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Sample records for pdz domain proteins

  1. A molecular-properties-based approach to understanding PDZ domain proteins and PDZ ligands

    PubMed Central

    Giallourakis, Cosmas; Cao, Zhifang; Green, Todd; Wachtel, Heather; Xie, Xiaohui; Lopez-Illasaca, Marco; Daly, Mark; Rioux, John; Xavier, Ramnik

    2006-01-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins and their interaction partners are mutated in numerous human diseases and function in complexes regulating epithelial polarity, ion channels, cochlear hair cell development, vesicular sorting, and neuronal synaptic communication. Among several properties of a collection of documented PDZ domain–ligand interactions, we discovered embedded in a large-scale expression data set the existence of a significant level of co-regulation between PDZ domain-encoding genes and these ligands. From this observation, we show how integration of expression data, a comparative genomics catalog of 899 mammalian genes with conserved PDZ-binding motifs, phylogenetic analysis, and literature mining can be utilized to infer PDZ complexes. Using molecular studies we map novel interaction partners for the PDZ proteins DLG1 and CARD11. These results provide insight into the diverse roles of PDZ–ligand complexes in cellular signaling and provide a computational framework for the genome-wide evaluation of PDZ complexes. PMID:16825666

  2. PDZ Affinity Chromatography: A general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G.; Kennedy, Mary B.

    2014-01-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ~ 90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ-domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins. PMID:24607360

  3. PDZ affinity chromatography: a general method for affinity purification of proteins based on PDZ domains and their ligands.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2014-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, DiscsLarge, ZO1) domains function in nature as protein binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise ∼90 residues and make specific, high affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, with other PDZ domains, and with phospholipids. We hypothesized that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands would make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. Here we describe a novel affinity chromatography method applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We created a series of affinity resins comprised of PDZ domains from the scaffold protein PSD-95, or from neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), coupled to solid supports. We used them to purify heterologously expressed neuronal proteins or protein domains containing endogenous PDZ domain ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands. We show that Proteins of Interest (POIs) lacking endogenous PDZ domain ligands can be engineered as fusion products containing C-terminal PDZ domain ligand peptides or internal, N- or C-terminal PDZ domains and then can be purified by the same method. Using this method, we recovered recombinant GFP fused to a PDZ domain ligand in active form as verified by fluorescence yield. Similarly, chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and β-Galactosidase (LacZ) fused to a C-terminal PDZ domain ligand or an N-terminal PDZ domain were purified in active form as assessed by enzymatic assay. In general, PDZ domains and ligands derived from PSD-95 were superior to those from nNOS for this method. PDZ Domain Affinity Chromatography promises to be a versatile and effective method for purification of a wide variety of natural and recombinant proteins.

  4. Ligand binding by PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Chi, Celestine N; Bach, Anders; Strømgaard, Kristian; Gianni, Stefano; Jemth, Per

    2012-01-01

    The postsynaptic density protein-95/disks large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) protein domain family is one of the most common protein-protein interaction modules in mammalian cells, with paralogs present in several hundred human proteins. PDZ domains are found in most cell types, but neuronal proteins, for example, are particularly rich in these domains. The general function of PDZ domains is to bring proteins together within the appropriate cellular compartment, thereby facilitating scaffolding, signaling, and trafficking events. The many functions of PDZ domains under normal physiological as well as pathological conditions have been reviewed recently. In this review, we focus on the molecular details of how PDZ domains bind their protein ligands and their potential as drug targets in this context.

  5. The PDZ Domain of the LIM Protein Enigma Binds to β-Tropomyosin

    PubMed Central

    Guy, Pamela M.; Kenny, Daryn A.; Gill, Gordon N.

    1999-01-01

    PDZ and LIM domains are modular protein interaction motifs present in proteins with diverse functions. Enigma is representative of a family of proteins composed of a series of conserved PDZ and LIM domains. The LIM domains of Enigma and its most related family member, Enigma homology protein, bind to protein kinases, whereas the PDZ domains of Enigma and family member actin-associated LIM protein bind to actin filaments. Enigma localizes to actin filaments in fibroblasts via its PDZ domain, and actin-associated LIM protein binds to and colocalizes with the actin-binding protein α-actinin-2 at Z lines in skeletal muscle. We show that Enigma is present at the Z line in skeletal muscle and that the PDZ domain of Enigma binds to a skeletal muscle target, the actin-binding protein tropomyosin (skeletal β-TM). The interaction between Enigma and skeletal β-TM was specific for the PDZ domain of Enigma, was abolished by mutations in the PDZ domain, and required the PDZ-binding consensus sequence (Thr-Ser-Leu) at the extreme carboxyl terminus of skeletal β-TM. Enigma interacted with isoforms of tropomyosin expressed in C2C12 myotubes and formed an immunoprecipitable complex with skeletal β-TM in transfected cells. The association of Enigma with skeletal β-TM suggests a role for Enigma as an adapter protein that directs LIM-binding proteins to actin filaments of muscle cells. PMID:10359609

  6. A systematic, family-wide investigation reveals that ~30% of mammalian PDZ domains engage in PDZ-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Bryan H.; Gujral, Taranjit S.; Karp, Ethan S.; BuKhalid, Raghida; Grantcharova, Viara P.; MacBeath, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Summary PDZ domains are independently folded modules that typically mediate protein-protein interactions by binding to the C-termini of their target proteins. In a few instances, however, PDZ domains have been reported to dimerize with other PDZ domains. To investigate this noncanonical binding mode further, we used protein microarrays comprising virtually every mouse PDZ domain to systematically query all possible PDZ-PDZ pairs. We then used fluorescence polarization to retest and quantify novel interactions and co-affinity purification to test biophysically validated interactions in the context of their full-length proteins. Overall, we discovered 37 PDZ-PDZ interactions involving 46 PDZ domains (~30% of all PDZ domains tested), revealing that dimerization is a more frequently used binding mode than was previously appreciated. This suggests that many PDZ domains evolved to form multiprotein complexes by simultaneously interacting with more than one ligand. PMID:21944753

  7. Protein purification using PDZ affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Walkup, Ward G; Kennedy, Mary B

    2015-04-01

    PDZ domains function in nature as protein-binding domains within scaffold and membrane-associated proteins. They comprise approximately 90 residues and undergo specific, high-affinity interactions with complementary C-terminal peptide sequences, other PDZ domains, and/or phospholipids. We have previously shown that the specific, strong interactions of PDZ domains with their ligands make them well suited for use in affinity chromatography. This unit provides protocols for the PDZ affinity chromatography procedure that are applicable for the purification of proteins that contain PDZ domains or PDZ domain-binding ligands, either naturally or introduced by genetic engineering. We detail the preparation of affinity resins composed of PDZ domains or PDZ domain peptide ligands coupled to solid supports. These resins can be used to purify proteins containing endogenous or genetically introduced PDZ domains or ligands, eluting the proteins with free PDZ domain peptide ligands.

  8. ALP/Enigma PDZ-LIM domain proteins in the heart.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming; Cheng, Hongqiang; Banerjee, Indroneal; Chen, Ju

    2010-04-01

    Actinin-associated LIM protein (ALP) and Enigma are two subfamilies of Postsynaptic density 95, discs large and zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-Lin-11, Isl1 and Mec-3 (LIM) domain containing proteins. ALP family members have one PDZ and one LIM domain, whereas Enigma proteins contain one PDZ and three LIM domains. Four ALP and three Enigma proteins have been identified in mammals, each having multiple splice variants and unique expression patterns. Functionally, these proteins bind through their PDZ domains to alpha-actinin and bind through their LIM domains or other internal protein interaction domains to other proteins, including signaling molecules. ALP and Enigma proteins have been implicated in cardiac and skeletal muscle structure, function and disease, neuronal function, bipolar disorder, tumor growth, platelet and epithelial cell motility and bone formation. This review will focus on recent advances in the biological roles of ALP/Enigma PDZ-LIM domain proteins in cardiac muscle and provide insights into mechanisms by which mutations in these proteins are related to human cardiac disease.

  9. Solid-state nanopore analysis of the PDZ2 protein domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Kevin; Haq, Raza; Jurgens, Maike; Mulero, Rafael; Prabhu, Anmiv; Jemth, Per; Edel, Joshua; Kim, Minjun

    2010-03-01

    The PDZ2 protein domain plays a significant role in biology; specifically as a ubiquitous binding domain for a variety of proteins found in organisms from bacteria to humans. PDZ2 and a single-point mutant were characterized using nanopores to help elucidate the structure-function relationship of this protein and provide a framework for more complex studies involving protein folding/binding. The translocation properties and unfolding of this domain was interrogated by the ionic-current blockade method using a single digit nanometer solid-state pore. By conducting these experiments under a wide variety of fluidic conditions, significantly different ionic current blockades were recorded and provided a method for sensing the folding/unfolding characteristics of the PDZ2 protein domain and its single-point mutant.

  10. PTEN-PDZ domain interactions: binding of PTEN to PDZ domains of PTPN13.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Natalia S; Schepens, Jan T G; Valiente, Miguel; Hendriks, Wiljan J A J; Pulido, Rafael

    2015-05-01

    Protein modular interactions mediated by PDZ domains are essential for the establishment of functional protein networks controlling diverse cellular functions. The tumor suppressor PTEN possesses a C-terminal PDZ-binding motif (PDZ-BM) that is recognized by a specific set of PDZ domains from scaffolding and regulatory proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge on PTEN-PDZ domain interactions and tumor suppressor networks, describe methodology suitable to analyze these interactions, and report the binding of PTEN and the PDZ domain-containing protein tyrosine phosphatase PTPN13. Yeast two-hybrid and GST pull-down analyses showed that PTEN binds to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain in a manner that depends on the specific PTPN13 PDZ domain arrangement involving the interdomain region between PDZ1 and PDZ2. Furthermore, a specific binding profile of PTEN to PDZ2/PTPN13 domain was observed by mutational analysis of the PTEN PDZ-BM. Our results disclose a PDZ-mediated physical interaction of PTEN and PTPN13 with potential relevance in tumor suppression and cell homeostasis.

  11. High-resolution crystal structure of the PDZ1 domain of human protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP-Bas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Ok; Lee, Mi-Kyung; Ku, Bonsu; Bae, Kwang-Hee; Lee, Sang Chul; Lim, Heon M; Kim, Seung Jun; Chi, Seung-Wook

    2016-09-23

    Protein tyrosine phosphatase-Basophil (PTP-Bas) is a membrane-associated protein tyrosine phosphatase with five PDZ domains and is involved in apoptosis, tumorigenesis, and insulin signaling. The interaction between PTP-Bas and tandem-PH-domain-containing protein 1/2 (TAPP1/2) plays an essential role in the regulation of insulin signaling. Despite its high sequence homology with the other PDZ domains, only the PDZ1 domain of PTP-Bas showed distinct binding specificity for TAPP1/2. Although the interaction between PTP-Bas PDZ1 and TAPP1/2 is a therapeutic target for diabetes, the structural basis for the interaction has not been elucidated. In the present study, we determined the crystal structure of the PTP-Bas PDZ1 domain at 1.6 Å resolution. In addition, we calculated the structural models of complexes of PTP-Bas PDZ1 and the C-terminal peptides of TAPP1/2 (referred to as TAPP1p/2p). Structural comparison with the PTP-Bas PDZ2/RA-GEF2 peptide complex revealed a structural basis for distinct binding specificity of PTP-Bas PDZ1 for TAPP1p/2p peptides. Our high-resolution crystal structure of PTP-Bas PDZ1 will serve as a useful template for rational structure-based design of novel anti-diabetes therapeutics.

  12. ENH, containing PDZ and LIM domains, heart/skeletal muscle-specific protein, associates with cytoskeletal proteins through the PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, N; Hoshijima, M; Oyasu, M; Saito, N; Tanizawa, K; Kuroda, S

    2000-06-07

    The Enigma homologue protein (ENH), containing an N-terminal PDZ domain and three C-terminal LIM domains, is a heart and skeletal muscle-specific protein that has been shown to preferentially interact with protein kinase C beta (PKCbeta) through the LIM domains (Kuroda et al., J. Biol. Chem. 271, 31029-31032, 1996). We here demonstrate that ENH is colocalized with a cytoskeletal protein alpha-actinin in the Z-disk region of rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Pull-down assays using the glutathione-S-transferase-fusion system also showed the interaction of the PDZ domain of ENH with actin and alpha-actinin. Furthermore, by combined use of the in silico and conventional cDNA cloning methods, we have isolated three ENH-related clones from a mouse heart-derived cDNA library: mENH1 (591 amino acid residues) corresponding to rat ENH, mENH2 (337 residues), and mENH3 (239 residues); the latter two containing only a single PDZ domain. Deciphering their cDNA sequences, these mENH1-3 mRNAs appear to be generated from a single mENH gene by alternative splicing. Northern blot analyses using human cancer cells and mouse embryos have shown expression of each mENH mRNA to vary considerably among the cell types and during the developmental stage. Together with a recent finding that PKCbeta is markedly activated in the cardiac hypertrophic signaling, these results suggest that ENH1 plays an important role in the heart development by scaffolding PKCbeta to the Z-disk region and that ENH2 and ENH3 negatively modulate the scaffolding activity of ENH1.

  13. Subtype-specific roles of phospholipase C-β via differential interactions with PDZ domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Lim, Seyoung; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Jae Ho; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2011-01-01

    Since we first identified the PLC-β isozyme, enormous studies have been conducted to investigate the functional roles of this protein (Min et al., 1993; Suh et al.,1988). It is now well-known that the four PLC-β subtypes are major effector molecules in GPCR-mediated signaling, especially for intracellular Ca2+ signaling. Nonetheless, it is still poorly understood why multiple PLC-β subtype exist. Most cells express multiple subtypes of PLC-β in different combinations, and each subtype is involved in somewhat different signaling pathways. Therefore, studying the differential roles of each PLC-β subtype is a very interesting issue. In this regard, we focus here on PDZ domain proteins which are novel PLC-β interacting proteins. As scaffolders, PDZ domain proteins recruit various target proteins ranging from membrane receptors to cytoskeletal proteins to assemble highly organized signaling complexes; this can give rise to efficiency and diversity in cellular signaling. Because PLC-β subtypes have different PDZ-binding motifs, it is possible that they are engaged with different PDZ domain proteins, and in turn participate in distinct physiological responses. To date, several PDZ domain proteins, such as the NHERF family, Shank2, and Par-3, have been reported to selectively interact with certain PLC-β subtypes and GPCRs. Systematic predictions of potential binding partners also suggests differential binding properties between PLC-β subtypes. Furthermore, we elucidated parallel signaling processes for multiple PLC-β subtypes, which still perform distinct functions resulting from differential interactions with PDZ domain proteins within a single cell. Therefore, these results highlight the novel function of PDZ domain proteins as intermediaries in subtype-specific role of PLC-β in GPCR-mediated signaling. Future studies will focus on the physiological meanings of this signaling complex formation by different PDZ domain proteins and PLC-β subtypes. It has been

  14. Noncanonical Role of the PDZ4 Domain of the Adaptor Protein PDZK1 in the Regulation of the Hepatic High Density Lipoprotein Receptor Scavenger Receptor Class B, Type I (SR-BI)*

    PubMed Central

    Tsukamoto, Kosuke; Wales, Thomas E.; Daniels, Kathleen; Pal, Rinku; Sheng, Ren; Cho, Wonhwa; Stafford, Walter; Engen, John R.; Krieger, Monty; Kocher, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The four PDZ (PDZ1 to PDZ4) domain-containing adaptor protein PDZK1 controls the expression, localization, and function of the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), in hepatocytes in vivo. This control depends on both the PDZ4 domain and the binding of SR-BI's cytoplasmic C terminus to the canonical peptide-binding sites of either the PDZ1 or PDZ3 domain (no binding to PDZ2 or PDZ4). Using transgenic mice expressing in the liver domain deletion (ΔPDZ2 or ΔPDZ3), domain replacement (PDZ2→1), or target peptide binding-negative (PDZ4(G389P)) mutants of PDZK1, we found that neither PDZ2 nor PDZ3 nor the canonical target peptide binding activity of PDZ4 were necessary for hepatic SR-BI regulatory activity. Immunohistochemical studies established that the localization of PDZK1 on hepatocyte cell surface membranes in vivo is dependent on its PDZ4 domain and the presence of SR-BI. Analytical ultracentrifugation and hydrogen deuterium exchange mass spectrometry suggested that the requirement of PDZ4 for localization and SR-BI regulation is not due to PDZ4-mediated oligomerization or induction of conformational changes in the PDZ123 portion of PDZK1. However, surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that PDZ4, but not the other PDZ domains, can bind vesicles that mimic the plasma membrane. Thus, PDZ4 may potentiate PDZK1's regulation of SR-BI by promoting its lipid-mediated attachment to the cytoplasmic membrane. Our results show that not all of the PDZ domains of a multi-PDZ domain-containing adaptor protein are required for its biological activities and that both canonical target peptide binding and noncanonical (peptide binding-independent) capacities of PDZ domains may be employed by a single such adaptor for optimal in vivo activity. PMID:23720744

  15. Molecular characterization and ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain-containing protein GIPC3 from Schistosoma japonicum

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a serious global health problem that afflicts more than 230 million people in 77 countries. Long-term mass treatments with the only available drug, praziquantel, have caused growing concerns about drug resistance. PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain-containing proteins are recognized as potential targets for the next generation of drug development. However, the PDZ domain-containing protein family in parasites has largely been unexplored. Methods We present the molecular characteristics of a PDZ domain-containing protein, GIPC3, from Schistosoma japonicum (SjGIPC3) according to bioinformatics analysis and experimental approaches. The ligand binding specificity of the PDZ domain of SjGIPC3 was confirmed by screening an arbitrary peptide library in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays. The native ligand candidates were predicted by Tailfit software based on the C-terminal binding specificity, and further validated by Y2H assays. Results SjGIPC3 is a single PDZ domain-containing protein comprised of 328 amino acid residues. Structural prediction revealed that a conserved PDZ domain was presented in the middle region of the protein. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that SjGIPC3 and other trematode orthologues clustered into a well-defined cluster but were distinguishable from those of other phyla. Transcriptional analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed that the SjGIPC3 gene was relatively highly expressed in the stages within the host, especially in male adult worms. By using Y2H assays to screen an arbitrary peptide library, we confirmed the C-terminal binding specificity of the SjGIPC3-PDZ domain, which could be deduced as a consensus sequence, -[SDEC]-[STIL]-[HSNQDE]-[VIL]*. Furthermore, six proteins were predicted to be native ligand candidates of SjGIPC3 based on the C-terminal binding properties and other biological information; four of these were confirmed to be potential ligands using the Y2H system. Conclusions In this study, we first

  16. The structure of the Tiam1 PDZ domain/ phospho-syndecan1 complex reveals a ligand conformation that modulates protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xu; Shepherd, Tyson R; Murray, Ann M; Xu, Zhen; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2013-03-05

    PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) domains are protein-protein interaction modules often regulated by ligand phosphorylation. Here, we investigated the specificity, structure, and dynamics of Tiam1 PDZ domain/ligand interactions. We show that the PDZ domain specifically binds syndecan1 (SDC1), phosphorylated SDC1 (pSDC1), and SDC3 but not other syndecan isoforms. The crystal structure of the PDZ/SDC1 complex indicates that syndecan affinity is derived from amino acids beyond the four C-terminal residues. Remarkably, the crystal structure of the PDZ/pSDC1 complex reveals a binding pocket that accommodates the phosphoryl group. Methyl relaxation experiments of PDZ/SCD1 and PDZ/pSDC1 complexes reveal that PDZ-phosphoryl interactions dampen dynamic motions in a distal region of the PDZ domain by decoupling them from the ligand-binding site. Our data are consistent with a selection model by which specificity and phosphorylation regulate PDZ/syndecan interactions and signaling events. Importantly, our relaxation data demonstrate that PDZ/phospho-ligand interactions regulate protein dynamics and their coupling to distal sites.

  17. The neuronal RhoA GEF, Tech, interacts with the synaptic multi-PDZ-domain-containing protein, MUPP1.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Marcel A; Henderson, Jennifer A; Ahn, David; Zhu, Xin-Ran; Poschmann, Gereon; Lübbert, Hermann; Marx, Ruth; Baraban, Jay M

    2008-08-01

    Tech is a RhoA guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) that is highly enriched in hippocampal and cortical neurons. To help define its function, we have conducted studies aimed at identifying partner proteins that bind to its C-terminal PDZ ligand motif. Yeast two hybrid studies using the Tech C-terminal segment as bait identified MUPP1, a protein that contains 13 PDZ domains and has been localized to the post-synaptic compartment, as a candidate partner protein for Tech. Co-transfection of Tech and MUPP1 in human embryonic kidney 293 cells confirmed that these full-length proteins interact in a PDZ-dependent fashion. Furthermore, we confirmed that endogenous Tech co-precipitates with MUPP1, but not PSD-95, from hippocampal and cortical extracts prepared from rat brain. In addition, immunostaining of primary cortical cultures revealed co-localization of MUPP1 and Tech puncta in the vicinity of synapses. In assessing which PDZ domains of MUPP1 mediate binding to Tech, we found that Tech can bind to either PDZ domain 10 or 13 of MUPP1 as mutation of both these domains is needed to disrupt their interaction. Taken together, these findings demonstrate that Tech binds to MUPP1 and suggest that it regulates RhoA signaling pathways in the vicinity of synapses.

  18. Post-translational modifications modulate ligand recognition by the third PDZ domain of the MAGUK protein PSD-95.

    PubMed

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Corbi-Verge, Carles; Candel, Adela M; Luque, Irene; Martinez, Jose C

    2014-01-01

    The relative promiscuity of hub proteins such as postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95) can be achieved by alternative splicing, allosteric regulation, and post-translational modifications, the latter of which is the most efficient method of accelerating cellular responses to environmental changes in vivo. Here, a mutational approach was used to determine the impact of phosphorylation and succinimidation post-translational modifications on the binding affinity of the postsynaptic density protein-95/discs large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ3) domain of PSD-95. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the binding affinity of this domain is influenced by an interplay between salt-bridges linking the α3 helix, the β2-β3 loop and the positively charged Lys residues in its high-affinity hexapeptide ligand KKETAV. The α3 helix is an extra structural element that is not present in other PDZ domains, which links PDZ3 with the following SH3 domain in the PSD-95 protein. This regulatory mechanism was confirmed experimentally via thermodynamic and NMR chemical shift perturbation analyses, discarding intra-domain long-range effects. Taken together, the results presented here reveal the molecular basis of the regulatory role of the α3 extra-element and the effects of post-translational modifications of PDZ3 on its binding affinity, both energetically and dynamically.

  19. The Src Homology 3 Domain Is Required for Junctional Adhesion Molecule Binding to the Third PDZ Domain of the Scaffolding Protein ZO-1

    SciTech Connect

    Nomme, Julian; Fanning, Alan S.; Caffrey, Michael; Lye, Ming F.; Anderson, James M.; Lavie, Arnon

    2012-01-20

    Tight junctions are cell-cell contacts that regulate the paracellular flux of solutes and prevent pathogen entry across cell layers. The assembly and permeability of this barrier are dependent on the zonula occludens (ZO) membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) proteins ZO-1, -2, and -3. MAGUK proteins are characterized by a core motif of protein-binding domains that include a PDZ domain, a Src homology 3 (SH3) domain, and a region of homology to guanylate kinase (GUK); the structure of this core motif has never been determined for any MAGUK. To better understand how ZO proteins organize the assembly of protein complexes we have crystallized the entire PDZ3-SH3-GUK core motif of ZO-1. We have also crystallized this core motif in complex with the cytoplasmic tail of the ZO-1 PDZ3 ligand, junctional adhesion molecule A (JAM-A) to determine how the activity of different domains is coordinated. Our study shows a new feature for PDZ class II ligand binding that implicates the two highly conserved Phe{sup -2} and Ser{sup -3} residues of JAM. Our x-ray structures and NMR experiments also show for the first time a role for adjacent domains in the binding of ligands to PDZ domains in the MAGUK proteins family.

  20. A structural portrait of the PDZ domain family.

    PubMed

    Ernst, Andreas; Appleton, Brent A; Ivarsson, Ylva; Zhang, Yingnan; Gfeller, David; Wiesmann, Christian; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-10-23

    PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO1) domains are interaction modules that typically bind to specific C-terminal sequences of partner proteins and assemble signaling complexes in multicellular organisms. We have analyzed the existing database of PDZ domain structures in the context of a specificity tree based on binding specificities defined by peptide-phage binding selections. We have identified 16 structures of PDZ domains in complex with high-affinity ligands and have elucidated four additional structures to assemble a structural database that covers most of the branches of the PDZ specificity tree. A detailed comparison of the structures reveals features that are responsible for the diverse specificities across the PDZ domain family. Specificity differences can be explained by differences in PDZ residues that are in contact with the peptide ligands, but these contacts involve both side-chain and main-chain interactions. Most PDZ domains bind peptides in a canonical conformation in which the ligand main chain adopts an extended β-strand conformation by interacting in an antiparallel fashion with a PDZ β-strand. However, a subset of PDZ domains bind peptides with a bent main-chain conformation and the specificities of these non-canonical domains could not be explained based on canonical structures. Our analysis provides a structural portrait of the PDZ domain family, which serves as a guide in understanding the structural basis for the diverse specificities across the family.

  1. Crystallographic and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Evaluation of the Impact of Peptide Binding to the Second PDZ Domain of Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase 1E

    SciTech Connect

    J Zhang; P Sapienza; H Ke; A Chang; S Hengel; H Wang; G Phillips Jr.; A Lee

    2011-12-31

    PDZ (PSD95/Discs large/ZO-1) domains are ubiquitous protein interaction motifs found in scaffolding proteins involved in signal transduction. Despite the fact that many PDZ domains show a limited tendency to undergo structural change, the PDZ family has been associated with long-range communication and allostery. One of the PDZ domains studied most in terms of structure and biophysical properties is the second PDZ ('PDZ2') domain from protein tyrosine phosphatase 1E (PTP1E, also known as PTPL1). Previously, we showed through NMR relaxation studies that binding of the RA-GEF2 C-terminal peptide substrate results in long-range propagation of side-chain dynamic changes in human PDZ2 [Fuentes, E. J., et al. (2004) J. Mol. Biol. 335, 1105-1115]. Here, we present the first X-ray crystal structures of PDZ2 in the absence and presence of RA-GEF2 ligand, determined to resolutions of 1.65 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. These structures deviate somewhat from previously determined NMR structures and indicate that very minor structural changes in PDZ2 accompany peptide binding. NMR residual dipolar couplings confirm the crystal structures to be accurate models of the time-averaged atomic coordinates of PDZ2. The impact on side-chain dynamics was further tested with a C-terminal peptide from APC, which showed results nearly identical to those of RA-GEF2. Thus, allosteric transmission in PDZ2 induced by peptide binding is conveyed purely and robustly by dynamics. {sup 15}N relaxation dispersion measurements did not detect appreciable populations of a kinetic structural intermediate. Collectively, for ligand binding to PDZ2, these data support a lock-and-key binding model from a structural perspective and an allosteric model from a dynamical perspective, which together suggest a complex energy landscape for functional transitions within the ensemble.

  2. The PDZ3 domain of the cellular scaffolding protein MAGI-1 interacts with the Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR).

    PubMed

    Yan, Ran; Sharma, Priyanka; Kolawole, Abimbola O; Martin, Sterling C T; Readler, James M; Kotha, Poornima L N; Hostetler, Heather A; Excoffon, Katherine J D A

    2015-04-01

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) is an essential cellular protein that is involved in cell-cell adhesion, protein trafficking, and viral infection. The major isoform of CAR is selectively sorted to the basolateral membrane of polarized epithelial cells where it co-localizes with the cellular scaffolding protein membrane-associated guanylate kinase with inverted domain structure-1 (MAGI-1). Previously, we demonstrated CAR interacts with MAGI-1 through a PDZ-domain dependent interaction. Here, we show that the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 is exclusively responsible for the high affinity interaction between the seven exon isoform of CAR and MAGI-1 using yeast-two-hybrid analysis and confirming this interaction biochemically and in cellular lysates by in vitro pull down assay and co-immunoprecipitation. The high affinity interaction between the PDZ3 domain and CAR C-terminus was measured by fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Further, we investigated the biological relevance of this high affinity interaction between CAR and the PDZ3 domain of MAGI-1 and found that it does not alter CAR-mediated adenovirus infection. By contrast, interruption of this high affinity interaction altered the localization of MAGI-1 indicating that CAR is able to traffic MAGI-1 to cell junctions. These data deepen the molecular understanding of the interaction between CAR and MAGI-1 and indicate that although CAR plays a role in trafficking PDZ-based scaffolding proteins to cellular junctions, association with a high affinity intracellular binding partner does not significantly alter adenovirus binding and entry via CAR.

  3. Peptide binding properties of the three PDZ domains of Bazooka (Drosophila Par-3).

    PubMed

    Yu, Cao Guo; Tonikian, Raffi; Felsensteiner, Corinna; Jhingree, Jacquelyn R; Desveaux, Darrell; Sidhu, Sachdev S; Harris, Tony J C

    2014-01-01

    The Par complex is a conserved cell polarity regulator. Bazooka/Par-3 is scaffold for the complex and contains three PDZ domains in tandem. PDZ domains can act singly or synergistically to bind the C-termini of interacting proteins. Sequence comparisons among Drosophila Baz and its human and C. elegans Par-3 counterparts indicate a divergence of the peptide binding pocket of PDZ1 and greater conservation for the pockets of PDZ2 and PDZ3. However, it is unclear whether the domains from different species share peptide binding preferences, or if their tandem organization affects their peptide binding properties. To investigate these questions, we first used phage display screens to identify unique peptide binding profiles for each single PDZ domain of Baz. Comparisons with published phage display screens indicate that Baz and C. elegans PDZ2 bind to similar peptides, and that the peptide binding preferences of Baz PDZ3 are more similar to C. elegans versus human PDZ3. Next we quantified the peptide binding preferences of each Baz PDZ domain using single identified peptides in surface plasmon resonance assays. In these direct binding studies, each peptide had a binding preference for a single PDZ domain (although the peptide binding of PDZ2 was weakest and the least specific). PDZ1 and PDZ3 bound their peptides with dissociation constants in the nM range, whereas PDZ2-peptide binding was in the µM range. To test whether tandem PDZ domain organization affects peptide binding, we examined a fusion protein containing all three PDZ domains and their normal linker regions. The binding strengths of the PDZ-specific peptides to single PDZ domains and to the PDZ domain tandem were indistinguishable. Thus, the peptide binding pockets of each PDZ domain in Baz are not obviously affected by the presence of neighbouring PDZ domains, but act as isolated modules with specific in vitro peptide binding preferences.

  4. Solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain from Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Mei, Song; Dong, Yuanqiu; Zhang, Jiahai; Zhang, Xuecheng; Tu, Xiaoming

    2016-05-01

    PDZ domains are abundant protein interaction modules that often recognize short amino acid motifs at the C-termini of target proteins and regulate multiple biological processes. So far, no PDZ domain in Trypanosoma brucei, an eukaryotic parasite causing sleeping sickness, has been studied. Q388A3, conserved in the related kinetoplastid parasites, is a 1634-residue protein containing a PDZ domain at its C-terminus. In this work, the solution structure of Q388A3 PDZ domain was solved by NMR spectroscopy. Q388A3 PDZ domain adopts a PDZ-like fold composed by a five-stranded β-sheet capped by two α-helices, which is similar to the PDZ domains from HtrA family proteins. Meanwhile, Q388A3 PDZ domain shows some structural features quite different from HtrA PDZ domain.

  5. Aquaporin-2 trafficking is regulated by PDZ-domain containing protein SPA-1.

    PubMed

    Noda, Yumi; Horikawa, Saburo; Furukawa, Tetsushi; Hirai, Keiji; Katayama, Yoshifumi; Asai, Tomoki; Kuwahara, Michio; Katagiri, Koko; Kinashi, Tatsuo; Hattori, Masakazu; Minato, Nagahiro; Sasaki, Sei

    2004-06-18

    Targeted positioning of water channel aquaporin-2 (AQP2) strictly regulates body water homeostasis. Trafficking of AQP2 to the apical membrane is critical to the reabsorption of water in renal collecting ducts. Controlled apical positioning of AQP2 suggests the existence of proteins that interact with AQP2. A biochemical search for AQP2-interacting proteins led to the identification of PDZ-domain containing protein, signal-induced proliferation-associated gene-1 (SPA-1) which is a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) for Rap1. The distribution of SPA-1 coincided with that of AQP2 in renal collecting ducts. The site of colocalization was concomitantly relocated by hydration status. AQP2 trafficking to the apical membrane was inhibited by the SPA-1 mutant lacking Rap1GAP activity and by the constitutively active mutant of Rap1. AQP2 trafficking was impaired in SPA-1-deficient mice. Our results show that SPA-1 directly binds to AQP2 and regulates at least in part AQP2 trafficking.

  6. The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) forms a complex with the PDZ domain-containing protein ligand-of-numb protein-X (LNX).

    PubMed

    Sollerbrant, Kerstin; Raschperger, Elisabeth; Mirza, Momina; Engstrom, Ulla; Philipson, Lennart; Ljungdahl, Per O; Pettersson, Ralf F

    2003-02-28

    The Coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) functions as a virus receptor, but its primary biological function is unknown. A yeast two-hybrid screen was used to identify Ligand-of-Numb protein-X (LNX) as a binding partner to the intracellular tail of CAR. LNX harbors several protein-protein interacting domains, including four PDZ domains, and was previously shown to bind to and regulate the expression level of the cell-fate determinant Numb. CAR was able to bind LNX both in vivo and in vitro. Efficient binding to LNX required not only the consensus PDZ domain binding motif in the C terminus of CAR but also upstream sequences. The CAR binding region in LNX was mapped to the second PDZ domain. CAR and LNX were also shown to colocalize in vivo in mammalian cells. We speculate that CAR and LNX are part of a larger protein complex that might have important functions at discrete subcellular localizations in the cell.

  7. A model for regulation by SynGAP-α1 of binding of synaptic proteins to PDZ-domain 'Slots' in the postsynaptic density

    PubMed Central

    Walkup, Ward G; Mastro, Tara L; Schenker, Leslie T; Vielmetter, Jost; Hu, Rebecca; Iancu, Ariella; Reghunathan, Meera; Bannon, Barry Dylan; Kennedy, Mary B

    2016-01-01

    SynGAP is a Ras/Rap GTPase-activating protein (GAP) that is a major constituent of postsynaptic densities (PSDs) from mammalian forebrain. Its α1 isoform binds to all three PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domains of PSD-95, the principal PSD scaffold, and can occupy as many as 15% of these PDZ domains. We present evidence that synGAP-α1 regulates the composition of the PSD by restricting binding to the PDZ domains of PSD-95. We show that phosphorylation by Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) and Polo-like kinase-2 (PLK2) decreases its affinity for the PDZ domains by several fold, which would free PDZ domains for occupancy by other proteins. Finally, we show that three critical postsynaptic signaling proteins that bind to the PDZ domains of PSD-95 are present in higher concentration in PSDs isolated from mice with a heterozygous deletion of synGAP. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16813.001 PMID:27623146

  8. Structures and target recognition modes of PDZ domains: recurring themes and emerging pictures.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Zhang, Mingjie

    2013-10-01

    PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules and are often found in multidomain scaffold proteins. PDZ-domain-containing scaffold proteins regulate multiple biological processes, including trafficking and clustering receptors and ion channels at defined membrane regions, organizing and targeting signalling complexes at specific cellular compartments, interfacing cytoskeletal structures with membranes, and maintaining various cellular structures. PDZ domains, each with ~90-amino-acid residues folding into a highly similar structure, are best known to bind to short C-terminal tail peptides of their target proteins. A series of recent studies have revealed that, in addition to the canonical target-binding mode, many PDZ-target interactions involve amino acid residues beyond the regular PDZ domain fold, which we refer to as extensions. Such extension sequences often form an integral structural and functional unit with the attached PDZ domain, which is defined as a PDZ supramodule. Correspondingly, PDZ-domain-binding sequences from target proteins are frequently found to require extension sequences beyond canonical short C-terminal tail peptides. Formation of PDZ supramodules not only affords necessary binding specificities and affinities demanded by physiological functions of PDZ domain targets, but also provides regulatory switches to be built in the PDZ-target interactions. At the 20th anniversary of the discovery of PDZ domain proteins, we try to summarize structural features and target-binding properties of such PDZ supramodules emerging from studies in recent years.

  9. Genome-Wide Analysis of PDZ Domain Binding Reveals Inherent Functional Overlap within the PDZ Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    te Velthuis, Aartjan J. W.; Sakalis, Philippe A.; Fowler, Donald A.; Bagowski, Christoph P.

    2011-01-01

    Binding selectivity and cross-reactivity within one of the largest and most abundant interaction domain families, the PDZ family, has long been enigmatic. The complete human PDZ domain complement (the PDZome) consists of 267 domains and we applied here a Bayesian selectivity model to predict hundreds of human PDZ domain interactions, using target sequences of 22,997 non-redundant proteins. Subsequent analysis of these binding scores shows that PDZs can be divided into two genome-wide clusters that coincide well with the division between canonical class 1 and 2 PDZs. Within the class 1 PDZs we observed binding overlap at unprecedented levels, mediated by two residues at positions 1 and 5 of the second α-helix of the binding pocket. Eight PDZ domains were subsequently selected for experimental binding studies and to verify the basics of our predictions. Overall, the PDZ domain class 1 cross-reactivity identified here implies that auxiliary mechanisms must be in place to overcome this inherent functional overlap and to minimize cross-selectivity within the living cell. Indeed, when we superimpose PDZ domain binding affinities with gene ontologies, network topology data and the domain position within a PDZ superfamily protein, functional overlap is minimized and PDZ domains position optimally in the binding space. We therefore propose that PDZ domain selectivity is achieved through cellular context rather than inherent binding specificity. PMID:21283644

  10. Zasp52, a Core Z-disc Protein in Drosophila Indirect Flight Muscles, Interacts with α-Actinin via an Extended PDZ Domain

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Kuo An; González-Morales, Nicanor

    2016-01-01

    Z-discs are organizing centers that establish and maintain myofibril structure and function. Important Z-disc proteins are α-actinin, which cross-links actin thin filaments at the Z-disc and Zasp PDZ domain proteins, which directly interact with α-actinin. Here we investigate the biochemical and genetic nature of this interaction in more detail. Zasp52 is the major Drosophila Zasp PDZ domain protein, and is required for myofibril assembly and maintenance. We show by in vitro biochemistry that the PDZ domain plus a C-terminal extension is the only area of Zasp52 involved in the interaction with α-actinin. In addition, site-directed mutagenesis of 5 amino acid residues in the N-terminal part of the PDZ domain, within the PWGFRL motif, abolish binding to α-actinin, demonstrating the importance of this motif for α-actinin binding. Rescue assays of a novel Zasp52 allele demonstrate the crucial importance of the PDZ domain for Zasp52 function. Flight assays also show that a Zasp52 mutant suppresses the α-actinin mutant phenotype, indicating that both proteins are core structural Z-disc proteins required for optimal Z-disc function. PMID:27783625

  11. Systematic Analysis of Bacterial Effector-Postsynaptic Density 95/Disc Large/Zonula Occludens-1 (PDZ) Domain Interactions Demonstrates Shigella OspE Protein Promotes Protein Kinase C Activation via PDLIM Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Chae-ryun; Allen, John E.; Russo, Brian; Lee, Soo Young; Heindl, Jason E.; Baxt, Leigh A.; Herrera, Bobby Brooke; Kahoud, Emily; MacBeath, Gavin; Goldberg, Marcia B.

    2014-01-01

    Diseases caused by many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens depend on the activities of bacterial effector proteins that are delivered into eukaryotic cells via specialized secretion systems. Effector protein function largely depends on specific subcellular targeting and specific interactions with cellular ligands. PDZ domains are common domains that serve to provide specificity in protein-protein interactions in eukaryotic systems. We show that putative PDZ-binding motifs are significantly enriched among effector proteins delivered into mammalian cells by certain bacterial pathogens. We use PDZ domain microarrays to identify candidate interaction partners of the Shigella flexneri effector proteins OspE1 and OspE2, which contain putative PDZ-binding motifs. We demonstrate in vitro and in cells that OspE proteins interact with PDLIM7, a member of the PDLIM family of proteins, which contain a PDZ domain and one or more LIM domains, protein interaction domains that participate in a wide variety of functions, including activation of isoforms of protein kinase C (PKC). We demonstrate that activation of PKC during S. flexneri infection is attenuated in the absence of PDLIM7 or OspE proteins and that the OspE PDZ-binding motif is required for wild-type levels of PKC activation. These results are consistent with a model in which binding of OspE to PDLIM7 during infection regulates the activity of PKC isoforms that bind to the PDLIM7 LIM domain. PMID:25124035

  12. Application of Wavelet Transform for PDZ Domain Classification

    PubMed Central

    Daqrouq, Khaled; Alhmouz, Rami; Balamesh, Ahmed; Memic, Adnan

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains have been identified as part of an array of signaling proteins that are often unrelated, except for the well-conserved structural PDZ domain they contain. These domains have been linked to many disease processes including common Avian influenza, as well as very rare conditions such as Fraser and Usher syndromes. Historically, based on the interactions and the nature of bonds they form, PDZ domains have most often been classified into one of three classes (class I, class II and others - class III), that is directly dependent on their binding partner. In this study, we report on three unique feature extraction approaches based on the bigram and trigram occurrence and existence rearrangements within the domain's primary amino acid sequences in assisting PDZ domain classification. Wavelet packet transform (WPT) and Shannon entropy denoted by wavelet entropy (WE) feature extraction methods were proposed. Using 115 unique human and mouse PDZ domains, the existence rearrangement approach yielded a high recognition rate (78.34%), which outperformed our occurrence rearrangements based method. The recognition rate was (81.41%) with validation technique. The method reported for PDZ domain classification from primary sequences proved to be an encouraging approach for obtaining consistent classification results. We anticipate that by increasing the database size, we can further improve feature extraction and correct classification. PMID:25860375

  13. Extensions of PDZ domains as important structural and functional elements.

    PubMed

    Wang, Conan K; Pan, Lifeng; Chen, Jia; Zhang, Mingjie

    2010-08-01

    'Divide and conquer' has been the guiding strategy for the study of protein structure and function. Proteins are divided into domains with each domain having a canonical structural definition depending on its type. In this review, we push forward with the interesting observation that many domains have regions outside of their canonical definition that affect their structure and function; we call these regions 'extensions'. We focus on the highly abundant PDZ (PSD-95, DLG1 and ZO-1) domain. Using bioinformatics, we find that many PDZ domains have potential extensions and we developed an openly-accessible website to display our results ( http://bcz102.ust.hk/pdzex/ ). We propose, using well-studied PDZ domains as illustrative examples, that the roles of PDZ extensions can be classified into at least four categories: 1) protein dynamics-based modulation of target binding affinity, 2) provision of binding sites for macro-molecular assembly, 3) structural integration of multi-domain modules, and 4) expansion of the target ligand-binding pocket. Our review highlights the potential structural and functional importance of domain extensions, highlighting the significance of looking beyond the canonical boundaries of protein domains in general.

  14. The Tiam1 PDZ Domain Couples to Syndecan1 and Promotes Cell-Matrix Adhesion

    SciTech Connect

    Shepherd, Tyson R; Klaus, Suzi M; Liu, Xu; Ramaswamy, S; DeMali, Kris A; Fuentes, Ernesto J

    2010-08-12

    The T-cell lymphoma invasion and metastasis gene 1 (Tiam1) is a guanine exchange factor (GEF) for the Rho-family GTPase Rac1 that is crucial for the integrity of adherens junctions, tight junctions, and cell-matrix interactions. This GEF contains several protein-protein interaction domains, including a PDZ domain. Earlier studies identified a consensus PDZ-binding motif and a synthetic peptide capable of binding to the Tiam1 PDZ domain, but little is known about its ligand specificity and physiological role in cells. Here, we investigated the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. We determined the crystal structures of the Tiam1 PDZ domain free and in complex with a 'model' peptide, which revealed the structural basis for ligand specificity. Protein database searches using the consensus PDZ-binding motif identified two eukaryotic cell adhesion proteins, Syndecan1 and Caspr4, as potential Tiam1 PDZ domain binding proteins. Equilibrium binding experiments confirmed that C-terminal peptides derived from Syndecan1 and Caspr4 bound the Tiam1 PDZ domain. NMR chemical shift perturbation experiments indicated that the Tiam1 PDZ/Syndecan1 and PDZ/Caspr4 complexes were structurally distinct and identified key residues likely to be responsible for ligand selectivity. Moreover, cell biological analysis established that Syndecan1 is a physiological binding partner of Tiam1 and that the PDZ domain has a function in cell-matrix adhesion and cell migration. Collectively, our data provide insight into the structure, specificity, and function of the Tiam1 PDZ domain. Importantly, our data report on a physiological role for the Tiam1 PDZ domain and establish a novel link between two previously unrelated signal transduction pathways, both of which are implicated in cancer.

  15. The PDZ domain as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kurakin, Alexei; Swistowski, Andrzej; Wu, Susan C; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-09-26

    Specific protein associations define the wiring of protein interaction networks and thus control the organization and functioning of the cell as a whole. Peptide recognition by PDZ and other protein interaction domains represents one of the best-studied classes of specific protein associations. However, a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between selectivity and promiscuity commonly observed in the interactions mediated by peptide recognition modules as well as its functional meaning remain elusive. To address these questions in a comprehensive manner, two large populations of artificial and natural peptide ligands of six archetypal PDZ domains from the synaptic proteins PSD95 and SAP97 were generated by target-assisted iterative screening (TAIS) of combinatorial peptide libraries and by synthesis of proteomic fragments, correspondingly. A comparative statistical analysis of affinity-ranked artificial and natural ligands yielded a comprehensive picture of known and novel PDZ ligand specificity determinants, revealing a hitherto unappreciated combination of specificity and adaptive plasticity inherent to PDZ domain recognition. We propose a reconceptualization of the PDZ domain in terms of a complex adaptive system representing a flexible compromise between the rigid order of exquisite specificity and the chaos of unselective promiscuity, which has evolved to mediate two mutually contradictory properties required of such higher order sub-cellular organizations as synapses, cell junctions, and others--organizational structure and organizational plasticity/adaptability. The generalization of this reconceptualization in regard to other protein interaction modules and specific protein associations is consistent with the image of the cell as a complex adaptive macromolecular system as opposed to clockwork.

  16. Characterization of big bang, a novel gene encoding for PDZ domain-containing proteins that are dynamically expressed throughout Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sabrina Y; Renihan, Maia K; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2006-06-01

    PDZ (PSD-95, Discs-large, ZO-1) domain proteins often function as scaffolding proteins and have been shown to play important roles in diverse cellular processes such as the establishment and maintenance of cell polarity, and signal transduction. Here, we report the identification and cloning of a novel Drosophila melanogaster gene that is predicted to produce several different PDZ domain-containing proteins through alternative promoter usage and alternative splicing. This gene, that we have named big bang (bbg), was first identified as C96-GAL4, a GAL4 enhancer trap line that was generated in our lab. To further characterize bbg, its expression pattern was examined in ovaries, embryos, and late third instar larvae using UAS reporter gene constructs, in situ hybridization, or immunocytochemistry. In addition, the expression of alternatively spliced transcripts was examined in more detail using in situ hybridization. We find that during embryogenesis bbg is predominantly expressed in the developing gut, but it is also expressed in external sensory organs found in the epidermis. In the late third instar larva, bbg is expressed along the presumptive wing margin in the wing disc, broadly in the eye disc, and in other imaginal discs as well as in the brain. The expression patterns observed are dynamic and specific during development, suggesting that like other genes that encode for several different PDZ domain protein isoforms, bbg likely plays important roles in multiple developmental processes.

  17. The Impact of Extra-Domain Structures and Post-Translational Modifications in the Folding/Misfolding Behaviour of the Third PDZ Domain of MAGUK Neuronal Protein PSD-95

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Eva S.; Villegas, Sandra; Martinez, Jose C.

    2014-01-01

    The modulation of binding affinities and specificities by post-translational modifications located out from the binding pocket of the third PDZ domain of PSD-95 (PDZ3) has been reported recently. It is achieved through an intra-domain electrostatic network involving some charged residues in the β2–β3 loop (were a succinimide modification occurs), the α3 helix (an extra-structural element that links the PDZ3 domain with the following SH3 domain in PSD-95, and contains the phosphorylation target Tyr397), and the ligand peptide. Here, we have investigated the main structural and thermodynamic aspects that these structural elements and their related post-translational modifications display in the folding/misfolding pathway of PDZ3 by means of site-directed mutagenesis combined with calorimetry and spectroscopy. We have found that, although all the assayed mutations generate proteins more prone to aggregation than the wild-type PDZ3, those directly affecting the α3 helix, like the E401R substitution or the truncation of the whole α3 helix, increase the population of the DSC-detected intermediate state and the misfolding kinetics, by organizing the supramacromolecular structures at the expense of the two β-sheets present in the PDZ3 fold. However, those mutations affecting the β2–β3 loop, included into the prone-to-aggregation region composed by a single β-sheet comprising β2 to β4 chains, stabilize the trimeric intermediate previously shown in the wild-type PDZ3 and slow-down aggregation, also making it partly reversible. These results strongly suggest that the α3 helix protects to some extent the PDZ3 domain core from misfolding. This might well constitute the first example where an extra-element, intended to link the PDZ3 domain to the following SH3 in PSD-95 and in other members of the MAGUK family, not only regulates the binding abilities of this domain but it also protects PDZ3 from misfolding and aggregation. The influence of the post

  18. Structures of the human Pals1 PDZ domain with and without ligand suggest gated access of Crb to the PDZ peptide-binding groove

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanova, Marina E.; Fletcher, Georgina C.; O’Reilly, Nicola; Purkiss, Andrew G.; Thompson, Barry J.; McDonald, Neil Q.

    2015-03-01

    This study characterizes the interaction between the carboxy-terminal (ERLI) motif of the essential polarity protein Crb and the Pals1/Stardust PDZ-domain protein. Structures of human Pals1 PDZ with and without a Crb peptide are described, explaining the highly conserved nature of the ERLI motif and revealing a sterically blocked peptide-binding groove in the absence of ligand. Many components of epithelial polarity protein complexes possess PDZ domains that are required for protein interaction and recruitment to the apical plasma membrane. Apical localization of the Crumbs (Crb) transmembrane protein requires a PDZ-mediated interaction with Pals1 (protein-associated with Lin7, Stardust, MPP5), a member of the p55 family of membrane-associated guanylate kinases (MAGUKs). This study describes the molecular interaction between the Crb carboxy-terminal motif (ERLI), which is required for Drosophila cell polarity, and the Pals1 PDZ domain using crystallography and fluorescence polarization. Only the last four Crb residues contribute to Pals1 PDZ-domain binding affinity, with specificity contributed by conserved charged interactions. Comparison of the Crb-bound Pals1 PDZ structure with an apo Pals1 structure reveals a key Phe side chain that gates access to the PDZ peptide-binding groove. Removal of this side chain enhances the binding affinity by more than fivefold, suggesting that access of Crb to Pals1 may be regulated by intradomain contacts or by protein–protein interaction.

  19. Nucleo-cytoplasmic functions of the PDZ-LIM protein family: new insights in organ development

    PubMed Central

    Krcmery, Jennifer; Camarata, Troy; Kulisz, Andre; Simon, Hans-Georg

    2010-01-01

    Summary Recent work on the PDZ-LIM protein family has revealed important activities at the cellular level, mediating signals between the nucleus and the cytoskeleton, with significant impact on organ development. We review and integrate current knowledge about the PDZ-LIM protein family and propose a new functional role, sequestering nuclear factors in the cytoplasm. Characterized by their PDZ and LIM domains, the PDZ-LIM family is comprised of evolutionarily conserved proteins found throughout the animal kingdom, from worms to humans. Combining two functional domains in one protein, PDZ-LIM proteins have wide-ranging and multi-compartmental cell functions during development and homeostasis while, in contrast, misregulation can lead to cancer formation and progression. New emerging roles include interactions with integrins, T-box transcription factors, and receptor tyrosine kinases. Facilitating the assembly of protein complexes, PDZ-LIM proteins can act as signal modulators, influence actin dynamics, regulate cell architecture and control gene transcription. PMID:20091751

  20. Nectin/PRR: an immunoglobulin-like cell adhesion molecule recruited to cadherin-based adherens junctions through interaction with Afadin, a PDZ domain-containing protein.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K; Nakanishi, H; Miyahara, M; Mandai, K; Satoh, K; Satoh, A; Nishioka, H; Aoki, J; Nomoto, A; Mizoguchi, A; Takai, Y

    1999-05-03

    We have isolated a novel actin filament-binding protein, named afadin, localized at cadherin-based cell-cell adherens junctions (AJs) in various tissues and cell lines. Afadin has one PDZ domain, three proline-rich regions, and one actin filament-binding domain. We found here that afadin directly interacted with a family of the immunoglobulin superfamily, which was isolated originally as the poliovirus receptor-related protein (PRR) family consisting of PRR1 and -2, and has been identified recently to be the alphaherpes virus receptor. PRR has a COOH-terminal consensus motif to which the PDZ domain of afadin binds. PRR and afadin were colocalized at cadherin-based cell-cell AJs in various tissues and cell lines. In E-cadherin-expressing EL cells, PRR was recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. PRR showed Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion activity. These results indicate that PRR is a cell-cell adhesion molecule of the immunoglobulin superfamily which is recruited to cadherin-based cell-cell AJs through interaction with afadin. We rename PRR as nectin (taken from the Latin word "necto" meaning "to connect").

  1. Recruitment of an alternatively spliced form of synaptojanin 2 to mitochondria by the interaction with the PDZ domain of a mitochondrial outer membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Nemoto, Y; De Camilli, P

    1999-01-01

    Synaptojanin 1 is an inositol 5'-phosphatase highly enriched in nerve terminals with a putative role in recycling of synaptic vesicles. We have previously described synaptojanin 2, which is more broadly expressed as multiple alternatively spliced forms. Here we have identified and characterized a novel mitochondrial outer membrane protein, OMP25, with a single PDZ domain that specifically binds to a unique motif in the C-terminus of synaptojanin 2A. This motif is encoded by the exon sequence specific to synaptojanin 2A. OMP25 mRNA is widely expressed in rat tissues. OMP25 is localized to the mitochondrial outer membrane via the C-terminal transmembrane region, with the PDZ domain facing the cytoplasm. Overexpression of OMP25 results in perinuclear clustering of mitochondria in transfected cells. This effect is mimicked by enforced expression of synaptojanin 2A on the mitochondrial outer membrane, but not by the synaptojanin 2A mutants lacking the inositol 5'-phosphatase domain. Our findings provide evidence that OMP25 mediates recruitment of synaptojanin 2A to mitochondria and that modulation of inositol phospholipids by synaptojanin 2A may play a role in maintenance of the intracellular distribution of mitochondria. PMID:10357812

  2. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  3. Alteration of the C-terminal ligand specificity of the erbin PDZ domain by allosteric mutational effects.

    PubMed

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; McLaughlin, Megan E; Erijman, Ariel; Hooda, Yogesh; Chakravorty, Nishant; Martinez, Jose C; Shifman, Julia M; Sidhu, Sachdev S

    2014-10-23

    Modulation of protein binding specificity is important for basic biology and for applied science. Here we explore how binding specificity is conveyed in PDZ (postsynaptic density protein-95/discs large/zonula occludens-1) domains, small interaction modules that recognize various proteins by binding to an extended C terminus. Our goal was to engineer variants of the Erbin PDZ domain with altered specificity for the most C-terminal position (position 0) where a Val is strongly preferred by the wild-type domain. We constructed a library of PDZ domains by randomizing residues in direct contact with position 0 and in a loop that is close to but does not contact position 0. We used phage display to select for PDZ variants that bind to 19 peptide ligands differing only at position 0. To verify that each obtained PDZ domain exhibited the correct binding specificity, we selected peptide ligands for each domain. Despite intensive efforts, we were only able to evolve Erbin PDZ domain variants with selectivity for the aliphatic C-terminal side chains Val, Ile and Leu. Interestingly, many PDZ domains with these three distinct specificities contained identical amino acids at positions that directly contact position 0 but differed in the loop that does not contact position 0. Computational modeling of the selected PDZ domains shows how slight conformational changes in the loop region propagate to the binding site and result in different binding specificities. Our results demonstrate that second-sphere residues could be crucial in determining protein binding specificity.

  4. Frizzled 7 and PIP2 binding by syntenin PDZ2 domain supports Frizzled 7 trafficking and signalling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egea-Jimenez, Antonio Luis; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Ivarsson, Ylva; Wawrzyniak, Anna Maria; Kashyap, Rudra; Loris, Remy; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2016-07-01

    PDZ domain-containing proteins work as intracellular scaffolds to control spatio-temporal aspects of cell signalling. This function is supported by the ability of their PDZ domains to bind other proteins such as receptors, but also phosphoinositide lipids important for membrane trafficking. Here we report a crystal structure of the syntenin PDZ tandem in complex with the carboxy-terminal fragment of Frizzled 7 and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2). The crystal structure reveals a tripartite interaction formed via the second PDZ domain of syntenin. Biophysical and biochemical experiments establish co-operative binding of the tripartite complex and identify residues crucial for membrane PIP2-specific recognition. Experiments with cells support the importance of the syntenin-PIP2 interaction for plasma membrane targeting of Frizzled 7 and c-jun phosphorylation. This study contributes to our understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins as key players in membrane compartmentalization and dynamics.

  5. Optimizing Dvl PDZ domain inhibitor by exploring chemical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Jufang; Zheng, Jie J.

    2009-01-01

    Because of advances in the high-throughput screening technology, identification of a hit that can bind to a target protein has become a relatively easy task; however, in the process of drug discovery, the following hit-to-lead and lead optimization still remain challenging. In a typical hit-to-lead and lead optimization process, the analogues of the most promising hits are synthesized for the development of structure-activity relationship (SAR) analysis, and in turn, in the effort of optimization of lead compounds, such analysis provides guidance for the further synthesis. The synthesis processes are usually long and labor-intensive. In silico searching has becoming an alternative approach to explore SAR especially with millions of compounds ready to be screened and most of them can be easily obtained. Here, we report our discovery of 15 new Dishevelled PDZ domain inhibitors by using such an approach. In our studies, we first developed a pharmacophore model based on NSC668036, an inhibitor previously identified in our laboratory; based on the model, we then screened the ChemDiv database by using an algorithm that combines similarity search and docking procedures; finally, we selected potent inhibitors based on docking analysis and examined them by using NMR spectroscopy. NMR experiments showed that all the 15 compounds we chose bound to the PDZ domain tighter than NSC668036.

  6. PDZ Binding Domains, Structural Disorder and Phosphorylation: A Menage-a-trois Tailing Dcp2 mRNA Decapping Enzymes.

    PubMed

    Gunawardana, Dilantha

    2016-01-01

    Diverse cellular activities are mediated through the interaction of protein domains and their binding partners. One such protein domain widely distributed in the higher metazoan world is the PDZ domain, which facilitates abundant protein-protein interactions. The PDZ domain-PDZ binding domain interaction has been implicated in several pathologies including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Down syndrome. PDZ domains bind to C-terminal peptides/proteins which have either of the following combinations: S/T-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type I, hydrophobic-Xhydrophobic- COOH for type II, and D/E-X-hydrophobic-COOH for type III, although hydrophobicity in the termini form the key characteristic of the PDZ-binding domains. We identified and characterized a Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzyme from Arabidopsis thaliana, a protein containing a putative PDZ-binding domain using mutagenesis and protein biochemistry. Now we are using bioinformatics to study the Cterminal end of mRNA decapping enzymes from complex metazoans with the aim of (1) identifying putative PDZ-binding domains (2) Correlating structural disorder with PDZ binding domains and (3) Demonstrating the presence of phosphorylation sites in C-terminal extremities of Dcp2 type mRNA decapping enzymes. It is proposed here that the trinity of PDZbinding domains, structural disorder and phosphorylation-susceptible sites are a feature of the Dcp2 family of decapping enzymes and perhaps is a wider trick in protein evolution where scaffolding/tethering is a requirement for localization and function. It is critical though laboratory-based supporting evidence is sought to back-up this bioinformatics exploration into tail regions of mRNA decapping enzymes.

  7. The roles of PDZ-containing proteins in PLC-beta-mediated signaling.

    PubMed

    Suh, P G; Hwang, J I; Ryu, S H; Donowitz, M; Kim, J H

    2001-10-19

    Mammalian phospholipase C-beta isozymes are activated by a heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein linked to various cell surface receptors. Recent reports suggest that PDZ domain proteins play a significant role of PDZ-containing proteins in the regulation of mammalian PLC-beta isozymes. PDZ-containing proteins mediate the clustering of receptors and signaling molecules and thereby regulate agonist-induced signal transduction in polarized cells such as neuronal and epithelial cells. NORPA, a Drosophila PLC-beta, is known to be a component of a signaling complex that includes TRP and rhodopsin through interaction with INAD, a PDZ-containing protein. Mammalian PLC-beta1 and -beta2 isoforms interact with a PDZ-containing protein NHERF which is coupled to Trp4, a Ca(2+) channel. In addition, PLC-beta3 specifically interacts with E3KARP, another protein closely related to NHERF, through its C-terminal PDZ-binding motif. E3KARP up-regulates the PLC-beta3 activation coupled to muscarinic receptor. In this review, the role of signaling complexes mediated by PDZ-containing proteins in the regulation of PLC-beta isoforms will be discussed.

  8. Prevalence, Specificity and Determinants of Lipid-Interacting PDZ Domains from an In-Cell Screen and In Vitro Binding Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kashyap, Rudra; Polanowska, Jolanta; Betzi, Stéphane; Lembo, Frédérique; Vermeiren, Elke; Chiheb, Driss; Lenfant, Nicolas; Morelli, Xavier; Borg, Jean-Paul; Reboul, Jérôme; Zimmermann, Pascale

    2013-01-01

    Background PDZ domains are highly abundant protein-protein interaction modules involved in the wiring of protein networks. Emerging evidence indicates that some PDZ domains also interact with phosphoinositides (PtdInsPs), important regulators of cell polarization and signaling. Yet our knowledge on the prevalence, specificity, affinity, and molecular determinants of PDZ-PtdInsPs interactions and on their impact on PDZ-protein interactions is very limited. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened the human proteome for PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains by a combination of in vivo cell-localization studies and in vitro dot blot and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) experiments using synthetic lipids and recombinant proteins. We found that PtdInsPs interactions contribute to the cellular distribution of some PDZ domains, intriguingly also in nuclear organelles, and that a significant subgroup of PDZ domains interacts with PtdInsPs with affinities in the low-to-mid micromolar range. In vitro specificity for the head group is low, but with a trend of higher affinities for more phosphorylated PtdInsPs species. Other membrane lipids can assist PtdInsPs-interactions. PtdInsPs-interacting PDZ domains have generally high pI values and contain characteristic clusters of basic residues, hallmarks that may be used to predict additional PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains. In tripartite binding experiments we established that peptide binding can either compete or cooperate with PtdInsPs binding depending on the combination of ligands. Conclusions/Significance Our screen substantially expands the set of PtdInsPs interacting PDZ domains, and shows that a full understanding of the biology of PDZ proteins will require a comprehensive insight into the intricate relationships between PDZ domains and their peptide and lipid ligands. PMID:23390500

  9. Simultaneous prediction of binding free energy and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crivelli, Joseph J.; Lemmon, Gordon; Kaufmann, Kristian W.; Meiler, Jens

    2013-12-01

    Interactions between protein domains and linear peptides underlie many biological processes. Among these interactions, the recognition of C-terminal peptides by PDZ domains is one of the most ubiquitous. In this work, we present a mathematical model for PDZ domain-peptide interactions capable of predicting both affinity and specificity of binding based on X-ray crystal structures and comparative modeling with R osetta. We developed our mathematical model using a large phage display dataset describing binding specificity for a wild type PDZ domain and 91 single mutants, as well as binding affinity data for a wild type PDZ domain binding to 28 different peptides. Structural refinement was carried out through several R osetta protocols, the most accurate of which included flexible peptide docking and several iterations of side chain repacking and backbone minimization. Our findings emphasize the importance of backbone flexibility and the energetic contributions of side chain-side chain hydrogen bonds in accurately predicting interactions. We also determined that predicting PDZ domain-peptide interactions became increasingly challenging as the length of the peptide increased in the N-terminal direction. In the training dataset, predicted binding energies correlated with those derived through calorimetry and specificity switches introduced through single mutations at interface positions were recapitulated. In independent tests, our best performing protocol was capable of predicting dissociation constants well within one order of magnitude of the experimental values and specificity profiles at the level of accuracy of previous studies. To our knowledge, this approach represents the first integrated protocol for predicting both affinity and specificity for PDZ domain-peptide interactions.

