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris in soil.

    PubMed

    Saragih, Syaiful Amri; Takemoto, S; Hisamoto, Y; Fujii, M; Sato, H; Kamata, N

    2015-01-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR using a primer pair CM2946F/CM3160R was developed for specific detection and quantification of Cordyceps militaris from soil. Standard curves were obtained for genomic DNA and DNA extracts from autoclaved soil with a certain dose of C. militaris suspension. C. militaris was detected from two forest soil samples out of ten that were collected when fruit bodies of C. militaris were found. This method seemed effective in detection of C. militaris in the soil and useful for rapid and reliable quantification of C. militaris in different ecosystems.

  7. ddpcr: an R package and web application for analysis of droplet digital PCR data

    PubMed Central

    Attali, Dean; Bidshahri, Roza; Haynes, Charles; Bryan, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel platform for exact quantification of DNA which holds great promise in clinical diagnostics. It is increasingly popular due to its digital nature, which provides more accurate quantification and higher sensitivity than traditional real-time PCR. However, clinical adoption has been slowed in part by the lack of software tools available for analyzing ddPCR data. Here, we present ddpcr – a new R package for ddPCR visualization and analysis. In addition, ddpcr includes a web application (powered by the Shiny R package) that allows users to analyze ddPCR data using an interactive graphical interface. PMID:27703666

  8. ddpcr: an R package and web application for analysis of droplet digital PCR data

    PubMed Central

    Attali, Dean; Bidshahri, Roza; Haynes, Charles; Bryan, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel platform for exact quantification of DNA which holds great promise in clinical diagnostics. It is increasingly popular due to its digital nature, which provides more accurate quantification and higher sensitivity than traditional real-time PCR. However, clinical adoption has been slowed in part by the lack of software tools available for analyzing ddPCR data. Here, we present ddpcr – a new R package for ddPCR visualization and analysis. In addition, ddpcr includes a web application (powered by the Shiny R package) that allows users to analyze ddPCR data using an interactive graphical interface.

  9. Absolute Quantification of Enterococcal 23S rRNA Gene Using Digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dan; Yamahara, Kevan M; Cao, Yiping; Boehm, Alexandria B

    2016-04-01

    We evaluated the ability of chip-based digital PCR (dPCR) to quantify enterococci, the fecal indicator recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) for water-quality monitoring. dPCR uses Poisson statistics to estimate the number of DNA fragments in a sample with a specific sequence. Underestimation may occur when a gene is redundantly encoded in the genome and multiple copies of that gene are on one DNA fragment. When genomic DNA (gDNA) was extracted using two commercial DNA extraction kits, we confirmed that dPCR could discern individual copies of the redundant 23s rRNA gene in the enterococcal genome. dPCR quantification was accurate when compared to the nominal concentration inferred from fluorometer measurements (linear regression slope = 0.98, intercept = 0.03, R(2) = 0.99, and p value <0.0001). dPCR quantification was also consistent with quantitative PCR (qPCR) measurements as well as cell counts for BioBall reference standard and 24 environmental water samples. qPCR and dPCR quantification of enterococci in the 24 environmental samples were significantly correlated (linear regression slope =1.08, R(2) of 0.96, and p value <0.0001); the group mean of the qPCR measurements was 0.19 log units higher than that of the dPCR measurements. At environmentally relevant concentrations, dPCR quantification was more precise (i.e., had narrower 95% confidence intervals than qPCR quantification). We observed that humic acid caused a similar level of inhibition in both dPCR and qPCR, but calcium inhibited dPCR to a lesser degree than qPCR. Inhibition of dPCR was partially relieved when the number of thermal cycles was increased. Based on these results, we conclude that dPCR is a viable option for enumerating enterococci in ambient water. PMID:26903207

  10. Detection of adenoviruses and enteroviruses in tap water and river water by reverse transcription multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Cho, H B; Lee, S H; Cho, J C; Kim, S J

    2000-05-01

    A reverse transcription (RT) multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was developed to simultaneously detect adenoviruses and enteroviruses, both of which have attracted much attention as molecular indices of viral pollution in environmental samples. The method involves a reverse transcription step, followed by a multiplex nested PCR in which the combination of primers amplifies cDNA from enteroviruses and adenoviruses. The sensitivity of this assay was found to be similar to that of each monoplex PCR or RT-PCR assay, and to be consistent regardless of relative concentrations of adenoviruses and enteroviruses. To assess suitability and environmental application of the RT multiplex PCR assay, a total of 12 river water samples and 4 tap water samples were analyzed by RT multiplex PCR, each monoplex PCR or RT-PCR, and cell culture assay on the Buffalo Green Monkey kidney cell line. The sensitivity of the RT multiplex PCR was also found to be similar to that of each monoplex PCR in environmental samples. This suggests the RT multiplex PCR assay could be applied to the routine monitoring of viral pollution in environmental waters.

  11. High-throughput STR analysis for DNA database using direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jeong Eun; Park, Su Jeong; Lee, Han Chul; Kim, Se-Yong; Kim, Jong Yeol; Lee, Seung Hwan

    2013-07-01

    Since the Korean criminal DNA database was launched in 2010, we have focused on establishing an automated DNA database profiling system that analyzes short tandem repeat loci in a high-throughput and cost-effective manner. We established a DNA database profiling system without DNA purification using a direct PCR buffer system. The quality of direct PCR procedures was compared with that of conventional PCR system under their respective optimized conditions. The results revealed not only perfect concordance but also an excellent PCR success rate, good electropherogram quality, and an optimal intra/inter-loci peak height ratio. In particular, the proportion of DNA extraction required due to direct PCR failure could be minimized to <3%. In conclusion, the newly developed direct PCR system can be adopted for automated DNA database profiling systems to replace or supplement conventional PCR system in a time- and cost-saving manner.

  12. EPA Method 1615. Measurement of Enterovirus and Norovirus Occurrence in Water by Culture and RT-qPCR. Part III. Virus Detection by RT-qPCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA Method 1615 measures enteroviruses and noroviruses present in environmental and drinking waters. The viral ribonucleic acid (RNA) from water sample concentrates is extracted and tested for enterovirus and norovirus RNA using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). V...

  13. Interlaboratory study of DNA extraction from multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for individual kernel detection system of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kozue; Makiyma, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Teshima, Reiko; Nakashima, Akie; Ogawa, Asako; Yamagishi, Toru; Futo, Satoshi; Oguchi, Taichi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    In many countries, the labeling of grains, feed, and foodstuff is mandatory if the genetically modified (GM) organism content exceeds a certain level of approved GM varieties. We previously developed an individual kernel detection system consisting of grinding individual kernels, DNA extraction from the individually ground kernels, GM detection using multiplex real-time PCR, and GM event detection using multiplex qualitative PCR to analyze the precise commingling level and varieties of GM maize in real sample grains. We performed the interlaboratory study of the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR detection, and multiplex qualitative PCR detection to evaluate its applicability, practicality, and ruggedness for the individual kernel detection system of GM maize. DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR were evaluated by five laboratories in Japan, and all results from these laboratories were consistent with the expected results in terms of the commingling level and event analysis. Thus, the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for the individual kernel detection system is applicable and practicable in a laboratory to regulate the commingling level of GM maize grain for GM samples, including stacked GM maize.

  14. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-12-22

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients' samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAF(V600E) and BRAF(V600K) mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method.

  15. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  16. [Evaluation of pathogen disinfection efficacy by chlorine and monochloramine disinfection based on quantitative PCR combined with propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR)].

    PubMed

    Tong, Tie-Zheng; Wu, Shu-Xu; Li, Dan; He, Miao; Yang, Tian; Shi, Han-Chang

    2011-04-01

    A novel detection method of quantitative PCR combined with a DNA intercalating dye propidium monoazide (PMA-qPCR) was developed and then applied to analyze inactivation efficacy of chlorine and monochloramine on E. coli as a representative organism. The results shows that PMA removed 99.94% and 99.99% DNA from non-viable E. coli and Salmonella cells respectively and PMA-qPCR could effectively differentiate viable bacteria from non-viable bacteria; According to the first-order kinetic model, the inactivation coefficients on E. coli obtained by PMA-qPCR were 2.24 L x (mg x min)-1 and 0.0175 L x (mg x min)-1 for chlorine and monochloramine respectively, both of which were lower than those obtained by traditional plating counting method. In order to inactivate 99% of E. coli, the ct values by PMA-qPCR were 0.9 mg L(-1) min and more than 100 mg x L(-1) x min for chlorine and monochloramine while those by plating counting method were only 0.6 mg x L(-1) x min and 20 mg x L(-1) min, respectively; E. coli concentration detected by conventional qPCR kept almost the same when ct value increased, indicating that conventional qPCR was unable to evaluate inactivation efficacy of both chlorine and monochloramine disinfection. In summary, PMA-qPCR shows to be a promising method for evaluating disinfection efficacy by chlorine and monochloramine more accurately.

  17. Simultaneous detection of listeria monocytogenes in chicken meat enrichments by PCR and reverse-transcription PCR without DNA/RNA isolation.

    PubMed

    Navas, Jaime; Ortiz, Sagrario; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquin V

    2005-02-01

    Environmental and food samples can be analyzed using PCR and reverse transcription (RT)-PCR techniques to discriminate between viable and nonviable cells of bacterial pathogens. Here, we describe the use of a commercial lysis buffer, initially designed for mammalian cells, that permits the rapid extraction of bacterial DNA and RNA. The buffer is an RT-PCR-compatible lysis solution in which RNA is stable and can be frozen for later use. RT-PCR is carried out directly after DNase I treatment of crude bacterial lysates using rTth polymerase for RT-PCR in a single tube. Untreated lysate is used for standard PCR. The procedure permits the amplification of either mRNA or DNA of Listeria monocytogenes at a level similar to that obtained with purified nucleic acids. Using lysates obtained with this buffer, nested PCR and RT-PCR assays detected low numbers of L. monocytogenes cells from artificially contaminated chicken meat samples. The simplicity of this system may foster the development of similar buffers specifically designed for bacteria to improve RNA detection methods that can be performed in parallel with DNA analysis. The use of a single buffer decreases the time needed for analysis, is amenable to automation and real-time assays, and might be adaptable to all bacteria and amplification methods.

  18. Allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): an accurate and cost-effective assay to diagnose and quantify KRAS and BRAF mutation.

    PubMed

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes.

  19. Competitive allele-specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) is a sensitive, specific and fast method for BRAF V600 mutation detection in Melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Barbano, Raffaela; Pasculli, Barbara; Coco, Michelina; Fontana, Andrea; Copetti, Massimiliano; Rendina, Michelina; Valori, Vanna Maria; Graziano, Paolo; Maiello, Evaristo; Fazio, Vito Michele; Parrella, Paola

    2015-01-01

    BRAF codon 600 mutation testing of melanoma patients is mandatory for the choice of the most appropriate therapy in the clinical setting. Competitive allele specific TaqMan PCR (Cast-PCR) technology allows not only the selective amplification of minor alleles, but it also blocks the amplification of non-mutant allele. We genotyped codon 600 of the BRAF gene in 54 patients’ samples by Cast-PCR and bidirectional direct sequence analysis. All the mutations detected by sequencing were also identified by Cast-PCR. In addition, Cast-PCR assay detected four samples carrying mutations and was able to clearly identify two mutations of uncertain interpretation by Sanger sequencing. The limit of detection of Cast-PCR was evaluated by constructing dilution curves of BRAFV600E and BRAFV600K mutated clinical samples mixed with a not-mutated specimens. Both mutations could be detected until a 1:100 mutated/not mutated ratio. Cloning and sequencing of the clones was used to confirm mutations on representative discrepant cases. Cast PCR performances were not affected by intratumour heterogeneity, and less affected by melanin content. Our results indicate that Cast-PCR is a reliable diagnostic tool for the identification of melanoma patients as eligible to be treated with TKIs and might be implemented in the clinical setting as elective screening method. PMID:26690267

  20. Interlaboratory study of DNA extraction from multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for individual kernel detection system of genetically modified maize.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Hiroshi; Sakata, Kozue; Makiyma, Daiki; Nakamura, Kosuke; Teshima, Reiko; Nakashima, Akie; Ogawa, Asako; Yamagishi, Toru; Futo, Satoshi; Oguchi, Taichi; Mano, Junichi; Kitta, Kazumi

    2011-01-01

    In many countries, the labeling of grains, feed, and foodstuff is mandatory if the genetically modified (GM) organism content exceeds a certain level of approved GM varieties. We previously developed an individual kernel detection system consisting of grinding individual kernels, DNA extraction from the individually ground kernels, GM detection using multiplex real-time PCR, and GM event detection using multiplex qualitative PCR to analyze the precise commingling level and varieties of GM maize in real sample grains. We performed the interlaboratory study of the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR detection, and multiplex qualitative PCR detection to evaluate its applicability, practicality, and ruggedness for the individual kernel detection system of GM maize. DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR were evaluated by five laboratories in Japan, and all results from these laboratories were consistent with the expected results in terms of the commingling level and event analysis. Thus, the DNA extraction with multiple ground samples, multiplex real-time PCR, and multiplex qualitative PCR for the individual kernel detection system is applicable and practicable in a laboratory to regulate the commingling level of GM maize grain for GM samples, including stacked GM maize. PMID:22165018

  1. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assay for human-dog-cat species identification and nuclear DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Kanthaswamy, S; Premasuthan, A; Ng, J; Satkoski, J; Goyal, V

    2012-03-01

    In the United States, human forensic evidence collected from crime scenes is usually comingled with biomaterial of canine and feline origins. Knowledge of the concentration of nuclear DNA extracted from a crime scene biological sample and the species from which the sample originated is essential for DNA profiling. The ability to accurately detect and quantify target DNA in mixed-species samples is crucial when target DNA may be overwhelmed by non-target DNA. We have designed and evaluated a species-specific (human, dog and cat) nuclear DNA identification assay based on the TaqMan(®) quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) technology that can simultaneously detect and measure minute quantities of DNA specific to either humans, dogs and/or cats. The fluorogenic triplex assay employs primers and hydrolysis probes that target the human TH01 locus as well as the dog and cat Melanocortin 1 Receptor (MC1R) sequences in a species-specific manner. We also demonstrate that the assay is a highly sensitive, reliable and robust method for identifying and quantifying mixed-species templates of human-dog-cat origin with as little as 0.4 pg of human and cat nuclear DNA, respectively, and 4.0 pg of dog nuclear DNA.

  2. Rapid and sensitive detection of Feline immunodeficiency virus using an insulated isothermal PCR-based assay with a point-of-need PCR detection platform.

    PubMed

    Wilkes, Rebecca Penrose; Kania, Stephen A; Tsai, Yun-Long; Lee, Pei-Yu Alison; Chang, Hsiu-Hui; Ma, Li-Juan; Chang, Hsiao-Fen Grace; Wang, Hwa-Tang Thomas

    2015-07-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is an important infectious agent of cats. Clinical syndromes resulting from FIV infection include immunodeficiency, opportunistic infections, and neoplasia. In our study, a 5' long terminal repeat/gag region-based reverse transcription insulated isothermal polymerase chain reaction (RT-iiPCR) was developed to amplify all known FIV strains to facilitate point-of-need FIV diagnosis. The RT-iiPCR method was applied in a point-of-need PCR detection platform--a field-deployable device capable of generating automatically interpreted RT-iiPCR results from nucleic acids within 1 hr. Limit of detection 95% of FIV RT-iiPCR was calculated to be 95 copies standard in vitro transcription RNA per reaction. Endpoint dilution studies with serial dilutions of an ATCC FIV type strain showed that the sensitivity of lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent was comparable to that of a reference nested PCR. The established reaction did not amplify any nontargeted feline pathogens, including Felid herpesvirus 1, feline coronavirus, Feline calicivirus, Feline leukemia virus, Mycoplasma haemofelis, and Chlamydophila felis. Based on analysis of 76 clinical samples (including blood and bone marrow) with the FIV RT-iiPCR, test sensitivity was 97.78% (44/45), specificity was 100.00% (31/31), and agreement was 98.65% (75/76), determined against a reference nested-PCR assay. A kappa value of 0.97 indicated excellent correlation between these 2 methods. The lyophilized FIV RT-iiPCR reagent, deployed on a user-friendly portable device, has potential utility for rapid and easy point-of-need detection of FIV in cats. PMID:26185125

  3. [Detection of fish DNA in ruminant feed by PCR amplification].

    PubMed

    Nomura, Tetsuya; Kusama, Toyoko; Kadowaki, Koh-ichi

    2006-10-01

    The Japanese Government has prohibited the use of seafood protein, as well as mammalian protein, in ruminant feed. There is an official method to detect meat and bone meal, but no method is yet available to detect fishmeal in ruminant feed. We tried to develop a suitable method to detect fishmeal in ruminant feed, similar to the official method "PCR detection of animal-derived DNA in feed". Our previously reported primers (fishcon5 and fishcon3-1) showed low sensitivity, so we designed new primers based on a DNA sequence from yellowfin tuna mitchondrial DNA. Among the primers, FM5 and FM3 specifically detected fish DNA (sardine, yellowfin tuna, skipjack tuna, chub mackerel, Pacific saury, salmon, rainbow trout, Japanese anchovy, codfish and Japanese horse mackerel) from fish meat, and did not amplify DNA from animals and plants. The sensitivity for detection of the presence of fishmeal in ruminant feed was 0.01-0.001%. PMID:17128872

  4. PCR detection of groundwater bacteria associated with colloidal transport

    SciTech Connect

    Cruz-Perez, P.; Stetzenbach, L.D.; Alvarez, A.J.

    1996-02-29

    Colloidal transport may increase the amount of contaminant material than that which could be transported by water flow alone. The role of colloids in groundwater contaminant transport is complicated and may involve many different processes, including sorption of elements onto colloidal particles, coagulation/dissolution, adsorption onto solid surfaces, filtration, and migration. Bacteria are known to concentrate minerals and influence the transport of compounds in aqueous environments and may also serve as organic colloids, thereby influencing subsurface transport of radionuclides and other contaminants. The initial phase of the project consisted of assembling a list of bacteria capable of sequestering or facilitating mineral transport. The development and optimization of the PCR amplification assay for the detection of the organisms of interest, and the examination of regional groundwaters for those organisms, are presented for subsequent research.

