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Sample records for pea mosaic virus

  1. Finding linked markers to En for efficient selection of pea enation Mosaic Virus resistance in pea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) causes an important disease of cool season food legumes, resulting in significant yield loss worldwide. The present investigation was carried out to study the inheritance and identify the molecular markers linked with the PEMV resistance gene (En) in field pea (Pisum ...

  2. Pea enation mosaic virus genoma RNA contains no polyadenylate sequences and cannot be aminoacylated.

    PubMed

    German, T L; De Zoeten, G A; Hall, T C

    1978-01-01

    An active synthetase enzyme preparation from peas (Pisum sativum L.) did not catalyze the aminoacylation of pea enation mosaic virus RNA. The viral RNA was shown not to contain polyadenylic acid sequences.

  3. Evidence that QTL may be involved in a tolerance response to Pea enation mosaic virus in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is a serious disease of fresh market and dry pea in the Pacific Northwest region of the U.S. The En gene confers resistance to PEMV in pea, however a limited number of available cultivars contain the gene, and sources of tolerance have not been reported. In 2007, ad...

  4. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seed-borne was assessed by collecting dev...

  5. Role of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Coat Protein in the Host Plant and Aphid Vector.

    PubMed

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Sheber, Melissa; Bonning, Bryony C; Miller, W Allen

    2016-11-18

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in plant virus-vector interactions is essential for the development of effective control measures for aphid-vectored epidemic plant diseases. The coat proteins (CP) are the main component of the viral capsids, and they are implicated in practically every stage of the viral infection cycle. Pea enation mosaic virus 1 (PEMV1, Enamovirus, Luteoviridae) and Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2, Umbravirus, Tombusviridae) are two RNA viruses in an obligate symbiosis causing the pea enation mosaic disease. Sixteen mutant viruses were generated with mutations in different domains of the CP to evaluate the role of specific amino acids in viral replication, virion assembly, long-distance movement in Pisum sativum, and aphid transmission. Twelve mutant viruses were unable to assemble but were able to replicate in inoculated leaves, move long-distance, and express the CP in newly infected leaves. Four mutant viruses produced virions, but three were not transmissible by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Three-dimensional modeling of the PEMV CP, combined with biological assays for virion assembly and aphid transmission, allowed for a model of the assembly of PEMV coat protein subunits.

  6. Identification of novel sources of resistance to Pea enation mosaic virus in chickpea germplasm.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) can be seriously affected by Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) in the Pacific Northwest of the USA and other areas of the world when viruliferous aphid populations are high. Use of pesticides to manage PEMV vector transmission is ineffective and PEMV-resistant chickpeas hav...

  7. Molecular characterization of genetic variation to pea enation mosaic virus resistance in lentil (Lenz culinaris Medik.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of genetically diverse lentil germplasm with resistance to pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) through combined of molecular marker analysis and phenotyping could prove useful in breeding programs. A total of 44 lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) accessions, were screened for resistance to PE...

  8. Role of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Coat Protein in the Host Plant and Aphid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Sheber, Melissa; Bonning, Bryony C.; Miller, W. Allen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in plant virus–vector interactions is essential for the development of effective control measures for aphid-vectored epidemic plant diseases. The coat proteins (CP) are the main component of the viral capsids, and they are implicated in practically every stage of the viral infection cycle. Pea enation mosaic virus 1 (PEMV1, Enamovirus, Luteoviridae) and Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2, Umbravirus, Tombusviridae) are two RNA viruses in an obligate symbiosis causing the pea enation mosaic disease. Sixteen mutant viruses were generated with mutations in different domains of the CP to evaluate the role of specific amino acids in viral replication, virion assembly, long-distance movement in Pisum sativum, and aphid transmission. Twelve mutant viruses were unable to assemble but were able to replicate in inoculated leaves, move long-distance, and express the CP in newly infected leaves. Four mutant viruses produced virions, but three were not transmissible by the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum. Three-dimensional modeling of the PEMV CP, combined with biological assays for virion assembly and aphid transmission, allowed for a model of the assembly of PEMV coat protein subunits. PMID:27869713

  9. A peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of Pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sijun; Sivakumar, S.; Sparks, Wendy O.; Miller, W. Allen; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-05-25

    Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1-green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

  10. Baculovirus expressed virus-like particles of Pea eation mosaic virus vary in size and encapsidate baculovirus mRNAs

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV: family Luteoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative manner by aphids. We inserted cDNAs encoding the structural proteins of PEMV, the coat protein (CP) and coat protein-read through domain (CPRT) into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica m...

  11. Apple latent spherical virus vector as vaccine for the prevention and treatment of mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants by bean yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-07

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases.

  12. Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector as Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Mosaic Diseases in Pea, Broad Bean, and Eustoma Plants by Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases. PMID:25386843

  13. Molecular characterization of genetic variation related to pea enation mosaic virus resistance in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Identification of genetically diverse lentil germplasm with resistance to pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) through combined approach of molecular marker analysis and phenotyping could prove useful in breeding programs. A total of 44 lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) accessions, were screened for resista...

  14. Conditional Facilitation of an Aphid Vector, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the Plant Pathogen, Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Simon; Powell, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogens can induce symptoms that affect the performance of insect herbivores utilizing the same host plant. Previous studies examining the effects of infection of tic bean, Vicia faba L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV), an important disease of legume crops, indicated there were no changes in the growth and reproductive rate of its primary vector the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments investigating how A. pisum responded to PEMV infection of a different host plant, Pisum sativum L., at different stages of symptom development. Aphid growth rate was negatively related to the age of the host plant, but when they were introduced onto older plants with well-developed PEMV symptoms they exhibited a higher growth rate compared to those developing on uninfected plants of the same age. In choice tests using leaf discs A. pisum showed a strong preference for discs from PEMV-infected peas, probably in response to visual cues from the yellowed and mottled infected leaves. When adults were crowded onto leaves using clip-cages they produced more winged progeny on PEMV-infected plants. The results indicate that PEMV produces symptoms in the host plant that can enhance the performance of A. pisum as a vector, modify the production of winged progeny and affect their spatial distribution. The findings provide further evidence that some insect vector/plant pathogen interactions could be regarded as mutualistic rather than commensal when certain conditions regarding the age, stage of infection and species of host plant are met. PMID:21067425

  15. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  16. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2016-01-29

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5'-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3' terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5′-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3′ terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  18. Differential use of 3'CITEs by the subgenomic RNA of Pea enation mosaic virus 2.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E

    2017-10-01

    The genomic RNA (gRNA) of Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2) is the template for p33 and -1 frameshift product p94. The PEMV2 subgenomic RNA (sgRNA) encodes two overlapping ORFs, p26 and p27, which are required for movement and stability of the gRNA. Efficient translation of p33 requires two of three 3' proximal cap-independent translation enhancers (3'CITEs): the kl-TSS, which binds ribosomes and engages in a long-distance interaction with the 5'end; and the adjacent eIF4E-binding PTE. Unlike the gRNA, all three 3'CITEs were required for efficient translation of the sgRNA, which included the ribosome-binding 3'TSS. A hairpin in the 5' proximal coding region of p26/p27 supported translation by the 3'CITEs by engaging in a long-distance RNA:RNA interaction with the kl-TSS. These results strongly suggest that the 5' ends of PEMV2 gRNA and sgRNA connect with the 3'UTR through similar long-distance interactions while having different requirements for 3'CITEs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Photosynthetic alterations of pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus: A coordinated decrease in efficiencies of CO(2) assimilation and photosystem II photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kyseláková, Helena; Prokopová, Jitka; Nauš, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Navrátil, Milan; Safářová, Dana; Spundová, Martina; Ilík, Petr

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated photosynthetic changes of fully expanded pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) that often attacks legumes particularly in northern temperate regions. A typical compatible virus-host interaction was monitored during 40 post-inoculation days (dpi). An initial PEMV-induced decrease in photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation was detected at 15 dpi, when the virus appeared in the measured leaves. This decrease was not induced by stomata closure and corresponded with a decrease in the efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (Φ(PSII)). Despite of a slight impairment of oxygen evolution at this stage, PSII function was not primarily responsible for the decrease in Φ(PSII). Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that Φ(PSII) started to decrease from the leaf tip to the base. More pronounced symptoms of PEMV disease appeared at later stages, when a typical mosaic and enations appeared in the infected leaves and oxidative damage of cell membranes was detected. From 30 dpi, a degradation of photosynthetic pigments accelerated, stomata were closing and corresponding pronounced decline in CO(2) assimilation was observed. A concomitant photoprotective responses, i.e. an increase in non-photochemical quenching and accumulation of de-epoxidized xanthophylls, were also detected. Interestingly, alternative electron sinks in chloroplasts were not stimulated by PEMV infection, which is in contradiction to earlier reports dealing with virus-induced plant stresses. The presented results show that the PEMV-induced alterations in mature pea leaves accelerated leaf senescence during which a decrease in Φ(PSII) took place in coordinated manner with an inhibition of CO(2) assimilation.