  10. In vitro and in vivo Analysis of the Binding of the C Terminus of the HDL Receptor Scavenger Receptor Class B type I (SR-BI) to the PDZ1 Domain of its Cytoplasmic Adaptor Protein PDZK1

    SciTech Connect

    O Kocher; G Birrane; K Tsukamoto; S Fenske; A Yesilaltay; R Pal; K Daniels; J Ladias; M Krieger

    2011-12-31

    The PDZ1 domain of the four PDZ domain-containing protein PDZK1 has been reported to bind the C terminus of the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B, type I (SR-BI), and to control hepatic SR-BI expression and function. We generated wild-type (WT) and mutant murine PDZ1 domains, the mutants bearing single amino acid substitutions in their carboxylate binding loop (Lys(14)-Xaa(4)-Asn(19)-Tyr-Gly-Phe-Phe-Leu(24)), and measured their binding affinity for a 7-residue peptide corresponding to the C terminus of SR-BI ((503)VLQEAKL(509)). The Y20A and G21Y substitutions abrogated all binding activity. Surprisingly, binding affinities (K(d)) of the K14A and F22A mutants were 3.2 and 4.0 ?M, respectively, similar to 2.6 ?M measured for the WT PDZ1. To understand these findings, we determined the high resolution structure of WT PDZ1 bound to a 5-residue sequence from the C-terminal SR-BI ((505)QEAKL(509)) using x-ray crystallography. In addition, we incorporated the K14A and Y20A substitutions into full-length PDZK1 liver-specific transgenes and expressed them in WT and PDZK1 knock-out mice. In WT mice, the transgenes did not alter endogenous hepatic SR-BI protein expression (intracellular distribution or amount) or lipoprotein metabolism (total plasma cholesterol, lipoprotein size distribution). In PDZK1 knock-out mice, as expected, the K14A mutant behaved like wild-type PDZK1 and completely corrected their hepatic SR-BI and plasma lipoprotein abnormalities. Unexpectedly, the 10-20-fold overexpressed Y20A mutant also substantially, but not completely, corrected these abnormalities. The results suggest that there may be an additional site(s) within PDZK1 that bind(s) SR-BI and mediate(s) productive SR-BI-PDZK1 interaction previously attributed exclusively to the canonical binding of the C-terminal SR-BI to PDZ1.

  11. Computational Design of Selective Peptides to Discriminate Between Similar PDZ Domains in an Oncogenic Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Fan; Jewell, Heather; Fitzpatrick, Jeremy; Zhang, Jian; Mierke, Dale F.; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2016-01-01

    Reagents that target protein-protein interactions to rewire signaling are of great relevance in biological research. Computational protein design may offer a means of creating such reagents on demand, but methods for encoding targeting selectivity are sorely needed. This is especially challenging when targeting interactions with ubiquitous recognition modules—e.g., PDZ domains, which bind C-terminal sequences of partner proteins. Here we consider the problem of designing selective PDZ inhibitor peptides in the context of an oncogenic signaling pathway, in which two PDZ domains (NHERF-2 PDZ2—N2P2 and MAGI-3 PDZ6—M3P6) compete for a receptor C-terminus to differentially modulate oncogenic activities. Because N2P2 increases tumorigenicity and M3P6 decreases it, we sought to design peptides that inhibit N2P2 without affecting M3P6. We developed a structure-based computational design framework that models peptide flexibility in binding, yet is efficient enough to rapidly analyze tradeoffs between affinity and selectivity. Designed peptides showed low-micromolar inhibition constants for N2P2 and no detectable M3P6 binding. Peptides designed for reverse discrimination bound M3P6 tighter than N2P2, further testing our technology. Experimental and computational analysis of selectivity determinants revealed significant indirect energetic coupling in the binding site. Successful discrimination between N2P2 and M3P6, despite their overlapping binding preferences, is highly encouraging for computational approaches to selective PDZ targeting, especially because design relied on a homology model of M3P6. Still, we demonstrate specific deficiencies of structural modeling that must be addressed to enable truly robust design. The presented framework is general and can be applied in many scenarios to engineer selective targeting. PMID:25451599

  12. Computational design of selective peptides to discriminate between similar PDZ domains in an oncogenic pathway.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Fan; Jewell, Heather; Fitzpatrick, Jeremy; Zhang, Jian; Mierke, Dale F; Grigoryan, Gevorg

    2015-01-30

    Reagents that target protein-protein interactions to rewire signaling are of great relevance in biological research. Computational protein design may offer a means of creating such reagents on demand, but methods for encoding targeting selectivity are sorely needed. This is especially challenging when targeting interactions with ubiquitous recognition modules--for example, PDZ domains, which bind C-terminal sequences of partner proteins. Here we consider the problem of designing selective PDZ inhibitor peptides in the context of an oncogenic signaling pathway, in which two PDZ domains (NHERF-2 PDZ2-N2P2 and MAGI-3 PDZ6-M3P6) compete for a receptor C-terminus to differentially modulate oncogenic activities. Because N2P2 has been shown to increase tumorigenicity and M3P6 to decreases it, we sought to design peptides that inhibit N2P2 without affecting M3P6. We developed a structure-based computational design framework that models peptide flexibility in binding yet is efficient enough to rapidly analyze tradeoffs between affinity and selectivity. Designed peptides showed low-micromolar inhibition constants for N2P2 and no detectable M3P6 binding. Peptides designed for reverse discrimination bound M3P6 tighter than N2P2, further testing our technology. Experimental and computational analysis of selectivity determinants revealed significant indirect energetic coupling in the binding site. Successful discrimination between N2P2 and M3P6, despite their overlapping binding preferences, is highly encouraging for computational approaches to selective PDZ targeting, especially because design relied on a homology model of M3P6. Still, we demonstrate specific deficiencies of structural modeling that must be addressed to enable truly robust design. The presented framework is general and can be applied in many scenarios to engineer selective targeting.

  13. PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) protein regulates phospholipase C-β3 (PLC-β3)-specific activation of somatostatin by forming a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and somatostatin receptors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jung Kuk; Kwon, Ohman; Kim, Jinho; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Park, Hye Kyung; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Lock; Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Seok, Heon; Lee-Kwon, Whaseon; Choi, Jang Hyun; Kang, Byoung Heon; Kim, Sanguk; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2012-06-15

    Phospholipase C-β (PLC-β) is a key molecule in G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling. Many studies have shown that the four PLC-β subtypes have different physiological functions despite their similar structures. Because the PLC-β subtypes possess different PDZ-binding motifs, they have the potential to interact with different PDZ proteins. In this study, we identified PDZ domain-containing 1 (PDZK1) as a PDZ protein that specifically interacts with PLC-β3. To elucidate the functional roles of PDZK1, we next screened for potential interacting proteins of PDZK1 and identified the somatostatin receptors (SSTRs) as another protein that interacts with PDZK1. Through these interactions, PDZK1 assembles as a ternary complex with PLC-β3 and SSTRs. Interestingly, the expression of PDZK1 and PLC-β3, but not PLC-β1, markedly potentiated SST-induced PLC activation. However, disruption of the ternary complex inhibited SST-induced PLC activation, which suggests that PDZK1-mediated complex formation is required for the specific activation of PLC-β3 by SST. Consistent with this observation, the knockdown of PDZK1 or PLC-β3, but not that of PLC-β1, significantly inhibited SST-induced intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, which further attenuated subsequent ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the formation of a complex between SSTRs, PDZK1, and PLC-β3 is essential for the specific activation of PLC-β3 and the subsequent physiologic responses by SST.

  14. A thermodynamic study of the third PDZ domain of MAGUK neuronal protein PSD-95 reveals a complex three-state folding behavior.

    PubMed

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Martinez, Jose C; Marin-Argany, Marta; Villegas, Sandra; Cobos, Eva S

    2014-01-01

    The relevance of the C-terminal α helix of the PDZ3 domain of PSD95 in its unfolding process has been explored by achieving the thermodynamic characterization of a construct where the sequence of the nine residues corresponding to such motif has been deleted. Calorimetric traces at neutral pH require the application of a three-state model displaying three different equilibrium processes in which the intermediate state self-associates upon heating, being stable and populated in a wide temperature range. Temperature scans followed by circular dichroism, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering support the presence of such oligomeric-partially folded species. This study reveals that the deletion of the α3-helix sequence results in a more complex description of the domain unfolding.

  15. Similar and Distinct Properties of MUPP1 and Patj, Two Homologous PDZ Domain-Containing Tight-Junction Proteins ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Adachi, Makoto; Hamazaki, Yoko; Kobayashi, Yuka; Itoh, Masahiko; Tsukita, Sachiko; Furuse, Mikio; Tsukita, Shoichiro

    2009-01-01

    MUPP1 and Patj are both composed of an L27 domain and multiple PDZ domains (13 and 10 domains, respectively) and are localized to tight junctions (TJs) in epithelial cells. Although Patj is known to be responsible for the organization of TJs and epithelial polarity, characterization of MUPP1 is lacking. In this study, we found that MUPP1 and Patj share several binding partners, including JAM1, ZO-3, Pals1, Par6, and nectins (cell-cell adhesion molecules at adherens junctions). MUPP1 and Patj exhibited similar subcellular distributions, and the mechanisms with which they localize to TJs also appear to overlap. Despite these similarities, functional studies have revealed that Patj is indispensable for the establishment of TJs and epithelial polarization, whereas MUPP1 is not. Thus, although MUPP1 and Patj share several molecular properties, their functions are entirely different. We present evidence that the signaling mediated by Pals1, which has a higher affinity for Patj than for MUPP1 and is involved in the activation of the Par6-aPKC complex, is of principal importance for the function of Patj in epithelial cells. PMID:19255144

  16. Inter-channel scaffolding of presynaptic CaV2.2 via the C terminal PDZ ligand domain.

    PubMed

    Gardezi, Sabiha R; Li, Qi; Stanley, Elise F

    2013-05-15

    Calcium entry through CaV2.2 calcium channels clustered at the active zone (AZ) of the presynaptic nerve terminal gates synaptic vesicle (SV) fusion and the discharge of neurotransmitters, but the mechanism of channel scaffolding remains poorly understood. Recent studies have implicated the binding of a PDZ ligand domain (PDZ-LD) at the tip of the channel C terminal to a partner PDZ domain on RIM1/2, a synaptic vesicle-associated protein. To explore CaV2.2 scaffolding, we created intracellular region fusion proteins and used these to test for binding by 'fishing' for native CaV2.2 channels from cell lysates. Fusion proteins mimicking the distal half of the channel C terminal (C3strep) reliably captured CaV2.2 from whole brain crude membrane or purified synaptosome membrane lysates, whereas channel I-II loop or the distal half of the II-III loop proteins were negative. This capture could be replicated in a non-synaptic environment using CaV2.2 expressed in a cell line. The distal tip PDZ-LD, DDWC-COOH, was confirmed as the critical binding site by block of pull-down with mimetic peptides. Pull-down experiments using brain crude membrane lysates confirmed that RIM1/2 can bind to the DDWC PDZ-LD. However, robust CaV2.2 capture was observed from synaptosome membrane or in the cell line expression system with little or no RIM1/2 co-capture. Thus, we conclude that CaV2.2 channels can scaffold to each other via an interaction that involves the PDZ-LD by an inter-channel linkage bridged by an unknown protein.

  17. Discovery of novel interacting partners of PSMD9, a proteasomal chaperone: Role of an Atypical and versatile PDZ-domain motif interaction and identification of putative functional modules

    PubMed Central

    Sangith, Nikhil; Srinivasaraghavan, Kannan; Sahu, Indrajit; Desai, Ankita; Medipally, Spandana; Somavarappu, Arun Kumar; Verma, Chandra; Venkatraman, Prasanna

    2014-01-01

    PSMD9 (Proteasome Macropain non-ATPase subunit 9), a proteasomal assembly chaperone, harbors an uncharacterized PDZ-like domain. Here we report the identification of five novel interacting partners of PSMD9 and provide the first glimpse at the structure of the PDZ-domain, including the molecular details of the interaction. We based our strategy on two propositions: (a) proteins with conserved C-termini may share common functions and (b) PDZ domains interact with C-terminal residues of proteins. Screening of C-terminal peptides followed by interactions using full-length recombinant proteins, we discovered hnRNPA1 (an RNA binding protein), S14 (a ribosomal protein), CSH1 (a growth hormone), E12 (a transcription factor) and IL6 receptor as novel PSMD9-interacting partners. Through multiple techniques and structural insights, we clearly demonstrate for the first time that human PDZ domain interacts with the predicted Short Linear Sequence Motif (SLIM) at the C-termini of the client proteins. These interactions are also recapitulated in mammalian cells. Together, these results are suggestive of the role of PSMD9 in transcriptional regulation, mRNA processing and editing, hormone and receptor activity and protein translation. Our proof-of-principle experiments endorse a novel and quick method for the identification of putative interacting partners of similar PDZ-domain proteins from the proteome and for discovering novel functions. PMID:25009770

  18. A binding site outside the canonical PDZ domain determines the specific interaction between Shank and SAPAP and their function

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Menglong; Shang, Yuan; Guo, Tingfeng; He, Qinghai; Yung, Wing-Ho; Liu, Kai; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-01-01

    Shank and SAPAP (synapse-associated protein 90/postsynaptic density-95–associated protein) are two highly abundant scaffold proteins that directly interact with each other to regulate excitatory synapse development and plasticity. Mutations of SAPAP, but not other reported Shank PDZ domain binders, share a significant overlap on behavioral abnormalities with the mutations of Shank both in patients and in animal models. The molecular mechanism governing the exquisite specificity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction is not clear, however. Here we report that a sequence preceding the canonical PDZ domain of Shank, together with the elongated PDZ BC loop, form another binding site for a sequence upstream of the SAPAP PDZ-binding motif, leading to a several hundred-fold increase in the affinity of the Shank/SAPAP interaction. We provide evidence that the specific interaction afforded by this newly identified site is required for Shank synaptic targeting and the Shank-induced synaptic activity increase. Our study provides a molecular explanation of how Shank and SAPAP dosage changes due to their gene copy number variations can contribute to different psychiatric disorders. PMID:27185935

  19. Accurate Prediction of the Dynamical Changes within the Second PDZ Domain of PTP1e

    PubMed Central

    Cilia, Elisa; Vuister, Geerten W.; Lenaerts, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Experimental NMR relaxation studies have shown that peptide binding induces dynamical changes at the side-chain level throughout the second PDZ domain of PTP1e, identifying as such the collection of residues involved in long-range communication. Even though different computational approaches have identified subsets of residues that were qualitatively comparable, no quantitative analysis of the accuracy of these predictions was thus far determined. Here, we show that our information theoretical method produces quantitatively better results with respect to the experimental data than some of these earlier methods. Moreover, it provides a global network perspective on the effect experienced by the different residues involved in the process. We also show that these predictions are consistent within both the human and mouse variants of this domain. Together, these results improve the understanding of intra-protein communication and allostery in PDZ domains, underlining at the same time the necessity of producing similar data sets for further validation of thses kinds of methods. PMID:23209399

  20. The α-syntrophin PH and PDZ domains scaffold acetylcholine receptors, utrophin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase at the neuromuscular junction

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Marvin E.; Anderson, Kendra N.E.; Froehner, Stanley C.

    2010-01-01

    At the neuromuscular junction (NMJ), the dystrophin protein complex provides a scaffold that functions to stabilize acetylcholine receptor (AChR) clusters. Syntrophin, a key component of that scaffold, is a multi-domain adapter protein that links a variety of signaling proteins and ion channels to the dystrophin protein complex. Without syntrophin, utrophin and neuronal nitric oxide synthase μ (nNOSμ) fail to localize to the NMJ and the AChRs are distributed abnormally. Here we investigate the contribution of syntrophin domains to AChR distribution and to localization of utrophin and nNOSμ at the NMJ. Transgenic mice expressing α-syntrophin lacking portions of the first pleckstrin homology (PH) domain (ΔPH1a or ΔPH1b) or the entire PDZ domainPDZ) were bred onto the α-syntrophin null background. As expected the ΔPDZ transgene did not restore the NMJ localization of nNOS. The ΔPH1a transgene did restore postsynaptic nNOS but surprisingly did not restore sarcolemmal nNOS (although sarcolemmal aquaporin-4 was restored). Mice lacking the α-syntrophin PDZ domain, or either half of the PH1 domain were able to restore utrophin to the NMJ but did not correct the aberrant AChR distribution of the α-syntrophin knockout mice. However, mice expressing both the transgenic ΔPDZ and the transgenic ΔPH1a constructs did restore normal AChR distribution, demonstrating that both domains are required but need not be confined within the same protein to function. We conclude that the PH1 and PDZ domains of α-syntrophin work in concert to facilitate the localization of AChRs and nNOS at the NMJ. PMID:20720107

  1. High-energy water sites determine peptide binding affinity and specificity of PDZ domains.

    PubMed

    Beuming, Thijs; Farid, Ramy; Sherman, Woody

    2009-08-01

    PDZ domains have well known binding preferences for distinct C-terminal peptide motifs. For most PDZ domains, these motifs are of the form [S/T]-W-[I/L/V]. Although the preference for S/T has been explained by a specific hydrogen bond interaction with a histidine in the PDZ domain and the (I/L/V) is buried in a hydrophobic pocket, the mechanism for Trp specificity at the second to last position has thus far remained unknown. Here, we apply a method to compute the free energies of explicit water molecules and predict that potency gained by Trp binding is due to a favorable release of high-energy water molecules into bulk. The affinities of a series of peptides for both wild-type and mutant forms of the PDZ domain of Erbin correlate very well with the computed free energy of binding of displaced waters, suggesting a direct relationship between water displacement and peptide affinity. Finally, we show a correlation between the magnitude of the displaced water free energy and the degree of Trp-sensitivity among subtypes of the HTRA PDZ family, indicating a water-mediated mechanism for specificity of peptide binding.

  2. Structure-based identification of CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and rational design of peptide ligands to target such interaction in human fertilization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi-Le; Han, Zhao-Feng; Sun, Ying-Pu

    2016-06-01

    The recognition and association between Ca(2+)/calmodulin-activated protein kinase II-α (CaMKIIα) and multi-PDZ domain protein 1 (MUPP1) plays an important role in sperm acrosome reaction and human fertilization, which is mediated by the binding of CaMKIIα's C-terminal tail to one or more PDZ domains of the scaffolding protein MUPP1. In this study, we attempt to identify the CaMKIIα-interacting MUPP1 PDZ domains and to design peptide ligands that can potently target and then competitively disrupt such interaction. Here, a synthetic biology approach was proposed to systematically characterize the structural basis, energetic property, dynamic behavior and biological implication underlying the intermolecular interactions between the C-terminal peptide of CaMKIIα and all the 13 PDZ domains of MUPP1. These domains can be grouped into four clusters in terms of their sequence, structure and physiochemical profile; different clusters appear to recognize different classes of PDZ-binding motifs. The cluster 3 includes two members, i.e. MUPP1 PDZ 5 and 11 domains, which were suggested to bind class II motif Φ-X-Φ(-COOH) of the C-terminal peptide SGAPSV(-COOH) of CaMKIIα. Subsequently, the two domains were experimentally measured as the moderate- and high-affinity binders of the peptide by using fluorescence titration (dissociation constants K d = 25.2 ± 4.6 and 0.47 ± 0.08 µM for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively), which was in line with theoretical prediction (binding free energies ΔG total = -7.6 and -9.2 kcal/mol for peptide binding to PDZ 5 and 11, respectively). A systematic mutation of SGAPSV(-COOH) residues suggested few favorable amino acids at different residue positions of the peptide, which were then combined to generate a number of potent peptide mutants for PDZ 11 domain. Consequently, two peptides (SIAPNV(-COOH) and SIVMNV(-COOH)) were identified to have considerably improved affinity with K d increase by ~tenfold relative to

  3. Conserved tertiary couplings stabilize elements in the PDZ fold, leading to characteristic patterns of domain conformational flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ho, Bosco K; Agard, David A

    2010-03-01

    Single-domain allostery has been postulated to occur through intramolecular pathways of signaling within a protein structure. We had previously investigated these pathways by introducing a local thermal perturbation and analyzed the anisotropic propagation of structural changes throughout the protein. Here, we develop an improved approach, the Rotamerically Induced Perturbation (RIP), that identifies strong couplings between residues by analyzing the pathways of heat-flow resulting from thermal excitation of rotameric rotations at individual residues. To explore the nature of these couplings, we calculate the complete coupling maps of 5 different PDZ domains. Although the PDZ domain is a well conserved structural fold that serves as a scaffold in many protein-protein complexes, different PDZ domains display unique patterns of conformational flexibility in response to ligand binding: some show a significant shift in a set of alpha-helices, while others do not. Analysis of the coupling maps suggests a simple relationship between the computed couplings and observed conformational flexibility. In domains where the alpha-helices are rigid, we find couplings of the alpha-helices to the body of the protein, whereas in domains having ligand-responsive alpha-helices, no couplings are found. This leads to a model where the alpha-helices are intrinsically dynamic but can be damped if sidechains interact at key tertiary contacts. These tertiary contacts correlate to high covariation contacts as identified by the statistical coupling analysis method. As these dynamic modules are exploited by various allosteric mechanisms, these tertiary contacts have been conserved by evolution.

  4. A C-terminal PDZ domain binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    PubMed Central

    Rickhag, Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar; Strandfelt, Kristine Nørgaard; Andresen, Bjørn; Gotfryd, Kamil; Madsen, Kenneth L.; Vestergaard-Klewe, Ib; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Eriksen, Jacob; Füchtbauer, Ernst-Martin; Gomeza, Jesus; Woldbye, David P.D.; Wörtwein, Gitta; Gether, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter (DAT) mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling DAT levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. DAT contains a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain binding sequence believed to bind synaptic scaffolding proteins, but its functional significance is uncertain. Here we demonstrate that two different DAT knock-in mice with disrupted PDZ-binding motifs (DAT-AAA and DAT+Ala) are characterized by dramatic loss of DAT expression in the striatum, causing hyperlocomotion and attenuated response to amphetamine. In cultured dopaminergic neurons and striatal slices from DAT-AAA mice, we find markedly reduced DAT surface levels and evidence for enhanced constitutive internalization. In DAT-AAA neurons, but not in wild type neurons, surface levels are rescued in part by expression of a dominant-negative dynamin mutation (K44A). Our findings suggest that PDZ domain interactions are critical for synaptic distribution of DAT in vivo and thereby for proper maintenance of dopamine homeostasis. PMID:23481388

  5. Crystal structure of the PDZ domain of mouse Dishevelled 1 and its interaction with CXXC5.

    PubMed

    Lee, Inhwan; Choi, Sooho; Yun, Ji-Hye; Seo, Seolhwa; Choi, Sehee; Choi, Kang-Yell; Lee, Weontae

    2016-12-05

    Dishevelled (Dvl) plays a crucial role in Wnt signaling by interacting with membrane-bound receptors and downstream molecules through its PDZ domain. CXXC5 is one of the key molecules that interacts with Dvl and negatively regulates the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in osteoblast differentiation. Recently, the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction has been identified as an excellent target for osteoporosis treatment. Therefore, it is desirable to have detailed structural information for the Dvl-CXXC5 interaction. Although solution structures of the Dvl1 PDZ domain have been reported, a high-resolution crystal structure would provide detailed sidechain information that is essential for drug development. Here, we determined the first crystal structure of the Dvl-1 PDZ domain at a resolution of 1.76 Å, and compared it with its previously reported solution structure. The Dvl1 PDZ domain crystal belonged to the space group H32 with unit-cell parameters a = b = 72.837, c = 120.616, α = ß = 90.00, γ = 120.00. The crystal structure of Dvl1 PDZ shared its topology with the previously reported structure determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR); however, the crystal structure was quite different from the solution structure in both the secondary structural region and the ligand-binding pocket. Molecular modeling based on NMR and X-ray crystallographic data yielded detailed information about the Dvl1/CXXC5 interaction, which will be useful for designing inhibitors.

  6. SAP97 Controls the Trafficking and Resensitization of the Beta-1-Adrenergic Receptor through Its PDZ2 and I3 Domains

    PubMed Central

    Nooh, Mohammed M.; Naren, Anjaparavanda P.; Kim, Sung-Jin; Xiang, Yang K.; Bahouth, Suleiman W.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have determined that the type-1 PDZ sequence at the extreme carboxy-terminus of the ß1-adrenergic receptor (ß1-AR) binds SAP97 and AKAP79 to organize a scaffold involved in trafficking of the ß1-AR. In this study we focused on characterizing the domains in SAP97 that were involved in recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR in HEK-293 cells. Using a SAP97 knockdown and rescue strategy, we determined that PDZ-deletion mutants of SAP97 containing PDZ2 rescued the recycling and resensitization of the ß1-AR. Among the three PDZs of SAP97, PDZ2 displayed the highest affinity in binding to the ß1-AR. Expression of isolated PDZ2, but not the other PDZs, inhibited the recycling of the ß1-AR by destabilizing the macromolecular complex involved in trafficking and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. In addition to its PDZs, SAP97 contains other protein interacting domains, such as the I3 sequence in the SRC homology-3 (SH3) domain, which binds to AKAP79. Deletion of I3 from SAP97 (ΔI3-SAP97) did not affect the binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR. However, ΔI3-SAP97 could not rescue the recycling of the ß1-AR because it failed to incorporate AKAP79/PKA into the SAP97-ß1-AR complex. Therefore, bipartite binding of SAP97 to the ß1-AR and to AKAP79 is necessary for SAP97-mediated effects on recycling, externalization and functional resensitization of the ß1-AR. These data establish a prominent role for PDZ2 and I3 domains of SAP97 in organizing the ß1-adrenergic receptosome involved in connecting the ß1-AR to trafficking and signaling networks. PMID:23696820

  7. A role for the PDZ-binding domain of the coxsackie B virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR) in cell adhesion and growth.

    PubMed

    Excoffon, Katherine J D Ashbourne; Hruska-Hageman, Alesia; Klotz, Michael; Traver, Geri L; Zabner, Joseph

    2004-09-01

    The coxsackie and adenovirus receptor (CAR) plays a role in viral infection, maintenance of the junction adhesion complex in polarized epithelia, and modulation of cellular growth properties. As a viral receptor, the C-terminus appears to play no role indicating that the major function of CAR is to tether the virus to the cell. By contrast, the C-terminus is known to play a role in cellular localization and probably has a significant function in CAR-mediated adhesion and cell growth properties. We hypothesized that the CAR PDZ (PSD-95/Disc-large/ZO-1) binding motif interacts with PDZ-domain-containing proteins to modulate the cellular phenotype. CAR was modified by deleting the last four amino acids (CARDeltaGSIV) and evaluated for cell-cell adhesion in polarized primary human airway epithelia and growth characteristics in stably transfected L-cells. Although ablation of the CAR PDZ-binding motif did not affect adenoviral infection, it did have a significant effect both on cell-cell adhesion and on cell growth. Expression of CARDeltaGSIV failed to increase the transepithelial resistance in polarized epithelia to the same degree as wild-type CAR and failed to act as a growth modulator in L-cells. Furthermore, we provide evidence for three new CAR interacting partners, including MAGI-1b, PICK1 and PSD-95. CAR appears to interact with several distinct PDZ-domain-containing proteins and may exert its biological function through these interactions.

  8. Two Mutations Preventing PDZ-Protein Interactions of GluR1 Have Opposite Effects on Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boehm, Jannic; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Hsieh, Helen; Malinow, Roberto

    2006-01-01

    The regulated trafficking of GluR1 contributes significantly to synaptic plasticity, but studies addressing the function of the GluR1 C-terminal PDZ-ligand domain in this process have produced conflicting results. Here, we resolve this conflict by showing that apparently similar C-terminal mutations of the GluR1 PDZ-ligand domain result in…

  9. Disrupting 5-HT2A Receptor/PDZ Protein Interactions Reduces Hyperalgesia and Enhances SSRI Efficacy in Neuropathic Pain

    PubMed Central

    Pichon, Xavier; Wattiez, Anne S; Becamel, Carine; Ehrlich, Ingrid; Bockaert, Joel; Eschalier, Alain; Marin, Philippe; Courteix, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Antidepressants are one of the first-line treatments for neuropathic pain. Despite the influence of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) in pain modulation, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) are less effective than tricyclic antidepressants. Here, we show, in diabetic neuropathic rats, an alteration of the antihyperalgesic effect induced by stimulation of 5-HT2A receptors, which are known to mediate SSRI-induced analgesia. 5-HT2A receptor density was not changed in the spinal cord of diabetic rats, whereas postsynaptic density protein-95 (PSD-95), one of the PSD-95/disc large suppressor/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ) domain containing proteins interacting with these receptors, was upregulated. Intrathecal injection of a cell-penetrating peptidyl mimetic of the 5-HT2A receptor C-terminus, which disrupts 5-HT2A receptor–PDZ protein interactions, induced an antihyperalgesic effect in diabetic rats, which results from activation of 5-HT2A receptors by endogenous 5-HT. The peptide also enhanced antihyperalgesia induced by the SSRI fluoxetine. Its effects likely resulted from an increase in receptor responsiveness, because it revealed functional 5-HT2A receptor-operated Ca2+ responses in neurons, an effect mimicked by knockdown of PSD-95. Hence, 5-HT2A receptor/PDZ protein interactions might contribute to the resistance to SSRI-induced analgesia in painful diabetic neuropathy. Disruption of these interactions might be a valuable strategy to design novel treatments for neuropathic pain and to increase the effectiveness of SSRIs. PMID:20531396

  10. Crystallization and Preliminary Diffraction Analysis of the CAL PDZ Domain in Complex with a Selective Peptide Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    J Amacher; P Cushing; J Weiner; D Madden

    2011-12-31

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is associated with loss-of-function mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), which regulates epithelial fluid and ion homeostasis. The CFTR cytoplasmic C-terminus interacts with a number of PDZ (PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1) proteins that modulate its intracellular trafficking and chloride-channel activity. Among these, the CFTR-associated ligand (CAL) has a negative effect on apical-membrane expression levels of the most common disease-associated mutant {Delta}F508-CFTR, making CAL a candidate target for the treatment of CF. A selective peptide inhibitor of the CAL PDZ domain (iCAL36) has recently been developed and shown to stabilize apical expression of {Delta}F508-CFTR, enhancing net chloride-channel activity, both alone and in combination with the folding corrector corr-4a. As a basis for structural studies of the CAL-iCAL36 interaction, a purification protocol has been developed that increases the oligomeric homogeneity of the protein. Here, the cocrystallization of the complex in space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 35.9, b = 47.7, c = 97.3 {angstrom}, is reported. The crystals diffracted to 1.4 {angstrom} resolution. Based on the calculated Matthews coefficient (1.96 {angstrom}{sup 3} Da{sup -1}), it appears that the asymmetric unit contains two complexes.

  11. The NHERF1 PDZ2 Domain Regulates PKA–RhoA–p38-mediated NHE1 Activation and Invasion in Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Rosa A.; Bellizzi, Antonia; Busco, Giovanni; Weinman, Edward J.; Dell'Aquila, Maria E.; Casavola, Valeria; Azzariti, Amalia; Mangia, Anita; Paradiso, Angelo

    2007-01-01

    Understanding the signal transduction systems governing invasion is fundamental for the design of therapeutic strategies against metastasis. Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor (NHERF1) is a postsynaptic density 95/disc-large/zona occludens (PDZ) domain-containing protein that recruits membrane receptors/transporters and cytoplasmic signaling proteins into functional complexes. NHERF1 expression is altered in breast cancer, but its effective role in mammary carcinogenesis remains undefined. We report here that NHERF1 overexpression in human breast tumor biopsies is associated with metastatic progression, poor prognosis, and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α expression. In cultured tumor cells, hypoxia and serum deprivation increase NHERF1 expression, promote the formation of leading-edge pseudopodia, and redistribute NHERF1 to these pseudopodia. This pseudopodial localization of NHERF1 was verified in breast biopsies and in three-dimensional Matrigel culture. Furthermore, serum deprivation and hypoxia stimulate the Na+/H+ exchanger, invasion, and activate a protein kinase A (PKA)-gated RhoA/p38 invasion signal module. Significantly, NHERF1 overexpression was sufficient to induce these morphological and functional changes, and it potentiated their induction by serum deprivation. Functional experiments with truncated and binding groove-mutated PDZ domain constructs demonstrated that NHERF1 regulates these processes through its PDZ2 domain. We conclude that NHERF1 overexpression enhances the invasive phenotype in breast cancer cells, both alone and in synergy with exposure to the tumor microenvironment, via the coordination of PKA-gated RhoA/p38 signaling. PMID:17332506

  12. Biophysical Characterization of Interactions between the C-termini of Peripheral Nerve Claudins and the PDZ1 Domain of Zonula Occludens

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiawen; Peng, Dungeng; Zhang, Yang; Lu, Zhenwei; Voehler, Markus; Sanders, Charles R.; Li, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has shown that cellular junctions in myelin and in the epi-/perineruium that encase nerve fibers regulate the permeability of the peripheral nerves. This permeability may affect propagation of the action potential. Direct interactions between the PDZ1 domain of zonula occludens (ZO1 or ZO2) and the C-termini of claudins are known to be crucial for the formation of tight junctions. Using the purified PDZ1 domain of ZO2 and a variety of C-terminal mutants of peripheral nerve claudins (claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5 in epi-/perineurium; claudin-19 in myelin), we have utilized NMR spectroscopy to determine specific roles of the 3 C-terminal claudin residues (position -2, -1, 0) for their interactions with PDZ1 of ZO2. In contrast to the canonical model that emphasizes the importance of residues at the -2 and 0 positions, our results demonstrate that, for peripheral nerve claudins, the residue at position -1 plays a critical role in association with PDZ1, while the side-chain of residue 0 plays a significant but lesser role. Surprisingly, claudin-19, the most abundant claudin in myelin, exhibited no binding to ZO2. These findings reveal that the binding mechanism of claudin/ZO in epi-/perineurium is distinct from the canonical interactions between non-ZO PDZ-containing proteins with their ligands. This observation provides the molecular basis for a strategy to develop drugs that target tight junctions in the epi-/perineurium of peripheral nerves. PMID:25712527

  13. The cellular distribution of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 is determined by the PDZ-I domain and regulates the malignant progression of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Du, Guifang; Gu, Yanan; Hao, Chengcheng; Yuan, Zhu; He, Junqi; Jiang, Wen G.; Cheng, Shan

    2016-01-01

    The oncogenic role of ectopic expression of Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF1) was recently suggested. Here, we show that NHERF1 was upregulated in high grades compared with low grades. Increased NHERF1 expression was correlated with poor prognosis and poor survival. NHERF1 expression was higher in the nucleus of cancer cells than in contiguous non- mammary epithelial cells. A novel mutation, namely NHERF1 Y24S, was identified in human breast cancer tissues and shown to correspond to a conserved residue in the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1. Truncation and mutation of the PDZ-I domain of NHERF1 increased the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, and this redistribution was associated with the malignant phenotype of breast cancer cells, including growth, migration, and adhesion. The present results suggest a role for NHERF1 in the progression of breast cancer mediated by the nuclear distribution of the NHERF1 protein, as determined by the truncation or key site mutation of the PDZ-I domain. PMID:27097111

  14. Systematic family‐wide analysis of sodium bicarbonate cotransporter NBCn1/SLC4A7 interactions with PDZ scaffold proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hye Jeong; Kwon, Min Hyung; Lee, Soojung; Hall, Randy A.; Yun, C. Chris; Choi, Inyeong

    2014-01-01

    Abstract NBCn1 (SLC4A7) plays a role in transepithelial HCO3− movement and intracellular pH maintenance in many tissues. In this study, we searched PDZ proteins capable of binding to NBCn1. We screened a protein array membrane, on which 96 different class I PDZ protein peptides were blotted, with the C‐terminal domain of NBCn1 fused to GST. Thirteen proteins were identified in these screens: MAGI‐3, NHERF‐1, NHERF‐2, PSD‐95, chapsyn‐110, ERBIN, MALS‐1, densin‐180, syntrophins α1, β2, γ2, MUPP1, and PDZK1. After determining these binding partners, we analyzed the database of known and predicted protein interactions to obtain an NBCn1 interaction network. The network shows NBCn1 being physically and functionally associated with a variety of membrane and cytosolic proteins via the binding partners. We then focused on syntrophin γ2 to examine the molecular and functional interaction between NBCn1 and one of the identified binding partners in the Xenopus oocyte expression system. GST/NBCn1 pulled down syntrophin γ2 and conversely GST/syntrophin γ2 pulled down NBCn1. Moreover, syntrophin γ2 increased intracellular pH recovery, from acidification, mediated by NBCn1's Na/HCO3 cotransport. Syntrophin γ2 also increased an ionic conductance produced by NBCn1 channel‐like activity. Thus, syntrophin γ2 regulates NBCn1 activity. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that NBCn1 binds to many PDZ proteins, which in turn may allow the transporter to associate with other physiologically important proteins. PMID:24844638

  15. Regulation of Postsynaptic Stability by the L-type Calcium Channel CaV1.3 and its Interaction with PDZ Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Stanika, Ruslan I.; Flucher, Bernhard E.; Obermair, Gerald J.

    2015-01-01

    Alterations in dendritic spine morphology and postsynaptic structure are a hallmark of neurological disorders. Particularly spine pruning of striatal medium spiny neurons and aberrant rewiring of corticostriatal synapses have been associated with the pathology of Parkinson’s disease and L-DOPA induced dyskinesia, respectively. Owing to its low activation threshold the neuronal L-type calcium channel CaV1.3 is particularly critical in the control of neuronal excitability and thus in the calcium-dependent regulation of neuronal functions. CaV1.3 channels are located in dendritic spines and contain a C-terminal class 1 PDZ domain-binding sequence. Until today the postsynaptic PDZ domain proteins shank, densin-180, and erbin have been shown to interact with CaV1.3 channels and to modulate their current properties. Interestingly experimental evidence suggests an involvement of all three PDZ proteins as well as CaV1.3 itself in regulating dendritic and postsynaptic morphology. Here we briefly review the importance of CaV1.3 and its proposed interactions with PDZ proteins for the stability of dendritic spines. With a special focus on the pathology associated with Parkinson’s disease, we discuss the hypothesis that CaV1.3 L-type calcium channels may be critical modulators of dendritic spine stability. PMID:25966696

  16. Genetic Variants at the PDZ-Interacting Domain of the Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I Interact with Diet to Influence the Risk of Metabolic Syndrome in Obese Men and Women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The scaffolding protein PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) regulates the HDL receptor scavenger receptor class B type I. However, the effect of PDZK1 genetic variants on lipids and metabolic syndrome (MetS) traits remains unknown. This study evaluated the association of 3 PDZK1 single nucleotide polymo...

  17. An Exquisitely Specific PDZ/Target Recognition Revealed by the Structure of INAD PDZ3 in Complex with TRP Channel Tail.

    PubMed

    Ye, Fei; Liu, Wei; Shang, Yuan; Zhang, Mingjie

    2016-03-01

    The vast majority of PDZ domains are known to bind to a few C-terminal tail residues of target proteins with modest binding affinities and specificities. Such promiscuous PDZ/target interactions are not compatible with highly specific physiological functions of PDZ domain proteins and their targets. Here, we report an unexpected PDZ/target binding occurring between the scaffold protein inactivation no afterpotential D (INAD) and transient receptor potential (TRP) channel in Drosophila photoreceptors. The C-terminal 15 residues of TRP are required for the specific interaction with INAD PDZ3. The INAD PDZ3/TRP peptide complex structure reveals that only the extreme C-terminal Leu of TRP binds to the canonical αB/βB groove of INAD PDZ3. The rest of the TRP peptide, by forming a β hairpin structure, binds to a surface away from the αB/βB groove of PDZ3 and contributes to the majority of the binding energy. Thus, the INAD PDZ3/TRP channel interaction is exquisitely specific and represents a new mode of PDZ/target recognitions.

  18. Degradation of Human PDZ-Proteins by Human Alphapapillomaviruses Represents an Evolutionary Adaptation to a Novel Cellular Niche.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; DeSalle, Rob; Einstein, Mark H; Burk, Robert D

    2015-06-01

    In order to complete their life cycle, papillomaviruses have evolved to manipulate a plethora of cellular pathways. The products of the human Alphapapillomavirus E6 proteins specifically interact with and target PDZ containing proteins for degradation. This viral phenotype has been suggested to play a role in viral oncogenesis. To analyze the association of HPV E6 mediated PDZ-protein degradation with cervical oncogenesis, a high-throughput cell culture assay was developed. Degradation of an epitope tagged human MAGI1 isoform was visualized by immunoblot. The correlation between HPV E6-induced degradation of hMAGI1 and epidemiologically determined HPV oncogenicity was evaluated using a Bayesian approach within a phylogenetic context. All tested oncogenic types degraded the PDZ-containing protein hMAGI1d; however, E6 proteins isolated from several related albeit non-oncogenic viral types were equally efficient at degrading hMAGI1. The relationship between both traits (oncogenicity and PDZ degradation potential) is best explained by a model in which the potential to degrade PDZ proteins was acquired prior to the oncogenic phenotype. This analysis provides evidence that the ancestor of both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPVs acquired the potential to degrade human PDZ-containing proteins. This suggests that HPV E6 directed degradation of PDZ-proteins represents an ancient ecological niche adaptation. Phylogenetic modeling indicates that this phenotype is not specifically correlated with oncogenic risk, but may act as an enabling phenotype. The role of PDZ protein degradation in HPV fitness and oncogenesis needs to be interpreted in the context of Alphapapillomavirus evolution.

  19. Structure-based optimization of salt-bridge network across the complex interface of PTPN4 PDZ domain with its peptide ligands in neuroglioma.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Xian; He, Qiang-Hua; Yu, Li-Yan; Wang, Song-Qing; Li, Yang; Yang, Hua; Zhang, Ai-Hua; Ma, Xiao-Hong; Peng, Yu-Jie; Chen, Bing

    2017-02-01

    The PTP non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) is an important regulator protein in learning, spatial memory and cerebellar synaptic plasticity; targeting the PDZ domain of PTPN4 has become as attractive therapeutic strategy for human neuroglioma. Here, we systematically examined the complex crystal structures of PTPN4 PDZ domain with its known peptide ligands; a number of charged amino acid residues were identified in these ligands and in the peptide-binding pocket of PDZ domain, which can constitute a complicated salt-bridge network across the complex interface. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, binding free energy calculations and continuum model analysis revealed that the electrostatic effect plays a predominant role in domain-peptide binding, while other noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic forces are also responsible for the binding. The computational findings were then used to guide structure-based optimization of the interfacial salt-bridge network. Consequently, five peptides were rationally designed using the high-affinity binder Cyto8-RETEV (RETEV(-COOH)) as template, including four single-point mutants (i.e. Cyto8-mtxe0: RETEE(-COOH), Cyto8-mtxd-1: RETDV(-COOH), Cyto8-mtxd-3: RDTEV(-COOH) and Cyto8-mtxk-4: KETEV(-COOH)) and one double-point mutant (i.e. Cyto8-mtxd-1k-4: KETDV(-COOH)). Binding assays confirmed that three (Cyto8-mtxd-1, Cyto8-mtxk-4 and Cyto8-mtxd-1k-4) out of the five designed peptides exhibit moderately or considerably increased affinity as compared to the native peptide Cyto8-RETEV.

  20. A mechanistic role of Helix 8 in GPCRs: Computational modeling of the dopamine D2 receptor interaction with the GIPC1-PDZ-domain

    PubMed Central

    Sensoy, Ozge; Weinstein, Harel

    2015-01-01

    Helix-8 (Hx8) is a structurally conserved amphipathic helical motif in class-A GPCRs, adjacent to the C-terminal sequence that is responsible for PDZ-domain-recognition. The Hx8 segment in the dopamine D2 receptor (D2R) constitutes the C-terminal segment and we investigate its role in the function of D2R by studying the interaction with the PDZ-containing GIPC1 using homology models based on the X-ray structures of very closely related analogs: the D3R for the D2R model, and the PDZ domain of GIPC2 for GIPC1-PDZ. The mechanism of this interaction was investigated with all-atom unbiased molecular dynamics (MD) simulations that reveal the role of the membrane in maintaining the helical fold of Hx8, and with biased MD simulations to elucidate the energy drive for the interaction with the GIPC1-PDZ. We found that it becomes more favorable energetically for Hx8 to adopt the extended conformation observed in all PDZ-ligand complexes when it moves away from the membrane, and that C-terminus palmitoylation of D2R enhanced membrane penetration by the Hx8 backbone. De-palmitoylation enables Hx8 to move out into the aqueous environment for interaction with the PDZ domain. All-atom unbiased MD simulations of the full D2R-GIPC1 complex in sphingolipid/cholesterol membranes shows that the D2R carboxyl C-terminus samples the region of the conserved GFGL motif located on the carboxylate-binding loop of the GIPC1-PDZ, and the entire complex distances itself from the membrane interface. Together, these results outline a likely mechanism of Hx8 involvement in the interaction of the GPCR with PDZ-domains in the course of signaling. PMID:25592838

  1. Actin/alpha-actinin-dependent transport of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines: role of the PDZ-LIM protein RIL.

    PubMed

    Schulz, Torsten W; Nakagawa, Terunaga; Licznerski, Pawel; Pawlak, Verena; Kolleker, Alexander; Rozov, Andrei; Kim, Jinhyun; Dittgen, Tanjew; Köhr, Georg; Sheng, Morgan; Seeburg, Peter H; Osten, Pavel

    2004-09-29

    The efficacy of excitatory transmission in the brain depends to a large extent on synaptic AMPA receptors, hence the importance of understanding the delivery and recycling of the receptors at the synaptic sites. Here we report a novel regulation of the AMPA receptor transport by a PDZ (postsynaptic density-95/Drosophila disc large tumor suppressor zona occludens 1) and LIM (Lin11/rat Isl-1/Mec3) domain-containing protein, RIL (reversion-induced LIM protein). We show that RIL binds to the AMPA glutamate receptor subunit GluR-A C-terminal peptide via its LIM domain and to alpha-actinin via its PDZ domain. RIL is enriched in the postsynaptic density fraction isolated from rat forebrain, strongly localizes to dendritic spines in cultured neurons, and coprecipitates, together with alpha-actinin, in a protein complex isolated by immunoprecipitation of AMPA receptors from forebrain synaptosomes. Functionally, in heterologous cells, RIL links AMPA receptors to the alpha-actinin/actin cytoskeleton, an effect that appears to apply selectively to the endosomal surface-internalized population of the receptors. In cultured neurons, an overexpression of recombinant RIL increases the accumulation of AMPA receptors in dendritic spines, both at the total level, as assessed by immunodetection of endogenous GluR-A-containing receptors, and at the synaptic surface, as assessed by recording of miniature EPSCs. Our results thus indicate that RIL directs the transport of GluR-A-containing AMPA receptors to and/or within dendritic spines, in an alpha-actinin/actin-dependent manner, and that such trafficking function promotes the synaptic accumulation of the receptors.

  2. Direct Binding of the PDZ Domain of Dishevelled to a Conserved Internal Sequence in the C-Terminal Region of Frizzled

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Hing-C.; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Summary The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl. PMID:14636582

  3. Direct binding of the PDZ domain of Dishevelled to a conserved internal sequence in the C-terminal region of Frizzled.

    PubMed

    Wong, Hing-C; Bourdelas, Audrey; Krauss, Anke; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shao, Youming; Wu, Dianqing; Mlodzik, Marek; Shi, De-Li; Zheng, Jie

    2003-11-01

    The cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dvl) and the associated membrane-bound receptor Frizzled (Fz) are essential in canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling pathways. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this signaling are not well understood. By using NMR spectroscopy, we determined that an internal sequence of Fz binds to the conventional peptide binding site in the PDZ domain of Dvl; this type of site typically binds to C-terminal binding motifs. The C-terminal region of the Dvl inhibitor Dapper (Dpr) and Frodo bound to the same site. In Xenopus, Dvl binding peptides of Fz and Dpr/Frodo inhibited canonical Wnt signaling and blocked Wnt-induced secondary axis formation in a dose-dependent manner, but did not block noncanonical Wnt signaling mediated by the DEP domain. Together, our results identify a missing molecular connection within the Wnt pathway. Differences in the binding affinity of the Dvl PDZ domain and its binding partners may be important in regulating signal transduction by Dvl.

  4. Structure-Based Design of a Br Halogen Bond at the Complex Interface of the Human Placental HtrA1 PDZ Domain with Its Heptapeptide Ligand.

    PubMed

    Dou, Shuo-Fen; Liu, Hong; Cao, Tong-Mei; Wen, Qing-Li; Li, Jie; Shao, Qing-Chun

    2016-04-01

    The shock-induced serine protease HtrA1 is a potential regulator of human placenta development during pregnancy. The protein contains a functional PDZ domain that has been solved in complex with a phage display-derived heptapeptide: Asp-6 Ser-5 Arg-4 Ile-3 Trp-2 Trp-1 Val0 . In this study, a rationally designed halogen bond was introduced to the domain-peptide complex based on its NMR structure in solution. We computationally compared the stabilization energies and hindrance effects due to the presence of different halogens X (X = F, Cl, Br, or I), using a hybrid quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics (QM/MM) approach, and found that the Br atom could considerably promote the peptide binding free energy (ΔΔG = -5.2 kcal/mol). Fluorescence assays confirmed that the peptide affinity to the HtrA1 PDZ domain was improved by approximately sevenfold upon bromination. Structural analysis identified a geometrically perfect halogen bond between the Br atom of the peptide Trp-1 residue and the carbonyl O atom of the HtrA1 Ile385 residue, with a bond length and an interaction energy of d = 3.20 Å and ΔE = -3.7 kcal/mol, respectively.

  5. Targeted inhibition of disheveled PDZ domain via NSC668036 depresses fibrotic process

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cong; Dai, Jinghong; Sun, Zhaorui; Shi, Chaowen; Cao, Honghui; and others

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we determined the effects of transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and Wnt/β-catenin signaling on myofibroblast differentiation of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts in vitro and evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of NSC668036 in bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis murine model. In vitro study, NSC668036, a small organic inhibitor of the PDZ domain in Dvl, suppressed β-catenin-driven gene transcription and abolished TGF-β1-induced migration, expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in fibroblasts. In vivo study, we found that NSC668036 significantly suppressed accumulation of collagen I, α-SMA, and TGF-β1 but increased the expression of CK19, Occludin and E-cadherin that can inhibit pulmonary fibrogenesis. Because fibrotic lung exhibit aberrant activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling, these data collectively suggest that inhibition of Wnt/β-catenin signaling at the Dvl level may be an effective approach to the treatment of fibrotic lung diseases. - Highlights: • NSC668036 inhibited the proliferation and migration of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts. • NSC668036 suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. • TGF-β-induced stimulation of profibrotic responses were inhibited by NSC668036. • NSC668036 can inhibit the development of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  6. Characterization of physiological phenotypes of dentate gyrus synapses of PDZ1/2 domain-deficient PSD-95-knockin mice.

    PubMed

    Nagura, Hitoshi; Doi, Tomoko; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-03-01

    The hippocampal formation is involved in several important brain functions of animals, such as memory formation and pattern separation, and the synapses in the dentate gyrus (DG) play critical roles as the first step in the hippocampal circuit. Previous studies have reported that mice with genetic modifications of the PDZ1/2 domains of postsynaptic density (PSD)-95 exhibit altered synaptic properties in the DG and impaired hippocampus-dependent behaviors. Based on the involvement of the DG in the regulation of behaviors, these data suggest that the abnormal behavior of these knockin (KI) mice is due partly to altered DG function. Precise understanding of the phenotypes of these mutant mice requires characterization of the synaptic properties of the DG, and here we provide detailed studies of DG synapses. We have demonstrated global changes in the PSD membrane-associated guanylate kinase expression pattern in the DG of mutant mice, and DG synapses in these mice exhibited increased long-term potentiation under a wide range of stimulus intensities, although the N-methyl-d-aspartic acid receptor dependence of the long-term potentiation was unchanged. Furthermore, our data also indicate increased silent synapses in the DG of the KI mice. These findings suggest that abnormal protein expression and physiological properties disrupt the function of DG neurons in these KI mice.

  7. An oligomeric equilibrium intermediate as the precursory nucleus of globular and fibrillar supramacromolecular assemblies in a PDZ domain.

    PubMed

    Murciano-Calles, Javier; Cobos, Eva S; Mateo, Pedro L; Camara-Artigas, Ana; Martinez, Jose C

    2010-07-07

    The equilibrium unfolding at neutral pH of the third PDZ domain of PSD95, as followed by DSC, is characterized by the presence of an equilibrium intermediate with clear signs of oligomerization. DLS and SEC measurements indicate that at 60-70 degrees C small oligomers populate, showing a typical beta-sheet far-UV CD spectrum. These intermediate species lead to the formation of rodlike particulates of approximately 12 nm, which remain in solution after 2 weeks incubation and grow until they adopt annular/spherical shapes of approximately 50 nm and protofibrils, which are subsequently fully transformed into fibrils. The fibrils can also disaggregate after the addition of 1:1 buffer dilution followed by cooling to room temperature, thus returning to the initial monomeric state. Growth kinetics, as shown by ThT and ANS fluorescence, show that the organization of the different supramacromolecular structures comes from a common nucleation unit, the small oligomers, which organize themselves before reaching the incubation temperature of 60 degrees C. Our experiments point toward the existence of a well-defined reversible, stepwise, and downhill organization of the processes involved in the association-dissociation of the intermediate. We estimate the enthalpy change accompanying the association-dissociation equilibria to be 130 kJ x mol(-1). Furthermore, the coalescence under essentially reversible conditions of different kinds of supramacromolecular assemblies renders this protein system highly interesting for biophysical studies aimed at our further understanding of amyloid pathological conditions.

  8. PDZ Domain Dependent Regulation of NHE3 Occurs by Both Internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PDZ Binding Motifs.

    PubMed

    Cha, Boyoung; Yang, Jianbo; Singh, Varsha; Zachos, Nicholas C; Sarker, Rafiquel I; Chen, Tian-E; Chakraborty, Molee; Tse, Chung-Ming; Donowitz, Mark

    2017-03-10

    NHE3 directly binds NHERF family scaffolding proteins that are required for many aspects of NHE3 regulation. The NHERFs bind both to an internal region (aa. 586-660) of the NHE3 C-terminus and to the NHE3 C-terminal four amino acids. The internal NHERF binding region contains both putative Class I (-592SAV-) and Class II (-595CLDM-) PDZ binding motifs (PBM). Point mutagenesis showed that only the Class II motif contributes to NHERF binding. In this study, the roles in regulation of NHE3 activity of these two PBMs were investigated, revealing: 1) Interaction between these binding sites since mutation of either removed nearly all NHERF binding. 2) Mutations in either significantly reduced basal NHE3 activity. Total and percent plasma membrane (PM) NHE3 protein expression were reduced in the C-terminal but not in the internal PBD mutation. 3) cGMP and Ca2+-mediated inhibition of NHE3 were impaired both in the internal and in the C-terminal PBM mutations. 4) A significant reduction in half-life of the PM pool of NHE3 in only the internal PBM mutation but no change in total NHE3 half-life in either. 5) Some difference in NHE3 associating proteins in the two PBM mutations. In conclusion, NHE3 binds to NHERF proteins via both an internal Class II and C-terminal Class I PBM, which interact. The former appears to determine NHE3 stability of a pool in the PM and the letter determines total expression and percent PM expression.

  9. Intracellular Delivery of Peptidyl Ligands by Reversible Cyclization: Discovery of a PDZ Domain Inhibitor that Rescues CFTR Activity**

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Ziqing; Xu, Xiaohua; Amacher, Jeanine F.; Madden, Dean R.; Cormet-Boyaka, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    We report a general strategy for intracellular delivery of linear peptidyl ligands by fusing them with a cell-penetrating peptide and cyclizing the fusion peptides through a disulfide bond. The resulting cyclic peptides are cell permeable and have improved proteolytic stability. Once inside the cell, the disulfide bond is reduced to produce linear, biologically active peptides. This strategy was applied to generate a cell-permeable peptide substrate for real-time detection of intracellular caspase activities during apoptosis and a CAL-PDZ domain inhibitor for potential treatment of cystic fibrosis. PMID:25785567

  10. The Human PDZome: A Gateway to PSD95-Disc Large-Zonula Occludens (PDZ)-mediated Functions*

    PubMed Central

    Belotti, Edwige; Polanowska, Jolanta; Daulat, Avais M.; Audebert, Stéphane; Thomé, Virginie; Lissitzky, Jean-Claude; Lembo, Frédérique; Blibek, Karim; Omi, Shizue; Lenfant, Nicolas; Gangar, Akanksha; Montcouquiol, Mireille; Santoni, Marie-Josée; Sebbagh, Michael; Aurrand-Lions, Michel; Angers, Stéphane; Kodjabachian, Laurent; Reboul, Jérome; Borg, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    Protein–protein interactions organize the localization, clustering, signal transduction, and degradation of cellular proteins and are therefore implicated in numerous biological functions. These interactions are mediated by specialized domains able to bind to modified or unmodified peptides present in binding partners. Among the most broadly distributed protein interaction domains, PSD95-disc large-zonula occludens (PDZ) domains are usually able to bind carboxy-terminal sequences of their partners. In an effort to accelerate the discovery of PDZ domain interactions, we have constructed an array displaying 96% of the human PDZ domains that is amenable to rapid two-hybrid screens in yeast. We have demonstrated that this array can efficiently identify interactions using carboxy-terminal sequences of PDZ domain binders such as the E6 oncoviral protein and protein kinases (PDGFRβ, BRSK2, PCTK1, ACVR2B, and HER4); this has been validated via mass spectrometry analysis. Taking advantage of this array, we show that PDZ domains of Scrib and SNX27 bind to the carboxy-terminal region of the planar cell polarity receptor Vangl2. We also have demonstrated the requirement of Scrib for the promigratory function of Vangl2 and described the morphogenetic function of SNX27 in the early Xenopus embryo. The resource presented here is thus adapted for the screen of PDZ interactors and, furthermore, should facilitate the understanding of PDZ-mediated functions. PMID:23722234

  11. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity

    SciTech Connect

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits constitutively active YAP (5SA)-induced oncogenic cell transformation. •The PDZ-binding motif of YAP promotes its nuclear localization in cultured cells and mouse liver. •Loss of the PDZ-binding motif inhibits YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF transcription in cultured cells and mouse liver. -- Abstract: YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP’s functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP’s co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  12. The PDZ-binding motif of Yes-associated protein is required for its co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription and oncogenic cell transforming activity.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Tadanori; Miyamura, Norio; Hata, Shoji; Miura, Ryota; Hirayama, Jun; Nishina, Hiroshi

    2014-01-17

    YAP is a transcriptional co-activator that acts downstream of the Hippo signaling pathway and regulates multiple cellular processes, including proliferation. Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation of YAP negatively regulates its function. Conversely, attenuation of Hippo-mediated phosphorylation of YAP increases its ability to stimulate proliferation and eventually induces oncogenic transformation. The C-terminus of YAP contains a highly conserved PDZ-binding motif that regulates YAP's functions in multiple ways. However, to date, the importance of the PDZ-binding motif to the oncogenic cell transforming activity of YAP has not been determined. In this study, we disrupted the PDZ-binding motif in the YAP (5SA) protein, in which the sites normally targeted by Hippo pathway-dependent phosphorylation are mutated. We found that loss of the PDZ-binding motif significantly inhibited the oncogenic transformation of cultured cells induced by YAP (5SA). In addition, the increased nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and its enhanced activation of TEAD-dependent transcription of the cell proliferation gene CTGF were strongly reduced when the PDZ-binding motif was deleted. Similarly, in mouse liver, deletion of the PDZ-binding motif suppressed nuclear localization of YAP (5SA) and YAP (5SA)-induced CTGF expression. Taken together, our results indicate that the PDZ-binding motif of YAP is critical for YAP-mediated oncogenesis, and that this effect is mediated by YAP's co-activation of TEAD-mediated CTGF transcription.

  13. Biochemical investigations of the mechanism of action of small molecules ZL006 and IC87201 as potential inhibitors of the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anders; Pedersen, Søren W.; Dorr, Liam A.; Vallon, Gary; Ripoche, Isabelle; Ducki, Sylvie; Lian, Lu-Yun

    2015-01-01

    ZL006 and IC87201 have been presented as efficient inhibitors of the nNOS/PSD-95 protein-protein interaction and shown great promise in cellular experiments and animal models of ischemic stroke and pain. Here, we investigate the proposed mechanism of action of ZL006 and IC87201 using biochemical and biophysical methods, such as fluorescence polarization (FP), isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), and 1H-15N HSQC NMR. Our data show that under the applied in vitro conditions, ZL006 and IC87201 do not interact with the PDZ domains of nNOS or PSD-95, nor inhibit the nNOS-PDZ/PSD-95-PDZ interface by interacting with the β-finger of nNOS-PDZ. Our findings have implications for further medicinal chemistry efforts of ZL006, IC87201 and analogues, and challenge the general and widespread view on their mechanism of action. PMID:26177569

  14. Common variant of PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) gene is associated with gout susceptibility: A replication study and meta-analysis in Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Toshihide; Matsuo, Hirotaka; Sakiyama, Masayuki; Nakayama, Akiyoshi; Nakamura, Takahiro; Takada, Tappei; Ogata, Hiraku; Kawamura, Yusuke; Kawaguchi, Makoto; Naito, Mariko; Kawai, Sayo; Takada, Yuzo; Ooyama, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Hiroshi; Shinomiya, Nariyoshi

    2016-12-01

    PDZ domain containing 1 (PDZK1) is a scaffold protein that organizes a transportsome and regulates several transporters' functions including urate and drug transporters. Therefore, PDZK1 in renal proximal tubules may affect serum uric acid levels through PDZK1-binding renal urate transporters. Two previous studies in Japanese male population reported that a PDZK1 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), rs12129861, was not associated with gout. In the present study, we performed a further association analysis between gout and rs12129861 in a different large-scale Japanese male population and a meta-analysis with previous Japanese population studies. We genotyped rs12129861 in 1210 gout cases and 1224 controls of a Japanese male population by TaqMan assay. As a result, we showed that rs12129861 was significantly associated with gout susceptibility (P = 0.016, odds ratio [OR] = 0.80, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.67-0.96). The result of the meta-analysis among Japanese populations also showed a significant association (P = 0.013, OR = 0.85, 95%CI 0.75-0.97). Our findings show the significant association between gout susceptibility and common variant of PDZK1 which reportedly regulates the functions of urate transporters in the urate transportsome.