  5. Hungarian population data on seven PCR-based loci.

    PubMed

    Budowle, B; Woller, J; Koons, B W; Furedi, S; Errera, J D; Padar, Z

    1996-07-01

    Hungarian population data for the loci LDLR, GYPA, HBGG, D7S8, Gc, HLA-DQA1, and D1S80 were generated. The genotype frequency distributions for the loci do not deviate from Hardy Weinberg expectations. Furthermore, there was little evidence for departures from expectations of independence between the loci. Using a test for homogeneity all the loci were similar between two Hungarian population samples and only the HLA-DQA1 locus was statistically different between Hungarians and US Caucasians. There generally would be little forensic differences, whether a Hungarian or a US Caucasian database was used, for estimating multiple locus profile frequencies for the seven PCR-based loci. PMID:8754580

  6. High-throughput single-cell PCR using microfluidic emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Mira; Mazutis, Linas; Agresti, Jeremy; Sommer, Morten; Dantas, Gautam; Church, George; Turnbaugh, Peter; Weitz, David

    2012-02-01

    The human gut and other environmental samples contain large populations of diverse bacteria that are poorly characterized and unculturable, yet have many functions relevant to human health. Our goal is to identify exactly which species carry some gene of interest, such as a carbohydrate metabolism gene. Conventional metagenomic assays sequence DNA extracted in bulk from populations of mixed cell types, and are therefore unable to associate a gene of interest with a species-identifying 16S gene, to determine that the two genes originated from the same cell. We solve this problem by microfluidically encapsulating single bacteria cells in drops, using PCR to amplify the two genes inside any drop whose encapsulated cell contains both genes, and sequencing the DNA from those drops that contain both amplification products.

  7. STS-79 payload SPACEHAB in PCR at LC39A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Workers in the Payload Changeout Room (PCR) at Launch Pad 39A are preparing to close the payload doors for flight on the Space Shuttle Atlantis, targeted for liftoff on Mission STS-79 around September 12. The SPACEHAB Double Module located in the aft area of the payload bay is filled with supplies that will be transferred to the Russian Space Station Mir. STS-79 marks the second flight of a SPACEHAB in support of the Shuttle-Mir dockings, and the first flight of the double-module configuration. The SPACEHAB is connected by tunnel to the Orbiter Docking System (ODS), with the Androgynous Peripheral Docking System (APDS) clearly visible on top of the ODS. The APDS provides the docking interface for the linkup with Mir, while the ODS provides a passageway from the orbiter to the Russian space station and the SPACEHAB.

  8. Rapid diagnosis of strangles (Streptococcus equi subspecies equi) using PCR.

    PubMed

    Cordoni, Guido; Williams, Adele; Durham, Andy; Florio, Daniela; Zanoni, Renato Giulio; La Ragione, Roberto M

    2015-10-01

    Strangles is one of the most common equine infectious diseases with serious health, welfare and socio-economic impact. However, the detection of Streptococcus equi subspecies equi can be challenging and persistently infected carriers are common. Furthermore, the use of classical microbiology can result in an underestimation of the prevalence of the disease. The difficulties associated with the slow diagnosis of Strangles can result in rapid spread of the disease. Therefore, rapid and economical diagnostic tests are urgently required. Here, two multiplex assays, were developed and validated for the detection of S. equi and S. equi subspecies zooepidemicus, the most common differential diagnosis. Using 59 S. equi and 59 S. zooepidemicus strains collected from various geographical areas, the PCR tests demonstrated a sensitivity of 95% and a specificity of 98%. Furthermore, the assay can be performed directly from clinical swabs. Thus, the assays designed here provide a rapid, reliable and economical solution for the diagnosis of Strangles.

  9. Real-time PCR detection of ruminant DNA.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Romero, Luis; Verkaar, Edward L C; Savelkoul, Paul H; Catsburg, Arnold; Aarts, Henk J M; Buntjer, Jaap B; Lenstra, Johannes A

    2004-03-01

    To control the spread of bovine spongiform encephalopathy, several DNA methods have been described for the detection of the species origin of meat and bone meal. Most of these methods are based on the amplification of a mitochondrial DNA segment. We have developed a semiquantitative method based on real-time PCR for detection of ruminant DNA, targeting an 88-bp segment of the ruminant short interspersed nuclear element Bov-A2. This method is specific for ruminants and is able to detect as little as 10 fg of bovine DNA. Autoclaving decreased the amount of detectable DNA, but positive signals were observed in feeding stuff containing 10% bovine material if this had not been rendered in accordance with the regulations, i.e., heated at 134 degrees C for 3 instead of 20 min. PMID:15035372

  10. Molecular diagnosis of sex chromosome aneuploidy using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Mutter, G L; Pomponio, R J

    1991-08-11

    Numeric sex chromosome imbalances, or aneuploidies, are present in several pathological conditions including tumors, abnormal gestations, and clinical syndromes. Here we report a method to identify karyotypic imbalances of the X and Y chromosomes using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The polymerase chain reaction was used to quantitatively coamplify the sex chromosome linked genes ZFX and ZFY. Quantitation was facilitated by 1) use of a single primer set which recognizes both templates, 2) incorporation of radiolabelled nucleotides during amplification, and 3) use of amplification conditions which minimize heteroduplex formation. High accuracy of the method was confirmed by concordance with values expected from titrated male and female DNAs and cells from patients with sex chromosome aneuploidy. This approach provides a rapid and reproducible method of evaluating relative abundance of allelic genes, and might be applied to detection of autosomal aneuploidy.

  11. PCR detection of Neospora caninum in water buffalo foetal tissues.

    PubMed

    Auriemma, Clementina; Lucibelli, Maria Gabriella; Borriello, Giorgia; De Carlo, Esterina; Martucciello, Alessandra; Schiavo, Lorena; Gallo, Amalia; Bove, Francesca; Corrado, Federica; Girardi, Santa; Amoroso, Maria Grazia; Ďegli Uberti, Barbara; Galiero, Giorgio

    2014-03-01

    The seroprevalence of Neospora caninum was surveyed by an ELISA kit on two water buffalo herds of Southern Italy. Seropositive samples were detected in 47% and 59% of individuals, respectively, thus indicating high level of exposure to the parasite even if the possibility of vertical transmission cannot be excluded. Tissue samples collected from three aborted fetuses from the same herds were investigated for N. caninum presence by PCR assays targeting the 18S and the Nc5 DNA sequences, respectively. Both methods have shown the presence of N. caninum DNA in heart and brain. Sequencing of the Nc5 genomic DNA confirmed the presence of N. caninum in the samples; phylogenetic analysis of the obtained sequences showed high homology among the Neospora recovered from different samples. The present study suggests an important role of N. caninum as a possible abortive agent for water buffaloes.

  12. PCR-based isolation of microsatellite arrays (PIMA).

    PubMed

    Lin, Heng-Sheng; Chang, Song-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Microsatellite is one of the most high-speed developing genetic markers for its wide application in molecular biology researches. It is proved to be a powerful marker-assisted tool in genetic relationship identification, the inheritance breeding, the population genetics, the physical map construction, the management and security of germplasm. These short tandem repeats loci are distributed throughout the eukaryotic genome. They represent not only highly conservative trait but also significant differentiation properties between individuals, making it advantageous over other molecular markers. Traditionally, hard labor is required for isolating these loci and the flanking sequences, including small fragment DNA library construction, DNA cloning, radioactive hybridization, sequencing, and microsatellite test. PIMA is a relatively simple microsatellite isolation technique which avoids not only library construction but also radioactivity manipulation. This approach builds on random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) process but investigates microsatellite arrays by repeat-specific PCR rather than radioactive hybridization. PIMA screening microsatellites use one repeat-specific and two vector primers to run PCR. A number of useful vectors are widely circulated and the repeat-specific primer is easy to obtain. The advantages of obtaining both flank sequences simultaneously, no need of specific sequencing primers, the ease of operation, and well amplification of bacterial colonies persuade us of its high value. It prevails other tools because of its traits of cheaper, high-efficient, and relatively lower requirement of specialized equipment tool. Since no protocol is universal and perfect for every species, it is recommended that modification should be made according to the objective of the experiments. Existing examples serve as good sources of future works. PMID:23546782

  13. [Study on the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype].

    PubMed

    Hong, Xiao-Zhen; Shao, Xiao-Chun; Xu, Xian-Guo; Hu, Qing-Fa; Wu, Jun-Jie; Zhu, Fa-Ming; Fu, Qi-Hua; Yan, Li-Xing

    2005-12-01

    To investigate the molecular genetics basis for one para-Bombay phenotype, the red blood cell phenotype of the proband was characterized by standard serological techniques. Exon 6 and 7 of ABO gene, the entire coding region of FUT1 gene and FUT2 gene were amplified by polymerase chain reaction from genomic DNA of the proband respectively. The PCR products were purified by agarose gels and directly sequenced. The PCR-SSP and genescan were performed to confirm the mutations detected by sequencing. The results showed that the proband ABO genotype was A(102)A(102). Two heterozygous mutations of FUT1 gene, an A to G transition at position 682 and AG deletion at position 547-552 were detected in the proband. A682G could cause transition of Met-->Val at amino acid position 228, AG deletion at position 547-552 caused a reading frame shift and a premature stop codon. The FUT2 genotype was heterozygous for a functional allele Se(357) and a weakly functional allele Se(357), 385 (T/T homozygous at position 357 and A/T heterozygous at 385 position). It is concluded that the compound heterozygous mutation--a novel A682G missense mutation and a 547-552 del AG is the molecular mechanism of this para-Bombay phenotype.

  14. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing.

  15. Development of a novel immuno-PCR for detection of avian leukosis virus.

    PubMed

    Xie, Quan; Zhang, Jianjun; Shao, Hongxia; Wan, Zhimin; Tian, Xiaoyan; Yang, Jialiang; Pang, Mayun; Qian, Kun; Gao, Wei; Wang, Chengming; Qin, Aijian; Ye, Jianqiang

    2016-10-01

    Avian leukosis virus (ALV) is an important pathogen for various neoplasms, including lymphoid, myeloid, and erythroid neoplasms, and it causes significant economic loss in the poultry industry. Several efficient methods for the detection of ALV have been reported. However, these previously developed approaches are based on either PCR or immunoassays. Here, we used a proximity ligation technique and combined PCR with the immunoassay to develop a novel immuno-PCR (Im-PCR) approach for the detection of ALV. Our data showed that the Im-PCR had high specificity and sensitivity to ALV. The Im-PCR method selectively reacted to ALV but not to the other avian viruses tested. The limit of detection of Im-PCR could reach 0.5 TCID50. Moreover, the results of Im-PCR were in agreement with results from commercial ELISA when the clinical cloaca samples were used for ALV detection. The present results demonstrate that the novel Im-PCR method can be efficiently applied to detect ALV in a clinical setting. Our data also highlight that Im-PCR may have promising applications in the diagnosis of pathogens.

  16. Simplified development of multiplex real-time PCR through master mix augmented by universal fluorogenic reporters.

    PubMed

    Wadle, Simon; Lehnert, Michael; Schuler, Friedrich; Köppel, René; Serr, Annerose; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Mediator probe (MP) PCR is a real-time PCR approach that uses standardized universal fluorogenic reporter oligonucleotides (UR) in conjunction with label-free sequence-specific probes. To enable multiplex real-time MP PCR, we designed a set of five optimized URs with different fluorescent labels. Performance of the optimized URs was verified in multiplex real-time MP PCR for the detection of a pentaplex food panel and a quadruplex methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) panel. Results were comparable to corresponding multiplex hydrolysis probe (HP) PCR, also designated as TaqMan PCR. Analyses of MRSA DNA standards and DNA extracted from patient swab samples showed improved lower limits of detection (LoDs) by a factor of 2-5 when using quadruplex real-time MP PCR instead of HP PCR. The novel set of standardized URs we present here simplifies development of multiplex real-time PCR assays by requiring only the design of label-free probes. In the future, real-time PCR master mixes could be augmented with up to five standardized fluorogenic URs, each emitting light at a different wavelength.

  17. Simplified development of multiplex real-time PCR through master mix augmented by universal fluorogenic reporters.

    PubMed

    Wadle, Simon; Lehnert, Michael; Schuler, Friedrich; Köppel, René; Serr, Annerose; Zengerle, Roland; von Stetten, Felix

    2016-01-01

    Mediator probe (MP) PCR is a real-time PCR approach that uses standardized universal fluorogenic reporter oligonucleotides (UR) in conjunction with label-free sequence-specific probes. To enable multiplex real-time MP PCR, we designed a set of five optimized URs with different fluorescent labels. Performance of the optimized URs was verified in multiplex real-time MP PCR for the detection of a pentaplex food panel and a quadruplex methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) panel. Results were comparable to corresponding multiplex hydrolysis probe (HP) PCR, also designated as TaqMan PCR. Analyses of MRSA DNA standards and DNA extracted from patient swab samples showed improved lower limits of detection (LoDs) by a factor of 2-5 when using quadruplex real-time MP PCR instead of HP PCR. The novel set of standardized URs we present here simplifies development of multiplex real-time PCR assays by requiring only the design of label-free probes. In the future, real-time PCR master mixes could be augmented with up to five standardized fluorogenic URs, each emitting light at a different wavelength. PMID:27625206

  18. PCR biocompatibility of lab-on-a-chip and MEMS materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christensen, T. B.; Pedersen, C. M.; Gröndahl, K. G.; Jensen, T. G.; Sekulovic, A.; Bang, D. D.; Wolff, A.

    2007-08-01

    DNA amplification using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important tool in biotechnology, pathogen surveillance in food, medical and forensic science etc. The PCR technique is now an important part of the research in and development of miniaturized biochemical analysis systems. However, reduced or no DNA amplification at all is an important challenge for microfabricated PCR devices due to a negative interaction between PCR chemicals and the surrounding environment, i.e. the materials encapsulating the PCR mix. Materials of special interest regarding PCR compatibility are silicon, glass and polymers, which are important in the fabrication of microelectromechanical systems (MEMS), micro total analysis systems (µTAS) and lab-on-a-chip (LOC) systems. The PCR inhibition effect is a particularly important phenomenon in microsystems due to an increased surface-to-volume ratio which enhances the possibility of interaction between the surfaces and ingredients in the PCR mixture. By proper surface treatment the PCR reaction can be facilitated and in this paper we present a systematic and quantitative study of the impact on the PCR compatibility of a chemical and a biological surface treatment. The chemical treatments are based on the silanizing agent dichlordimethylsilane [(CH3)2SiCl2

  19. A mathematical model and a computerized simulation of PCR using complex templates.

    PubMed Central

    Rubin, E; Levy, A A

    1996-01-01

    A mathematical model and a computer simulation were used to study PCR specificity. The model describes the occurrences of non-targeted PCR products formed through random primer-template interactions. The PCR simulation scans DNA sequence databases with primers pairs. According to the model prediction, PCR with complex templates should rarely yield non-targeted products under typical reaction conditions. This is surprising as such products are often amplified in real PCR under conditions optimized for stringency. The causes for this 'PCR paradox' were investigated by comparing the model predictions with simulation results. We found that deviations from randomness in sequences from real genomes could not explain the frequent occurrence of non-targeted products in real PCR. The most likely explanation to the 'PCR paradox' is a relatively high tolerance of PCR to mismatches. The model also predicts that mismatch tolerance has the strongest effect on the number of non-targeted products, followed by primer length, template size and product size limit. The model and the simulation can be utilized for PCR studies, primer design and probing DNA uniqueness and randomness. PMID:8836180

  20. Comparison of PCR-based approaches to molecular epidemiologic analysis of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed Central

    Collier, M C; Stock, F; DeGirolami, P C; Samore, M H; Cartwright, C P

    1996-01-01

    Representative isolates of the 10 serogroups of Clostridium difficile and 39 clinical isolates (30 toxigenic and 9 nontoxigenic), including 5 isolates from a confirmed nosocomial outbreak, were analyzed by using two previously described arbitrary-primer PCR (AP-PCR) molecular typing methodologies (AP-PG05 and AP-ARB11) and PCR ribotyping. The two AP-PCR methods investigated gave comparable results; AP-PG05 and AP-ARB11 identified 8 and 7 groups among the serogroup isolates and classified the clinical isolates into 21 and 20 distinct groups, respectively. PCR ribotyping also identified 8 unique groups among the serogroup isolates but classified the clinical isolates into 23 groups. In addition, when results obtained by the PCR methods were compared with typing data generated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE), PCR ribotyping and PFGE were found to be in agreement for 83% (29 of 35) of isolates typeable by both techniques while AP-PG05 was in agreement with PFGE for 60% (20 of 33) and AP-ARB11 was in agreement with PFGE for only 44% (17 of 36). These results indicate that PCR ribotyping is a more discriminatory approach than AP-PCR for typing C. difficile and, furthermore, that this technique generates results that are in higher concordance with those obtained by using an established method for differentiating isolates of this organism on a molecular level than are results generated by using AP-PCR. PMID:8727893

  1. Evaluation of a PCR/ESI-MS platform to identify respiratory viruses from nasopharyngeal aspirates.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yong; Fu, Yongfeng; Xu, Menghua; Su, Liyun; Cao, Lingfeng; Xu, Jin; Cheng, Xunjia

    2015-11-01

    Acute respiratory tract infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in infants and young children. High-throughput, accurate, broad-range tools for etiologic diagnosis are critical for effective epidemic control. In this study, the diagnostic capacities of an Ibis platform based on the PCR/ESI-MS assay were evaluated using clinical samples. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected from 120 children (<5 years old) who were hospitalized with lower respiratory tract infections between November 2010 and October 2011. The respiratory virus detection assay was performed using the PCR/ESI-MS assay and the DFA. The discordant PCR/ESI-MS and DFA results were resolved with RT-PCR plus sequencing. The overall agreement for PCR/ESI-MS and DFA was 98.3% (118/120). Compared with the results from DFA, the sensitivity and specificity of the PCR/ESI-MS assay were 100% and 97.5%, respectively. The PCR/ESI-MS assay also detected more multiple virus infections and revealed more detailed subtype information than DFA. Among the 12 original specimens with discordant results between PCR/ESI-MS and DFA, 11 had confirmed PCR/ESI-MS results. Thus, the PCR/ESI-MS assay is a high-throughput, sensitive, specific and promising method to detect and subtype conventional viruses in respiratory tract infections and allows rapid identification of mixed pathogens.