  20. Quantification of Pea enation mosaic virus 1 and 2 during infection of Pisum sativum by one step real-time RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Doumayrou, Juliette; Sheber, Melissa; Bonning, Bryony C; Miller, W Allen

    2017-02-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus 1 (PEMV1) and Pea enation mosaic virus 2 (PEMV2) are two viruses in an obligate symbiosis that cause pea enation mosaic disease mainly in plants in the Fabaceae family. This virus system is a valuable model to investigate plant virus replication, movement and vector transmission. Thus, here we describe growth conditions, virus detection methods, and virus accumulation behavior. To measure the accumulation and movement of PEMV1 and PEMV2 in plants during the course of infection, we developed a quantitative real-time one-step reverse transcription PCR procedure using the SYBR-green(®) technology. Viral primers were designed that anneal to conserved but distinct regions in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase gene of each virus. Moreover, the normalization of viral accumulation was performed to correct for sample-to-sample variation by designing primers to two different Pisum sativum housekeeping genes: actin and β-tubulin. Transcript levels for these housekeeping genes did not change significantly in response to PEMV infection. Conditions were established for maximum PCR efficiency for each gene, and quantification using QuBit(®) technology. Both viruses reached maximum accumulation around 21days post-inoculation of pea plants. These results provide valuable tools and knowledge to allow reproducible studies of this emerging model virus system virus complex. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Narrow Bottlenecks Affect Pea Seedborne Mosaic Virus Populations during Vertical Seed Transmission but not during Leaf Colonization

    PubMed Central

    Johansen, Elisabeth Ida; Simon, Vincent; Jacquemond, Mireille; Senoussi, Rachid

    2014-01-01

    The effective size of populations (Ne) determines whether selection or genetic drift is the predominant force shaping their genetic structure and evolution. Populations having high Ne adapt faster, as selection acts more intensely, than populations having low Ne, where random effects of genetic drift dominate. Estimating Ne for various steps of plant virus life cycle has been the focus of several studies in the last decade, but no estimates are available for the vertical transmission of plant viruses, although virus seed transmission is economically significant in at least 18% of plant viruses in at least one plant species. Here we study the co-dynamics of two variants of Pea seedborne mosaic virus (PSbMV) colonizing leaves of pea plants (Pisum sativum L.) during the whole flowering period, and their subsequent transmission to plant progeny through seeds. Whereas classical estimators of Ne could be used for leaf infection at the systemic level, as virus variants were equally competitive, dedicated stochastic models were needed to estimate Ne during vertical transmission. Very little genetic drift was observed during the infection of apical leaves, with Ne values ranging from 59 to 216. In contrast, a very drastic genetic drift was observed during vertical transmission, with an average number of infectious virus particles contributing to the infection of a seedling from an infected mother plant close to one. A simple model of vertical transmission, assuming a cumulative action of virus infectious particles and a virus density threshold required for vertical transmission to occur fitted the experimental data very satisfactorily. This study reveals that vertically-transmitted viruses endure bottlenecks as narrow as those imposed by horizontal transmission. These bottlenecks are likely to slow down virus adaptation and could decrease virus fitness and virulence. PMID:24415934

  2. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of eIF4E in Relation to sbm1 Resistance to Pea Seed-Borne Mosaic Virus in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Jamie A.; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Jarvis, Gavin E.; Lawson, David M.; Maule, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pea encodes eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E (eIF4ES), which supports the multiplication of Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV). In common with hosts for other potyviruses, some pea lines contain a recessive allele (sbm1) encoding a mutant eIF4E (eIF4ER) that fails to interact functionally with the PSbMV avirulence protein, VPg, giving genetic resistance to infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To study structure-function relationships between pea eIF4E and PSbMV VPg, we obtained an X-ray structure for eIF4ES bound to m7GTP. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contained eight independent copies of the protein, providing insights into the structurally conserved and flexible regions of eIF4E. To assess indirectly the importance of key residues in binding to VPg and/or m7GTP, an extensive range of point mutants in eIF4E was tested for their ability to complement PSbMV multiplication in resistant pea tissues and for complementation of protein translation, and hence growth, in an eIF4E-defective yeast strain conditionally dependent upon ectopic expression of eIF4E. The mutants also dissected individual contributions from polymorphisms present in eIF4ER and compared the impact of individual residues altered in orthologous resistance alleles from other crop species. The data showed that essential resistance determinants in eIF4E differed for different viruses although the critical region involved (possibly in VPg-binding) was conserved and partially overlapped with the m7GTP-binding region. This overlap resulted in coupled inhibition of virus multiplication and translation in the majority of cases, although the existence of a few mutants that uncoupled the two processes supported the view that the specific role of eIF4E in potyvirus infection may not be restricted to translation. Conclusions/Significance The work describes the most extensive structural analysis of eIF4E in relation to potyvirus resistance. In addition to defining functional

  3. The 3′ Untranslated Region of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Contains Two T-Shaped, Ribosome-Binding, Cap-Independent Translation Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Szarko, Christine; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant viruses without 5′caps or 3′ poly(A) tails contain 3′ proximal, cap-independent translation enhancers (3′CITEs) that bind to ribosomal subunits or translation factors thought to assist in ribosome recruitment. Most 3′CITEs participate in a long-distance kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin to deliver ribosomal subunits to the 5′ end for translation initiation. Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) contains two adjacent 3′CITEs in the center of its 703-nucleotide 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), the ribosome-binding, kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding Panicum mosaic virus-like translation enhance (PTE). We now report that PEMV contains a third, independent 3′CITE located near the 3′ terminus. This 3′CITE is composed of three hairpins and two pseudoknots, similar to the TSS 3′CITE of the carmovirus Turnip crinkle virus (TCV). As with the TCV TSS, the PEMV 3′TSS is predicted to fold into a T-shaped structure that binds to 80S ribosomes and 60S ribosomal subunits. A small hairpin (kl-H) upstream of the 3′TSS contains an apical loop capable of forming a kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin and is critical for the accumulation of full-length PEMV in protoplasts. Although the kl-H and 3′TSS are dispensable for the translation of a reporter construct containing the complete PEMV 3′UTR in vitro, deleting the normally required kl-TSS and PTE 3′CITEs and placing the kl-H and 3′TSS proximal to the reporter termination codon restores translation to near wild-type levels. This suggests that PEMV requires three 3′CITEs for proper translation and that additional translation enhancers may have been missed if reporter constructs were used in 3′CITE identification. IMPORTANCE The rapid life cycle of viruses requires efficient translation of viral-encoded proteins. Many plant RNA viruses contain 3′ cap-independent translation

  4. Proteomics offers insight to the mechanism behind Pisum sativum L. response to pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV).