  15. Improved affinity at the cost of decreased specificity: a recurring theme in PDZ-peptide interactions.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, O Andreas; Sundell, Gustav N; Andersson, Eva; Ivarsson, Ylva; Jemth, Per

    2016-10-03

    The E6 protein from human papillomavirus (HPV) plays an important role during productive infection and is a potential drug target. We have previously designed a high affinity bivalent protein binder for the E6 protein, a fusion between a helix from the E6 associated protein and PDZØ9, an engineered variant (L391F/K392M) of the second PDZ domain from synapse associated protein 97 (SAP97 PDZ2). How the substitutions improve the affinity of SAP97 PDZ2 for HPV E6 is not clear and it is not known to what extent they affect the specificity for cellular targets. Here, we explore the specificity of wild type SAP97 PDZ2 and PDZØ9 through proteomic peptide phage display. In addition, we employ a double mutant cycle of SAP97 PDZ2 in which the binding kinetics for nine identified potential cellular peptide ligands are measured and compared with those for the C-terminal E6 peptide. The results demonstrate that PDZØ9 has an increased affinity for all peptides, but at the cost of specificity. Furthermore, there is a peptide dependent coupling free energy between the side chains at positions 391 and 392. This corroborates our previous allosteric model for PDZ domains, involving sampling of intramolecular energetic pathways.

  16. A Novel PDZ Domain Interaction Mediates the Binding between Human Papillomavirus 16 L2 and Sorting Nexin 27 and Modulates Virion Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Broniarczyk, Justyna; Bergant, Martina; Playford, Martin P.; Banks, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have demonstrated an interaction between sorting nexin 17 and the L2 capsid proteins from a variety of papillomavirus types. This interaction is required for late endosomal trafficking of the L2 protein and entry of the L2/DNA complex into the nucleus during infection. Here we show an interaction between papillomavirus L2 proteins and the related PX-FERM family member sorting nexin 27 (SNX27), which is mediated in part by a novel interaction between the PDZ domain of SNX27 and sequences in a central portion of L2. The interaction is direct and, unlike that with SNX17, is variable in strength depending on the papillomavirus type. We show that small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of SNX27 alone leads to a marginal reduction in the efficiency of viral infection but that double knockdown of both sorting nexins results in a striking reduction in infection, greater than that observed for the knockdown of either sorting nexin alone. These results suggest that the HPV L2 proteins can interact through distinct mechanisms with multiple components of the cellular cargo-sorting machinery. IMPORTANCE The trafficking of papillomaviruses to the host cell nucleus during their natural infectious life cycle is an incompletely understood process. Studies have suggested that the virus minor capsid protein L2 can interact with the endosomal recycling pathway, in part by association with sorting nexin 17, to ensure that virus DNA bound to L2 is recycled through the trans-Golgi network rather than back to the plasma membrane. In this study, we characterize the interaction between L2 and a second sorting nexin, SNX27, which is also part of the retromer complex. The study furthers our understanding of papillomavirus infection dynamics and provides potential tools for the further dissection of endosomal structure and function. PMID:26202251

  17. Specificity Profiling of Protein-Binding Domains Using One-Bead-One-Compound Peptide Libraries

    PubMed Central

    Kunys, Andrew R.; Lian, Wenlong; Pei, Dehua

    2013-01-01

    One-bead-one-compound (OBOC) libraries consist of structurally related compounds (e.g., peptides) covalently attached to a solid support, with each resin bead carrying a unique compound. OBOC libraries of high structural diversity can be rapidly synthesized and screened without the need of any special equipment and therefore can be employed in any chemical or biochemical laboratory. OBOC peptide libraries have been widely used to map the ligand specificity of proteins, to determine the substrate specificity of enzymes, and to develop inhibitors against macromolecular targets. They have proven particularly useful in profiling the binding specificity of protein modular domains (e.g., SH2 domains, BIR domains, and PDZ domains) and subsequently using the specificity information to predict the protein targets of these domains. The protocols outlined in this article describe the methodologies for synthesizing and screening OBOC peptide libraries against SH2 and PDZ domains and the related data analysis. PMID:23788558

  18. PRMT5 C-terminal Phosphorylation Modulates a 14-3-3/PDZ Interaction Switch.

    PubMed

    Espejo, Alexsandra B; Gao, Guozhen; Black, Karynne; Gayatri, Sitaram; Veland, Nicolas; Kim, Jeesun; Chen, Taiping; Sudol, Marius; Walker, Cheryl; Bedford, Mark T

    2017-02-10

    PRMT5 is the primary enzyme responsible for the deposition of the symmetric dimethylarginine in mammalian cells. In an effort to understand how PRMT5 is regulated, we identified a threonine phosphorylation site within a C-terminal tail motif, which is targeted by the Akt/serum- and glucocorticoid-inducible kinases. While investigating the function of this posttranslational modification, we serendipitously discovered that its free C-terminal tail binds PDZ domains (when unphosphorylated) and 14-3-3 proteins (when phosphorylated). In essence, a phosphorylation event within the last few residues of the C-terminal tail generates a posttranslational modification-dependent PDZ/14-3-3 interaction "switch." The C-terminal motif of PRMT5 is required for plasma membrane association, and loss of this switching capacity is not compatible with life. This signaling phenomenon was recently reported for the HPV E6 oncoprotein but has not yet been observed for mammalian proteins. To investigate the prevalence of PDZ/14-3-3 switching in signal transduction, we built a protein domain microarray that harbors PDZ domains and 14-3-3 proteins. We have used this microarray to interrogate the C-terminal tails of a small group of candidate proteins and identified ERBB4, PGHS2, and IRK1 (as well as E6 and PRMT5) as conforming to this signaling mode, suggesting that PDZ/14-3-3 switching may be a broad biological paradigm.

  19. Modeling Protein Domain Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, William P.; Jones, Carleton "Buck"; Hull, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    This simple but effective laboratory exercise helps students understand the concept of protein domain function. They use foam beads, Styrofoam craft balls, and pipe cleaners to explore how domains within protein active sites interact to form a functional protein. The activity allows students to gain content mastery and an understanding of the…

  20. Sac phosphatase domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, W E; Cooke, F T; Parker, P J

    2000-01-01

    Advances in our understanding of the roles of phosphatidylinositol phosphates in controlling cellular functions such as endocytosis, exocytosis and the actin cytoskeleton have included new insights into the phosphatases that are responsible for the interconversion of these lipids. One of these is an entirely novel class of phosphatase domain found in a number of well characterized proteins. Proteins containing this Sac phosphatase domain include the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins Sac1p and Fig4p. The Sac phosphatase domain is also found within the mammalian phosphoinositide 5-phosphatase synaptojanin and the yeast synaptojanin homologues Inp51p, Inp52p and Inp53p. These proteins therefore contain both Sac phosphatase and 5-phosphatase domains. This review describes the Sac phosphatase domain-containing proteins and their actions, with particular reference to the genetic and biochemical insights provided by study of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:10947947

  1. Extra domains in secondary transport carriers and channel proteins.

    PubMed

    Barabote, Ravi D; Tamang, Dorjee G; Abeywardena, Shannon N; Fallah, Neda S; Fu, Jeffrey Yu Chung; Lio, Jeffrey K; Mirhosseini, Pegah; Pezeshk, Ronnie; Podell, Sheila; Salampessy, Marnae L; Thever, Mark D; Saier, Milton H

    2006-10-01

    "Extra" domains in members of the families of secondary transport carrier and channel proteins provide secondary functions that expand, amplify or restrict the functional nature of these proteins. Domains in secondary carriers include TrkA and SPX domains in DASS family members, DedA domains in TRAP-T family members (both of the IT superfamily), Kazal-2 and PDZ domains in OAT family members (of the MF superfamily), USP, IIA(Fru) and TrkA domains in ABT family members (of the APC superfamily), ricin domains in OST family members, and TrkA domains in AAE family members. Some transporters contain highly hydrophilic domains consisting of multiple repeat units that can also be found in proteins of dissimilar function. Similarly, transmembrane alpha-helical channel-forming proteins contain unique, conserved, hydrophilic domains, most of which are not found in carriers. In some cases the functions of these domains are known. They may be ligand binding domains, phosphorylation domains, signal transduction domains, protein/protein interaction domains or complex carbohydrate-binding domains. These domains mediate regulation, subunit interactions, or subcellular targeting. Phylogenetic analyses show that while some of these domains are restricted to closely related proteins derived from specific organismal types, others are nearly ubiquitous within a particular family of transporters and occur in a tremendous diversity of organisms. The former probably became associated with the transporters late in the evolutionary process; the latter probably became associated with the carriers much earlier. These domains can be located at either end of the transporter or in a central region, depending on the domain and transporter family. These studies provide useful information about the evolution of extra domains in channels and secondary carriers and provide novel clues concerning function.

  2. Structural and functional characterization of synapse-associated protein-97

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lei

    Synapse-associated protein-97 (SAP97) as a scaffold protein plays an important role in regulating neural signal transmission in the central nervous system by coupling with activated membrane receptors, ion channels, and downstream signaling proteins. SAP97 consists of six functional domains: L27, PDZ1, PDZ2, PDZ3, SH3, and GK. Each of these domains mediates the interactions of SAP97 with other proteins. Understanding the molecular mechanism of these interactions in neural signal transmission is a goal of this study. Here high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fluorescence anisotropy are employed towards the goal of the structural and functional characterization of SAP97; specifically, we (a) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains of SAP97 with the C-terminus of NR2B, and determine the structure of the PDZ1-NR2B; (b) characterize the binding of the PDZ domains with the C-terminus of stargazin and multiple mutants, and identify the perturbed amino acids in PDZ2 upon the binding of stargazin; (c) characterize the binding specificity carried by the beta2/beta3 loop of the PDZ3 domain. These results provide insight into the molecular mechanism for the binding specificities of the PDZ domains of SAP97, thereby furthering the development of drugs that target these domains to treat neurological diseases.

  3. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc; Doi, Roy

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  4. Cellulose binding domain proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.; Doi, R.

    1998-11-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  5. Activation of nanoscale allosteric protein domain motion revealed by neutron spin echo spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Zimei; Farago, Bela; Callaway, David

    2012-02-01

    NHERF1 is a multi-domain scaffolding protein that assembles the signaling complexes, and regulates the cell surface expression and endocytic recycling of a variety of membrane proteins. The ability of the two PDZ domains in NHERF1 to assemble protein complexes is allosterically modulated by a membrane-cytoskeleton linker protein ezrin, whose binding site is located as far as 110 angstroms away from the PDZ domains. Here, using neutron spin echo (NSE) spectroscopy, selective deuterium labeling, and theoretical analyses, we reveal the activation of interdomain motion in NHERF1 on nanometer length scales and on sub-microsecond time scales upon forming a complex with ezrin. We show that a much simplified coarse-grained model is sufficient to describe inter-domain motion of a multi-domain protein or protein complex. We expect that future NSE experiments will benefit by exploiting our approach of selective deuteration to resolve the specific domain motions of interest from a plethora of global translational and rotational motions. The results demonstrate that propagation of allosteric signals to distal sites involves the activation of long-range coupled domain motions on submicrosecond time scales, and that these coupled motions can be distinguished and characterized by NSE.

  6. Activated RhoA Binds to the Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain of PDZ-RhoGEF, a Potential Site for Autoregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Zhe; Medina, Frank; Liu, Mu-ya; Thomas, Celestine; Sprang, Stephen R.; Sternweis, Paul C.

    2010-07-19

    Guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) catalyze exchange of GDP for GTP by stabilizing the nucleotide-free state of the small GTPases through their Dbl homology/pleckstrin homology (DH {center_dot} PH) domains. Unconventionally, PDZ-RhoGEF (PRG), a member of the RGS-RhoGEFs, binds tightly to both nucleotide-free and activated RhoA (RhoA {center_dot} GTP). We have characterized the interaction between PRG and activated RhoA and determined the structure of the PRG-DH {center_dot} PH-RhoA {center_dot} GTP{gamma}S (guanosine 5{prime}-O-[{gamma}-thio]triphosphate) complex. The interface bears striking similarity to a GTPase-effector interface and involves the switch regions in RhoA and a hydrophobic patch in PRG-PH that is conserved among all Lbc RhoGEFs. The two surfaces that bind activated and nucleotide-free RhoA on PRG-DH {center_dot} PH do not overlap, and a ternary complex of PRG-DH {center_dot} PH bound to both forms of RhoA can be isolated by size-exclusion chromatography. This novel interaction between activated RhoA and PH could play a key role in regulation of RhoGEF activity in vivo.

  7. Subtype-specific role of phospholipase C-beta in bradykinin and LPA signaling through differential binding of different PDZ scaffold proteins.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jung Woong; Lim, Seyoung; Oh, Yong-Seok; Kim, Eung-Kyun; Kim, Sun-Hee; Kim, Yun-Hee; Heo, Kyun; Kim, Jaeyoon; Kim, Jung Kuk; Yang, Yong Ryul; Ryu, Sung Ho; Suh, Pann-Ghill

    2010-07-01

    Among phospholipase C (PLC) isozymes (beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, zeta and eta), PLC-beta plays a key role in G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR)-mediated signaling. PLC-beta subtypes are often overlapped in their distribution, but have unique knock-out phenotypes in organism, suggesting that each subtype may have the different role even within the same type of cells. In this study, we examined the possibility of the differential coupling of each PLC-beta subtype to GPCRs, and explored the molecular mechanism underlying the specificity. Firstly, we found that PLC-beta1 and PLC-beta 3 are activated by bradykinin (BK) or lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), respectively. BK-triggered phosphoinositides hydrolysis and subsequent Ca(2+) mobilization were abolished specifically by PLC-beta1 silencing, whereas LPA-triggered events were by PLC-beta 3 silencing. Secondly, we showed the evidence that PDZ scaffold proteins is a key mediator for the selective coupling between PLC-beta subtype and GPCR. We found PAR-3 mediates physical interaction between PLC-beta1 and BK receptor, while NHERF2 does between PLC-beta 3 and LPA(2) receptor. Consistently, the silencing of PAR-3 or NHERF2 blunted PLC signaling induced by BK or LPA respectively. Taken together, these data suggest that each subtype of PLC-beta is selectively coupled to GPCR via PDZ scaffold proteins in given cell types and plays differential role in the signaling of various GPCRs.

  8. Z-band alternatively spliced PDZ motif protein (ZASP) is the major O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine-substituted protein in human heart myofibrils.

    PubMed

    Leung, Man-Ching; Hitchen, Paul G; Ward, Douglas G; Messer, Andrew E; Marston, Steven B

    2013-02-15

    We studied O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) modification of contractile proteins in human heart using SDS-PAGE and three detection methods: specific enzymatic conjugation of O-GlcNAc with UDP-N-azidoacetylgalactosamine (UDP-GalNAz) that is then linked to a tetramethylrhodamine fluorescent tag and CTD110.6 and RL2 monoclonal antibodies to O-GlcNAc. All three methods showed that O-GlcNAc modification was predominantly in a group of bands ~90 kDa that did not correspond to any of the major myofibrillar proteins. MALDI-MS/MS identified the 90-kDa band as the protein ZASP (Z-band alternatively spliced PDZ motif protein), a minor component of the Z-disc (about 1 per 400 α-actinin) important for myofibrillar development and mechanotransduction. This was confirmed by the co-localization of O-GlcNAc and ZASP in Western blotting and by immunofluorescence microscopy. O-GlcNAcylation of ZASP increased in diseased heart, being 49 ± 5% of all O-GlcNAc in donor, 68 ± 9% in end-stage failing heart, and 76 ± 6% in myectomy muscle samples (donor versus myectomy p < 0.05). ZASP is only 22% of all O-GlcNAcylated proteins in mouse heart myofibrils.

  9. The PDZ Protein Canoe/AF-6 Links Ras-MAPK, Notch and Wingless/Wnt Signaling Pathways by Directly Interacting with Ras, Notch and Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Carmena, Ana; Speicher, Stephan; Baylies, Mary

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, it has become increasingly apparent that signal transduction pathways are not merely linear cascades; they are organized into complex signaling networks that require high levels of regulation to generate precise and unique cell responses. However, the underlying regulatory mechanisms by which signaling pathways cross-communicate remain poorly understood. Here we show that the Ras-binding protein Canoe (Cno)/AF-6, a PDZ protein normally associated with cellular junctions, is a key modulator of Wingless (Wg)/Wnt, Ras-Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) and Notch (N) signaling pathways cross-communication. Our data show a repressive effect of Cno/AF-6 on these three signaling pathways through physical interactions with Ras, N and the cytoplasmic protein Dishevelled (Dsh), a key Wg effector. We propose a model in which Cno, through those interactions, actively coordinates, at the membrane level, Ras-MAPK, N and Wg signaling pathways during progenitor specification. PMID:17183697

  10. Protein domain connectivity and essentiality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da F. Costa, L.; Rodrigues, F. A.; Travieso, G.

    2006-10-01

    Protein-protein interactions can be properly modeled as scale-free complex networks, while the lethality of proteins has been correlated with the node degrees, therefore defining a lethality-centrality rule. In this work the authors revisit this relevant problem by focusing attention not on proteins as a whole, but on their functional domains, which are ultimately responsible for their binding potential. Four networks are considered: the original protein-protein interaction network, its randomized version, and two domain networks assuming different lethality hypotheses. By using formal statistical analysis, they show that the correlation between connectivity and essentiality is higher for domains than for proteins.

  11. Molecular characterization of a PDZ-LIM protein in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): a fish ortholog of the alpha-actinin-associated LIM-protein (ALP).

    PubMed

    Andersen, Øivind; Østbye, Tone-Kari; Gabestad, Irene; Nielsen, Christer; Bardal, Tora; Galloway, Trina Falck

    2004-01-01

    A protein containing both PDZ and LIM protein-protein interaction motifs has for the first time been identified in a lower vertebrate species. A full-length cDNA encoding the ortholog of the alpha-actinin-associated LIM protein (ALP) was isolated from white skeletal muscle of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar). Whereas ALP is expressed as two muscle specific isoforms in mammals and chicken as the result of alternative splicing, a single ALP transcript was found in both muscle and non-muscular tissues of Atlantic salmon. On the other hand, Western blot analysis revealed several immunoreactive ALP variants in salmon muscle tissues, including a 45 kDa protein in white and red skeletal muscle and a 37-40 kDa protein in heart and smooth muscle. Salmon ALP and alpha-actinin showed similar striated patterns in serial longitudinal sections of white and red skeletal muscle and heart muscle. Expression of ALP was initiated at the 45-somite stage of the salmon embryogenesis contemporary with the first appearance of alpha-actinin transcripts. The similarities in both the spatial and temporal expression patterns of salmon ALP and alpha-actinin strongly indicate that the two proteins are associated as in higher vertebrates, and that the assumed involvement of ALP in the organization and/or maintenance of the Z-lines in striated muscle has been conserved during vertebrate evolution. However, in contrast to the restricted expression of ALP in higher vertebrates, the ubiquitous expression of salmon ALP suggest that this factor is involved in the assembly of additional multi-protein complexes in fish.

  12. Interdomain interface-mediated target recognition by the Scribble PDZ34 supramodule.

    PubMed

    Ren, Jinqi; Feng, Lei; Bai, Yujie; Pei, Haohong; Yuan, Zengqiang; Feng, Wei

    2015-05-15

    Tandem-arranged PDZ [PSD-95 (postsynaptic density-95), Dlg (discs large homologue) and ZO-1 (zonula occludens-1)] domains often form structural and functional supramodules with distinct target-binding properties. In the present study, we found that the two PDZ domains within the PDZ34 tandem of Scribble, a cell polarity regulator, tightly pack in a 'front-to-back' mode to form a compact supramodule. Although PDZ4 contains a distorted αB/βB pocket, the attachment of PDZ4 to PDZ3 generates an unexpected interdomain pocket that is adjacent to and integrates with the canonical αB/βB pocket of PDZ3 to form an expanded target-binding groove. The structure of the PDZ34-target peptide complex further demonstrated that the peptide binds to this expanded target-binding groove with its upstream residues anchoring into the interdomain pocket directly. Mutations of the interdomain pocket and disruptions of the PDZ34 supramodule both interfere with its target-binding capacity. Therefore, the interdomain interface between the PDZ34 supramodule is intrinsically required for its target recognition and determines its target-binding specificity. This interdomain interface-mediated specific recognition may represent a novel mode of target recognition and would broaden the target-binding versatility for PDZ supramodules. The supramodular nature and target recognition mode of the PDZ34 tandem found in the present study would also help to identify the new binding partners of Scribble and thus may direct further research on the PDZ domain-mediated assembly of Scribble polarity complexes.

  13. The Serine Protease HhoA from Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Substrate Specificity and Formation of a Hexameric Complex Are Regulated by the PDZ Domain▿

    PubMed Central

    Huesgen, Pitter F.; Scholz, Philipp; Adamska, Iwona

    2007-01-01

    Enzymes of the ATP-independent Deg serine endopeptidase family are very flexible with regard to their substrate specificity. Some family members cleave only one substrate, while others act as general proteases on unfolded substrates. The proteolytic activity of Deg proteases is regulated by PDZ protein interaction domains. Here we characterized the HhoA protease from Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 in vitro using several recombinant protein constructs. The proteolytic activity of HhoA was found to increase with temperature and basic pH and was stimulated by the addition of Mg2+ or Ca2+. We found that the single PDZ domain of HhoA played a critical role in regulating protease activity and in the assembly of a hexameric complex. Deletion of the PDZ domain strongly reduced proteolysis of a sterically challenging resorufin-labeled casein substrate, but unlabeled β-casein was still degraded. Reconstitution of the purified HhoA with total membrane proteins isolated from Synechocystis sp. wild-type strain PCC 6803 and a ΔhhoA mutant resulted in specific degradation of selected proteins at elevated temperatures. We concluded that a single PDZ domain of HhoA plays a critical role in defining the protease activity and oligomerization state, combining the functions that are attributed to two PDZ domains in the homologous DegP protease from Escherichia coli. Based on this first enzymatic study of a Deg protease from cyanobacteria, we propose a general role for HhoA in the quality control of extracytoplasmic proteins, including membrane proteins, in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. PMID:17616590

  14. Targeting Protein-Protein Interactions with Trimeric Ligands: High Affinity Inhibitors of the MAGUK Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Klaus B.; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M.; Wilbek, Theis S.; Nielsen, Line S.; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S.; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins. PMID:25658767

  15. Targeting protein-protein interactions with trimeric ligands: high affinity inhibitors of the MAGUK protein family.

    PubMed

    Nissen, Klaus B; Haugaard-Kedström, Linda M; Wilbek, Theis S; Nielsen, Line S; Åberg, Emma; Kristensen, Anders S; Bach, Anders; Jemth, Per; Strømgaard, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    PDZ domains in general, and those of PSD-95 in particular, are emerging as promising drug targets for diseases such as ischemic stroke. We have previously shown that dimeric ligands that simultaneously target PDZ1 and PDZ2 of PSD-95 are highly potent inhibitors of PSD-95. However, PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins contain three consecutive PDZ domains, hence we envisioned that targeting all three PDZ domains simultaneously would lead to more potent and potentially more specific interactions with the MAGUK proteins. Here we describe the design, synthesis and characterization of a series of trimeric ligands targeting all three PDZ domains of PSD-95 and the related MAGUK proteins, PSD-93, SAP-97 and SAP-102. Using our dimeric ligands targeting the PDZ1-2 tandem as starting point, we designed novel trimeric ligands by introducing a PDZ3-binding peptide moiety via a cysteine-derivatized NPEG linker. The trimeric ligands generally displayed increased affinities compared to the dimeric ligands in fluorescence polarization binding experiments and optimized trimeric ligands showed low nanomolar inhibition towards the four MAGUK proteins, thus being the most potent inhibitors described. Kinetic experiments using stopped-flow spectrometry showed that the increase in affinity is caused by a decrease in the dissociation rate of the trimeric ligand as compared to the dimeric ligands, likely reflecting the lower probability of simultaneous dissociation of all three PDZ ligands. Thus, we have provided novel inhibitors of the MAGUK proteins with exceptionally high affinity, which can be used to further elucidate the therapeutic potential of these proteins.

  16. Diversity in protein domain superfamilies

    PubMed Central

    Das, Sayoni; Dawson, Natalie L; Orengo, Christine A

    2015-01-01

    Whilst ∼93% of domain superfamilies appear to be relatively structurally and functionally conserved based on the available data from the CATH-Gene3D domain classification resource, the remainder are much more diverse. In this review, we consider how domains in some of the most ubiquitous and promiscuous superfamilies have evolved, in particular the plasticity in their functional sites and surfaces which expands the repertoire of molecules they interact with and actions performed on them. To what extent can we identify a core function for these superfamilies which would allow us to develop a ‘domain grammar of function’ whereby a protein's biological role can be proposed from its constituent domains? Clearly the first step is to understand the extent to which these components vary and how changes in their molecular make-up modifies function. PMID:26451979

  17. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1998-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  18. Cellulose binding domain fusion proteins

    DOEpatents

    Shoseyov, O.; Yosef, K.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1998-02-17

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  19. Structure of Dimeric and Tetrameric Complexes of the BAR Domain Protein PICK1 Determined by Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering.

    PubMed

    Karlsen, Morten L; Thorsen, Thor S; Johner, Niklaus; Ammendrup-Johnsen, Ina; Erlendsson, Simon; Tian, Xinsheng; Simonsen, Jens B; Høiberg-Nielsen, Rasmus; Christensen, Nikolaj M; Khelashvili, George; Streicher, Werner; Teilum, Kaare; Vestergaard, Bente; Weinstein, Harel; Gether, Ulrik; Arleth, Lise; Madsen, Kenneth L

    2015-07-07

    PICK1 is a neuronal scaffolding protein containing a PDZ domain and an auto-inhibited BAR domain. BAR domains are membrane-sculpting protein modules generating membrane curvature and promoting membrane fission. Previous data suggest that BAR domains are organized in lattice-like arrangements when stabilizing membranes but little is known about structural organization of BAR domains in solution. Through a small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis, we determine the structure of dimeric and tetrameric complexes of PICK1 in solution. SAXS and biochemical data reveal a strong propensity of PICK1 to form higher-order structures, and SAXS analysis suggests an offset, parallel mode of BAR-BAR oligomerization. Furthermore, unlike accessory domains in other BAR domain proteins, the positioning of the PDZ domains is flexible, enabling PICK1 to perform long-range, dynamic scaffolding of membrane-associated proteins. Together with functional data, these structural findings are compatible with a model in which oligomerization governs auto-inhibition of BAR domain function.

  20. Functional domains in tetraspanin proteins.

    PubMed

    Stipp, Christopher S; Kolesnikova, Tatiana V; Hemler, Martin E

    2003-02-01

    Exciting new findings have emerged about the structure, function and biochemistry of tetraspanin proteins. Five distinct tetraspanin regions have now been delineated linking structural features to specific functions. Within the large extracellular loop of tetraspanins, there is a variable region that mediates specific interactions with other proteins, as well as a more highly conserved region that has been suggested to mediate homodimerization. Within the transmembrane region, the four tetraspanin transmembrane domains are probable sites of both intra- and inter-molecular interactions that are crucial during biosynthesis and assembly of the network of tetraspanin-linked membrane proteins known as the 'tetraspanin web'. In the intracellular juxtamembrane region, palmitoylation of cysteine residues also contributes to tetraspanin web assembly, and the C-terminal cytoplasmic tail region could provide specific functional links to cytoskeletal or signaling proteins.

  1. Structure-function analysis of SAP97, a modular scaffolding protein that drives dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Hsu, F-C; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, J; Jablonski, A M; Zhai, J; Coulter, D A; Kalb, R G

    2015-03-01

    Activation of AMPA receptors assembled with the GluA1 subunit can promote dendrite growth in a manner that depends on its direct binding partner, SAP97. SAP97 is a modular scaffolding protein that has at least seven recognizable protein-protein interaction domains. Several complementary approaches were employed to show that the dendrite branching promoting action of full length SAP97 depends on ligand(s) that bind to the PDZ3 domain. Ligand(s) to PDZ1, PDZ2 and I3 domains also contribute to dendrite growth. The ability of PDZ3 ligand(s) to promote dendrite growth depends on localization at the plasma membrane along with GluA1 and SAP97. These results suggest that the assembly of a multi-protein complex at or near synapses is vital for the translation of AMPA-R activity into dendrite growth.

  2. Actinin-associated LIM protein-deficient mice maintain normal development and structure of skeletal muscle.

    PubMed

    Jo, K; Rutten, B; Bunn, R C; Bredt, D S

    2001-03-01

    The actinin-associated LIM protein, ALP, is the prototype of a large family of proteins containing an N-terminal PDZ domain and a C-terminal LIM domain. These PDZ-LIM proteins are components of the muscle cytoskeleton and occur along the Z lines owing to interaction of the PDZ domain with the spectrin-like repeats of alpha-actinin. Because PDZ and LIM domains are typically found in proteins that mediate cellular signaling, PDZ-LIM proteins are suspected to participate in muscle development. Interestingly the ALP gene occurs at 4q35 near the heterochromatic region mutated in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, indicating a possible role for ALP in this disease. Here, we describe the generation and analysis of mice lacking the ALP gene. Surprisingly, the ALP knockout mice show no gross histological abnormalities and maintain sarcolemmal integrity as determined by serum pyruvate kinase assays. The absence of a dystrophic phenotype in these mice suggests that down-regulation of ALP does not participate in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy. These data suggest that ALP does not participate in muscle development or that an alternative PDZ-LIM protein can compensate for the lack of ALP.

  3. The PDZ protein TIP-1 facilitates cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human invasive breast cancer cells in athymic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Miaojun; Wang, Hailun; Zhang, Hua-Tang; Han, Zhaozhong

    2012-05-25

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study has revealed novel oncogenic functions of TIP-1 in human invasive breast cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Elevated TIP-1 expression levels in human breast cancers correlate to the disease prognosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell migration and pulmonary metastasis of human breast cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the expression and functionality of motility-related genes. -- Abstract: Tax-interacting protein 1 (TIP-1, also known as Tax1bp3) inhibited proliferation of colon cancer cells through antagonizing the transcriptional activity of beta-catenin. However, in this study, elevated TIP-1 expression levels were detected in human invasive breast cancers. Studies with two human invasive breast cancer cell lines indicated that RNAi-mediated TIP-1 knockdown suppressed the cell adhesion, proliferation, migration and invasion in vitro, and inhibited tumor growth in mammary fat pads and pulmonary metastasis in athymic mice. Biochemical studies showed that TIP-1 knockdown had moderate and differential effects on the beta-catenin-regulated gene expression, but remarkably down regulated the genes for cell adhesion and motility in breast cancer cells. The decreased expression of integrins and paxillin was accompanied with reduced cell adhesion and focal adhesion formation on fibronectin-coated surface. In conclusion, this study revealed a novel oncogenic function of TIP-1 suggesting that TIP-1 holds potential as a prognostic biomarker and a therapeutic target in the treatment of human invasive breast cancers.

  4. PDZ binding motif of HTLV-1 Tax promotes virus-mediated T-cell proliferation in vitro and persistence in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li; Yamamoto, Brenda; Haoudi, Abdelali; Semmes, O John; Green, Patrick L

    2006-03-01

    HTLV-1 cellular transformation and disease induction is dependent on expression of the viral Tax oncoprotein. PDZ is a modular protein interaction domain used in organizing signaling complexes in eukaryotic cells through recognition of a specific binding motif in partner proteins. Tax-1, but not Tax-2, contains a PDZ-binding domain motif (PBM) that promotes the interaction with several cellular PDZ proteins. Herein, we investigate the contribution of the Tax-1 PBM in HTLV-induced proliferation and immortalization of primary T cells in vitro and viral survival in an infectious rabbit animal model. We generated several HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 Tax viral mutants, including HTLV-1deltaPBM, HTLV-2+C22(+PBM), and HTLV-2+ C18(deltaPBM). All Tax mutants maintained the ability to significantly activate the CREB/ATF or NFkappaB signaling pathways. Microtiter proliferation assays revealed that the Tax-1 PBM significantly increases both HTLV-1- and HTLV-2-induced primary T-cell proliferation. In addition, Tax-1 PBM was responsible for the micronuclei induction activity of Tax-1 relative to that of Tax-2. Viral infection and persistence were severely attenuated in rabbits inoculated with HTLV-1deltaPBM. Our results provide the first direct evidence suggesting that PBM-mediated associations between Tax-1 and cellular proteins play a key role in HTLV-induced cell proliferation and genetic instability in vitro and facilitate viral persistence in vivo.

  5. J domain independent functions of J proteins.

    PubMed

    Ajit Tamadaddi, Chetana; Sahi, Chandan

    2016-07-01

    Heat shock proteins of 40 kDa (Hsp40s), also called J proteins, are obligate partners of Hsp70s. Via their highly conserved and functionally critical J domain, J proteins interact and modulate the activity of their Hsp70 partners. Mutations in the critical residues in the J domain often result in the null phenotype for the J protein in question. However, as more J proteins have been characterized, it is becoming increasingly clear that a significant number of J proteins do not "completely" rely on their J domains to carry out their cellular functions, as previously thought. In some cases, regions outside the highly conserved J domain have become more important making the J domain dispensable for some, if not for all functions of a J protein. This has profound effects on the evolution of such J proteins. Here we present selected examples of J proteins that perform J domain independent functions and discuss this in the context of evolution of J proteins with dispensable J domains and J-like proteins in eukaryotes.

  6. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay.

    PubMed

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-08-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this end, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to 1,000 domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from human papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human 'PDZome'. We obtained sharply sequence-dependent binding profiles that quantitatively describe the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes.

  7. A complex of ZO-1 and the BAR-domain protein TOCA-1 regulates actin assembly at the tight junction

    PubMed Central

    Van Itallie, Christina M.; Tietgens, Amber Jean; Krystofiak, Evan; Kachar, Bechara; Anderson, James M.

    2015-01-01

    Assembly and sealing of the tight junction barrier are critically dependent on the perijunctional actin cytoskeleton, yet little is known about physical and functional links between barrier-forming proteins and actin. Here we identify a novel functional complex of the junction scaffolding protein ZO-1 and the F-BAR–domain protein TOCA-1. Using MDCK epithelial cells, we show that an alternative splice of TOCA-1 adds a PDZ-binding motif, which binds ZO-1, targeting TOCA-1 to barrier contacts. This isoform of TOCA-1 recruits the actin nucleation–promoting factor N-WASP to tight junctions. CRISPR-Cas9–mediated knockout of TOCA-1 results in increased paracellular flux and delayed recovery in a calcium switch assay. Knockout of TOCA-1 does not alter FRAP kinetics of GFP ZO-1 or occludin, but longer term (12 h) time-lapse microscopy reveals strikingly decreased tight junction membrane contact dynamics in knockout cells compared with controls. Reexpression of TOCA-1 with, but not without, the PDZ-binding motif rescues both altered flux and membrane contact dynamics. Ultrastructural analysis shows actin accumulation at the adherens junction in TOCA-1–knockout cells but unaltered freeze-fracture fibril morphology. Identification of the ZO-1/TOCA-1 complex provides novel insights into the underappreciated dependence of the barrier on the dynamic nature of cell-to-cell contacts and perijunctional actin. PMID:26063734

  8. Analysis of Multiple HPV E6 PDZ Interactions Defines Type-Specific PDZ Fingerprints That Predict Oncogenic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Miranda; Myers, Michael P.; Guarnaccia, Corrado; Banks, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncoproteins are characterised by the presence of a class I PDZ-binding motif (PBM) on their extreme carboxy termini. The PBM is present on the E6 proteins derived from all cancer-causing HPV types, but can also be found on some related non-cancer-causing E6 proteins. We have therefore been interested in investigating the potential functional differences between these different E6 PBMs. Using an unbiased proteomic approach in keratinocytes, we have directly compared the interaction profiles of these different PBMs. This has allowed us to identify the potential PDZ target fingerprints of the E6 PBMs from 7 different cancer-causing HPV types, from 3 HPV types with weak cancer association, and from one benign HPV type that possesses an ancestral PBM. We demonstrate a striking increase in the number of potential PDZ targets bound by each E6 PBM as cancer-causing potential increases, and show that the HPV-16 and HPV-18 PBMs have the most flexibility in their PDZ target selection. Furthermore, the specific interaction with hScrib correlates directly with increased oncogenic potential. In contrast, hDlg is bound equally well by all the HPV E6 PBMs analysed, indicating that this is an evolutionarily conserved interaction, and was most likely one of the original E6 PBM target proteins that was important for the occupation of a potential new niche. Finally, we present evidence that the cell junction components ZO-2 and β-2 syntrophin are novel PDZ domain–containing targets of a subset of high-risk HPV types. PMID:27483446

  9. Synthetic Protein Scaffolds Based on Peptide Motifs and Cognate Adaptor Domains for Improving Metabolic Productivity

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Anselm H. C.; Sticht, Heinrich

    2015-01-01

    The efficiency of many cellular processes relies on the defined interaction among different proteins within the same metabolic or signaling pathway. Consequently, a spatial colocalization of functionally interacting proteins has frequently emerged during evolution. This concept has been adapted within the synthetic biology community for the purpose of creating artificial scaffolds. A recent advancement of this concept is the use of peptide motifs and their cognate adaptor domains. SH2, SH3, GBD, and PDZ domains have been used most often in research studies to date. The approach has been successfully applied to the synthesis of a variety of target molecules including catechin, D-glucaric acid, H2, hydrochinone, resveratrol, butyrate, gamma-aminobutyric acid, and mevalonate. Increased production levels of up to 77-fold have been observed compared to non-scaffolded systems. A recent extension of this concept is the creation of a covalent linkage between peptide motifs and adaptor domains, which leads to a more stable association of the scaffolded systems and thus bears the potential to further enhance metabolic productivity. PMID:26636078

  10. The architecture of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-03-14

    Understanding the design of the universe of protein structures may provide insights into protein evolution. We study the architecture of the protein domain universe, which has been found to poses peculiar scale-free properties. We examine the origin of these scale-free properties of the graph of protein domain structures (PDUG) and determine that that the PDUG is not modular, i.e. it does not consist of modules with uniform properties. Instead, we find the PDUG to be self-similar at all scales. We further characterize the PDUG architecture by studying the properties of the hub nodes that are responsible for the scale-free connectivity of the PDUG. We introduce a measure of the betweenness centrality of protein domains in the PDUG and find a power-law distribution of the betweenness centrality values. The scale-free distribution of hubs in the protein universe suggests that a set of specific statistical mechanics models, such as the self-organized criticality model, can potentially identify the principal driving forces of protein evolution. We also find a gatekeeper protein domain, removal of which partitions the largest cluster into two large sub-clusters. We suggest that the loss of such gatekeeper protein domains in the course of evolution is responsible for the creation of new fold families.

  11. Domain structure of Lassa virus L protein.

    PubMed

    Brunotte, Linda; Lelke, Michaela; Hass, Meike; Kleinsteuber, Katja; Becker-Ziaja, Beate; Günther, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    The 200-kDa L protein of arenaviruses plays a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. This study aimed at providing evidence for the domain structure of L protein by combining bioinformatics with a stepwise mutagenesis approach using the Lassa virus minireplicon system. Potential interdomain linkers were predicted using various algorithms. The prediction was challenged by insertion of flexible sequences into the predicted linkers. Insertion of 5 or 10 amino acid residues was tolerated at seven sites (S407, G446, G467, G774, G939, S1952, and V2074 in Lassa virus AV). At two of these sites, G467 and G939, L protein could be split into an N-terminal and a C-terminal part, which were able to trans-complement each other and reconstitute a functional complex upon coexpression. Coimmunoprecipitation studies revealed physical interaction between the N- and C-terminal domains, irrespective of whether L protein was split at G467 or G939. In confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, the N-terminal domains showed a dot-like, sometimes perinuclear, cytoplasmic distribution similar to that of full-length L protein, while the C-terminal domains were homogenously distributed in cytoplasm. The latter were redistributed into the dot-like structures upon coexpression with the corresponding N-terminal domain. In conclusion, this study demonstrates two interdomain linkers in Lassa virus L protein, at G467 and G939, suggesting that L protein is composed of at least three structural domains spanning residues 1 to 467, 467 to 939, and 939 to 2220. The first domain seems to mediate accumulation of L protein into cytoplasmic dot-like structures.

  12. Protein function prediction using domain families

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Here we assessed the use of domain families for predicting the functions of whole proteins. These 'functional families' (FunFams) were derived using a protocol that combines sequence clustering with supervised cluster evaluation, relying on available high-quality Gene Ontology (GO) annotation data in the latter step. In essence, the protocol groups domain sequences belonging to the same superfamily into families based on the GO annotations of their parent proteins. An initial test based on enzyme sequences confirmed that the FunFams resemble enzyme (domain) families much better than do families produced by sequence clustering alone. For the CAFA 2011 experiment, we further associated the FunFams with GO terms probabilistically. All target proteins were first submitted to domain superfamily assignment, followed by FunFam assignment and, eventually, function assignment. The latter included an integration step for multi-domain target proteins. The CAFA results put our domain-based approach among the top ten of 31 competing groups and 56 prediction methods, confirming that it outperforms simple pairwise whole-protein sequence comparisons. PMID:23514456

  13. Discovering interacting domains and motifs in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Hugo, Willy; Sung, Wing-Kin; Ng, See-Kiong

    2013-01-01

    Many important biological processes, such as the signaling pathways, require protein-protein interactions (PPIs) that are designed for fast response to stimuli. These interactions are usually transient, easily formed, and disrupted, yet specific. Many of these transient interactions involve the binding of a protein domain to a short stretch (3-10) of amino acid residues, which can be characterized by a sequence pattern, i.e., a short linear motif (SLiM). We call these interacting domains and motifs domain-SLiM interactions. Existing methods have focused on discovering SLiMs in the interacting proteins' sequence data. With the recent increase in protein structures, we have a new opportunity to detect SLiMs directly from the proteins' 3D structures instead of their linear sequences. In this chapter, we describe a computational method called SLiMDIet to directly detect SLiMs on domain interfaces extracted from 3D structures of PPIs. SLiMDIet comprises two steps: (1) interaction interfaces belonging to the same domain are extracted and grouped together using structural clustering and (2) the extracted interaction interfaces in each cluster are structurally aligned to extract the corresponding SLiM. Using SLiMDIet, de novo SLiMs interacting with protein domains can be computationally detected from structurally clustered domain-SLiM interactions for PFAM domains which have available 3D structures in the PDB database.

  14. Proteins and cholesterol-rich domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2008-01-01

    Biological membranes are composed of many molecular species of lipids and proteins. These molecules do not mix ideally. In the plane of the membrane components are segregated into domains that are enriched in certain lipids and proteins. Cholesterol is a membrane lipid that is not uniformly distributed in the membrane. Proteins play an important role in determining cholesterol distribution. Certain types of protein lipidation are known to cause the lipoprotein to sequester with cholesterol and to stabilize cholesterol-rich domains. However, proteins that are excluded from such domains also contribute to the redistribution of cholesterol. One of the motifs that favor interaction with cholesterol is the CRAC motif. The role of the CRAC motif of the gp41 fusogenic protein of HIV is discussed. The distribution of the multianionic lipid, phosphatidylinositol(4,5)bis-phosphate (PtnIns(4,5)P2), is also not uniform in cell membranes. This lipid has several functions in the cell, including a morphological role in determining the sites of attachment of the actin cytoskeleton to the plasma membrane. PtnIns(4,5)P2 is sequestered by proteins having clusters of cationic residues in their sequence. Certain proteins containing cationic clusters also contain moieties such as myristoylation or a CRAC segment that would also endow them with the ability to sequester to a cholesterol-rich domain. These proteins interact with PtnIns(4,5)P2 in a cholesterol-dependent manner forming domains that are enriched in both cholesterol and in PtnIns(4,5)P2 but can also be distinct from liquid-ordered raft-like domains.

  15. Functional innovation from changes in protein domains and their combinations.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-06-01

    Domains are the functional building blocks of proteins. In this work we discuss how domains can contribute to the evolution of new functions. Domains themselves can evolve through various mechanisms, altering their intrinsic function. Domains can also facilitate functional innovations by combining with other domains to make novel proteins. We discuss the mechanisms by which domain and domain combinations support functional innovations. We highlight interesting examples where changes in domain combination promote changes at the domain level.

  16. Functional genomics of intracellular peptide recognition domains with combinatorial biology methods.

    PubMed

    Sidhu, Sachdev S; Bader, Gary D; Boone, Charles

    2003-02-01

    Phage-displayed peptide libraries have been used to identify specific ligands for peptide-binding domains that mediate intracellular protein-protein interactions. These studies have provided significant insights into the specificities of particular domains. For PDZ domains that recognize C-terminal sequences, the information has proven useful in identifying natural binding partners from genomic databases. For SH3 domains that recognize internal proline-rich motifs, the results of database searches with phage-derived ligands have been compared with the results of yeast-two-hybrid experiments to produce overlap networks that reliably predict natural protein-protein interactions. In addition, libraries of phage-displayed PDZ and SH3 domains have been used to identify the residues responsible for ligand recognition, and also to engineer domains with altered specificities.

  17. ECOD: an evolutionary classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Hua; Schaeffer, R Dustin; Liao, Yuxing; Kinch, Lisa N; Pei, Jimin; Shi, Shuoyong; Kim, Bong-Hyun; Grishin, Nick V

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the evolution of a protein, including both close and distant relationships, often reveals insight into its structure and function. Fast and easy access to such up-to-date information facilitates research. We have developed a hierarchical evolutionary classification of all proteins with experimentally determined spatial structures, and presented it as an interactive and updatable online database. ECOD (Evolutionary Classification of protein Domains) is distinct from other structural classifications in that it groups domains primarily by evolutionary relationships (homology), rather than topology (or "fold"). This distinction highlights cases of homology between domains of differing topology to aid in understanding of protein structure evolution. ECOD uniquely emphasizes distantly related homologs that are difficult to detect, and thus catalogs the largest number of evolutionary links among structural domain classifications. Placing distant homologs together underscores the ancestral similarities of these proteins and draws attention to the most important regions of sequence and structure, as well as conserved functional sites. ECOD also recognizes closer sequence-based relationships between protein domains. Currently, approximately 100,000 protein structures are classified in ECOD into 9,000 sequence families clustered into close to 2,000 evolutionary groups. The classification is assisted by an automated pipeline that quickly and consistently classifies weekly releases of PDB structures and allows for continual updates. This synchronization with PDB uniquely distinguishes ECOD among all protein classifications. Finally, we present several case studies of homologous proteins not recorded in other classifications, illustrating the potential of how ECOD can be used to further biological and evolutionary studies.

  18. Inferring Evolutionary Scenarios for Protein Domain Compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiedenhoeft, John; Krause, Roland; Eulenstein, Oliver

    Essential cellular processes are controlled by functional interactions of protein domains, which can be inferred from their evolutionary histories. Methods to reconstruct these histories are challenged by the complexity of reconstructing macroevolutionary events. In this work we model these events using a novel network-like structure that represents the evolution of domain combinations, called plexus. We describe an algorithm to find a plexus that represents the evolution of a given collection of domain histories as phylogenetic trees with the minimum number of macroevolutionary events, and demonstrate its effectiveness in practice.

  19. A Comparison of Rosetta Stones in Adapter Protein Families

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Hulikal Shivashankara Santosh; Kumar, Vadlapudi

    2016-01-01

    The inventory of proteins used in different kingdoms appears surprisingly similar in all sequenced eukaryotic genome. Protein domains represent the basic evolutionary units that form proteins. Domain duplication and shuffling by recombination are probably the most important forces driving protein evolution and hence the complexity of the proteome. While the duplication of whole genes as well as domain encoding exons increases the abundance of domains in the proteome, domain shuffling increases versatility, i.e. the number of distinct contexts in which a domain can occur. In this study we considered five important adapter domain families namely WD40, KELCH, Ankyrin, PDZ and Pleckstrin Homology (PH domain) family for the comparison of Domain versatility, Abundance and domain sharing between them. We used ecological statistics methods such as Jaccard’s Similarity Index (JSI), Detrended Correspondence Analysis, k-Means clustering for the domain distribution data. We found high propensity of domain sharing between PH and PDZ. We found higher abundance of only few selected domains in PH, PDZ, ANK and KELCH families. We also found WD40 family with high versatility and less redundant domain occurrence, with less domain sharing. Hence, the assignments of functions to more orphan WD40 proteins that will help in the identification of suitable drug targets. PMID:28246462

  20. Folding mechanism of a multiple independently-folding domain protein: double B domain of protein A.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Hammes, Gordon G; Oas, Terrence G

    2006-10-10

    The antibody binding properties of staphylococcal protein A (SpA) can be attributed to the presence of five highly homologous domains (E, D, A, B, and C). Although the folding of the B domain of protein A (BdpA) is well-characterized, the folding behavior of this domain in the context of full-length SpA in the cell remains unexplored. The sequence of the B domain is 89 and 91% identical to those of domains A and C, respectively. We have fused B domain sequences (BBdpA) as a close approximation of the A-B or B-C portion of SpA. Circular dichroism and fluorescence-detected denaturation curves of BBdpA are experimentally indistinguishable from those of BdpA. The rate constants for folding and unfolding from NMR line shape analysis for the single- and double-domain proteins are the same within experimental uncertainties (+/-20%). These results support the designation of SpA as a multiple independently-folding domain (MIFD) protein. We develop a mathematical model that describes the folding thermodynamics and kinetics of MIFD proteins. The model depicts MIFD protein folding and unfolding as a parallel network and explicitly calculates the flux through all parallel pathways. These fluxes are combined to give a complete description of the global thermodynamics and kinetics of the folding and unfolding of MIFD proteins. The global rates for complete folding and unfolding of a MIFD protein and those of the individual domains depend on the stability of the protein. We show that the global unfolding rate of a MIFD protein may be many orders of magnitude slower than that of the constituent domains.

  1. Tight junction protein ZO-1 controls organic cation/carnitine transporter OCTN2 (SLC22A5) in a protein kinase C-dependent way.

    PubMed

    Jurkiewicz, Dominika; Michalec, Katarzyna; Skowronek, Krzysztof; Nałęcz, Katarzyna A

    2017-05-01

    OCTN2 (SLC22A5) is an organic cation/carnitine transporter belonging to the solute carrier transporters (SLC) family. OCTN2 is ubiquitously expressed and its presence was shown in various brain cells, including the endothelial cells forming blood-brain barrier, where it was mainly detected at abluminal membrane and in proximity of tight junctions (TJ). Since OCTN2 contains a PDZ-binding domain, the present study was focused on a possible role of transporter interaction with a TJ-associated protein ZO-1, containing PDZ domains and detected in rat Octn2 proteome. We showed previously that activation of protein kinase C (PKC) in rat astrocytes regulates Octn2 surface presence and activity. Regulation of a wild type Octn2 and its deletion mutant without a PDZ binding motif were studied in heterologous expression system in HEK293 cells. Plasma membrane presence of overexpressed Octn2 did not depend on either PKC activation or presence of PDZ-binding motif, anyhow, as assayed in proximity ligation assay, the truncation of PDZ binding motif resulted in a strongly diminished Octn2/ZO-1 interaction and in a decreased transporter activity. The same effects on Octn2 activity were detected upon PKC activation, what correlated with ZO-1 phosphorylation. It is postulated that ZO-1, when not phosphorylated by PKC, keeps Octn2 in an active state, while elimination of this binding in ΔPDZ mutant or after ZO-1 phosphorylation leads to diminution of Octn2 activity.

  2. BAR domain proteins regulate Rho GTPase signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aspenström, Pontus

    2014-01-01

    BAR proteins comprise a heterogeneous group of multi-domain proteins with diverse biological functions. The common denominator is the Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain that not only confers targeting to lipid bilayers, but also provides scaffolding to mold lipid membranes into concave or convex surfaces. This function of BAR proteins is an important determinant in the dynamic reconstruction of membrane vesicles, as well as of the plasma membrane. Several BAR proteins function as linkers between cytoskeletal regulation and membrane dynamics. These links are provided by direct interactions between BAR proteins and actin-nucleation-promoting factors of the Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein family and the Diaphanous-related formins. The Rho GTPases are key factors for orchestration of this intricate interplay. This review describes how BAR proteins regulate the activity of Rho GTPases, as well as how Rho GTPases regulate the function of BAR proteins. This mutual collaboration is a central factor in the regulation of vital cellular processes, such as cell migration, cytokinesis, intracellular transport, endocytosis, and exocytosis. PMID:25483303

  3. Linking in domain-swapped protein dimers

    PubMed Central

    Baiesi, Marco; Orlandini, Enzo; Trovato, Antonio; Seno, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The presence of knots has been observed in a small fraction of single-domain proteins and related to their thermodynamic and kinetic properties. The exchanging of identical structural elements, typical of domain-swapped proteins, makes such dimers suitable candidates to validate the possibility that mutual entanglement between chains may play a similar role for protein complexes. We suggest that such entanglement is captured by the linking number. This represents, for two closed curves, the number of times that each curve winds around the other. We show that closing the curves is not necessary, as a novel parameter G′, termed Gaussian entanglement, is strongly correlated with the linking number. Based on 110 non redundant domain-swapped dimers, our analysis evidences a high fraction of chains with a significant intertwining, that is with |G′| > 1. We report that Nature promotes configurations with negative mutual entanglement and surprisingly, it seems to suppress intertwining in long protein dimers. Supported by numerical simulations of dimer dissociation, our results provide a novel topology-based classification of protein-swapped dimers together with some preliminary evidence of its impact on their physical and biological properties. PMID:27659606

  4. TARP modulation of synaptic AMPA receptor trafficking and gating depends on multiple intracellular domains.

    PubMed

    Milstein, Aaron D; Nicoll, Roger A

    2009-07-07

    Previous work has established stargazin and its related family of transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins (TARPs) as auxiliary subunits of AMPA receptors (AMPARs) that control synaptic strength both by targeting AMPARs to synapses through an intracellular PDZ-binding motif and by modulating their gating through an extracellular domain. However, TARPs gamma-2 and gamma-8 differentially regulate the synaptic targeting of AMPARs, despite having identical PDZ-binding motifs. Here, we investigate the structural elements that contribute to this functional difference between TARP subtypes by using domain transplantation and truncation. We identify a component of synaptic AMPAR trafficking that is independent of the TARP C-terminal PDZ-binding motif, and we establish previously uncharacterized roles for the TARP intracellular N terminus, loop, and C terminus in modulating both the trafficking and gating of synaptic AMPARs.

  5. Joining RDC data from flexible protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sgheri, Luca

    2010-11-01

    We study the inverse problem of determining the conformational freedom of two protein domains from residual dipolar coupling (RDC) measurements. For each paramagnetic ion attached to one of the domains we obtain a magnetic susceptibility tensor χ from the RDC of couples of atoms of that domain, and a mean paramagnetic susceptibility tensor {\\bar{\\chi }} from the RDC of couples of atoms of the other domain. The latter is an integral average of rotations of χ which depends on the conformational freedom of the two domains. In this paper we consider the case when we have data from paramagnetic ions attached separately to each of the domains. We prove that in this case not all the elements of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} are independent. We derive the mathematical equations for the compatibility of the measurements and show how these relations can be used in the presence of noisy data to determine a compatible set of χ and {\\bar{\\chi }} with an unconstrained minimization. If available, information about the shape of the noise can be included in the target function. We show that in this case the compatible set obtained has a reduced error with respect to the noisy data.

  6. Protein function annotation using protein domain family resources.

    PubMed

    Das, Sayoni; Orengo, Christine A

    2016-01-15

    As a result of the genome sequencing and structural genomics initiatives, we have a wealth of protein sequence and structural data. However, only about 1% of these proteins have experimental functional annotations. As a result, computational approaches that can predict protein functions are essential in bridging this widening annotation gap. This article reviews the current approaches of protein function prediction using structure and sequence based classification of protein domain family resources with a special focus on functional families in the CATH-Gene3D resource.

  7. Structure and function of WD40 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chao; Min, Jinrong

    2011-03-01

    The WD40 domain exhibits a β-propeller architecture, often comprising seven blades. The WD40 domain is one of the most abundant domains and also among the top interacting domains in eukaryotic genomes. In this review, we will discuss the identification, definition and architecture of the WD40 domains. WD40 domain proteins are involved in a large variety of cellular processes, in which WD40 domains function as a protein-protein or protein-DNA interaction platform. WD40 domain mediates molecular recognition events mainly through the smaller top surface, but also through the bottom surface and sides. So far, no WD40 domain has been found to display enzymatic activity. We will also discuss the different binding modes exhibited by the large versatile family of WD40 domain proteins. In the last part of this review, we will discuss how post-translational modifications are recognized by WD40 domain proteins.

  8. Phylogenetic Analysis of Brassica rapa MATH-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Liming; Huang, Yong; Hu, Yan; He, Xiaoli; Shen, Wenhui; Liu, Chunlin; Ruan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The MATH (meprin and TRAF-C homology) domain is a fold of seven anti-parallel β-helices involved in protein-protein interaction. Here, we report the identification and characterization of 90 MATH-domain proteins from the Brassica rapa genome. By sequence analysis together with MATH-domain proteins from other species, the B. rapa MATH-domain proteins can be grouped into 6 classes. Class-I protein has one or several MATH domains without any other recognizable domain; Class-II protein contains a MATH domain together with a conserved BTB (Broad Complex, Tramtrack, and Bric-a-Brac ) domain; Class-III protein belongs to the MATH/Filament domain family; Class-IV protein contains a MATH domain frequently combined with some other domains; Class-V protein has a relative long sequence but contains only one MATH domain; Class-VI protein is characterized by the presence of Peptidase and UBQ (Ubiquitinylation) domains together with one MATH domain. As part of our study regarding seed development of B. rapa, six genes are screened by SSH (Suppression Subtractive Hybridization) and their expression levels are analyzed in combination with seed developmental stages, and expression patterns suggested that Bra001786, Bra03578 and Bra036572 may be seed development specific genes, while Bra001787, Bra020541 and Bra040904 may be involved in seed and flower organ development. This study provides the first characterization of the MATH domain proteins in B. rapa PMID:24179444

  9. Discovery and Confirmation of Ligand Binding Specificities of the Schistosoma japonicum Polarity Protein Scribble

    PubMed Central

    Piao, Xianyu; Hou, Nan; Liu, Shuai; Gao, Youhe; Wang, Heng; Chen, Qijun

    2014-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a chronic debilitating parasitic disease that afflicts more than 200 million individuals worldwide. Long-term administration of chemotherapy with the single available drug, praziquantel, has led to growing concerns about drug resistance. The PSD-95/Dlg/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain is an important module found in many scaffolding proteins, which has been recognized as promising targets for the development of novel drugs. However, the parasite-derived PDZ domains and their associated functions are still largely unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings The gene encoding the Schistosoma japonicum Scribble protein (SjScrib) was identified by homologous search with the S. mansoni Scrib sequence. By screening an arbitrary peptide library in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) assays, we identified and confirmed the ligand binding specificity for each of the four PDZ domains of SjScrib. Both SjScrib-PDZ1 and SjScrib-PDZ3 recognize type I C-terminal PDZ-domain binding motifs (PBMs), which can be deduced as consensus sequences of -[Φ][x][E][TS][x][ILF] and -[x][RKx][ETS][T][WΦ][ILV], respectively. SjScrib-PDZ2 prefers stringent type II C-terminal PBMs, which significantly differs from that of its human ortholog. SjScrib-PDZ4 binds to typical II C-terminal PBMs with a consensus sequence -[x][FW][x][LI][x][LIV], in which the aromatic residue Phe is predominantly selected at position -4. The irregular and unconventional internal ligand binding specificities for the PDZ domains of SjScrib were confirmed by point mutations of the key amino acids within the ligand binding motifs. We also compared the differences in ligand specificities between SjScrib-PDZs and hScrib-PDZs, and explored the structural basis for the ligand binding properties of SjScrib-PDZs. Conclusions/Significance In this study, we characterized and confirmed the ligand binding specificities of all four PDZ domains of SjScrib for the first time. We denoted the differential ligand binding specificities

  10. SNX27 mediates PDZ-directed sorting from endosomes to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Lauffer, Benjamin E.L.; Melero, Cristina; Temkin, Paul; Lei, Cai; Hong, Wanjin; Kortemme, Tanja

    2010-01-01

    Postsynaptic density 95/discs large/zonus occludens-1 (PDZ) domain–interacting motifs, in addition to their well-established roles in protein scaffolding at the cell surface, are proposed to act as cis-acting determinants directing the molecular sorting of transmembrane cargo from endosomes to the plasma membrane. This hypothesis requires the existence of a specific trans-acting PDZ protein that mediates the proposed sorting operation in the endosome membrane. Here, we show that sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) is required for efficient PDZ-directed recycling of the β2-adrenoreceptor (β2AR) from early endosomes. SNX27 mediates this sorting function when expressed at endogenous levels, and its recycling activity requires both PDZ domain–dependent recognition of the β2AR cytoplasmic tail and Phox homology (PX) domain–dependent association with the endosome membrane. These results identify a discrete role of SNX27 in PDZ-directed recycling of a physiologically important signaling receptor, and extend the concept of cargo-specific molecular sorting in the recycling pathway. PMID:20733053

  11. The role of prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD) during rosiglitazone-induced adipocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Juyoung; Kwak, Hyun Jeong; Cha, Ji-Young; Jeong, Yun-Seung; Rhee, Sang Dahl; Cheon, Hyae Gyeong

    2014-01-31

    Rosiglitazone, a well known insulin sensitizer, stimulates adipocyte differentiation via the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ). Previous two-dimensional proteomics studies using C3H10T1/2 murine mesenchymal pluripotent stem cells revealed that prolyl hydroxylase domain protein (PHD) levels significantly increased during rosiglitazone-induced adipocyte differentiation (RIAD). In this study, we investigated the functional role played by PHD during RIAD. Three PHD isoforms (PHD1, 2, and 3) were found to be up-regulated in C3H10T1/2 cells during RIAD, whereas PHD knockdown and treatment with PHD inhibitors (dimethyloxalyl glycine or ethyl-3,4-dihydroxybenzoate) blocked RIAD. PHD inhibition was found to be associated with increases in the levels of anti-adipogenic proteins such as GATA-3, KLF-2, and transcriptional coactivator with PDZ binding motif (TAZ), with their reduced ubiquitination, suggesting that PHDs evoke the ubiquitination/proteasomal degradation of anti-adipogenic proteins. On the other hand, MG-132 (a proteasomal inhibitor) prevented the degradation of anti-adipogenic proteins and retarded RIAD. PPARγ antagonists (bisphenol A diglycidyl ether or GW9662) blunted the effects of rosiglitazone on PHD regulation. Furthermore, putative PPARγ binding sites were identified in the promoter region of PHDs by ChIP-PCR, implying that rosiglitazone may induce PHD up-regulation directly by PPARγ activation. Consistent with in vitro results, oral administration of rosiglitazone to ob/ob mice for 2 weeks increased adipose PHD levels and decreased anti-adipogenic protein levels by increasing their ubiquitination. These results suggest that rosiglitazone increases PHD expression in a PPARγ-dependent manner and that this leads to the commitment of anti-adipogenic proteins to the ubiquitination-proteasomal pathway and to the subsequent induction of adipocyte differentiation.

  12. Plasma Membrane Targeting of Protocadherin 15 Is Regulated by the Golgi-Associated Chaperone Protein PIST.

    PubMed

    Nie, Hongyun; Liu, Yueyue; Yin, Xiaolei; Cao, Huiren; Wang, Yanfei; Xiong, Wei; Lin, Yushuang; Xu, Zhigang

    2016-01-01

    Protocadherin 15 (PCDH15) is a core component of hair cell tip-links and crucial for proper function of inner ear hair cells. Mutations of PCDH15 gene cause syndromic and nonsyndromic hearing loss. At present, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the intracellular transportation of PCDH15 largely remain unknown. Here we show that PIST, a Golgi-associated, PDZ domain-containing protein, interacts with PCDH15. The interaction is mediated by the PDZ domain of PIST and the C-terminal PDZ domain-binding interface (PBI) of PCDH15. Through this interaction, PIST retains PCDH15 in the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and reduces the membrane expression of PCDH15. We have previously showed that PIST regulates the membrane expression of another tip-link component, cadherin 23 (CDH23). Taken together, our finding suggests that PIST regulates the intracellular trafficking and membrane targeting of the tip-link proteins CDH23 and PCDH15.