  2. Real-time-PCR assay for diagnosis of Entamoeba histolytica infection.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shantanu; Kabir, Mamun; Mondal, Dinesh; Ali, Ibne Karim M; Petri, William A; Haque, Rashidul

    2005-05-01

    We developed a real-time-PCR assay utilizing a molecular-beacon probe for the detection of Entamoeba histolytica and compared its sensitivity to stool antigen detection and traditional PCR. A total of 205 stool and liver abscess pus specimens from patients and controls were used for this purpose, 101 (49%) of which were positive by the TechLab E. histolytica-specific antigen detection test, while the other 104 (51%) stool and liver abscess pus specimens were negative by the antigen detection test. DNA was extracted from the stool and liver abscess pus specimens by the QIAGEN method and the small-subunit rRNA gene of E. histolytica and then amplified by traditional and real-time PCR. Out of these 205 stool and liver abscess pus specimens, 124 were positive by the real-time-PCR assay and 90 were positive by the traditional-PCR test. Compared to the real-time-PCR assay, the antigen detection test was 79% sensitive and 96% specific. When the traditional-PCR test results were compared to the real-time-PCR assay, the sensitivity of traditional PCR was 72% and the specificity was 99%. In conclusion, all three methods for the detection of E. histolytica were highly specific, with real-time PCR being the most sensitive.

  3. Development of a novel PCR-RFLP assay for improved detection and typing of bovine papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Kawauchi, Kyoko; Takahashi, Chiaki; Ishihara, Ryoko; Hatama, Shinichi

    2015-06-15

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was developed to detect and type bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) from tumors in cattle. Two degenerate primer sets targeting the BPV L1 gene, subAup/subAdw and subBup/subBdw, and one restriction enzyme RsaI were used in this assay. In silico analyses of the restriction enzyme sites in the PCR fragments of 13 BPV sequences (BPV-1 to -13) revealed that all known BPVs are differentiated by the PCR-RFLP assay. Analyses of 63 previously typed clinical samples, that included teat papillomas and both esophageal and urinary bladder cancer biopsies, show that the assay clearly differentiates between eight clinically important BPV types (BPV-1 to -6, -9, -10), and discriminates between single and multiple infections. To further assess the reliability of the PCR-RFLP method amplified fragments were sequenced. A high correlation (95%) was observed when the results of the PCR-RFLP method were compared with PCR-sequencing. Differences in typing occurred for 3 of 63 specimens; PCR-RFLP identified additional BPV types in these specimens, while the PCR-sequencing identified only one. These results indicate that the PCR-RFLP method reported here is simpler and more reliable in the detection and typing of BPVs from bovine tumor samples than PCR-sequencing.

  4. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing. PMID:26210470

  5. Modified COLD-PCR for detection of minor microorganisms in wine samples during the fermentation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Masayuki; Masaki, Kazuo; Mizuno, Akihiro; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami

    2014-05-01

    The detection of low-abundant microorganism is difficult when in a sample in which a specific microorganism represents an overwhelming majority using polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. A modified CO-amplification at Lower Denaturation temperature PCR (mCOLD-PCR) method was developed to detect low-abundant microorganisms using a double-strand RNA probe to inhibit the amplification of the sequence of a major microorganism. Combining the mCOLD-PCR and downstream application (e.g., denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and next-generation sequencing (NGS)), low-abundant microorganisms were detected more efficiently, even when a specific microorganism represents an overwhelming majority of the sample. We demonstrated that mCOLD-PCR-DGGE enabled us to detect Schizosaccharomyces pombe in a model sample coexisting with 10,000 times as many Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When mCOLD-PCR-DGGE was applied in the microbiota analysis of a fermenting white wine, Candida sp. and Cladosporium sp., which were not detected by conventional PCR, were detected. According to the NGS analysis after mCOLD-PCR of a fermenting red wine, the detection ratio of Saccharomyces was decreased dramatically, and the detection ratios of other microorganisms and the numbers of genera detected were increased compared with the conventional PCR. Thus, the application of mCOLD-PCR will reveal comprehensive microbiota of fermented foods, beverages, and so on.

  6. Determination of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus in breast milk of healthy women by digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Qian, L; Song, H; Cai, W

    2016-09-01

    Breast milk is one of the most important sources of postnatal microbes. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is currently used for the quantitative analysis of bacterial 16S rRNA genes in breast milk. However, this method relies on the use of standard curves and is imprecise when quantitating target DNA of low abundance. In contrast, droplet digital PCR (DD-PCR) provides an absolute quantitation without the need for calibration curves. A comparison between DD-PCR and qRT-PCR was conducted for the quantitation of Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus 16S RNA genes in human breast milk, and the impacts of selected maternal factors were studied on the composition of these two bacteria in breast milk. From this study, DD-PCR reported between 0-34,460 16S rRNA gene copies of Bifidobacterium genera and between 1,108-634,000 16S rRNA gene copies of Lactobacillus genera in 1 ml breast milk. The 16S rRNA gene copy number of Lactobacillus genera was much greater than that of Bifidobacterium genera in breast milk. DD-PCR showed a 10-fold lower limit of quantitation as compared to qRT-PCR. A higher correlation and agreement was observed between qRT-PCR and DD-PCR in Lactobacillus quantitation as compared to Bifidobacterium quantitation. Based on our DD-PCR quantitation, a low abundance of Bifidobacterium bacteria in breast milk was correlated to higher pre-pregnancy body mass index (BMI). However, no significant difference was observed for these two bacteria in breast milk between mothers who had vaginal deliveries and caesarean deliveries. This study suggests that DD-PCR is a better tool to quantitate the bacterial load of breast milk compared to the conventional qRT-PCR method. The number of breast milk Bifidobacterium bacteria is influenced by maternal pre-pregnancy BMI.

  7. Nested PCR detection of malaria directly using blood filter paper samples from epidemiological surveys

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Nested PCR is considered a sensitive and specific method for detecting malaria parasites and is especially useful in epidemiological surveys. However, the preparation of DNA templates for PCR is often time-consuming and costly. Methods A simplified PCR method was developed to directly use a small blood filter paper square (2 × 2 mm) as the DNA template after treatment with saponin. This filter paper-based nested PCR method (FP-PCR) was compared to microscopy and standard nested PCR with DNA extracted by using a Qiagen DNA mini kit from filter paper blood spots of 204 febrile cases. The FP-PCR technique was further applied to evaluate malaria infections in 1,708 participants from cross-sectional epidemiological surveys conducted in Myanmar and Thailand. Results The FP-PCR method had a detection limit of ~0.2 parasites/μL blood, estimated using cultured Plasmodium falciparum parasites. With 204 field samples, the sensitivity of the FP-PCR method was comparable to that of the standard nested PCR method, which was significantly higher than that of microscopy. Application of the FP-PCR method in large cross-sectional studies conducted in Myanmar and Thailand detected 1.9% (12/638) and 6.2% (66/1,070) asymptomatic Plasmodium infections, respectively, as compared to the detection rates of 1.3% (8/638) and 0.04% (4/1,070) by microscopy. Conclusion This FP-PCR method was much more sensitive than microscopy in detecting Plasmodium infections. It drastically increased the detection sensitivity of asymptomatic infections in cross-sectional surveys conducted in Thailand and Myanmar, suggesting that this FP-PCR method has a potential for future applications in malaria epidemiology studies. PMID:24884761

  8. Detection of Histoplasma capsulatum from clinical specimens by cycling probe-based real-time PCR and nested real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Muraosa, Yasunori; Toyotome, Takahito; Yahiro, Maki; Watanabe, Akira; Shikanai-Yasuda, Maria Aparecida; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2016-05-01

    We developed new cycling probe-based real-time PCR and nested real-time PCR assays for the detection of Histoplasma capsulatum that were designed to detect the gene encoding N-acetylated α-linked acidic dipeptidase (NAALADase), which we previously identified as an H. capsulatum antigen reacting with sera from patients with histoplasmosis. Both assays specifically detected the DNAs of all H. capsulatum strains but not those of other fungi or human DNA. The limited of detection (LOD) of the real-time PCR assay was 10 DNA copies when using 10-fold serial dilutions of the standard plasmid DNA and 50 DNA copies when using human serum spiked with standard plasmid DNA. The nested real-time PCR improved the LOD to 5 DNA copies when using human serum spiked with standard plasmid DNA, which represents a 10-fold higher than that observed with the real-time PCR assay. To assess the ability of the two assays to diagnose histoplasmosis, we analyzed a small number of clinical specimens collected from five patients with histoplasmosis, such as sera (n = 4), formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue (n = 4), and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) (n = 1). Although clinical sensitivity of the real-time PCR assay was insufficiently sensitive (33%), the nested real-time PCR assay increased the clinical sensitivity (77%), suggesting it has a potential to be a useful method for detecting H. capsulatum DNA in clinical specimens.

  9. Comparison of digital PCR platforms and semi-nested qPCR as a tool to determine the size of the HIV reservoir

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, K. J.; Nijhuis, M.; van Ham, P. M.; Wensing, A. M. J.; Vervisch, K.; Vandekerckhove, L.; De Spiegelaere, W.

    2015-01-01

    HIV persists in latently infected cells of patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). This persistent proviral DNA reservoir is an important predictor of viral rebound upon therapy failure or interruption and forms a major obstacle towards cure. Accurate quantification of the low levels of persisting HIV DNA may aid patient monitoring and cure research. Digital PCR is a promising tool that enables direct absolute quantification with high sensitivity. With recent technological advances, several platforms are available to implement digital PCR in a clinical setting. Here, we compared two digital PCR platforms, the Quantstudio 3D (Life Technologies) and the QX100 (Bio-Rad) with a semi-nested qPCR on serial HIV DNA dilutions and DNA isolated from PBMCs of ART-suppressed patients. All three methods were able to detect target to the lowest levels of 2.5 HIV DNA copies. The QX100 excelled in having the least bias and highest precision, efficiency and quantitative linearity. Patient sample quantifications by the QX100 and semi-nested qPCR were highly agreeable by Bland-Altman analysis (0.01 ± 0.32 log10). Due to the observation of false-positive signals with current digital PCR platforms however, semi-nested qPCR may still be preferred in a setup of low quantity detection to discriminate between presence or absence of HIV DNA. PMID:26350506

  10. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR (FPNI-PCR): a new high-efficiency strategy for rapid chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The advent of genomics-based technologies has revolutionized many fields of biological enquiry. However, chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning is still a necessary and important procedure to determining gene structure. Such methods are used to identify T-DNA insertion sites and so are especially relevant for organisms where large T-DNA insertion libraries have been created, such as rice and Arabidopsis. The currently available methods for flanking sequence cloning, including the popular TAIL-PCR technique, are relatively laborious and slow. Results Here, we report a simple and effective fusion primer and nested integrated PCR method (FPNI-PCR) for the identification and cloning of unknown genomic regions flanked known sequences. In brief, a set of universal primers was designed that consisted of various 15-16 base arbitrary degenerate oligonucleotides. These arbitrary degenerate primers were fused to the 3' end of an adaptor oligonucleotide which provided a known sequence without degenerate nucleotides, thereby forming the fusion primers (FPs). These fusion primers are employed in the first step of an integrated nested PCR strategy which defines the overall FPNI-PCR protocol. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel strategy, we have successfully used it to isolate multiple genomic sequences namely, 21 orthologs of genes in various species of Rosaceace, 4 MYB genes of Rosa rugosa, 3 promoters of transcription factors of Petunia hybrida, and 4 flanking sequences of T-DNA insertion sites in transgenic tobacco lines and 6 specific genes from sequenced genome of rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusions The successful amplification of target products through FPNI-PCR verified that this novel strategy is an effective, low cost and simple procedure. Furthermore, FPNI-PCR represents a more sensitive, rapid and accurate technique than the established TAIL-PCR and hiTAIL-PCR procedures. PMID:22093809

  11. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays.

  12. Further improvement and validation of MagMAX-96 AI/ND viral RNA isolation for efficient removal of RT-PCR inhibitors from cloacal swabs and tissues for rapid diagnosis of avian influenza virus by RT reverse transcription PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Real time RT-PCR (RRT-PCR) is a high throughput molecular diagnostic test used for rapid detection of avian influenza virus (AIV) in clinical samples. However the performance of RRT-PCR can be adversely affected by RT-PCR inhibitors present in the sample. The tested commercial RNA extraction kits ...

  13. Ethidium monoazide does not inhibit RT-PCR amplification of nonviable avian influenza RNA.

    PubMed

    Graiver, David A; Saunders, Samuel E; Topliff, Christina L; Kelling, Clayton L; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L

    2010-03-01

    A critical obstacle to using PCR to quantify viral titers is the distinguishment of viable and nonviable genomic material. Pretreatments of ethidium monoazide (EMA) have been effective in preventing PCR amplification of DNA from nonviable bacteria. To test whether an EMA pretreatment could be used with RT-PCR to quantify viable RNA virions, avian influenza virus (AIV) survival was measured in water through 28d using cell culture titration and real-time RT-PCR with or without EMA pretreatment. Cell culture titration yielded significantly lower titers than both RT-PCR procedures, and there was no significant difference between RT-PCR results with or without EMA. Ineffective binding of EMA to AIV RNA may have allowed nonviable AIV RNA to amplify. Furthermore, since AIV inactivation may take place by means other than membrane disruption, any pretreatment distinguishing viable and nonviable AIV virions by membrane integrity may not be practical.

  14. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES

    PubMed Central

    STAGGEMEIER, Rodrigo; BORTOLUZZI, Marina; HECK, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; SPILKI, Fernando Rosado; ALMEIDA, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively. PMID:26422153

  15. QUANTITATIVE VS. CONVENTIONAL PCR FOR DETECTION OF HUMAN ADENOVIRUSES IN WATER AND SEDIMENT SAMPLES.

    PubMed

    Staggemeier, Rodrigo; Bortoluzzi, Marina; Heck, Tatiana Moraes da Silva; Spilki, Fernando Rosado; Almeida, Sabrina Esteves de Matos

    2015-01-01

    Human Adenoviruses (HAdV) are notably resistant in the environment. These agents may serve as effective indicators of fecal contamination, and may act as causative agents of a number of different diseases in human beings. Conventional polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and, more recently, quantitative PCR (qPCR) are widely used for detection of viral agents in environmental matrices. In the present study PCR and SYBR(r)Green qPCR assays were compared for detection of HAdV in water (55) and sediments (20) samples of spring and artesian wells, ponds and streams, collected from dairy farms. By the quantitative methodology HAdV were detected in 87.3% of the water samples and 80% of the sediments, while by the conventional PCR 47.3% and 35% were detected in water samples and sediments, respectively.

  16. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR. PMID:12470637

  17. Real time PCR on disposable PDMS chip with a miniaturized thermal cycler.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Q; Xu, B; Fu, R; Li, D

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents the design and implementation of a low-cost miniature PCR device consisting of a disposable reactor chip and a miniature thermal cycler. The simple fabrication of the PCR chip by PDMS (Polydimethylsiloxane) does not need micro-machining or photolithography processes. The thermal cycler was built with a thin film heater for heating and a fan for rapid cooling. This device can perform PCR tests in a single well chip or a multiple-well chip. It can run PCR reactions of different volumes to meet specific application requirements. The smallest reaction volume tested in this work is 0.9 microL. In addition, this device fits any standard fluorescence microscope for real time detection, which makes real time PCR affordable for most research labs and clinics with a fluorescence microscope. Real-time PCR of E. coli stx1 has been demonstrated with the device described. PMID:16404505

  18. Integrated real-time PCR for detection and monitoring of Legionella pneumophila in water systems.

    PubMed

    Yaradou, Diaraf Farba; Hallier-Soulier, Sylvie; Moreau, Sophie; Poty, Florence; Hillion, Yves; Reyrolle, Monique; André, Janine; Festoc, Gabriel; Delabre, Karine; Vandenesch, François; Etienne, Jerome; Jarraud, Sophie

    2007-03-01

    We evaluated a ready-to-use real-time quantitative Legionella pneumophila PCR assay system by testing 136 hot-water-system samples collected from 55 sites as well as 49 cooling tower samples collected from 20 different sites, in parallel with the standard culture method. The PCR assay was reproducible and suitable for routine quantification of L. pneumophila. An acceptable correlation between PCR and culture results was obtained for sanitary hot-water samples but not for cooling tower samples. We also monitored the same L. pneumophila-contaminated cooling tower for 13 months by analyzing 104 serial samples. The culture and PCR results were extremely variable over time, but the curves were similar. The differences between the PCR and culture results did not change over time and were not affected by regular biocide treatment. This ready-to-use PCR assay for L. pneumophila quantification could permit more timely disinfection of cooling towers. PMID:17194840

  19. Detection of hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) in wild shrimp from India by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR).