    PubMed

    Cerna, Hana; Černý, Martin; Habánová, Hana; Šafářová, Dana; Abushamsiya, Kifah; Navrátil, Milan; Brzobohatý, Břetislav

    2017-02-05

    Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) significantly reduces yields in a broad spectra of legumes. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor has been shown to confer resistance to this pathogen, thus implying that translation and proteome dynamics play a role in resistance. This study presents the results of a proteome-wide analysis of Pisum sativum L. response to PSbMV infection. LC-MS profiling of two contrasting pea cultivars, resistant (B99) and susceptible (Raman) to PSbMV infection, detected >2300 proteins, 116 of which responded to PSbMV ten and/or twenty days post-inoculation. These differentially abundant proteins are involved in number of processes that have previously been reported in the plant-pathogen response, including protein and amino acid metabolism, stress signaling, redox homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, and lipid metabolism. We complemented our proteome-wide analysis work with targeted analyses of free amino acids and selected small molecules, fatty acid profiling, and enzyme activity assays. Data from these additional experiments support our findings and validate the biological relevance of the observed proteome changes. We found surprising similarities in the resistant and susceptible cultivars, which implies that a seemingly unaffected plant, with no detectable levels of PSbMV, actively suppresses viral replication. Plant resistance to PSbMV is connected to translation initiation factors, yet the processes involved are still poorly understood at the proteome level. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first survey of the global proteomic response to PSbMV in plants. The combination of label-free LC-MS profiling and two contrasting cultivars (resistant and susceptible) provided highly sensitive snapshots of protein abundance in response to PSbMV infection. PSbMV is a member of the largest family of plant viruses and our results are in accordance with previously characterized potyvirus-responsive proteomes. Hence, the results of this

  5. The kissing-loop T-shaped structure translational enhancer of Pea enation mosaic virus can bind simultaneously to ribosomes and a 5' proximal hairpin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D; Shapiro, Bruce A; Simon, Anne E

    2013-11-01

    The Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) 3' translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5'-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5' and 3' PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3' translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5' hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5' end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation.

  6. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  7. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  8. The Kissing-Loop T-Shaped Structure Translational Enhancer of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Can Bind Simultaneously to Ribosomes and a 5′ Proximal Hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P.; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) 3′ translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5′-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5′ and 3′ PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3′ translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5′ hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5′ end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation. PMID:23986599

  9. Apple mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV), a member of the ilarvirus group, naturally infects Betula, Aesculus, Humulus, and several crop genera in the family Rosaceae (Malus, Prunus, Rosa and Rubus). ApMV was first reported in Rubus in several blackberry and raspberry cultivars in the United States and subsequentl...

  10. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  11. Cucumber mosaic virus in Rubus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been reported on red raspberry in Chile, Scotland and the Soviet Union and in Chile on blackberry. Its occurrence in Rubus is rare and seems to cause little damage. Except for one early, unconfirmed report, CMV has not been reported on Rubus in North America. This vir...

  12. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic...

  13. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic...

  14. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic...

  15. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic...

  16. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. 174.514... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic...

  17. Genetic mechanisms of Maize dwarf mosaic virus resistance in maize

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize resistance to viruses has been well-characterized at the genetic level, and loci responsible for resistance to potyviruses including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), have been mapped in several ge...

  18. Predation Determines Different Selective Pressure on Pea Aphid Host Races in a Complex Agricultural Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Adalbert; Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2013-01-01

    Field assessments were conducted to examine the interplay between host plant and predation in complex agricultural mosaic on pea aphid clover and alfalfa races. In one experiment, we examined the relative fitness on clover race (CR) and alfalfa race (AR) pea aphids on broad bean, red clover and alfalfa alone. But because clover is typically grown in a more complex agricultural mosaic with alfalfa and broad bean, a second experiment was conducted to assess the fitness consequences under predation in a more complex agricultural field setting that also included potential apparent competition with AR pea aphids. In a third experiment we tested for the effect of differential host race density on the fitness of the other host race mediated by a predator effect. CR pea aphids always had fitness losses when on broad bean (had lower fitness on broad bean relative to red clover) and fitness benefits when on red clover (higher fitness on red clover relative to broad bean), whether or not in apparent competition with alfalfa race aphids on bean and alfalfa. AR suffered fitness loss on both alfalfa and bean in apparent competition with CR on clover. Therefore we can conclude that the predation rate between host races was highly asymmetrical. The complexity of the agricultural mosaic thus can influence prey selection by predators on different host plants. These may have evolutionary consequences through context dependent fitness benefits on particular host plants. PMID:23409081

  19. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  20. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  1. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  2. Virus Strains Causing Mosaic in Louisiana and Florida Sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mosaic caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), respectively, affects sugarcane in Louisiana and Florida. Between 2004 and 2007, surveys were conducted in both states to determine which virus and virus strains were causing mosaic of sugarcane. In Louisiana, leaf sam...

  3. Multiplex Real Time PCR For Detection of Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TRIMV) are widespread throughout the southwestern Great Plains states. Using conventional diagnostics such as Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assays (ELISA), these two viruses are commonly found together in infected wheat samples. Methods for m...

  4. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Viurus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully reduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystals grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were visually perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This stylized ribbon model shows the protein coat in white and the nucleic acid in yellow. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California at Irvin.

  5. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  6. Nucleotide sequence and infectious cDNA clone of the L1 isolate of Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Olsen, B S; Johansen, I E

    2001-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Pea seed-borne mosaic potyvirus isolate L1 has been determined from cloned virus cDNA. The PSbMV L1 genome is 9895 nucleotides in length excluding the poly(A) tail. Computer analysis of the sequence revealed a single long open reading frame (ORF) of 9594 nucleotides. The ORF potentially encodes a polyprotein of 3198 amino acids with a deduced Mr of 363537. Nine putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by analogy to consensus sequences and genome arrangement in other potyviruses. Two full-length cDNA clones, p35S-L1-4 and p35S-L1-5, were assembled under control of an enhanced 35S promoter and nopaline synthase terminator. Clone p35S-L1-4 was constructed with four introns and p35S-L1-5 with five introns inserted in the cDNA. Clone p35S-L1-4 was unstable in Escherichia coli often resulting in amplification of plasmids with deletions. Clone p35S-L1-5 was stable and apparently less toxic to Escherichia coli resulting in larger bacterial colonies and higher plasmid yield. Both clones were infectious upon mechanical inoculation of plasmid DNA on susceptible pea cultivars Fjord, Scout, and Brutus. Eight pea genotypes resistant to L1 virus were also resistant to the cDNA derived L1 virus. Both native PSbMV L1 and the cDNA derived virus infected Chenopodium quinoa systemically giving rise to characteristic necrotic lesions on uninoculated leaves.

  7. Diffraction studies of papaya mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Tollin, P; Bancroft, J B; Richardson, J F; Payne, N C; Beveridge, T J

    1979-10-15

    X-ray and optical diffraction studies of the flexuous papaya mosaic virus are described. The virus is constructed so that there are 35 coat protein subunits in 4 turns of the helix. The virus contains about 1410 protein subunits and 6800 nucleotides and has a molecular weight of about 33 x 10(6). The structure of tubes assembled in vitro from coat protein both in the presence and absence of nucleic acid resembles that of the native virus.

  8. Triticum mosaic virus isolates in the southern Great Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2006, a Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV)-resistant wheat variety RonL was found to have mosaic symptoms similar to WSMV. The virus inducing the symptoms was determined to be previously unknown and given the name Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV). Since, TriMV has been found in plant samples isolate...

  9. Wheat Genotypes With Combined Resistance to Wheat Curl Mite, Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus, Wheat Mosaic Virus, and Triticum Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Wen-Po; Rojas, Lina Maria Aguirre; Khalaf, Luaay Kahtan; Zhang, Guorong; Fritz, Allan K; Whitfield, Anna E; Smith, C Michael

    2017-01-13

    The wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer, (WCM) is a global pest of bread wheat that reduces yields significantly. In addition, WCM carries Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, family Potyviridae, genus Tritimovirus), the most significant wheat virus in North America; High Plains wheat mosaic virus (HPWMoV, genus Emaravirus, formerly High plains virus); and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, family Potyviridae, genus Poacevirus). Viruses carried by WCM have reduced wheat yields throughout the U.S. Great Plains for >50 yr, with average yield losses of 2-3% and occasional yield losses of 7-10%. Acaricides are ineffective against WCM, and delayed planting of winter wheat is not feasible. Five wheat breeding lines containing Cmc4, a WCM resistance gene from Aegilops tauschii, and Wsm2, a WSMV resistance gene from wheat germplasm CO960293-2 were selected from the breeding process and assessed for phenotypic reaction to WCM feeding, population increase, and the degree of WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection. Experiments determined that all five lines are resistant to WCM biotype 1 feeding and population increase, and that two breeding lines contain resistance to WSMV, HPWMoV, and TriMV infection as well. These WCM-, WSMV-, HPWMoV-, and TriMV-resistant genotypes can be used improve management of wheat yield losses from WCM-virus complexes.