  13. Independent Structural Domains in Paramyxovirus Polymerase Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Dochow, Melanie; Krumm, Stefanie A.; Crowe, James E.; Moore, Martin L.; Plemper, Richard K.

    2012-01-01

    All enzymatic activities required for genomic replication and transcription of nonsegmented negative strand RNA viruses (or Mononegavirales) are believed to be concentrated in the viral polymerase (L) protein. However, our insight into the organization of these different enzymatic activities into a bioactive tertiary structure remains rudimentary. Fragments of Mononegavirales polymerases analyzed to date cannot restore bioactivity through trans-complementation, unlike the related L proteins of segmented NSVs. We investigated the domain organization of phylogenetically diverse Paramyxovirus L proteins derived from measles virus (MeV), Nipah virus (NiV), and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Through a comprehensive in silico and experimental analysis of domain intersections, we defined MeV L position 615 as an interdomain candidate in addition to the previously reported residue 1708. Only position 1708 of MeV and the homologous positions in NiV and RSV L also tolerated the insertion of epitope tags. Splitting of MeV L at residue 1708 created fragments that were unable to physically interact and trans-complement, but strikingly, these activities were reconstituted by the addition of dimerization tags to the fragments. Equivalently split fragments of NiV, RSV, and MeV L oligomerized with comparable efficiency in all homo- and heterotypic combinations, but only the homotypic pairs were able to trans-complement. These results demonstrate that synthesis as a single polypeptide is not required for the Mononegavirales polymerases to adopt a proper tertiary conformation. Paramyxovirus polymerases are composed of at least two truly independent folding domains that lack a traditional interface but require molecular compatibility for bioactivity. The functional probing of the L domain architecture through trans-complementation is anticipated to be applicable to all Mononegavirales polymerases. PMID:22215662

  14. Synthetic mimetics of protein secondary structure domains

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Nathan T.; Katt, William P.; Hamilton, Andrew D.

    2010-01-01

    Proteins modulate the majority of all biological functions and are primarily composed of highly organized secondary structural elements such as helices, turns and sheets. Many of these functions are affected by a small number of key protein–protein contacts, often involving one or more of these well-defined structural elements. Given the ubiquitous nature of these protein recognition domains, their mimicry by peptidic and non-peptidic scaffolds has become a major focus of contemporary research. This review examines several key advances in secondary structure mimicry over the past several years, particularly focusing upon scaffolds that show not only promising projection of functional groups, but also a proven effect in biological systems. PMID:20123744

  15. Modular protein domains: an engineering approach toward functional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Lin, Charng-Yu; Liu, Julie C

    2016-08-01

    Protein domains and peptide sequences are a powerful tool for conferring specific functions to engineered biomaterials. Protein sequences with a wide variety of functionalities, including structure, bioactivity, protein-protein interactions, and stimuli responsiveness, have been identified, and advances in molecular biology continue to pinpoint new sequences. Protein domains can be combined to make recombinant proteins with multiple functionalities. The high fidelity of the protein translation machinery results in exquisite control over the sequence of recombinant proteins and the resulting properties of protein-based materials. In this review, we discuss protein domains and peptide sequences in the context of functional protein-based materials, composite materials, and their biological applications.

  16. Molecular and functional characterization of proteins interacting with the C-terminal domains of 5-HT2 receptors: emergence of 5-HT2 "receptosomes".

    PubMed

    Gavarini, Sophie; Bécamel, Carine; Chanrion, Benjamin; Bockaert, Joël; Marin, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    Many cellular functions are carried out by multiprotein complexes. The last five years of research have revealed that many G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) functions that are not mediated by G proteins involve protein networks, which interact with their intracellular domains. This review focuses on one family of GPCRs activated by serotonin, the 5-HT(2) receptor family, which comprises three closely related subtypes, the 5-HT(2A), the 5-HT(2B) and the 5-HT(2c) receptors. These receptors still raise particular interest, because a large number of psychoactive drugs including hallucinogens, anti-psychotics, anxiolytics and anti-depressants, mediate their action, at least in part, through activation of 5-HT(2) receptors. Recent studies based on two-hybrid screens, proteomic, biochemical and cell biology approaches, have shown that the C-terminal domains of 5-HT(2) receptors interact with intracellular proteins. To date, the protein network associated with the C-terminus of the 5-HT(2C) receptor has been the most extensively characterized, using a proteomic approach combining affinity chromatography, mass spectrometry and immunoblotting. It includes scaffolding proteins containing one or several PDZ domains, signalling proteins and proteins of the cytoskeleton. Data indicating that the protein complexes interacting with 5-HT(2) receptor C-termini tightly control receptor trafficking and receptor-mediated signalling will also be reviewed.

  17. Evolution of Protein Domain Repeats in Metazoa

    PubMed Central

    Schüler, Andreas; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich

    2016-01-01

    Repeats are ubiquitous elements of proteins and they play important roles for cellular function and during evolution. Repeats are, however, also notoriously difficult to capture computationally and large scale studies so far had difficulties in linking genetic causes, structural properties and evolutionary trajectories of protein repeats. Here we apply recently developed methods for repeat detection and analysis to a large dataset comprising over hundred metazoan genomes. We find that repeats in larger protein families experience generally very few insertions or deletions (indels) of repeat units but there is also a significant fraction of noteworthy volatile outliers with very high indel rates. Analysis of structural data indicates that repeats with an open structure and independently folding units are more volatile and more likely to be intrinsically disordered. Such disordered repeats are also significantly enriched in sites with a high functional potential such as linear motifs. Furthermore, the most volatile repeats have a high sequence similarity between their units. Since many volatile repeats also show signs of recombination, we conclude they are often shaped by concerted evolution. Intriguingly, many of these conserved yet volatile repeats are involved in host-pathogen interactions where they might foster fast but subtle adaptation in biological arms races. Key Words: protein evolution, domain rearrangements, protein repeats, concerted evolution. PMID:27671125

  18. Replacing the PDZ-interacting C-termini of DSCAM and DSCAML1 with epitope tags causes different phenotypic severity in different cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Garrett, Andrew M; Tadenev, Abigail LD; Hammond, Yuna T; Fuerst, Peter G; Burgess, Robert W

    2016-01-01

    Different types of neurons in the retina are organized vertically into layers and horizontally in a mosaic pattern that helps ensure proper neural network formation and information processing throughout the visual field. The vertebrate Dscams (DSCAM and DSCAML1) are cell adhesion molecules that support the development of this organization by promoting self-avoidance at the level of cell types, promoting normal developmental cell death, and directing vertical neurite stratification. To understand the molecular interactions required for these activities, we tested the functional significance of the interaction between the C-terminus of the Dscams and multi-PDZ domain-containing scaffolding proteins in mouse. We hypothesized that this PDZ-interacting domain would mediate a subset of the Dscams’ functions. Instead, we found that in the absence of these interactions, some cell types developed almost normally, while others resembled complete loss of function. Thus, we show differential dependence on this domain for Dscams’ functions in different cell types. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.16144.001 PMID:27637097

  19. Stochastic single-molecule dynamics of synaptic membrane protein domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahraman, Osman; Li, Yiwei; Haselwandter, Christoph A.

    2016-09-01

    Motivated by single-molecule experiments on synaptic membrane protein domains, we use a stochastic lattice model to study protein reaction and diffusion processes in crowded membranes. We find that the stochastic reaction-diffusion dynamics of synaptic proteins provide a simple physical mechanism for collective fluctuations in synaptic domains, the molecular turnover observed at synaptic domains, key features of the single-molecule trajectories observed for synaptic proteins, and spatially inhomogeneous protein lifetimes at the cell membrane. Our results suggest that central aspects of the single-molecule and collective dynamics observed for membrane protein domains can be understood in terms of stochastic reaction-diffusion processes at the cell membrane.

  20. Tetramer formation in Arabidopsis MADS domain proteins: analysis of a protein-protein interaction network

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background MADS domain proteins are transcription factors that coordinate several important developmental processes in plants. These proteins interact with other MADS domain proteins to form dimers, and it has been proposed that they are able to associate as tetrameric complexes that regulate transcription of target genes. Whether the formation of functional tetramers is a widespread property of plant MADS domain proteins, or it is specific to few of these transcriptional regulators remains unclear. Results We analyzed the structure of the network of physical interactions among MADS domain proteins in Arabidopsis thaliana. We determined the abundance of subgraphs that represent the connection pattern expected for a MADS domain protein heterotetramer. These subgraphs were significantly more abundant in the MADS domain protein interaction network than in randomized analogous networks. Importantly, these subgraphs are not significantly frequent in a protein interaction network of TCP plant transcription factors, when compared to expectation by chance. In addition, we found that MADS domain proteins in tetramer-like subgraphs are more likely to be expressed jointly than proteins in other subgraphs. This effect is mainly due to proteins in the monophyletic MIKC clade, as there is no association between tetramer-like subgraphs and co-expression for proteins outside this clade. Conclusions Our results support that the tendency to form functional tetramers is widespread in the MADS domain protein-protein interaction network. Our observations also suggest that this trend is prevalent, or perhaps exclusive, for proteins in the MIKC clade. Because it is possible to retrodict several experimental results from our analyses, our work can be an important aid to make new predictions and facilitates experimental research on plant MADS domain proteins. PMID:24468197

  1. Increasing the Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphB2 Prevents Amyloid-β-induced Depletion of Cell Surface Glutamate Receptors by a Mechanism That Requires the PDZ-binding Motif of EphB2 and Neuronal Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Miyamoto, Takashi; Kim, Daniel; Knox, Joseph A.; Johnson, Erik; Mucke, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    Diverse lines of evidence suggest that amyloid-β (Aβ) peptides causally contribute to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD), the most frequent neurodegenerative disorder. However, the mechanisms by which Aβ impairs neuronal functions remain to be fully elucidated. Previous studies showed that soluble Aβ oligomers interfere with synaptic functions by depleting NMDA-type glutamate receptors (NMDARs) from the neuronal surface and that overexpression of the receptor tyrosine kinase EphB2 can counteract this process. Through pharmacological treatments and biochemical analyses of primary neuronal cultures expressing wild-type or mutant forms of EphB2, we demonstrate that this protective effect of EphB2 depends on its PDZ-binding motif and the presence of neuronal activity but not on its kinase activity. We further present evidence that the protective effect of EphB2 may be mediated by the AMPA-type glutamate receptor subunit GluA2, which can become associated with the PDZ-binding motif of EphB2 through PDZ domain-containing proteins and can promote the retention of NMDARs in the membrane. In addition, we show that the Aβ-induced depletion of surface NMDARs does not depend on several factors that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of Aβ-induced neuronal dysfunction, including aberrant neuronal activity, tau, prion protein (PrPC), and EphB2 itself. Thus, although EphB2 does not appear to be directly involved in the Aβ-induced depletion of NMDARs, increasing its expression may counteract this pathogenic process through a neuronal activity- and PDZ-dependent regulation of AMPA-type glutamate receptors. PMID:26589795

  2. Imaging the dynamics of intracellular protein translocation by photoconversion of phamret-cybr/ROM.

    PubMed

    Yang, L; Matsuda, T; Raviraj, V; Ching, Y W; Braet, F; Nagai, T; Soon, L L

    2011-06-01

    Cybr/Reduced On-random Motile (ROM) is a scaffold protein, containing a postsynaptic density protein-95/discs-large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain, a LEU region and a PDZ domain binding region at the C-terminus. In the immune system, Cybr/ROM was found to localize in vesicles and at the plasma membrane, through interactions with cytohesin-1. In this investigation, we reported Cybr/ROM as occurring in vesicles, the cytoplasm and at membrane ruffles of H1299 lung cancer cells. Its localization at the ruffles was dependent on intact actin structures as indicated by latrunculin A treatment, which abrogated ruffle formation and staining of Cybr/ROM at the cells' periphery. Transfection of truncation mutants consisting of either the PDZ or LEU domain showed that the LEU domain of ROM was localized to membrane ruffles, vesicles and the cytoplasm, whereas, the PDZ domain localized to the membrane ruffles and cytoplasm only. There was therefore, domain/molecular segregation of Cybr/ROM in different cellular compartments. Cybr/ROM was subcloned into a plasmid carrying the photoactivation-mediated resonance energy transfer (Phamret) protein. The photoconversion experiments demonstrated the diffusion of ROM from the cytoplasm to the membrane ruffling sites and conversely from membrane ruffles to the cytoplasm. Large variances in the transport velocity of Cybr/ROM in the cytoplasm suggested that its movements were facilitated by other mechanisms in addition to diffusion.

  3. Design of protein function leaps by directed domain interface evolution

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jin; Koide, Akiko; Makabe, Koki; Koide, Shohei

    2008-01-01

    Most natural proteins performing sophisticated tasks contain multiple domains where an active site is located at the domain interface. Comparative structural analyses suggest that major leaps in protein function occur through gene recombination events that connect two or more protein domains to generate a new active site, frequently occurring at the newly created domain interface. However, such functional leaps by combination of unrelated domains have not been directly demonstrated. Here we show that highly specific and complex protein functions can be generated by joining a low-affinity peptide-binding domain with a functionally inert second domain and subsequently optimizing the domain interface. These directed evolution processes dramatically enhanced both affinity and specificity to a level unattainable with a single domain, corresponding to >500-fold and >2,000-fold increases of affinity and specificity, respectively. An x-ray crystal structure revealed that the resulting “affinity clamp” had clamshell architecture as designed, with large additional binding surface contributed by the second domain. The affinity clamps having a single-nanomolar dissociation constant outperformed a monoclonal antibody in immunochemical applications. This work establishes evolutionary paths from isolated domains with primitive function to multidomain proteins with sophisticated function and introduces a new protein-engineering concept that allows for the generation of highly functional affinity reagents to a predefined target. The prevalence and variety of natural interaction domains suggest that numerous new functions can be designed by using directed domain interface evolution. PMID:18445649

  4. Purification and Structural Analysis of LEM-Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Herrada, Isaline; Bourgeois, Benjamin; Samson, Camille; Buendia, Brigitte; Worman, Howard J; Zinn-Justin, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    LAP2-emerin-MAN1 (LEM)-domain proteins are modular proteins characterized by the presence of a conserved motif of about 50 residues. Most LEM-domain proteins localize at the inner nuclear membrane, but some are also found in the endoplasmic reticulum or nuclear interior. Their architecture has been analyzed by predicting the limits of their globular domains, determining the 3D structure of these domains and in a few cases calculating the 3D structure of specific domains bound to biological targets. The LEM domain adopts an α-helical fold also found in SAP and HeH domains of prokaryotes and unicellular eukaryotes. The LEM domain binds to BAF (barrier-to-autointegration factor; BANF1), which interacts with DNA and tethers chromatin to the nuclear envelope. LAP2 isoforms also share an N-terminal LEM-like domain, which binds DNA. The structure and function of other globular domains that distinguish LEM-domain proteins from each other have been characterized, including the C-terminal dimerization domain of LAP2α and C-terminal WH and UHM domains of MAN1. LEM-domain proteins also have large intrinsically disordered regions that are involved in intra- and intermolecular interactions and are highly regulated by posttranslational modifications in vivo.

  5. WW domain-containing proteins: retrospectives and the future.

    PubMed

    Salah, Zaidoun; Alian, Akram; Aqeilan, Rami I

    2012-01-01

    WW domains are protein modules that mediate protein-protein interactions through recognition of proline-rich peptide motifs (PRM) and phosphorylated serine/threonine-proline sites. WW domains are found in many different structural and signaling proteins that are involved in a variety of cellular processes, including RNA transcription and processing, protein trafficking and stability, receptor signaling, and control of the cytoskeleton. WW domain-containing proteins and complexes have been implicated in major human diseases including cancer as well as in major signaling cascades such as the Hippo tumor suppressor pathway, making them targets for new diagnostics and therapeutics. In this review, we discuss how WW domains provide versatile platforms that link individual proteins into physiologically important networks and the indispensible role of WW domain-containing proteins in biology and pathology, especially tumorogenesis.

  6. Fold of the conserved DTC domain in deltex proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Obiero, Josiah; Walker, John R.; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano

    2012-04-30

    Human Deltex 3-like (DTX3L) is a member of the Deltex family of proteins. Initially identified as a B-lymphoma and BAL-associated protein, DTX3L is an E3 ligase that regulates subcellular localization of its partner protein, BAL, by a dynamic nucleocytoplasmic trafficking mechanism. Unlike other members of the Deltex family of proteins, DTX3L lacks the highly basic N-terminal motif and the central proline-rich motif present in other Deltex proteins, and instead contains other unique N-terminal domains. The C-terminal domains are, however, homologous with other members of the Deltex family of proteins; these include a RING domain and a previously unidentified C-terminal domain. In this study, we report the high-resolution crystal structure of this previously uncharacterized C-terminal domain of human DTX3L, which we term the Deltex C-terminal domain.

  7. Fuzzy domains: new way of describing flexibility and interdependence of the protein domains.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Kharkyanen, Valery N

    2009-03-01

    We proposed the innovative method of domain identification based on the concept of the fuzzy domains. In this method each residue of the protein can belong to several domains simultaneously with certain weights, which reflect to what extent this residue shares the motion pattern of the given domain. Our method allows describing the fuzzy boundaries between the domains and the gradual changes of the motion pattern from one domain to the other. It provides the reasonable compromise between the continuous change of the protein dynamics from one residue to the other and the discrete description of the structure in terms of small number of domains. We suggested quantitative criterion, which shows the overall degree of domain flexibility in the protein. The concept of the fuzzy domains provides an innovative way of visualization of domain flexibility, which makes the gradual transitions between the domains clearly visible and comparable to available experimental and structural data. In the future, the concept of the fuzzy domains can be used in the coarse-grained simulations of the domain dynamics in order to account for internal protein flexibility.

  8. Domain mobility in proteins: functional and evolutionary implications.

    PubMed

    Basu, Malay Kumar; Poliakov, Eugenia; Rogozin, Igor B

    2009-05-01

    A substantial fraction of eukaryotic proteins contains multiple domains, some of which show a tendency to occur in diverse domain architectures and can be considered mobile (or 'promiscuous'). These promiscuous domains are typically involved in protein-protein interactions and play crucial roles in interaction networks, particularly those contributing to signal transduction. They also play a major role in creating diversity of protein domain architecture in the proteome. It is now apparent that promiscuity is a volatile and relatively fast-changing feature in evolution, and that only a few domains retain their promiscuity status throughout evolution. Many such domains attained their promiscuity status independently in different lineages. Only recently, we have begun to understand the diversity of protein domain architectures and the role the promiscuous domains play in evolution of this diversity. However, many of the biological mechanisms of protein domain mobility remain shrouded in mystery. In this review, we discuss our present understanding of protein domain promiscuity, its evolution and its role in cellular function.

  9. Modelling protein functional domains in signal transduction using Maude

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sriram, M. G.

    2003-01-01

    Modelling of protein-protein interactions in signal transduction is receiving increased attention in computational biology. This paper describes recent research in the application of Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic, to the modelling of functional domains within signalling proteins. Protein functional domains (PFDs) are a critical focus of modern signal transduction research. In general, Maude models can simulate biological signalling networks and produce specific testable hypotheses at various levels of abstraction. Developing symbolic models of signalling proteins containing functional domains is important because of the potential to generate analyses of complex signalling networks based on structure-function relationships.

  10. Do proteins facilitate the formation of cholesterol-rich domains?

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2004-11-03

    Both biological and model membranes can exhibit the formation of domains. A brief review of some of the diverse methodologies used to identify the presence of domains in membranes is given. Some of these domains are enriched in cholesterol. The segregation of lipids into cholesterol-rich domains can occur in both pure lipid systems as well as membranes containing peptides and proteins. Peptides and proteins can promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains not only by preferentially interacting with cholesterol and being sequestered into these regions of the membrane, but also indirectly as a consequence of being excluded from cholesterol-rich domains. The redistribution of components is dictated by the thermodynamics of the system. The formation of domains in a biological membrane is a consequence of all of the intermolecular interactions including those among lipid molecules as well as between lipids and proteins.

  11. Interaction between Functional Domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Insecticidal Crystal Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rang, Cécile; Vachon, Vincent; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Villalon, Mario; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Bosch, Dirk; Frutos, Roger; Laprade, Raynald

    1999-01-01

    Interactions among the three structural domains of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1 toxins were investigated by functional analysis of chimeric proteins. Hybrid genes were prepared by exchanging the regions coding for either domain I or domain III among Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1C, and Cry1E. The activity of the purified trypsin-activated chimeric toxins was evaluated by testing their effects on the viability and plasma membrane permeability of Sf9 cells. Among the parental toxins, only Cry1C was active against these cells and only chimeras possessing domain II from Cry1C were functional. Combination of domain I from Cry1E with domains II and III from Cry1C, however, resulted in an inactive toxin, indicating that domain II from an active toxin is necessary, but not sufficient, for activity. Pores formed by chimeric toxins in which domain I was from Cry1Ab or Cry1Ac were slightly smaller than those formed by toxins in which domain I was from Cry1C. The properties of the pores formed by the chimeras are therefore likely to result from an interaction between domain I and domain II or III. Domain III appears to modulate the activity of the chimeric toxins: combination of domain III from Cry1Ab with domains I and II of Cry1C gave a protein which was more strongly active than Cry1C. PMID:10388684

  12. Continuous and discontinuous domains: an algorithm for the automatic generation of reliable protein domain definitions.

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, A. S.; Barton, G. J.

    1995-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the fast and accurate definition of protein structural domains from coordinate data without prior knowledge of the number or type of domains. The algorithm explicitly locates domains that comprise one or two continuous segments of protein chain. Domains that include more than two segments are also located. The algorithm was applied to a nonredundant database of 230 protein structures and the results compared to domain definitions obtained from the literature, or by inspection of the coordinates on molecular graphics. For 70% of the proteins, the derived domains agree with the reference definitions, 18% show minor differences and only 12% (28 proteins) show very different definitions. Three screens were applied to identify the derived domains least likely to agree with the subjective definition set. These screens revealed a set of 173 proteins, 97% of which agree well with the subjective definitions. The algorithm represents a practical domain identification tool that can be run routinely on the entire structural database. Adjustment of parameters also allows smaller compact units to be identified in proteins. PMID:7663343

  13. Delineation of modular proteins: domain boundary prediction from sequence information.

    PubMed

    Kong, Lesheng; Ranganathan, Shoba

    2004-06-01

    The delineation of domain boundaries of a given sequence in the absence of known 3D structures or detectable sequence homology to known domains benefits many areas in protein science, such as protein engineering, protein 3D structure determination and protein structure prediction. With the exponential growth of newly determined sequences, our ability to predict domain boundaries rapidly and accurately from sequence information alone is both essential and critical from the viewpoint of gene function annotation. Anyone attempting to predict domain boundaries for a single protein sequence is invariably confronted with a plethora of databases that contain boundary information available from the internet and a variety of methods for domain boundary prediction. How are these derived and how well do they work? What definition of 'domain' do they use? We will first clarify the different definitions of protein domains, and then describe the available public databases with domain boundary information. Finally, we will review existing domain boundary prediction methods and discuss their strengths and weaknesses.

  14. ELISA: a unified, multidimensional view of the protein domain universe.

    PubMed

    Shakhnovich, Boris E; Harvey, John Max; Delisi, Charles

    2004-01-01

    ELISA (http://romi.bu.edu/elisa/) is a database that was designed for flexibility in defining interesting queries about protein domain evolution. We have defined and included both the inherent characteristics of the domains such as structure and function and comparisons of these characteristics between domains. Thus, the database is useful in defining structural and functional links between related protein domains and by extension sequences that encode them. In this database we introduce and employ a novel method of functional annotation and comparison. For each protein domain we create a probabilistic functional annotation tree using GO. We have designed an algorithm that accurately compares these trees and thus provides a measure of "functional distance" between two protein domains. Along with functional annotation, we have also included structural comparison between protein domains and best sequence comparisons to all known genomes. The latter enables researchers to dynamically do searches for domains sharing similar phylogenetic profiles. This combination of data and tools enables the researcher to design complex queries to carry out research in the areas of protein domain evolution, structure prediction and functional annotation of novel sequences.

  15. Protein universe containing a PUA RNA-binding domain.

    PubMed

    Cerrudo, Carolina S; Ghiringhelli, Pablo D; Gomez, Daniel E

    2014-01-01

    Here, we review current knowledge about pseudouridine synthase and archaeosine transglycosylase (PUA)-domain-containing proteins to illustrate progress in this field. A methodological analysis of the literature about the topic was carried out, together with a 'qualitative comparative analysis' to give a more comprehensive review. Bioinformatics methods for whole-protein or protein-domain identification are commonly based on pairwise protein sequence comparisons; we added comparison of structures to detect the whole universe of proteins containing the PUA domain. We present an update of proteins having this domain, focusing on the specific proteins present in Homo sapiens (dyskerin, MCT1, Nip7, eIF2D and Nsun6), and explore the existence of these in other species. We also analyze the phylogenetic distribution of the PUA domain in different species and proteins. Finally, we performed a structural comparison of the PUA domain through data mining of structural databases, determining a conserved structural motif, despite the differences in the sequence, even among eukaryotes, archaea and bacteria. All data discussed in this review, both bibliographic and analytical, corroborate the functional importance of the PUA domain in RNA-binding proteins.

  16. The history of the CATH structural classification of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Sillitoe, Ian; Dawson, Natalie; Thornton, Janet; Orengo, Christine

    2015-12-01

    This article presents a historical review of the protein structure classification database CATH. Together with the SCOP database, CATH remains comprehensive and reasonably up-to-date with the now more than 100,000 protein structures in the PDB. We review the expansion of the CATH and SCOP resources to capture predicted domain structures in the genome sequence data and to provide information on the likely functions of proteins mediated by their constituent domains. The establishment of comprehensive function annotation resources has also meant that domain families can be functionally annotated allowing insights into functional divergence and evolution within protein families.

  17. Protein domain definition should allow for conditional disorder.

    PubMed

    Yegambaram, Kavestri; Bulloch, Esther M M; Kingston, Richard L

    2013-11-01

    Proteins are often classified in a binary fashion as either structured or disordered. However this approach has several deficits. Firstly, protein folding is always conditional on the physiochemical environment. A protein which is structured in some circumstances will be disordered in others. Secondly, it hides a fundamental asymmetry in behavior. While all structured proteins can be unfolded through a change in environment, not all disordered proteins have the capacity for folding. Failure to accommodate these complexities confuses the definition of both protein structural domains and intrinsically disordered regions. We illustrate these points with an experimental study of a family of small binding domains, drawn from the RNA polymerase of mumps virus and its closest relatives. Assessed at face value the domains fall on a structural continuum, with folded, partially folded, and near unstructured members. Yet the disorder present in the family is conditional, and these closely related polypeptides can access the same folded state under appropriate conditions. Any heuristic definition of the protein domain emphasizing conformational stability divides this domain family in two, in a way that makes no biological sense. Structural domains would be better defined by their ability to adopt a specific tertiary structure: a structure that may or may not be realized, dependent on the circumstances. This explicitly allows for the conditional nature of protein folding, and more clearly demarcates structural domains from intrinsically disordered regions that may function without folding.

  18. CBS domains: structure, function, and pathology in human proteins.

    PubMed

    Ignoul, Sofie; Eggermont, Jan

    2005-12-01

    The cystathionine-beta-synthase (CBS) domain is an evolutionarily conserved protein domain that is present in the proteome of archaebacteria, prokaryotes, and eukaryotes. CBS domains usually come in tandem repeats and are found in cytosolic and membrane proteins performing different functions (metabolic enzymes, kinases, and channels). Crystallographic studies of bacterial CBS domains have shown that two CBS domains form an intramolecular dimeric structure (CBS pair). Several human hereditary diseases (homocystinuria, retinitis pigmentosa, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, myotonia congenital, etc.) can be caused by mutations in CBS domains of, respectively, cystathionine-beta-synthase, inosine 5'-monophosphate dehydrogenase, AMP kinase, and chloride channels. Despite their clinical relevance, it remains to be established what the precise function of CBS domains is and how they affect the structural and/or functional properties of an enzyme, kinase, or channel. Depending on the protein in which they occur, CBS domains have been proposed to affect multimerization and sorting of proteins, channel gating, and ligand binding. However, recent experiments revealing that CBS domains can bind adenosine-containing ligands such ATP, AMP, or S-adenosylmethionine have led to the hypothesis that CBS domains function as sensors of intracellular metabolites.

  19. Cholesterol and the interaction of proteins with membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Epand, Richard M

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol is not uniformly distributed in biological membranes. One of the factors influencing the formation of cholesterol-rich domains in membranes is the unequal lateral distribution of proteins in membranes. Certain proteins are found in cholesterol-rich domains. In some of these cases, it is as a consequence of the proteins interacting directly with cholesterol. There are several structural features of a protein that result in the protein preferentially associating with cholesterol-rich domains. One of the best documented of these is certain types of lipidations. In addition, however, there are segments of a protein that can preferentially sequester cholesterol. We discuss two examples of these cholesterol-recognition elements: the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) domain and the sterol-sensing domain (SSD). The requirements for a CRAC motif are quite flexible and predict that a large number of sequences could recognize cholesterol. There are, however, certain proteins that are known to interact with cholesterol-rich domains of cell membranes that have CRAC motifs, and synthetic peptides corresponding to these segments also promote the formation of cholesterol-rich domains. Modeling studies have provided a rationale for certain requirements of the CRAC motif. The SSD is a larger protein segment comprising five transmembrane domains. The amino acid sequence YIYF is found in several SSD and in certain other proteins for which there is evidence that they interact with cholesterol-rich domains. The CRAC sequences as well as YIYF are generally found adjacent to a transmembrane helical segment. These regions appear to have a strong influence of the localization of certain proteins into domains in biological membranes. In addition to the SSD, there is also a domain found in soluble proteins, the START domain, that binds lipids. Certain proteins with START domains specifically bind cholesterol and are believed to function in

  20. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  1. Discrete structure of van der Waals domains in globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Berezovsky, Igor N

    2003-03-01

    Most globular proteins are divisible by domains, distinct substructures of the globule. The notion of hierarchy of the domains was introduced earlier via van der Waals energy profiles that allow one to subdivide the proteins into domains (subdomains). The question remains open as to what is the possible structural connection of the energy profiles. The recent discovery of the loop-n-lock elements in the globular proteins suggests such a structural connection. A direct comparison of the segmentation by van der Waals energy criteria with the maps of the locked loops of nearly standard size reveals a striking correlation: domains in general appear to consist of one to several such loops. In addition, it was demonstrated that a variety of subdivisions of the same protein into domains is just a regrouping of the loop-n-lock elements.

  2. δ-Catenin Regulates Spine Architecture via Cadherin and PDZ-dependent Interactions*

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Li; Seong, Eunju; Beuscher, James L.; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2015-01-01

    The ability of neurons to maintain spine architecture and modulate it in response to synaptic activity is a crucial component of the cellular machinery that underlies information storage in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. Here we show a critical role for δ-catenin, a component of the cadherin-catenin cell adhesion complex, in regulating spine head width and length in pyramidal neurons of the hippocampus. The loss of Ctnnd2, the gene encoding δ-catenin, has been associated with the intellectual disability observed in the cri du chat syndrome, suggesting that the functional roles of δ-catenin are vital for neuronal integrity and higher order functions. We demonstrate that loss of δ-catenin in a mouse model or knockdown of δ-catenin in pyramidal neurons compromises spine head width and length, without altering spine dynamics. This is accompanied by a reduction in the levels of synaptic N-cadherin. The ability of δ-catenin to modulate spine architecture is critically dependent on its ability to interact with cadherin and PDZ domain-containing proteins. We propose that loss of δ-catenin during development perturbs synaptic architecture leading to developmental aberrations in neural circuit formation that contribute to the learning disabilities in a mouse model and humans with cri du chat syndrome. PMID:25724647

  3. GluA1 and its PDZ-interaction: a role in experience-dependent behavioral plasticity in the forced swim test.

    PubMed

    Freudenberg, Florian; Marx, Verena; Mack, Volker; Layer, Liliana E; Klugmann, Matthias; Seeburg, Peter H; Sprengel, Rolf; Celikel, Tansu

    2013-04-01

    Glutamate receptor dependent synaptic plasticity plays an important role in the pathophysiology of depression. Hippocampal samples from clinically depressed patients display reduced mRNA levels for GluA1, a major subunit of AMPA receptors. Moreover, activation and synaptic incorporation of GluA1-containing AMPA receptors are required for the antidepressant-like effects of NMDA receptor antagonists. These findings argue that GluA1-dependent synaptic plasticity might be critically involved in the expression of depression. Using an animal model of depression, we demonstrate that global or hippocampus-selective deletion of GluA1 impairs expression of experience-dependent behavioral despair. This impairment is mediated by the interaction of GluA1 with PDZ-binding domain proteins, as deletion of the C-terminal leucine alone is sufficient to replicate the behavioral phenotype. Our results provide evidence for a significant role of hippocampal GluA1-containing AMPA receptors and their PDZ-interaction in experience-dependent expression of behavioral despair and link mechanisms of hippocampal synaptic plasticity with behavioral expression of depression.

  4. Quantifying information transfer by protein domains: Analysis of the Fyn SH2 domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Lenaerts, Tom; Ferkinghoff-Borg, Jesper; Stricher, Francois; Serrano, Luis; Schymkowitz, Joost WH; Rousseau, Frederic

    2008-01-01

    Background Efficient communication between distant sites within a protein is essential for cooperative biological response. Although often associated with large allosteric movements, more subtle changes in protein dynamics can also induce long-range correlations. However, an appropriate formalism that directly relates protein structural dynamics to information exchange between functional sites is still lacking. Results Here we introduce a method to analyze protein dynamics within the framework of information theory and show that signal transduction within proteins can be considered as a particular instance of communication over a noisy channel. In particular, we analyze the conformational correlations between protein residues and apply the concept of mutual information to quantify information exchange. Mapping out changes of mutual information on the protein structure then allows visualizing how distal communication is achieved. We illustrate the approach by analyzing information transfer by the SH2 domain of Fyn tyrosine kinase, obtained from Monte Carlo dynamics simulations. Our analysis reveals that the Fyn SH2 domain forms a noisy communication channel that couples residues located in the phosphopeptide and specificity binding sites and a number of residues at the other side of the domain near the linkers that connect the SH2 domain to the SH3 and kinase domains. We find that for this particular domain, communication is affected by a series of contiguous residues that connect distal sites by crossing the core of the SH2 domain. Conclusion As a result, our method provides a means to directly map the exchange of biological information on the structure of protein domains, making it clear how binding triggers conformational changes in the protein structure. As such it provides a structural road, next to the existing attempts at sequence level, to predict long-range interactions within protein structures. PMID:18842137

  5. Selection of soluble protein expression constructs: the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

    PubMed

    Dyson, Michael R

    2010-08-01

    Proteins can contain multiple domains each of which is capable of possessing a separate independent function and three-dimensional structure. It is often useful to clone and express individual protein domains to study their biochemical properties and for structure determination. However, the annotated domain boundaries in databases such as Pfam or SMART are not always accurate. The present review summarizes various strategies for the experimental determination of protein domain boundaries.

  6. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer. PMID:26512702

  7. Membrane and Protein Interactions of the Pleckstrin Homology Domain Superfamily.

    PubMed

    Lenoir, Marc; Kufareva, Irina; Abagyan, Ruben; Overduin, Michael

    2015-10-23

    The human genome encodes about 285 proteins that contain at least one annotated pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. As the first phosphoinositide binding module domain to be discovered, the PH domain recruits diverse protein architectures to cellular membranes. PH domains constitute one of the largest protein superfamilies, and have diverged to regulate many different signaling proteins and modules such as Dbl homology (DH) and Tec homology (TH) domains. The ligands of approximately 70 PH domains have been validated by binding assays and complexed structures, allowing meaningful extrapolation across the entire superfamily. Here the Membrane Optimal Docking Area (MODA) program is used at a genome-wide level to identify all membrane docking PH structures and map their lipid-binding determinants. In addition to the linear sequence motifs which are employed for phosphoinositide recognition, the three dimensional structural features that allow peripheral membrane domains to approach and insert into the bilayer are pinpointed and can be predicted ab initio. The analysis shows that conserved structural surfaces distinguish which PH domains associate with membrane from those that do not. Moreover, the results indicate that lipid-binding PH domains can be classified into different functional subgroups based on the type of membrane insertion elements they project towards the bilayer.

  8. Domain tree-based analysis of protein architecture evolution.

    PubMed

    Forslund, Kristoffer; Henricson, Anna; Hollich, Volker; Sonnhammer, Erik L L

    2008-02-01

    Understanding the dynamics behind domain architecture evolution is of great importance to unravel the functions of proteins. Complex architectures have been created throughout evolution by rearrangement and duplication events. An interesting question is how many times a particular architecture has been created, a form of convergent evolution or domain architecture reinvention. Previous studies have approached this issue by comparing architectures found in different species. We wanted to achieve a finer-grained analysis by reconstructing protein architectures on complete domain trees. The prevalence of domain architecture reinvention in 96 genomes was investigated with a novel domain tree-based method that uses maximum parsimony for inferring ancestral protein architectures. Domain architectures were taken from Pfam. To ensure robustness, we applied the method to bootstrap trees and only considered results with strong statistical support. We detected multiple origins for 12.4% of the scored architectures. In a much smaller data set, the subset of completely domain-assigned proteins, the figure was 5.6%. These results indicate that domain architecture reinvention is a much more common phenomenon than previously thought. We also determined which domains are most frequent in multiply created architectures and assessed whether specific functions could be attributed to them. However, no strong functional bias was found in architectures with multiple origins.

  9. The evolution of filamin – A protein domain repeat perspective

    PubMed Central

    Light, Sara; Sagit, Rauan; Ithychanda, Sujay S.; Qin, Jun; Elofsson, Arne

    2013-01-01

    Particularly in higher eukaryotes, some protein domains are found in tandem repeats, performing broad functions often related to cellular organization. For instance, the eukaryotic protein filamin interacts with many proteins and is crucial for the cytoskeleton. The functional properties of long repeat domains are governed by the specific properties of each individual domain as well as by the repeat copy number. To provide better understanding of the evolutionary and functional history of repeating domains, we investigated the mode of evolution of the filamin domain in some detail. Among the domains that are common in long repeat proteins, sushi and spectrin domains evolve primarily through cassette tandem duplications while scavenger and immunoglobulin repeats appear to evolve through clustered tandem duplications. Additionally, immunoglobulin and filamin repeats exhibit a unique pattern where every other domain shows high sequence similarity. This pattern may be the result of tandem duplications, serve to avert aggregation between adjacent domains or it is the result of functional constraints. In filamin, our studies confirm the presence of interspersed integrin binding domains in vertebrates, while invertebrates exhibit more varied patterns, including more clustered integrin binding domains. The most notable case is leech filamin, which contains a 20 repeat expansion and exhibits unique dimerization topology. Clearly, invertebrate filamins are varied and contain examples of similar adjacent integrin-binding domains. Given that invertebrate integrin shows more similarity to the weaker filamin binder, integrin β3, it is possible that the distance between integrin-binding domains is not as crucial for invertebrate filamins as for vertebrates. PMID:22414427

  10. Classification of domain movements in proteins using dynamic contact graphs.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Daniel; Cawley, Gavin; Hayward, Steven

    2013-01-01

    A new method for the classification of domain movements in proteins is described and applied to 1822 pairs of structures from the Protein Data Bank that represent a domain movement in two-domain proteins. The method is based on changes in contacts between residues from the two domains in moving from one conformation to the other. We argue that there are five types of elemental contact changes and that these relate to five model domain movements called: "free", "open-closed", "anchored", "sliding-twist", and "see-saw." A directed graph is introduced called the "Dynamic Contact Graph" which represents the contact changes in a domain movement. In many cases a graph, or part of a graph, provides a clear visual metaphor for the movement it represents and is a motif that can be easily recognised. The Dynamic Contact Graphs are often comprised of disconnected subgraphs indicating independent regions which may play different roles in the domain movement. The Dynamic Contact Graph for each domain movement is decomposed into elemental Dynamic Contact Graphs, those that represent elemental contact changes, allowing us to count the number of instances of each type of elemental contact change in the domain movement. This naturally leads to sixteen classes into which the 1822 domain movements are classified.

  11. Exogenous agents that target transmembrane domains of proteins.

    PubMed

    Yin, Hang

    2008-01-01

    Although membrane proteins account for approximately one third of all proteins encoded in the human genome, the functions and structures of their transmembrane domains are much less understood than the water-soluble regions. A major hurdle in studying these transmembrane domains is the lack of appropriate exogenous agents that can be used as specific probes. Despite the daunting challenges, major strides have recently been made in targeting the transmembrane domains of a variety of membrane proteins. High affinity and selectivity have been achieved in model biophysical systems, membranes of bacteria, and mammalian cells.

  12. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains.

    PubMed

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object-in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our "multipartitioning" approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules.

  13. An ambiguity principle for assigning protein structural domains

    PubMed Central

    Postic, Guillaume; Ghouzam, Yassine; Chebrek, Romain; Gelly, Jean-Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Ambiguity is the quality of being open to several interpretations. For an image, it arises when the contained elements can be delimited in two or more distinct ways, which may cause confusion. We postulate that it also applies to the analysis of protein three-dimensional structure, which consists in dividing the molecule into subunits called domains. Because different definitions of what constitutes a domain can be used to partition a given structure, the same protein may have different but equally valid domain annotations. However, knowledge and experience generally displace our ability to accept more than one way to decompose the structure of an object—in this case, a protein. This human bias in structure analysis is particularly harmful because it leads to ignoring potential avenues of research. We present an automated method capable of producing multiple alternative decompositions of protein structure (web server and source code available at www.dsimb.inserm.fr/sword/). Our innovative algorithm assigns structural domains through the hierarchical merging of protein units, which are evolutionarily preserved substructures that describe protein architecture at an intermediate level, between domain and secondary structure. To validate the use of these protein units for decomposing protein structures into domains, we set up an extensive benchmark made of expert annotations of structural domains and including state-of-the-art domain parsing algorithms. The relevance of our “multipartitioning” approach is shown through numerous examples of applications covering protein function, evolution, folding, and structure prediction. Finally, we introduce a measure for the structural ambiguity of protein molecules. PMID:28097215

  14. 14-3-3 proteins, FHA domains and BRCT domains in the DNA damage response.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Duaa H; Yaffe, Michael B

    2009-09-02

    The DNA damage response depends on the concerted activity of protein serine/threonine kinases and modular phosphoserine/threonine-binding domains to relay the damage signal and recruit repair proteins. The PIKK family of protein kinases, which includes ATM/ATR/DNA-PK, preferentially phosphorylate Ser-Gln sites, while their basophilic downstream effecter kinases, Chk1/Chk2/MK2 preferentially phosphorylate hydrophobic-X-Arg-X-X-Ser/Thr-hydrophobic sites. A subset of tandem BRCT domains act as phosphopeptide binding modules that bind to ATM/ATR/DNA-PK substrates after DNA damage. Conversely, 14-3-3 proteins interact with substrates of Chk1/Chk2/MK2. FHA domains have been shown to interact with substrates of ATM/ATR/DNA-PK and CK2. In this review we consider how substrate phosphorylation together with BRCT domains, FHA domains and 14-3-3 proteins function to regulate ionizing radiation-induced nuclear foci and help to establish the G(2)/M checkpoint. We discuss the role of MDC1 a molecular scaffold that recruits early proteins to foci, such as NBS1 and RNF8, through distinct phosphodependent interactions. In addition, we consider the role of 14-3-3 proteins and the Chk2 FHA domain in initiating and maintaining cell cycle arrest.

  15. Domain view: a web tool for protein domain visualization and analysis.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaokang; Bingman, Craig A; Wesenberg, Gary E; Sun, Zhaohui; Phillips, George N

    2010-12-01

    The identification of sequence-based protein domains and their boundaries is often a prelude to structure determination. An accurate prediction of disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences can improve the efficiency of selection in structural genomics and also aid in design of constructs for directed structural biology studies. At the Center for Eukaryotic Structural Genomics (CESG) we have developed DomainView, a web tool to visualize and analyze predicted protein domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments of target protein sequences for selection of experimental protein structure attempts. DomainView consists of a relational database and a web graphical-user interface. The database was developed based on MySQL, which stores data from target protein sequences and their domains, disordered regions, secondary structures and low complexity segments. The program of the web user interface is a Perl CGI script. When a user searches for a target protein sequence, the script displays the combinational information about the domains and other features of that target sequence graphically on a web page by querying the database. The graphical representation for each feature is linked to a web page showing more detailed annotation information or to a new window directly running the corresponding prediction program to show further information about that feature.

  16. Proteasomes and protein conjugation across domains of life.

    PubMed

    Maupin-Furlow, Julie

    2011-12-19

    Like other energy-dependent proteases, proteasomes, which are found across the three domains of life, are self-compartmentalized and important in the early steps of proteolysis. Proteasomes degrade improperly synthesized, damaged or misfolded proteins and hydrolyse regulatory proteins that must be specifically removed or cleaved for cell signalling. In eukaryotes, proteins are typically targeted for proteasome-mediated destruction through polyubiquitylation, although ubiquitin-independent pathways also exist. Interestingly, actinobacteria and archaea also covalently attach small proteins (prokaryotic ubiquitin-like protein (Pup) and small archaeal modifier proteins (Samps), respectively) to certain proteins, and this may serve to target the modified proteins for degradation by proteasomes.

  17. Quantifying domain-ligand affinities and specificities by high-throughput holdup assay

    PubMed Central

    Vincentelli, Renaud; Luck, Katja; Poirson, Juline; Polanowska, Jolanta; Abdat, Julie; Blémont, Marilyne; Turchetto, Jeremy; Iv, François; Ricquier, Kevin; Straub, Marie-Laure; Forster, Anne; Cassonnet, Patricia; Borg, Jean-Paul; Jacob, Yves; Masson, Murielle; Nominé, Yves; Reboul, Jérôme; Wolff, Nicolas; Charbonnier, Sebastian; Travé, Gilles

    2015-01-01

    Many protein interactions are mediated by small linear motifs interacting specifically with defined families of globular domains. Quantifying the specificity of a motif requires measuring and comparing its binding affinities to all its putative target domains. To this aim, we developed the high-throughput holdup assay, a chromatographic approach that can measure up to a thousand domain-motif equilibrium binding affinities per day. Extracts of overexpressed domains are incubated with peptide-coated resins and subjected to filtration. Binding affinities are deduced from microfluidic capillary electrophoresis of flow-throughs. After benchmarking the approach on 210 PDZ-peptide pairs with known affinities, we determined the affinities of two viral PDZ-binding motifs derived from Human Papillomavirus E6 oncoproteins for 209 PDZ domains covering 79% of the human PDZome. We obtained exquisite sequence-dependent binding profiles, describing quantitatively the PDZome recognition specificity of each motif. This approach, applicable to many categories of domain-ligand interactions, has a wide potential for quantifying the specificities of interactomes. PMID:26053890

  18. Targeting of passenger protein domains to multiple intracellular membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Janiak, F; Glover, J R; Leber, B; Rachubinski, R A; Andrews, D W

    1994-01-01

    The role of passenger domains in protein targeting was examined by fusing previously characterized targeting motifs to different protein sequences. To compare the targeting requirements for a variety of subcellular compartments, targeting of the fusion proteins was examined for endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondria and peroxisomes in vitro and in yeast. Although most passenger domains were only partially passive to translocation, motif-dependent targeting via motifs positioned at either end of one passenger domain (gPA) was demonstrated for all of the subcellular compartments tested. The data presented extend earlier suggestions that translocation competence is an intrinsic property of the passenger protein. However, the properties that determine protein targeting are not mutually exclusive for the compartments tested. Therefore, although the primary determinant of specificity is the targeting motif, our results suggest that translocation competence of the targeted protein augments the fidelity of transport. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:8198533

  19. de Gennes Narrowing Describes the Relative Motion of Protein Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Liang; Smolin, Nikolai; Smith, Jeremy C.

    2014-04-01

    The relative motion of structural domains is essential for the biological function of many proteins. Here, by analyzing neutron scattering data and performing molecular dynamics simulations, we find that interdomain motion in several proteins obeys the principle of de Gennes narrowing, in which the wave vector dependence of the interdomain diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the interdomain structure factor. Thus, the rate of interdomain motion is inversely proportional to the probability distribution of the spatial configurations of domains.

  20. Evolution of a protein domain interaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li-Feng; Shi, Jian-Jun; Guan, Shan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we attempt to understand complex network evolution from the underlying evolutionary relationship between biological organisms. Firstly, we construct a Pfam domain interaction network for each of the 470 completely sequenced organisms, and therefore each organism is correlated with a specific Pfam domain interaction network; secondly, we infer the evolutionary relationship of these organisms with the nearest neighbour joining method; thirdly, we use the evolutionary relationship between organisms constructed in the second step as the evolutionary course of the Pfam domain interaction network constructed in the first step. This analysis of the evolutionary course shows: (i) there is a conserved sub-network structure in network evolution; in this sub-network, nodes with lower degree prefer to maintain their connectivity invariant, and hubs tend to maintain their role as a hub is attached preferentially to new added nodes; (ii) few nodes are conserved as hubs; most of the other nodes are conserved as one with very low degree; (iii) in the course of network evolution, new nodes are added to the network either individually in most cases or as clusters with relative high clustering coefficients in a very few cases.

  1. Singlet CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-03-01

    The actin cytoskeleton presents the basic force in processes such as cytokinesis, endocytosis, vesicular trafficking and cell migration. Here, we list 30 human singlet CH (calpononin homology/actin binding) containing multidomain molecules, each encoded by one gene. We show the domain distributions as given by the SMART program. These mosaic proteins organize geographically the placement of selected proteins in proximity within the cell. In most instances, their precise location, their actin binding capacity by way of the singlet CH (or by other domains?) and their physiological functions need further elucidation. A dendrogram based solely on the relationship for the human singlet CH domains (in terms of AA sequences) for the various molecules that possess the domain, implies that the singlet descended from a common ancestor which in turn sprouted three main branches of protein products. Each branch bifurcated multiple times thus accounting for a cornucopia of products. Wherever, additional (unassigned), highly homologous regions exist in related proteins (e.g., in LIM and LMO7 or in Tangerin and EH/BP1), these unrecognized domain regions await assignment as specific functional domains. Frequently genes coding multidomain proteins duplicated. The varying modular nature within multidomain proteins should have accelerated evolutionary changes to a degree not feasible to achieve by means of mere post-duplication mutational changes.

  2. Protein interacting with C kinase 1 (PICK1) reduces reinsertion rates of interaction partners sorted to Rab11-dependent slow recycling pathway.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Kenneth L; Thorsen, Thor S; Rahbek-Clemmensen, Troels; Eriksen, Jacob; Gether, Ulrik

    2012-04-06

    The scaffolding protein PICK1 (protein interacting with C kinase 1) contains an N-terminal PSD-95/Discs large/ZO-1 (PDZ) domain and a central lipid-binding Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain. PICK1 is thought to regulate trafficking of its PDZ binding partners but different and even opposing functions have been suggested. Here, we apply ELISA-based assays and confocal microscopy in HEK293 cells with inducible PICK1 expression to assess in an isolated system the ability of PICK1 to regulate trafficking of natural and engineered PDZ binding partners. The dopamine transporter (DAT), which primarily sorts to degradation upon internalization, did not form perinuclear clusters with PICK1, and PICK1 did not affect DAT internalization/recycling. However, transfer of the PICK1-binding DAT C terminus to the β(2)-adrenergic receptor, which sorts to recycling upon internalization, led to formation of PICK1 co-clusters in Rab11-positive compartments. Furthermore, PICK1 inhibited Rab11-mediated recycling of the receptor in a BAR and PDZ domain-dependent manner. In contrast, transfer of the DAT C terminus to the δ-opioid receptor, which sorts to degradation, did not result in PICK1 co-clusters or any change in internalization/recycling. Further support for a role of PICK1 determined by its PDZ cargo was obtained for the PICK1 interaction partner prolactin-releasing peptide receptor (GPR10). GPR10 co-localized with Rab11 and clustered with PICK1 upon constitutive internalization but co-localized with the late endosomal marker Rab7 and did not cluster with PICK1 upon agonist-induced internalization. Our data suggest a selective role of PICK1 in clustering and reducing the recycling rates of PDZ domain binding partners sorted to the Rab11-dependent recycling pathway.

  3. Insights into Hox protein function from a large scale combinatorial analysis of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Merabet, Samir; Litim-Mecheri, Isma; Karlsson, Daniel; Dixit, Richa; Saadaoui, Mehdi; Monier, Bruno; Brun, Christine; Thor, Stefan; Vijayraghavan, K; Perrin, Laurent; Pradel, Jacques; Graba, Yacine

    2011-10-01

    Protein function is encoded within protein sequence and protein domains. However, how protein domains cooperate within a protein to modulate overall activity and how this impacts functional diversification at the molecular and organism levels remains largely unaddressed. Focusing on three domains of the central class Drosophila Hox transcription factor AbdominalA (AbdA), we used combinatorial domain mutations and most known AbdA developmental functions as biological readouts to investigate how protein domains collectively shape protein activity. The results uncover redundancy, interactivity, and multifunctionality of protein domains as salient features underlying overall AbdA protein activity, providing means to apprehend functional diversity and accounting for the robustness of Hox-controlled developmental programs. Importantly, the results highlight context-dependency in protein domain usage and interaction, allowing major modifications in domains to be tolerated without general functional loss. The non-pleoitropic effect of domain mutation suggests that protein modification may contribute more broadly to molecular changes underlying morphological diversification during evolution, so far thought to rely largely on modification in gene cis-regulatory sequences.

  4. Anchors aweigh: protein localization and transport mediated by transmembrane domains.

    PubMed

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S

    2013-10-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino acid sequences but physical properties such as the length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized, but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport.

  5. Anchors Aweigh: Protein Traffic Mediated by Transmembrane Domains

    PubMed Central

    Cosson, Pierre; Perrin, Jackie; Bonifacino, Juan S.

    2013-01-01

    The transmembrane domains (TMDs) of integral membrane proteins have emerged as major determinants of intracellular localization and transport in the secretory and endocytic pathways. Unlike sorting signals in the cytosolic domains, TMD sorting determinants are not conserved amino-acid sequences but physical properties such as length and hydrophilicity of the transmembrane span. The underlying sorting machinery is still poorly characterized but several mechanisms have been proposed, including TMD recognition by transmembrane sorting receptors and partitioning into membrane lipid domains. Here we review the nature of TMD sorting determinants and how they may dictate transmembrane protein localization and transport. PMID:23806646

  6. The COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa H+-ATPase subunit are PDZ motifs involved in their interaction.

    PubMed

    Pushkin, Alexander; Abuladze, Natalia; Newman, Debra; Muronets, Vladimir; Sassani, Pejvak; Tatishchev, Sergei; Kurtz, Ira

    2003-03-01

    The electroneutral sodium bicarbonate cotransporter 3 (NBC3) coimmunoprecipitates from renal lysates with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. In renal type A and B intercalated cells, NBC3 colocalizes with the vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. The involvement of the COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump in the interaction of these proteins was investigated. The intact and modified COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump were synthesized, coupled to Sepharose beads, and used to pull down kidney membrane proteins. Both the 56- and the 70-kDa subunits of the proton pump, as well as a PDZ domain containing protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF-1), were bound to the intact 18 amino acid NBC3 COOH terminus. A peptide truncated by five COOH-terminal amino acids did not bind these proteins. Replacement of the COOH-terminal leucine with glycine blocked binding of both the proton pump subunits but did not affect binding of NHERF-1. The 18 amino acid COOH terminus of the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump bound NHERF-1 and NBC3, but the truncated and modified peptide did not. A complex of NBC3, the 56-kDa subunit of the proton pump, and NHERF-1 was identified in rat kidney. The data indicate that the COOH termini of NBC3 and the 56-kDa subunit of the vacuolar proton pump are PDZ-interacting motifs that are necessary for the interaction of these proteins. NHERF-1 is involved in the interaction of NBC3 and the vacuolar proton pump.

  7. Cellular functions of phosphatidylinositol 3-phosphate and FYVE domain proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Gillooly, D J; Simonsen, A; Stenmark, H

    2001-01-01

    PtdIns3P is a phosphoinositide 3-kinase product that has been strongly implicated in regulating membrane trafficking in both mammalian and yeast cells. PtdIns3P has been shown to be specifically located on membranes associated with the endocytic pathway. Proteins that contain FYVE zinc-finger domains are recruited to PtdIns3P-containing membranes. Structural information is now available concerning the interaction between FYVE domains and PtdIns3P. A number of proteins have been identified which contain a FYVE domain, and in this review we discuss the functions of PtdIns3P and its FYVE-domain-containing effector proteins in membrane trafficking, cytoskeletal regulation and receptor signalling. PMID:11284710

  8. Epigenetic repression of PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 promotes ovarian cancer via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Linjie; Yu, Chuan; Zhou, Shengtao; Lau, Wayne Bond; Lau, Bonnie; Luo, Zhongyue; Lin, Qiao; Yang, Huiliang; Xuan, Yu; Yi, Tao; Zhao, Xia; Wei, Yuquan

    2016-01-12

    Ovarian cancer constitutes one of the most lethal gynaecological malignancies worldwide and currently no satisfactory therapeutic approaches have been established. Therefore, elucidation of molecular mechanisms to develop targeted therapy of ovarian cancer is crucial. PDLIM2 is critical to promote ubiquitination of nuclear p65 and thus its role in inflammation has been highlighted recently. We demonstrate that PDLIM2 is decreased in both ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma and in various human ovarian cancer cell lines compared with normal ovary tissues and human ovarian surface epithelial cells (HOSE). Further functional analysis revealed that PDLIM2 is epigenetically repressed in ovarian cancer development and inhibition of PDLIM2 promoted ovarian cancer growth both in vivo and in vitro via NOS2-derived nitric oxide signaling, leading to recruitment of M2 type macrophages. These results suggest that PDLIM2 might be involved in ovarian cancer pathogenesis, which could serve as a promising therapeutic target for ovarian cancer patients.

  9. Domain conservation in several volvocalean cell wall proteins.

    PubMed

    Woessner, J P; Molendijk, A J; van Egmond, P; Klis, F M; Goodenough, U W; Haring, M A

    1994-11-01

    Based on our previous work demonstrating that (SerPro)x epitopes are common to extensin-like cell wall proteins in Chlamydomonas' reinhardtii, we looked for similar proteins in the distantly related species C. eugametos. Using a polyclonal antiserum against a (SerPro)10 oligopeptide, we found distinct sets of stage-specific polypeptides immunoprecipitated from in vitro translations of C. eugametos RNA. Screening of a C. eugametos cDNA expression library with the antiserum led to the isolation of a cDNA (WP6) encoding a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. Analysis of a similarly selected cDNA (VSP-3) from a C. reinhardtii cDNA expression library revealed that it also coded for a (SerPro)x-rich multidomain wall protein. The C-terminal rod domains of VSP-3 and WP6 are highly homologous, while the N-terminal domains are dissimilar; however, the N-terminal domain of VSP-3 is homologous to the globular domain of a cell wall protein from Volvox carteri. Exon shuffling might be responsible for this example of domain conservation over 350 million years of volvocalean cell wall protein evolution.

  10. The PUB domain: a putative protein-protein interaction domain implicated in the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, T; Park, H; Till, E A; Lennarz, W J

    2001-10-12

    Cytoplasmic peptide:N-glycanase (PNGase) is a de-N-glycosylating enzyme which may be involved in the proteasome-dependent pathway for degradation of misfolded glycoproteins formed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) that are exported into the cytoplasm. A cytoplasmic PNGase found in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Png1p, is widely distributed in higher eukaryotes as well as in yeast (Suzuki, T., et al. J. Cell Biol. 149, 1039-1051, 2000). The recently uncovered complete genome sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana prompted us to search for the protein homologue of Png1p in this organism. Interestingly, when the mouse Png1p homologue sequence was used as a query, not only a Png1p homologue containing a transglutaminase-like domain that is believed to contain a catalytic triad for PNGase activity, but also four proteins which had a domain of 46 amino acids in length that exhibited significant similarity to the N-terminus of mouse Png1p were identified. Moreover, three of these homologous proteins were also found to possess a UBA or UBX domain, which are found in various proteins involved in the ubiquitin-related pathway. We name this newly found homologous region the PUB (Peptide:N-glycanase/UBA or UBX-containing proteins) domain and propose that this domain may mediate protein-protein interactions.

  11. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD+ to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. IMPORTANCE Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular

  12. A new and unexpected domain-domain interaction in the AraC protein.

    PubMed

    Cole, Stephanie Dirla; Schleif, Robert

    2012-05-01

    An interaction between the dimerization domains and DNA binding domains of the dimeric AraC protein has previously been shown to facilitate repression of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon by AraC in the absence of arabinose. A new interaction between the domains of AraC in the presence of arabinose is reported here, the regulatory consequences of which are unknown. Evidence for the interaction is the following: the dissociation rate of arabinose-bound AraC from half-site DNA is considerably faster than that of free DNA binding domain, and the affinity of the dimerization domains for arabinose is increased when half-site DNA is bound. In addition, an increase in the fluorescence intensity of tryptophan residues located in the arabinose-bound dimerization domain is observed upon binding of half-site DNA to the DNA binding domains. Direct physical evidence of the new domain-domain interaction is demonstrated by chemical crosslinking and NMR experiments.

  13. Global Patterns of Protein Domain Gain and Loss in Superkingdoms

    PubMed Central

    Nasir, Arshan; Kim, Kyung Mo; Caetano-Anollés, Gustavo

    2014-01-01

    Domains are modules within proteins that can fold and function independently and are evolutionarily conserved. Here we compared the usage and distribution of protein domain families in the free-living proteomes of Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya and reconstructed species phylogenies while tracing the history of domain emergence and loss in proteomes. We show that both gains and losses of domains occurred frequently during proteome evolution. The rate of domain discovery increased approximately linearly in evolutionary time. Remarkably, gains generally outnumbered losses and the gain-to-loss ratios were much higher in akaryotes compared to eukaryotes. Functional annotations of domain families revealed that both Archaea and Bacteria gained and lost metabolic capabilities during the course of evolution while Eukarya acquired a number of diverse molecular functions including those involved in extracellular processes, immunological mechanisms, and cell regulation. Results also highlighted significant contemporary sharing of informational enzymes between Archaea and Eukarya and metabolic enzymes between Bacteria and Eukarya. Finally, the analysis provided useful insights into the evolution of species. The archaeal superkingdom appeared first in evolution by gradual loss of ancestral domains, bacterial lineages were the first to gain superkingdom-specific domains, and eukaryotes (likely) originated when an expanding proto-eukaryotic stem lineage gained organelles through endosymbiosis of already diversified bacterial lineages. The evolutionary dynamics of domain families in proteomes and the increasing number of domain gains is predicted to redefine the persistence strategies of organisms in superkingdoms, influence the make up of molecular functions, and enhance organismal complexity by the generation of new domain architectures. This dynamics highlights ongoing secondary evolutionary adaptations in akaryotic microbes, especially Archaea. PMID:24499935

  14. Protein kinase C phosphorylation disrupts Na+/H+ exchanger regulatory factor 1 autoinhibition and promotes cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator macromolecular assembly.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianquan; Poulikakos, Poulikos I; Dai, Zhongping; Testa, Joseph R; Callaway, David J E; Bu, Zimei

    2007-09-14

    An emerging theme in cell signaling is that membrane-bound channels and receptors are organized into supramolecular signaling complexes for optimum function and cross-talk. In this study, we determined how protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation influences the scaffolding protein Na(+)/H(+) exchanger regulatory factor 1 (NHERF) to assemble protein complexes of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), a chloride ion channel that controls fluid and electrolyte transport across cell membranes. NHERF directs polarized expression of receptors and ion transport proteins in epithelial cells, as well as organizes the homo- and hetero-association of these cell surface proteins. NHERF contains two modular PDZ domains that are modular protein-protein interaction motifs, and a C-terminal domain. Previous studies have shown that NHERF is a phosphoprotein, but how phosphorylation affects NHERF to assemble macromolecular complexes is unknown. We show that PKC phosphorylates two amino acid residues Ser-339 and Ser-340 in the C-terminal domain of NHERF, but a serine 162 of PDZ2 is specifically protected from being phosphorylated by the intact C-terminal domain. PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant S339D/S340D of NHERF has increased affinity and stoichiometry when binding to C-CFTR. Moreover, solution small angle x-ray scattering indicates that the PDZ2 and C-terminal domains contact each other in NHERF, but such intramolecular domain-domain interactions are released in the PKC phosphorylation-mimicking mutant indicating that PKC phosphorylation disrupts the autoinhibition interactions in NHERF. The results demonstrate that the C-terminal domain of NHERF functions as an intramolecular switch that regulates the binding capability of PDZ2, and thus controls the stoichiometry of NHERF to assemble protein complexes.