    PubMed

    Manjanaik, B; Umesha, K R; Karunasagar, Indrani; Karunasagar, Iddya

    2005-02-28

    The prevalence of hepatopancreatic parvovirus (HPV) in wild penaeid shrimp samples from India was studied by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers designed in our laboratory. The virus could be detected in 9 out of 119 samples by non-nested PCR. However, by nested PCR 69 out of 119 samples were positive. The PCR results were confirmed by hybridization with digoxigenin-labelled DNA probe. Shrimp species positive by non-nested PCR included Penaeus monodon, Penaeus indicus and Penaeus semisulcatus and by nested PCR Parapenaeopsis stylifera, Penaeus japonicus, Metapenaeus monoceros, M. affinis, M. elegans, M. dobsoni, M. ensis and Solenocera choprai. This is the first report on the prevalence of HPV in captured wild shrimp from India. PMID:15819441

  20. Kinetic characterisation of primer mismatches in allele-specific PCR: a quantitative assessment.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Christy M; Eisenthal, Robert; Cobb, Benjamin D

    2002-12-20

    A novel method of estimating the kinetic parameters of Taq DNA polymerase during rapid cycle PCR is presented. A model was constructed using a simplified sigmoid function to represent substrate accumulation during PCR in combination with the general equation describing high substrate inhibition for Michaelis-Menten enzymes. The PCR progress curve was viewed as a series of independent reactions where initial rates were accurately measured for each cycle. Kinetic parameters were obtained for allele-specific PCR (AS-PCR) amplification to examine the effect of mismatches on amplification. A high degree of correlation was obtained providing evidence of substrate inhibition as a major cause of the plateau phase that occurs in the later cycles of PCR.

  1. Evaluation of the use of PCR and reverse transcriptase PCR for detection of pathogenic bacteria in biosolids from anaerobic digestors and aerobic composters.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, Carola; Wuertz, Stefan

    2003-08-01

    A PCR-based method and a reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR)-based method were developed for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in organic waste, using Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, Yersinia enterocolitica, and Staphylococcus aureus as model organisms. In seeded organic waste samples, detection limits of less than 10 cells per g of organic waste were achieved after one-step enrichment of bacteria, isolation, and purification of DNA or RNA before PCR or RT-PCR amplification. To test the reproducibility and reliability of the newly developed methods, 46 unseeded samples were collected from diverse aerobic (composting) facilities and anaerobic digestors and analyzed by both culture-based classical and newly developed PCR-based procedures. No false-positive but some false-negative results were generated by the PCR- or RT-PCR-based methods after one-step enrichment when compared to the classical detection methods. The results indicated that the level of activity of the tested bacteria in unseeded samples was very low compared to that of freshly inoculated cells, preventing samples from reaching the cell density required for PCR-based detection after one-step enrichment. However, for Salmonella spp., a distinct PCR product could be obtained for all 22 nonamended samples that tested positive for Salmonella spp. by the classical detection procedure when a selective two-step enrichment (20 h in peptone water at 37 degrees C and 24 h in Rappaport Vassiliadis medium at 43 degrees C) was performed prior to nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Hence, the classical procedure was shortened, since cell plating and further differentiation of isolated colonies can be omitted, substituted for by highly sensitive and reliable detection based on nucleic acid extraction and PCR. Similarly, 2 of the 22 samples in which Salmonella spp. were detected also tested positive for Listeria monocytogenes according to a two-step enrichment procedure followed by PCR, compared to 3 samples

  2. Digital PCR to assess hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Stahl, Tanja; Böhme, Manja U; Kröger, Nicolaus; Fehse, Boris

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of hematopoietic chimerism after allogeneic stem cell transplantation represents a crucial method to evaluate donor-cell engraftment. Whereas sensitivity of classical approaches for chimerism monitoring is limited to ≥1%, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)-based techniques readily detect one patient cell in >1,000 donor cells, thus facilitating application of chimerism assessment as a surrogate for minimal residual disease. However, due to methodologic specificities, qPCR combines its high sensitivity with limited resolution power in the state of mixed chimerism (e.g., >10% patient cells). Our aim was to overcome this limitation by employing a further development of qPCR, namely digital PCR (dPCR), for chimerism analysis. For proof-of-principle, we established more than 10 dPCR assays detecting Indel polymorphisms or Y-chromosome sequences and tested them on artificial cell mixtures and patient samples. Employing artificial cell mixtures, we found that dPCR allows exact quantification of chimerism over several orders of magnitude. Digital PCR results proved to be highly reproducible (deviation <5%), particularly in the "difficult" range of mixed chimerism. Excellent performance of the new assays was confirmed by analysis of multiple retrospective blood samples from patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation, in comparison with established qPCR (14 patients) and short-tandem repeat PCR (4 patients) techniques. Finally, dPCR is easy to perform, needs only small amounts of DNA for chimerism assessment (65 ng corresponds to a sensitivity of approximately 0.03%), and does not require the use of standard curves and replicate analysis. In conclusion, dPCR represents a very promising method for routine chimerism monitoring.

  3. A quantitative TaqMan PCR assay for the detection of Ureaplasma diversum.

    PubMed

    Marques, Lucas M; Amorim, Aline T; Martins, Hellen Braga; Rezende, Izadora Souza; Barbosa, Maysa Santos; Lobão, Tassia Neves; Campos, Guilherme B; Timenetsky, Jorge

    2013-12-27

    Ureaplasma diversum in veterinary studies is an undesirable microbe, which may cause infection in bulls and may result in seminal vesiculitis, balanopostitis, and alterations in spermatozoids, whereas in cows, it may cause placentitis, fetal alveolitis, abortion, and birth of weak calves. U. diversum is released through organic secretions, especially semen, preputial and vaginal mucus, conjunctival secretion, and milk. The aim of the present study was to develop a TaqMan probe, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for the detection and quantification of U. diversum from genital swabs of bovines. Primers and probes specific to U. diversum 16S rRNA gene were designed. The specificity, detection limit, intra- and inter-assay variability of qPCR to detect this ureaplasma was compared with the results of the conventional PCR assay (cPCR). Swabs of vaginal mucus from 169 cows were tested. The qPCR assay detected as few as 10 copies of U. diversum and was 100-fold more sensitive than the cPCR. No cross-reactivity with other Mollicutes or eubacteria was observed. U. diversum was detected in 79 swabs (46.42%) by qPCR, while using cPCR it was detected in 42 (25%) samples. The difference in cPCR and qPCR ureaplasma detection between healthy and sick animals was not statistically significant. But the U. diversum load in samples from animals with genital disorders was higher than in healthy animals. The qPCR assay developed herein is highly sensitive and specific for the detection and quantification of U. diversum in vaginal bovine samples.

  4. Application of quantitative PCR for the detection of microorganisms in water.

    PubMed

    Botes, Marelize; de Kwaadsteniet, Michéle; Cloete, Thomas Eugene

    2013-01-01

    The occurrence of microorganisms in water due to contamination is a health risk and control thereof is a necessity. Conventional detection methods may be misleading and do not provide rapid results allowing for immediate action. The quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) method has proven to be an effective tool to detect and quantify microorganisms in water within a few hours. Quantitative PCR assays have recently been developed for the detection of specific adeno- and polyomaviruses, bacteria and protozoa in different water sources. The technique is highly sensitive and able to detect low numbers of microorganisms. Quantitative PCR can be applied for microbial source tracking in water sources, to determine the efficiency of water and wastewater treatment plants and act as a tool for risk assessment. Different qPCR assays exist depending on whether an internal control is used or whether measurements are taken at the end of the PCR reaction (end-point qPCR) or in the exponential phase (real-time qPCR). Fluorescent probes are used in the PCR reaction to hybridise within the target sequence to generate a signal and, together with specialised systems, quantify the amount of PCR product. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) is a more sensitive technique that detects low copy number RNA and can be applied to detect, e.g. enteric viruses and viable microorganisms in water, and measure specific gene expression. There is, however, a need to standardise qPCR protocols if this technique is to be used as an analytical diagnostic tool for routine monitoring. This review focuses on the application of qPCR in the detection of microorganisms in water.

  5. PCR analysis for assessment of bacterial bioburden in orthokeratology lens cases

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Jung; Fang, Po-Chiung; Chien, Chun-Chih; Hsiao, Chang-Chun; Tseng, Shin-Ling; Lai, Yu-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To develop a PCR gel analysis method for assessing the bacterial bioburden in orthokeratology contact lens (OK) case fluid determined by culture. Methods A prospective study with the participation of 41 OK wearers (20 girls, 21 boys) was performed. The mean OK-wearing experience was 3.5±1.9 years. PCR was used to assess the bacterial bioburden (colony-forming units per milliliter) of OK after removal and soaking in the storage case for 6 h. The signal intensity of the PCR bands was analyzed after grayscale image transformation. The difference (cPCR-d) and ratio (cPCR-r) between a PCR signal and its background were used as two standardized indices of PCR signals. The association between the two indices of the PCR signals and the bacterial bioburden determined by culture were analyzed with Pearson’s correlation coefficient (r) and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) plots. Results At least one microbe was isolated from the OK lens case from 38 of the 41 subjects. Both cPCR-d and cPCR-r showed strong correlations with the bacterial bioburden (r>0.7, p<0.0001). ROC analysis enabled good determination of the cutoff values for the two PCR indices with acceptable sensitivity and specificity (78−89%) to assess the degree of bacterial contamination. Conclusions The high microbial contamination rate of the OK lens cases revealed the general inappropriate lens care by OK wearers. PCR analysis provides an alternative and rapid method for assessing the bacterial bioburden of OK lens cases, and these results should serve as a warning to OK wearers to follow appropriate lens care procedures to prevent infection. PMID:26900321

  6. Stability of repetitive-sequence PCR patterns with respect to culture age and subculture frequency.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyunseok Peter; Dunne, W Michael

    2003-06-01

    To examine the stability of repetitive-sequence (rep) PCR profiles, six species of bacteria were subcultured to blood agar plates and DNA was extracted from the cultures after 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation at 35 degrees C. In addition, the same species were subcultured to fresh blood plates daily and DNA was extracted from the cultures after growth of 5, 10, and 15 subcultures, respectively. rep PCR analysis demonstrated that all rep PCR fingerprints from a single species were identical.

  7. Quantitative PCR analysis of salivary pathogen burden in periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Salminen, Aino; Kopra, K A Elisa; Hyvärinen, Kati; Paju, Susanna; Mäntylä, Päivi; Buhlin, Kåre; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Pussinen, Pirkko J

    2015-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the value of salivary concentrations of four major periodontal pathogens and their combination in diagnostics of periodontitis. The Parogene study included 462 dentate subjects (mean age 62.9 ± 9.2 years) with coronary artery disease (CAD) diagnosis who underwent an extensive clinical and radiographic oral examination. Salivary levels of four major periodontal bacteria were measured by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). Median salivary concentrations of Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, and Prevotella intermedia, as well as the sum of the concentrations of the four bacteria, were higher in subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis compared to subjects with no to mild periodontitis. Median salivary Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans concentrations did not differ significantly between the subjects with no to mild periodontitis and subjects with moderate to severe periodontitis. In logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, and the number of teeth and implants, high salivary concentrations of P. gingivalis, T. forsythia, and P. intermedia were significantly associated with moderate to severe periodontitis. When looking at different clinical and radiographic parameters of periodontitis, high concentrations of P. gingivalis and T. forsythia were significantly associated with the number of 4-5 mm periodontal pockets, ≥6 mm pockets, and alveolar bone loss (ABL). High level of T. forsythia was associated also with bleeding on probing (BOP). The combination of the four bacteria, i.e., the bacterial burden index, was associated with moderate to severe periodontitis with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.40 (95% CI 1.39-4.13). When A. actinomycetemcomitans was excluded from the combination of the bacteria, the OR was improved to 2.61 (95% CI 1.51-4.52). The highest OR 3.59 (95% CI 1.94-6.63) was achieved when P. intermedia was further excluded from the combination and only the levels of P. gingivalis and T

  8. Quantitative detection of perchlorate-reducing bacteria by real-time PCR targeting the perchlorate reductase gene.

    PubMed

    Nozawa-Inoue, Mamie; Jien, Mercy; Hamilton, Nicholas S; Stewart, Valley; Scow, Kate M; Hristova, Krassimira R

    2008-03-01

    A quantitative real-time PCR assay targeting the pcrA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of perchlorate reductase, detected pcrA genes from perchlorate-reducing bacteria in three different genera and from soil microbial communities. Partial pcrA sequences indicated differences in the composition of perchlorate-reducing bacterial communities following exposure to different electron donors.

  9. [Research progress of real-time quantitative PCR method for group A rotavirus detection].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yan-Qing; Li, Dan-Di; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2013-11-01

    Group A rotavirus is one of the most significant etiological agents which causes acute gastroenteritis among infants and young children worldwide. So far, several method which includes electron microscopy (EM), enzyme immunoassay (EIA), reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)and Real-time Quantitative PCR has been established for the detection of rotavirus. Compared with other methods, Real-time quantitative PCR have advantages in specificity, sensitivity, genotyping and quantitative accuracy. This article shows a overview of the application of real-time quantitative PCR technique to detecte group A rotavirus.

  10. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin; He, Qiushui; Yan, Yongping

    2015-11-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries.

  11. Quantification of total bacteria, enterobacteria and lactobacilli populations in pig digesta by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Marisol; Martín-Orúe, Susana M; Manzanilla, Edgar G; Badiola, Ignacio; Martín, Marga; Gasa, Josep

    2006-04-16

    Jejunum digesta samples were taken from weaning pigs in order to evaluate real-time PCR (qPCR) as a method for quantifying pig gut bacteria. Total bacteria, lactobacilli and enterobacteria were quantified by qPCR and the results were compared with those obtained with traditional methods: 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI staining) for total bacteria, selective culture for lactobacilli and enterobacteria. Real-time PCR showed higher values in terms of 16S rRNA gene copies than DAPI counts or CFU. Despite the differences, the lactobacilli:enterobacteria ratio was similar between methods (2.5 +/- 0.58 for qPCR and 3.1 +/- 0.71 for selective culture, P = 0.39). Possible reasons for the higher PCR counts are discussed considering both an overestimation with PCR by quantification of dead bacteria or free DNA and also an underestimation with conventional methods. Inherent differences in the pre-treatment of the samples could partially explain the discrepancies observed. Regardless of the numerical differences between methods, values obtained by qPCR and traditional methods showed a significant correlation for lactobacilli and total bacteria. In the light of these results, real-time PCR seems a valid method to quantify microbial shifts in the gastrointestinal tract. PMID:16384658

  12. Linear amplification mediated PCR--localization of genetic elements and characterization of unknown flanking DNA.

    PubMed

    Gabriel, Richard; Kutschera, Ina; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; von Kalle, Christof; Schmidt, Manfred

    2014-06-25

    Linear-amplification mediated PCR (LAM-PCR) has been developed to study hematopoiesis in gene corrected cells of patients treated by gene therapy with integrating vector systems. Due to the stable integration of retroviral vectors, integration sites can be used to study the clonal fate of individual cells and their progeny. LAM- PCR for the first time provided evidence that leukemia in gene therapy treated patients originated from provirus induced overexpression of a neighboring proto-oncogene. The high sensitivity and specificity of LAM-PCR compared to existing methods like inverse PCR and ligation mediated (LM)-PCR is achieved by an initial preamplification step (linear PCR of 100 cycles) using biotinylated vector specific primers which allow subsequent reaction steps to be carried out on solid phase (magnetic beads). LAM-PCR is currently the most sensitive method available to identify unknown DNA which is located in the proximity of known DNA. Recently, a variant of LAM-PCR has been developed that circumvents restriction digest thus abrogating retrieval bias of integration sites and enables a comprehensive analysis of provirus locations in host genomes. The following protocol explains step-by-step the amplification of both 3'- and 5'- sequences adjacent to the integrated lentiviral vector.

  13. Improved thermal cycling durability and PCR compatibility of polymer coated quantum dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xun, Zhe; Zhao, Xiaoyun; Guan, Yifu

    2013-09-01

    Quantum dots have experienced rapid development in imaging, labeling and sensing in medicine and life science. To be suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, we have tested QD thermal cycling durability and compatibility, which have not been addressed in previous reports. In this study, we synthesized CdSe/ZnS QDs with a surface modification with high-MW amphiphilic copolymers and observed that Mg2+ ions in the PCR reaction could induce the QDs to precipitate and reduce their fluorescence signal significantly after thermal cycling. To overcome this problem, we used mPEG2000 to conjugate the QD surface for further protection, and found that this modification enables QDs to endure 40 thermal cycles in the presence of other components essential for PCR reactions. We have also identified that QDs have different effects on rTaq and Ex Taq polymerization systems. A high QD concentration could apparently reduce the PCR efficiency, but this inhibition was relieved significantly in the Ex PCR system as the concentration of Ex Taq polymerase was increased. Real-time PCR amplification results showed that QDs could provide a sufficiently measurable fluorescence signal without excessively inhibiting the DNA amplification. Based on this improved thermal cycling durability and compatibility with the PCR system, QDs have the potential to be developed as stable fluorescent sensors in PCR and real-time PCR amplification.

  14. Direct Detection of Erythromycin-Resistant Bordetella pertussis in Clinical Specimens by PCR

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zengguo; Han, Ruijun; Liu, Ying; Du, Quanli; Liu, Jifeng; Ma, Chaofeng; Li, Hengxin

    2015-01-01

    Resistance of Bordetella pertussis to erythromycin has been increasingly reported. We developed an allele-specific PCR method for rapid detection of erythromycin-resistant B. pertussis directly from nasopharyngeal (NP) swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. Based on the proven association of erythromycin resistance with the A2047G mutation in the 23S rRNA of B. pertussis, four primers, two of which were designed to be specific for either the wild-type or the mutant allele, were used in two different versions of the allele-specific PCR assay. The methods were verified with results obtained by PCR-based sequencing of 16 recent B. pertussis isolates and 100 NP swab samples submitted for diagnostic PCR. The detection limits of the two PCR assays ranged from 10 to 100 fg per reaction for both erythromycin-susceptible and -resistant B. pertussis. Two amplified fragments of each PCR, of 286 and 112 bp, respectively, were obtained from a mutant allele of the isolates and/or NP swab samples containing B. pertussis DNAs. For the wild-type allele, only a 286-bp fragment was visible when the allele-specific PCR assay 1 was performed. No amplification was found when a number of non-Bordetella bacterial pathogens and NP swab samples that did not contain the DNAs of B. pertussis were examined. This assay can serve as an alternative for PCR-based sequencing, especially for local laboratories in resource-poor countries. PMID:26224847

  15. Absolute quantification of lung cancer related microRNA by droplet digital PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ping; Jing, Fengxiang; Li, Gang; Wu, Zhenhua; Cheng, Zule; Zhang, Jishen; Zhang, Honglian; Jia, Chunping; Jin, Qinghui; Mao, Hongju; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-12-15

    Digital polymerase chain reaction (digital PCR) enables the absolute quantification of nucleic acids through the counting of single molecules, thus eliminating the need for standard curves or endogenous controls. In this study, we developed a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) system based on an oil saturated PDMS (OSP) microfluidic chip platform for quantification of lung cancer related microRNA (miRNA). The OSP chip was made with PDMS and was oil saturated to constrain oil swallow and maintain the stability of droplets. Two inlets were designed for oil and sample injection with a syringe pump at the outlet. Highly uniform monodisperse water-in-oil emulsion droplets to be used for subsequent detection and analysis were generated at the cross section of the channel. We compared miRNA quantification by the ddPCR system and quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) to demonstrate that the ddPCR system was superior to qPCR both in its detection limit and smaller fold changes measurement. This droplet PCR system provides new possibilities for highly sensitive and efficient detection of cancer-related genes. PMID:26232679

  16. Surmounting a PCR challenge using a Contradictory matrix from the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ).