  10. Tobacco mosaic virus: Proof by synthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A linear, non-self-replicating DNA molecule encoding Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was enzymatically synthesized in vitro from DNA templates made from overlapping oligonucleotides. The molecule was a replica of the alphabetic text rendering of the first TMV genome sequence elucidated by Goelet et al. ...

  11. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  12. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High Plains disease of wheat and maize emerged in the United States in 1993 and its distribution has expanded in subsequent years. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of disease. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus...

  13. Infection of Plants by Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Larry; Maratos, Marina; Farabaugh, Joan

    1998-01-01

    Provides three exercises that introduce high school and college students to a common strain of the tobacco mosaic virus and the study of some basic biological processes. Activities involve inoculation of plants and observing and recording symptom development in infected plants. (DDR)

  14. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  15. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  16. An Experimental Host Range of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus isolated from wheat. This study was conducted to determine an experimental host range for TriMV and identify species that could serve as differential hosts for isolating TriMV from Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV). Plants tested were mechan...

  17. Subassembly aggregates of papaya mosaic virus protein.

    PubMed

    Erickson, J W; Hallett, F R; Bancroft, J B

    1983-08-01

    An examination of the number of subunits in small aggregates of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) coat protein is presented based on a model system which gives results consistent with the experimental observation that the 14 S subassembly species is a double disc, composed of two rows of nine subunits each. The estimated hydration of the disc, about 0.85 g 1H20/9 protein, is unusually large and indicates a cavitated structure for the disc. Comparison with other rod-shaped viruses suggests that the flexuous nature of PMV is a consequence of sparse axial inter-subunit contacts at high radius.

  18. Response of maize (Zea mays L.) lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to the potyviruses Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize dwarf mosaic disease is one of the most important viral diseases of maize throughout the world. It is caused by a set of related viruses in the family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), and S...

  19. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Williams, Dewight; Bian, Wen; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  20. Genetic diversity of viruses causing mosaic in Louisiana sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mosaic caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) contributed to the near collapse of Louisiana’s sugarcane industry in the early 20th Century. By the 1950s, the cultivation of resistant cultivars eliminated mosaic as a major disease problem; however, new strains arose among previously resistant cultiv...

  1. Flow visualization using tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, David L.; Goreau, Thomas J.; Bush, John W. M.

    2009-03-01

    A flow visualization technique using dilute solutions of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is described. Rod-shaped TMV-particles align with shear, an effect that produces a luminous interference pattern when the TMV solution is viewed between crossed polarizers. Attractive features of this technique are that it is both transparent to the naked eye and benign to fish. We use it here to visualize the evolution and decay of the flows that they produce. We also report that dilute solutions of Kalliroscope are moderately birefringent and so may similarly be used for qualitative in situ flow visualizations.

  2. Host susceptibility of the papaya mosaic virus in Sri Lanka.

    PubMed

    Rajapakse, R H; Herath, H M

    1981-01-01

    75 plant species from 11 families were tested in Sri Lanka for their susceptibility to transferring the papaya mosaic virus. After inoculation with this virus, six species, Cucurbita pepo, Cucumis sativus, Nicotiana tabacum, Chenopodium amaranticolor, Gomphrena globosa and Lycopersicum esculentum, developed such symptoms, and after re-isolation from the host plant the virus again infected papaya plants. Thus these species are possible alternate hosts of papaya mosaic virus in Sri Lanka.

  3. Molecular variation of hop mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Poke, Fiona S; Crowle, Damian R; Whittock, Simon P; Wilson, Calum R

    2010-10-01

    Hop mosaic virus (HpMV), a member of the genus Carlavirus, is importance to hop production worldwide. We identified variation in nucleic and amino acid sequences among 23 HpMV isolates from Australia, the USA, the Czech Republic, South Africa and Japan using a 1,455-bp fragment covering the 3' end of the virus genome including ORFs 4, 5 and 6. Three clusters of two or more isolates were identified in phylogenies of the total nucleotide sequence and the coat protein (ORF5) amino acid sequence. Two of these clusters combined in analyses of ORF4 and ORF6 amino acid sequences. Isolates from within and outside of Australia were found in each cluster, indicating that sequence variation was not associated with geographic source. Monitoring of HpMV variants in the field and evaluation of the impact of variants on vector association, rate of spread, and hop yield and quality can now be undertaken.

  4. Cowpea mosaic virus: the plant virus-based biotechnology workhorse.

    PubMed

    Sainsbury, Frank; Cañizares, M Carmen; Lomonossoff, George P

    2010-01-01

    In the 50 years since it was first described, Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has become one of the most intensely studied plant viruses. Research in the past 15 to 20 years has shifted from studying the underlying genetics and structure of the virus to focusing on ways in which it can be exploited in biotechnology. This work led first to the use of virus particles to present peptides, then to the creation of a variety of replicating virus vectors and finally to the development of a highly efficient protein expression system that does not require viral replication. The circle has been completed by the use of the latter system to create empty particles for peptide presentation and other novel uses. The history of CPMV in biotechnology can be likened to an Ouroborus, an ancient symbol depicting a snake or dragon swallowing its own tail, thus forming a circle.

  5. Effects of single and double infections of winter wheat by Triticum mosaic virus and Wheat streak mosaic virus on yield determinants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. It is transmitted by wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella Keifer) which also transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Wheat mosaic virus. In a gree...

  6. Nucleotide sequence of papaya mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Sit, T L; Abouhaidar, M G; Holy, S

    1989-09-01

    The RNA genome of papaya mosaic virus is 6656 nucleotides long [excluding the poly(A) tail] with six open reading frames (ORFs) more than 200 nucleotides long. The four nearest the 5' end each overlap with adjacent ORFs and could code for proteins with Mr 176307, 26248, 11949 and 7224 (ORFs 1 to 4). The fifth ORF produces the capsid protein of Mr 23043 and the sixth ORF, located completely within ORF1, could code for a protein with Mr 14113. The translation products of ORFs 1 to 3 show strong similarity with those of other potexviruses but the ORF 4 protein has only limited similarity with the other potexvirus ORF 4 proteins of 7K to 11K.

  7. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses.

  8. Inheritance of resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus and watermelon mosaic virus in watermelon.

    PubMed

    Xu, Y; Kang, D; Shi, Z; Shen, H; Wehner, T

    2004-01-01

    High resistance to zucchini yellow mosaic virus-China strain (ZYMV-CH) and moderate resistance to watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) were found in a selection of PI 595203 (Citrullus lanatus var. lanatus), an Egusi type originally collected in Nigeria. Mixed inoculations showed primarily that these two viruses have no cross-protection. This fact may explain the high frequency of mixed infection often observed in commercial fields. When plants were inoculated with a mixture of the two viruses, the frequency of plants resistant to ZYMV was lower than expected, indicating that WMV infection may reduce the ability of a plant to resist ZYMV. We studied inheritance of resistance to ZYMV-CH and WMV, using crosses between a single-plant selection of PI 595203 and the ZYMV-susceptible watermelon inbreds 9811 and 98R. According to virus ratings of the susceptible parents, the resistant parent, and the F1, F2, and BC1 generations, resistance to ZYMV-CH was conferred by a single recessive gene, for which the symbol zym-CH is suggested. The high tolerance to WMV was controlled by at least two recessive genes.

  9. Molecular characterization and population structure of Blueberry mosaic associated virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberry mosaic disease was first described in the 1950s but the causal agent has not been characterized to date. Next generation sequencing was employed in the identification of the causal agent and an undescribed ophiovirus, tentatively named as Blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), was dete...