  15. Characterization of Two Dinoflagellate Cold Shock Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Beauchemin, Mathieu; Roy, Sougata; Pelletier, Sarah; Averback, Alexandra; Lanthier, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Roughly two-thirds of the proteins annotated as transcription factors in dinoflagellate transcriptomes are cold shock domain-containing proteins (CSPs), an uncommon condition in eukaryotic organisms. However, no functional analysis has ever been reported for a dinoflagellate CSP, and so it is not known if they do in fact act as transcription factors. We describe here some of the properties of two CSPs from the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium polyedrum, LpCSP1 and LpCSP2, which contain a glycine-rich C-terminal domain and an N-terminal cold shock domain phylogenetically related to those in bacteria. However, neither of the two LpCSPs act like the bacterial CSP, since they do not functionally complement the Escherichia coli quadruple cold shock domain protein mutant BX04, and cold shock does not induce LpCSP1 and LpCSP2 to detectable levels, based on two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Both CSPs bind to RNA and single-stranded DNA in a nonspecific manner in electrophoretic mobility shift assays, and both proteins also bind double-stranded DNA nonspecifically, albeit more weakly. These CSPs are thus unlikely to act alone as sequence-specific transcription factors. IMPORTANCE Dinoflagellate transcriptomes contain cold shock domain proteins as the major component of the proteins annotated as transcription factors. We show here that the major family of cold shock domain proteins in the dinoflagellate Lingulodinium do not bind specific sequences, suggesting that transcriptional control is not a predominant mechanism for regulating gene expression in this group of protists. PMID:27303711

  16. Repeat proteins challenge the concept of structural domains.

    PubMed

    Espada, Rocío; Parra, R Gonzalo; Sippl, Manfred J; Mora, Thierry; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Ferreiro, Diego U

    2015-10-01

    Structural domains are believed to be modules within proteins that can fold and function independently. Some proteins show tandem repetitions of apparent modular structure that do not fold independently, but rather co-operate in stabilizing structural forms that comprise several repeat-units. For many natural repeat-proteins, it has been shown that weak energetic links between repeats lead to the breakdown of co-operativity and the appearance of folding sub-domains within an apparently regular repeat array. The quasi-1D architecture of repeat-proteins is crucial in detailing how the local energetic balances can modulate the folding dynamics of these proteins, which can be related to the physiological behaviour of these ubiquitous biological systems.

  17. Enigma interacts with adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains to control insulin-induced actin cytoskeleton remodeling and glucose transporter 4 translocation.

    PubMed

    Barrès, Romain; Grémeaux, Thierry; Gual, Philippe; Gonzalez, Teresa; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tanti, Jean-François

    2006-11-01

    APS (adaptor protein with PH and SH2 domains) initiates a phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-independent pathway involved in insulin-stimulated glucose transport. We recently identified Enigma, a PDZ and LIM domain-containing protein, as a partner of APS and showed that APS-Enigma complex plays a critical role in actin cytoskeleton organization in fibroblastic cells. Because actin rearrangement is important for insulin-induced glucose transporter 4 (Glut 4) translocation, we studied the potential involvement of Enigma in insulin-induced glucose transport in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Enigma mRNA was expressed in differentiated adipocytes and APS and Enigma were colocalized with cortical actin. Expression of an APS mutant unable to bind Enigma increased the insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation to the plasma membrane. By contrast, overexpression of Enigma inhibited insulin-stimulated glucose transport and Glut 4 translocation without alterations in proximal insulin signaling. This inhibitory effect was prevented with the deletion of the LIM domains of Enigma. Using time-lapse fluorescent microscopy of green fluorescent protein-actin, we demonstrated that the overexpression of Enigma altered insulin-induced actin rearrangements, whereas the expression of Enigma without its LIM domains was without effect. A physiological link between increased expression of Enigma and an alteration in insulin-induced glucose uptake was suggested by the increase in Enigma mRNA expression in adipose tissue of diabetic obese patients. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that the interaction between APS and Enigma is involved in insulin-induced Glut 4 translocation by regulating cortical actin remodeling and raise the possibility that modification of APS/Enigma ratio could participate in the alteration of insulin-induced glucose uptake in adipose tissue.

  18. An Algebro-Topological Description of Protein Domain Structure

    PubMed Central

    Penner, Robert Clark; Knudsen, Michael; Wiuf, Carsten; Andersen, Jørgen Ellegaard

    2011-01-01

    The space of possible protein structures appears vast and continuous, and the relationship between primary, secondary and tertiary structure levels is complex. Protein structure comparison and classification is therefore a difficult but important task since structure is a determinant for molecular interaction and function. We introduce a novel mathematical abstraction based on geometric topology to describe protein domain structure. Using the locations of the backbone atoms and the hydrogen bonds, we build a combinatorial object – a so-called fatgraph. The description is discrete yet gives rise to a 2-dimensional mathematical surface. Thus, each protein domain corresponds to a particular mathematical surface with characteristic topological invariants, such as the genus (number of holes) and the number of boundary components. Both invariants are global fatgraph features reflecting the interconnectivity of the domain by hydrogen bonds. We introduce the notion of robust variables, that is variables that are robust towards minor changes in the structure/fatgraph, and show that the genus and the number of boundary components are robust. Further, we invesigate the distribution of different fatgraph variables and show how only four variables are capable of distinguishing different folds. We use local (secondary) and global (tertiary) fatgraph features to describe domain structures and illustrate that they are useful for classification of domains in CATH. In addition, we combine our method with two other methods thereby using primary, secondary, and tertiary structure information, and show that we can identify a large percentage of new and unclassified structures in CATH. PMID:21629687

  19. Formation and organization of protein domains in the immunological synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlson, Andreas; Mahadevan, L.

    2014-11-01

    The cellular basis for the adaptive immune response during antigen recognition relies on a specialized protein interface known as the immunological synapse. Here, we propose a minimal mathematical model for the dynamics of the IS that encompass membrane mechanics, hydrodynamics and protein kinetics. Simple scaling laws describe the dynamics of protein clusters as a function of membrane stiffness, rigidity of the adhesive proteins, and fluid flow in the synaptic cleft. Numerical simulations complement the scaling laws by quantifying the nucleation, growth and stabilization of proteins domains on the size of the cell. Direct comparison with experiment suggests that passive dynamics suffices to describe the short-time formation and organization of protein clusters, while the stabilization and long time dynamics of the synapse is likely determined by active cytoskeleton processes triggered by receptor binding. Our study reveals that the fluid flow generated by the interplay between membrane deformation and protein binding kinetics can assist immune cells in regulating protein sorting.

  20. Efficient Binding of the NOS1AP C-Terminus to the nNOS PDZ Pocket Requires the Concerted Action of the PDZ Ligand Motif, the Internal ExF Site and Structural Integrity of an Independent Element

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li-Li; Cisek, Katryna; Courtney, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Neuronal nitric oxide synthase is widely regarded as an important contributor to a number of disorders of excitable tissues. Recently the adaptor protein NOS1AP has emerged as a contributor to several nNOS-linked conditions. As a consequence, the unexpectedly complex mechanisms of interaction between nNOS and its effector NOS1AP have become a particularly interesting topic from the point of view of both basic research and the potential for therapeutic applications. Here we demonstrate that the concerted action of two previously described motif regions contributing to the interaction of nNOS with NOS1AP, the ExF region and the PDZ ligand motif, efficiently excludes an alternate ligand from the nNOS-PDZ ligand-binding pocket. Moreover, we identify an additional element with a denaturable structure that contributes to interaction of NOS1AP with nNOS. Denaturation does not affect the functions of the individual motifs and results in a relatively mild drop, ∼3-fold, of overall binding affinity of the C-terminal region of NOS1AP for nNOS. However, denaturation selectively prevents the concerted action of the two motifs that normally results in efficient occlusion of the PDZ ligand-binding pocket, and results in 30-fold reduction of competition between NOS1AP and an alternate PDZ ligand. PMID:28360833

  1. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  2. SNP@Domain: a web resource of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within protein domain structures and sequences

    PubMed Central

    Han, Areum; Kang, Hyo Jin; Cho, Yoobok; Lee, Sunghoon; Kim, Young Joo; Gong, Sungsam

    2006-01-01

    The single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in conserved protein regions have been thought to be strong candidates that alter protein functions. Thus, we have developed SNP@Domain, a web resource, to identify SNPs within human protein domains. We annotated SNPs from dbSNP with protein structure-based as well as sequence-based domains: (i) structure-based using SCOP and (ii) sequence-based using Pfam to avoid conflicts from two domain assignment methodologies. Users can investigate SNPs within protein domains with 2D and 3D maps. We expect this visual annotation of SNPs within protein domains will help scientists select and interpret SNPs associated with diseases. A web interface for the SNP@Domain is freely available at and from . PMID:16845090

  3. Pleiotropic roles of cold shock domain proteins in plants.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Kentaro; Imai, Ryozo

    2011-01-01

    The cold shock domain (CSD) is a nucleic acid binding domain that is widely conserved from bacteria to higher plants and animals. In Escherichia coli, cold shock proteins (CSPs) are composed solely of a CSD and function as RNA chaperones that destabilize RNA secondary structures. Cellular RNAs tend to be folded into unfavorable structures under low temperature conditions, and RNA chaperones resolve these structures, recovering functionality of the RNAs. CSP functions are associated mainly with cold adaptation, but they are also involved in other biological processes under normal growth conditions. Eukaryotic CSD proteins contain auxiliary domains in addition to the CSD and regulate many biological processes such as development and stress tolerance. In plants, it has been demonstrated that CSD proteins play essential roles in acquiring freezing tolerance. In addition, it has been suggested that some plant CSD proteins regulate embryo development, flowering time, and fruit development. In this review, we summarize the pleiotropic biological functions of CSP proteins in plants and discuss possible mechanisms by which plant CSD proteins regulate the functions of RNA molecules.

  4. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, Oded; Shpiegl, Itai; Goldstein, Marc A.; Doi, Roy H.

    1997-01-01

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production thereof. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques.

  5. Methods of use of cellulose binding domain proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Shoseyov, O.; Shpiegl, I.; Goldstein, M.A.; Doi, R.H.

    1997-09-23

    A cellulose binding domain (CBD) having a high affinity for crystalline cellulose and chitin is disclosed, along with methods for the molecular cloning and recombinant production. Fusion products comprising the CBD and a second protein are likewise described. A wide range of applications are contemplated for both the CBD and the fusion products, including drug delivery, affinity separations, and diagnostic techniques. 16 figs.

  6. Morbillivirus and henipavirus attachment protein cytoplasmic domains differently affect protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly.

    PubMed

    Sawatsky, Bevan; Bente, Dennis A; Czub, Markus; von Messling, Veronika

    2016-05-01

    The amino-terminal cytoplasmic domains of paramyxovirus attachment glycoproteins include trafficking signals that influence protein processing and cell surface expression. To characterize the role of the cytoplasmic domain in protein expression, fusion support and particle assembly in more detail, we constructed chimeric Nipah virus (NiV) glycoprotein (G) and canine distemper virus (CDV) haemagglutinin (H) proteins carrying the respective heterologous cytoplasmic domain, as well as a series of mutants with progressive deletions in this domain. CDV H retained fusion function and was normally expressed on the cell surface with a heterologous cytoplasmic domain, while the expression and fusion support of NiV G was dramatically decreased when its cytoplasmic domain was replaced with that of CDV H. The cell surface expression and fusion support functions of CDV H were relatively insensitive to cytoplasmic domain deletions, while short deletions in the corresponding region of NiV G dramatically decreased both. In addition, the first 10 residues of the CDV H cytoplasmic domain strongly influence its incorporation into virus-like particles formed by the CDV matrix (M) protein, while the co-expression of NiV M with NiV G had no significant effect on incorporation of G into particles. The cytoplasmic domains of both the CDV H and NiV G proteins thus contribute differently to the virus life cycle.

  7. A Self-Assembling Protein Hydrogel Technology for Enzyme Incorporation onto Electrodes in Biofuel Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-26

    TEXAS ENGINEERING EXPERIMENT STATION COLLEGE STATION Final Report 10/26/2015 DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of...the intein with a PDZ-domain-containing protein-ligand pair whose interaction was reinforced by an engineered disulfide linkage2. Both hydrogels... engineered enzyme-loaded protein hydrogel, indicating that a vast majority of the immobilized enzymes cannot participate in current generation. The

  8. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins regulate the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhixiong; Meng, Xianzhang; Cai, Ying; Liang, Hong; Nagarajan, Lalitha; Brandt, Stephen J.

    2007-01-01

    The LIM domain-binding protein Ldb1 is an essential cofactor of LIM-homeodomain (LIM-HD) and LIM-only (LMO) proteins in development. The stoichiometry of Ldb1, LIM-HD, and LMO proteins is tightly controlled in the cell and is likely a critical determinant of their biological actions. Single-stranded DNA-binding proteins (SSBPs) were recently shown to interact with Ldb1 and are also important in developmental programs. We establish here that two mammalian SSBPs, SSBP2 and SSBP3, contribute to an erythroid DNA-binding complex that contains the transcription factors Tal1 and GATA-1, the LIM domain protein Lmo2, and Ldb1 and binds a bipartite E-box-GATA DNA sequence motif. In addition, SSBP2 was found to augment transcription of the Protein 4.2 (P4.2) gene, a direct target of the E-box-GATA-binding complex, in an Ldb1-dependent manner and to increase endogenous Ldb1 and Lmo2 protein levels, E-box-GATA DNA-binding activity, and P4.2 and β-globin expression in erythroid progenitors. Finally, SSBP2 was demonstrated to inhibit Ldb1 and Lmo2 interaction with the E3 ubiquitin ligase RLIM, prevent RLIM-mediated Ldb1 ubiquitination, and protect Ldb1 and Lmo2 from proteasomal degradation. These results define a novel biochemical function for SSBPs in regulating the abundance of LIM domain and LIM domain-binding proteins. PMID:17437998

  9. Defining the boundaries: structure and function of LOB domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Majer, Christine; Hochholdinger, Frank

    2011-01-01

    The plant-specific LBD (Lateral Organ Boundaries Domain) gene family is essential in the regulation of plant lateral organ development and is involved in the regulation of anthocyanin and nitrogen metabolism. LBD proteins contain a characteristic LOB domain composed of a C-motif required for DNA-binding, a conserved glycine residue, and a leucine-zipper-like sequence required for protein-protein interactions. Recently, several LBD genes associated with mutant phenotypes related to almost all aspects of plant development, including embryo, root, leaf, and inflorescence development have been functionally characterized. These novel insights contribute to a better understanding of the molecular definition of boundaries between organs or boundaries between organs and meristems and the regulation of these processes by environmental cues and phytohormones.

  10. Membrane shape instabilities induced by BAR domain proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgart, Tobias

    2014-03-01

    Membrane curvature has developed into a forefront of membrane biophysics. Numerous proteins involved in membrane curvature sensing and membrane curvature generation have recently been discovered, including proteins containing the crescent-shaped BAR domain as membrane binding and shaping module. Accordingly, the structure determination of these proteins and their multimeric complexes is increasingly well-understood. Substantially less understood, however, are thermodynamic and kinetic aspects and the detailed mechanisms of how these proteins interact with membranes in a curvature-dependent manner. New experimental approaches need to be combined with established techniques to be able to fill in these missing details. Here we use model membrane systems in combination with a variety of biophysical techniques to characterize mechanistic aspects of BAR domain protein function. This includes a characterization of membrane curvature sensing and membrane generation. We also establish kinetic and thermodynamic aspects of BAR protein dimerization in solution, and investigate kinetic aspects of membrane binding. We present two new approaches to investigate membrane shape instabilities and demonstrate that membrane shape instabilities can be controlled by protein binding and lateral membrane tension. This work is supported through NIH grant GM-097552 and NSF grant CBET-1053857.

  11. BC-box protein domain-related mechanism for VHL protein degradation

    PubMed Central

    Pozzebon, Maria Elena; Varadaraj, Archana; Mattoscio, Domenico; Jaffray, Ellis G.; Miccolo, Claudia; Galimberti, Viviana; Tommasino, Massimo; Hay, Ronald T.; Chiocca, Susanna

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor VHL (von Hippel–Lindau) protein is a substrate receptor for Ubiquitin Cullin Ring Ligase complexes (CRLs), containing a BC-box domain that associates to the adaptor Elongin B/C. VHL targets hypoxia-inducible factor 1α to proteasome-dependent degradation. Gam1 is an adenoviral protein, which also possesses a BC-box domain that interacts with the host Elongin B/C, thereby acting as a viral substrate receptor. Gam1 associates with both Cullin2 and Cullin5 to form CRL complexes targeting the host protein SUMO enzyme SAE1 for proteasomal degradation. We show that Gam1 protein expression induces VHL protein degradation leading to hypoxia-inducible factor 1α stabilization and induction of its downstream targets. We also characterize the CRL-dependent mechanism that drives VHL protein degradation via proteasome. Interestingly, expression of Suppressor of Cytokine Signaling (SOCS) domain-containing viral proteins and cellular BC-box proteins leads to VHL protein degradation, in a SOCS domain-containing manner. Our work underscores the exquisite ability of viral domains to uncover new regulatory mechanisms by hijacking key cellular proteins. PMID:24145437

  12. TULIPs: tunable, light-controlled interacting protein tags for cell biology.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Devin; Lin, Yuan; Wagner, Elizabeth; Hope, C Matthew; Zayner, Josiah; Antoniou, Chloe; Sosnick, Tobin R; Weiss, Eric L; Glotzer, Michael

    2012-03-04

    Naturally photoswitchable proteins offer a means of directly manipulating the formation of protein complexes that drive a diversity of cellular processes. We developed tunable light-inducible dimerization tags (TULIPs) based on a synthetic interaction between the LOV2 domain of Avena sativa phototropin 1 (AsLOV2) and an engineered PDZ domain (ePDZ). TULIPs can recruit proteins to diverse structures in living yeast and mammalian cells, either globally or with precise spatial control using a steerable laser. The equilibrium binding and kinetic parameters of the interaction are tunable by mutation, making TULIPs readily adaptable to signaling pathways with varying sensitivities and response times. We demonstrate the utility of TULIPs by conferring light sensitivity to functionally distinct components of the yeast mating pathway and by directing the site of cell polarization.

  13. ZASP Interacts with the Mechanosensing Protein Ankrd2 and p53 in the Signalling Network of Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Martinelli, Valentina C.; Kyle, W. Buck; Kojic, Snezana; Vitulo, Nicola; Li, Zhaohui; Belgrano, Anna; Maiuri, Paolo; Banks, Lawrence; Vatta, Matteo; Valle, Giorgio; Faulkner, Georgine

    2014-01-01

    ZASP is a cytoskeletal PDZ-LIM protein predominantly expressed in striated muscle. It forms multiprotein complexes and plays a pivotal role in the structural integrity of sarcomeres. Mutations in the ZASP protein are associated with myofibrillar myopathy, left ventricular non-compaction and dilated cardiomyopathy. The ablation of its murine homologue Cypher results in neonatal lethality. ZASP has several alternatively spliced isoforms, in this paper we clarify the nomenclature of its human isoforms as well as their dynamics and expression pattern in striated muscle. Interaction is demonstrated between ZASP and two new binding partners both of which have roles in signalling, regulation of gene expression and muscle differentiation; the mechanosensing protein Ankrd2 and the tumour suppressor protein p53. These proteins and ZASP form a triple complex that appears to facilitate poly-SUMOylation of p53. We also show the importance of two of its functional domains, the ZM-motif and the PDZ domain. The PDZ domain can bind directly to both Ankrd2 and p53 indicating that there is no competition between it and p53 for the same binding site on Ankrd2. However there is competition for this binding site between p53 and a region of the ZASP protein lacking the PDZ domain, but containing the ZM-motif. ZASP is negative regulator of p53 in transactivation experiments with the p53-responsive promoters, MDM2 and BAX. Mutations in the ZASP ZM-motif induce modification in protein turnover. In fact, two mutants, A165V and A171T, were not able to bind Ankrd2 and bound only poorly to alpha-actinin2. This is important since the A165V mutation is responsible for zaspopathy, a well characterized autosomal dominant distal myopathy. Although the mechanism by which this mutant causes disease is still unknown, this is the first indication of how a ZASP disease associated mutant protein differs from that of the wild type ZASP protein. PMID:24647531

  14. Prediction of Cancer Proteins by Integrating Protein Interaction, Domain Frequency, and Domain Interaction Data Using Machine Learning Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many proteins are known to be associated with cancer diseases. It is quite often that their precise functional role in disease pathogenesis remains unclear. A strategy to gain a better understanding of the function of these proteins is to make use of a combination of different aspects of proteomics data types. In this study, we extended Aragues's method by employing the protein-protein interaction (PPI) data, domain-domain interaction (DDI) data, weighted domain frequency score (DFS), and cancer linker degree (CLD) data to predict cancer proteins. Performances were benchmarked based on three kinds of experiments as follows: (I) using individual algorithm, (II) combining algorithms, and (III) combining the same classification types of algorithms. When compared with Aragues's method, our proposed methods, that is, machine learning algorithm and voting with the majority, are significantly superior in all seven performance measures. We demonstrated the accuracy of the proposed method on two independent datasets. The best algorithm can achieve a hit ratio of 89.4% and 72.8% for lung cancer dataset and lung cancer microarray study, respectively. It is anticipated that the current research could help understand disease mechanisms and diagnosis. PMID:25866773

  15. Evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 protein domains.

    PubMed

    O'Bleness, Majesta S; Dickens, C Michael; Dumas, Laura J; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Wyckoff, Gerald J; Sikela, James M

    2012-09-01

    DUF1220 protein domains exhibit the most extreme human lineage-specific (HLS) copy number increase of any protein coding region in the human genome and have recently been linked to evolutionary and pathological changes in brain size (e.g., 1q21-associated microcephaly). These findings lend support to the view that DUF1220 domain dosage is a key factor in the determination of primate (and human) brain size. Here we analyze 41 animal genomes and present the most complete account to date of the evolutionary history and genome organization of DUF1220 domains and the gene family that encodes them (NBPF). Included among the novel features identified by this analysis is a DUF1220 domain precursor in nonmammalian vertebrates, a unique predicted promoter common to all mammalian NBPF genes, six distinct clades into which DUF1220 sequences can be subdivided, and a previously unknown member of the NBPF gene family (NBPF25). Most importantly, we show that the exceptional HLS increase in DUF1220 copy number (from 102 in our last common ancestor with chimp to 272 in human; an average HLS increase of ~28 copies every million years since the Homo/Pan split) was driven by intragenic domain hyperamplification. This increase primarily involved a 4.7 kb, tandemly repeated three DUF1220 domain unit we have named the HLS DUF1220 triplet, a motif that is a likely candidate to underlie key properties unique to the Homo sapiens brain. Interestingly, all copies of the HLS DUF1220 triplet lie within a human-specific pericentric inversion that also includes the 1q12 C-band, a polymorphic heterochromatin expansion that is unique to the human genome. Both cytogenetic features likely played key roles in the rapid HLS DUF1220 triplet hyperamplification, which is among the most striking genomic changes specific to the human lineage.

  16. Regulation of ABCC6 trafficking and stability by a conserved C-terminal PDZ-like sequence.

    PubMed

    Xue, Peng; Crum, Chelsea M; Thibodeau, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in the ABCC6 ABC-transporter are causative of pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE). The loss of functional ABCC6 protein in the basolateral membrane of the kidney and liver is putatively associated with altered secretion of a circulatory factor. As a result, systemic changes in elastic tissues are caused by progressive mineralization and degradation of elastic fibers. Premature arteriosclerosis, loss of skin and vascular tone, and a progressive loss of vision result from this ectopic mineralization. However, the identity of the circulatory factor and the specific role of ABCC6 in disease pathophysiology are not known. Though recessive loss-of-function alleles are associated with alterations in ABCC6 expression and function, the molecular pathologies associated with the majority of PXE-causing mutations are also not known. Sequence analysis of orthologous ABCC6 proteins indicates the C-terminal sequences are highly conserved and share high similarity to the PDZ sequences found in other ABCC subfamily members. Genetic testing of PXE patients suggests that at least one disease-causing mutation is located in a PDZ-like sequence at the extreme C-terminus of the ABCC6 protein. To evaluate the role of this C-terminal sequence in the biosynthesis and trafficking of ABCC6, a series of mutations were utilized to probe changes in ABCC6 biosynthesis, membrane stability and turnover. Removal of this PDZ-like sequence resulted in decreased steady-state ABCC6 levels, decreased cell surface expression and stability, and mislocalization of the ABCC6 protein in polarized cells. These data suggest that the conserved, PDZ-like sequence promotes the proper biosynthesis and trafficking of the ABCC6 protein.

  17. Control of domain swapping in bovine odorant-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ramoni, Roberto; Vincent, Florence; Ashcroft, Alison E; Accornero, Paolo; Grolli, Stefano; Valencia, Christel; Tegoni, Mariella; Cambillau, Christian

    2002-01-01

    As revealed by the X-ray structure, bovine odorant-binding protein (OBPb) is a domain swapped dimer [Tegoni, Ramoni, Bignetti, Spinelli and Cambillau (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 863-867; Bianchet, Bains, Petosi, Pevsner, Snyder, Monaco and Amzel (1996) Nat. Struct. Biol. 3, 934-939]. This contrasts with all known mammalian OBPs, which are monomers, and in particular with porcine OBP (OBPp), sharing 42.3% identity with OBPb. By the mechanism of domain swapping, monomers are proposed to evolve into dimers and oligomers, as observed in human prion. Comparison of bovine and porcine OBP sequences pointed at OBPp glycine 121, in the hinge linking the beta-barrel to the alpha-helix. The absence of this residue in OBPb might explain why the normal lipocalin beta-turn is not formed. In order to decipher the domain swapping determinants we have produced a mutant of OBPb in which a glycine residue was inserted after position 121, and a mutant of OBPp in which glycine 121 was deleted. The latter mutation did not result in dimerization, while OBPb-121Gly+ became monomeric, suggesting that domain swapping was reversed. Careful structural analysis revealed that besides the presence of a glycine in the hinge, the dimer interface formed by the C-termini and by the presence of the lipocalins conserved disulphide bridge may also control domain swapping. PMID:11931632

  18. Single-domain protein folding: a multi-faceted problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Junier, Ivan; Ritort, Felix

    2006-08-01

    We review theoretical approaches, experiments and numerical simulations that have been recently proposed to investigate the folding problem in single-domain proteins. From a theoretical point of view, we emphasize the energy landscape approach. As far as experiments are concerned, we focus on the recent development of single-molecule techniques. In particular, we compare the results obtained with two main techniques: single protein force measurements with optical tweezers and single-molecule fluorescence in studies on the same protein (RNase H). This allows us to point out some controversial issues such as the nature of the denatured and intermediate states and possible folding pathways. After reviewing the various numerical simulation techniques, we show that on-lattice protein-like models can help to understand many controversial issues.

  19. Hendra virus fusion protein transmembrane domain contributes to pre-fusion protein stability.

    PubMed

    Webb, Stacy; Nagy, Tamas; Moseley, Hunter; Fried, Michael; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2017-02-17

    Enveloped viruses utilize fusion (F) proteins studding the surface of the virus to facilitate membrane fusion with a target cell membrane. Fusion of the viral envelope with a cellular membrane is required for release of viral genomic material so the virus can ultimately reproduce and spread. To drive fusion, the F protein undergoes an irreversible conformational change, transitioning from a meta-stable pre-fusion conformation to a more thermodynamically stable post-fusion structure. Understanding the elements which control stability of the pre-fusion state and triggering to the post-fusion conformation is important for understanding F protein function. Mutations in F protein transmembrane (TM) domains implicated the TM domain in the fusion process, but the structural and molecular details in fusion remain unclear. Previously, analytical ultracentrifugation was utilized to demonstrate that isolated TM domains of Hendra virus F protein associate in a monomer-trimer equilibrium (Smith EC, et al. Trimeric transmembrane domain interactions in paramyxovirus fusion proteins. 2013. J Biol Chem. 288, 35726). To determine factors driving this association, 140 paramyxovirus F protein TM domain sequences were analyzed. A heptad repeat of β-branched residues was found and analysis of the Hendra virus F TM domain revealed a heptad repeat leucine-isoleucine zipper motif (LIZ). Replacement of the LIZ with alanine resulted in dramatically reduced TM-TM association. Mutation of the LIZ in the whole protein resulted in decreased protein stability, including pre-fusion conformation stability. Together our data suggest that the heptad repeat LIZ contributed to TM-TM association and is important for F protein function and pre-fusion stability.

  20. Proteins on the catwalk: modelling the structural domains of the CCN family of proteins.

    PubMed

    Holbourn, Kenneth P; Perbal, Bernard; Ravi Acharya, K

    2009-03-01

    The CCN family of proteins (CCN1, CCN2, CCN3, CCN4, CCN5 and CCN6) are multifunctional mosaic proteins that play keys roles in crucial areas of physiology such as angiogenesis, skeletal development tumourigenesis, cell proliferation, adhesion and survival. This expansive repertoire of functions comes through a modular structure of 4 discrete domains that act both independently and in concert. How these interactions with ligands and with neighbouring domains lead to the biological effects is still to be explored but the molecular structure of the domains is likely to play an important role in this. In this review we have highlighted some of the key features of the individual domains of CCN family of proteins based on their biological effects using a homology modelling approach.

  1. The β1 domain of protein G can replace the chorismate mutase domain of the T-protein.

    PubMed

    Osuna, Joel; Flores, Humberto; Saab-Rincón, Gloria

    2012-02-17

    T-protein is composed of chorismate mutase (AroQ(T)) fused to the N-terminus of prephenate dehydrogenase (TyrA). Here, we report the replacement of AroQ(T) with the β1-domain of protein G (Gβ1). The TyrA domain shows a strong dehydrogenase activity within the context of this fusion, and our data indicate that Gβ1-TyrA folds into a dimeric conformation. Amino acid substitutions in the Gβ1 domain of Gβ1-TyrA identified residues involved in stabilizing the TyrA dimeric conformation. Gβ1 substitutions in the N-terminal β-hairpin eliminated Gβ1-TyrA expression, whereas Gβ1-TyrA tolerated Gβ1 substitutions in the C-terminal β-hairpin and in the α-helix. All of the characterized variants folded into a dimeric conformation. The importance of the β2-strand in forming a Gβ1 homo-dimerization interface explains the relevance of the first-β-hairpin in stabilizing the dimeric TyrA protein.

  2. Using support vector machine for improving protein-protein interaction prediction utilizing domain interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Singhal, Mudita; Shah, Anuj R.; Brown, Roslyn N.; Adkins, Joshua N.

    2010-10-02

    Understanding protein interactions is essential to gain insights into the biological processes at the whole cell level. The high-throughput experimental techniques for determining protein-protein interactions (PPI) are error prone and expensive with low overlap amongst them. Although several computational methods have been proposed for predicting protein interactions there is definite room for improvement. Here we present DomainSVM, a predictive method for PPI that uses computationally inferred domain-domain interaction values in a Support Vector Machine framework to predict protein interactions. DomainSVM method utilizes evidence of multiple interacting domains to predict a protein interaction. It outperforms existing methods of PPI prediction by achieving very high explanation ratios, precision, specificity, sensitivity and F-measure values in a 10 fold cross-validation study conducted on the positive and negative PPIs in yeast. A Functional comparison study using GO annotations on the positive and the negative test sets is presented in addition to discussing novel PPI predictions in Salmonella Typhimurium.

  3. Normalized Cut Algorithm for Automated Assignment of Protein Domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Samanta, M. P.; Liang, S.; Zha, H.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a novel computational method for automatic assignment of protein domains from structural data. At the core of our algorithm lies a recently proposed clustering technique that has been very successful for image-partitioning applications. This grap.,l-theory based clustering method uses the notion of a normalized cut to partition. an undirected graph into its strongly-connected components. Computer implementation of our method tested on the standard comparison set of proteins from the literature shows a high success rate (84%), better than most existing alternative In addition, several other features of our algorithm, such as reliance on few adjustable parameters, linear run-time with respect to the size of the protein and reduced complexity compared to other graph-theory based algorithms, would make it an attractive tool for structural biologists.

  4. Method for identification of rigid domains and hinge residues in proteins based on exhaustive enumeration.

    PubMed

    Sim, Jaehyun; Sim, Jun; Park, Eunsung; Lee, Julian

    2015-06-01

    Many proteins undergo large-scale motions where relatively rigid domains move against each other. The identification of rigid domains, as well as the hinge residues important for their relative movements, is important for various applications including flexible docking simulations. In this work, we develop a method for protein rigid domain identification based on an exhaustive enumeration of maximal rigid domains, the rigid domains not fully contained within other domains. The computation is performed by mapping the problem to that of finding maximal cliques in a graph. A minimal set of rigid domains are then selected, which cover most of the protein with minimal overlap. In contrast to the results of existing methods that partition a protein into non-overlapping domains using approximate algorithms, the rigid domains obtained from exact enumeration naturally contain overlapping regions, which correspond to the hinges of the inter-domain bending motion. The performance of the algorithm is demonstrated on several proteins.

  5. Identifying the hierarchy of dynamic domains in proteins using the data of molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Yesylevskyy, Semen O

    2010-04-01

    The Hierarchical Domain-Wise Alignment (HDWA) technique of domain identification in proteins is presented. HDWA is designed to identify hierarchically organized dynamic domains in proteins using the MD trajectories by eliminating systematic motions from MD trajectories recursively in a model-free manner. The method is tested on the proteins from different structural classes.

  6. ABI domain-containing proteins contribute to surface protein display and cell division in Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Matthew B; Wojcik, Brandon M; DeDent, Andrea C; Missiakas, Dominique M; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-10-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus requires cell wall anchored surface proteins to cause disease. During cell division, surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides are secreted into the cross-wall, a layer of newly synthesized peptidoglycan between separating daughter cells. The molecular determinants for the trafficking of surface proteins are, however, still unknown. We screened mutants with non-redundant transposon insertions by fluorescence-activated cell sorting for reduced deposition of protein A (SpA) into the staphylococcal envelope. Three mutants, each of which harboured transposon insertions in genes for transmembrane proteins, displayed greatly reduced envelope abundance of SpA and surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides. Characterization of the corresponding mutations identified three transmembrane proteins with abortive infectivity (ABI) domains, elements first described in lactococci for their role in phage exclusion. Mutations in genes for ABI domain proteins, designated spdA, spdB and spdC (surface protein display), diminish the expression of surface proteins with YSIRK signal peptides, but not of precursor proteins with conventional signal peptides. spdA, spdB and spdC mutants display an increase in the thickness of cross-walls and in the relative abundance of staphylococci with cross-walls, suggesting that spd mutations may represent a possible link between staphylococcal cell division and protein secretion.

  7. Investigating the Role of Large-Scale Domain Dynamics in Protein-Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Delaforge, Elise; Milles, Sigrid; Huang, Jie-rong; Bouvier, Denis; Jensen, Malene Ringkjøbing; Sattler, Michael; Hart, Darren J.; Blackledge, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered linkers provide multi-domain proteins with degrees of conformational freedom that are often essential for function. These highly dynamic assemblies represent a significant fraction of all proteomes, and deciphering the physical basis of their interactions represents a considerable challenge. Here we describe the difficulties associated with mapping the large-scale domain dynamics and describe two recent examples where solution state methods, in particular NMR spectroscopy, are used to investigate conformational exchange on very different timescales. PMID:27679800

  8. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of plant protein sequences. A domain homology between storage and lipid-transfer proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Henrissat, B; Popineau, Y; Kader, J C

    1988-01-01

    Hydrophobic-cluster analysis was used to characterize a conserved domain located near the C-terminal amino acid sequence of wheat (Triticum aestivum) storage proteins. This domain was transformed into a linear template for a global search for similarities in over 5200 protein sequences. In addition to proteins that had already been found to exhibit homology to wheat storage proteins, a previously unreported homology was found with non-specific lipid-transfer proteins from castor bean (Ricinus communis) and from spinach (Spinacia oleracea) leaf. Hydrophobic-cluster analysis of various members of the present protein group clearly shows a typical domain structure where (i) variable and conserved domains are located along the sequence at precise positions, (ii) the conserved domains probably reflect a common ancestor, and (iii) the unique properties of a given protein (chain cut into subunits, repetitive domains, trypsin-inhibitor active site) are associated with the variable domains. PMID:3214430

  9. Pathway logic modeling of protein functional domains in signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Talcott, C; Eker, S; Knapp, M; Lincoln, P; Laderoute, K

    2004-01-01

    Protein functional domains (PFDs) are consensus sequences within signaling molecules that recognize and assemble other signaling components into complexes. Here we describe the application of an approach called Pathway Logic to the symbolic modeling signal transduction networks at the level of PFDs. These models are developed using Maude, a symbolic language founded on rewriting logic. Models can be queried (analyzed) using the execution, search and model-checking tools of Maude. We show how signal transduction processes can be modeled using Maude at very different levels of abstraction involving either an overall state of a protein or its PFDs and their interactions. The key insight for the latter is our algebraic representation of binding interactions as a graph.

  10. Domain-specific functions of Stardust in Drosophila embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Leonie; Feicht, Sabine; Sun, Rui; Sen, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    In Drosophila, the adaptor protein Stardust is essential for the stabilization of the polarity determinant Crumbs in various epithelial tissues, including the embryonic epidermis, the follicular epithelium and photoreceptor cells of the compound eye. In turn, Stardust recruits another adaptor protein, PATJ, to the subapical region to support adherens junction formation and morphogenetic events. Moreover, Stardust binds to Lin-7, which is dispensable in epithelial cells but functions in postsynaptic vesicle fusion. Finally, Stardust has been reported to bind directly to PAR-6, thereby linking the Crumbs–Stardust–PATJ complex to the PAR-6/aPKC complex. PAR-6 and aPKC are also capable of directly binding Bazooka (the Drosophila homologue of PAR-3) to form the PAR/aPKC complex, which is essential for apical–basal polarity and cell–cell contact formation in most epithelia. However, little is known about the physiological relevance of these interactions in the embryonic epidermis of Drosophila in vivo. Thus, we performed a structure–function analysis of the annotated domains with GFP-tagged Stardust and evaluated the localization and function of the mutant proteins in epithelial cells of the embryonic epidermis. The data presented here confirm a crucial role of the PDZ domain in binding Crumbs and recruiting the protein to the subapical region. However, the isolated PDZ domain is not capable of being recruited to the cortex, and the SH3 domain is essential to support the binding to Crumbs. Notably, the conserved N-terminal regions (ECR1 and ECR2) are not crucial for epithelial polarity. Finally, the GUK domain plays an important role for the protein's function, which is not directly linked to Crumbs stabilization, and the L27N domain is essential for epithelial polarization independently of recruiting PATJ. PMID:28018665

  11. Experimental mapping of soluble protein domains using a hierarchical approach.

    PubMed

    Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Nguyen, Hau B; Cabantous, Stephanie; Mark, Brian L; Listwan, Pawel; Bell, Carolyn; Friedland, Natasha; Lockard, Meghan; Faille, Alexandre; Mourey, Lionel; Terwilliger, Thomas C; Waldo, Geoffrey S

    2011-10-01

    Exploring the function and 3D space of large multidomain protein targets often requires sophisticated experimentation to obtain the targets in a form suitable for structure determination. Screening methods capable of selecting well-expressed, soluble fragments from DNA libraries exist, but require the use of automation to maximize chances of picking a few good candidates. Here, we describe the use of an insertion dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) vector to select in-frame fragments and a split-GFP assay technology to filter-out constructs that express insoluble protein fragments. With the incorporation of an IPCR step to create high density, focused sublibraries of fragments, this cost-effective method can be performed manually with no a priori knowledge of domain boundaries while permitting single amino acid resolution boundary mapping. We used it on the well-characterized p85α subunit of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our methodology. We then successfully tested it onto the polyketide synthase PpsC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential drug target involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids in the cell envelope. X-ray quality crystals from the acyl-transferase (AT), dehydratase (DH) and enoyl-reductase (ER) domains have been obtained.

  12. Experimental mapping of soluble protein domains using a hierarchical approach

    PubMed Central

    Pedelacq, Jean-Denis; Nguyen, Hau B.; Cabantous, Stephanie; Mark, Brian L.; Listwan, Pawel; Bell, Carolyn; Friedland, Natasha; Lockard, Meghan; Faille, Alexandre; Mourey, Lionel; Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Waldo, Geoffrey S.

    2011-01-01

    Exploring the function and 3D space of large multidomain protein targets often requires sophisticated experimentation to obtain the targets in a form suitable for structure determination. Screening methods capable of selecting well-expressed, soluble fragments from DNA libraries exist, but require the use of automation to maximize chances of picking a few good candidates. Here, we describe the use of an insertion dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) vector to select in-frame fragments and a split-GFP assay technology to filter-out constructs that express insoluble protein fragments. With the incorporation of an IPCR step to create high density, focused sublibraries of fragments, this cost-effective method can be performed manually with no a priori knowledge of domain boundaries while permitting single amino acid resolution boundary mapping. We used it on the well-characterized p85α subunit of the phosphoinositide-3-kinase to demonstrate the robustness and efficiency of our methodology. We then successfully tested it onto the polyketide synthase PpsC from Mycobacterium tuberculosis, a potential drug target involved in the biosynthesis of complex lipids in the cell envelope. X-ray quality crystals from the acyl-transferase (AT), dehydratase (DH) and enoyl-reductase (ER) domains have been obtained. PMID:21771856

  13. AGL15, a MADS domain protein expressed in developing embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Heck, G R; Perry, S E; Nichols, K W; Fernandez, D E

    1995-01-01

    To extend our knowledge of genes expressed during early embryogenesis, the differential display technique was used to identify and isolate mRNA sequences that accumulate preferentially in young Brassica napus embryos. One of these genes encodes a new member of the MADS domain family of regulatory proteins; it has been designated AGL15 (for AGAMOUS-like). AGL15 shows a novel pattern of expression that is distinct from those of previously characterized family members. RNA gel blot analyses and in situ hybridization techniques were used to demonstrate that AGL15 mRNA accumulated primarily in the embryo and was present in all embryonic tissues, beginning at least as early as late globular stage in B. napus. Genomic and cDNA clones corresponding to two AGL15 genes from B. napus and the homologous single-copy gene from Arabidopsis, which is located on chromosome 5, were isolated and analyzed. Antibodies prepared against overexpressed Brassica AGL15 lacking the conserved MADS domain were used to probe immunoblots, and AGL15-related proteins were found in embryos of a variety of angiosperms, including plants as distantly related as maize. Based on these data, we suggest that AGL15 is likely to be an important component of the regulatory circuitry directing seed-specific processes in the developing embryo. PMID:7549483

  14. The binding domain structure of retinoblastoma-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Figge, J.; Breese, K.; Vajda, S.; Zhu, Q. L.; Eisele, L.; Andersen, T. T.; MacColl, R.; Friedrich, T.; Smith, T. F.

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (Rb), a cellular growth suppressor, complexes with viral and cellular proteins that contain a specific binding domain incorporating three invariant residues: Leu-X-Cys-X-Glu, where X denotes a nonconserved residue. Hydrophobic and electrostatic properties are strongly conserved in this segment even though the nonconserved amino acids vary considerably from one Rb-binding protein to another. In this report, we present a diagnostic computer pattern for a high-affinity Rb-binding domain featuring the three conserved residues as well as the conserved physico-chemical properties. Although the pattern encompasses only 10 residues (with only 4 of these explicitly defined), it exhibits 100% sensitivity and 99.95% specificity in database searches. This implies that a certain pattern of structural and physico-chemical properties encoded by this short sequence is sufficient to govern specific Rb binding. We also present evidence that the secondary structural conformation through this region is important for effective Rb binding. PMID:8382993

  15. Structure and evolution of the magnetochrome domains: no longer alone

    PubMed Central

    Arnoux, Pascal; Siponen, Marina I.; Lefèvre, Christopher T.; Ginet, Nicolas; Pignol, David

    2014-01-01

    Magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) can swim along Earth's magnetic field lines, thanks to the alignment of dedicated cytoplasmic organelles. These organelles, termed magnetosomes, are proteolipidic vesicles filled by a 35–120 nm crystal of either magnetite or greigite. The formation and alignment of magnetosomes are mediated by a group of specific genes, the mam genes, encoding the magnetosome-associated proteins. The whole process of magnetosome biogenesis can be divided into four sequential steps; (i) cytoplasmic membrane invagination, (ii) magnetosomes alignment, (iii) iron crystal nucleation and (iv) species-dependent mineral size and shape control. Since both magnetite and greigite are a mix of iron (III) and iron (II), iron redox state management within the magnetosome vesicle is a key issue. Recently, studies have started pointing out the importance of a MTB-specific c-type cytochrome domain found in several magnetosome-associated proteins (MamE, P, T, and X). This magnetochrome (MCR) domain is almost always found in tandem, and this tandem is either found alone (MamT), in combination with a PDZ domain (MamP), a domain of unknown function (MamX) or with a trypsin combined to one or two PDZ domains (MamE). By taking advantage of new genomic data available on MTB and a recent structural study of MamP, which helped define the MCR domain boundaries, we attempt to retrace the evolutionary history within and between the different MCR-containing proteins. We propose that the observed tandem repeat of MCR is the result of a convergent evolution and attempt to explain why this domain is rarely found alone. PMID:24723915

  16. Critical domains within the sequence of human organic anion transporting polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Hong, Mei

    2014-03-01

    Organic anion-transporting polypeptides (human OATPs; other species Oatps; gene family SLC21/SLCO) play important roles in drug absorption and distribution. In recent years, much information has been obtained on substrates that are transported by OATPs. Computer-based hydropathy analysis predicts that OATP family members share several structural features including twelve transmembrane domains (TMs), conserved cysteine residues at extracellular loop 5, glycosylation sites, PDZ binding domains as well as putative phosphorylation sites. Studies on transmembrane domains have identified several amino acids that are essential for substrate uptake; while mutation of the conserved cysteine residues and glycosylation sites resulted in mis-processing transporter proteins. The interaction with PDZ proteins and phosphorylation modification of OATPs, on the other hand, mainly regulate the trafficking of these transporters. Although progress has been made on revealing the critical domains of OATPs, information is still limited and more studies on these aspects are needed. A better understanding of the important structural domains of OATPs will shed light on future targeted drug design and a more in-depth analysis of inter-individual variability of drug disposition.

  17. Electroporation of the photosynthetic membrane: structural changes in protein and lipid-protein domains.

    PubMed Central

    Rosemberg, Y; Rotenberg, M; Korenstein, R

    1994-01-01

    A biological membrane undergoes a reversible permeability increase through structural changes in the lipid domain when exposed to high external electric fields. The present study shows the occurrence of electric field-induced changes in the conductance of the proton channel of the H(+)-ATPase as well as electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domain of photosystem (PS) II in the photosynthetic membrane. The study was carried out by analyzing the electric field-stimulated delayed luminescence (EPL), which originates from charge recombination in the protein complexes of PS I and II of photosynthetic vesicles. We established that a small fraction of the total electric field-induced conductance change was abolished by N,N'-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD), an inhibitor of the H(+)-ATPase. This reversible electric field-induced conductance change has characteristics of a small channel and possesses a lifetime < or = 1 ms. To detect electric field-induced changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II, we examined the effects of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) on EPL. Higher values of EPL were observed from vesicles that were exposed in the presence of PLA2 to an electroporating electric field than to a nonelectroporating electric field. The effect of the electroporating field was a long-lived one, lasting for a period > or = 2 min. This effect was attributed to long-lived electric field-induced structural changes in the lipid-protein domains of PS II. PMID:7811916

  18. A domain shared by the Polycomb group proteins Scm and ph mediates heterotypic and homotypic interactions.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A J; Kyba, M; Bornemann, D; Morgan, K; Brock, H W; Simon, J

    1997-11-01

    The Sex comb on midleg (Scm) and polyhomeotic (ph) proteins are members of the Polycomb group (PcG) of transcriptional repressors. PcG proteins maintain differential patterns of homeotic gene expression during development in Drosophila flies. The Scm and ph proteins share a homology domain with 38% identity over a length of 65 amino acids, termed the SPM domain, that is located at their respective C termini. Using the yeast two-hybrid system and in vitro protein-binding assays, we show that the SPM domain mediates direct interaction between Scm and ph. Binding studies with isolated SPM domains from Scm and ph show that the domain is sufficient for these protein interactions. These studies also show that the Scm-ph and Scm-Scm domain interactions are much stronger than the ph-ph domain interaction, indicating that the isolated domain has intrinsic binding specificity determinants. Analysis of site-directed point mutations identifies residues that are important for SPM domain function. These binding properties, predicted alpha-helical secondary structure, and conservation of hydrophobic residues prompt comparisons of the SPM domain to the helix-loop-helix and leucine zipper domains used for homotypic and heterotypic protein interactions in other transcriptional regulators. In addition to in vitro studies, we show colocalization of the Scm and ph proteins at polytene chromosome sites in vivo. We discuss the possible roles of the SPM domain in the assembly or function of molecular complexes of PcG proteins.

  19. Computational Prediction of Protein Function Based on Weighted Mapping of Domains and GO Terms

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Zhixia; Guo, Maozu; Dai, Qiguo; Wang, Chunyu; Li, Jin; Liu, Xiaoyan

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel method, SeekFun, to predict protein function based on weighted mapping of domains and GO terms. Firstly, a weighted mapping of domains and GO terms is constructed according to GO annotations and domain composition of the proteins. The association strength between domain and GO term is weighted by symmetrical conditional probability. Secondly, the mapping is extended along the true paths of the terms based on GO hierarchy. Finally, the terms associated with resident domains are transferred to host protein and real annotations of the host protein are determined by association strengths. Our careful comparisons demonstrate that SeekFun outperforms the concerned methods on most occasions. SeekFun provides a flexible and effective way for protein function prediction. It benefits from the well-constructed mapping of domains and GO terms, as well as the reasonable strategy for inferring annotations of protein from those of its domains. PMID:24868539

  20. Improving protein-protein interaction article classification using biological domain knowledge.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifei; Guo, Hongjian; Liu, Feng; Manderick, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Interaction Article Classification (IAC) is a specific text classification application in biological domain that tries to find out which articles describe Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) to help extract PPIs from biological literature more efficiently. However, the existing text representation and feature weighting schemes commonly used for text classification are not well suited for IAC. We capture and utilise biological domain knowledge, i.e. gene mentions also known as protein or gene names in the articles, to address the problem. We put forward a new gene mention order-based approach that highlights the important role of gene mentions to represent the texts. Furthermore, we also incorporate the information concerning gene mentions into a novel feature weighting scheme called Gene Mention-based Term Frequency (GMTF). By conducting experiments, we show that using the proposed representation and weighting schemes, our Interaction Article Classifier (IACer) performs better than other leading systems for the moment.

  1. A functional protein pore with a "retro" transmembrane domain.

    PubMed Central

    Cheley, S.; Braha, O.; Lu, X.; Conlan, S.; Bayley, H.

    1999-01-01

    Extended retro (reversed) peptide sequences have not previously been accommodated within functional proteins. Here, we show that the entire transmembrane portion of the beta-barrel of the pore-forming protein alpha-hemolysin can be formed by retrosequences comprising a total of 175 amino acid residues, 25 contributed by the central sequence of each subunit of the heptameric pore. The properties of wild-type and retro heptamers in planar bilayers are similar. The single-channel conductance of the retro pore is 15% less than that of the wild-type heptamer and its current-voltage relationship denotes close to ohmic behavior, while the wild-type pore is weakly rectifying. Both wild-type and retro pores are very weakly anion selective. These results and the examination of molecular models suggest that beta-barrels may be especially accepting of retro sequences compared to other protein folds. Indeed, the ability to form a retro domain could be diagnostic of a beta-barrel, explaining, for example, the activity of the retro forms of many membrane-permeabilizing peptides. By contrast with the wild-type subunits, monomeric retro subunits undergo premature assembly in the absence of membranes, most likely because the altered central sequence fails to interact with the remainder of the subunit, thereby initiating assembly. Despite this difficulty, a technique was devised for obtaining heteromeric pores containing both wild-type and retro subunits. Most probably as a consequence of unfavorable interstrand side-chain interactions, the heteromeric pores are less stable than either the wild-type or retro homoheptamers, as judged by the presence of subconductance states in single-channel recordings. Knowledge about the extraordinary plasticity of the transmembrane beta-barrel of alpha-hemolysin will be very useful in the de novo design of functional membrane proteins based on the beta-barrel motif. PMID:10386875

  2. Distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Ogawara, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    PASTA domains (penicillin-binding protein and serine/threonine kinase-associated domains) have been identified in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases of Gram-positive Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. They are believed to bind β-lactam antibiotics, and be involved in peptidoglycan metabolism, although their biological function is not definitively clarified. Actinobacteria, especially Streptomyces species, are distinct in that they undergo complex cellular differentiation and produce various antibiotics including β-lactams. This review focuses on the distribution of PASTA domains in penicillin-binding proteins and serine/threonine kinases in Actinobacteria. In Actinobacteria, PASTA domains are detectable exclusively in class A but not in class B penicillin-binding proteins, in sharp contrast to the cases in other bacteria. In penicillin-binding proteins, PASTA domains distribute independently from taxonomy with some distribution bias. Particularly interesting thing is that no Streptomyces species have penicillin-binding protein with PASTA domains. Protein kinases in Actinobacteria possess 0 to 5 PASTA domains in their molecules. Protein kinases in Streptomyces can be classified into three groups: no PASTA domain, 1 PASTA domain and 4 PASTA domain-containing groups. The 4 PASTA domain-containing groups can be further divided into two subgroups. The serine/threonine kinases in different groups may perform different functions. The pocket region in one of these subgroup is more dense and extended, thus it may be involved in binding of ligands like β-lactams more efficiently.

  3. Anti-idiotypic protein domains selected from protein A-based affibody libraries.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Malin; Axelsson, Lars; Uhlén, Mathias; Nygren, Per-Ake

    2002-08-15

    Three pairs of small protein domains showing binding behavior in analogy with anti-idiotypic antibodies have been selected using phage display technology. From an affibody protein library constructed by combinatorial variegation of the Fc binding surface of the 58 residue staphylococcal protein A (SPA)-derived domain Z, affibody variants have been selected to the parental SPA scaffold and to two earlier identified SPA-derived affibodies. One selected affibody (Z(SPA-1)) was shown to recognize each of the five domains of wild-type SPA with dissociation constants (K(D)) in the micromolar range. The binding of the Z(SPA-1) affibody to its parental structure was shown to involve the Fc binding site of SPA, while the Fab-binding site was not involved. Similarly, affibodies showing anti-idiotypic binding characteristics were also obtained when affibodies previously selected for binding to Taq DNA polymerase and human IgA, respectively, were used as targets for selections. The potential applications for these types of affinity pairs were exemplified by one-step protein recovery using affinity chromatography employing the specific interactions between the respective protein pair members. These experiments included the purification of the Z(SPA-1) affibody from a total Escherichia coli cell lysate using protein A-Sepharose, suggesting that this protein A/antiprotein A affinity pair could provide a basis for novel affinity gene fusion systems. The use of this type of small, robust, and easily expressed anti-idiotypic affibody pair for affinity technology applications, including self-assembled protein networks, is discussed.

  4. Structure of a two-CAP-domain protein from the human hookworm parasite Necator americanus

    SciTech Connect

    Asojo, Oluwatoyin A.

    2011-05-01

    The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite N. americanus refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å is presented. Major proteins secreted by the infective larval stage hookworms upon host entry include Ancylostoma secreted proteins (ASPs), which are characterized by one or two CAP (cysteine-rich secretory protein/antigen 5/pathogenesis related-1) domains. The CAP domain has been reported in diverse phylogenetically unrelated proteins, but has no confirmed function. The first structure of a two-CAP-domain protein, Na-ASP-1, from the major human hookworm parasite Necator americanus was refined to a resolution limit of 2.2 Å. The structure was solved by molecular replacement (MR) using Na-ASP-2, a one-CAP-domain ASP, as the search model. The correct MR solution could only be obtained by truncating the polyalanine model of Na-ASP-2 and removing several loops. The structure reveals two CAP domains linked by an extended loop. Overall, the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain is more similar to Na-ASP-2 than to the amino-terminal CAP domain. A large central cavity extends from the amino-terminal CAP domain to the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain, encompassing the putative CAP-binding cavity. The putative CAP-binding cavity is a characteristic cavity in the carboxyl-terminal CAP domain that contains a His and Glu pair. These residues are conserved in all single-CAP-domain proteins, but are absent in the amino-terminal CAP domain. The conserved His residues are oriented such that they appear to be capable of directly coordinating a zinc ion as observed for CAP proteins from reptile venoms. This first structure of a two-CAP-domain ASP can serve as a template for homology modeling of other two-CAP-domain proteins.

  5. HIV-1 Nucleocapsid Mimics the Membrane Adaptor Syntenin PDZ to Gain Access to ESCRTs and Promote Virus Budding.

    PubMed

    Sette, Paola; O'Connor, Sarah K; Yerramilli, V Siddartha; Dussupt, Vincent; Nagashima, Kunio; Chutiraka, Kasana; Lingappa, Jaisri; Scarlata, Suzanne; Bouamr, Fadila

    2016-03-09

    HIV-1 recruits cellular endosomal sorting complexes required for transport (ESCRTs) to bud virions from the membrane. Disruption of the viral nucleocapsid (NC) domain integrity affects HIV-1 budding. However, the molecular mechanisms of NC's involvement in HIV budding remain unclear. We find that NC mimics the PDZ domains of syntenin, a membrane-binding adaptor involved in cell-to-cell contact/communication, to capture the Bro1 domain of ALIX, which is an ESCRTs recruiting cellular adaptor. NC binds membranes via basic residues in either the distal or proximal zinc fingers, and NC-membrane binding is essential for Bro1 capture and HIV-1 budding. Removal of RNA enhances NC membrane binding, suggesting a dynamic competition between membrane lipids and RNA for the same binding sites in NC. Remarkably, syntenin PDZ can substitute for NC function in HIV-1 budding. Thus, NC mimics syntenin PDZs to function as a membrane-binding adaptor critical for HIV-1 budding at specific microdomains of the membrane.

  6. Structural organization and interactions of transmembrane domains in tetraspanin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V; Metcalf, Douglas G; DeGrado, William F; Hemler, Martin E

    2005-01-01

    Background Proteins of the tetraspanin family contain four transmembrane domains (TM1-4) linked by two extracellular loops and a short intracellular loop, and have short intracellular N- and C-termini. While structure and function analysis of the larger extracellular loop has been performed, the organization and role of transmembrane domains have not been systematically assessed. Results Among 28 human tetraspanin proteins, the TM1-3 sequences display a distinct heptad repeat motif (abcdefg)n. In TM1, position a is occupied by structurally conserved bulky residues and position d contains highly conserved Asn and Gly residues. In TM2, position a is occupied by conserved small residues (Gly/Ala/Thr), and position d has a conserved Gly and two bulky aliphatic residues. In TM3, three a positions of the heptad repeat are filled by two leucines and a glutamate/glutamine residue, and two d positions are occupied by either Phe/Tyr or Val/Ile/Leu residues. No heptad motif is apparent in TM4 sequences. Mutations of conserved glycines in human CD9 (Gly25 and Gly32 in TM1; Gly67 and Gly74 in TM2) caused aggregation of mutant proteins inside the cell. Modeling of the TM1-TM2 interface in CD9, using a novel algorithm, predicts tight packing of conserved bulky residues against conserved Gly residues along the two helices. The homodimeric interface of CD9 was mapped, by disulfide cross-linking of single-cysteine mutants, to the vicinity of residues Leu14 and Phe17 in TM1 (positions g and c) and Gly77, Gly80 and Ala81 in TM2 (positions d, g and a, respectively). Mutations of a and d residues in both TM1 and TM2 (Gly25, Gly32, Gly67 and Gly74), involved in intramolecular TM1-TM2 interaction, also strongly diminished intermolecular interaction, as assessed by cross-linking of Cys80. Conclusion Our results suggest that tetraspanin intra- and intermolecular interactions are mediated by conserved residues in adjacent, but distinct regions of TM1 and TM2. A key structural element that

  7. Mutual effects of disorder and order in fusion proteins between intrinsically disordered domains and fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Lotti, Marina; Longhi, Sonia

    2012-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins are being paid an increasing amount of interest due to the understanding of the crucial role that flexible regions play in molecular recognition and in signaling. Accordingly, reports focusing on the structural and functional characterization of intrinsically disordered proteins or regions are growing exponentially. Relatively few studies have however been reported on the mutual effects of ordered and disordered moieties in artificial fusion proteins. In this review, we focus on the few available experimental data based on the use of chimeras in which fluorescent proteins were fused to disordered domains of different lengths, compactness and propensity to form secondary structures. The impact of the artificial fusion on the conformational and functional properties of the resulting proteins is discussed.

  8. CDD/SPARCLE: functional classification of proteins via subfamily domain architectures.

    PubMed

    Marchler-Bauer, Aron; Bo, Yu; Han, Lianyi; He, Jane; Lanczycki, Christopher J; Lu, Shennan; Chitsaz, Farideh; Derbyshire, Myra K; Geer, Renata C; Gonzales, Noreen R; Gwadz, Marc; Hurwitz, David I; Lu, Fu; Marchler, Gabriele H; Song, James S; Thanki, Narmada; Wang, Zhouxi; Yamashita, Roxanne A; Zhang, Dachuan; Zheng, Chanjuan; Geer, Lewis Y; Bryant, Stephen H

    2017-01-04

    NCBI's Conserved Domain Database (CDD) aims at annotating biomolecular sequences with the location of evolutionarily conserved protein domain footprints, and functional sites inferred from such footprints. An archive of pre-computed domain annotation is maintained for proteins tracked by NCBI's Entrez database, and live search services are offered as well. CDD curation staff supplements a comprehensive collection of protein domain and protein family models, which have been imported from external providers, with representations of selected domain families that are curated in-house and organized into hierarchical classifications of functionally distinct families and sub-families. CDD also supports comparative analyses of protein families via conserved domain architectures, and a recent curation effort focuses on providing functional characterizations of distinct subfamily architectures using SPARCLE: Subfamily Protein Architecture Labeling Engine. CDD can be accessed at https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/Structure/cdd/cdd.shtml.

  9. The Leptospiral Antigen Lp49 is a Two-Domain Protein with Putative Protein Binding Function

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Giuseppe,P.; Oliveira Neves, F.; Nascimento, A.; Gomes Guimaraes, B.

    2008-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira is the etiological agent of leptospirosis, a life-threatening disease that affects populations worldwide. Currently available vaccines have limited effectiveness and therapeutic interventions are complicated by the difficulty in making an early diagnosis of leptospirosis. The genome of Leptospira interrogans was recently sequenced and comparative genomic analysis contributed to the identification of surface antigens, potential candidates for development of new vaccines and serodiagnosis. Lp49 is a membrane-associated protein recognized by antibodies present in sera from early and convalescent phases of leptospirosis patients. Its crystal structure was determined by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction using selenomethionine-labelled crystals and refined at 2.0 Angstroms resolution. Lp49 is composed of two domains and belongs to the all-beta-proteins class. The N-terminal domain folds in an immunoglobulin-like beta-sandwich structure, whereas the C-terminal domain presents a seven-bladed beta-propeller fold. Structural analysis of Lp49 indicates putative protein-protein binding sites, suggesting a role in Leptospira-host interaction. This is the first crystal structure of a leptospiral antigen described to date.