    PubMed

    Drábek, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    In this paper I tested whether Contradictory Matrix with 40 Inventive Principles, the simplest instrument from the Theory of Inventive Problem Solving (TRIZ), is a useful approach to a real-life PCR scenario. The PCR challenge consisted of standardization of fluorescence melting curve measurements in Competitive Amplification of Differentially Melting Amplicons (CADMA) PCR for multiple targets. Here I describe my way of using the TRIZ Matrix to generate seven alternative solutions from which I can choose the successful solution, consisting of repeated cycles of amplification and melting in a single PCR run. PMID:26835236

  17. An improved colony PCR procedure for genetic screening of Chlorella and related microalgae.

    PubMed

    Wan, Minxi; Rosenberg, Julian N; Faruq, Junaid; Betenbaugh, Michael J; Xia, Jinlan

    2011-08-01

    A colony PCR technique was applied for both genomic and chloroplast DNA in the green microalgae Chlorella. Of five different lysis buffers, Chelex-100 was superior for DNA extraction, PCR and DNA storage. It also was insensitive to variations in cell density. The conditions established for an improved PCR formulation are applicable for screening of genetically-engineered transformants as well as bioprospecting of natural microalgal isolates. Besides multiple Chlorella species, we also demonstrate the efficacy of Chelex-100 for colony PCR with a number of other microalgal strains, including Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, Dunaliella salina, Nannochloropsis sp., Coccomyxa sp., and Thalassiosira pseudonana.

  18. Real-Time PCR: Revolutionizing Detection and Expression Analysis of Genes

    PubMed Central

    Deepak, SA; Kottapalli, KR; Rakwal, R; Oros, G; Rangappa, KS; Iwahashi, H; Masuo, Y; Agrawal, GK

    2007-01-01

    Invention of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology by Kary Mullis in 1984 gave birth to real-time PCR. Real-time PCR — detection and expression analysis of gene(s) in real-time — has revolutionized the 21st century biological science due to its tremendous application in quantitative genotyping, genetic variation of inter and intra organisms, early diagnosis of disease, forensic, to name a few. We comprehensively review various aspects of real-time PCR, including technological refinement and application in all scientific fields ranging from medical to environmental issues, and to plant. PMID:18645596

  19. Quantification Bias Caused by Plasmid DNA Conformation in Quantitative Real-Time PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chih-Hui; Chen, Yu-Chieh; Pan, Tzu-Ming

    2011-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is the gold standard for the quantification of specific nucleic acid sequences. However, a serious concern has been revealed in a recent report: supercoiled plasmid standards cause significant over-estimation in qPCR quantification. In this study, we investigated the effect of plasmid DNA conformation on the quantification of DNA and the efficiency of qPCR. Our results suggest that plasmid DNA conformation has significant impact on the accuracy of absolute quantification by qPCR. DNA standard curves shifted significantly among plasmid standards with different DNA conformations. Moreover, the choice of DNA measurement method and plasmid DNA conformation may also contribute to the measurement error of DNA standard curves. Due to the multiple effects of plasmid DNA conformation on the accuracy of qPCR, efforts should be made to assure the highest consistency of plasmid standards for qPCR. Thus, we suggest that the conformation, preparation, quantification, purification, handling, and storage of standard plasmid DNA should be described and defined in the Minimum Information for Publication of Quantitative Real-Time PCR Experiments (MIQE) to assure the reproducibility and accuracy of qPCR absolute quantification. PMID:22194997

  20. [Clarification of a break-in theft crime by multiplex PCR analysis of cigarette butts].

    PubMed

    Hochmeister, M; Haberl, J; Borer, V; Rudin, O; Dirnhofer, R

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes the first use of multiplex PCR amplification kits for the analysis of DNA extracted from cigarette butts in a criminal case. Two suspects could be excluded as potential contributors to the samples, whereas the multi locus PCR-based DNa profile derived from the cigarette butts was consistent with a DNA profile derived from a third suspect. For identity testing in criminal cases where cigarette butts are involved, commercially available PCR amplification kits provide currently the most powerful tool. Furthermore this PCR-based analysis can be implemented into most application orientated laboratories.

  1. Gene expression analysis by a competitive and differential PCR with antisense competitors.

    PubMed

    de Kant, E; Rochlitz, C F; Herrmann, R

    1994-11-01

    We report a sensitive method for the reproducible and accurate measurement of gene expression from small samples of RNA. This method is based on a combination of two PCR techniques: First, an endogenous reporter gene and the gene of interest are simultaneously amplified in one tube after random-primed reverse transcription (RT) of RNA (differential RT-PCR). Second, exogenous homologous fragments of both genes with artificially introduced mutations are added and coamplified in the same reaction (competitive PCR). The first-strand cDNA, and the mutated antisense homologues of the reporter as well as the target gene compete for their respective primers and are therefore amplified with equal efficiencies. After PCR, restriction enzyme digestion allows visualization of the quantitative differences between the four resulting reaction products. The ratios of products that competed during PCR provide the quantitative information. The initial amount of a specific cDNA can be calculated from any competitor/cDNA ratio of reliably measurable PCR product amounts. Extensive competitor titration to experimentally approach the equilibrium is therefore unnecessary. The differential counterpart of competitive and differential RT-PCR (CD-RT-PCR) allows expression of the levels in reference to a reporter gene. MDR1 expression was determined in tumor cells by CD-RT-PCR.

  2. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications. PMID:19203085

  3. Establishing a novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure for the direct detection of gene doping.

    PubMed

    Beiter, Thomas; Zimmermann, Martina; Fragasso, Annunziata; Armeanu, Sorin; Lauer, Ulrich M; Bitzer, Michael; Su, Hua; Young, William L; Niess, Andreas M; Simon, Perikles

    2008-01-01

    So far, the abuse of gene transfer technology in sport, so-called gene doping, is undetectable. However, recent studies in somatic gene therapy indicate that long-term presence of transgenic DNA (tDNA) following various gene transfer protocols can be found in DNA isolated from whole blood using conventional PCR protocols. Application of these protocols for the direct detection of gene doping would require almost complete knowledge about the sequence of the genetic information that has been transferred. Here, we develop and describe the novel single-copy primer-internal intron-spanning PCR (spiPCR) procedure that overcomes this difficulty. Apart from the interesting perspectives that this spiPCR procedure offers in the fight against gene doping, this technology could also be of interest in biodistribution and biosafety studies for gene therapeutic applications.

  4. PCR-Based Identification of Oral Streptococcal Species

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Dawson, Deborah V.; Cao, Huojun; Levy, Steven M.

    2016-01-01

    The microbial etiology of dental caries is still debated. Among the hypothesized contributors are the “low pH streptococci,” a designation given to unusually acid proficient strains among the primary plaque colonizers S. oralis, S. mitis, S. gordonii, and S. anginosus. However, accurate assignment of species is difficult among the oral streptococci. Our objective was to develop a streamlined method for identifying strains of S. oralis and S. mitis from plaque samples so that they could be analyzed in a separate study devoted to low pH streptococci and caries. Two independent PCR amplifications of a locus highly conserved among streptococci were used for presumptive species identification. Multilocus sequence analysis (MLSA) was used to measure accuracy. Sensitivity was 100% for selecting S. oralis and S. mitis among the clones sampled. Specificity was good except for the most closely related species that could not be reliably distinguished even by MLSA. The results with S. oralis and S. mitis were used to identify new primer sets that expanded the utility of the approach to other oral streptococcal species. These novel primer sets offer a convenient means of presumptive identification that will have utility in many studies where large scale, in-depth genomic analyses are not practical. PMID:27703479

  5. DNA profiles from clothing fibers using direct PCR.

    PubMed

    Blackie, Renée; Taylor, Duncan; Linacre, Adrian

    2016-09-01

    We report on the successful use of direct PCR amplification of single fibers from items of worn clothing. Items of clothing were worn throughout the course of a day, with the individual commencing regular activities. Single fibers were taken from the cuff of the clothing at regular intervals and amplified directly. The same areas were subjected to tape-lifting, and also amplified directly for comparison. The NGM™ kit that amplifies 15 STR loci plus amelogenin was used. A total of 35 single fiber samples were processed and analyzed from five items of clothing, with 81 % of samples returning a profile of 14 alleles or more. All tape-lift samples amplified directly produced DNA profiles of 15 alleles or more. The aim was to develop a simple, operational method that could be used routinely in forensic science casework and that has the potential to generate more complete profiles, which would not be detected using standard extraction methods on this type of sample. For ease of implementation, the process also adheres to standard methods with no increase in the cycle number.

  6. Homolog-specific PCR primer design for profiling splice variants

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Gyan Prakash; Hanumappa, Mamatha; Kushwaha, Garima; Nguyen, Henry T.; Xu, Dong

    2011-01-01

    To study functional diversity of proteins encoded from a single gene, it is important to distinguish the expression levels among the alternatively spliced variants. A variant-specific primer pair is required to amplify each alternatively spliced variant individually. For this purpose, we developed a new feature, homolog-specific primer design (HSPD), in our high-throughput primer and probe design software tool, PRIMEGENS-v2. The algorithm uses a de novo approach to design primers without any prior information of splice variants or close homologs for an input query sequence. It not only designs primer pairs but also finds potential isoforms and homologs of the input sequence. Efficiency of this algorithm was tested for several gene families in soybean. A total of 187 primer pairs were tested under five different abiotic stress conditions with three replications at three time points. Results indicate a high success rate of primer design. Some primer pairs designed were able to amplify all splice variants of a gene. Furthermore, by utilizing combinations within the same multiplex pool, we were able to uniquely amplify a specific variant or duplicate gene. Our method can also be used to design PCR primers to specifically amplify homologs in the same gene family. PRIMEGENS-v2 is available at: http://primegens.org. PMID:21415011

  7. Nucleic acid sequence detection using multiplexed oligonucleotide PCR

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, John P.; White, P. Scott

    2006-12-26

    Methods for rapidly detecting single or multiple sequence alleles in a sample nucleic acid are described. Provided are all of the oligonucleotide pairs capable of annealing specifically to a target allele and discriminating among possible sequences thereof, and ligating to each other to form an oligonucleotide complex when a particular sequence feature is present (or, alternatively, absent) in the sample nucleic acid. The design of each oligonucleotide pair permits the subsequent high-level PCR amplification of a specific amplicon when the oligonucleotide complex is formed, but not when the oligonucleotide complex is not formed. The presence or absence of the specific amplicon is used to detect the allele. Detection of the specific amplicon may be achieved using a variety of methods well known in the art, including without limitation, oligonucleotide capture onto DNA chips or microarrays, oligonucleotide capture onto beads or microspheres, electrophoresis, and mass spectrometry. Various labels and address-capture tags may be employed in the amplicon detection step of multiplexed assays, as further described herein.

  8. Disentangling mite predator-prey relationships by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayas, Consuelo; Pina, Tatiana; Gómez-Martínez, María A; Camañes, Gemma; Ibáñez-Gual, María V; Jaques, Josep A; Hurtado, Mónica A

    2015-11-01

    Gut content analysis using molecular techniques can help elucidate predator-prey relationships in situations in which other methodologies are not feasible, such as in the case of trophic interactions between minute species such as mites. We designed species-specific primers for a mite community occurring in Spanish citrus orchards comprising two herbivores, the Tetranychidae Tetranychus urticae and Panonychus citri, and six predatory mites belonging to the Phytoseiidae family; these predatory mites are considered to be these herbivores' main biological control agents. These primers were successfully multiplexed in a single PCR to test the range of predators feeding on each of the two prey species. We estimated prey DNA detectability success over time (DS50), which depended on the predator-prey combination and ranged from 0.2 to 18 h. These values were further used to weight prey detection in field samples to disentangle the predatory role played by the most abundant predators (i.e. Euseius stipulatus and Phytoseiulus persimilis). The corrected predation value for E. stipulatus was significantly higher than for P. persimilis. However, because this 1.5-fold difference was less than that observed regarding their sevenfold difference in abundance, we conclude that P. persimilis is the most effective predator in the system; it preyed on tetranychids almost five times more frequently than E. stipulatus did. The present results demonstrate that molecular tools are appropriate to unravel predator-prey interactions in tiny species such as mites, which include important agricultural pests and their predators.

  9. Disentangling mite predator-prey relationships by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sayas, Consuelo; Pina, Tatiana; Gómez-Martínez, María A; Camañes, Gemma; Ibáñez-Gual, María V; Jaques, Josep A; Hurtado, Mónica A

    2015-11-01

    Gut content analysis using molecular techniques can help elucidate predator-prey relationships in situations in which other methodologies are not feasible, such as in the case of trophic interactions between minute species such as mites. We designed species-specific primers for a mite community occurring in Spanish citrus orchards comprising two herbivores, the Tetranychidae Tetranychus urticae and Panonychus citri, and six predatory mites belonging to the Phytoseiidae family; these predatory mites are considered to be these herbivores' main biological control agents. These primers were successfully multiplexed in a single PCR to test the range of predators feeding on each of the two prey species. We estimated prey DNA detectability success over time (DS50), which depended on the predator-prey combination and ranged from 0.2 to 18 h. These values were further used to weight prey detection in field samples to disentangle the predatory role played by the most abundant predators (i.e. Euseius stipulatus and Phytoseiulus persimilis). The corrected predation value for E. stipulatus was significantly higher than for P. persimilis. However, because this 1.5-fold difference was less than that observed regarding their sevenfold difference in abundance, we conclude that P. persimilis is the most effective predator in the system; it preyed on tetranychids almost five times more frequently than E. stipulatus did. The present results demonstrate that molecular tools are appropriate to unravel predator-prey interactions in tiny species such as mites, which include important agricultural pests and their predators. PMID:25824504

  10. Clostridium difficile PCR Ribotype 018, a Successful Epidemic Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Trovato, Alberto; Bianchini, Valentina; Biancardi, Anna; Cichero, Paola; Mazzotti, Maria; Nizzero, Paola; Moro, Matteo; Ossi, Cristina; Scarpellini, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) became a public health problem for the global spreading of the so-called hypervirulent PCR ribotypes (RTs) 027 and 078, associated with increases in the transmission and severity of the disease. However, especially in Europe, several RTs are prevalent, and the concept of hypervirulence is currently debated. We investigated the toxin and resistance profiles and the genetic relatedness of 312 C. difficile strains isolated in a large Italian teaching hospital during a 5-year period. We evaluated the role of CDI-related antibiotic consumption and infection control practices on the RT predominance in association with their molecular features and transmission capacity. Excluding secondary cases due to nosocomial transmission, RT018 was the predominant genotype (42.4%) followed by RT078 (13.6%), while RT027 accounted for 0.8% of the strains. RT078 was most frequently isolated from patients in intensive care units. Its prevalence significantly increased over time, but its transmission capacity was very low. In contrast, RT018 was highly transmissible and accounted for 95.7% of the secondary cases. Patients with the RT018 genotype were significantly older than those with RT078 and other RTs, indicating an association between epidemic RT and age. We provide here the first epidemiological evidence to consider RT018 as a successful epidemic genotype that deserves more attention in clinical practice. PMID:26041894

  11. Flow through PCR module of BioBriefcase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, E.; Wheeler, E. K.; Shediac, R.; Hindson, B.; Nasarabadi, S.; Vrankovich, G.; Bell, P.; Bailey, C.; Sheppod, T.; Christian, A. T.

    2005-11-01

    The BioBriefcase is an integrated briefcase-sized aerosol collection and analysis system for autonomous monitoring of the environment, which is currently being jointly developed by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories. This poster presents results from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) module of the system. The DNA must be purified after exiting the aerosol collector to prevent inhibition of the enzymatic reaction. Traditional solid-phase extraction results in a large loss of sample. In this flow-through system, we perform sample purification, concentration and amplification in one reactor, which minimizes the loss of material. The sample from the aerosol collector is mixed with a denaturation solution prior to flowing through a capillary packed with silica beads. The DNA adheres to the silica beads allowing the environmental contaminants to be flushed to waste while effectively concentrating the DNA on the silica matrix. The adhered DNA is amplified while on the surface of the silica beads, resulting in a lower limit of detection than an equivalent eluted sample. Thus, this system is beneficial since more DNA is available for amplification, less reagents are utilized, and contamination risks are reduced.