  10. Paspalum striate mosaic virus: an Australian mastrevirus from Paspalum dilatatum.

    PubMed

    Geering, Andrew D W; Thomas, John E; Holton, Timothy; Hadfield, James; Varsani, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Three monocot-infecting mastreviruses from Australia, all found primarily in pasture and naturalised grasses, have been characterised at the molecular level. Here, we present the full genome sequence of a fourth, Paspalum striate mosaic virus (PSMV), isolated from Paspalum dilatatum from south-east Queensland. The genome was 2816 nt long and had an organisation typical of other monocot-infecting mastreviruses. Its nearest relative is Bromus cartharticus striate mosaic virus (BCSMV), with which it shares an overall genome identity of 75%. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genome and each of the putative viral proteins places PSMV in a group with the other three Australian striate mosaic viruses. PSMV, BCSMV and Digitaria didactyla striate mosaic virus all contain a similar, small recombinant sequence in the small intergenic region.

  11. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-02-02

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat and maize. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus evaded thorough molecular characterization for many years due to the experimental challenges of mite transmission and manipulating multisegmented negative sense RNA genomes. Recently, the complete genome sequence of a Nebraska isolate of WMoV revealed eight segments, plus a variant sequence of the nucleocapsid protein-encoding segment. Here, near-complete and partial consensus sequences of five more WMoV isolates are reported and compared to the Nebraska isolate: an Ohio maize isolate (GG1), a Kansas barley isolate (KS7), and three Ohio wheat isolates (H1, K1, W1). Results show two distinct groups of WMoV isolates: Ohio wheat isolate RNA segments had 84% or lower nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate, whereas GG1 and KS7 had 98% or higher nucleotide sequence identity to the NE isolate. Knowledge of the sequence variability of WMoV isolates is a step toward understanding virus biology, and potentially explaining observed biological variation.

  12. Phase diagram of tobacco mosaic virus solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Hartmut; Löwen, Hartmut

    1999-02-01

    The phase behavior of an aqueous suspension of rodlike tobacco mosaic viruses is investigated theoretically as a function of the virus density and the concentration of added salt. The total free energy involves ``volume terms'' from the microscopic counter- and co-ions and an effective pair interaction between the colloidal rods described by a Yukawa-segment model according to linear screening theory. Within a thermodynamic perturbation approach, the short-range repulsion between the rods is mapped onto a reference system of effective hard spherocylinders. The free energy of the spherocylinder system is gained from combining a cell model with scaled particle theory, which yields a reasonable phase diagram. The remaining long-range interaction is treated within a mean-field approximation. As a result we find stable fluid, nematic, and smectic phases as well as AAA- and ABC-stacked crystals. For increasing salt concentration at fixed rod concentration, there is a nematic reentrant transition. We finally discuss our results in view of experimental data.

  13. Occurrance in Korea of three major soybean viruses, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) revealed by a nationwide survey of soybean fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) were recently isolated in Korea, and it hasn’t been reported how these two viruses were dispersed in Korea. In 2012, we performed a nationwide survey of subsistence soybean farms in Korea. Leaves that appeared ...

  14. Maize dwarf mosaic disease in different regions of China is caused by Sugarcane mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, J X; Zhou, X P

    2002-12-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) was detected in all 62 maize samples collected from eight maize-growing provinces in China showing dwarf mosaic symptoms by immunocapture reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), however, were not detected in any of the samples by RT-PCR. Eleven cDNA fragments of approximately 0.8 kilobases covering most of the coat protein (CP) gene of SCMV were sequenced and sequence analysis indicates that these eleven isolates share 98.1 to 100 % identity at the amino acid level. Sequence comparison and phylogenetic analysis of the CP genes from the eleven Chinese isolates as well as 21 SCMV subgroup virus isolates indicate that the eleven Chinese virus isolates were closely related to SCMV with 97.0 to 98.1 % sequence identity at the amino acid level, while relatively lower sequence identity was found with MDWV, SrMV or JGMV. The results indicate that the Chinese isolates are members of the SCMV species, and thus, SCMV can be considered as the most common and important potyvirus infecting maize in China.

  15. Characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Solanki, Vikas; Verma, H N; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-10-01

    Frangipani mosaic virus (FrMV) is known to infect frangipani tree (Plumeria rubra f. acutifolia) in India but the virus has not been characterized at genomic level and diagnosis is not available. In the present study, an isolate of FrMV (FrMV-Ind-1) showing greenish mosaic and vein-banding symptoms in P. rubra f. acutifolia in New Delhi was characterized based on host reactions, serology and genome sequence. The virus isolate induced local symptoms on several new experimental host species: Capsicum annuum (chilli), Nicotiana benthamiana, Solanum lycopersicum and S. melongena. N. benthamiana could be used as an efficient propagation host as it developed systemic mottle mosaic symptoms all round the year. The genome of FrMV-Ind-1 was 6643 (JN555602) nucleotides long with genome organization similar to tobamoviruses. The Indian isolate of FrMV shared a very close genome sequence identity (98.3 %) with the lone isolate of FrMV-P from Australia. FrMV-Ind-1 together with FrMV-P formed a new phylogenetic group i.e. Apocynaceae-infecting tobamovirus. The polyclonal antiserum generated through the purified virus preparation was successfully utilized to detect the virus in field samples of frangipani by ELISA. Of the eight different tobamoviruses tested, FrMV-Ind-1 shared distant serological relationships with only cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, bell pepper mottle virus and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus. RT-PCR based on coat protein gene primer successfully detected the virus in frangipani plants. This study is the first comprehensive description of FrMV occurring in India.

  16. First report of apple mosaic virus in Alaska

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Apple mosaic virus (ApMV, family Bromoviridae, genus Ilarvirus) is one of the oldest and most economically important viruses of apples (Malus x domestica Borkh.). Yield losses may vary from negligible to as high as fifty percent, depending on the affected cultivar. Although ApMV is found worldwide...

  17. Zucchini tigre mosaic virus infection of cucurbits in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zucchini tigre mosaic virus (ZTMV) was identified infecting cucurbits in Florida in 2002 and again in 2015. This is the first report of ZTMV in the U.S. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants, and research and regulatory scientists....

  18. Complete genome sequences of Maize dwarf mosaic and Sugarcane mosaic virus isolates coinfecting maize in Spain.

    PubMed

    Achon, M A; Serrano, L; Alonso-Dueñas, N; Porta, C

    2007-01-01

    The genomes of Spanish isolates of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV-Sp) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV-Sp) were completely sequenced. Nucleotide sequence identities of SCMV-Sp to those of other SCMV isolates ranged from 79 to 90%. MDMV-Sp shared 85% nucleotide identity with the only other fully sequenced isolate of MDMV. MDMV-Sp and SCMV-Sp differed from each other by 31% in their nucleotide sequences. Phylogenetic analyses showed that SCMV isolates group by host rather than by geographical location. Two significant recombination signals were identified in the NIa and NIb regions of the SCMV-Sp genome.

  19. Wheat Cultivar-Specific Disease Synergism and Alteration of Virus Accumulation During Co-Infection with Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), the type member of the newly proposed Poacevirus genus and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae, infect wheat naturally in the Great Plains and are transmitted by wheat curl mites. In this study, we examined ...

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Tomato Mosaic Virus Isolated from Jasmine in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara

    2015-01-01

    Tomato mosaic virus was reported from jasmine in Florida. We present the first complete genome sequence of a tomato mosaic virus isolate from this woody perennial plant in the United States. PMID:26159525

  1. Detection of Corchorus golden mosaic virus Associated with Yellow Mosaic Disease of Jute (Corchorus capsularis).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Palit, Paramita; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2012-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease, caused by a whitefly transmitted New World Begomovirus, named Corchorus golden mosaic virus (CoGMV), is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for jute fibre production in Asia. For rapid and sensitive diagnosis of the Begomovirus associated with this disease, a non-radiolabelled diagnostic probe, developed against the DNA A component of the east Indian isolate of CoGMV, detected the presence of the virus in infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies following Southern hybridization and nucleic acid spot hybridization tests. Presence of the virus was also confirmed when polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using virus-specific primers on DNA templates isolated from infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies.