  10. The SBASE protein domain library, release 2.0: a collection of annotated protein sequence segments.

    PubMed Central

    Pongor, S; Skerl, V; Cserzö, M; Hátsági, Z; Simon, G; Bevilacqua, V

    1993-01-01

    SBASE 2.0 is the second release of SBASE, a collection of annotated protein domain sequences. SBASE entries represent various structural, functional, ligand-binding and topogenic segments of proteins [Pongor, S. et al. (1993) Prot. Eng., in press]. This release contains 34,518 entries provided with standardized names and it is cross-referenced to the major protein and nucleic acid databanks as well as to the PROSITE catalog of protein sequence patterns [Bairoch, A. (1992) Nucl. Acids Res., 20 suppl, 2013-2018]. SBASE can be used for establishing domain homologies using different database-search tools such as FASTA [Lipman and Pearson (1985) Science, 227, 1436-1441], FASTDB [Brutlag et al. (1990) Comp. Appl. Biosci., 6, 237-245] or BLAST3 [Altschul and Lipman (1990) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA, 87, 5509-5513] which is especially useful in the case of loosely defined domain types for which efficient consensus patterns can not be established. SBASE 2.0 and a set of search and retrieval tools are freely available on request to the authors or by anonymous 'ftp' file transfer from mean value of ftp.icgeb.trieste.it. PMID:8332532

  11. Proteins with an Euonymus lectin-like domain are ubiquitous in Embryophyta

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Cloning of the Euonymus lectin led to the discovery of a novel domain that also occurs in some stress-induced plant proteins. The distribution and the diversity of proteins with an Euonymus lectin (EUL) domain were investigated using detailed analysis of sequences in publicly accessible genome and transcriptome databases. Results Comprehensive in silico analyses indicate that the recently identified Euonymus europaeus lectin domain represents a conserved structural unit of a novel family of putative carbohydrate-binding proteins, which will further be referred to as the Euonymus lectin (EUL) family. The EUL domain is widespread among plants. Analysis of retrieved sequences revealed that some sequences consist of a single EUL domain linked to an unrelated N-terminal domain whereas others comprise two in tandem arrayed EUL domains. A new classification system for these lectins is proposed based on the overall domain architecture. Evolutionary relationships among the sequences with EUL domains are discussed. Conclusion The identification of the EUL family provides the first evidence for the occurrence in terrestrial plants of a highly conserved plant specific domain. The widespread distribution of the EUL domain strikingly contrasts the more limited or even narrow distribution of most other lectin domains found in plants. The apparent omnipresence of the EUL domain is indicative for a universal role of this lectin domain in plants. Although there is unambiguous evidence that several EUL domains possess carbohydrate-binding activity further research is required to corroborate the carbohydrate-binding properties of different members of the EUL family. PMID:19930663

  12. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Proteins convey the majority of biochemical and cellular activities in organisms. Over the course of evolution, proteins undergo normal sequence mutations as well as large scale mutations involving domain duplication and/or domain shuffling. These events result in the generation of new proteins and protein families. Processes that affect proteome evolution drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, change over the course of metazoan evolution, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion events within protein families and domains, was examined using the proteomes of 9 metazoan and two outgroup species. Results In studying members of the three major metazoan groups, the vertebrates, arthropods, and nematodes, we found that the number of protein families increased at the majority of lineages over the course of metazoan evolution where the magnitude of these increases was greatest at the lineages leading to mammals. In contrast, the number of protein domains decreased at most lineages and at all terminal lineages. This resulted in a weak correlation between protein family birth and domain birth; however, the correlation between domain birth and domain member duplication was quite strong. These data suggest that domain birth and protein family birth occur via different mechanisms, and that domain shuffling plays a role in the formation of protein families. The ratio of protein family birth to protein domain birth (domain shuffling index) suggests that shuffling had a more demonstrable effect on protein families in nematodes and arthropods than in vertebrates. Through the contrast of high and low domain shuffling indices at the lineages of Trichinella spiralis and Gallus gallus, we propose a link between protein redundancy and evolutionary changes controlled by domain shuffling; however, the speed of adaptation among the different lineages was relatively invariant. Evaluating the functions of protein families that appeared or disappeared at the

  13. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting in a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.

  14. CDvist: A webserver for identification and visualization of conserved domains in protein sequences

    DOE PAGES

    Adebali, Ogun; Ortega, Davi R.; Zhulin, Igor B.

    2014-12-18

    Identification of domains in protein sequences allows their assigning to biological functions. Several webservers exist for identification of protein domains using similarity searches against various databases of protein domain models. However, none of them provides comprehensive domain coverage while allowing bulk querying and their visualization schemes can be improved. To address these issues, we developed CDvist (a comprehensive domain visualization tool), which combines the best available search algorithms and databases into a user-friendly framework. First, a given protein sequence is matched to domain models using high-specificity tools and only then unmatched segments are subjected to more sensitive algorithms resulting inmore » a best possible comprehensive coverage. In conclusion, bulk querying and rich visualization and download options provide improved functionality to domain architecture analysis.« less

  15. Co-evolutionary Analysis of Domains in Interacting Proteins Reveals Insights into Domain–Domain Interactions Mediating Protein–Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Jothi, Raja; Cherukuri, Praveen F.; Tasneem, Asba; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in functional genomics have helped generate large-scale high-throughput protein interaction data. Such networks, though extremely valuable towards molecular level understanding of cells, do not provide any direct information about the regions (domains) in the proteins that mediate the interaction. Here, we performed co-evolutionary analysis of domains in interacting proteins in order to understand the degree of co-evolution of interacting and non-interacting domains. Using a combination of sequence and structural analysis, we analyzed protein–protein interactions in F1-ATPase, Sec23p/Sec24p, DNA-directed RNA polymerase and nuclear pore complexes, and found that interacting domain pair(s) for a given interaction exhibits higher level of co-evolution than the noninteracting domain pairs. Motivated by this finding, we developed a computational method to test the generality of the observed trend, and to predict large-scale domain–domain interactions. Given a protein–protein interaction, the proposed method predicts the domain pair(s) that is most likely to mediate the protein interaction. We applied this method on the yeast interactome to predict domain–domain interactions, and used known domain–domain interactions found in PDB crystal structures to validate our predictions. Our results show that the prediction accuracy of the proposed method is statistically significant. Comparison of our prediction results with those from two other methods reveals that only a fraction of predictions are shared by all the three methods, indicating that the proposed method can detect known interactions missed by other methods. We believe that the proposed method can be used with other methods to help identify previously unrecognized domain–domain interactions on a genome scale, and could potentially help reduce the search space for identifying interaction sites. PMID:16949097

  16. Archaeal surface layer proteins contain beta propeller, PKD, and beta helix domains and are related to metazoan cell surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hua; Takagi, Junichi; Liu, Jin-huan; Lindgren, Sara; Zhang, Rong-guang; Joachimiak, A; Wang, Jia-huai; Springer, Timothy A

    2002-10-01

    The surface layer of archaeobacteria protects cells from extreme environments and, in Methanosarcina, may regulate cell adhesion. We identify three domain types that account for the complete architecture of numerous Methanosarcina surface layer proteins (SLPs). We solve the crystal structure for two of these domains, which correspond to the two N-terminal domains of an M. mazei SLP. One domain displays a unique, highly symmetrical, seven-bladed beta propeller fold, and the other belongs to the polycystic kidney disease (PKD) superfamily fold. The third domain is predicted to adopt a beta helix fold. These domains have homologs in metazoan cell surface proteins, suggesting remarkable relationships between domains in archaeal SLPs and metazoan cell surface proteins.

  17. Impact of protein domains on PE_PGRS30 polar localization in Mycobacteria.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Flavio; Maulucci, Giuseppe; Minerva, Mariachiara; Anoosheh, Saber; Palucci, Ivana; Iantomasi, Raffaella; Palmieri, Valentina; Camassa, Serena; Sali, Michela; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Bitter, Wilbert; Manganelli, Riccardo; De Spirito, Marco; Delogu, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    PE_PGRS proteins are unique to the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and a number of other pathogenic mycobacteria. PE_PGRS30, which is required for the full virulence of M. tuberculosis (Mtb), has three main domains, i.e. an N-terminal PE domain, repetitive PGRS domain and the unique C-terminal domain. To investigate the role of these domains, we expressed a GFP-tagged PE_PGRS30 protein and a series of its functional deletion mutants in different mycobacterial species (Mtb, Mycobacterium bovis BCG and Mycobacterium smegmatis) and analysed protein localization by confocal microscopy. We show that PE_PGRS30 localizes at the mycobacterial cell poles in Mtb and M. bovis BCG but not in M. smegmatis and that the PGRS domain of the protein strongly contributes to protein cellular localization in Mtb. Immunofluorescence studies further showed that the unique C-terminal domain of PE_PGRS30 is not available on the surface, except when the PGRS domain is missing. Immunoblot demonstrated that the PGRS domain is required to maintain the protein strongly associated with the non-soluble cellular fraction. These results suggest that the repetitive GGA-GGN repeats of the PGRS domain contain specific sequences that contribute to protein cellular localization and that polar localization might be a key step in the PE_PGRS30-dependent virulence mechanism.

  18. Comparative analysis of SET domain proteins in maize and Arabidopsis reveals multiple duplications preceding the divergence of monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nathan M; Napoli, Carolyn A; Selinger, David A; Pandey, Ritu; Cone, Karen C; Chandler, Vicki L; Kaeppler, Heidi F; Kaeppler, Shawn M

    2003-06-01

    Histone proteins play a central role in chromatin packaging, and modification of histones is associated with chromatin accessibility. SET domain [Su(var)3-9, Enhancer-of-zeste, Trithorax] proteins are one class of proteins that have been implicated in regulating gene expression through histone methylation. The relationships of 22 SET domain proteins from maize (Zea mays) and 32 SET domain proteins from Arabidopsis were evaluated by phylogenetic analysis and domain organization. Our analysis reveals five classes of SET domain proteins in plants that can be further divided into 19 orthology groups. In some cases, such as the Enhancer of zeste-like and trithorax-like proteins, plants and animals contain homologous proteins with a similar organization of domains outside of the SET domain. However, a majority of plant SET domain proteins do not have an animal homolog with similar domain organization, suggesting that plants have unique mechanisms to establish and maintain chromatin states. Although the domains present in plant and animal SET domain proteins often differ, the domains found in the plant proteins have been generally implicated in protein-protein interactions, indicating that most SET domain proteins operate in complexes. Combined analysis of the maize and Arabidopsis SET domain proteins reveals that duplication of SET domain proteins in plants is extensive and has occurred via multiple mechanisms that preceded the divergence of monocots and dicots.

  19. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  20. Functional domains of plant chimeric calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase: regulation by autoinhibitory and visinin-like domains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandiran, S.; Takezawa, D.; Wang, W.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1997-01-01

    A novel calcium-binding calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CCaMK) with a catalytic domain, calmodulin-binding domain, and a neural visinin-like domain was cloned and characterized from plants [Patil et al., (1995) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 92, 4797-4801; Takezawa et al. (1996) J. Biol. Chem. 271, 8126-8132]. The mechanisms of CCaMK activation by calcium and calcium/calmodulin were investigated using various deletion mutants. The use of deletion mutants of CCaMK lacking either one, two, or all three calcium-binding EF hands indicated that all three calcium-binding sites in the visinin-like domain were crucial for the full calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity. As each calcium-binding EF hand was deleted, there was a gradual reduction in calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase activity from 100 to 4%. Another mutant (amino acids 1-322) which lacks both the visinin-like domain containing three EF hands and the calmodulin-binding domain was constitutively active, indicating the presence of an autoinhibitory domain around the calmodulin-binding domain. By using various synthetic peptides and the constitutively active mutant, we have shown that CCaMK contains an autoinhibitory domain within the residues 322-340 which overlaps its calmodulin-binding domain. Kinetic studies with both ATP and the GS peptide substrate suggest that the autoinhibitory domain of CCaMK interacts only with the peptide substrate binding motif of the catalytic domain, but not with the ATP-binding motif.

  1. The role of internal duplication in the evolution of multi-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Nacher, J C; Hayashida, M; Akutsu, T

    2010-08-01

    Many proteins consist of several structural domains. These multi-domain proteins have likely been generated by selective genome growth dynamics during evolution to perform new functions as well as to create structures that fold on a biologically feasible time scale. Domain units frequently evolved through a variety of genetic shuffling mechanisms. Here we examine the protein domain statistics of more than 1000 organisms including eukaryotic, archaeal and bacterial species. The analysis extends earlier findings on asymmetric statistical laws for proteome to a wider variety of species. While proteins are composed of a wide range of domains, displaying a power-law decay, the computation of domain families for each protein reveals an exponential distribution, characterizing a protein universe composed of a thin number of unique families. Structural studies in proteomics have shown that domain repeats, or internal duplicated domains, represent a small but significant fraction of genome. In spite of its importance, this observation has been largely overlooked until recently. We model the evolutionary dynamics of proteome and demonstrate that these distinct distributions are in fact rooted in an internal duplication mechanism. This process generates the contemporary protein structural domain universe, determines its reduced thickness, and tames its growth. These findings have important implications, ranging from protein interaction network modeling to evolutionary studies based on fundamental mechanisms governing genome expansion.

  2. SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Xu, A-Man

    2017-01-01

    Lysine methylation plays a vital role in histone modification. Deregulations of lysine methyltransferases and demethylases have been frequently observed in human cancers. The SET and MYND domain containing protein 3 (SMYD3) is a novel histone lysine methyltransferase and it functions by regulating chromatin during the development of myocardial and skeletal muscle. It has been recently unveiled to play significant roles in human cancer genesis and progression via regulating various key cancer-associated genes and pathways and promoting cell proliferation and migration. Upregulation of SMYD3 expression is present in multiple cancer types, suggesting it as a potential prognostic marker. Herein the structure, substrates and targets of SMYD3, and its effects on initiation, invasion and metastasis of diverse tumors (e.g., esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, gastric cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma, cholangiocarcinoma, breast cancer, prostate cancer, and leukemia) are systematically reviewed, providing clues for the development of novel SMYD3-specific personalized anti-cancer therapy. SMYD3 inhibitors (e.g., BCI-121 and novobiocin) could hopefully fight against tumors with efficacy. PMID:28123630

  3. Characterization of domain-peptide interaction interface: prediction of SH3 domain-mediated protein-protein interaction network in yeast by generic structure-based models.

    PubMed

    Hou, Tingjun; Li, Nan; Li, Youyong; Wang, Wei

    2012-05-04

    Determination of the binding specificity of SH3 domain, a peptide recognition module (PRM), is important to understand their biological functions and reconstruct the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. In the present study, the SH3-peptide interactions for both class I and II SH3 domains were characterized by the intermolecular residue-residue interaction network. We developed generic MIEC-SVM models to infer SH3 domain-peptide recognition specificity that achieved satisfactory prediction accuracy. By investigating the domain-peptide recognition mechanisms at the residue level, we found that the class-I and class-II binding peptides have different binding modes even though they occupy the same binding site of SH3. Furthermore, we predicted the potential binding partners of SH3 domains in the yeast proteome and constructed the SH3-mediated protein-protein interaction network. Comparison with the experimentally determined interactions confirmed the effectiveness of our approach. This study showed that our sophisticated computational approach not only provides a powerful platform to decipher protein recognition code at the molecular level but also allows identification of peptide-mediated protein interactions at a proteomic scale. We believe that such an approach is general to be applicable to other domain-peptide interactions.

  4. Small Molecule-Induced Domain Swapping as a Mechanism for Controlling Protein Function and Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Karchin, Joshua M.; Ha, Jeung-Hoi; Namitz, Kevin E.; Cosgrove, Michael S.; Loh, Stewart N.

    2017-01-01

    Domain swapping is the process by which identical proteins exchange reciprocal segments to generate dimers. Here we introduce induced domain swapping (INDOS) as a mechanism for regulating protein function. INDOS employs a modular design consisting of the fusion of two proteins: a recognition protein that binds a triggering molecule, and a target protein that undergoes a domain swap in response to binding of the triggering ligand. The recognition protein (FK506 binding protein) is inserted into functionally-inactivated point mutants of two target proteins (staphylococcal nuclease and ribose binding protein). Binding of FK506 to the FKBP domain causes the target domain to first unfold, then refold via domain swap. The inactivating mutations become ‘swapped out’ in the dimer, increasing nuclease and ribose binding activities by 100-fold and 15-fold, respectively, restoring them to near wild-type values. INDOS is intended to convert an arbitrary protein into a functional switch, and is the first example of rational design in which a small molecule is used to trigger protein domain swapping and subsequent activation of biological function. PMID:28287617

  5. Development of a protein microarray using sequence-specific DNA binding domain on DNA chip surface

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Yoo Seong; Pack, Seung Pil; Yoo, Young Je . E-mail: yjyoo@snu.ac.kr

    2005-04-22

    A protein microarray based on DNA microarray platform was developed to identify protein-protein interactions in vitro. The conventional DNA chip surface by 156-bp PCR product was prepared for a substrate of protein microarray. High-affinity sequence-specific DNA binding domain, GAL4 DNA binding domain, was introduced to the protein microarray as fusion partner of a target model protein, enhanced green fluorescent protein. The target protein was oriented immobilized directly on the DNA chip surface. Finally, monoclonal antibody of the target protein was used to identify the immobilized protein on the surface. This study shows that the conventional DNA chip can be used to make a protein microarray directly, and this novel protein microarray can be applicable as a tool for identifying protein-protein interactions.

  6. Genetic, structural, and molecular insights into the function of ras of complex proteins domains.

    PubMed

    Civiero, Laura; Dihanich, Sybille; Lewis, Patrick A; Greggio, Elisa

    2014-07-17

    Ras of complex proteins (ROC) domains were identified in 2003 as GTP binding modules in large multidomain proteins from Dictyostelium discoideum. Research into the function of these domains exploded with their identification in a number of proteins linked to human disease, including leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) and death-associated protein kinase 1 (DAPK1) in Parkinson's disease and cancer, respectively. This surge in research has resulted in a growing body of data revealing the role that ROC domains play in regulating protein function and signaling pathways. In this review, recent advances in the structural information available for proteins containing ROC domains, along with insights into enzymatic function and the integration of ROC domains as molecular switches in a cellular and organismal context, are explored.

  7. The CRM domain: an RNA binding module derived from an ancient ribosome-associated protein.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Alice; Klipcan, Larik; Ostersetzer, Oren; Kawamura, Tetsuya; Asakura, Yukari; Watkins, Kenneth P

    2007-01-01

    The CRS1-YhbY domain (also called the CRM domain) is represented as a stand-alone protein in Archaea and Bacteria, and in a family of single- and multidomain proteins in plants. The function of this domain is unknown, but structural data and the presence of the domain in several proteins known to interact with RNA have led to the proposal that it binds RNA. Here we describe a phylogenetic analysis of the domain, its incorporation into diverse proteins in plants, and biochemical properties of a prokaryotic and eukaryotic representative of the domain family. We show that a bacterial member of the family, Escherichia coli YhbY, is associated with pre-50S ribosomal subunits, suggesting that YhbY functions in ribosome assembly. GFP fused to a single-domain CRM protein from maize localizes to the nucleolus, suggesting that an analogous activity may have been retained in plants. We show further that an isolated maize CRM domain has RNA binding activity in vitro, and that a small motif shared with KH RNA binding domains, a conserved "GxxG" loop, contributes to its RNA binding activity. These and other results suggest that the CRM domain evolved in the context of ribosome function prior to the divergence of Archaea and Bacteria, that this function has been maintained in extant prokaryotes, and that the domain was recruited to serve as an RNA binding module during the evolution of plant genomes.

  8. Defining the Domain Arrangement of the Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex Component Rictor Protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Ping; Zhang, Ning; Nussinov, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complexes play a pivotal role in the cell. Raptor and Rictor proteins interact with mTOR to form two distinct complexes, mTORC1 and mTORC2, respectively. While the domain structure of Raptor is known, current bioinformatics tools failed to classify the domains in Rictor. Here we focus on identifying specific domains in Rictor by searching for conserved regions. We scanned the pdb structural database and constructed three protein domain datasets. Next we carried out multiple pairwise sequence alignments of the proteins in the domain dataset. By analyzing the z-scores of Rictor sequence similarity to protein sequences in the dataset, we assigned the structural and functional domains of Rictor. We found that, like Raptor, Rictor also has HEAT and WD40 domains, which could be the common motif binding to mTORC. Rictor may also have pleckstrin homology domains, which mediate cellular localization and transmit signals to downstream targets, as well as a domain that is homologous to 50S protein L17 and human 39S protein L17. This putative ribosome binding domain could mediate mTORC2–ribosome interaction. PMID:26176550

  9. Structure of the C-terminal heme-binding domain of THAP domain containing protein 4 from Homo sapiens

    SciTech Connect

    Bianchetti, Christopher M.; Bingman, Craig A.; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2012-03-15

    The thanatos (the Greek god of death)-associated protein (THAP) domain is a sequence-specific DNA-binding domain that contains a C2-CH (Cys-Xaa{sub 2-4}-Cys-Xaa{sub 35-50}-Cys-Xaa{sub 2}-His) zinc finger that is similar to the DNA domain of the P element transposase from Drosophila. THAP-containing proteins have been observed in the proteome of humans, pigs, cows, chickens, zebrafish, Drosophila, C. elegans, and Xenopus. To date, there are no known THAP domain proteins in plants, yeast, or bacteria. There are 12 identified human THAP domain-containing proteins (THAP0-11). In all human THAP protein, the THAP domain is located at the N-terminus and is {approx}90 residues in length. Although all of the human THAP-containing proteins have a homologous N-terminus, there is extensive variation in both the predicted structure and length of the remaining protein. Even though the exact function of these THAP proteins is not well defined, there is evidence that they play a role in cell proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle modulation, chromatin modification, and transcriptional regulation. THAP-containing proteins have also been implicated in a number of human disease states including heart disease, neurological defects, and several types of cancers. Human THAP4 is a 577-residue protein of unknown function that is proposed to bind DNA in a sequence-specific manner similar to THAP1 and has been found to be upregulated in response to heat shock. THAP4 is expressed in a relatively uniform manner in a broad range of tissues and appears to be upregulated in lymphoma cells and highly expressed in heart cells. The C-terminal domain of THAP4 (residues 415-577), designated here as cTHAP4, is evolutionarily conserved and is observed in all known THAP4 orthologs. Several single-domain proteins lacking a THAP domain are found in plants and bacteria and show significant levels of homology to cTHAP4. It appears that cTHAP4 belongs to a large class of proteins that have yet to be fully

  10. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Vishchuk, Olesia S; Sun, Huimin; Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-04-05

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo.

  11. PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase is a target of the fucoidan from brown alga Fucus evanescens in the prevention of EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation and colon cancer growth

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Ermakova, Svetlana P.; Xiao, JuanJuan; Lu, Tao; Xue, PeiPei; Zvyagintseva, Tatyana N.; Xiong, Hua; Shao, Chen; Yan, Wei; Duan, Qiuhong; Zhu, Feng

    2016-01-01

    The fucoidan with high anticancer activity was isolated from brown alga Fucus evanescens. The compound effectively prevented EGF-induced neoplastic cell transformation through inhibition of TOPK/ERK1/2/MSK 1 signaling axis. In vitro studies showed that the fucoidan attenuated mitogen-activated protein kinases downstream signaling in a colon cancer cells with different expression level of TOPK, resulting in growth inhibition. The fucoidan exerts its effects by directly interacting with TOPK kinase in vitro and ex vivo and inhibits its kinase activity. In xenograft animal model, oral administration of the fucoidan suppressed HCT 116 colon tumor growth. The phosphorylation of TOPK downstream signaling molecules in tumor tissues was also inhibited by the fucoidan. Taken together, our findings support the cancer preventive efficacy of the fucoidan through its targeting of TOPK for the prevention of neoplastic cell transformation and progression of colon carcinomas in vitro and ex vivo. PMID:26936995

  12. IQGAP Proteins Reveal an Atypical Phosphoinositide (aPI) Binding Domain with a Pseudo C2 Domain Fold

    SciTech Connect

    Dixon, Miles J.; Gray, Alexander; Schenning, Martijn; Agacan, Mark; Tempel, Wolfram; Tong, Yufeng; Nedyalkova, Lyudmila; Park, Hee-Won; Leslie, Nicholas R.; van Aalten, Daan M.F.; Downes, C. Peter; Batty, Ian H.

    2012-10-16

    Class I phosphoinositide (PI) 3-kinases act through effector proteins whose 3-PI selectivity is mediated by a limited repertoire of structurally defined, lipid recognition domains. We describe here the lipid preferences and crystal structure of a new class of PI binding modules exemplified by select IQGAPs (IQ motif containing GTPase-activating proteins) known to coordinate cellular signaling events and cytoskeletal dynamics. This module is defined by a C-terminal 105-107 amino acid region of which IQGAP1 and -2, but not IQGAP3, binds preferentially to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-trisphosphate (PtdInsP3). The binding affinity for PtdInsP3, together with other, secondary target-recognition characteristics, are comparable with those of the pleckstrin homology domain of cytohesin-3 (general receptor for phosphoinositides 1), an established PtdInsP3 effector protein. Importantly, the IQGAP1 C-terminal domain and the cytohesin-3 pleckstrin homology domain, each tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein, were both re-localized from the cytosol to the cell periphery following the activation of PI 3-kinase in Swiss 3T3 fibroblasts, consistent with their common, selective recognition of endogenous 3-PI(s). The crystal structure of the C-terminal IQGAP2 PI binding module reveals unexpected topological similarity to an integral fold of C2 domains, including a putative basic binding pocket. We propose that this module integrates select IQGAP proteins with PI 3-kinase signaling and constitutes a novel, atypical phosphoinositide binding domain that may represent the first of a larger group, each perhaps structurally unique but collectively dissimilar from the known PI recognition modules.

  13. Structure and function of Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domains.

    PubMed

    Ve, Thomas; Williams, Simon J; Kobe, Bostjan

    2015-02-01

    The Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain is a protein-protein interaction domain consisting of 125-200 residues, widely distributed in animals, plants and bacteria but absent from fungi, archea and viruses. In plants and animals, these domains are found in proteins with functions in innate immune pathways, while in bacteria, some TIR domain-containing proteins interfere with the innate immune pathways in the host. TIR domains function as protein scaffolds, mostly involving self-association and homotypic interactions with other TIR domains. In the last 15 years, the three-dimensional structures of TIR domains from several mammalian, plant and bacterial proteins have been reported. These structures, jointly with functional data including the identification of interacting proteins, have started to provide insight into the molecular basis of the assembly of animal and plant immune signaling complexes, and for host immunosuppression by bacterial pathogens. This review focuses on the current knowledge of the structures of the TIR domains and how the structure relates to function.

  14. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  15. Reconstituting Protein Interaction Networks Using Parameter-Dependent Domain-Domain Interactions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-07

    Superfamily ( SF ) [33], and SMART [34,35]. PFAM domains: FH2, Drf_FH3, and two Drf_GBD domains; SF domains: Formin homology 2 domain (FH2 domain) and ARM...annotation data from six commonly used annotation databases: PFAM-A (release 25.0) [32], Superfamily ( SF ) [33], SMART [34,35], PRODOM [36], TIGRFAM [37... SF 3,651 62.1 962,602 33.0 1,355 1,307 0.79 SMART 3,023 51.4 455,523 15.6 392 379 0.66 PRODOM 146 2.5 19,760 0.7 111 111 0.02 TIGRFAM 3,019 51.3

  16. Different functional modes of BAR domain proteins in formation and plasticity of mammalian postsynapses.

    PubMed

    Kessels, Michael M; Qualmann, Britta

    2015-09-01

    A plethora of cell biological processes involve modulations of cellular membranes. By using extended lipid-binding interfaces, some proteins have the power to shape membranes by attaching to them. Among such membrane shapers, the superfamily of Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain proteins has recently taken center stage. Extensive structural work on BAR domains has revealed a common curved fold that can serve as an extended membrane-binding interface to modulate membrane topologies and has allowed the grouping of the BAR domain superfamily into subfamilies with structurally slightly distinct BAR domain subtypes (N-BAR, BAR, F-BAR and I-BAR). Most BAR superfamily members are expressed in the mammalian nervous system. Neurons are elaborately shaped and highly compartmentalized cells. Therefore, analyses of synapse formation and of postsynaptic reorganization processes (synaptic plasticity) - a basis for learning and memory formation - has unveiled important physiological functions of BAR domain superfamily members. These recent advances, furthermore, have revealed that the functions of BAR domain proteins include different aspects. These functions are influenced by the often complex domain organization of BAR domain proteins. In this Commentary, we review these recent insights and propose to classify BAR domain protein functions into (1) membrane shaping, (2) physical integration, (3) action through signaling components, and (4) suppression of other BAR domain functions.

  17. The J-domain proteins of Arabidopsis thaliana: an unexpectedly large and diverse family of chaperones.

    PubMed

    Miernyk, J A

    2001-07-01

    A total of 89 J-domain proteins were identified in the genome of the model flowering plant Arabidopsis thaliana. The deduced amino acid sequences of the J-domain proteins were analyzed for an assortment of structural features and motifs. Based on the results of sequence comparisons and structure and function predictions, 51 distinct families were identified. The families ranged in size from 1 to 6 members. Subcellular localizations of the A thaliana J-domain proteins were predicted; species were found in both the soluble and membrane compartments of all cellular organelles. Based on digital Northern analysis, the J-domain proteins could be separated into groups of low, medium, and moderate expression levels. This genomics-based analysis of the A thaliana J-domain proteins establishes a framework for detailed studies of biological function and specificity. It additionally provides a comprehensive basis for evolutionary comparisons.

  18. Implications of 3D domain swapping for protein folding, misfolding and function.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, Frederic; Schymkowitz, Joost; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2012-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is the process by which two identical protein chains exchange a part of their structure to form an intertwined dimer or higher-order oligomer. The phenomenon has been observed in the crystal structures of a range of different proteins. In this chapter we review the experiments that have been performed in order to understand the sequence and structural determinants of domain-swapping and these show how the general principles obtained can be used to engineer proteins to domain swap. We discuss the role of domain swapping in regulating protein function and as one possible mechanism of protein misfolding that can lead to aggregation and disease. We also review a number of interesting pathways of macromolecular assembly involving β-strand insertion or complementation that are related to the domain-swapping phenomenon.

  19. Dynamics and Adaptive Benefits of Protein Domain Emergence and Arrangements during Plant Genome Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Kersting, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Moore, Andrew D.; Grath, Sonja

    2012-01-01

    Plant genomes are generally very large, mostly paleopolyploid, and have numerous gene duplicates and complex genomic features such as repeats and transposable elements. Many of these features have been hypothesized to enable plants, which cannot easily escape environmental challenges, to rapidly adapt. Another mechanism, which has recently been well described as a major facilitator of rapid adaptation in bacteria, animals, and fungi but not yet for plants, is modular rearrangement of protein-coding genes. Due to the high precision of profile-based methods, rearrangements can be well captured at the protein level by characterizing the emergence, loss, and rearrangements of protein domains, their structural, functional, and evolutionary building blocks. Here, we study the dynamics of domain rearrangements and explore their adaptive benefit in 27 plant and 3 algal genomes. We use a phylogenomic approach by which we can explain the formation of 88% of all arrangements by single-step events, such as fusion, fission, and terminal loss of domains. We find many domains are lost along every lineage, but at least 500 domains are novel, that is, they are unique to green plants and emerged more or less recently. These novel domains duplicate and rearrange more readily within their genomes than ancient domains and are overproportionally involved in stress response and developmental innovations. Novel domains more often affect regulatory proteins and show a higher degree of structural disorder than ancient domains. Whereas a relatively large and well-conserved core set of single-domain proteins exists, long multi-domain arrangements tend to be species-specific. We find that duplicated genes are more often involved in rearrangements. Although fission events typically impact metabolic proteins, fusion events often create new signaling proteins essential for environmental sensing. Taken together, the high volatility of single domains and complex arrangements in plant genomes

  20. Polydom: a secreted protein with pentraxin, complement control protein, epidermal growth factor and von Willebrand factor A domains.

    PubMed Central

    Gilgès, D; Vinit, M A; Callebaut, I; Coulombel, L; Cacheux, V; Romeo, P H; Vigon, I

    2000-01-01

    To identify extracellular proteins with epidermal growth factor (EGF) domains that are potentially involved in the control of haemopoiesis, we performed degenerate reverse-transcriptase-mediated PCR on the murine bone-marrow stromal cell line MS-5 and isolated a new partial cDNA encoding EGF-like domains related to those in the Notch proteins. Cloning and sequencing of the full-length cDNA showed that it encoded a new extracellular multi-domain protein that we named polydom. This 387 kDa mosaic protein contained a signal peptide followed by a new association of eight different protein domains, including a pentraxin domain and a von Willebrand factor type A domain, ten EGF domains, and 34 complement control protein modules. The human polydom mRNA is strongly expressed in placenta, its expression in the other tissues being weak or undetectable. The particular multidomain structure of the encoded protein suggests an important biological role in cellular adhesion and/or in the immune system. PMID:11062057

  1. Structure and function of regulator of G protein signaling homology domains.

    PubMed

    Tesmer, John J G

    2009-01-01

    All regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins contain a conserved domain of approximately 130 amino acids that binds to activated heterotrimeric G protein α subunits (Gα) and accelerates their rate of GTP hydrolysis. Homologous domains are found in at least six other protein families, including a family of Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors (RhoGEFs) and the G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). Although some of the RhoGEF and GRK RGS-like domains can also bind to activated Gα subunits, they do so in distinct ways and with much lower levels of GTPase activation. In other protein families, the domains have as of yet no obvious relationship to heterotrimeric G protein signaling. These RGS homology (RH) domains are now recognized as mediators of extraordinarily diverse protein-protein interactions. Through these interactions, they play roles that range from enzyme to molecular scaffold to signal transducing module. In this review, the atomic structures of RH domains from RGS proteins, Axins, RhoGEFs, and GRKs are compared in light of what is currently known about their functional roles.

  2. Cytoplasmic Ig-Domain Proteins: Cytoskeletal Regulators with a Role in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Otey, Carol A.; Dixon, Richard; Stack, Christianna; Goicoechea, Silvia M.

    2009-01-01

    Immunoglobulin domains are found in a wide variety of functionally diverse transmembrane proteins, and also in a smaller number of cytoplasmic proteins. Members of this latter group are usually associated with the actin cytoskeleton, and most of them bind directly to either actin or myosin, or both. Recently, studies of inherited human disorders have identified disease-causing mutations in five cytoplasmic Ig-domain proteins: myosin-binding protein C, titin, myotilin, palladin, and myopalladin. Together with results obtained from cultured cells and mouse models, these clinical studies have yielded novel insights into the unexpected roles of Ig domain proteins in mechanotransduction and signaling to the nucleus. An emerging theme in this field is that cytoskeleton-associated Ig domain proteins are more than structural elements of the cell, and may have evolved to fill different needs in different cellular compartments. PMID:19466753

  3. Versatile TPR domains accommodate different modes of target protein recognition and function.

    PubMed

    Allan, Rudi Kenneth; Ratajczak, Thomas

    2011-07-01

    The tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motif is one of many repeat motifs that form structural domains in proteins that can act as interaction scaffolds in the formation of multi-protein complexes involved in numerous cellular processes such as transcription, the cell cycle, protein translocation, protein degradation and host defence against invading pathogens. The crystal structures of many TPR domain-containing proteins have been determined, showing TPR motifs as two anti-parallel α-helices packed in tandem arrays to form a structure with an amphipathic groove which can bind a target peptide. This is however not the only mode of target recognition by TPR domains, with short amino acid insertions and alternative TPR motif conformations also shown to contribute to protein interactions, highlighting diversity in TPR domains and the versatility of this structure in mediating biological events.

  4. Bax transmembrane domain interacts with prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins in biological membranes

    PubMed Central

    Andreu-Fernández, Vicente; Sancho, Mónica; Genovés, Ainhoa; Lucendo, Estefanía; Todt, Franziska; Lauterwasser, Joachim; Funk, Kathrin; Jahreis, Günther; Pérez-Payá, Enrique; Mingarro, Ismael; Edlich, Frank; Orzáez, Mar

    2017-01-01

    The Bcl-2 (B-cell lymphoma 2) protein Bax (Bcl-2 associated X, apoptosis regulator) can commit cells to apoptosis via outer mitochondrial membrane permeabilization. Bax activity is controlled in healthy cells by prosurvival Bcl-2 proteins. C-terminal Bax transmembrane domain interactions were implicated recently in Bax pore formation. Here, we show that the isolated transmembrane domains of Bax, Bcl-xL (B-cell lymphoma-extra large), and Bcl-2 can mediate interactions between Bax and prosurvival proteins inside the membrane in the absence of apoptotic stimuli. Bcl-2 protein transmembrane domains specifically homooligomerize and heterooligomerize in bacterial and mitochondrial membranes. Their interactions participate in the regulation of Bcl-2 proteins, thus modulating apoptotic activity. Our results suggest that interactions between the transmembrane domains of Bax and antiapoptotic Bcl-2 proteins represent a previously unappreciated level of apoptosis regulation. PMID:28028215

  5. Maximum occurrence analysis of protein conformations for different distributions of paramagnetic metal ions within flexible two-domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Luchinat, Claudio; Nagulapalli, Malini; Parigi, Giacomo; Sgheri, Luca

    2012-02-01

    Multidomain proteins are composed of rigid domains connected by (flexible) linkers. Therefore, the domains may experience a large degree of reciprocal reorientation. Pseudocontact shifts and residual dipolar couplings arising from one or more paramagnetic metals successively placed in a single metal binding site in the protein can be used as restraints to assess the degree of mobility of the different domains. They can be used to determine the maximum occurrence (MO) of each possible protein conformation, i.e. the maximum weight that such conformations can have independently of the real structural ensemble, in agreement with the provided restraints. In the case of two-domain proteins, the metal ions can be placed all in the same domain, or distributed between the two domains. It has been demonstrated that the quantity of independent information for the characterization of the system is larger when all metals are bound in the same domain. At the same time, it has been shown that there are practical advantages in placing the metals in different domains. Here, it is shown that distributing the metals between the domains provides a tool for defining a coefficient of compatibility among the restraints obtained from different metals, without a significant decrease of the capability of the MO values to discriminate among conformations with different weights.

  6. Identification of brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 as an interaction partner of glutaminase interacting protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zencir, Sevil; Ovee, Mohiuddin; Dobson, Melanie J.; Banerjee, Monimoy; Topcu, Zeki; Mohanty, Smita

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} Brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2) is a new partner protein for GIP. {yields} BAI2 interaction with GIP was revealed by yeast two-hybrid assay. {yields} Binding of BAI2 to GIP was characterized by NMR, CD and fluorescence. {yields} BAI2 and GIP binding was mediated through the C-terminus of BAI2. -- Abstract: The vast majority of physiological processes in living cells are mediated by protein-protein interactions often specified by particular protein sequence motifs. PDZ domains, composed of 80-100 amino acid residues, are an important class of interaction motif. Among the PDZ-containing proteins, glutaminase interacting protein (GIP), also known as Tax Interacting Protein TIP-1, is unique in being composed almost exclusively of a single PDZ domain. GIP has important roles in cellular signaling, protein scaffolding and modulation of tumor growth and interacts with a number of physiological partner proteins, including Glutaminase L, {beta}-Catenin, FAS, HTLV-1 Tax, HPV16 E6, Rhotekin and Kir 2.3. To identify the network of proteins that interact with GIP, a human fetal brain cDNA library was screened using a yeast two-hybrid assay with GIP as bait. We identified brain-specific angiogenesis inhibitor 2 (BAI2), a member of the adhesion-G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), as a new partner of GIP. BAI2 is expressed primarily in neurons, further expanding GIP cellular functions. The interaction between GIP and the carboxy-terminus of BAI2 was characterized using fluorescence, circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy assays. These biophysical analyses support the interaction identified in the yeast two-hybrid assay. This is the first study reporting BAI2 as an interaction partner of GIP.

  7. Pinkbar is an epithelial-specific BAR domain protein that generates planar membrane structures

    SciTech Connect

    Pykäläinen, Anette; Boczkowska, Malgorzata; Zhao, Hongxia; Saarikangas, Juha; Rebowski, Grzegorz; Jansen, Maurice; Hakanen, Janne; Koskela, Essi V.; Peränen, Johan; Vihinen, Helena; Jokitalo, Eija; Salminen, Marjo; Ikonen, Elina; Dominguez, Roberto; Lappalainen, Pekka

    2013-05-29

    Bin/amphipysin/Rvs (BAR)-domain proteins sculpt cellular membranes and have key roles in processes such as endocytosis, cell motility and morphogenesis. BAR domains are divided into three subfamilies: BAR- and F-BAR-domain proteins generate positive membrane curvature and stabilize cellular invaginations, whereas I-BAR-domain proteins induce negative curvature and stabilize protrusions. We show that a previously uncharacterized member of the I-BAR subfamily, Pinkbar, is specifically expressed in intestinal epithelial cells, where it localizes to Rab13-positive vesicles and to the plasma membrane at intercellular junctions. Notably, the BAR domain of Pinkbar does not induce membrane tubulation but promotes the formation of planar membrane sheets. Structural and mutagenesis analyses reveal that the BAR domain of Pinkbar has a relatively flat lipid-binding interface and that it assembles into sheet-like oligomers in crystals and in solution, which may explain its unique membrane-deforming activity.

  8. Mapping of chorismate mutase and prephenate dehydrogenase domains in the Escherichia coli T-protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuqing; Vincent, Sarah; Wilson, David B; Ganem, Bruce

    2003-02-01

    The Escherichia coli bifunctional T-protein transforms chorismic acid to p-hydroxyphenylpyruvic acid in the l-tyrosine biosynthetic pathway. The 373 amino acid T-protein is a homodimer that exhibits chorismate mutase (CM) and prephenate dehydrogenase (PDH) activities, both of which are feedback-inhibited by tyrosine. Fifteen genes coding for the T-protein and various fragments thereof were constructed and successfully expressed in order to characterize the CM, PDH and regulatory domains. Residues 1-88 constituted a functional CM domain, which was also dimeric. Both the PDH and the feedback-inhibition activities were localized in residues 94-373, but could not be separated into discrete domains. The activities of cloned CM and PDH domains were comparatively low, suggesting some cooperative interactions in the native state. Activity data further indicate that the PDH domain, in which NAD, prephenate and tyrosine binding sites were present, was more unstable than the CM domain.

  9. Gene3D: Multi-domain annotations for protein sequence and comparative genome analysis.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jonathan G; Lee, David; Studer, Romain A; Dawson, Natalie L; Sillitoe, Ian; Das, Sayoni; Yeats, Corin; Dessailly, Benoit H; Rentzsch, Robert; Orengo, Christine A

    2014-01-01

    Gene3D (http://gene3d.biochem.ucl.ac.uk) is a database of protein domain structure annotations for protein sequences. Domains are predicted using a library of profile HMMs from 2738 CATH superfamilies. Gene3D assigns domain annotations to Ensembl and UniProt sequence sets including >6000 cellular genomes and >20 million unique protein sequences. This represents an increase of 45% in the number of protein sequences since our last publication. Thanks to improvements in the underlying data and pipeline, we see large increases in the domain coverage of sequences. We have expanded this coverage by integrating Pfam and SUPERFAMILY domain annotations, and we now resolve domain overlaps to provide highly comprehensive composite multi-domain architectures. To make these data more accessible for comparative genome analyses, we have developed novel search algorithms for searching genomes to identify related multi-domain architectures. In addition to providing domain family annotations, we have now developed a pipeline for 3D homology modelling of domains in Gene3D. This has been applied to the human genome and will be rolled out to other major organisms over the next year.

  10. Occurrence of protein disulfide bonds in different domains of life: a comparison of proteins from the Protein Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Bošnjak, I; Bojović, V; Šegvić-Bubić, T; Bielen, A

    2014-03-01

    Disulfide bonds (SS bonds) are important post-translational modifications of proteins. They stabilize a three-dimensional (3D) structure (structural SS bonds) and also have the catalytic or regulatory functions (redox-active SS bonds). Although SS bonds are present in all groups of organisms, no comparative analyses of their frequency in proteins from different domains of life have been made to date. Using the Protein Data Bank, the number and subcellular locations of SS bonds in Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya have been compared. Approximately three times higher frequency of proteins with SS bonds in eukaryotic secretory organelles (e.g. endoplasmic reticulum) than in bacterial periplasmic/secretory pathways was calculated. Protein length also affects the SS bond frequency: the average number of SS bonds is positively correlated with the length for longer proteins (>200 amino acids), while for the shorter and less stable proteins (<200 amino acids) this correlation is negative. Medium-sized proteins (250-350 amino acids) indicated a high number of SS bonds only in Archaea which could be explained by the need for additional protein stabilization in hyperthermophiles. The results emphasize higher capacity for the SS bond formation and isomerization in Eukarya when compared with Archaea and Bacteria.

  11. Transcriptional synergy between LIM-homeodomain proteins and basic helix-loop-helix proteins: the LIM2 domain determines specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, J D; Zhang, W; Rudnick, A; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1997-01-01

    LIM-homeodomain proteins direct cellular differentiation by activating transcription of cell-type-specific genes, but this activation requires cooperation with other nuclear factors. The LIM-homeodomain protein Lmx1 cooperates with the basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) protein E47/Pan-1 to activate the insulin promoter in transfected fibroblasts. In this study, we show that two proteins originally called Lmx1 are the closely related products of two distinct vertebrate genes, Lmx1.1 and Lmx1.2. We have used yeast genetic systems to delineate the functional domains of the Lmx1 proteins and to characterize the physical interactions between Lmx1 proteins and E47/Pan-1 that produce synergistic transcriptional activation. The LIM domains of the Lmx1 proteins, and particularly the second LIM domain, mediate both specific physical interactions and transcriptional synergy with E47/Pan-1. The LIM domains of the LIM-homeodomain protein Isl-1, which cannot mediate transcriptional synergy with E47/Pan-1, do not interact with E47/Pan-1. In vitro studies demonstrate that the Lmx1.1 LIM2 domain interacts specifically with the bHLH domain of E47/Pan-1. These studies provide the basis for a model of the assembly of LIM-homeodomain-containing complexes on DNA elements that direct cell-type-restricted transcription in differentiated tissues. PMID:9199284

  12. Structural basis of interactions between epidermal growth factor receptor and SH2 domain proteins.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Longo, G M; Koland, J G

    1993-02-26

    The structural basis of the interactions between the activated epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor and SH2 domain proteins was investigated. The c-src SH2 domain (second domain of src homology) was expressed as a recombinant fusion protein, and an in vitro assay was developed to monitor EGF receptor/SH2 domain interactions. EGF receptor tyrosine kinase domain (TKD) forms expressed in the baculovirus/insect cell system were shown to bind to the SH2 domain when phosphorylated. These TKD/SH2 domain interactions were characterized by dissociation constants of 60-320 nM. Deletion analysis indicated that the entire SH2 domain was required for recognition of the phosphorylated TKD. The binding of a highly truncated TKD protein to the SH2 domain suggested that the sites recognized by the SH2 domain included the EGF receptor autophosphorylation site, tyr992. A phosphorylated EGF receptor peptide containing tyr992 was also shown to interact with the SH2 domain. This residue may therefore mediate interactions between the EGF receptor and tyrosine kinases in the src family.

  13. Clustering amino acid contents of protein domains: biochemical functions of proteins and implications for origin of biological macromolecules.

    PubMed

    Torshin, I Y

    2001-04-01

    Structural classes of protein domains correlate with their amino acid compositions. Several successful algorithms (that use only amino acid composition) have been elaborated for the prediction of structural class or potential biochemical significance. This work deals with dynamic classification (clustering) of the domains on the basis of their amino acid composition. Amino acid contents of domains from a non-redundant PDB set were clustered in 20-dimensional space of amino acid contents. Despite the variations of an empirical parameter and non-redundancy of the set, only one large cluster (tens-hundreds of proteins) surrounded by hundreds of small clusters (1-5 proteins), was identified. The core of the largest cluster contains at least 64% DNA (nucleotide)-interacting protein domains from various sources. About 90% of the proteins of the core are intracellular proteins. 83% of the DNA/nucleotide interacting domains in the core belong to the mixed alpha-beta folds (a+b, a/b), 14% are all-alpha (mostly helices) and all-beta (mostly beta-strands) proteins. At the same time, when core domains that belong to one organism (E.coli) are considered, over 80% of them prove to be DNA/nucleotide interacting proteins. The core is compact: amino acid contents of domains from the core lie in relatively narrow and specific ranges. The core also contains several Fe-S cluster-binding domains, amino acid contents of the core overlap with ferredoxin and CO-dehydrogenase clusters, the oldest known proteins. As Fe-S clusters are thought to be the first biocatalysts, the results are discussed in relation to contemporary experiments and models dealing with the origin of biological macromolecules. The origin of most primordial proteins is considered here to be a result of co-adsorption of nucleotides and amino acids on specific clays, followed by en-block polymerization of the adsorbed mixtures of amino acids.

  14. SH2 domain proteins as high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinase substrates.

    PubMed

    Sierke, S L; Koland, J G

    1993-09-28

    Activation of a growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) is accompanied by a rapid autophosphorylation of the receptor on tyrosine residues. Receptor activation has been shown to promote the association of signal-transducing proteins containing SH2 domains (second domain of src homology). These receptor-associated proteins can, in turn, be phosphorylated by the RTK, an event which presumably regulates their activities. It has been suggested that SH2 domains in signal-transducing proteins target these proteins as substrates of the activated RTK. To test this hypothesis, recombinant proteins were generated that contained tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the erbB3 receptor and/or the SH2 domain of c-src. Incorporation of the SH2 domain led to a decrease in KM and an increase in Vmax for the substrate. The KM determined for one chimeric SH2/erbB3 substrate was among the lowest reported for epidermal growth factor RTK substrates. Experiments with a truncated kinase lacking C-terminal autophosphorylation sites indicated that the reduction in KM for these substrates was mediated by interactions between the substrate SH2 domain and phosphotyrosine residues of the RTK. These interactions could also inhibit RTK activity. These results demonstrate that the SH2 domain can effectively target substrates to a RTK and that SH2 domain proteins can regulate RTK activity.

  15. Structure and Function of the TIR Domain from the Grape NLR Protein RPV1

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Simon J.; Yin, Ling; Foley, Gabriel; Casey, Lachlan W.; Outram, Megan A.; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Lu, Jiang; Boden, Mikael; Dry, Ian B.; Kobe, Bostjan

    2016-01-01

    The N-terminal Toll/interleukin-1 receptor/resistance protein (TIR) domain has been shown to be both necessary and sufficient for defense signaling in the model plants flax and Arabidopsis. In examples from these organisms, TIR domain self-association is required for signaling function, albeit through distinct interfaces. Here, we investigate these properties in the TIR domain containing resistance protein RPV1 from the wild grapevine Muscadinia rotundifolia. The RPV1 TIR domain, without additional flanking sequence present, is autoactive when transiently expressed in tobacco, demonstrating that the TIR domain alone is capable of cell-death signaling. We determined the crystal structure of the RPV1 TIR domain at 2.3 Å resolution. In the crystals, the RPV1 TIR domain forms a dimer, mediated predominantly through residues in the αA and αE helices (“AE” interface). This interface is shared with the interface discovered in the dimeric complex of the TIR domains from the Arabidopsis RPS4/RRS1 resistance protein pair. We show that surface-exposed residues in the AE interface that mediate the dimer interaction in the crystals are highly conserved among plant TIR domain-containing proteins. While we were unable to demonstrate self-association of the RPV1 TIR domain in solution or using yeast 2-hybrid, mutations of surface-exposed residues in the AE interface prevent the cell-death autoactive phenotype. In addition, mutation of residues known to be important in the cell-death signaling function of the flax L6 TIR domain were also shown to be required for RPV1 TIR domain mediated cell-death. Our data demonstrate that multiple TIR domain surfaces control the cell-death function of the RPV1 TIR domain and we suggest that the conserved AE interface may have a general function in TIR-NLR signaling. PMID:28008335

  16. Cooperative folding of intrinsically disordered domains drives assembly of a strong elongated protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruszka, Dominika T.; Whelan, Fiona; Farrance, Oliver E.; Fung, Herman K. H.; Paci, Emanuele; Jeffries, Cy M.; Svergun, Dmitri I.; Baldock, Clair; Baumann, Christoph G.; Brockwell, David J.; Potts, Jennifer R.; Clarke, Jane

    2015-06-01

    Bacteria exploit surface proteins to adhere to other bacteria, surfaces and host cells. Such proteins need to project away from the bacterial surface and resist significant mechanical forces. SasG is a protein that forms extended fibrils on the surface of Staphylococcus aureus and promotes host adherence and biofilm formation. Here we show that although monomeric and lacking covalent cross-links, SasG maintains a highly extended conformation in solution. This extension is mediated through obligate folding cooperativity of the intrinsically disordered E domains that couple non-adjacent G5 domains thermodynamically, forming interfaces that are more stable than the domains themselves. Thus, counterintuitively, the elongation of the protein appears to be dependent on the inherent instability of its domains. The remarkable mechanical strength of SasG arises from tandemly arrayed `clamp' motifs within the folded domains. Our findings reveal an elegant minimal solution for the assembly of monomeric mechano-resistant tethers of variable length.

  17. Mapping of domains on HIV envelope protein mediating association with calnexin and protein-disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-04-30

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents.

  18. Mapping of Domains on HIV Envelope Protein Mediating Association with Calnexin and Protein-disulfide Isomerase*

    PubMed Central

    Papandréou, Marie-Jeanne; Barbouche, Rym; Guieu, Régis; Rivera, Santiago; Fantini, Jacques; Khrestchatisky, Michel; Jones, Ian M.; Fenouillet, Emmanuel

    2010-01-01

    The cell catalysts calnexin (CNX) and protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) cooperate in establishing the disulfide bonding of the HIV envelope (Env) glycoprotein. Following HIV binding to lymphocytes, cell-surface PDI also reduces Env to induce the fusogenic conformation. We sought to define the contact points between Env and these catalysts to illustrate their potential as therapeutic targets. In lysates of Env-expressing cells, 15% of the gp160 precursor, but not gp120, coprecipitated with CNX, whereas only 0.25% of gp160 and gp120 coprecipitated with PDI. Under in vitro conditions, which mimic the Env/PDI interaction during virus/cell contact, PDI readily associated with Env. The domains of Env interacting in cellulo with CNX or in vitro with PDI were then determined using anti-Env antibodies whose binding site was occluded by CNX or PDI. Antibodies against domains V1/V2, C2, and the C terminus of V3 did not bind CNX-associated Env, whereas those against C1, V1/V2, and the CD4-binding domain did not react with PDI-associated Env. In addition, a mixture of the latter antibodies interfered with PDI-mediated Env reduction. Thus, Env interacts with intracellular CNX and extracellular PDI via discrete, largely nonoverlapping, regions. The sites of interaction explain the mode of action of compounds that target these two catalysts and may enable the design of further new competitive agents. PMID:20202930

  19. Chemical Ligation of Folded Recombinant Proteins: Segmental Isotopic Labeling of Domains for NMR Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rong; Ayers, Brenda; Cowburn, David; Muir, Tom W.

    1999-01-01

    A convenient in vitro chemical ligation strategy has been developed that allows folded recombinant proteins to be joined together. This strategy permits segmental, selective isotopic labeling of the product. The src homology type 3 and 2 domains (SH3 and SH2) of Abelson protein tyrosine kinase, which constitute the regulatory apparatus of the protein, were individually prepared in reactive forms that can be ligated together under normal protein-folding conditions to form a normal peptide bond at the ligation junction. This strategy was used to prepare NMR sample quantities of the Abelson protein tyrosine kinase-SH(32) domain pair, in which only one of the domains was labeled with 15N Mass spectrometry and NMR analyses were used to confirm the structure of the ligated protein, which was also shown to have appropriate ligand-binding properties. The ability to prepare recombinant proteins with selectively labeled segments having a single-site mutation, by using a combination of expression of fusion proteins and chemical ligation in vitro, will increase the size limits for protein structural determination in solution with NMR methods. In vitro chemical ligation of expressed protein domains will also provide a combinatorial approach to the synthesis of linked protein domains.

  20. Structure of the GH1 domain of guanylate kinase-associated protein from Rattus norvegicus

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, Junsen; Yang, Huiseon; Eom, Soo Hyun; Chun, ChangJu; Im, Young Jun

    2014-09-12

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The crystal structure of GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) was determined. • GKAP GH1 is a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. • The predicted helix α4 associates weakly with the helix α3, suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. - Abstract: Guanylate-kinase-associated protein (GKAP) is a scaffolding protein that links NMDA receptor-PSD-95 to Shank–Homer complexes by protein–protein interactions at the synaptic junction. GKAP family proteins are characterized by the presence of a C-terminal conserved GKAP homology domain 1 (GH1) of unknown structure and function. In this study, crystal structure of the GH1 domain of GKAP from Rattus norvegicus was determined in fusion with an N-terminal maltose-binding protein at 2.0 Å resolution. The structure of GKAP GH1 displays a three-helix bundle connected by short flexible loops. The predicted helix α4 which was not visible in the crystal structure associates weakly with the helix α3 suggesting dynamic nature of the GH1 domain. The strict conservation of GH1 domain across GKAP family members and the lack of a catalytic active site required for enzyme activity imply that the GH1 domain might serve as a protein–protein interaction module for the synaptic protein clustering.

  1. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-09

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  2. Redox-coupled structural changes of the catalytic a' domain of protein disulfide isomerase.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, Koya; Satoh, Tadashi; Yagi-Utsumi, Maho; Le Gulluche, Anne-Charlotte; Anzai, Takahiro; Uekusa, Yoshinori; Kamiya, Yukiko; Kato, Koichi

    2015-09-14

    Protein disulfide isomerase functions as a folding catalyst in the endoplasmic reticulum. Its b' and a' domains provide substrate-binding sites and undergo a redox-dependent domain rearrangement coupled to an open-closed structural change. Here we determined the first solution structure of the a' domain in its oxidized form and thereby demonstrate that oxidation of the a' domain induces significant conformational changes not only in the vicinity of the active site but also in the distal b'-interfacial segment. Based on these findings, we propose that this conformational transition triggers the domain segregation coupled with the exposure of the hydrophobic surface.

  3. Phosphorylation of ezrin-radixin-moesin-binding phosphoprotein 50 (EBP50) by Akt promotes stability and mitogenic function of S-phase kinase-associated protein-2 (Skp2).

    PubMed

    Song, Gyun Jee; Leslie, Kristen L; Barrick, Stacey; Mamonova, Tatyana; Fitzpatrick, Jeremy M; Drombosky, Kenneth W; Peyser, Noah; Wang, Bin; Pellegrini, Maria; Bauer, Philip M; Friedman, Peter A; Mierke, Dale F; Bisello, Alessandro

    2015-01-30

    The regulation of the cell cycle by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is dependent on the activity of E3 ligases. Skp2 (S-phase kinase associated protein-2) is the substrate recognition subunit of the E3 ligase that ubiquitylates the cell cycle inhibitors p21(cip1) and p27(kip1) thus promoting cell cycle progression. Increased expression of Skp2 is frequently observed in diseases characterized by excessive cell proliferation, such as cancer and neointima hyperplasia. The stability and cellular localization of Skp2 are regulated by Akt, but the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects remain only partly understood. The scaffolding protein Ezrin-Binding Phosphoprotein of 50 kDa (EBP50) contains two PDZ domains and plays a critical role in the development of neointimal hyperplasia. Here we report that EBP50 directly binds Skp2 via its first PDZ domain. Moreover, EBP50 is phosphorylated by Akt on Thr-156 within the second PDZ domain, an event that allosterically promotes binding to Skp2. The interaction with EBP50 causes cytoplasmic localization of Skp2, increases Skp2 stability and promotes proliferation of primary vascular smooth muscle cells. Collectively, these studies define a novel regulatory mechanism contributing to aberrant cell growth and highlight the importance of scaffolding function of EBP50 in Akt-dependent cell proliferation.

  4. Role of oligomerization domains in thrombospondins and other extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jürgen

    2004-06-01

    Coiled coils, collagen triple helices and globular oligomerization domains mediate the subunit assembly of many proteins in vertebrates and invertebrates. Oligomerization offers functional advantages including multivalency, increased binding strength and the combined function of different domains. These features are seen in natural proteins and may be introduced by protein engineering. The special focus of this review is on oligomerization domain of extracellular matrix proteins. For thrombospondins, initial interesting results on the functional role of oligomerization have been published. Other features remain to be explored. For example, it is not clear why thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are trimers whereas thrombospondins-3 to -5 are pentamers. To stimulate this type of research, this review makes a survey of oligomerization domains and their functional role in extracellular matrix proteins.

  5. LdFlabarin, a New BAR Domain Membrane Protein of Leishmania Flagellum

    PubMed Central

    Thonnus, Magali; Salin, Bénédicte; Boissier, Fanny; Blancard, Corinne; Sauvanet, Cécile; Metzler, Christelle; Espiau, Benoît; Sahin, Annelise; Merlin, Gilles

    2013-01-01

    During the Leishmania life cycle, the flagellum undergoes successive assembly and disassembly of hundreds of proteins. Understanding these processes necessitates the study of individual components. Here, we investigated LdFlabarin, an uncharacterized L. donovani flagellar protein. The gene is conserved within the Leishmania genus and orthologous genes only exist in the Trypanosoma genus. LdFlabarin associates with the flagellar plasma membrane, extending from the base to the tip of the flagellum as a helicoidal structure. Site-directed mutagenesis, deletions and chimera constructs showed that LdFlabarin flagellar addressing necessitates three determinants: an N-terminal potential acylation site and a central BAR domain for membrane targeting and the C-terminal domain for flagellar specificity. In vitro, the protein spontaneously associates with liposomes, triggering tubule formation, which suggests a structural/morphogenetic function. LdFlabarin is the first characterized Leishmania BAR domain protein, and the first flagellum-specific BAR domain protein. PMID:24086735

  6. The b' domain provides the principal peptide-binding site of protein disulfide isomerase but all domains contribute to binding of misfolded proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Klappa, P; Ruddock, L W; Darby, N J; Freedman, R B

    1998-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) is a very efficient catalyst of folding of many disulfide-bonded proteins. A great deal is known about the catalytic functions of PDI, while little is known about its substrate binding. We recently demonstrated by cross-linking that PDI binds peptides and misfolded proteins, with high affinity but broad specificity. To characterize the substrate-binding site of PDI, we investigated the interactions of various recombinant fragments of human PDI, expressed in Escherichia coli, with different radiolabelled model peptides. We observed that the b' domain of human PDI is essential and sufficient for the binding of small peptides. In the case of larger peptides, specifically a 28 amino acid fragment derived from bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, or misfolded proteins, the b' domain is essential but not sufficient for efficient binding, indicating that contributions from additional domains are required. Hence we propose that the different domains of PDI all contribute to the binding site, with the b' domain forming the essential core. PMID:9463371

  7. The mammalian START domain protein family in lipid transport in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Clark, Barbara J

    2012-03-01

    Lipid transfer proteins of the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related lipid transfer (START) domain family are defined by the presence of a conserved ∼210 amino acid sequence that folds into an α/β helix-grip structure forming a hydrophobic pocket for ligand binding. The mammalian START proteins bind diverse ligands, such as cholesterol, oxysterols, phospholipids, sphingolipids, and possibly fatty acids, and have putative roles in non-vesicular lipid transport, thioesterase enzymatic activity, and tumor suppression. However, the biological functions of many members of the START domain protein family are not well established. Recent research has focused on characterizing the cell-type distribution and regulation of the START proteins, examining the specificity and directionality of lipid transport, and identifying disease states associated with dysregulation of START protein expression. This review summarizes the current concepts of the proposed physiological and pathological roles for the mammalian START domain proteins in cholesterol and lipid trafficking.