  12. Flow Through PCR Module of BioBriefcase

    SciTech Connect

    Arroyo, E S; Wheeler, E K; Hindson, B; Nasarabadi, S; Vrankovich, G; Bell, P; Bailey, C; Sheppod, T; Christian, A

    2005-09-19

    The BioBriefcase is an integrated briefcase-sized aerosol collection and analysis system for autonomous monitoring of the environment, which is currently being jointly developed by Lawrence Livermore and Sandia National Laboratories. This poster presents results from the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) module of the system. The DNA must be purified after exiting the aerosol collector to prevent inhibition of the enzymatic reaction. Traditional solid-phase extraction results in a large loss of sample. In this flow-through system, we perform sample purification, concentration and amplification in one reactor, which minimizes the loss of material. The sample from the aerosol collector is mixed with a denaturation solution prior to flowing through a capillary packed with silica beads. The DNA adheres to the silica beads allowing the environmental contaminants to be flushed to waste while effectively concentrating the DNA on the silica matrix. The adhered DNA is amplified while on the surface of the silica beads, resulting in a lower limit of detection than an equivalent eluted sample. Thus, this system is beneficial since more DNA is available for amplification, less reagents are utilized, and contamination risks are reduced.

  13. Bias in template-to-product ratios in multitemplate PCR.

    PubMed

    Polz, M F; Cavanaugh, C M

    1998-10-01

    Bias introduced by the simultaneous amplification of specific genes from complex mixtures of templates remains poorly understood. To explore potential causes and the extent of bias in PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal DNAs (rDNAs), genomic DNAs of two closely and one distantly related bacterial species were mixed and amplified with universal, degenerate primers. Quantification and comparison of template and product ratios showed that there was considerable and reproducible overamplification of specific templates. Variability between replicates also contributed to the observed bias but in a comparatively minor way. Based on these initial observations, template dosage and differences in binding energies of permutations of the degenerate, universal primers were tested as two likely causes of this template-specific bias by using 16S rDNA templates modified by site-directed mutagenesis. When mixtures of mutagenized templates containing AT- and GC-rich priming sites were used, templates containing the GC-rich permutation amplified with higher efficiency, indicating that different primer binding energies may to a large extent be responsible for overamplification. In contrast, gene copy number was found to be an unlikely cause of the observed bias. Similarly, amplification from DNA extracted from a natural community to which different amounts of genomic DNA of a single bacterial species were added did not affect relative product ratios. Bias was reduced considerably by using high template concentrations, by performing fewer cycles, and by mixing replicate reaction preparations.

  14. Comparison of a quantitative Real-Time PCR assay and droplet digital PCR for copy number analysis of the CCL4L genes.

    PubMed

    Bharuthram, Avani; Paximadis, Maria; Picton, Anabela C P; Tiemessen, Caroline T

    2014-07-01

    The controversy surrounding the findings that copy number variation, of the CCL3 encoding genes, influences HIV-1 infection and disease progression has been in part attributed to the variable results obtained from methods used for copy number evaluation. Like CCL3, the genes encoding the CC chemokine CCL4, also a natural ligand of the CCR5 receptor, are found to occur in population-specific multiple copy number and have been shown to play a protective role against HIV-1. This study evaluated the standard method of quantitative Real-Time PCR (qPCR) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) for CCL4L gene copy number determination. The CCL4 encoding genes are CCL4, occurring in two copies per diploid genome (pdg), and the non-allelic CCL4L genes, comprised of CCL4L1 and CCL4L2, which are both found in multiple copies pdg. Copy number of CCL4L, CCL4L1 and CCL4L2 was determined in a cohort of HIV-1-uninfected individuals from the South African Black (n=23) and Caucasian (n=32) population groups using qPCR and ddPCR. A stronger correlation between the number of CCL4L copies and the sum of CCL4L1 and CCL4L2 copies generated by ddPCR (r=0.99, p<0.0001) compared to qPCR (r=0.87, p<0.0001) was observed. Real-Time qPCR exhibited greater inaccuracy at higher copy numbers which is particularly relevant to our cohort of Black individuals who have a higher range of CCL4L copies (3-6) compared to Caucasians (0-4) and a higher population median (4 and 2, respectively). Medians and ranges of CCL4L1 (Black: 2, 0-4, Caucasian: 0, 0-2) and CCL4L2 (Black: 2, 1-5, Caucasian: 2, 0-3) were also higher in the Black population. Droplet digital PCR was shown to be a far superior method to qPCR for assessment of CCL4 gene copy number variation, the accuracy of which is essential for studies of the contribution of variable gene copy number to phenotypic outcomes of host infection and disease course.

  15. Interlaboratory Validation for a Real-Time PCR Salmonella Detection Method Using the ABI 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR System.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Chorng-Ming; Doran, Tara; Lin, Wen; Chen, Kai-Shun; Williams-Hill, Donna; Pamboukian, Ruiqing

    2015-06-01

    Sixteen FERN (Food Emergency Response Network) member laboratories collaborated in this study to verify extension of the real-time PCR Salmonella detection method originally designed for the single-tube Cepheid SmartCycler II and validated against the Salmonella method of the U. S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual to the Applied Biosystems (ABI) 7500 FAST Real-Time PCR system multiwell plate platform. Four foods were selected for this study: chili powder, soft cheese, fish, and tomatoes; these foods represent products that are commonly analyzed for the presence of Salmonella for regulatory purposes. Each food consisted of six uninoculated control samples, six samples inoculated with low Salmonella levels (target 1 to 5 CFU/25 g), and six samples inoculated with high levels (target 10 to 50 CFU/25 g). All samples were tested for Salmonella using the 24-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) method for detecting Salmonella, which utilizes modified buffered peptone water as the sole enrichment medium and an internal control for the qPCR. Each of these 18 samples was individually analyzed for Salmonella by the collaborating laboratories using both the ABI 7500 FAST system (alternative method) and the SmartCycler II system (reference method). Statistical analysis of the data revealed no significant difference (P ≥ 0.05) between these two qPCR platforms except for the chili powder samples. The differences noted with chili powder (P = 0.0455) were attributed to the enhanced sensitivity of the ABI 7500 FAST system compared with the SmartCycler II system. The detection limit of both qPCR methods was 0.02 to 0.15 CFU/g. These results provide a solid basis for extending the 24-h qPCR Salmonella method to the ABI 7500 FAST system for high-throughput detection of Salmonella in foods. PMID:26038901

  16. Profound inhibition of the PCR step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes.

    PubMed

    Fox, David H; Huang, Chih-Kang; Du, Juan; Chang, Tylis Y; Pan, Qiulu

    2007-06-01

    Supplies, such as bags of plastic reaction tubes, are sometimes left in the laminar flow hoods unintentionally while the ultraviolet (UV) lamp is illuminated overnight. In addition, UV irradiation is used for sterilization and amplicon inactivation to avoid contamination. The oligonucleotide ligation assay (OLA) is a unique approach to mutation detection of point mutations, small deletions, and small insertions. Recently, we encountered problems with this assay and peak heights were much lower or disappeared. After going through systemic trouble-shooting, we found that profound inhibition of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) step of CF V3 multiplex PCR/OLA assay by the use of UV-irradiated plastic reaction tubes. When UV-irradiated tubes used throughout the assay, tubes exposed for 8 weeks at 0.7 m from the UV source gave a reduction of 60% and 67% in the assay products on the basis of sum of peak heights. Tubes exposed for 3 weeks at 0.1 m from the UV source totally eliminated assay product yielding no peaks. Further experiments showed that the inhibition happened mostly in the PCR step. Burgess and Hall had reported that inhibition of PCR of human glyceraldehydes-3-phosphate dehydrogenase transcripts after UV irradiating the tubes. This showed that the inhibition was not assay-specific. The reason that the inhibition of PCR was more profound could be due to a multiplex PCR assay and small reaction volume. The mechanism of PCR inhibition by UV irradiation is not clear. In conclusion, plastic reaction tubes intended for PCR/OLA assays should not be exposed to UV.

  17. Comparison of Real-Time PCR Signal-Amplified In Situ Hybridization and Conventional PCR for Detection and Quantification of Human Papillomavirus in Archival Cervical Cancer Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Biedermann, Karin; Dandachi, Nadia; Trattner, Maria; Vogl, Georgia; Doppelmayr, Hildegard; Moré, Elena; Staudach, Alfons; Dietze, Otto; Hauser-Kronberger, Cornelia

    2004-01-01

    Archival paraffin-embedded tumor specimens offer a wealth of information for both cancer research and for routine clinical applications. However, the use of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded specimens for quantitative real-time PCR is not yet a standard diagnostic method in many laboratories, in particular for the quantification of human papillomavirus (HPV). Particularly high-risk HPV types are involved in almost 100% of the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. We compared the diagnostic applicability and sensitivity of real-time PCR to that of chromogenic tyramide-signal-amplified in situ hybridization and conventional PCR for the detection of HPV from archival tissue in 164 cases of carcinoma in situ and cervical cancer. Furthermore, we examined whether the viral load of HPV is of prognostic relevance. Our findings indicate that patients in tumor stage I with a lower viral load of HPV type 16 (HPV16; up to 1,000 copies/ng of DNA) had a significantly better survival than HPV 16-negative patients (P = 0.037). We observed a greater sensitivity of both real-time PCR and conventional PCR for the detection of HPV16 and -18 compared to signal amplified in situ hybridization. We found a considerable concordance between HPV16 (κ = 0.661) and HPV18 (κ = 0.781) status as measured by real-time PCR and conventional PCR, indicating similar sensitivities. We recognized an inhibitory effect of formalin fixation and paraffin embedding on the evaluation of real-time PCR quantification. PMID:15297527

  18. Development of allele-specific PCR and RT-PCR assays for clustered resistance genes using a potato late blight resistance transgene as a model.

    PubMed

    Millett, B P; Bradeen, J M

    2007-02-01

    Members of the NBS-LRR gene family impart resistance to a wide variety of pathogens and are often found clustered within a plant genome. This clustering of homologous sequences can complicate PCR-based characterizations, especially the study of transgenes. We have developed allele-specific PCR and RT-PCR assays for the potato late blight resistance gene RB. Our assay utilizes two approaches toward primer design, allowing discrimination between the RB transgene and both the endogenous RB gene and numerous RB homeologs. First, a reverse primer was designed to take advantage of an indel present in the RB transgene but absent in rb susceptibility alleles, enhancing specificity for the transgene, though not fully discriminating against RB homeologs. Second, a forward primer was designed according to the principles of mismatch amplification mutation assay (MAMA) PCR, targeting SNPs introduced during the cloning of RB. Together, the indel reverse primer and the MAMA forward primer provide an assay that is highly specific for the RB transgene, being capable of distinguishing the transgene from all RB endogenous gene copies and from all RB paralogs in a diverse collection of wild and cultivated potato genotypes. These primers have been successfully multiplexed with primers of an internal control. The multiplexed assay is useful for both PCR and RT-PCR applications. Double MAMA-PCR, in which both PCR primers target separate transgene-specific SNPs, was also tested and shown to be equally specific for the RB transgene. We propose extending the use of MAMA for the characterization of resistance transgenes. PMID:17177064

  19. Applicability of integrated cell culture quantitative PCR (ICC-qPCR) for the detection of infectious adenovirus type 2 in UV disinfection studies.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Hodon; Cashdollar, Jennifer L; Fout, G Shay; Schrantz, Karen A; Hayes, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Practical difficulties of the traditional adenovirus infectivity assay such as intensive labor requirements and longer turnaround period limit the direct use of adenovirus as a testing microorganism for systematic, comprehensive disinfection studies. In this study, we attempted to validate the applicability of integrated cell culture quantitative PCR (ICC-qPCR) as an alternative to the traditional cell culture method with human adenovirus type 2 (HAdV2) in a low-pressure UV disinfection study and to further optimize the procedures of ICC-qPCR for 24-well plate format. The relatively high stability of the hexon gene of HAdV2 was observed after exposure to UV radiation, resulting in a maximum gene copy reduction of 0.5 log10 at 280 mJ cm(-2). Two-day post-inoculation incubation period and a maximum spiking level of 10(5) MPN mL(-1) were selected as optimum conditions of ICC-qPCR with the tested HAdV2. An approximate 1:1 correlation of virus quantities by the traditional and ICC-qPCR cell culture based methods suggested that ICC-qPCR is a satisfactory alternative for practical application in HAdV2 disinfection studies. ICC-qPCR results, coupled with a first-order kinetic model (i.e., the inactivation rate constant of 0.0232 cm(2) mJ(-1)), showed that an UV dose of 172 mJ cm(-2) achieved a 4-log inactivation credit for HAdV2. This estimate is comparable to other studies with HAdV2 and other adenovirus respiratory types. The newly optimized ICC-qPCR shows much promise for further study on its applicability of other slow replicating viruses in disinfection studies.

  20. Droplet digital PCR for simultaneous quantification of general and human-associated fecal indicators for water quality assessment.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yiping; Raith, Meredith R; Griffith, John F

    2015-03-01

    Despite wide application to beach water monitoring and microbial source identification, results produced by quantitative PCR (qPCR) methods are subject to bias introduced by reliance on quantitative standards. Digital PCR technology provides direct, standards-free quantification and may potentially alleviate or greatly reduce other qPCR limitations such as difficulty in multiplexing and susceptibility to PCR inhibition. This study examined the efficacy of employing a duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay that simultaneously quantifies Enterococcus spp. and the human fecal-associated HF183 marker for water quality assessment. Duplex ddPCR performance was evaluated side-by-side with qPCR and simplex ddPCR using reference material and 131 fecal and water samples. Results for fecal and water samples were highly correlated between ddPCR and simplex qPCR (coefficients > 0.93, p < 0.001). Duplexing Enterococcus and HF183 in qPCR led to competition and resulted in non-detection or underestimation of the target with low concentration relative to the other, while results produced by simplex and duplex ddPCR were consistent and often indistinguishable from one another. ddPCR showed greater tolerance for inhibition, with no discernable effect on quantification at inhibitor concentrations one to two orders of magnitude higher than that tolerated by qPCR. Overall, ddPCR also exhibited improved precision, higher run-to-run repeatability, similar diagnostic sensitivity and specificity on the HF183 marker, but a lower upper limit of quantification than qPCR. Digital PCR has the potential to become a reliable and economical alternative to qPCR for recreational water monitoring and fecal source identification. Findings from this study may also be of interest to other aspects of water research such as detection of pathogens and antibiotic resistance genes.

  1. Detection of five potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease: A comparison of PCR and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Schmalz, Gerhard; Tsigaras, Sandra; Rinke, Sven; Kottmann, Tanja; Haak, Rainer; Ziebolz, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the microbial analysis methods of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR (RT-PCR) in terms of detection of five selected potentially periodontal pathogenic bacteria in peri-implant disease. Therefore 45 samples of healthy, mucositis and peri-implantitis (n = 15 each) were assessed according to presence of the following bacteria using PCR (DNA-strip technology) and RT-PCR (fluorescent dye SYBR green-system): Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (Aa), Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg), Treponema denticola (Td), Tanerella forsythia (Tf), and Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn). There were no significant correlations between the bacterial and disease patterns, so the benefit of using microbiological tests for the diagnosis of peri-implant diseases is questionable. Correlations between the methods were highest for Tf (Kendall's Tau: 0.65, Spearman: 0.78), Fn (0.49, 0.61) and Td (0.49, 0.59). For Aa (0.38, 0.42) and Pg (0.04, 0.04), lower correlation values were detected. Accordingly, conventional semi-quantitative PCR seems to be sufficient for analyzing potentially periodontal pathogenic bacterial species.

  2. Inverse PCR and Quantitative PCR as Alternative Methods to Southern Blotting Analysis to Assess Transgene Copy Number and Characterize the Integration Site in Transgenic Woody Plants.

    PubMed

    Stefano, Biricolti; Patrizia, Bogani; Matteo, Cerboneschi; Massimo, Gori

    2016-06-01

    One of the major unanswered questions with respect to the commercial use of genetic transformation in woody plants is the stability of the transgene expression over several decades within the same individual. Gene expression is strongly affected by the copy number which has been integrated into the plant genome and by the local DNA features close to the integration sites. Because woody plants cannot be subjected to selfing or backcrossing to modify the transgenic allelic structure without affecting the valuable traits of the cultivar, molecular characterization of the transformation event is therefore crucial. After assessing the transgene copy number of a set of apple transgenic clones with Southern blotting, we describe two alternative methods: the first is based on inverse PCR (i-PCR) and the second on the quantitative PCR (q-PCR). The methods produced comparable results with the exception of the data regarding a high copy number clone, but while the q-PCR-based system is rapid and easily adaptable to high throughput systems, the i-PCR-based method can provide information regarding the transformation event and the characteristics of the sequences flanking the transgenic construct.

  3. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in water samples from Scotland and a comparison between the 529bp real-time PCR and ITS1 nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Shaw, Hannah; Innocent, Giles; Guido, Stefano; Hotchkiss, Emily; Parigi, Maria; Opsteegh, Marieke; Green, James; Gillespie, Simon; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2015-12-15

    Waterborne transmission of Toxoplasma gondii is a potential public health risk and there are currently no agreed optimised methods for the recovery, processing and detection of T. gondii oocysts in water samples. In this study modified methods of T. gondii oocyst recovery and DNA extraction were applied to 1427 samples collected from 147 public water supplies throughout Scotland. T. gondii DNA was detected, using real time PCR (qPCR) targeting the 529bp repeat element, in 8.79% of interpretable samples (124 out of 1411 samples). The samples which were positive for T. gondii DNA originated from a third of the sampled water sources. The samples which were positive by qPCR and some of the negative samples were reanalysed using ITS1 nested PCR (nPCR) and results compared. The 529bp qPCR was the more sensitive technique and a full analysis of assay performance, by Bayesian analysis using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, was completed which demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the detection of T. gondii in water samples. PMID:26408950

  4. Isolation of Bifidobacteria from Breast Milk and Assessment of the Bifidobacterial Population by PCR-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis and Quantitative Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Rocío; Jiménez, Esther; Heilig, Hans; Fernández, Leonides; Marín, María L.; Zoetendal, Erwin G.; Rodríguez, Juan M.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this work was to elucidate if breast milk contains bifidobacteria and whether they can be transmitted to the infant gut through breastfeeding. Twenty-three women and their respective infants provided samples of breast milk and feces, respectively, at days 4 to 7 after birth. Gram-positive and catalase-negative isolates from specific media with typical bifidobacterial shapes were identified to the genus level by F6PPK (fructose-6-phosphate phosphoketolase) assays and to the species level by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Bifidobacterial communities in breast milk were assessed by PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE), and their levels were estimated by quantitative real-time PCR (qRTi-PCR). Bifidobacteria were present in 8 milk samples and 21 fecal samples. Bifidobacterium breve, B. adolescentis, and B. bifidum were isolated from milk samples, while infant feces also contained B. longum and B. pseudocatenulatum. PCR-DGGE revealed the presence of one to four dominant bifidobacterial bands in 22 milk samples. Sequences with similarities above 98% were identified as Bifidobacterium breve, B. adolescentis, B. longum, B. bifidum, and B. dentium. Bifidobacterial DNA was detected by qRTi-PCR in the same 22 milk samples at a range between 40 and 10,000 16S rRNA gene copies per ml. In conclusion, human milk seems to be a source of living bifidobacteria for the infant gut. PMID:19088308

  5. Molecular detection of Toxoplasma gondii in water samples from Scotland and a comparison between the 529bp real-time PCR and ITS1 nested PCR.