  2. Virus-derived transgenes expressing hairpin RNA give immunity to Tobacco mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background An effective method for obtaining resistant transgenic plants is to induce RNA silencing by expressing virus-derived dsRNA in plants and this method has been successfully implemented for the generation of different plant lines resistant to many plant viruses. Results Inverted repeats of the partial Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) gene and the partial Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) replication protein (Rep) gene were introduced into the plant expression vector and the recombinant plasmids were transformed into Agrobacterium tumefaciens. Agrobacterium-mediated transformation was carried out and three transgenic tobacco lines (MP16-17-3, MP16-17-29 and MP16-17-58) immune to TMV infection and three transgenic tobacco lines (Rep15-1-1, Rep15-1-7 and Rep15-1-32) immune to CMV infection were obtained. Virus inoculation assays showed that the resistance of these transgenic plants could inherit and keep stable in T4 progeny. The low temperature (15℃) did not influence the resistance of transgenic plants. There was no significant correlation between the resistance and the copy number of the transgene. CMV infection could not break the resistance to TMV in the transgenic tobacco plants expressing TMV hairpin MP RNA. Conclusions We have demonstrated that transgenic tobacco plants expressed partial TMV movement gene and partial CMV replicase gene in the form of an intermolecular intron-hairpin RNA exhibited complete resistance to TMV or CMV infection. PMID:21269519

  3. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  4. Development of a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for the detection of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus in sugarcane

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was developed for detecting Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) in sugarcane. Six sets of four primers corresponding to the conserved coat protein gene were designed for each virus and their succ...

  5. Natural recombination between tobacco and tomato mosaic viruses.

    PubMed

    He, Mei; He, Cheng-Qiang; Ding, Nai-Zheng

    2012-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a positive-sense plant RNA virus which has a wide host range and a worldwide distribution. Other than a troublesome pathogen, TMV is regarded as a model system pioneering biologic research for a century. The tomato strain of TMV has been recognized to be a distinct tobamovirus as the tomato mosaic virus (ToMV). Recombination has been increasingly recognized as an important factor generating genetic diversity in many RNA viruses. However, it is still unclear whether recombination can function in driving the evolution of tobamoviruses. Herein, based on sequence comparison, we found three recombinants involving each viral gene, all of which might be derived from homologous or aberrant homologous recombination between TMV and ToMV. The study provided evidence that recombination did contribute to the genetic diversity of tobamoviruses.

  6. Sequence variability between Plantago asiatica mosaic virus isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Plantago asiatica mosaic virus (PlAMV) was described four decades ago from the weedy species Plantago asiatica in the Russian Far East, but has also been reported from lilies (Lilium spp.) and primrose (Primula seiboldii) in Japan. More recently PlAMV has been reported in the Netherlands and elsewhe...

  7. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  8. Dalmatian toadflax (Linaria dalmatica): New host for cucumber mosaic virus

    Treesearch

    Courtney L. Pariera Dinkins; Sue K. Brumfield; Robert K. D. Peterson; William E. Grey; Sharlene E. Sing

    2007-01-01

    To date, there have been no reports of Dalmatian toadflax serving as a host for cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infestations of Dalmatian toadflax may serve as a reservoir of CMV, thereby facilitating aphid transmission of CMV to both agricultural crops and native plants. The goal of this study was to determine whether Dalmatian toadflax is a host for CMV. Dalmatian...

  9. Variability in alternanthera mosaic virus isolates from different hosts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We have determined the complete genome sequences of Alternanthera mosaic virus phlox isolate PA (AltMV-PA) and four infectious clone variants derived from AltMV-SP, as well as partial sequences of other isolates from various types of phlox, and from portulaca, nandina, and cineraria. Phylogenetic co...

  10. Wheat streak mosaic virus resistance in eight wheat germplasm lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus (WSMV) disease is an important disease in wheat. Use of resistant cultivars is the most effective approach to reduce the yield losses caused by the disease. To identify new sources of resistance to WSMV, eight resistant wheat lines that were selected based on the results fr...

  11. Agropyron mosaic virus detected in Ohio wheat (Triticum aestivum)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Agropyron mosaic virus (AgMV) was identified in Ohio wheat during a 2016 field survey by RNA-Seq. AgMV was confirmed in 3 counties by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and transmitted to wheat. Isolated Ohio AgMV infected wheat, ryegrass, and rye, but not oat, maize, sorghum, or orcha...

  12. PCNA Interacts with Indian Mung Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus Rep and Downregulates Rep Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bagewadi, Basavaraj; Chen, Shoajiang; Lal, Sunil K.; Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Mukherjee, Sunil K.

    2004-01-01

    Proliferative cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), a conserved plant protein as well as an important replication factor, is induced in response to geminivirus infection in the resting cells of the phloem tissues. The biochemical role of PCNA in rolling circle replication (RCR) of geminivirus DNA has not been explored in detail. The initiation of RCR of the bipartite genome of a geminivirus, Indian mung bean yellow mosaic virus (IMYMV), is mainly controlled by viral protein Rep (or AL1 or AC1). The role of host PCNA in RCR of IMYMV was revealed by studying the physical and functional interactions between recombinant PCNA and recombinant IMYMV Rep. Pea nuclear PCNA as well as recombinant pea PCNA showed binding to recombinant Rep in experiments involving both affinity chromatography and yeast two-hybrid approaches. The contacting amino acid residues of PCNA seemed to be present throughout a wide region of the trimeric protein, while those of Rep appeared to be localized only in the middle part of the protein. The site-specific nicking-closing activity and the ATPase function of IMYMV Rep were impaired by PCNA. These observations lead to interesting speculations about the control of viral RCR and dynamic profiles of protein-protein interactions at the RCR origin of the geminiviruses. PMID:15479830

  13. First report of Sugarcane mosaic virus infecting Columbus Grass (Sorghum almum) in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Mosaic symptoms in sorghum can be caused by several potyviruses [family Potyviridae], including Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). SrMV and SCMV are responsible for global economic losses in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane. Ten plants of Columbus grass (Sorghum almum) exhib...

  14. Role of wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded proteins in disease development

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are the type species of Tritimovirus and Poacevirus genera, respectively, in the family Potyviridae. TriMV and WSMV exhibit differential symptom phenotypes on wheat: TriMV elicits mild mosaic and mottling ...

  15. Spiranthes Mosaic Virus 3 and Bidens Mottle Virus,Two Potyviruses Detected in Phlox divaricata

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This is the first report of Spiranthes mosaic virus in Florida and the first report of Bidens mottle virus in Phlox divaricata. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  16. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is a bipartite single stranded positive sense RNA virus with rigid-rod shaped virions. Taxonomically the virus is in the family Viragviridae, as are commonly used gene silencing or expression viral vectors, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Barley stripe mosaic viru...

  17. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  18. Recombination analysis of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin

    2015-02-01

    Recombination among RNA viruses is a natural phenomenon that appears to have played a significant role in the species development and the evolution of many strains. It also has particular significance for the risk assessment of plants which have been genetically modified for disease resistance by incorporating viral sequences into their genomes. However, the exact recombination events taking place in viral genomes are not investigated in detail for many virus groups. In this analysis, different single-stranded positive-sense RNA potyviruses were compared using various in silico recombination detection methods and new recombination events in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup were detected. For an extended in silico recombination analysis, two of the analyzed Maize dwarf mosaic virus full-length genomes were sequenced additionally during this work. These results strengthen the evidence that recombination is a major driving force in virus evolution, and the emergence of new virus variants in the SCMV subgroup, paired with mutations, could generate viruses with altered biological properties. The intra- and interspecific homolog recombinations seem to be a general trait in this virus group, causing little or no changes to the amino acid of the progenies. However, we found a few breakpoints between the members of SCMV subgroup and the weed-infecting distant relatives, but only a few methods of the RDP3 package predicted these events with low significance level.