  8. The NHR domains of Neuralized and related proteins: Beyond Notch signalling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sili; Boulianne, Gabrielle L

    2017-01-01

    Neuralized Homology Repeats (NHRs) were first identified in Neuralized, an E3-ubiquitin ligase that plays a key role in the Notch signalling pathway. Since their original discovery, NHR domains have been shown to regulate protein-protein interactions in a broad range of developmental processes and in a wide variety of species from flies to humans. The NHR family of proteins can be categorized into three groups: (1) those that contain a RING finger, (2) those that contain a SOCS box and, (3) those that only have NHR domains. Here we review the structure and function of NHR domains in various cellular and developmental processes.

  9. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery.

    PubMed

    Kalescky, Robert; Zhou, Hongyu; Liu, Jin; Tao, Peng

    2016-04-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier's principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery.

  10. Rigid Residue Scan Simulations Systematically Reveal Residue Entropic Roles in Protein Allostery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Intra-protein information is transmitted over distances via allosteric processes. This ubiquitous protein process allows for protein function changes due to ligand binding events. Understanding protein allostery is essential to understanding protein functions. In this study, allostery in the second PDZ domain (PDZ2) in the human PTP1E protein is examined as model system to advance a recently developed rigid residue scan method combining with configurational entropy calculation and principal component analysis. The contributions from individual residues to whole-protein dynamics and allostery were systematically assessed via rigid body simulations of both unbound and ligand-bound states of the protein. The entropic contributions of individual residues to whole-protein dynamics were evaluated based on covariance-based correlation analysis of all simulations. The changes of overall protein entropy when individual residues being held rigid support that the rigidity/flexibility equilibrium in protein structure is governed by the La Châtelier’s principle of chemical equilibrium. Key residues of PDZ2 allostery were identified with good agreement with NMR studies of the same protein bound to the same peptide. On the other hand, the change of entropic contribution from each residue upon perturbation revealed intrinsic differences among all the residues. The quasi-harmonic and principal component analyses of simulations without rigid residue perturbation showed a coherent allosteric mode from unbound and bound states, respectively. The projection of simulations with rigid residue perturbation onto coherent allosteric modes demonstrated the intrinsic shifting of ensemble distributions supporting the population-shift theory of protein allostery. Overall, the study presented here provides a robust and systematic approach to estimate the contribution of individual residue internal motion to overall protein dynamics and allostery. PMID:27115535

  11. A Protein Domain and Family Based Approach to Rare Variant Association Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Shihab, Hashem A.; Rivas, Manuel A.; McCarthy, Mark I.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J.; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background It has become common practice to analyse large scale sequencing data with statistical approaches based around the aggregation of rare variants within the same gene. We applied a novel approach to rare variant analysis by collapsing variants together using protein domain and family coordinates, regarded to be a more discrete definition of a biologically functional unit. Methods Using Pfam definitions, we collapsed rare variants (Minor Allele Frequency ≤ 1%) together in three different ways 1) variants within single genomic regions which map to individual protein domains 2) variants within two individual protein domain regions which are predicted to be responsible for a protein-protein interaction 3) all variants within combined regions from multiple genes responsible for coding the same protein domain (i.e. protein families). A conventional collapsing analysis using gene coordinates was also undertaken for comparison. We used UK10K sequence data and investigated associations between regions of variants and lipid traits using the sequence kernel association test (SKAT). Results We observed no strong evidence of association between regions of variants based on Pfam domain definitions and lipid traits. Quantile-Quantile plots illustrated that the overall distributions of p-values from the protein domain analyses were comparable to that of a conventional gene-based approach. Deviations from this distribution suggested that collapsing by either protein domain or gene definitions may be favourable depending on the trait analysed. Conclusion We have collapsed rare variants together using protein domain and family coordinates to present an alternative approach over collapsing across conventionally used gene-based regions. Although no strong evidence of association was detected in these analyses, future studies may still find value in adopting these approaches to detect previously unidentified association signals. PMID:27128313

  12. Differential Occurrence of Interactions and Interaction Domains in Proteins Containing Homopolymeric Amino Acid Repeats

    PubMed Central

    Pelassa, Ilaria; Fiumara, Ferdinando

    2015-01-01

    Homopolymeric amino acids repeats (AARs), which are widespread in proteomes, have often been viewed simply as spacers between protein domains, or even as “junk” sequences with no obvious function but with a potential to cause harm upon expansion as in genetic diseases associated with polyglutamine or polyalanine expansions, including Huntington disease and cleidocranial dysplasia. A growing body of evidence indicates however that at least some AARs can form organized, functional protein structures, and can regulate protein function. In particular, certain AARs can mediate protein-protein interactions, either through homotypic AAR-AAR contacts or through heterotypic contacts with other protein domains. It is still unclear however, whether AARs may have a generalized, proteome-wide role in shaping protein-protein interaction networks. Therefore, we have undertaken here a bioinformatics screening of the human proteome and interactome in search of quantitative evidence of such a role. We first identified the sets of proteins that contain repeats of any one of the 20 amino acids, as well as control sets of proteins chosen at random in the proteome. We then analyzed the connectivity between the proteins of the AAR-containing protein sets and we compared it with that observed in the corresponding control networks. We find evidence for different degrees of connectivity in the different AAR-containing protein networks. Indeed, networks of proteins containing polyglutamine, polyglutamate, polyproline, and other AARs show significantly increased levels of connectivity, whereas networks containing polyleucine and other hydrophobic repeats show lower degrees of connectivity. Furthermore, we observed that numerous protein-protein, -nucleic acid, and -lipid interaction domains are significantly enriched in specific AAR protein groups. These findings support the notion of a generalized, combinatorial role of AARs, together with conventional protein interaction domains, in

  13. 3DSwap: curated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping.

    PubMed

    Shameer, Khader; Shingate, Prashant N; Manjunath, S C P; Karthika, M; Pugalenthi, Ganesan; Sowdhamini, Ramanathan

    2011-01-01

    Three-dimensional domain swapping is a unique protein structural phenomenon where two or more protein chains in a protein oligomer share a common structural segment between individual chains. This phenomenon is observed in an array of protein structures in oligomeric conformation. Protein structures in swapped conformations perform diverse functional roles and are also associated with deposition diseases in humans. We have performed in-depth literature curation and structural bioinformatics analyses to develop an integrated knowledgebase of proteins involved in 3D domain swapping. The hallmark of 3D domain swapping is the presence of distinct structural segments such as the hinge and swapped regions. We have curated the literature to delineate the boundaries of these regions. In addition, we have defined several new concepts like 'secondary major interface' to represent the interface properties arising as a result of 3D domain swapping, and a new quantitative measure for the 'extent of swapping' in structures. The catalog of proteins reported in 3DSwap knowledgebase has been generated using an integrated structural bioinformatics workflow of database searches, literature curation, by structure visualization and sequence-structure-function analyses. The current version of the 3DSwap knowledgebase reports 293 protein structures, the analysis of such a compendium of protein structures will further the understanding molecular factors driving 3D domain swapping.

  14. Structure of the caspase-recruitment domain from a zebrafish guanylate-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Jin, Tengchuan; Huang, Mo; Smith, Patrick; Jiang, Jiansheng; Xiao, T Sam

    2013-08-01

    The caspase-recruitment domain (CARD) mediates homotypic protein-protein interactions that assemble large oligomeric signaling complexes such as the inflammasomes during innate immune responses. Structural studies of the mammalian CARDs demonstrate that their six-helix bundle folds belong to the death-domain superfamily, whereas such studies have not been reported for other organisms. Here, the zebrafish interferon-induced guanylate-binding protein 1 (zIGBP1) was identified that contains an N-terminal GTPase domain and a helical domain typical of the mammalian guanylate-binding proteins, followed by a FIIND domain and a C-terminal CARD similar to the mammalian inflammasome proteins NLRP1 and CARD8. The structure of the zIGBP1 CARD as a fusion with maltose-binding protein was determined at 1.47 Å resolution. This revealed a six-helix bundle fold similar to the NLRP1 CARD structure with the bent α1 helix typical of all known CARD structures. The zIGBP1 CARD surface contains a positively charged patch near its α1 and α4 helices and a negatively charged patch near its α2, α3 and α5 helices, which may mediate its interaction with partner domains. Further studies using binding assays and other analyses will be required in order to address the physiological function(s) of this zebrafish protein.

  15. Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 has an interdigitated double Tudor domain with DNA binding activity.

    PubMed

    Gong, Weibin; Wang, Jinfeng; Perrett, Sarah; Feng, Yingang

    2014-02-21

    Retinoblastoma-binding protein 1 (RBBP1) is a tumor and leukemia suppressor that binds both methylated histone tails and DNA. Our previous studies indicated that RBBP1 possesses a Tudor domain, which cannot bind histone marks. In order to clarify the function of the Tudor domain, the solution structure of the RBBP1 Tudor domain was determined by NMR and is presented here. Although the proteins are unrelated, the RBBP1 Tudor domain forms an interdigitated double Tudor structure similar to the Tudor domain of JMJD2A, which is an epigenetic mark reader. This indicates the functional diversity of Tudor domains. The RBBP1 Tudor domain structure has a significant area of positively charged surface, which reveals a capability of the RBBP1 Tudor domain to bind nucleic acids. NMR titration and isothermal titration calorimetry experiments indicate that the RBBP1 Tudor domain binds both double- and single-stranded DNA with an affinity of 10-100 μM; no apparent DNA sequence specificity was detected. The DNA binding mode and key interaction residues were analyzed in detail based on a model structure of the Tudor domain-dsDNA complex, built by HADDOCK docking using the NMR data. Electrostatic interactions mediate the binding of the Tudor domain with DNA, which is consistent with NMR experiments performed at high salt concentration. The DNA-binding residues are conserved in Tudor domains of the RBBP1 protein family, resulting in conservation of the DNA-binding function in the RBBP1 Tudor domains. Our results provide further insights into the structure and function of RBBP1.

  16. Modulation of neurotransmitter receptors and synaptic differentiation by proteins containing complement-related domains.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Minoru; Hama, Chihiro

    2011-02-01

    Neurotransmitter receptors play central roles in basic neurotransmission and synaptic plasticity. Recent studies have revealed that some transmembrane and extracellular proteins bind to neurotransmitter receptors, forming protein complexes that are required for proper synaptic localization or gating of core receptor molecules. Consequently, the components of these complexes contribute to long-term potentiation, a process that is critical for learning and memory. Here, we review factors that regulate neurotransmitter receptors, with a focus on proteins containing CUB (complement C1r/C1s, Uegf, Bmp1) or CCP (complement control protein) domains, which are frequently found in complement system proteins. Proteins that contain these domains are structurally distinct from TARPs (transmembrane AMPA receptor regulatory proteins), and may constitute new protein families that modulate either the localization or function of neurotransmitter receptors. In addition, other CCP domain-containing proteins participate in dendritic patterning and/or synaptic differentiation, although current evidence has not identified any direct activities on neurotransmitter receptors. Some of these proteins are involved in pathologic conditions such as epileptic seizure and mental retardation. Together, these lines of information have shown that CUB and CCP domain-containing proteins contribute to a wide variety of neuronal events that ultimately establish neural circuits.

  17. Reciprocal Influence of Protein Domains in the Cold-Adapted Acyl Aminoacyl Peptidase from Sporosarcina psychrophila

    PubMed Central

    Parravicini, Federica; Natalello, Antonino; Papaleo, Elena; De Gioia, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Lotti, Marina; Brocca, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Acyl aminoacyl peptidases are two-domain proteins composed by a C-terminal catalytic α/β-hydrolase domain and by an N-terminal β-propeller domain connected through a structural element that is at the N-terminus in sequence but participates in the 3D structure of the C-domain. We investigated about the structural and functional interplay between the two domains and the bridge structure (in this case a single helix named α1-helix) in the cold-adapted enzyme from Sporosarcina psychrophila (SpAAP) using both protein variants in which entire domains were deleted and proteins carrying substitutions in the α1-helix. We found that in this enzyme the inter-domain connection dramatically affects the stability of both the whole enzyme and the β-propeller. The α1-helix is required for the stability of the intact protein, as in other enzymes of the same family; however in this psychrophilic enzyme only, it destabilizes the isolated β-propeller. A single charged residue (E10) in the α1-helix plays a major role for the stability of the whole structure. Overall, a strict interaction of the SpAAP domains seems to be mandatory for the preservation of their reciprocal structural integrity and may witness their co-evolution. PMID:23457536

  18. Efficient secretion of a folded protein domain by a monomeric bacterial autotransporter.

    PubMed

    Skillman, Kristen M; Barnard, Travis J; Peterson, Janine H; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Bernstein, Harris D

    2005-11-01

    Bacterial autotransporters are proteins that contain a small C-terminal 'beta domain' that facilitates translocation of a large N-terminal 'passenger domain' across the outer membrane (OM) by an unknown mechanism. Here we used EspP, an autotransporter produced by Escherichia coli 0157:H7, as a model protein to gain insight into the transport reaction. Initially we found that the passenger domain of a truncated version of EspP (EspPDelta1-851) was translocated efficiently across the OM. Blue Native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, analytical ultracentrifugation and other biochemical methods showed that EspPDelta1-851 behaves as a compact monomer and strongly suggest that the channel formed by the beta domain is too narrow to accommodate folded polypeptides. Surprisingly, we found that a folded protein domain fused to the N-terminus of EspPDelta1-851 was efficiently translocated across the OM. Further analysis revealed that the passenger domain of wild-type EspP also folds at least partially in the periplasm. To reconcile these data, we propose that the EspP beta domain functions primarily to target and anchor the protein and that an external factor transports the passenger domain across the OM.

  19. Methyl-CpG-binding domain proteins: readers of the epigenome.

    PubMed

    Du, Qian; Luu, Phuc-Loi; Stirzaker, Clare; Clark, Susan J

    2015-01-01

    How DNA methylation is interpreted and influences genome regulation remains largely unknown. Proteins of the methyl-CpG-binding domain (MBD) family are primary candidates for the readout of DNA methylation as they recruit chromatin remodelers, histone deacetylases and methylases to methylated DNA associated with gene repression. MBD protein binding requires both functional MBD domains and methyl-CpGs; however, some MBD proteins also bind unmethylated DNA and active regulatory regions via alternative regulatory domains or interaction with the nucleosome remodeling deacetylase (NuRD/Mi-2) complex members. Mutations within MBD domains occur in many diseases, including neurological disorders and cancers, leading to loss of MBD binding specificity to methylated sites and gene deregulation. Here, we summarize the current state of knowledge about MBD proteins and their role as readers of the epigenome.

  20. Ligation of erythrocyte CR1 induces its clustering in complex with scaffolding protein FAP-1

    PubMed Central

    Glodek, Aleksandra M.; Weaver, Gregory; Klickstein, Lloyd B.; Nicholson-Weller, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The primary identified function of complement receptor 1 (CR1/CD35) on primate erythrocytes is to bind complement-tagged inflammatory particles including microbes and immune complexes. When erythrocytes circulate through liver and spleen, sinusoidal phagocytes remove CR1-adherent particles and erythrocytes return to the circulation. This process of immune adherence clearance is important for host defense and prevention of autoimmunity. CR1 was previously described as clustered in the human erythrocyte membrane, which was thought to be necessary for binding complement-opsonized particles. In contrast, we demonstrate that on erythrocytes CR1 is not clustered, but dispersed, and able to bind complement-tagged particles. When fresh erythrocytes are solubilized by nonionic detergent, CR1 partitions to the cytoskeleton fraction. Using a PDZ-peptide array, CR1's cytoplasmic tail, which contains 2 PDZ-motifs, binds PDZ domains 2, 3, and 5 of Fas-associated phosphatase 1 (FAP-1), a scaffolding protein. We show that FAP-1, not previously recognized as an erythroid protein, is expressed on circulating erythrocytes. CR1 and FAP-1 coimmunoprecipitate, which confirms their molecular association. Disperse CR1 on erythrocytes may be advantageous for capturing immune-complexes, while ligation-induced CR1 clustering may prevent ingestion of the erythrocyte during the immune-complex transfer to the macrophages by keeping the opsonic stimulus localized thus preventing phagocyosis. PMID:18684861

  1. Protein domain networks: Scale-free mixing of positive and negative exponents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacher, J. C.; Hayashida, M.; Akutsu, T.

    2006-07-01

    Many biological studies have been focused on the study of proteins, since proteins are essential for most cell functions. Although proteins are unique, they share certain common properties. For example, well-defined regions within a protein can fold independently from the rest of the protein and have their own function. They are called protein domains, and served as protein building blocks. In this article, we present a theoretical model for studying the protein domain networks, where one node of the network corresponds to one protein and two proteins are connected if they contain the same domain. The resulting distribution of nodes with a given degree, k, shows not only a power-law with negative exponent γ=-1, but it resembles the superposition of two power-law functions, one with a negative exponent and another with a positive exponent β=1. We call this distribution pattern “ scale-free mixing”. To explain the emergence of this superposition of power-laws, we propose a basic model with two main components: (1) mutation and (2) duplication of domains. Precisely, duplication gives rise to complete subgraphs (i.e., cliques) on the network, thus for several values of k a large number of nodes with degree k is produced, which explains the positive power-law branch of the degree distribution. In order to compare our model with experimental data, we generate protein domain networks with data from the UniProt Knowledgebase-Swissprot database for protein sequences and using InterPro, Pfam and Smart for domain databases. Our results indicate that the signal of this scale-free mixing pattern is also observed in the experimental data and it is conserved among organisms as Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, Drosophila melanogaster, Mus musculus, and Homo sapiens.

  2. Histone Code Modulation by Oncogenic PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-06-01

    Hoffmann MJ. Transcription factor networks in embryonic stem cells and testicular cancer and the definition of epigenetics. Epigenetics 2007; 2(1): 37-42...PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Zeng-Quan Yang, Ph.D...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Histone Code Modulation by Oncogenic PWWP-domain Protein in Breast Cancers 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0109 5c

  3. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-12-29

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins.

  4. The Transactivation Domains of the p53 Protein.

    PubMed

    Raj, Nitin; Attardi, Laura D

    2017-01-03

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a transcriptional activator, with discrete domains that participate in sequence-specific DNA binding, tetramerization, and transcriptional activation. Mutagenesis and reporter studies have delineated two distinct activation domains (TADs) and specific hydrophobic residues within these TADs that are critical for their function. Knockin mice expressing p53 mutants with alterations in either or both of the two TADs have revealed that TAD1 is critical for responses to acute DNA damage, whereas both TAD1 and TAD2 participate in tumor suppression. Biochemical and structural studies have identified factors that bind either or both TADs, including general transcription factors (GTFs), chromatin modifiers, and negative regulators, helping to elaborate a model through which p53 activates transcription. Posttranslational modifications (PTMs) of the p53 TADs through phosphorylation also regulate TAD activity. Together, these studies on p53 TADs provide great insight into how p53 serves as a tumor suppressor.

  5. Cypher/ZASP Is a Novel A-kinase Anchoring Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Changsong; Guo, Xiaogang; Lange, Stephan; Liu, Jie; Ouyang, Kunfu; Yin, Xiang; Jiang, Liujun; Cai, Yibo; Mu, Yongxin; Sheikh, Farah; Ye, Sheng; Chen, Ju; Ke, Yuehai; Cheng, Hongqiang

    2013-01-01

    PKA signaling is important for the post-translational modification of proteins, especially those in cardiomyocytes involved in cardiac excitation-contraction coupling. PKA activity is spatially and temporally regulated through compartmentalization by protein kinase A anchoring proteins. Cypher/ZASP, a member of PDZ-LIM domain protein family, is a cytoskeletal protein that forms multiprotein complexes at sarcomeric Z-lines. It has been demonstrated that Cypher/ZASP plays a pivotal structural role in the structural integrity of sarcomeres, and several of its mutations are associated with myopathies including dilated cardiomyopathy. Here we show that Cypher/ZASP, interacting specifically with the type II regulatory subunit RIIα of PKA, acted as a typical protein kinase A anchoring protein in cardiomyocytes. In addition, we show that Cypher/ZASP itself was phosphorylated at Ser265 and Ser296 by PKA. Furthermore, the PDZ domain of Cypher/ZASP interacted with the L-type calcium channel through its C-terminal PDZ binding motif. Expression of Cypher/ZASP facilitated PKA-mediated phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel in vitro. Additionally, the phosphorylation of the L-type calcium channel at Ser1928 induced by isoproterenol was impaired in neonatal Cypher/ZASP-null cardiomyocytes. Moreover, Cypher/ZASP interacted with the Ser/Thr phosphatase calcineurin, which is a phosphatase for the L-type calcium channel. Taken together, our data strongly suggest that Cypher/ZASP not only plays a structural role for the sarcomeric integrity, but is also an important sarcomeric signaling scaffold in regulating the phosphorylation of channels or contractile proteins. PMID:23996002

  6. Travelling lipid domains in a dynamic model for protein-induced pattern formation in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Karin; Bär, Markus

    2005-06-01

    Cell membranes are composed of a mixture of lipids. Many biological processes require the formation of spatial domains in the lipid distribution of the plasma membrane. We have developed a mathematical model that describes the dynamic spatial distribution of acidic lipids in response to the presence of GMC proteins and regulating enzymes. The model encompasses diffusion of lipids and GMC proteins, electrostatic attraction between acidic lipids and GMC proteins as well as the kinetics of membrane attachment/detachment of GMC proteins. If the lipid-protein interaction is strong enough, phase separation occurs in the membrane as a result of free energy minimization and protein/lipid domains are formed. The picture is changed if a constant activity of enzymes is included into the model. We chose the myristoyl-electrostatic switch as a regulatory module. It consists of a protein kinase C that phosphorylates and removes the GMC proteins from the membrane and a phosphatase that dephosphorylates the proteins and enables them to rebind to the membrane. For sufficiently high enzymatic activity, the phase separation is replaced by travelling domains of acidic lipids and proteins. The latter active process is typical for nonequilibrium systems. It allows for a faster restructuring and polarization of the membrane since it acts on a larger length scale than the passive phase separation. The travelling domains can be pinned by spatial gradients in the activity; thus the membrane is able to detect spatial clues and can adapt its polarity dynamically to changes in the environment.

  7. A nuclear localization domain in the hnRNP A1 protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The heterogeneous nuclear RNP (hnRNP) A1 protein is one of the major pre-mRNA/mRNA binding proteins in eukaryotic cells and one of the most abundant proteins in the nucleus. It is localized to the nucleoplasm and it also shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. The amino acid sequence of A1 contains two RNP motif RNA-binding domains (RBDs) at the amino terminus and a glycine-rich domain at the carboxyl terminus. This configuration, designated 2x RBD-Gly, is representative of perhaps the largest family of hnRNP proteins. Unlike most nuclear proteins characterized so far, A1 (and most 2x RBD-Gly proteins) does not contain a recognizable nuclear localization signal (NLS). We have found that a segment of ca. 40 amino acids near the carboxyl end of the protein (designated M9) is necessary and sufficient for nuclear localization; attaching this segment to the bacterial protein beta- galactosidase or to pyruvate kinase completely localized these otherwise cytoplasmic proteins to the nucleus. The RBDs and another RNA binding motif found in the glycine-rich domain, the RGG box, are not required for A1 nuclear localization. M9 is a novel type of nuclear localization domain as it does not contain sequences similar to classical basic-type NLS. Interestingly, sequences similar to M9 are found in other nuclear RNA-binding proteins including hnRNP A2. PMID:7730395

  8. Protective activity of the CnaBE3 domain conserved among Staphylococcus aureus Sdr proteins.

    PubMed

    Becherelli, Marco; Prachi, Prachi; Viciani, Elisa; Biagini, Massimiliano; Fiaschi, Luigi; Chiarot, Emiliano; Nosari, Sarah; Brettoni, Cecilia; Marchi, Sara; Biancucci, Marco; Fontana, Maria Rita; Montagnani, Francesca; Bagnoli, Fabio; Barocchi, Michèle A; Manetti, Andrea G O

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen, commensal of the human skin and nares, but also responsible for invasive nosocomial as well as community acquired infections. Staphylococcus aureus adheres to the host tissues by means of surface adhesins, such as SdrC, SdrD, and SdrE proteins. The Sdr family of proteins together with a functional A domain, contain respectively two, three or five repeated sequences called B motifs which comprise the CnaB domains. SdrD and SdrE proteins were reported to be protective in animal models against invasive diseases or lethal challenge with human clinical S. aureus isolates. In this study we identified a 126 amino acid sequence containing a CnaB domain, conserved among the three Sdr proteins. The three fragments defined here as CnaBC2, D5 and E3 domains even though belonging to phylogenetically distinct strains, displayed high sequence similarity. Based on the sequence conservation data, we selected the CnaBE3 domain for further analysis and characterization. Polyclonal antibodies raised against the recombinant CnaBE3 domain recognized SdrE, SdrC and SdrD proteins of different S. aureus lineages. Moreover, we demonstrated that the CnaBE3 domain was expressed in vivo during S. aureus infections, and that immunization of this domain alone significantly reduces the bacterial load in mice challenged with S. aureus. Furthermore, we show that the reduction of bacteria by CnaBE3 vaccination is due to functional antibodies. Finally, we demonstrated that the region of the SdrE protein containing the CnaBE3 domain was resistant to trypsin digestion, a characteristic often associated with the presence of an isopeptide bond.

  9. p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin proteins define a conserved sequence domain present in other eukaryotic protein families.

    PubMed

    Garcia-Ranea, J A; Mirey, Gladys; Camonis, Jacques; Valencia, Alfonso

    2002-10-09

    We identified families of proteins characterized by the presence of a domain similar to human p23 protein, which include proteins such as Sgt1, involved in the yeast kinetochore assembly; melusin, involved in specific interactions with the cytoplasmic integrin beta1 domain; Rar1, related to pathogenic resistance in plants, and to development in animals; B5+B5R flavo-hemo cytochrome NAD(P)H oxidoreductase type B in humans and mice; and NudC, involved in nucleus migration during mitosis. We also found that p23 and the HSP20/alpha-crystallin family of heat shock proteins, which share the same three-dimensional folding, show a pattern of conserved residues that points to a common origin in the evolution of both protein domains. The p23 and HSP20/alpha-crystallin phylogenetic relationship and their similar role in chaperone activity suggest a common function, probably involving protein-protein interaction, for those proteins containing p23-like domains.

  10. An alternative scenario for the formation of specialized protein nano-domains (cluster phases) in biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Destainville, N.

    2010-09-01

    We discuss a realistic scenario, accounting for the existence of sub-micrometric protein domains in cell membranes. At the biological level, such membrane domains have been shown to be specialized, in order to perform a determined biological task, in the sense that they gather one or a few protein species out of the hundreds of different ones that a cell membrane may contain. By analyzing the balance between mixing entropy and protein affinities, we propose that such protein sorting in distinct domains can be explained without appealing to pre-existing lipidic micro-phase separations, as in the lipid raft scenario. We show that the proposed scenario is compatible with known physical interactions between membrane proteins, even if thousands of different species coexist.

  11. Predicting protein N-glycosylation by combining functional domain and secretion information.

    PubMed

    Li, Sujun; Liu, Boshu; Cai, Yudong; Li, Yixue

    2007-08-01

    Protein N-glycosylation plays an important role in protein function. Yet, at present, few computational methods are available for the prediction of this protein modification. This prompted our development of a support vector machine (SVM)-based method for this task, as well as a partial least squares (PLS) regression based prediction method for comparison. A functional domain feature space was used to create SVM and PLS models, which achieved accuracies of 83.91% and 79.89%, respectively, as evaluated by a leave-one-out cross-validation. Subsequently, SVM and PLS models were developed based on functional domain and protein secretion information, which yielded accuracies of 89.13% and 86%, respectively. This analysis demonstrates that the protein functional domain and secretion information are both efficient predictors of N-glycosylation.

  12. The HPr Proteins from the Thermophile Bacillus stearothermophilus Can Form Domain-swapped Dimers

    SciTech Connect

    Sridharan, Sudharsan; Razvi, Abbas; Scholtz, J. Martin; Sacchettini, James C.

    2010-07-20

    The study of proteins from extremophilic organisms continues to generate interest in the field of protein folding because paradigms explaining the enhanced stability of these proteins still elude us and such studies have the potential to further our knowledge of the forces stabilizing proteins. We have undertaken such a study with our model protein HPr from a mesophile, Bacillus subtilis, and a thermophile, Bacillus stearothermophilus. We report here the high-resolution structures of the wild-type HPr protein from the thermophile and a variant, F29W. The variant proved to crystallize in two forms: a monomeric form with a structure very similar to the wild-type protein as well as a domain-swapped dimer. Interestingly, the structure of the domain-swapped dimer for HPr is very different from that observed for a homologous protein, Crh, from B. subtilis. The existence of a domain-swapped dimer has implications for amyloid formation and is consistent with recent results showing that the HPr proteins can form amyloid fibrils. We also characterized the conformational stability of the thermophilic HPr proteins using thermal and solvent denaturation methods and have used the high-resolution structures in an attempt to explain the differences in stability between the different HPr proteins. Finally, we present a detailed analysis of the solution properties of the HPr proteins using a variety of biochemical and biophysical methods.

  13. Protein Domain of Unknown Function 3233 is a Translocation Domain of Autotransporter Secretory Mechanism in Gamma proteobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Prakash, Ananth; Yogeeshwari, S.; Sircar, Sanchari; Agrawal, Shipra

    2011-01-01

    Vibrio cholerae, the enteropathogenic gram negative bacteria is one of the main causative agents of waterborne diseases like cholera. About 1/3rd of the organism's genome is uncharacterised with many protein coding genes lacking structure and functional information. These proteins form significant fraction of the genome and are crucial in understanding the organism's complete functional makeup. In this study we report the general structure and function of a family of hypothetical proteins, Domain of Unknown Function 3233 (DUF3233), which are conserved across gram negative gammaproteobacteria (especially in Vibrio sp. and similar bacteria). Profile and HMM based sequence search methods were used to screen homologues of DUF3233. The I-TASSER fold recognition method was used to build a three dimensional structural model of the domain. The structure resembles the transmembrane beta-barrel with an axial N-terminal helix and twelve antiparallel beta-strands. Using a combination of amphipathy and discrimination analysis we analysed the potential transmembrane beta-barrel forming properties of DUF3233. Sequence, structure and phylogenetic analysis of DUF3233 indicates that this gram negative bacterial hypothetical protein resembles the beta-barrel translocation unit of autotransporter Va secretory mechanism with a gene organisation that differs from the conventional Va system. PMID:22073138

  14. IS-Dom: a dataset of independent structural domains automatically delineated from protein structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebina, Teppei; Umezawa, Yuki; Kuroda, Yutaka

    2013-05-01

    Protein domains that can fold in isolation are significant targets in diverse area of proteomics research as they are often readily analyzed by high-throughput methods. Here, we report IS-Dom, a dataset of Independent Structural Domains (ISDs) that are most likely to fold in isolation. IS-Dom was constructed by filtering domains from SCOP, CATH, and DomainParser using quantitative structural measures, which were calculated by estimating inter-domain hydrophobic clusters and hydrogen bonds from the full length protein's atomic coordinates. The ISD detection protocol is fully automated, and all of the computed interactions are stored in the server which enables rapid update of IS-Dom. We also prepared a standard IS-Dom using parameters optimized by maximizing the Youden's index. The standard IS-Dom, contained 54,860 ISDs, of which 25.5 % had high sequence identity and termini overlap with a Protein Data Bank (PDB) cataloged sequence and are thus experimentally shown to fold in isolation [coined autonomously folded domain (AFDs)]. Furthermore, our ISD detection protocol missed less than 10 % of the AFDs, which corroborated our protocol's ability to define structural domains that are able to fold independently. IS-Dom is available through the web server (http://domserv.lab.tuat.ac.jp/IS-Dom.html), and users can either, download the standard IS-Dom dataset, construct their own IS-Dom by interactively varying the parameters, or assess the structural independence of newly defined putative domains.

  15. ERAD of proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains requires ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Kit; Koay, Yee-Hui; Otsuka, Yuka; Swanton, Eileithyia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Clearance of misfolded proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is mediated by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in a process known as ER-associated degradation (ERAD). The mechanisms through which proteins containing aberrant transmembrane domains are degraded by ERAD are poorly understood. To address this question, we generated model ERAD substrates based on CD8 with either a non-native transmembrane domain but a folded ER luminal domain (CD8TMD*), or the native transmembrane domain but a misfolded luminal domain (CD8LUM*). Although both chimeras were degraded by ERAD, we found that the location of the folding defect determined the initial site of ubiquitylation. Ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues was required for the extraction of CD8TMD* from the ER membrane during ERAD, whereas CD8LUM* continued to be degraded in the absence of cytoplasmic lysine residues. Cytoplasmic lysine residues were also required for degradation of an additional ERAD substrate containing an unassembled transmembrane domain and when a non-native transmembrane domain was introduced into CD8LUM*. Our results suggest that proteins with defective transmembrane domains are removed from the ER through a specific ERAD mechanism that depends upon ubiquitylation of cytoplasmic lysine residues. PMID:26446255

  16. Charting the Landscape of Tandem BRCT Domain-Mediated Protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Nicholas T.; Mesquita, Rafael D.; Sweet, Michael; Carvalho, Marcelo A.; Li, Xueli; Liu, Yun; Nguyen, Huey; Thomas, C. Eric; Iversen, Edwin S.; Marsillac, Sylvia; Karchin, Rachel; Koomen, John; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells have evolved an intricate system to resolve DNA damage to prevent its transmission to daughter cells. This system, collectively known as the DNA damage response (DDR) network, includes a large number of proteins responsible for detection of DNA damage, promotion of repair, and coordination with cell cycle progression. Because defects in this network can lead to cancer, this network constitutes a barrier against tumorigenesis. The BRCT domain is a modular protein domain critical for relaying signals in the DDR. We performed a systematic analysis of protein-protein interactions involving tandem BRCT domains (tBRCT) in the DDR by combining literature curation, yeast two hybrid (Y2H) screens, and tandem affinity purification coupled to mass spectrometry (TAP-MS). We identified one previously unrecognized BRCT protein and generated human protein-protein interaction network for this type of modular domain. This study also reveals several novel components in DNA damage signaling such as COMMD1 and mTORC2. Additionally, integration of tBRCT domain interactions with DDR phosphoprotein studies and analysis of kinase-substrate interactions revealed signaling subnetworks that may aid in understanding the involvement of tBRCT in disease and DNA repair. PMID:22990118

  17. DNA binding residues in the RQC domain of Werner protein are critical for its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Kulikowicz, Tomasz; Dawut, Lale; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2012-06-01

    Werner protein (WRN), member of the RecQ helicase family, is a helicase and exonuclease, and participates in multiple DNA metabolic processes including DNA replication, recombination and DNA repair. Mutations in the WRN gene cause Werner syndrome, associated with premature aging, genome instability and cancer predisposition. The RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain of WRN, containing α2-α3 loop and β-wing motifs, is important for DNA binding and for many protein interactions. To better understand the critical functions of this domain, we generated recombinant WRN proteins (using a novel purification scheme) with mutations in Arg-993 within the α2-α3 loop of the RQC domain and in Phe-1037 of the -wing motif. We then studied the catalytic activities and DNA binding of these mutant proteins as well as some important functional protein interactions. The mutant proteins were defective in DNA binding and helicase activity, and interestingly, they had deficient exonuclease activity and strand annealing function. The RQC domain of WRN has not previously been implicated in exonuclease or annealing activities. The mutant proteins could not stimulate NEIL1 incision activity as did the wild type. Thus, the Arg-993 and Phe-1037 in the RQC domain play essential roles in catalytic activity, and in functional interactions mediated by WRN.

  18. Fusion protein of retinol-binding protein and albumin domain III reduces liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hongsik; Jeong, Hyeyeun; Park, Sangeun; Yoo, Wonbaek; Choi, Soyoung; Choi, Kyungmin; Lee, Min-Goo; Lee, Mihwa; Cha, DaeRyong; Kim, Young-Sik; Han, Jeeyoung; Kim, Wonkon; Park, Sun-Hwa; Oh, Junseo

    2015-06-01

    Activated hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) play a key role in liver fibrosis, and inactivating HSCs has been considered a promising therapeutic approach. We previously showed that albumin and its derivative designed for stellate cell-targeting, retinol-binding protein-albumin domain III fusion protein (referred to as R-III), inactivate cultured HSCs. Here, we investigated the mechanism of action of albumin/R-III in HSCs and examined the anti-fibrotic potential of R-III in vivo. R-III treatment and albumin expression downregulated retinoic acid (RA) signaling which was involved in HSC activation. RA receptor agonist and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase overexpression abolished the anti-fibrotic effect of R-III and albumin, respectively. R-III uptake into cultured HSCs was significantly decreased by siRNA-STRA6, and injected R-III was localized predominantly in HSCs in liver. Importantly, R-III administration reduced CCl4- and bile duct ligation-induced liver fibrosis. R-III also exhibited a preventive effect against CCl4-inducd liver fibrosis. These findings suggest that the anti-fibrotic effect of albumin/R-III is, at least in part, mediated by downregulation of RA signaling and that R-III is a good candidate as a novel anti-fibrotic drug.

  19. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E. O.; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J.; Andersen, Jens S.; Yao, Gang

    2013-01-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1’s defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made. PMID:22836166

  20. Mass spectrometric identification of proteins that interact through specific domains of the poly(A) binding protein.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Roy; Denis, Clyde L; Zhang, Chongxu; Nielsen, Maria E O; Chiang, Yueh-Chin; Kierkegaard, Morten; Wang, Xin; Lee, Darren J; Andersen, Jens S; Yao, Gang

    2012-09-01

    Poly(A) binding protein (PAB1) is involved in a number of RNA metabolic functions in eukaryotic cells and correspondingly is suggested to associate with a number of proteins. We have used mass spectrometric analysis to identify 55 non-ribosomal proteins that specifically interact with PAB1 from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Because many of these factors may associate only indirectly with PAB1 by being components of the PAB1-mRNP structure, we additionally conducted mass spectrometric analyses on seven metabolically defined PAB1 deletion derivatives to delimit the interactions between these proteins and PAB1. These latter analyses identified 13 proteins whose associations with PAB1 were reduced by deleting one or another of PAB1's defined domains. Included in this list of 13 proteins were the translation initiation factors eIF4G1 and eIF4G2, translation termination factor eRF3, and PBP2, all of whose previously known direct interactions with specific PAB1 domains were either confirmed, delimited, or extended. The remaining nine proteins that interacted through a specific PAB1 domain were CBF5, SLF1, UPF1, CBC1, SSD1, NOP77, yGR250c, NAB6, and GBP2. In further study, UPF1, involved in nonsense-mediated decay, was confirmed to interact with PAB1 through the RRM1 domain. We additionally established that while the RRM1 domain of PAB1 was required for UPF1-induced acceleration of deadenylation during nonsense-mediated decay, it was not required for the more critical step of acceleration of mRNA decapping. These results begin to identify the proteins most likely to interact with PAB1 and the domains of PAB1 through which these contacts are made.

  1. In planta localisation patterns of MADS domain proteins during floral development in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Urbanus, Susan L; de Folter, Stefan; Shchennikova, Anna V; Kaufmann, Kerstin; Immink, Richard GH; Angenent, Gerco C

    2009-01-01

    Background MADS domain transcription factors play important roles in various developmental processes in flowering plants. Members of this family play a prominent role in the transition to flowering and the specification of floral organ identity. Several studies reported mRNA expression patterns of the genes encoding these MADS domain proteins, however, these studies do not provide the necessary information on the temporal and spatial localisation of the proteins. We have made GREEN FLUORESCENT PROTEIN (GFP) translational fusions with the four MADS domain proteins SEPALLATA3, AGAMOUS, FRUITFULL and APETALA1 from the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and analysed the protein localisation patterns in living plant tissues by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Results We unravelled the protein localisation patterns of the four MADS domain proteins at a cellular and subcellular level in inflorescence and floral meristems, during development of the early flower bud stages, and during further differentiation of the floral organs. The protein localisation patterns revealed a few deviations from known mRNA expression patterns, suggesting a non-cell autonomous action of these factors or alternative control mechanisms. In addition, we observed a change in the subcellular localisation of SEPALLATA3 from a predominantly nuclear localisation to a more cytoplasmic localisation, occurring specifically during petal and stamen development. Furthermore, we show that the down-regulation of the homeodomain transcription factor WUSCHEL in ovular tissues is preceded by the occurrence of both AGAMOUS and SEPALLATA3 proteins, supporting the hypothesis that both proteins together suppress WUSCHEL expression in the ovule. Conclusion This approach provides a highly detailed in situ map of MADS domain protein presence during early and later stages of floral development. The subcellular localisation of the transcription factors in the cytoplasm, as observed at certain stages during

  2. SPECTRUS: A Dimensionality Reduction Approach for Identifying Dynamical Domains in Protein Complexes from Limited Structural Datasets.

    PubMed

    Ponzoni, Luca; Polles, Guido; Carnevale, Vincenzo; Micheletti, Cristian

    2015-08-04

    Identifying dynamical, quasi-rigid domains in proteins provides a powerful means for characterizing functionally oriented structural changes via a parsimonious set of degrees of freedom. In fact, the relative displacements of few dynamical domains usually suffice to rationalize the mechanics underpinning biological functionality in proteins and can even be exploited for structure determination or refinement purposes. Here we present SPECTRUS, a general scheme that, by solely using amino acid distance fluctuations, can pinpoint the innate quasi-rigid domains of single proteins or large complexes in a robust way. Consistent domains are usually obtained by using either a pair of representative structures or thousands of conformers. The functional insights offered by the approach are illustrated for biomolecular systems of very different size and complexity such as kinases, ion channels, and viral capsids. The decomposition tool is available as a software package and web server at spectrus.sissa.it.

  3. Discovery of cancer drug targets by CRISPR-Cas9 screening of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Shi, Junwei; Wang, Eric; Milazzo, Joseph P; Wang, Zihua; Kinney, Justin B; Vakoc, Christopher R

    2015-06-01

    CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology holds great promise for discovering therapeutic targets in cancer and other diseases. Current screening strategies target CRISPR-Cas9-induced mutations to the 5' exons of candidate genes, but this approach often produces in-frame variants that retain functionality, which can obscure even strong genetic dependencies. Here we overcome this limitation by targeting CRISPR-Cas9 mutagenesis to exons encoding functional protein domains. This generates a higher proportion of null mutations and substantially increases the potency of negative selection. We also show that the magnitude of negative selection can be used to infer the functional importance of individual protein domains of interest. A screen of 192 chromatin regulatory domains in murine acute myeloid leukemia cells identifies six known drug targets and 19 additional dependencies. A broader application of this approach may allow comprehensive identification of protein domains that sustain cancer cells and are suitable for drug targeting.

  4. Biochemical and functional significance of F-BAR domain proteins interaction with WASP/N-WASP.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yolande; Aardema, Jorie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-04-01

    The Bin-Amphiphysin-Rvs (BAR) domain family of proteins includes groups which promote positive (classical BAR, N-BAR, and F-BAR) and negative (I-BAR) membrane deformation. Of these groups, the F-BAR subfamily is the most diverse in its biochemical properties. F-BAR domain proteins dimerize to form a tight scaffold about the membrane. The F-BAR domain provides a banana-shaped, alpha-helical structure that senses membrane curvature. Different types of F-BAR domain proteins contain tyrosine kinase or GTPase activities; some interact with phosphatases and RhoGTPases. Most possess an SH3 domain that facilitates the recruitment and activation of WASP/N-WASP. Thus, F-BAR domain proteins affect remodeling of both membrane and the actin cytoskeleton. The purpose of this review is to highlight the role of F-BAR proteins in coupling WASP/N-WASP to cytoskeletal remodeling. A role for F-BAR/WASP interaction in human diseases affecting nervous, blood, and neoplastic tissues is discussed.

  5. Effect of interdomain linker length on an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between two protein domains.

    PubMed

    Cutler, Thomas A; Mills, Brandon M; Lubin, David J; Chong, Lillian T; Loh, Stewart N

    2009-02-27

    Fusion of one protein domain with another is a common event in both evolution and protein engineering experiments. When insertion is at an internal site (e.g., a surface loop or turn), as opposed to one of the termini, conformational strain can be introduced into both domains. Strain is manifested by an antagonistic folding-unfolding equilibrium between the two domains, which we previously showed can be parameterized by a coupling free-energy term (DeltaG(X)). The extent of strain is predicted to depend primarily on the ratio of the N-to-C distance of the guest protein to the distance between ends of the surface loop in the host protein. Here, we test that hypothesis by inserting ubiquitin (Ub) into the bacterial ribonuclease barnase (Bn), using peptide linkers from zero to 10 amino acids each. DeltaG(X) values are determined by measuring the extent to which Co(2+) binding to an engineered site on the Ub domain destabilizes the Bn domain. All-atom, unforced Langevin dynamics simulations are employed to gain structural insight into the mechanism of mechanically induced unfolding. Experimental and computational results find that the two domains are structurally and energetically uncoupled when linkers are long and that DeltaG(X) increases with decreasing linker length. When the linkers are fewer than two amino acids, strain is so great that one domain unfolds the other. However, the protein is able to refold as dimers and higher-order oligomers. The likely mechanism is a three-dimensional domain swap of the Bn domain, which relieves conformational strain. The simulations suggest that an effective route to mechanical unfolding begins with disruption of the hydrophobic core of Bn near the Ub insertion site.

  6. Rapid Activation of Bone Morphogenic Protein 9 by Receptor-mediated Displacement of Pro-domains*

    PubMed Central

    Kienast, Yvonne; Jucknischke, Ute; Scheiblich, Stefan; Thier, Martina; de Wouters, Mariana; Haas, Alexander; Lehmann, Christian; Brand, Verena; Bernicke, Dirk; Honold, Konrad; Lorenz, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    By non-covalent association after proteolytic cleavage, the pro-domains modulate the activities of the mature growth factor domains across the transforming growth factor-β family. In the case of bone morphogenic protein 9 (BMP9), however, the pro-domains do not inhibit the bioactivity of the growth factor, and the BMP9·pro-domain complexes have equivalent biological activities as the BMP9 mature ligand dimers. By using real-time surface plasmon resonance, we could demonstrate that either binding of pro-domain-complexed BMP9 to type I receptor activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1), type II receptors, co-receptor endoglin, or to mature BMP9 domain targeting antibodies leads to immediate and complete displacement of the pro-domains from the complex. Vice versa, pro-domain binding by an anti-pro-domain antibody results in release of the mature BMP9 growth factor. Based on these findings, we adjusted ELISA assays to measure the protein levels of different BMP9 variants. Although mature BMP9 and inactive precursor BMP9 protein were directly detectable by ELISA, BMP9·pro-domain complex could only be measured indirectly as dissociated fragments due to displacement of mature growth factor and pro-domains after antibody binding. Our studies provide a model in which BMP9 can be readily activated upon getting into contact with its receptors. This increases the understanding of the underlying biology of BMP9 activation and also provides guidance for ELISA development for the detection of circulating BMP9 variants. PMID:26677222

  7. Network mapping among the functional domains of Chikungunya virus nonstructural proteins.

    PubMed

    Rana, Jyoti; Rajasekharan, Sreejith; Gulati, Sahil; Dudha, Namrata; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay Kumar; Gupta, Sanjay

    2014-10-01

    Formation of virus specific replicase complex is among the most important steps that determines the fate of viral transcription and replication during Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection. In the present study, the authors have computationally generated a 3D structure of CHIKV late replicase complex on the basis of the interactions identified among the domains of CHIKV nonstructural proteins (nsPs) which make up the late replicase complex. The interactions among the domains of CHIKV nsPs were identified using systems such as pull down, protein interaction ELISA, and yeast two-hybrid. The structures of nsPs were generated using I-TASSER and the biological assembly of the replicase complex was determined using ZRANK and RDOCK. A total of 36 interactions among the domains and full length proteins were tested and 12 novel interactions have been identified. These interactions included the homodimerization of nsP1 and nsP4 through their respective C-ter domains; the associations of nsP2 helicase domain and C-ter domain of nsP4 with methyltransferase and membrane binding domains of nsP1; the interaction of nsP2 protease domain with C-ter domain of nsP4; and the interaction of nsP3 macro and alphavirus unique domains with the C-ter domain of nsP1. The novel interactions identified in the current study form a network of organized associations that suggest the spatial arrangement of nsPs in the late replicase complex of CHIKV.

  8. Genomic and functional characterization of the diverse immunoglobulin domain-containing protein (DICP) family

    PubMed Central

    Haire, Robert N.; Cannon, John P.; O’Driscoll, Marci L.; Ostrov, David A.; Mueller, M. Gail; Turner, Poem M.; Litman, Ronda T.; Litman, Gary W.; Yoder, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    A heretofore-unrecognized multigene family encoding diverse immunoglobulin (Ig) domain-containing proteins (DICPs) was identified in the zebrafish genome. Twenty-nine distinct loci mapping to three chromosomal regions encode receptor-type structures possessing two classes of Ig ectodomains (D1 and D2). The sequence and number of Ig domains, transmembrane regions and signaling motifs varies between DICPs. Interindividual polymorphism and alternative RNA processing contribute to DICP diversity. Molecular models indicate that most D1 domains are of the variable (V) type; D2 domains are Ig-like. Sequence differences between D1 domains are concentrated in hypervariable regions on the front sheet strands of the Ig fold. Recombinant DICP Ig domains bind lipids, a property shared by mammalian CD300 and TREM family members. These findings suggest that novel multigene families encoding diversified immune receptors have arisen in different vertebrate lineages and effect parallel patterns of ligand recognition that potentially impact species-specific advantages. PMID:22386706

  9. α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (ABHD15)--an adipogenic protein protecting from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Walenta, Evelyn; Pessentheiner, Ariane R; Pelzmann, Helmut J; Deutsch, Alexander; Goeritzer, Madeleine; Kratky, Dagmar; Hackl, Hubert; Oh, Da Young; Prokesch, Andreas; Bogner-Strauss, Juliane G

    2013-01-01

    Our knowledge about adipocyte metabolism and development is steadily growing, yet many players are still undefined. Here, we show that α/β-hydrolase domain containing protein 15 (Abhd15) is a direct and functional target gene of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ), the master regulator of adipogenesis. In line, Abhd15 is mainly expressed in brown and white adipose tissue and strongly upregulated during adipogenesis in various murine and human cell lines. Stable knockdown of Abhd15 in 3T3-L1 cells evokes a striking differentiation defect, as evidenced by low lipid accumulation and decreased expression of adipocyte marker genes. In preconfluent cells, knockdown of Abhd15 leads to impaired proliferation, which is caused by apoptosis, as we see an increased SubG1 peak, caspase 3/7 activity, and BAX protein expression as well as a reduction in anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein. Furthermore, apoptosis-inducing amounts of palmitic acid evoke a massive increase of Abhd15 expression, proposing an apoptosis-protecting role for ABHD15. On the other hand, in mature adipocytes physiological (i.e. non-apoptotic) concentrations of palmitic acid down-regulate Abhd15 expression. Accordingly, we found that the expression of Abhd15 in adipose tissue is reduced in physiological situations with high free fatty acid levels, like high-fat diet, fasting, and aging as well as in genetically obese mice. Collectively, our results position ABHD15 as an essential component in the development of adipocytes as well as in apoptosis, thereby connecting two substantial factors in the regulation of adipocyte number and size. Together with its intricate regulation by free fatty acids, ABHD15 might be an intriguing new target in obesity and diabetes research.

  10. Purification and Structural Analysis of SUN and KASH Domain Proteins.

    PubMed

    Esra Demircioglu, F; Cruz, Victor E; Schwartz, Thomas U

    2016-01-01

    Molecular tethers span the nuclear envelope to mechanically connect the cytoskeleton and nucleoskeleton. These bridge-like tethers, termed linkers of nucleoskeleton and cytoskeleton (LINC) complexes, consist of SUN proteins at the inner nuclear membrane and KASH proteins at the outer nuclear membrane. LINC complexes are central to a variety of cell activities including nuclear positioning and mechanotransduction, and LINC-related abnormalities are associated with a spectrum of tissue-specific diseases, termed laminopathies or envelopathies. Protocols used to study the biochemical and structural characteristics of core elements of SUN-KASH complexes are described here to facilitate further studies in this new field of cell biology.

  11. Roots of angiosperm formins: The evolutionary history of plant FH2 domain-containing proteins

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Shuffling of modular protein domains is an important source of evolutionary innovation. Formins are a family of actin-organizing proteins that share a conserved FH2 domain but their overall domain architecture differs dramatically between opisthokonts (metazoans and fungi) and plants. We performed a phylogenomic analysis of formins in most eukaryotic kingdoms, aiming to reconstruct an evolutionary scenario that may have produced the current diversity of domain combinations with focus on the origin of the angiosperm formin architectures. Results The Rho GTPase-binding domain (GBD/FH3) reported from opisthokont and Dictyostelium formins was found in all lineages except plants, suggesting its ancestral character. Instead, mosses and vascular plants possess the two formin classes known from angiosperms: membrane-anchored Class I formins and Class II formins carrying a PTEN-like domain. PTEN-related domains were found also in stramenopile formins, where they have been probably acquired independently rather than by horizontal transfer, following a burst of domain rearrangements in the chromalveolate lineage. A novel RhoGAP-related domain was identified in some algal, moss and lycophyte (but not angiosperm) formins that define a specific branch (Class III) of the formin family. Conclusion We propose a scenario where formins underwent multiple domain rearrangements in several eukaryotic lineages, especially plants and chromalveolates. In plants this replaced GBD/FH3 by a probably inactive RhoGAP-like domain, preserving a formin-mediated association between (membrane-anchored) Rho GTPases and the actin cytoskeleton. Subsequent amplification of formin genes, possibly coincident with the expansion of plants to dry land, was followed by acquisition of alternative membrane attachment mechanisms present in extant Class I and Class II formins, allowing later loss of the RhoGAP-like domain-containing formins in angiosperms. PMID:18430232

  12. Characterization of a Fasciola gigantica protein carrying two DM9 domains reveals cellular relocalization property.

    PubMed

    Phadungsil, Wansika; Smooker, Peter M; Vichasri-Grams, Suksiri; Grams, Rudi

    2016-01-01

    Even at the present age of whole-organism analysis, e.g., genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, the biological roles of many proteins remain unresolved. Classified among the proteins of unknown function is a family of proteins harboring repeats of the DM9 domain, a 60-75 amino acids motif first described in a small number of Drosophila melanogaster proteins. Proteins may carry two or more DM9 domains either in combination with other domains or as their sole constituent. Here we have characterized a 16.8 kDa Fasciola gigantica protein comprising two tandem repeated DM9 domains (FgDM9-1). The protein was located in the parenchyma of the immature and mature parasite and consequently it was not detected in the ES product of the parasite but only in the whole worm extract. Interestingly, extraction with SDS yielded a substantially higher amount of the protein suggesting association with insoluble cell components. In Sf9 insect cells a heterologously expressed EGFP-FgDM9-1 chimera showed cell-wide distribution but relocated to vesicle-like structures in the cytoplasm after stimulating cellular stress by bacteria, heat shock or chloroquine. These structures did not colocalize with the markers of endocytosis/phagocytosis ubiquitin, RAB7, GABARAP. The same behavior was noted for Aedes aegypti PRS1, a homologous mosquito DM9 protein as a positive control while EGFP did not exhibit such relocation in the insect cells. Cross-linking experiments on soluble recombinant FgDM9-1 indicated that the protein can undergo specific oligomerization. It is speculated that proteins carrying the DM9 domain have a role in vesicular transport in flatworms and insects.

  13. Exploring metazoan evolution through dynamic and holistic changes in protein families and domains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding proteome evolution is important for deciphering processes that drive species diversity and adaptation. Herein, the dynamics of change in protein families and protein domains over the course of metazoan evolution was explored. Change, as defined by birth/death and duplication/deletion ...

  14. Insights into the evolution and domain structure of ataxin-2 proteins across eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ataxin-2 is an evolutionarily conserved protein first identified in humans as responsible for spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2). The molecular basis of SCA2 is the expansion of a polyglutamine tract in Ataxin-2, encoding a Lsm domain that may bind RNA and a PAM2 motif that enables interaction with the poly (A) binding protein. Although the association with SCA2 has been verified, a detailed molecular function for Ataxin-2 has not been established. Results We have undertaken a survey of Ataxin-2 proteins across all eukaryotic domains. In eukaryotes, except for vertebrates and land plants, a single ortholog was identified. Notably, with the exception of birds, two Ataxin-2 genes exist in vertebrates. Expansion was observed in land plants and a novel class lacking the LsmAD domain was identified. Large polyQ tracts appear limited to primates and insects of the orders Hymenoptera and Diptera. A common feature across Ataxin-2 orthologs is the presence of proline-rich motifs, formerly described in the human protein. Conclusion Our analysis provides valuable information on the evolution and domain structure of Ataxin-2 proteins. Proline-rich motifs that may mediate protein interactions are widespread in Ataxin-2 proteins, but expansion of polyglutamine tracts associated with spinocerebellar ataxia type 2, is present only in primates, as well as some insects. Our analysis of Ataxin-2 proteins provides also a source to examine orthologs in a number of different species. PMID:25027299

  15. Role of Internal Water on Protein Thermal Stability: The Case of Homologous G Domains.

    PubMed

    Rahaman, Obaidur; Kalimeri, Maria; Melchionna, Simone; Hénin, Jérôme; Sterpone, Fabio

    2015-07-23

    In this work, we address the question of whether the enhanced stability of thermophilic proteins has a direct connection with internal hydration. Our model systems are two homologous G domains of different stability: the mesophilic G domain of the elongation factor thermal unstable protein from E. coli and the hyperthermophilic G domain of the EF-1α protein from S. solfataricus. Using molecular dynamics simulation at the microsecond time scale, we show that both proteins host water molecules in internal cavities and that these molecules exchange with the external solution in the nanosecond time scale. The hydration free energy of these sites evaluated via extensive calculations is found to be favorable for both systems, with the hyperthermophilic protein offering a slightly more favorable environment to host water molecules. We estimate that, under ambient conditions, the free energy gain due to internal hydration is about 1.3 kcal/mol in favor of the hyperthermophilic variant. However, we also find that, at the high working temperature of the hyperthermophile, the cavities are rather dehydrated, meaning that under extreme conditions other molecular factors secure the stability of the protein. Interestingly, we detect a clear correlation between the hydration of internal cavities and the protein conformational landscape. The emerging picture is that internal hydration is an effective observable to probe the conformational landscape of proteins. In the specific context of our investigation, the analysis confirms that the hyperthermophilic G domain is characterized by multiple states and it has a more flexible structure than its mesophilic homologue.

  16. A domain-centric analysis of oomycete plant pathogen genomes reveals unique protein organization.

    PubMed

    Seidl, Michael F; Van den Ackerveken, Guido; Govers, Francine; Snel, Berend

    2011-02-01

    Oomycetes comprise a diverse group of organisms that morphologically resemble fungi but belong to the stramenopile lineage within the supergroup of chromalveolates. Recent studies have shown that plant pathogenic oomycetes have expanded gene families that are possibly linked to their pathogenic lifestyle. We analyzed the protein domain organization of 67 eukaryotic species including four oomycete and five fungal plant pathogens. We detected 246 expanded domains in fungal and oomycete plant pathogens. The analysis of genes differentially expressed during infection revealed a significant enrichment of genes encoding expanded domains as well as signal peptides linking a substantial part of these genes to pathogenicity. Overrepresentation and clustering of domain abundance profiles revealed domains that might have important roles in host-pathogen interactions but, as yet, have not been linked to pathogenicity. The number of distinct domain combinations (bigrams) in oomycetes was significantly higher than in fungi. We identified 773 oomycete-specific bigrams, with the majority composed of domains common to eukaryotes. The analyses enabled us to link domain content to biological processes such as host-pathogen interaction, nutrient uptake, or suppression and elicitation of plant immune responses. Taken together, this study represents a comprehensive overview of the domain repertoire of fungal and oomycete plant pathogens and points to novel features like domain expansion and species-specific bigram types that could, at least partially, explain why oomycetes are such remarkable plant pathogens.

  17. In vitro antitumor activity of Latcripin-15 regulator of chromosome condensation 1 domain protein

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Li; Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Xingyun; Liu, Ben; Zhang, Wei; Cao, Jing; Ning, Anhong; Huang, Min; Zhong, Mintao

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the most significant health problems worldwide and thus the development of novel therapeutic agents with fewer side effects is required. The present study investigated the in vitro anticancer effects of a newly isolated fungal protein. In this study, Latcripin-15 (LP-15) regulator of chromosome condensation 1 (RCC1) domain protein, which is obtained from the Lentinula edodes C91-3 fungal strain, was identified, cloned, expressed, purified and re-folded to assess the in vitro antitumor activity of the protein. LP-15 RCC1 full-length cDNA was isolated from Lentinula edodes using 3′ and 5′-rapid amplification of cDNA ends and then cloned, expressed, purified and re-folded in vitro. In addition, the effects of the isolated LP-15 RCC1 protein's functional domain on the viability and apoptosis of human lung cancer A549 cells were assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, transmission electron microscopy, flow cytometry and Hoechst 33258 staining. The LP-15 RCC1 functional domain protein was successfully expressed, purified and re-folded in vitro. Treatment with the LP-15 RCC1 functional domain protein significantly reduced tumor cell viability and induced apoptosis in A549 cells. The results of the present study indicate that the LP-15 RCC1 functional domain requires further investigation as a novel therapeutic agent for cancer therapy. PMID:27899975

  18. Localization and Function of Pals1-associated Tight Junction Protein in Drosophila Is Regulated by Two Distinct Apical Complexes.

    PubMed

    Sen, Arnab; Sun, Rui; Krahn, Michael P

    2015-05-22

    The transmembrane protein Crumbs (Crb) and its intracellular adaptor protein Pals1 (Stardust, Sdt in Drosophila) play a crucial role in the establishment and maintenance of apical-basal polarity in epithelial cells in various organisms. In contrast, the multiple PDZ domain-containing protein Pals1-associated tight junction protein (PATJ), which has been described to form a complex with Crb/Sdt, is not essential for apical basal polarity or for the stability of the Crb/Sdt complex in the Drosophila epidermis. Here we show that, in the embryonic epidermis, Sdt is essential for the correct subcellular localization of PATJ in differentiated epithelial cells but not during cellularization. Consistently, the L27 domain of PATJ is crucial for the correct localization and function of the protein. Our data further indicate that the four PDZ domains of PATJ function, to a large extent, in redundancy, regulating the function of the protein. Interestingly, the PATJ-Sdt heterodimer is not only recruited to the apical cell-cell contacts by binding to Crb but depends on functional Bazooka (Baz). However, biochemical experiments show that PATJ associates with both complexes, the Baz-Sdt and the Crb-Sdt complex, in the mature epithelium of the embryonic epidermis, suggesting a role of these two complexes for the function of PATJ during the development of Drosophila.

  19. Crystal structure of the homology domain of the eukaryotic DNA replication proteins Sld3/Treslin.

    PubMed

    Itou, Hiroshi; Muramatsu, Sachiko; Shirakihara, Yasuo; Araki, Hiroyuki

    2014-09-02

    The initiation of eukaryotic chromosomal DNA replication requires the formation of an active replicative helicase at the replication origins of chromosomal DNA. Yeast Sld3 and its metazoan counterpart Treslin are the hub proteins mediating protein associations critical for the helicase formation. Here, we show the crystal structure of the central domain of Sld3 that is conserved in Sld3/Treslin family of proteins. The domain consists of two segments with 12 helices and is sufficient to bind to Cdc45, the essential helicase component. The structure model of the Sld3-Cdc45 complex, which is crucial for the formation of the active helicase, is proposed.