    PubMed

    Wells, Beth; Shaw, Hannah; Innocent, Giles; Guido, Stefano; Hotchkiss, Emily; Parigi, Maria; Opsteegh, Marieke; Green, James; Gillespie, Simon; Innes, Elisabeth A; Katzer, Frank

    2015-12-15

    Waterborne transmission of Toxoplasma gondii is a potential public health risk and there are currently no agreed optimised methods for the recovery, processing and detection of T. gondii oocysts in water samples. In this study modified methods of T. gondii oocyst recovery and DNA extraction were applied to 1427 samples collected from 147 public water supplies throughout Scotland. T. gondii DNA was detected, using real time PCR (qPCR) targeting the 529bp repeat element, in 8.79% of interpretable samples (124 out of 1411 samples). The samples which were positive for T. gondii DNA originated from a third of the sampled water sources. The samples which were positive by qPCR and some of the negative samples were reanalysed using ITS1 nested PCR (nPCR) and results compared. The 529bp qPCR was the more sensitive technique and a full analysis of assay performance, by Bayesian analysis using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo method, was completed which demonstrated the efficacy of this method for the detection of T. gondii in water samples.

  6. PCR bias toward the wild-type k-ras and p53 sequences: implications for PCR detection of mutations and cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Barnard, R; Futo, V; Pecheniuk, N; Slattery, M; Walsh, T

    1998-10-01

    PCR-based cancer diagnosis requires detection of rare mutations in k-ras, p53 or other genes. The assumption has been that mutant and wild-type sequences amplify with near equal efficiency, so that they are eventually present in proportions representative of the starting material. Work on factor IX suggests that this assumption is invalid for one case of near-sequence identity. To test the generality of this phenomenon and its relevance to cancer diagnosis, primers distant from point mutations in p53 and k-ras were used to amplify wild-type and mutant sequences from these genes. A substantial bias against PCR amplification of mutants was observed for two regions of the p53 gene and one region of k-ras. For k-ras and p53, bias was observed when the wild-type and mutant sequences were amplified separately or when mixed in equal proportions before PCR. Bias was present with proofreading and non-proofreading polymerases. Mutant and wild-type segments of the factor V, cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator and prothrombin genes were amplified and did not exhibit PCR bias. Therefore, the assumption of equal PCR efficiency for point mutant and wild-type sequences is invalid in several systems. Quantitative or diagnostic PCR will require validation for each locus, and enrichment strategies may be needed to optimize detection of mutants. PMID:9793653

  7. Quantitative multiplex real-time PCR assay for shrimp allergen: comparison of commercial master mixes and PCR platforms in rapid cycling.

    PubMed

    Eischeid, Anne C; Kasko, Sasha M

    2015-01-01

    Real-time PCR has been used widely in numerous fields. In food safety, it has been applied to detection of microbes and other contaminants, including food allergens. Interest in rapid (fast) cycling real-time PCR has grown because it yields results in less time than does conventional cycling. However, fast cycling can adversely affect assay performance. Here we report on tests of commercial master mixes specifically designed for fast real-time PCR using a shrimp allergen assay we previously developed and validated. The objective of this work was to determine whether specialized commercial master mixes lead to improved assay performance in rapid cycling. Real-time PCR assays were carried out using four different master mixes and two different rapid cycling protocols. Results indicated that specialized master mixes did yield quality results. In many cases, linear ranges spanned up to 7 orders of magnitude, R(2) values were at least 0.95, and reaction efficiencies were within or near the optimal range of 90 to 110%. In the faster of the two rapid cycling protocols tested, assay performance and PCR amplification were markedly better for the shorter PCR product. In conclusion, specialized commercial master mixes were effective as part of rapid cycling protocols, but conventional cycling as used in our previous work is more reliable for the shrimp assay tested.

  8. Pre-PCR processing in bioterrorism preparedness: improved diagnostic capabilities for laboratory response networks.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Johannes; Knutsson, Rickard; Ansell, Ricky; Rådström, Peter; Rasmusson, Birgitta

    2013-09-01

    Diagnostic DNA analysis using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has become a valuable tool for rapid detection of biothreat agents. However, analysis is often challenging because of the limited size, quality, and purity of the biological target. Pre-PCR processing is an integrated concept in which the issues of analytical limit of detection and simplicity for automation are addressed in all steps leading up to PCR amplification--that is, sampling, sample treatment, and the chemical composition of PCR. The sampling method should maximize target uptake and minimize uptake of extraneous substances that could impair the analysis--so-called PCR inhibitors. In sample treatment, there is a trade-off between yield and purity, as extensive purification leads to DNA loss. A cornerstone of pre-PCR processing is to apply DNA polymerase-buffer systems that are tolerant to specific sample impurities, thereby lowering the need for expensive purification steps and maximizing DNA recovery. Improved awareness among Laboratory Response Networks (LRNs) regarding pre-PCR processing is important, as ineffective sample processing leads to increased cost and possibly false-negative or ambiguous results, hindering the decision-making process in a bioterrorism crisis. This article covers the nature and mechanisms of PCR-inhibitory substances relevant for agroterrorism and bioterrorism preparedness, methods for quality control of PCR reactions, and applications of pre-PCR processing to optimize and simplify the analysis of various biothreat agents. Knowledge about pre-PCR processing will improve diagnostic capabilities of LRNs involved in the response to bioterrorism incidents.

  9. Impact of multiplex PCR on antimicrobial treatment in febrile neutropenia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Idelevich, Evgeny A; Silling, Gerda; Niederbracht, Yvonne; Penner, Hanna; Sauerland, Maria Cristina; Tafelski, Sascha; Nachtigall, Irit; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Peters, Georg; Becker, Karsten

    2015-10-01

    Multiplex PCR (mPCR) directly from blood has been suggested as a promising method for rapid identification of pathogens causing sepsis. This study aimed to investigate whether mPCR has any impact on antimicrobial treatment. Hematological patients with febrile neutropenia were randomized into two groups. In the study group, mPCR was performed as an addition to standard diagnostics, and PCR finding was immediately communicated to the clinicians, thus being available for decision making. In the control group, clinicians were not aware of PCR result. PCR samples were collected simultaneously with clinically indicated blood culture specimens from peripheral vein and/or central venous catheter at fever onset and once again if fever persisted up to 72 h. Overall, 74 patients of the study group and 76 patients of the control group were enrolled and 253 samples collected. Therapy was changed to targeted antimicrobial therapy (AMT) in 12 patients (16.2%) in the study group and in 12 patients (15.8%) in the control group. For patients with changes, the median time to change to the targeted AMT was 21.4 h in the study group and 47.5 h in the control group (p = 0.018). In the study group, 57.1% (8/14) of changes to targeted AMT was due to PCR finding. PCR led to AMT change in 9.5% (7/74) of study group patients, i.e., in 33.3% (7/21) of patients who had positive PCR finding. There were no significant differences in patient outcomes (secondary endpoints). In conclusion, PCR method accelerates change to the targeted AMT in febrile neutropenic patients.

  10. Development of a Real-Time Microchip PCR System for Portable Plant Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Soo; Cifci, Osman S.; Vaughn-Diaz, Vanessa L.; Ma, Bo; Kim, Sungman; Abdel-Raziq, Haron; Ong, Kevin; Jo, Young-Ki; Gross, Dennis C.; Shim, Won-Bo; Han, Arum

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and accurate detection of plant pathogens in the field is crucial to prevent the proliferation of infected crops. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) process is the most reliable and accepted method for plant pathogen diagnosis, however current conventional PCR machines are not portable and require additional post-processing steps to detect the amplified DNA (amplicon) of pathogens. Real-time PCR can directly quantify the amplicon during the DNA amplification without the need for post processing, thus more suitable for field operations, however still takes time and require large instruments that are costly and not portable. Microchip PCR systems have emerged in the past decade to miniaturize conventional PCR systems and to reduce operation time and cost. Real-time microchip PCR systems have also emerged, but unfortunately all reported portable real-time microchip PCR systems require various auxiliary instruments. Here we present a stand-alone real-time microchip PCR system composed of a PCR reaction chamber microchip with integrated thin-film heater, a compact fluorescence detector to detect amplified DNA, a microcontroller to control the entire thermocycling operation with data acquisition capability, and a battery. The entire system is 25×16×8 cm3 in size and 843 g in weight. The disposable microchip requires only 8-µl sample volume and a single PCR run consumes 110 mAh of power. A DNA extraction protocol, notably without the use of liquid nitrogen, chemicals, and other large lab equipment, was developed for field operations. The developed real-time microchip PCR system and the DNA extraction protocol were used to successfully detect six different fungal and bacterial plant pathogens with 100% success rate to a detection limit of 5 ng/8 µl sample. PMID:24349341

  11. Multicenter evaluation of Seegene Anyplex TB PCR for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in respiratory specimens.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jinsook; Kim, Jimyung; Kim, Jong Wan; Ihm, Chunhwa; Sohn, Yong-Hak; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Kim, Jayoung; Koo, Sun Hoe

    2014-07-01

    Culture is the gold standard for diagnosis of tuberculosis, but it takes 6 to 8 weeks to confirm the result. This issue is complemented by the detection method using polymerase chain reaction, which is now widely used in a routine microbiology laboratory. In this study, we evaluated the performance of the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR to assess its diagnostic sensitivity and specificity, and compared its results with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR, one of the most widely used assays in the world. Five university hospitals located in the Chungcheong area in South Korea participated in the study. A total of 1,167 respiratory specimens ordered for acid-fast bacilli staining and culture were collected for four months, analyzed via the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR, and its results were compared with the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. For detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the Anyplex TB PCR were 87.5% and 98.2% respectively, whereas those of the Cobas TaqMan were 92.0% and 98.0% respectively (p value > 0.05). For smear-positive specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 95.2%, which was exactly the same as that of the Cobas TaqMan. For smear-negative specimens, the sensitivity of the Anyplex TB PCR was 69.2%, whereas that of the Cobas TaqMan TB PCR was 84.6%. For detection of MTB, the Seegene Anyplex TB PCR showed excellent diagnostic performance, and high sensitivity and specificity, which were comparable to the Roche Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR. In conclusion, the Anyplex TB PCR can be a useful diagnostic tool for the early detection of tuberculosis in clinical laboratories.

  12. Evaluation of Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Young Jae; Ki, Chang-Seok; Kim, Ji-Youn; Lee, Nam Yong

    2011-01-01

    Nucleic acid-based amplification tests allow the rapid detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Recently, a real-time PCR assay for M. tuberculosis complex, the Cobas TaqMan MTB test (Roche Diagnostics, Basel, Switzerland), was introduced. We performed a prospective study to evaluate the diagnostic performance of the Cobas TaqMan MTB test system. A total of 406 specimens collected from 247 patients were simultaneously tested by conventional culture, Cobas Amplicor MTB PCR, and TaqMan MTB PCR. The cross-reactivity with other Mycobacterium species and the detection limit were also evaluated. Among 406 specimens, a total of 24 specimens (5.9%) were culture positive: 14 specimens were positive by both TaqMan and Amplicor MTB PCRs, while 5 specimens were positive by only TaqMan PCR. The remaining five specimens were negative by both PCR methods. Seven specimens with negative culture results were positive by TaqMan PCR, but five of these were negative by Amplicor MTB PCR. The sensitivity, specificity, and positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values were 79.1%, 98.2%, 73.1%, and 98.7% for TaqMan and 58.3%, 99.5%, 87.5%, and 97.4% for the Amplicor MTB PCR test, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with M. tuberculosis and nontuberculous mycobacterial species. The detection limit for the Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR test was 4.0 copies/μl. The Cobas TaqMan MTB PCR test showed higher sensitivity for detection of the M. tuberculosis complex without disturbing the specificity and NPV than the Amplicor MTB PCR test.

  13. Identification and characterization of dermatophyte species and strains with PCR amplification.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guofang; He, Chenghua; Zhang, Haibin

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to use two polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods, with (GACA)4 and non-transcribed spacer (NTS) as primers, to identify and characterize dermatophyte isolates from dogs and cats to a species and strain level. A total of 45 isolates from nine dermatophyte species were collected from pet dogs and cats and subjected to PCR amplification with the microsatellite primer (GACA)4. Dermatophyte strains of three of the same species collected from four cities were subjected to PCR amplification with the NTS primer set. These two PCR methods were applied to identify and characterize the dermatophyte isolates to a species and strain level. Regional differences among the strain specificities were also examined. The results from PCR with (GACA)4 demonstrated that strains from the same species produced similar PCR product band patterns. In addition, these patterns differed among species, indicating that (GACA)4 primer-based PCR was able to distinguish between the various dermatophyte species. By contrast, dermatophyte isolates and/or strains within the same species revealed various band patterns with NTS-based PCR. In addition, the results indicated that regional differences contributed to the variations in PCR product band patterns. Therefore, the results of the present study indicate that the NTS-based PCR method is efficient in distinguishing dermatophytes to the strain level, while a combination of (GACA)4 and NTS primer-based PCR methods is able to clarify dermatophyte isolates to a species and strain level. The present study provides information concerning the identification of pathogenic fungi and the epidemiological characteristics of fungal skin diseases.

  14. [Selective detection of viable pathogenic bacteria in water using reverse transcription quantitative PCR].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Li, Dan; Wu, Shu-Xu; He, Miao; Yang, Tian

    2012-11-01

    A reverse transcription q quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay method was established, which can quantify the copy numbers of RNA in pathogenic bacteria of E. coli and Enterococcus faecium. The results showed that cDNA was generated with the RT-PCR reagents, target gene was quantified with the qPCR, the copy numbers of RNA were stable at about 1 copies x CFU(-1) for E. coli and 7.98 x 10(2) copies x CFU(-1) for Enterococcus faecium respectively during the stationary grow phase for the both indicator bacteria [E. coli (6-18 h) and Enterococcus faecium (10-38 h)]. The established RT-qPCR method can quantify the numbers of viable bacteria through detecting bacterial RNA targets. Through detecting the heat-treated E. coli and Enterococcus faecium by three methods (culture method, qPCR, RT-qPCR), we found that the qPCR and RT-qPCR can distinguish 1.43 lg copy non-viable E. coli and 2.5 lg copy non-viable Enterococcus faecium. These results indicated that the established methods could effectively distinguish viable bacteria from non-viable bacteria. Finally we used this method to evaluate the real effluents of the secondary sedimentation of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), the results showed that the correlation coefficients (R2) between RT-qPCR and culture method were 0.930 (E. coli) and 0.948 (Enterococcus faecium), and this established RT-PCR method can rapidly detect viable pathogenic bacteria in genuine waters.

  15. Process for para-ethyltoluene dehydrogenation

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, C.C.

    1986-06-03

    A process is described of dehydrogenating para-ethyltoluene to selectively form para-methylstyrene comprising contacting to para-ethyltoluene under dehydrogenation reaction conditions with a catalyst composition comprising: (a) from about 30% to 60% by weight of iron oxide, calculated as ferric oxide; (b) from about 13% to 48% by weight of a potassium compound, calculated as potassium oxide; and (c) from about 0% to 5% by weight of a chromium compound, calculated as chromic oxide. The improvement is described comprising dehydrogenating the para-ethyltoluene with a catalyst composition comprising, in addition to the components (a), (b) and (c), a modifying component (d) capable of rendering the para-methylstyrene-containing dehydrogenation reaction effluent especially resistant to the subsequent formation of popcorn polymers when the dehydrogenation of para-ethyltoluene is conducted over the modified catalyst, the modifying component (d) being a bismuth compound present to the extent of from about 1% to 20% by weight of the catalyst composition, calculated as bismuth trioxide.

  16. Assessing the Validity of Diagnostic Quantitative PCR Assays for Phakopsora pachyrhizi and P. meibomiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There are 123 confirmed species in the genus Phakopsora worldwide, with 19 species reported in the continental United States. In 2002, a quantitative PCR (qPCR) diagnostic assay was developed by Frederick et al. that has been used for detecting Phakopsora pachyrhizi in spore trapping studies. Based ...

  17. Universal reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR for infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Thompson, Rachel L.; Garver, Kyle A.; Hawley, Laura M.; Batts, William N.; Sprague, Laura; Sampson, Corie; Winton, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is an acute pathogen of salmonid fishes in North America, Europe and Asia and is reportable to the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE). Phylogenetic analysis has identified 5 major virus genogroups of IHNV worldwide, designated U, M, L, E and J; multiple subtypes also exist within those genogroups. Here, we report the development and validation of a universal IHNV reverse-transcriptase real-time PCR (RT-rPCR) assay targeting the IHNV nucleocapsid (N) gene. Properties of diagnostic sensitivity (DSe) and specificity (DSp) were defined using laboratory-challenged steelhead trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, and the new assay was compared to the OIE-accepted conventional PCR test and virus isolation in cell culture. The IHNV N gene RT-rPCR had 100% DSp and DSe and a higher estimated diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) than virus culture or conventional PCR. The RT-rPCR assay was highly repeatable within a laboratory and highly reproducible between laboratories. Field testing of the assay was conducted on a random sample of juvenile steelhead collected from a hatchery raceway experiencing an IHN epizootic. The RT-rPCR detected a greater number of positive samples than cell culture and there was 40% agreement between the 2 tests. Overall, the RT-rPCR assay was highly sensitive, specific, repeatable and reproducible and is suitable for use in a diagnostic setting.