  19. Quantitative and Qualitative Involvement of P3N-PIPO in Overcoming Recessive Resistance against Clover Yellow Vein Virus in Pea Carrying the cyv1 Gene

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Sun Hee; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Atsumi, Go; Shimada, Ryoko; Hisa, Yusuke; Naito, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    In pea carrying cyv1, a recessive gene for resistance to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV), ClYVV isolate Cl-no30 was restricted to the initially infected cells, whereas isolate 90-1 Br2 overcame this resistance. We mapped the region responsible for breaking of cyv1-mediated resistance by examining infection of cyv1 pea with chimeric viruses constructed from parts of Cl-no30 and 90-1 Br2. The breaking of resistance was attributed to the P3 cistron, which is known to produce two proteins: P3, from the main open reading frame (ORF), and P3N-PIPO, which has the N-terminal part of P3 fused to amino acids encoded by a small open reading frame (ORF) called PIPO in the +2 reading frame. We introduced point mutations that were synonymous with respect to the P3 protein but nonsynonymous with respect to the P3N-PIPO protein, and vice versa, into the chimeric viruses. Infection of plants with these mutant viruses revealed that both P3 and P3N-PIPO were involved in overcoming cyv1-mediated resistance. Moreover, P3N-PIPO quantitatively affected the virulence of Cl-no30 in cyv1 pea. Additional expression in trans of the P3N-PIPO derived from Cl-no30, using White clover mosaic virus as a vector, enabled Cl-no30 to move to systemic leaves in cyv1 pea. Susceptible pea plants infected with chimeric ClYVV possessing the P3 cistron of 90-1 Br2, and which were therefore virulent toward cyv1 pea, accumulated more P3N-PIPO than did those infected with Cl-no30, suggesting that the higher level of P3N-PIPO in infected cells contributed to the breaking of resistance by 90-1 Br2. This is the first report showing that P3N-PIPO is a virulence determinant in plants resistant to a potyvirus. PMID:23616656

  20. Quantitative and qualitative involvement of P3N-PIPO in overcoming recessive resistance against Clover yellow vein virus in pea carrying the cyv1 gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Hee; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Nakahara, Kenji S; Atsumi, Go; Shimada, Ryoko; Hisa, Yusuke; Naito, Satoshi; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2013-07-01

    In pea carrying cyv1, a recessive gene for resistance to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV), ClYVV isolate Cl-no30 was restricted to the initially infected cells, whereas isolate 90-1 Br2 overcame this resistance. We mapped the region responsible for breaking of cyv1-mediated resistance by examining infection of cyv1 pea with chimeric viruses constructed from parts of Cl-no30 and 90-1 Br2. The breaking of resistance was attributed to the P3 cistron, which is known to produce two proteins: P3, from the main open reading frame (ORF), and P3N-PIPO, which has the N-terminal part of P3 fused to amino acids encoded by a small open reading frame (ORF) called PIPO in the +2 reading frame. We introduced point mutations that were synonymous with respect to the P3 protein but nonsynonymous with respect to the P3N-PIPO protein, and vice versa, into the chimeric viruses. Infection of plants with these mutant viruses revealed that both P3 and P3N-PIPO were involved in overcoming cyv1-mediated resistance. Moreover, P3N-PIPO quantitatively affected the virulence of Cl-no30 in cyv1 pea. Additional expression in trans of the P3N-PIPO derived from Cl-no30, using White clover mosaic virus as a vector, enabled Cl-no30 to move to systemic leaves in cyv1 pea. Susceptible pea plants infected with chimeric ClYVV possessing the P3 cistron of 90-1 Br2, and which were therefore virulent toward cyv1 pea, accumulated more P3N-PIPO than did those infected with Cl-no30, suggesting that the higher level of P3N-PIPO in infected cells contributed to the breaking of resistance by 90-1 Br2. This is the first report showing that P3N-PIPO is a virulence determinant in plants resistant to a potyvirus.

  1. Gentian mosaic virus: A New Species in the Genus Fabavirus.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y O; Kobayashi, A; Hagiwara, K; Uga, H; Mikoshiba, Y; Naito, T; Honda, Y; Omura, T

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT A viral isolate, designated N-1 and obtained from a gentian (Gentiana scabra) plant that exhibited mosaic symptoms, was transmitted mechanically to nine plant species in six families. These plants are known as hosts of fabaviruses. The N-1 isolate was composed of isometric particles 30 nm in diameter and included two RNA molecules of approximately 6.0 and 3.6 kb in length, as estimated by agarose gel electrophoresis. The RNAs were encapsidated separately in two of the three types of particle. Each particle contained two distinct proteins with Mr values of 39.3 x 10(3) and 26.6 x 10(3), as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Analysis of complete nucleotide sequences of the RNAs suggested that each encoded a single large polyprotein, in which putative functional proteins were arranged in a manner similar to those in Broad bean wilt virus 1 (BBWV-1) and Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV-2), which are members of the genus Fabavirus (family Comoviridae). Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the proteins indicated that those of isolate N-1 shared 38 to 66% identity with those of BBWV-1 and BBWV-2 but only 16 to 42% identity with those of a comovirus, Cowpea mosaic virus. Phylogenetic analysis, based on the amino acid sequences of RNA polymerase, placed isolate N-1 in a separate lineage from BBWV-1 and BBWV-2. In indirect-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, isolate N-1 exhibited distant serological relationship to BBWV-1, BBWV-2, and Lamium mild mosaic virus, another fabavirus. Our results suggest that N-1 represents a new species of Fabavirus. We propose the name Gentian mosaic virus for this new species.

  2. Impact of Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus co-infection of wheat on transmission rates by wheat curl mites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are transmitted by the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer). Previous work has shown that different mite genotypes transmit TriMV at different rates. The objective of this research was to determine if mite genotypes differ...

  3. RNA: protein interactions associated with satellites of panicum mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Desvoyes, B; Scholthof, K B

    2000-11-17

    The interactions between satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) capsid protein (CP) and its 824 nucleotide (nt) single stranded RNA were investigated by gel mobility shift assay and Northwestern blot assay. SPMV CP has specificity for its RNA at high affinity, but little affinity for non-viral RNA. The SPMV CP also bound a 350 nt satellite RNA (satRNA) that, like SPMV, is dependent on panicum mosaic virus for its replication. SPMV CP has the novel property of encapsidating SPMV RNA and satRNA. Competition gel mobility shift assays performed with a non-viral RNA and unlabeled SPMV RNA and satRNA revealed that these RNA:protein interactions were in part sequence specific.

  4. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) inhibitors from Picrasma quassioides Benn.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia; Yan, Xiao-Hui; Dong, Jia-Hong; Sang, Peng; Fang, Xin; Di, Ying-Tong; Zhang, Zhong-Kai; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2009-08-12

    To investigate natural inhibitors against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) from plants, 10 known beta-carboline alkaloids and one quassinoid have been isolated from MeOH extract of the wood of Picrasma quassioides Benn. These compounds were screened for their inhibitory activities against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The activity of each compound against TMV infection and replication was tested using a half-leaf assay method, a leaf-disk method, and Western blotting analyses. All of the beta-carboline alkaloids showed moderate anti-TMV activities and exhibited synergistic effects when combined with the quassinoid nigakilactone B (11). To our knowledge, this is the first report on anti-TMV activity of beta-carbolines and their synergistic effects against TMV when combined with a quassinoid.

  5. Catharanthus mosaic virus: A potyvirus from a gymnosperm, Welwitschia mirabilis.

    PubMed

    Koh, Shu Hui; Li, Hua; Admiraal, Ryan; Jones, Michael G K; Wylie, Stephen J

    2015-05-04

    A virus from a symptomatic plant of the gymnosperm Welwitschia mirabilis Hook. growing as an ornamental plant in a domestic garden in Western Australia was inoculated to a plant of Nicotiana benthamiana where it established a systemic infection. The complete genome sequence of 9636 nucleotides was determined using high-throughput and Sanger sequencing technologies. The genome sequence shared greatest identity (83% nucleotides and 91% amino acids) with available partial sequences of catharanthus mosaic virus, indicating that the new isolate belonged to that taxon. Analysis of the phylogeny of the complete virus sequence placed it in a monotypic group in the genus Potyvirus. This is the first record of a virus from W. mirabilis, the first complete genome sequence of catharanthus mosaic virus determined, and the first record from Australia. This finding illustrates the risk to natural and managed systems posed by the international trade in live plants and propagules, which enables viruses to establish in new regions and infect new hosts. Crown Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Single- and double-stranded viral RNAs in plants infected with the potexviruses papaya mosaic virus and foxtail mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mackie, G A; Johnston, R; Bancroft, J B

    1988-01-01

    Three classes of viral RNA were recovered from polyribosomes purified from papaya leaves infected with papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and from barley leaves infected with foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV): full-length viral RNAs [6.8 and 6.2 kilobases (kb), respectively]; less abundant intermediate subgenomic RNAs (2.2 and 1.9 kb), and abundant, small subgenomic RNAs (1 and 0.9 kb). Small amounts of the PapMV-specified 1.0-kb subgenomic RNA were encapsidated, whereas no encapsidated subgenomic RNAs could be found in preparations of FoMV. Immunoprecipitation of the products of in vitro translation of the small subgenomic RNA of both viruses showed that it codes for the corresponding viral coat protein. FoMV genomic RNA isolated from polyribosomes also directed the efficient synthesis of a 37- to 38-kilodalton protein which was immunoprecipitated by an antiserum raised against the coat protein. We presume this product to be a readthrough protein initiated to the 5' side of and in the same reading frame as the coat protein-coding sequences in FoMV RNA. The predominant double-stranded viral-specified RNAs in tissues infected with PapMV, FoMV, and clover yellow mosaic virus were genome sized (6.8, 6.2, and 7.0 kb pairs, respectively). If double-stranded RNAs corresponding to coat protein subgenomic RNAs exist, they must be present in much lower relative abundances.