  20. Engineered staphylococcal protein A's IgG-binding domain with cathepsin L inhibitory activity

    SciTech Connect

    Bratkovic, Tomaz . E-mail: tomaz.bratkovic@ffa.uni-lj.si; Berlec, Ales; Popovic, Tatjana; Lunder, Mojca; Kreft, Samo; Urleb, Uros; Strukelj, Borut

    2006-10-13

    Inhibitory peptide of papain-like cysteine proteases, affinity selected from a random disulfide constrained phage-displayed peptide library, was grafted to staphylococcal protein A's B domain. Scaffold protein was additionally modified in order to allow solvent exposed display of peptide loop. Correct folding of fusion proteins was confirmed by CD-spectroscopy and by the ability to bind the Fc-region of rabbit IgG, a characteristic of parent domain. The recombinant constructs inhibited cathepsin L with inhibitory constants in the low-micromolar range.

  1. Efficient segmental isotope labeling of multi-domain proteins using Sortase A.

    PubMed

    Freiburger, Lee; Sonntag, Miriam; Hennig, Janosch; Li, Jian; Zou, Peijian; Sattler, Michael

    2015-09-01

    NMR studies of multi-domain protein complexes provide unique insight into their molecular interactions and dynamics in solution. For large proteins domain-selective isotope labeling is desired to reduce signal overlap, but available methods require extensive optimization and often give poor ligation yields. We present an optimized strategy for segmental labeling of multi-domain proteins using the S. aureus transpeptidase Sortase A. Critical improvements compared to existing protocols are (1) the efficient removal of cleaved peptide fragments by centrifugal filtration and (2) a strategic design of cleavable and non-cleavable affinity tags for purification. Our approach enables routine production of milligram amounts of purified segmentally labeled protein for NMR and other biophysical studies.

  2. Resilience of biochemical activity in protein domains in the face of structural divergence.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dapeng; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Burroughs, A Maxwell; Aravind, L

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies point to the prevalence of the evolutionary phenomenon of drastic structural transformation of protein domains while continuing to preserve their basic biochemical function. These transformations span a wide spectrum, including simple domains incorporated into larger structural scaffolds, changes in the structural core, major active site shifts, topological rewiring and extensive structural transmogrifications. Proteins from biological conflict systems, such as toxin-antitoxin, restriction-modification, CRISPR/Cas, polymorphic toxin and secondary metabolism systems commonly display such transformations. These include endoDNases, metal-independent RNases, deaminases, ADP ribosyltransferases, immunity proteins, kinases and E1-like enzymes. In eukaryotes such transformations are seen in domains involved in chromatin-related peptide recognition and protein/DNA-modification. Intense selective pressures from 'arms-race'-like situations in conflict and macromolecular modification systems could favor drastic structural divergence while preserving function.

  3. Review the role of terminal domains during storage and assembly of spider silk proteins.

    PubMed

    Eisoldt, Lukas; Thamm, Christopher; Scheibel, Thomas

    2012-06-01

    Fibrous proteins in nature fulfill a wide variety of functions in different structures ranging from cellular scaffolds to very resilient structures like tendons and even extra-corporal fibers such as silks in spider webs or silkworm cocoons. Despite their different origins and sequence varieties many of these fibrous proteins share a common building principle: they consist of a large repetitive core domain flanked by relatively small non-repetitive terminal domains. Amongst protein fibers, spider dragline silk shows prominent mechanical properties that exceed those of man-made fibers like Kevlar. Spider silk fibers assemble in a spinning process allowing the transformation from an aqueous solution into a solid fiber within milliseconds. Here, we highlight the role of the non-repetitive terminal domains of spider dragline silk proteins during storage in the gland and initiation of the fiber assembly process.

  4. Vaccinia Virus Immunomodulator A46: A Lipid and Protein-Binding Scaffold for Sequestering Host TIR-Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Radakovics, Katharina; Smith, Terry K.; Bobik, Nina; Round, Adam; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Usón, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Vaccinia virus interferes with early events of the activation pathway of the transcriptional factor NF-kB by binding to numerous host TIR-domain containing adaptor proteins. We have previously determined the X-ray structure of the A46 C-terminal domain; however, the structure and function of the A46 N-terminal domain and its relationship to the C-terminal domain have remained unclear. Here, we biophysically characterize residues 1–83 of the N-terminal domain of A46 and present the X-ray structure at 1.55 Å. Crystallographic phases were obtained by a recently developed ab initio method entitled ARCIMBOLDO_BORGES that employs tertiary structure libraries extracted from the Protein Data Bank; data analysis revealed an all β-sheet structure. This is the first such structure solved by this method which should be applicable to any protein composed entirely of β-sheets. The A46(1–83) structure itself is a β-sandwich containing a co-purified molecule of myristic acid inside a hydrophobic pocket and represents a previously unknown lipid-binding fold. Mass spectrometry analysis confirmed the presence of long-chain fatty acids in both N-terminal and full-length A46; mutation of the hydrophobic pocket reduced the lipid content. Using a combination of high resolution X-ray structures of the N- and C-terminal domains and SAXS analysis of full-length protein A46(1–240), we present here a structural model of A46 in a tetrameric assembly. Integrating affinity measurements and structural data, we propose how A46 simultaneously interferes with several TIR-domain containing proteins to inhibit NF-κB activation and postulate that A46 employs a bipartite binding arrangement to sequester the host immune adaptors TRAM and MyD88. PMID:27973613

  5. Alternative splicing for members of human mosaic domain superfamilies. I. The CH and LIM domains containing group of proteins.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2009-05-01

    In this paper we examine (restricted to homo sapiens) the products resulting from gene duplication and the subsequent alternative splicing for the members of a multidomain group of proteins which possess the evolutionary conserved calponin homology CH domain, i.e. an "actin binding domain", as a singlet and which, in addition, contain the conserved cysteine rich double Zn finger possessing Lim domain, also as a singlet. Seven genes, resulting from gene duplications, were identified that code for seven group members for which pre-mRNAs appear to have undergone multiple alternative splicing: Mical 1, 2 and 3 are located on chromosomes 6q21, 11p15 and 22q11, respectively. The LMO7 gene is present on chromosome 13q22 and the LIMCH1 gene on chromosome 4p13. Micall1 is mapped to chromosome 22q13 and Micall2 to chromosome 7p22. Translated Gen/Bank ESTs suggest the existence of multiple products alternatively spliced from the pre-mRNAs encoded by these genes. Characteristic indicators of such splicing among the proteins derived from one gene must include containment of some common extensive 100% identical regions. In some instances only one exon might be partly or completely eliminated. Sometimes alternative splicing is also associated with an increased frequency of creation of an exon or part of an exon from an intron. Not only coding regions for the body of the protein but also for its N- or -C ends could be affected by the splicing. If created forms are merely beginning at different starting points but remain identical in sequence thereafter, their existence as products of alternate splicing must be questioned. In the splicings, described in this paper, multiple isoforms rather than a single isoform appear as products during the gene expression.

  6. Flexible DNA binding of the BTB/POZ-domain protein FBI-1.

    PubMed

    Pessler, Frank; Hernandez, Nouria

    2003-08-01

    POZ-domain transcription factors are characterized by the presence of a protein-protein interaction domain called the POZ or BTB domain at their N terminus and zinc fingers at their C terminus. Despite the large number of POZ-domain transcription factors that have been identified to date and the significant insights that have been gained into their cellular functions, relatively little is known about their DNA binding properties. FBI-1 is a BTB/POZ-domain protein that has been shown to modulate HIV-1 Tat trans-activation and to repress transcription of some cellular genes. We have used various viral and cellular FBI-1 binding sites to characterize the interaction of a POZ-domain protein with DNA in detail. We find that FBI-1 binds to inverted sequence repeats downstream of the HIV-1 transcription start site. Remarkably, it binds efficiently to probes carrying these repeats in various orientations and spacings with no particular rotational alignment, indicating that its interaction with DNA is highly flexible. Indeed, FBI-1 binding sites in the adenovirus 2 major late promoter, the c-fos gene, and the c-myc P1 and P2 promoters reveal variously spaced direct, inverted, and everted sequence repeats with the consensus sequence G(A/G)GGG(T/C)(C/T)(T/C)(C/T) for each repeat.

  7. Activity of a Two-Domain Antifreeze Protein Is Not Dependent on Linker Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Nolan B.; Nishimiya, Yoshiyuki; Tsuda, Sakae; Sönnichsen, Frank D.

    2007-01-01

    The reported NMR structure of RD3, a naturally occurring two-domain antifreeze protein, suggests that the two nearly identical domains are oriented to allow simultaneous binding of their active regions to the ice surface. It is implied that the nine residues linking the two domains play a role in this alignment, but this has not been established. We have designed and expressed a modified form of RD3 that replaces the nine-residue linker with a generic sequence of one serine and eight glycine residues to test the importance of the linker amino acid sequence. The modified linker is shown to have significantly different characteristics compared to the original linker. Heteronuclear nuclear Overhauser effect experiments show that the new linker residues have more mobility than the linker residues in the native protein. Further, NMR data show that the folding of the C-terminal domain is somewhat perturbed by the altered linker. Finally, distributions of residual dipolar couplings indicate that the two domains tumble and move independently of each other. Nevertheless, the thermal hysteresis activity of the modified protein is indistinguishable from that of native RD3, proving that increased activity of the two-domain antifreeze protein is not dependent on structure of the linker. PMID:17056724

  8. Two barcodes encoded by the type-1 PDZ and by phospho-Ser(312) regulate retromer/WASH-mediated sorting of the ß1-adrenergic receptor from endosomes to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Nooh, Mohammed M; Bahouth, Suleiman W

    2017-01-01

    Recycling of the majority of agonist-internalized GPCR is dependent on a type I-PDZ "barcode" in their C-tail. The recycling of wild-type (WT) ß1-AR is also dependent on its default "type-1 PDZ barcode", but trafficking of the ß1-AR is inhibited when PKA or its substrate serine at position 312 (Ser(312)) are inactivated. We tested the hypothesis that phospho-Ser(312) provided a second barcode for ß1-AR sorting from endosomes to the plasma membrane by determining the role of retromer/WASH complexes in ß1-AR trafficking. Recycling of WT ß1-AR or WT ß2-AR was dependent on targeting the retromer to endosomal membranes via SNX3 and rab7a, and on complexing the retromer to the WASH pentamer via the C-tail of FAM21 (FAM21C). These maneuvers however, did not inhibit the recycling of a phospho-Ser(312) ß1-AR mimic ((S312D) ß1-AR). Knockdown of the trans-acting PDZ protein sorting nexin27 (SNX27) inhibited the recycling of WT ß1-AR and WT ß2-AR, but had no effect on (S312D) ß1-AR∆PDZ or on phosphorylation of WT ß1-AR by PKA at Ser(312). However, depletion of FKBP15, a FAM21C-binding endosomal protein, selectively inhibited WT ß1-AR but not ß2-AR recycling, suggesting divergence might exist in GPCR trafficking roadmaps. These results indicate that two barcodes are involved in sorting WT ß1-AR out of early endosomes. The first and antecedent "barcode" was the "type-1 PDZ", followed by a second reversible "phospho-Ser(312)" verification "barcode". This organization allows tight regulation of ß1-AR density to signaling intensity in conditions associated with aberrant ß1-AR signaling such as in hypertension and heart failure.

  9. Zyxin and cCRP: two interactive LIM domain proteins associated with the cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    Interaction with extracellular matrix can trigger a variety of responses by cells including changes in specific gene expression and cell differentiation. The mechanism by which cell surface events are coupled to the transcriptional machinery is not understood, however, proteins localized at sites of cell-substratum contact are likely to function as signal transducers. We have recently purified and characterized a low abundance adhesion plaque protein called zyxin (Crawford, A. W., and M. C. Beckerle. 1991. J. Biol. Chem. 266:5847- 5853; Crawford, A. W., J. W. Michelsen, and M. C. Beckerle. 1992. J. Cell Biol. 116:1381-1393). We have now isolated and sequenced zyxin cDNA and we report here that zyxin exhibits an unusual proline-rich NH2- terminus followed by three tandemly arrayed LIM domains. LIM domains have previously been identified in proteins that play important roles in transcriptional regulation and cellular differentiation. LIM domains have been proposed to coordinate metal ions and we have demonstrated by atomic absorption spectroscopy that purified zyxin binds zinc, a result consistent with the idea that zyxin has zinc fingers. In addition, we have discovered that zyxin interacts in vitro with a 23-kD protein that also exhibits LIM domains. Microsequence analysis has revealed that the 23-kD protein (or cCRP) is the chicken homologue of the human cysteine- rich protein (hCRP). By double-label indirect immunofluorescence, we found that zyxin and cCRP are extensively colocalized in chicken embryo fibroblasts, consistent with the idea that they interact in vivo. We conclude that LIM domains are zinc-binding sequences that may be involved in protein-protein interactions. The demonstration that two cytoskeletal proteins, zyxin and cCRP, share a sequence motif with proteins important for transcriptional regulation raises the possibility that zyxin and cCRP are components of a signal transduction pathway that mediates adhesion-stimulated changes in gene

  10. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U.; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-01-01

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms. PMID:25923201

  11. Metazoans evolved by taking domains from soluble proteins to expand intercellular communication network.

    PubMed

    Nam, Hyun-Jun; Kim, Inhae; Bowie, James U; Kim, Sanguk

    2015-04-29

    A central question in animal evolution is how multicellular animals evolved from unicellular ancestors. We hypothesize that membrane proteins must be key players in the development of multicellularity because they are well positioned to form the cell-cell contacts and to provide the intercellular communication required for the creation of complex organisms. Here we find that a major mechanism for the necessary increase in membrane protein complexity in the transition from non-metazoan to metazoan life was the new incorporation of domains from soluble proteins. The membrane proteins that have incorporated soluble domains in metazoans are enriched in many of the functions unique to multicellular organisms such as cell-cell adhesion, signaling, immune defense and developmental processes. They also show enhanced protein-protein interaction (PPI) network complexity and centrality, suggesting an important role in the cellular diversification found in complex organisms. Our results expose an evolutionary mechanism that contributed to the development of higher life forms.

  12. Selection on Network Dynamics Drives Differential Rates of Protein Domain Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Mannakee, Brian K.; Gutenkunst, Ryan N.

    2016-01-01

    The long-held principle that functionally important proteins evolve slowly has recently been challenged by studies in mice and yeast showing that the severity of a protein knockout only weakly predicts that protein’s rate of evolution. However, the relevance of these studies to evolutionary changes within proteins is unknown, because amino acid substitutions, unlike knockouts, often only slightly perturb protein activity. To quantify the phenotypic effect of small biochemical perturbations, we developed an approach to use computational systems biology models to measure the influence of individual reaction rate constants on network dynamics. We show that this dynamical influence is predictive of protein domain evolutionary rate within networks in vertebrates and yeast, even after controlling for expression level and breadth, network topology, and knockout effect. Thus, our results not only demonstrate the importance of protein domain function in determining evolutionary rate, but also the power of systems biology modeling to uncover unanticipated evolutionary forces. PMID:27380265

  13. Signal Activation and Inactivation by the Gα Helical Domain: A Long-Neglected Partner in G Protein Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dohlman, Henrik G.; Jones, Janice C.

    2013-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding proteins (G proteins) are positioned at the top of many signal transduction pathways. The G protein α subunit is composed of two domains, one that resembles Ras and another that is composed entirely of α helices. Historically, most attention has focused on the Ras-like domain, but emerging evidence reveals that the helical domain is an active participant in G protein signaling. PMID:22649098

  14. Identification of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor with multiple domains implicated in protein-protein interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Peles, E; Nativ, M; Lustig, M; Grumet, M; Schilling, J; Martinez, R; Plowman, G D; Schlessinger, J

    1997-01-01

    Receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase beta (RPTPbeta) expressed on the surface of glial cells binds to the glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored recognition molecule contactin on neuronal cells leading to neurite outgrowth. We describe the cloning of a novel contactin-associated transmembrane receptor (p190/Caspr) containing a mosaic of domains implicated in protein-protein interactions. The extracellular domain of Caspr contains a neurophilin/coagulation factor homology domain, a region related to fibrinogen beta/gamma, epidermal growth factor-like repeats, neurexin motifs as well as unique PGY repeats found in a molluscan adhesive protein. The cytoplasmic domain of Caspr contains a proline-rich sequence capable of binding to a subclass of SH3 domains of signaling molecules. Caspr and contactin exist as a complex in rat brain and are bound to each other by means of lateral (cis) interactions in the plasma membrane. We propose that Caspr may function as a signaling component of contactin, enabling recruitment and activation of intracellular signaling pathways in neurons. The binding of RPTPbeta to the contactin-Caspr complex could provide a mechanism for cell-cell communication between glial cells and neurons during development. PMID:9118959

  15. Spiroplasma eriocheiris Adhesin-Like Protein (ALP) Interacts with Epidermal Growth Factor (EGF) Domain Proteins to Facilitate Infection

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Libo; Liu, Yuhan; Gao, Qi; Xu, Xuechuan; Ning, Mingxiao; Bi, Jingxiu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Min; Gu, Wei; Wang, Wen; Meng, Qingguo

    2017-01-01

    Spiroplasma eriocheiris is a novel pathogen found in recent years, causing the tremor disease (TD) of Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. Like Spiroplasma mirum, S. eriocheiris infects the newborn mouse (adult mice are not infected) and can cause cataract. Adhesion-related protein is an important protein involved in the interaction between pathogen and host. In this study, the Adhesin-like Protein (ALP) of S. eriocheiris was detected on its outer membrane by using immune electron microscopy, and was found to be involved in the bacterium's infection of mouse embryo fibroblasts (3T6-Swiss albino). Yeast two-hybrid analysis demonstrated that ALP interacts with a diverse group of mouse proteins. The interactions between recombinant partial fibulin7 (FBLN7; including two epidermal growth factor [EGF] domains) and ALP were confirmed by Far-western blotting and colocalization. We synthetized the domains of FBLN7 [EGF domain: amino acids 136–172 and complement control protein (CCP) domain: 81–134 amino acids], and demonstrated that only EGF domain of FBLN7 can interact with ALP. Because the EGF domain has high degree of similarity to EGF, it can activate the downstream EGFR signaling pathway, in key site amino acids. The EGFR pathway in 3T6 cells was restrained after rALP stimulation resulting from competitive binding of ALP to EGF. The unborn mouse, newborn mouse, and the adult mouse with cataract have a small amount of expressed FBLN7; however, none was detected in the brain and very little expression was seen in the eye of normal adult mice. In short, ALP as a S. eriocheiris surface protein, is critical for infection and further supports the role of ALP in S. eriocheiris infection by competitive effection of the EGF/EGFR axis of the target cells. PMID:28184355

  16. The emerging importance of the SPX domain-containing proteins in phosphate homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Secco, David; Wang, Chuang; Arpat, Bulak A; Wang, Zhiye; Poirier, Yves; Tyerman, Stephen D; Wu, Ping; Shou, Huixia; Whelan, James

    2012-03-01

    Plant growth and development are strongly influenced by the availability of nutrients in the soil solution. Among them, phosphorus (P) is one of the most essential and most limiting macro-elements for plants. In the environment, plants are often confronted with P starvation as a result of extremely low concentrations of soluble inorganic phosphate (Pi) in the soil. To cope with these conditions, plants have developed a wide spectrum of mechanisms aimed at increasing P use efficiency. At the molecular level, recent studies have shown that several proteins carrying the SPX domain are essential for maintaining Pi homeostasis in plants. The SPX domain is found in numerous eukaryotic proteins, including several proteins from the yeast PHO regulon, involved in maintaining Pi homeostasis. In plants, proteins harboring the SPX domain are classified into four families based on the presence of additional domains in their structure, namely the SPX, SPX-EXS, SPX-MFS and SPX-RING families. In this review, we highlight the recent findings regarding the key roles of the proteins containing the SPX domain in phosphate signaling, as well as providing further research directions in order to improve our knowledge on P nutrition in plants, thus enabling the generation of plants with better P use efficiency.

  17. Duplex (or quadruplet) CH domain containing human multidomain proteins: an inventory.

    PubMed

    Friedberg, Felix

    2010-04-01

    In this paper, the inventory presented for singlet CH (calponin homology/actin binding) domain containing human multidomain proteins is extended to several duplex and one quadruplet CH containing forms. Invariably, the duplexes are located at the begin of the molecules. The regions connecting the two CH units suggest amino acid conservations which allows the placing of 18 duplex containing molecules into six groups wherein the gene for one member in each group created the others more recently by gene duplication. The ancient multidomain proteins, possibly, were primarily the result of an exon shuffling (transposition) mechanism that also guided the placing of the CH singlet or duplex domain at the amino end of the newly created proteins. A mechanism that creates pseudogenes could conceivably produce genes that encode multi-domain proteins. Intragenomic duplications (slippage) might have facilitated the occurrence of encoding repeats, thus allowing for the creation of multiple identical domains within one molecule. Gene duplication with subsequent modification and small domain gene recombination which formed multidomain proteins are important forces driving evolution.

  18. Improvement in Protein Domain Identification Is Reached by Breaking Consensus, with the Agreement of Many Profiles and Domain Co-occurrence.

    PubMed

    Bernardes, Juliana; Zaverucha, Gerson; Vaquero, Catherine; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    Traditional protein annotation methods describe known domains with probabilistic models representing consensus among homologous domain sequences. However, when relevant signals become too weak to be identified by a global consensus, attempts for annotation fail. Here we address the fundamental question of domain identification for highly divergent proteins. By using high performance computing, we demonstrate that the limits of state-of-the-art annotation methods can be bypassed. We design a new strategy based on the observation that many structural and functional protein constraints are not globally conserved through all species but might be locally conserved in separate clades. We propose a novel exploitation of the large amount of data available: 1. for each known protein domain, several probabilistic clade-centered models are constructed from a large and differentiated panel of homologous sequences, 2. a decision-making protocol combines outcomes obtained from multiple models, 3. a multi-criteria optimization algorithm finds the most likely protein architecture. The method is evaluated for domain and architecture prediction over several datasets and statistical testing hypotheses. Its performance is compared against HMMScan and HHblits, two widely used search methods based on sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison. Due to their closeness to actual protein sequences, clade-centered models are shown to be more specific and functionally predictive than the broadly used consensus models. Based on them, we improved annotation of Plasmodium falciparum protein sequences on a scale not previously possible. We successfully predict at least one domain for 72% of P. falciparum proteins against 63% achieved previously, corresponding to 30% of improvement over the total number of Pfam domain predictions on the whole genome. The method is applicable to any genome and opens new avenues to tackle evolutionary questions such as the reconstruction of ancient domain

  19. Improvement in Protein Domain Identification Is Reached by Breaking Consensus, with the Agreement of Many Profiles and Domain Co-occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Bernardes, Juliana; Zaverucha, Gerson; Vaquero, Catherine; Carbone, Alessandra

    2016-01-01

    Traditional protein annotation methods describe known domains with probabilistic models representing consensus among homologous domain sequences. However, when relevant signals become too weak to be identified by a global consensus, attempts for annotation fail. Here we address the fundamental question of domain identification for highly divergent proteins. By using high performance computing, we demonstrate that the limits of state-of-the-art annotation methods can be bypassed. We design a new strategy based on the observation that many structural and functional protein constraints are not globally conserved through all species but might be locally conserved in separate clades. We propose a novel exploitation of the large amount of data available: 1. for each known protein domain, several probabilistic clade-centered models are constructed from a large and differentiated panel of homologous sequences, 2. a decision-making protocol combines outcomes obtained from multiple models, 3. a multi-criteria optimization algorithm finds the most likely protein architecture. The method is evaluated for domain and architecture prediction over several datasets and statistical testing hypotheses. Its performance is compared against HMMScan and HHblits, two widely used search methods based on sequence-profile and profile-profile comparison. Due to their closeness to actual protein sequences, clade-centered models are shown to be more specific and functionally predictive than the broadly used consensus models. Based on them, we improved annotation of Plasmodium falciparum protein sequences on a scale not previously possible. We successfully predict at least one domain for 72% of P. falciparum proteins against 63% achieved previously, corresponding to 30% of improvement over the total number of Pfam domain predictions on the whole genome. The method is applicable to any genome and opens new avenues to tackle evolutionary questions such as the reconstruction of ancient domain

  20. Lipid-specific β-sheet formation in a mussel byssus protein domain.

    PubMed

    Heim, Markus; Elsner, Martina B; Scheibel, Thomas

    2013-09-09

    Intrinsically disordered proteins (IDP) or regions (IDR) can adopt multiple conformational states, depending on the interaction partners they encounter. This enables proteins or individual domains to fulfill multiple functions. Here, we analyzed the flank sequences of preCol-NG, one of three collagenous proteins of a mussel byssus thread governing its mechanical performance. preCol-NG comprises a collagen domain and nonrepetitive termini enclosing specific flank regions characterized by tandem repeats known from silk proteins, protein elastomers, and plant cell wall-associated proteins. We recombinantly produced a protein mimicking the M. galloprovincialis preCol-NG C-terminal flank region. The protein was intrinsically unfolded in solution, even at elevated temperatures. However, upon contact with small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) reversible β-structure formation occurred, reminiscent of partitioning-folding coupling. This behavior of preCol-NG flank domains likely impacts byssogenesis and sheds new light on a distinct mechanism of how fibrous protein materials might be achieved by lipid-induced self-assembly in nature.

  1. delta-Opioid receptors exhibit high efficiency when activating trimeric G proteins in membrane domains.

    PubMed

    Bourova, Lenka; Kostrnova, Alexandra; Hejnova, Lucie; Moravcova, Zuzana; Moon, Hyo-Eun; Novotny, Jiri; Milligan, Graeme; Svoboda, Petr

    2003-04-01

    Low-density membrane fragments (domains) were separated from the bulk of plasma membranes of human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells expressing a delta-opioid (DOP) receptor-Gi1alpha fusion protein by drastic homogenization and flotation on equilibrium sucrose density gradients. The functional activity of trimeric G proteins and capacity of the DOP receptor to stimulate both the fusion protein-linked Gi1alpha and endogenous pertussis-toxin sensitive G proteins was measured as d-Ala2, d-Leu5-enkephalin stimulated high-affinity GTPase or guanosine-5'-[gamma-35S]triphosphate ([35S]GTPgammaS) binding. The maximum d-Ala2-d-Leu5 enkephalin (DADLE)-stimulated GTPase was two times higher in low-density membrane fragments than in bulk of plasma membranes; 58 and 27 pmol/mg/min, respectively. The same difference was obtained for [35S]GTPgammaS binding. Contrarily, the low-density domains contained no more than half the DOP receptor binding sites (Bmax = 6.6 pmol/mg versus 13.6 pmol/mg). Thus, when corrected for expression levels of the receptor, low-density domains exhibited four times higher agonist-stimulated GTPase and [35S]GTPgammaS binding than the bulk plasma membranes. The regulator of G protein signaling RGS1, enhanced further the G protein functional activity but did not remove the difference between domain-bound and plasma membrane pools of G protein. The potency of the agonist in functional studies and the affinity of specific [3H]DADLE binding to the receptor were, however, the same in both types of membranes - EC50 = 4.5 +/- 0.1 x 10(-8) and 3.2 +/- 1.4 x 10(-8) m for GTPase; Kd = 1.2 +/- 0.1 and 1.3 +/- 0.1 nm for [3H]DADLE radioligand binding assay. Similar results were obtained when sodium bicarbonate was used for alkaline isolation of membrane domains. By contrast, detergent-insensitive membrane domains isolated following treatment of cells with Triton X100 exhibited no DADLE-stimulated GTPase or GTPgammaS binding. Functional coupling between the DOP receptor

  2. Modeling membrane shaping by proteins: focus on EHD2 and N-BAR domains.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Felix; Fabrikant, Gur; McMahon, Harvey T; Kozlov, Michael M

    2010-05-03

    Cellular membranes are highly dynamic, undergoing both persistent and dynamic shape changes driven by specialized proteins. The observed membrane shaping can be simple deformations of existing shapes or membrane remodeling involving fission or fusion. Here we describe several mechanistic principles by which membrane shaping proteins act. We especially consider models for membrane bending and fission by EHD2 proteins and membrane bending by N-BAR domains. There are major challenges ahead to understand the general principles by which diverse membrane bending proteins act and to understand how some proteins appear to span multiple modes of action from driving curvature to inducing membrane remodeling.

  3. Rational design of FRET sensor proteins based on mutually exclusive domain interactions.

    PubMed

    Merkx, Maarten; Golynskiy, Misha V; Lindenburg, Laurens H; Vinkenborg, Jan L

    2013-10-01

    Proteins that switch between distinct conformational states are ideal to monitor and control molecular processes within the complexity of biological systems. Inspired by the modular architecture of natural signalling proteins, our group explores generic design strategies for the construction of FRET-based sensor proteins and other protein switches. In the present article, I show that designing FRET sensors based on mutually exclusive domain interactions provides a robust method to engineer sensors with predictable properties and an inherently large change in emission ratio. The modularity of this approach should make it easily transferable to other applications of protein switches in fields ranging from synthetic biology, optogenetics and molecular diagnostics.

  4. Identification of FAH Domain-containing Protein 1 (FAHD1) as Oxaloacetate Decarboxylase*

    PubMed Central

    Pircher, Haymo; von Grafenstein, Susanne; Diener, Thomas; Metzger, Christina; Albertini, Eva; Taferner, Andrea; Unterluggauer, Hermann; Kramer, Christian; Liedl, Klaus R.; Jansen-Dürr, Pidder

    2015-01-01

    Fumarylacetoacetate hydrolase (FAH) domain-containing proteins occur in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, where they carry out diverse enzymatic reactions, probably related to structural differences in their respective FAH domains; however, the precise relationship between structure of the FAH domain and the associated enzyme function remains elusive. In mammals, three FAH domain-containing proteins, FAHD1, FAHD2A, and FAHD2B, are known; however, their enzymatic function, if any, remains to be demonstrated. In bacteria, oxaloacetate is subject to enzymatic decarboxylation; however, oxaloacetate decarboxylases (ODx) were so far not identified in eukaryotes. Based on molecular modeling and subsequent biochemical investigations, we identified FAHD1 as a eukaryotic ODx enzyme. The results presented here indicate that dedicated oxaloacetate decarboxylases exist in eukaryotes. PMID:25575590

  5. Short LOV Proteins in Methylocystis Reveal Insight into LOV Domain Photocycle Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    El-Arab, Kaley K.; Pudasaini, Ashutosh; Zoltowski, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    Light Oxygen Voltage (LOV) proteins are widely used in optogenetic devices, however universal signal transduction pathways and photocycle mechanisms remain elusive. In particular, short-LOV (sLOV) proteins have been discovered in bacteria and fungi, containing only the photoresponsive LOV element without any obvious signal transduction domains. These sLOV proteins may be ideal models for LOV domain function due to their ease of study as full-length proteins. Unfortunately, characterization of such proteins remains limited to select systems. Herein, we identify a family of bacterial sLOV proteins present in Methylocystis. Sequence analysis of Methylocystis LOV proteins (McLOV) demonstrates conservation with sLOV proteins from fungal systems that employ competitive dimerization as a signaling mechanism. Cloning and characterization of McLOV proteins confirms functional dimer formation and reveal unexpected photocycle mechanisms. Specifically, some McLOV photocycles are insensitive to external bases such as imidazole, in contrast to previously characterized LOV proteins. Mutational analysis identifies a key residue that imparts insensitivity to imidazole in two McLOV homologs and affects adduct decay by two orders of magnitude. The resultant data identifies a new family of LOV proteins that indicate a universal photocycle mechanism may not be present in LOV proteins. PMID:25933162

  6. Structure of the Bro1 Domain Protein BROX and Functional Analyses of the ALIX Bro1 Domain in HIV-1 Budding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai Q.; Robinson H.; Landesman M. B.; Sundquist W. I.; Hill C. P.

    2011-12-01

    Bro1 domains are elongated, banana-shaped domains that were first identified in the yeast ESCRT pathway protein, Bro1p. Humans express three Bro1 domain-containing proteins: ALIX, BROX, and HD-PTP, which function in association with the ESCRT pathway to help mediate intraluminal vesicle formation at multivesicular bodies, the abscission stage of cytokinesis, and/or enveloped virus budding. Human Bro1 domains share the ability to bind the CHMP4 subset of ESCRT-III proteins, associate with the HIV-1 NC{sup Gag} protein, and stimulate the budding of viral Gag proteins. The curved Bro1 domain structure has also been proposed to mediate membrane bending. To date, crystal structures have only been available for the related Bro1 domains from the Bro1p and ALIX proteins, and structures of additional family members should therefore aid in the identification of key structural and functional elements. We report the crystal structure of the human BROX protein, which comprises a single Bro1 domain. The Bro1 domains from BROX, Bro1p and ALIX adopt similar overall structures and share two common exposed hydrophobic surfaces. Surface 1 is located on the concave face and forms the CHMP4 binding site, whereas Surface 2 is located at the narrow end of the domain. The structures differ in that only ALIX has an extended loop that projects away from the convex face to expose the hydrophobic Phe105 side chain at its tip. Functional studies demonstrated that mutations in Surface 1, Surface 2, or Phe105 all impair the ability of ALIX to stimulate HIV-1 budding. Our studies reveal similarities in the overall folds and hydrophobic protein interaction sites of different Bro1 domains, and show that a unique extended loop contributes to the ability of ALIX to function in HIV-1 budding.

  7. Kinetic response of a photoperturbed allosteric protein.

    PubMed

    Buchli, Brigitte; Waldauer, Steven A; Walser, Reto; Donten, Mateusz L; Pfister, Rolf; Blöchliger, Nicolas; Steiner, Sandra; Caflisch, Amedeo; Zerbe, Oliver; Hamm, Peter

    2013-07-16

    By covalently linking an azobenzene photoswitch across the binding groove of a PDZ domain, a conformational transition, similar to the one occurring upon ligand binding to the unmodified domain, can be initiated on a picosecond timescale by a laser pulse. The protein structures have been characterized in the two photoswitch states through NMR spectroscopy and the transition between them through ultrafast IR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations. The binding groove opens on a 100-ns timescale in a highly nonexponential manner, and the molecular dynamics simulations suggest that the process is governed by the rearrangement of the water network on the protein surface. We propose this rearrangement of the water network to be another possible mechanism of allostery.

  8. Plant homologs of mammalian MBT-domain protein-regulated KDM1 histone lysine demethylases do not interact with plant Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sadiq, Irfan; Keren, Ido; Citovsky, Vitaly

    2016-01-01

    Histone lysine demethylases of the LSD1/KDM1 family play important roles in epigenetic regulation of eukaryotic chromatin, and they are conserved between plants and animals. Mammalian LSD1 is thought to be targeted to its substrates, i.e., methylated histones, by an MBT-domain protein SFMBT1 that represents a component of the LSD1-based repressor complex and binds methylated histones. Because MBT-domain proteins are conserved between different organisms, from animals to plants, we examined whether the KDM1-type histone lysine demethylases KDM1C and FLD of Arabidopsis interact with the Arabidopsis Tudor/PWWP/MBT-domain SFMBT1-like proteins SL1, SL2, SL3, and SL4. No such interaction was detected using the bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay in living plant cells. Thus, plants most likely direct their KDM1 chromatin-modifying enzymes to methylated histones of the target chromatin by a mechanism different from that employed by the mammalian cells. PMID:26826387

  9. Domain compatibility in Ire1 kinase is critical for the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Sopha, Pattarawut; Kaufman, Randal J; Tirasophon, Witoon

    2010-07-16

    The unfolded protein response is a mechanism to cope with endoplasmic reticulum stress. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Ire1 senses the stress and mediates a signaling cascade to upregulate responsive genes through an unusual HAC1 mRNA splicing. The splicing requires interconnected activity (kinase and endoribonuclease (RNase)) of Ire1 to cleave HAC1 mRNA at the non-canonical splice sites before translation into Hac1 transcription factor. Analysis of the truncated kinase domain from Ire1 homologs revealed that this domain is highly conserved. Characterization by domain swapping indicated that a functional ATP/ADP binding domain is minimally required. However the overall domain compatibility is critical for eliciting its full RNase function.

  10. The macro domain protein family: structure, functions, and their potential therapeutic implications.

    PubMed

    Han, Weidong; Li, Xiaolei; Fu, Xiaobing

    2011-01-01

    Macro domains are ancient, highly evolutionarily conserved domains that are widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life. The 'macro fold' is roughly 25kDa in size and is composed of a mixed α-β fold with similarity to the P loop-containing nucleotide triphosphate hydrolases. They function as binding modules for metabolites of NAD(+), including poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), which is synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs). Although there is a high degree of sequence similarity within this family, particularly for residues that might be involved in catalysis or substrates binding, it is likely that the sequence variation that does exist among macro domains is responsible for the specificity of function of individual proteins. Recent findings have indicated that macro domain proteins are functionally promiscuous and are implicated in the regulation of diverse biological functions, such as DNA repair, chromatin remodeling and transcriptional regulation. Significant advances in the field of macro domain have occurred in the past few years, including biological insights and the discovery of novel signaling pathways. To provide a framework for understanding these recent findings, this review will provide a comprehensive overview of the known and proposed biochemical, cellular and physiological roles of the macro domain family. Recent data that indicate a critical role of macro domain regulation for the proper progression of cellular differentiation programs will be discussed. In addition, the effect of dysregulated expression of macro domain proteins will be considered in the processes of tumorigenesis and bacterial pathogenesis. Finally, a series of observations will be highlighted that should be addressed in future efforts to develop macro domains as effective therapeutic targets.

  11. Crystal structure of the human, FIC-domain containing protein HYPE and implications for its functions.

    PubMed

    Bunney, Tom D; Cole, Ambrose R; Broncel, Malgorzata; Esposito, Diego; Tate, Edward W; Katan, Matilda

    2014-12-02

    Protein AMPylation, the transfer of AMP from ATP to protein targets, has been recognized as a new mechanism of host-cell disruption by some bacterial effectors that typically contain a FIC-domain. Eukaryotic genomes also encode one FIC-domain protein,HYPE, which has remained poorly characterized.Here we describe the structure of human HYPE, solved by X-ray crystallography, representing the first structure of a eukaryotic FIC-domain protein. We demonstrate that HYPE forms stable dimers with structurally and functionally integrated FIC-domains and with TPR-motifs exposed for protein-protein interactions. As HYPE also uniquely possesses a transmembrane helix, dimerization is likely to affect its positioning and function in the membrane vicinity. The low rate of auto AMPylation of the wild-type HYPE could be due to autoinhibition, consistent with the mechanism proposed for a number of putative FIC AMPylators. Our findings also provide a basis to further consider possible alternative cofactors of HYPE and distinct modes of target-recognition.

  12. Structure of the SCAN Domain of Human Paternally Expressed Gene 3 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rimsa, Vadim; Eadsforth, Thomas C.; Hunter, William N.

    2013-01-01

    Human paternally expressed gene 3 protein (PEG3) is a large multi-domain entity with diverse biological functions, including acting as a transcription factor. PEG3 contains twelve Cys2-His2 type zinc finger domains, extended regions of predicted disorder and at the N-terminus a SCAN domain. PEG3 has been identified as partner of the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase Siah1, an association we sought to investigate. An efficient bacterial recombinant expression system of the human PEG3-SCAN domain was prepared and crystals appeared spontaneously when the protein was being concentrated after purification. The structure was determined at 1.95 Å resolution and reveals a polypeptide fold of five helices in an extended configuration. An extensive dimerization interface, using almost a quarter of the solvent accessible surface, and key salt bridge interactions explain the stability of the dimer. Comparison with other SCAN domains reveals a high degree of conservation involving residues that contribute to the dimer interface. The PEG3-SCAN domain appears to constitute an assembly block, enabling PEG3 homo- or heterodimerization to control gene expression in a combinatorial fashion. PMID:23936039

  13. Bacterial SET domain proteins and their role in eukaryotic chromatin modification

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez-Venegas, Raúl

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown by many researchers that SET-domain containing proteins modify chromatin structure and, as expected, genes coding for SET-domain containing proteins have been found in all eukaryotic genomes sequenced to date. However, during the last years, a great number of bacterial genomes have been sequenced and an important number of putative genes involved in histone post-translational modifications (histone PTMs) have been identified in many bacterial genomes. Here, I aim at presenting an overview of SET domain genes that have been identified in numbers of bacterial genomes based on similarity to SET domains of eukaryotic histone methyltransferases. I will argue in favor of the hypothesis that SET domain genes found in extant bacteria are of bacterial origin. Then, I will focus on the available information on pathogen and symbiont SET-domain containing proteins and their targets in eukaryotic organisms, and how such histone methyltransferases allow a pathogen to inhibit transcriptional activation of host defense genes. PMID:24765100

  14. A mathematically related singularity and the maximum size of protein domains.

    PubMed

    Szilágyi, András

    2008-06-01

    In a paper titled "A topologically related singularity suggests a maximum preferred size for protein domains" (Zbilut et al., Proteins 2007;66:621-629), Zbilut et al. claim to have found a singularity in certain geometrical properties of protein structures, and suggest that this singularity may limit the maximum size of protein domains. They find further support for the singularity in their analysis of G-factors calculated by the PROCHECK program. Here, we show that the claimed singularity is a mathematical artifact with no physical meaning, and we reanalyze the G-factors to show that Zbilut et al.'s results are due to a single outlier in the data. Thus, the existence of an actual singularity in the topological properties of proteins is not supported by the findings of Zbilut et al.

  15. Solution structure of the RecQ C-terminal domain of human Bloom syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    Park, Chin-Ju; Ko, Junsang; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Choi, Byong-Seok

    2014-02-01

    RecQ C-terminal (RQC) domain is known as the main DNA binding module of RecQ helicases such as Bloom syndrome protein (BLM) and Werner syndrome protein (WRN) that recognizes various DNA structures. Even though BLM is able to resolve various DNA structures similarly to WRN, BLM has different binding preferences for DNA substrates from WRN. In this study, we determined the solution structure of the RQC domain of human BLM. The structure shares the common winged-helix motif with other RQC domains. However, half of the N-terminal has unstructured regions (α1-α2 loop and α3 region), and the aromatic side chain on the top of the β-hairpin, which is important for DNA duplex strand separation in other RQC domains, is substituted with a negatively charged residue (D1165) followed by the polar residue (Q1166). The structurally distinctive features of the RQC domain of human BLM suggest that the DNA binding modes of the BLM RQC domain may be different from those of other RQC domains.

  16. Structural mapping of the coiled-coil domain of a bacterial condensin and comparative analyses across all domains of life suggest conserved features of SMC proteins.

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Stanage, Tyler H; Mims, Alexandra; Norden, Ian S; Oakley, Martha G

    2015-06-01

    The structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) proteins form the cores of multisubunit complexes that are required for the segregation and global organization of chromosomes in all domains of life. These proteins share a common domain structure in which N- and C- terminal regions pack against one another to form a globular ATPase domain. This "head" domain is connected to a central, globular, "hinge" or dimerization domain by a long, antiparallel coiled coil. To date, most efforts for structural characterization of SMC proteins have focused on the globular domains. Recently, however, we developed a method to map interstrand interactions in the 50-nm coiled-coil domain of MukB, the divergent SMC protein found in γ-proteobacteria. Here, we apply that technique to map the structure of the Bacillus subtilis SMC (BsSMC) coiled-coil domain. We find that, in contrast to the relatively complicated coiled-coil domain of MukB, the BsSMC domain is nearly continuous, with only two detectable coiled-coil interruptions. Near the middle of the domain is a break in coiled-coil structure in which there are three more residues on the C-terminal strand than on the N-terminal strand. Close to the head domain, there is a second break with a significantly longer insertion on the same strand. These results provide an experience base that allows an informed interpretation of the output of coiled-coil prediction algorithms for this family of proteins. A comparison of such predictions suggests that these coiled-coil deviations are highly conserved across SMC types in a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

  17. Functional domains and motifs of bacterial type III effector proteins and their roles in infection.

    PubMed

    Dean, Paul

    2011-11-01

    A key feature of the virulence of many bacterial pathogens is the ability to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic cells via a dedicated type three secretion system (T3SS). Many bacterial pathogens, including species of Chlamydia, Xanthomonas, Pseudomonas, Ralstonia, Shigella, Salmonella, Escherichia and Yersinia, depend on the T3SS to cause disease. T3SS effectors constitute a large and diverse group of virulence proteins that mimic eukaryotic proteins in structure and function. A salient feature of bacterial effectors is their modular architecture, comprising domains or motifs that confer an array of subversive functions within the eukaryotic cell. These domains/motifs therefore represent a fascinating repertoire of molecular determinants with important roles during infection. This review provides a snapshot of our current understanding of bacterial effector domains and motifs where a defined role in infection has been demonstrated.

  18. Biological effects of individually synthesized TNF-binding domain of variola virus CrmB protein.

    PubMed

    Tsyrendorzhiev, D D; Orlovskaya, I A; Sennikov, S V; Tregubchak, T V; Gileva, I P; Tsyrendorzhieva, M D; Shchelkunov, S N

    2014-06-01

    The biological characteristics of a 17-kDa protein synthesized in bacterial cells, a TNF-binding domain (VARV-TNF-BP) of a 47-kDa variola virus CrmB protein (VARV-CrmB) consisting of TNF-binding and chemokine-binding domains, were studied. Removal of the C-terminal chemokine-binding domain from VARV-CrmB protein was inessential for the efficiency of its inhibition of TNF cytotoxicity towards L929 mouse fibroblast culture and for TNF-induced oxidative metabolic activity of mouse blood leukocytes. The results of this study could form the basis for further studies of VARV-TNF-BP mechanisms of activity for prospective use in practical medicine.

  19. Single domain antibodies for the knockdown of cytosolic and nuclear proteins.

    PubMed

    Böldicke, Thomas

    2017-03-08

    Single domain antibodies (sdAbs) from camels or sharks comprise only the variable heavy chain domain. Human sdAbs comprise the variable domain of the heavy chain (VH) or light chain (VL) and can be selected from human antibodies. SdAbs are stable, non aggregating molecules in vitro and in vivo compared to complete antibodies and scFv fragments. They are excellent novel inhibitors of cytosolic/nuclear proteins because they are correctly folded inside the cytosol in contrast to scFv fragments. SdAbs are unique because of their excellent specificity and possibility to target posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation sites, conformers or interaction regions of proteins that cannot be targeted with genetic knockout techniques and are impossible to knockdown with RNAi. The number of inhibiting cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs is increasing and usage of synthetic single pot single domain libraries will boost the generation of these fascinating molecules without the need of immunization. The most frequently selected antigenic epitopes belong to viral and oncogenic proteins, followed by toxins, proteins of the nervous system as well as plant- and drosophila proteins. It is now possible to select functional sdAbs against virtually every cytosolic/nuclear protein and desired epitope. The development of new endosomal escape protein domains and cell-penetrating peptides for efficient transfection broaden the application of inhibiting sdAbs. Last but not least, the generation of relatively new cell-specific nanoparticles such as polymersomes and polyplexes carrying cytosolic/nuclear sdAb-DNA or -protein will pave the way to apply cytosolic/nuclear sdAbs for inhibition of viral infection and cancer in the clinic. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. PAK4 suppresses PDZ-RhoGEF activity to drive invadopodia maturation in melanoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Nicole S.; Pipili, Aikaterini; Lesjak, Michaela S.; Ameer, Simon M.; Geh, Jenny L. C.; Healy, Ciaran; Ross, Alistair D. MacKenzie; Parsons, Maddy; Nestle, Frank O.; Lacy, Katie E.; Wells, Claire M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells are thought to use actin rich invadopodia to facilitate matrix degradation. Formation and maturation of invadopodia requires the co-ordained activity of Rho-GTPases, however the molecular mechanisms that underlie the invadopodia lifecycle are not fully elucidated. Previous work has suggested a formation and disassembly role for Rho family effector p-21 activated kinase 1 (PAK1) however, related family member PAK4 has not been explored. Systematic analysis of isoform specific depletion using in vitro and in vivo invasion assays revealed there are differential invadopodia-associated functions. We consolidated a role for PAK1 in the invadopodia formation phase and identified PAK4 as a novel invadopodia protein that is required for successful maturation. Furthermore, we find that PAK4 (but not PAK1) mediates invadopodia maturation likely via inhibition of PDZ-RhoGEF. Our work points to an essential role for both PAKs during melanoma invasion but provides a significant advance in our understanding of differential PAK function. PMID:27765920

  1. Molecular insights into the binding of phosphoinositides to the TH domain region of TIPE proteins.

    PubMed

    Antony, Priya; Baby, Bincy; Vijayan, Ranjit

    2016-11-01

    Phosphatidylinositols and their phosphorylated derivatives, phosphoinositides, play a central role in regulating diverse cellular functions. These phospholipids have been shown to interact with the hydrophobic TH domain of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α-induced protein 8 (TIPE) family of proteins. However, the precise mechanism of interaction of these lipids is unclear. Here we report the binding mode and interactions of these phospholipids in the TH domain, as elucidated using molecular docking and simulations. Results indicate that phosphoinositides bind to the TH domain in a similar way by inserting their lipid tails in the hydrophobic cavity. The exposed head group is stabilized by interactions with critical positively charged residues on the surface of these proteins. Further MD simulations confirmed the dynamic stability of these lipids in the TH domain. This computational analysis thus provides insight into the binding mode of phospholipids in the TH domain of the TIPE family of proteins. Graphical abstract A phosphoinositide (phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate; PtdIns4P) docked to TIPE2.

  2. Knowledge-Guided Docking of WW Domain Proteins and Flexible Ligands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haiyun; Li, Hao; Banu Bte Sm Rashid, Shamima; Leow, Wee Kheng; Liou, Yih-Cherng

    Studies of interactions between protein domains and ligands are important in many aspects such as cellular signaling. We present a knowledge-guided approach for docking protein domains and flexible ligands. The approach is applied to the WW domain, a small protein module mediating signaling complexes which have been implicated in diseases such as muscular dystrophy and Liddle’s syndrome. The first stage of the approach employs a substring search for two binding grooves of WW domains and possible binding motifs of peptide ligands based on known features. The second stage aligns the ligand’s peptide backbone to the two binding grooves using a quasi-Newton constrained optimization algorithm. The backbone-aligned ligands produced serve as good starting points to the third stage which uses any flexible docking algorithm to perform the docking. The experimental results demonstrate that the backbone alignment method in the second stage performs better than conventional rigid superposition given two binding constraints. It is also shown that using the backbone-aligned ligands as initial configurations improves the flexible docking in the third stage. The presented approach can also be applied to other protein domains that involve binding of flexible ligand to two or more binding sites.

  3. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  4. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-12-01

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  5. ADAR proteins: double-stranded RNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

    PubMed

    Barraud, Pierre; Allain, Frédéric H-T

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADAR) catalyze adenosine to inosine editing within double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) substrates. Inosine is read as a guanine by most cellular processes and therefore these changes create codons for a different amino acid, stop codons or even a new splice-site allowing protein diversity generated from a single gene. We review here the current structural and molecular knowledge on RNA editing by the ADAR family of protein. We focus especially on two types of nucleic acid binding domains present in ADARs, namely the dsRNA and Z-DNA binding domains.

  6. Crystal structure of the TLDc domain of oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Blaise, Mickaël; Alsarraf, Husam M A B; Wong, Jaslyn E M M; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Laroche, Fabrice; Schack, Lotte; Spaink, Herman; Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren

    2012-06-01

    The oxidation resistance proteins (OXR) help to protect eukaryotes from reactive oxygen species. The sole C-terminal domain of the OXR, named TLDc is sufficient to perform this function. However, the mechanism by which oxidation resistance occurs is poorly understood. We present here the crystal structure of the TLDc domain of the oxidation resistance protein 2 from zebrafish. The structure was determined by X-ray crystallography to atomic resolution (0.97Å) and adopts an overall globular shape. Two antiparallel β-sheets form a central β-sandwich, surrounded by two helices and two one-turn helices. The fold shares low structural similarity to known structures.

  7. Interaction of the Intermembrane Space Domain of Tim23 Protein with Mitochondrial Membranes*

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Rakhi; Munari, Francesca; Becker, Stefan; Zweckstetter, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Tim23 mediates protein translocation into mitochondria. Although inserted into the inner membrane, the dynamic association of its intermembrane space (IMS) domain with the outer membrane promotes protein import. However, little is known about the molecular basis of this interaction. Here, we demonstrate that the IMS domain of Tim23 tightly associates with both inner and outer mitochondrial membrane-like membranes through a hydrophobic anchor at its N terminus. The structure of membrane-bound Tim23IMS is highly dynamic, allowing recognition of both the incoming presequence and other translocase components at the translocation contact. Cardiolipin enhances Tim23 membrane attachment, suggesting that cardiolipin can influence preprotein import. PMID:25349212

  8. Differential Subcellular Localization of Leishmania Alba-Domain Proteins throughout the Parasite Development

    PubMed Central

    Dupé, Aurélien; Dumas, Carole; Papadopoulou, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Alba-domain proteins are RNA-binding proteins found in archaea and eukaryotes and recently studied in protozoan parasites where they play a role in the regulation of virulence factors and stage-specific proteins. This work describes in silico structural characterization, cellular localization and biochemical analyses of Alba-domain proteins in Leishmania infantum. We show that in contrast to other protozoa, Leishmania have two Alba-domain proteins, LiAlba1 and LiAlba3, representative of the Rpp20- and the Rpp25-like eukaryotic subfamilies, respectively, which share several sequence and structural similarities but also important differences with orthologs in other protozoa, especially in sequences targeted for post-translational modifications. LiAlba1 and LiAlba3 proteins form a complex interacting with other RNA-binding proteins, ribosomal subunits, and translation factors as supported by co-immunoprecipitation and sucrose gradient sedimentation analysis. A higher co-sedimentation of Alba proteins with ribosomal subunits was seen upon conditions of decreased translation, suggesting a role of these proteins in translational repression. The Leishmania Alba-domain proteins display differential cellular localization throughout the parasite development. In the insect promastigote stage, Alba proteins co-localize predominantly to the cytoplasm but they translocate to the nucleolus and the flagellum upon amastigote differentiation in the mammalian host and are found back to the cytoplasm once amastigote differentiation is completed. Heat-shock, a major signal of amastigote differentiation, triggers Alba translocation to the nucleolus and the flagellum. Purification of the Leishmania flagellum confirmed LiAlba3 enrichment in this organelle during amastigote differentiation. Moreover, partial characterization of the Leishmania flagellum proteome of promastigotes and differentiating amastigotes revealed the presence of other RNA-binding proteins, as well as differences in

  9. Distribution and evolution of stable single α-helices (SAH domains) in myosin motor proteins

    PubMed Central

    Simm, Dominic; Hatje, Klas

    2017-01-01

    Stable single-alpha helices (SAHs) are versatile structural elements in many prokaryotic and eukaryotic proteins acting as semi-flexible linkers and constant force springs. This way SAH-domains function as part of the lever of many different myosins. Canonical myosin levers consist of one or several IQ-motifs to which light chains such as calmodulin bind. SAH-domains provide flexibility in length and stiffness to the myosin levers, and may be particularly suited for myosins working in crowded cellular environments. Although the function of the SAH-domains in human class-6 and class-10 myosins has well been characterised, the distribution of the SAH-domain in all myosin subfamilies and across the eukaryotic tree of life remained elusive. Here, we analysed the largest available myosin sequence dataset consisting of 7919 manually annotated myosin sequences from 938 species representing all major eukaryotic branches using the SAH-prediction algorithm of Waggawagga, a recently developed tool for the identification of SAH-domains. With this approach we identified SAH-domains in more than one third of the supposed 79 myosin subfamilies. Depending on the myosin class, the presence of SAH-domains can range from a few to almost all class members indicating complex patterns of independent and taxon-specific SAH-domain gain and loss. PMID:28369123

  10. Mechanism of Protein Denaturation: Partial Unfolding of the P22 Coat Protein I-Domain by Urea Binding.

    PubMed

    Newcomer, Rebecca L; Fraser, LaTasha C R; Teschke, Carolyn M; Alexandrescu, Andrei T

    2015-12-15

    The I-domain is an insertion domain of the bacteriophage P22 coat protein that drives rapid folding and accounts for over half of the stability of the full-length protein. We sought to determine the role of hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in the unfolding of the I-domain by examining (3)JNC' couplings transmitted through H-bonds, the temperature and urea-concentration dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts, and native-state hydrogen exchange at urea concentrations where the domain is predominantly folded. The native-state hydrogen-exchange data suggest that the six-stranded β-barrel core of the I-domain is more stable against unfolding than a smaller subdomain comprised of a short α-helix and three-stranded β-sheet. H-bonds, separately determined from solvent protection and (3)JNC' H-bond couplings, are identified with an accuracy of 90% by (1)HN temperature coefficients. The accuracy is improved to 95% when (15)N temperature coefficients are also included. In contrast, the urea dependence of (1)HN and (15)N chemical shifts is unrelated to H-bonding. The protein segments with the largest chemical-shift changes in the presence of urea show curved or sigmoidal titration curves suggestive of direct urea binding. Nuclear Overhauser effects to urea for these segments are also consistent with specific urea-binding sites in the I-domain. Taken together, the results support a mechanism of urea unfolding in which denaturant binds to distinct sites in the I-domain. Disordered segments bind urea more readily than regions in stable secondary structure. The locations of the putative urea-binding sites correlate with the lower stability of the structure against solvent exchange, suggesting that partial unfolding of the structure is related to urea accessibility.

  11. Solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in protein FON

    PubMed Central

    He, Fahu; Umehara, Takashi; Tsuda, Kengo; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Matsuda, Takayoshi; Yabuki, Takashi; Aoki, Masaaki; Seki, Eiko; Terada, Takaho; Shirouzu, Mikako; Tanaka, Akiko; Sugano, Sumio; Muto, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-01-01

    The zinc finger HIT domain is a sequence motif found in many proteins, including thyroid hormone receptor interacting protein 3 (TRIP-3), which is possibly involved in maturity-onset diabetes of the young (MODY). Novel zinc finger motifs are suggested to play important roles in gene regulation and chromatin remodeling. Here, we determined the high-resolution solution structure of the zinc finger HIT domain in ZNHIT2 (protein FON) from Homo sapiens, by an NMR method based on 567 upper distance limits derived from NOE intensities measured in three-dimensional NOESY spectra. The structure yielded a backbone RMSD to the mean coordinates of 0.19 Å for the structured residues 12–48. The fold consists of two consecutive antiparallel β-sheets and two short C-terminal helices packed against the second β-sheet, and binds two zinc ions. Both zinc ions are coordinated tetrahedrally via a CCCC-CCHC motif to the ligand residues of the zf-HIT domain in an interleaved manner. The tertiary structure of the zinc finger HIT domain closely resembles the folds of the B-box, RING finger, and PHD domains with a cross-brace zinc coordination mode, but is distinct from them. The unique three-dimensional structure of the zinc finger HIT domain revealed a novel zinc-binding fold, as a new member of the treble clef domain family. On the basis of the structural data, we discuss the possible functional roles of the zinc finger HIT domain. PMID:17656577

  12. dcGOR: an R package for analysing ontologies and protein domain annotations.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hai

    2014-10-01

    I introduce an open-source R package 'dcGOR' to provide the bioinformatics community with the ease to analyse ontologies and protein domain annotations, particularly those in the dcGO database. The dcGO is a comprehensive resource for protein domain annotations using a panel of ontologies including Gene Ontology. Although increasing in popularity, this database needs statistical and graphical support to meet its full potential. Moreover, there are no bioinformatics tools specifically designed for domain ontology analysis. As an add-on package built in the R software environment, dcGOR offers a basic infrastructure with great flexibility and functionality. It implements new data structure to represent domains, ontologies, annotations, and all analytical outputs as well. For each ontology, it provides various mining facilities, including: (i) domain-based enrichment analysis and visualisation; (ii) construction of a domain (semantic similarity) network according to ontology annotations; and (iii) significance analysis for estimating a contact (statistical significance) network. To reduce runtime, most analyses support high-performance parallel computing. Taking as inputs a list of protein domains of interest, the package is able to easily carry out in-depth analyses in terms of functional, phenotypic and diseased relevance, and network-level understanding. More importantly, dcGOR is designed to allow users to import and analyse their own ontologies and annotations on domains (taken from SCOP, Pfam and InterPro) and RNAs (from Rfam) as well. The package is freely available at CRAN for easy installation, and also at GitHub for version control. The dedicated website with reproducible demos can be found at http://supfam.org/dcGOR.

  13. Phase separation and bistability in a three-dimensional model for protein domain formation at biomembranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alonso, Sergio; Bär, Markus

    2010-12-01

    Proteins in living cells interact with membranes. They may bind to or unbind from the membrane to the cytosol depending on the lipid composition of the membrane and their interaction with cytosolic enzymes. Moreover, proteins can accumulate at the membrane and assemble in spatial domains. Here, a simple model of protein cycling at biomembranes is studied, when the total number of proteins is conserved. Specifically, we consider the spatio-temporal dynamics of MARCKS proteins and their interactions with enzymes facilitating translocation from and rebinding to the membrane. The model exhibits two qualitatively different mechanisms of protein domain formation: phase separation related to a long-wave instability of a membrane state with homogeneous protein coverage and stable coexistence of two states with different homogeneous protein coverage in bistable media. We evaluate the impact of the cytosolic volume on the occurrence of protein pattern formation by simulations in a three-dimensional model. We show that the explicit treatment of the volume in the model leads to an effective rescaling of the reaction rates. For a simplified model of protein cycling, we can derive analytical expressions for the rescaling coefficients and verify them by direct simulations with the complete three-dimensional model.

  14. The expanded octarepeat domain selectively binds prions and disrupts homomeric prion protein interactions.

    PubMed

    Leliveld, Sirik Rutger; Dame, Remus Thei; Wuite, Gijs J L; Stitz, Lothar; Korth, Carsten

    2006-02-10

    Insertion of additional octarepeats into the prion protein gene has been genetically linked to familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease and hence to de novo generation of infectious prions. The pivotal event during prion formation is the conversion of the normal prion protein (PrPC) into the pathogenic conformer PrPSc, which subsequently induces further conversion in an autocatalytic manner. Apparently, an expanded octarepeat domain directs folding of PrP toward the PrPSc conformation and initiates a self-replicating conversion process. Here, based on three main observations, we have provided a model on how altered molecular interactions between wild-type and mutant PrP set the stage for familial Creutzfeldt Jakob disease with octarepeat insertions. First, we showed that wild-type octarepeat domains interact in a copper-dependent and reversible manner, a "copper switch." This interaction becomes irreversible upon domain expansion, possibly reflecting a loss of function. Second, expanded octarepeat domains of increasing length gradually form homogenous globular multimers of 11-21 nm in the absence of copper ions when expressed as soluble glutathione S-transferase fusion proteins. Third, octarepeat domain expansion causes a gain of function with at least 10 repeats selectively binding PrPSc in a denaturant-resistant complex in the absence of copper ions. Thus, the combination of both a loss and gain of function profoundly influences homomeric interaction behavior of PrP with an expanded octarepeat domain. A multimeric cluster of prion proteins carrying expanded octarepeat domains may therefore capture and incorporate spontaneously arising short-lived PrPSc-like conformers, thereby providing a matrix for their conversion.

  15. Structural determinants of protein partitioning into ordered membrane domains and lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Lorent, Joseph Helmuth; Levental, Ilya

    2015-11-01

    Increasing evidence supports the existence of lateral nanoscopic lipid domains in plasma membranes, known as lipid rafts. These domains preferentially recruit membrane proteins and lipids to facilitate their interactions and thereby regulate transmembrane signaling and cellular homeostasis. The functionality of raft domains is intrinsically dependent on their selectivity for specific membrane components; however, while the physicochemical determinants of raft association for lipids are known, very few systematic studies have focused on the structural aspects that guide raft partitioning of proteins. In this review, we describe biophysical and thermodynamic aspects of raft-mimetic liquid ordered phases, focusing on those most relevant for protein partitioning. Further, we detail the variety of experimental models used to study protein-raft interactions. Finally, we review the existing literature on mechanisms for raft targeting, including lipid post-translational modifications, lipid binding, and transmembrane domain features. We conclude that whi