  18. Comparison of quantitative PCR assays for Escherichia coli targeting ribosomal RNA and single copy genes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: Compare specificity and sensitivity of quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays targeting single and multi-copy gene regions of Escherichia coli. Methods and Results: A previously reported assay targeting the uidA gene (uidA405) was used as the basis for comparing the taxono...

  19. Quantitative Real-Time PCR Analysis of Total Propidium Monazide -Resistant Fecal Indicator Bacteria in Wastewater

    EPA Science Inventory

    A real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) method and a modification of this method incorporating pretreatment of samples with propidium monoazide (PMA) were evaluated for respective analyses of total and presumptively viable Enterococcus and Bacteroidales fecal indicator bacteria. Thes...

  20. Straightforward and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE samples

    PubMed Central

    Zeka, Fjoralba; Vanderheyden, Katrien; De Smet, Els; Cuvelier, Claude A.; Mestdagh, Pieter; Vandesompele, Jo

    2016-01-01

    Fragmented RNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue is a known obstacle to gene expression analysis. In this study, the impact of RNA integrity, gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification was quantified in terms of reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) sensitivity by measuring 48 protein coding genes on eight duplicate cultured cancer cell pellet FFPE samples and twenty cancer tissue FFPE samples. More intact RNA modestly increased gene detection sensitivity by 1.6 fold (earlier detection by 0.7 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 0.593–0.850). Application of gene-specific priming instead of whole transcriptome priming during reverse transcription further improved RT-qPCR sensitivity by a considerable 4.0 fold increase (earlier detection by 2.0 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 1.73–2.32). Targeted cDNA preamplification resulted in the strongest increase of RT-qPCR sensitivity and enabled earlier detection by an average of 172.4 fold (7.43 PCR cycles, 95% CI = 6.83–7.05). We conclude that gene-specific reverse transcription and targeted cDNA preamplification are adequate methods for accurate and sensitive RT-qPCR based gene expression analysis of FFPE material. The presented methods do not involve expensive or complex procedures and can be easily implemented in any routine RT-qPCR practice. PMID:26898768

  1. Evaluation of reference genes in Vibrio parahaemolyticus for gene expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vibrio parahaemolyticus is a significant human pathogen capable of causing foodborne gastroenteritis associated with the consumption of contaminated raw or undercooked seafood. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) is a useful tool for studying gene expression in V. parahaemolyticus to characterize the viru...

  2. Recommended reference genes for quantitative PCR analysis in soybean have variable stabilities during diverse biotic stresses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For real-time reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR) in soybean, reference genes in different tissues, developmental stages, various cultivars, and under stress conditions have been suggested but their usefulness for research on soybean under various biotic stresses occurring in North-Central U.S. is n...

  3. Low-cost, real-time, continuous flow PCR system for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carballo, B Leticia; McGuiness, Ian; McBeth, Christine; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Borrós, Salvador; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a portable and low cost point-of-care (POC) PCR system for quantitative detection of pathogens. Our system is based on continuous flow PCR which maintains fixed temperatures zones and pushes the PCR solution between two heated areas allowing for faster heat transfer and as a result, a faster PCR. The PCR system is built around a 46.0 mm × 30.9 mm × 0.4 mm disposable thermoplastic chip. In order to make the single-use chip economically viable, it was manufactured by hot embossing and was designed to be compatible with roll-to-roll embossing for large scale production. The prototype instrumentation surrounding the chip includes two heaters, thermal sensors, and an optical system. The optical system allows for pathogen detection via real time fluorescence measurements. FAM probes were used as fluorescent reporters of the amplicons generated during the PCR. To demonstrate the function of the chip, two infectious bacteria targets were selected: Chlamydia trachomatis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. For both bacteria, the limit of detection of the system was determined, PCR efficiencies were calculated, and different flow velocities were tested. We have demonstrated successful detection for these two bacterial pathogens highlighting the versatility and broad utility of our portable, low-cost, and rapid PCR diagnostic device.

  4. A Web-Based Adaptive Tutor to Teach PCR Primer Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Seters, Janneke R.; Wellink, Joan; Tramper, Johannes; Goedhart, Martin J.; Ossevoort, Miriam A.

    2012-01-01

    When students have varying prior knowledge, personalized instruction is desirable. One way to personalize instruction is by using adaptive e-learning to offer training of varying complexity. In this study, we developed a web-based adaptive tutor to teach PCR primer design: the PCR Tutor. We used part of the Taxonomy of Educational Objectives (the…

  5. Expression profiling by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR).

    PubMed

    Lech, Maciej; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Real-time quantitative PCR is a variation of the standard PCR technique that is commonly used to quantify nucleic acid. However, in this technique the amount of amplified specific sequence can be quantified at each stage of the PCR cycle. If investigated sequence is present in large number of copies in particular sample, amplification product is detected already in earlier cycles; if the sequence is rare, amplification is observed in later cycles. Quantification of amplified product is acquired using fluorescent probes or fluorescent DNA-binding dyes. Accumulation of fluorescent signal can be measured by real-time PCR instruments during each of 35-45 cycwwles of the PCR reaction, which simplify the procedure by eliminating the visualization of the amplified products using gel electrophoresis. Real-time-PCR allows quantifying the amount of product already during the PCR reaction as soon as it is detectable. Correctly performed, this method may be used for precise gene expression analysis in life science, medicine, and diagnostics and has become the standard method of choice for the quantification of mRNA. However in the past few years it became obvious that real-time PCR is complex and variability of RNA templates, assay designs, inappropriate data normalization, and data interpretation may cause diverse analytical problems.

  6. Molecular diagnostics of the honey bee parasites Lotmaria passim and Crithidia spp. (Trypanosomatidae) using multiplex PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lotmaria passim Schwarz is a recently described trypanosome parasite of honey bees in continental United States, Europe, and Japan. We developed a multiplex PCR technique using a PCR primer specific for L. passim to distinguish this species from C. mellificae. We report the presence of L. passim in ...

  7. Use PCR and a Single Hair To Produce a "DNA Fingerprint."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, A. Malcolm; And Others

    1997-01-01

    Presents a laboratory procedure that involves students extracting their own DNA from a single hair follicle, using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to amplify a polymorphic locus, performing electrophoresis on the PCR products on an agarose gel, and visualizing the alleles to generate a "DNA fingerprint." Discusses theoretical background,…

  8. Ten hour real-time PCR technique for detection of Salmonella in meats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We evaluated the efficacy of real-time PCR assays to detect low levels of Salmonella in meats following 8 h of pre-enrichment. The sensitivity and accuracy of molecular beacon and TaqMan probe PCR assays were compared with the conventional USDA microbiological procedure using artificially contaminat...

  9. Comparison of different standards for real-time PCR-based absolute quantification.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, S; Doherty, T Mark; Kenneth, John

    2010-03-31

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) is a powerful tool used for both research and diagnostic, which has the advantage, compared to relative quantification, of providing an absolute copy number for a particular target. However, reliable standards are essential for qPCR. In this study, we have compared four types of commonly-used standards--PCR products (with and without purification) and cloned target sequences (circular and linear plasmid) for their stability during storage (using percentage of variance in copy numbers, PCR efficiency and regression curve correlation coefficient (R(2))) using hydrolysis probe (TaqMan) chemistry. Results, expressed as copy numbers/microl, are presented from a sample human system in which absolute levels of HuPO (reference gene) and the cytokine gene IFN-gamma were measured. To ensure the suitability and stability of the four standards, the experiments were performed at 0, 7 and 14 day intervals and repeated 6 times. We have found that the copy numbers vary (due to degradation of standards) over the period of time during storage at 4 degrees C and -20 degrees C, which affected PCR efficiency significantly. The cloned target sequences were noticeably more stable than the PCR product, which could lead to substantial variance in results using standards constructed by different routes. Standard quality and stability should be routinely tested for assays using qPCR.

  10. Integrating PCR Theory and Bioinformatics into a Research-oriented Primer Design Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robertson, Amber L.; Phillips, Allison R.

    2008-01-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a conceptually difficult technique that embodies many fundamental biological processes. Traditionally, students have struggled to analyze PCR results due to an incomplete understanding of the biological concepts (theory) of DNA replication and strand complementarity. Here we describe the design of a novel…

  11. Thermal factors influencing detection of Vibrio vulnificus using real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shishan; Levin, Robert E

    2007-05-01

    Five thermal factors, including initial denaturation temperature, cycling denaturation temperature, annealing temperature, extension temperature and the temperature at which the intensity of the fluorescent signal is read, were evaluated for their effects on the detection of Vibrio vulnificus via real-time PCR. Fluorescent signal detection after extension was set between the Tm value of the primer-dimers (79 degrees C) and that of the PCR target amplicons (84 degrees C). This effectively eliminated the overestimation of the yield of PCR amplicons due to the presence of primer-dimers which otherwise led to erroneously lower Ct values (1.91+/-0.22 cycles lower). The annealing and extension steps were combined to convert a three-step PCR to a two-step PCR. This consisted of initial denaturation at 95 degrees C for 3 min, cycling denaturation at 94 degrees C for 15 s and a combined annealing and extension step at 60 degrees C for 5 s in each PCR cycle. One genomic target per real-time PCR reaction was detected with the simplified two-step PCR.

  12. Designing Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) Primer Multiplexes in the Forensic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elkins, Kelly M.

    2011-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is a common experiment in upper-level undergraduate biochemistry, molecular biology, and forensic laboratory courses as reagents and thermocyclers have become more affordable for institutions. Typically, instructors design PCR primers to amplify the region of interest and the students prepare their samples for…

  13. Hepatitis C virus detection by single-round PCR specific for the terminal 3' noncoding region.

    PubMed

    Umlauft, F; Wong, D T; Oefner, P J; Underhill, P A; Cheung, R C; Wright, T L; Kolykhalov, A A; Gruenewald, K; Greenberg, H B

    1996-10-01

    A single-round PCR method with primers specific for the 3' noncoding region (NCR) of hepatitis C virus (HCV) has been developed. Using a double RNAzol-B extraction, a high-temperature reverse-transcription step with SuperScript II reverse transcriptase, and a 40-cycle two-temperature PCR with a TaqStart antibody hot-start procedure, we were able to detect a 92-nucleotide fragment of the recently discovered 98-nucleotide highly conserved sequence at the 3' terminus of the HCV genome. Direct sequencing of the PCR products confirmed the specificity of the PCR and demonstrated conservation in this region. Only one nucleotide change in 14 specimens was found. End point dilution titration of sera with known viral RNA titers showed the sensitivity of the single-round 3' NCR PCR to be comparable to those of the established nested 5' NCR assays (fewer than 25 HCV genome equivalents). To evaluate specificity and sensitivity, a panel of 116 serum samples characterized by nested 5'-end PCR, genotyping, and quantitative assays was tested. A high degree of concordance (96%) between the 3' NCR and 5' NCR PCR results was found. The sequence conservation at the 3' end of the HCV genome among common genotypes and the savings in time, labor, and reagents from a single-round PCR make this assay a useful addition to the detection systems available to identify and monitor HCV infection.

  14. Advantages and disadvantages of using PCR techniques to characterize transgenic plants.

    PubMed

    Wassenegger, M

    2001-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) revolutionized molecular biology to a similar extent as the discovery of plasmids and restriction endonucleases. However, there are some limitations to the use of PCR. Transgenic plants containing potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) cDNA constructs, demonstrated to become de novo methylated upon PSTVd infection, represent a good example to illustrate the advantages of PCR. PSTVd is a 359 nt long autonomously replicating plant pathogenic RNA where all of its enzymatic requirements are entirely provided by the host cell. In addition, viroids that propagate without a DNA intermediate barely tolerate nucleotide substitutions of their RNA genome without losing infectivity. PCR is the method of choice to characterize the sequence context of genome-integrated viroid cDNA or of reverse transcribed PSTVd RNA, and can hardly be replaced by any alternative procedure. Furthermore, the precise examination of DNA methylation patterns (genomic sequencing) is entirely dependent on PCR. In contrast, the use of PCR is critical for the determination of copy number and arrangement of transgene constructs. Here, the advantages and disadvantages of PCR are discussed and protocols for PCR amplification of cDNA, genomic DNA, and bisulfite-treated DNA from transgenic plants are presented. PMID:11280933

  15. PCR for diagnosis of male Trichomonas vaginalis infection with chronic prostatitis and urethritis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Jin; Moon, Hong Sang; Lee, Tchun Yong; Hwang, Hwan Sik; Ahn, Myoung-Hee; Ryu, Jae-Sook

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the usefulness of PCR for diagnosis of Trichomonas vaginalis infection among male patients with chronic recurrent prostatitis and urethritis. Between June 2001 and December 2003, a total of 33 patients visited the Department of Urology, Hanyang University Guri Hospital and were examined for T. vaginalis infection by PCR and culture in TYM medium. For the PCR, we used primers based on a repetitive sequence cloned from T. vaginalis (TV-E650). Voided bladder urine (VB1 and VB3) was sampled from 33 men with symptoms of lower urinary tract infection (urethral charge, residual urine sensation, and frequency). Culture failed to detect any T. vaginalis infection whereas PCR identified 7 cases of trichomoniasis (21.2%). Five of the 7 cases had been diagnosed with prostatitis and 2 with urethritis. PCR for the 5 prostatitis cases yielded a positive 330 bp band from bothVB1 and VB3, whereas positive results were only obtained from VB1 for the 2 urethritis patients. We showed that the PCR method could detect T. vaginalis when there was only 1 T. vaginalis cell per PCR mixture. Our results strongly support the usefulness of PCR on urine samples for detecting T. vaginalis in chronic prostatitis and urethritis patients.

  16. Immuno-PCR assay for sensitive detection of proteins in real time

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immuno-PCR (IPCR) assay combines the versatility and robustness of immunoassays with the exponential signal amplification power of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Typically, IPCR allows a 10–1,000-fold increase in sensitivity over the analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Thi...

  17. Hypervirulent Clostridium difficile PCR-Ribotypes Exhibit Resistance to Widely Used Disinfectants

    PubMed Central

    Dawson, Lisa F.; Valiente, Esmeralda; Donahue, Elizabeth H.; Birchenough, George; Wren, Brendan W.

    2011-01-01

    The increased prevalence of Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has coincided with enhanced transmissibility and severity of disease, which is often linked to two distinct clonal lineages designated PCR-ribotype 027 and 017 responsible for CDI outbreaks in the USA, Europe and Asia. We assessed sporulation and susceptibility of three PCR-ribotypes; 012, 017 and 027 to four classes of disinfectants; chlorine releasing agents (CRAs), peroxygens, quaternary ammonium compounds (QAC) and biguanides. The 017 PCR-ribotype, showed the highest sporulation frequency under these test conditions. The oxidizing biocides and CRAs were the most efficacious in decontamination of C. difficile vegetative cells and spores, the efficacy of the CRAs were concentration dependent irrespective of PCR-ribotype. However, there were differences observed in the susceptibility of the PCR-ribotypes, independent of the concentrations tested for Virkon®, Newgenn®, Proceine 40® and Hibiscrub®. Whereas, for Steri7® and Biocleanse® the difference observed between the disinfectants were dependent on both PCR-ribotype and concentration. The oxidizing agent Perasafe® was consistently efficacious across all three PCR ribotypes at varying concentrations; with a consistent five Log10 reduction in spore titre. The PCR-ribotype and concentration dependent differences in the efficacy of the disinfectants in this study indicate that disinfectant choice is a factor for llimiting the survival and transmission of C. difficile spores in healthcare settings. PMID:22039420

  18. Extensive Recombination Due to Heteroduplexes Generates Large Amounts of Artificial Gene Fragments during PCR

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Song, Hongshuo; Liu, Donglai; Zuo, Tao; Lu, Fengmin; Zhuang, Hui; Gao, Feng

    2014-01-01

    Artificial recombinants can be generated during PCR when more than two genetically distinct templates coexist in a single PCR reaction. These recombinant amplicons can lead to the false interpretation of genetic diversity and incorrect identification of biological phenotypes that do not exist in vivo. We investigated how recombination between 2 or 35 genetically distinct HIV-1 genomes was affected by different PCR conditions using the parallel allele-specific sequencing (PASS) assay and the next generation sequencing method. In a standard PCR condition, about 40% of amplicons in a PCR reaction were recombinants. The high recombination frequency could be significantly reduced if the number of amplicons in a PCR reaction was below a threshold of 1013–1014 using low thermal cycles, fewer input templates, and longer extension time. Heteroduplexes (each DNA strand from a distinct template) were present at a large proportion in the PCR products when more thermal cycles, more templates, and shorter extension time were used. Importantly, the majority of recombinants were identified in heteroduplexes, indicating that the recombinants were mainly generated through heteroduplexes. Since prematurely terminated extension fragments can form heteroduplexes by annealing to different templates during PCR amplification, recombination has a better chance to occur with samples containing different genomes when the number of amplicons accumulate over the threshold. New technologies are warranted to accurately characterize complex quasispecies gene populations. PMID:25211143

  19. Quantitative detection of Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Guilbaud, Morgan; de Coppet, Pierre; Bourion, Fabrice; Rachman, Cinta; Prévost, Hervé; Dousset, Xavier

    2005-04-01

    A quantitative method based on a real-time PCR assay to enumerate Listeria monocytogenes in biofilms was developed. The specificity for L. monocytogenes of primers targeting the listeriolysin gene was demonstrated using a SYBR Green I real-time PCR assay. The number of L. monocytogenes detected growing in biofilms was 6 x 10(2) CFU/cm2.

  20. PMA treatment is an effective means to reduce false positive PCR testing results

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Traditional and real time PCR are widely used in detecting bacterial pathogens in various food matrix and environmental samples. Sometimes a positive detection using PCR can not be confirmed by subsequent culture isolation of the targeted pathogen, resulting in a potential “false positive.” False po...