  7. Cytological modifications in maize plants infected by barley yellow dwarf virus and maize dwarf mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Musetti, R; Bruni, L; Favali, M A

    2002-01-01

    Three inbred lines of maize (33-16, MO17 and B73) differing in their susceptibility to Barley yellow dwarf virus and Maize dwarf mosaic virus were studied to compare the ultrastructural modifications induced by the two viruses in leaf tissues of different age. The results demonstrate that the alterations induced by the two viruses in the different maize lines could depend on the particular line tested.

  8. Precise determination of the helical repeat of tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Stubbs, Gerald

    2007-12-05

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 A. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-} 0.03 A by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  9. Precise Determination of the Helical Repeat of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, A.; McDonald, M.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 {angstrom}. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-}0.03 {angstrom} by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  10. Fixation of Emerging Interviral Recombinants in Cucumber Mosaic Virus Populations

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.

    2013-01-01

    Interstrain recombinants were observed in the progenies of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) reassortant L1L2F3 containing RNAs 1 and 2 from LS-CMV and RNA 3 from Fny-CMV. We characterized these recombinants, and we found that their fixation was controlled by the nature of the replicating RNAs 1 and 2. We demonstrate that the 2b gene partially affects this fixation process, but only in the context of homologous RNAs 1 and 2. PMID:23115282

  11. Blueberry mosaic associated virus – A putative, new member of Ophioviridae

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Blueberry mosaic initially was reported more than 50 years ago and is now known from different parts of the world. A new virus, closely associated with the disease has been identified recently. The virus tentatively named as Blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), is a putative member of the gen...

  12. Molecular, serological and biological characterization of the emerging tomato mottle mosaic virus on tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    For many years, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) are the two major tobamoviruses that have a serious impact on tomato productions worldwide. These seed-borne and mechanically transmitted viruses are difficult to control. The most effective disease management has been the u...

  13. High sequence conservation among cucumber mosaic virus isolates from lily.

    PubMed

    Chen, Y K; Derks, A F; Langeveld, S; Goldbach, R; Prins, M

    2001-08-01

    For classification of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates from ornamental crops of different geographical areas, these were characterized by comparing the nucleotide sequences of RNAs 4 and the encoded coat proteins. Within the ornamental-infecting CMV viruses both subgroups were represented. CMV isolates of Alstroemeria and crocus were classified as subgroup II isolates, whereas 8 other isolates, from lily, gladiolus, amaranthus, larkspur, and lisianthus, were identified as subgroup I members. In general, nucleotide sequence comparisons correlated well with geographic distribution, with one notable exception: the analyzed nucleotide sequences of 5 lily isolates showed remarkably high homology despite different origins.

  14. Beijerinck's work on tobacco mosaic virus: historical context and legacy.

    PubMed

    Bos, L

    1999-03-29

    Beijerinck's entirely new concept, launched in 1898, of a filterable contagium vivum fluidum which multiplied in close association with the host's metabolism and was distributed in phloem vessels together with plant nutrients, did not match the then prevailing bacteriological germ theory. At the time, tools and concepts to handle such a new kind of agent (the viruses) were non-existent. Beijerinck's novel idea, therefore, did not revolutionize biological science or immediately alter human understanding of contagious diseases. That is how bacteriological dogma persisted, as voiced by Loeffler and Frosch when showing the filterability of an animal virus (1898), and especially by Ivanovsky who had already in 1892 detected filterability of the agent of tobacco mosaic but kept looking for a microbe and finally (1903) claimed its multiplication in an artificial medium. The dogma was also strongly advocated by Roux in 1903 when writing the first review on viruses, which he named 'so-called "invisible" microbes', unwittingly including the agent of bovine pleuropneumonia, only much later proved to be caused by a mycoplasma. In 1904, Baur was the first to advocate strongly the chemical view of viruses. But uncertainty about the true nature of viruses, with their similarities to enzymes and genes, continued until the 1930s when at long last tobacco mosaic virus particles were isolated as an enzyme-like protein (1935), soon to be better characterized as a nucleoprotein (1937). Physicochemical virus studies were a key element in triggering molecular biology which was to provide further means to reveal the true nature of viruses 'at the threshold of life'. Beijerinck's 1898 vision was not appreciated or verified during his lifetime. But Beijerinck already had a clear notion of the mechanism behind the phenomena he observed. Developments in virology and molecular biology since 1935 indicate how close Beijerinck (and even Mayer, Beijerinck's predecessor in research on tobacco

  15. Beijerinck's work on tobacco mosaic virus: historical context and legacy.

    PubMed Central

    Bos, L

    1999-01-01

    Beijerinck's entirely new concept, launched in 1898, of a filterable contagium vivum fluidum which multiplied in close association with the host's metabolism and was distributed in phloem vessels together with plant nutrients, did not match the then prevailing bacteriological germ theory. At the time, tools and concepts to handle such a new kind of agent (the viruses) were non-existent. Beijerinck's novel idea, therefore, did not revolutionize biological science or immediately alter human understanding of contagious diseases. That is how bacteriological dogma persisted, as voiced by Loeffler and Frosch when showing the filterability of an animal virus (1898), and especially by Ivanovsky who had already in 1892 detected filterability of the agent of tobacco mosaic but kept looking for a microbe and finally (1903) claimed its multiplication in an artificial medium. The dogma was also strongly advocated by Roux in 1903 when writing the first review on viruses, which he named 'so-called "invisible" microbes', unwittingly including the agent of bovine pleuropneumonia, only much later proved to be caused by a mycoplasma. In 1904, Baur was the first to advocate strongly the chemical view of viruses. But uncertainty about the true nature of viruses, with their similarities to enzymes and genes, continued until the 1930s when at long last tobacco mosaic virus particles were isolated as an enzyme-like protein (1935), soon to be better characterized as a nucleoprotein (1937). Physicochemical virus studies were a key element in triggering molecular biology which was to provide further means to reveal the true nature of viruses 'at the threshold of life'. Beijerinck's 1898 vision was not appreciated or verified during his lifetime. But Beijerinck already had a clear notion of the mechanism behind the phenomena he observed. Developments in virology and molecular biology since 1935 indicate how close Beijerinck (and even Mayer, Beijerinck's predecessor in research on tobacco

  16. Elucidation of the genome organization of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Zaitlin, M

    1999-01-01

    Proteins unique to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-infected plants were detected in the 1970s by electrophoretic analyses of extracts of virus-infected tissues, comparing their proteins to those generated in extracts of uninfected tissues. The genome organization of TMV was deduced principally from studies involving in vitro translation of proteins from the genomic and subgenomic messenger RNAs. The ultimate analysis of the TMV genome came in 1982 when P. Goelet and colleagues sequenced the entire genome. Studies leading to the elucidation of the TMV genome organization are described below. PMID:10212938

  17. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A New Virus Isolated From Wheat in Kansas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2006 a mechanically-transmissible and previously uncharacterized virus was isolated in Kansas from wheat with mosaic symptoms. The physio-chemical properties of the virus were examined by purification on cesium chloride density gradients, electron microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylalmid...

  18. Multiple roles of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virus biology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an economically important member of the Potyviridae family impacting wheat production in the Great Plains region. The role of WSMV coat protein (CP) in virus biology was examined by introducing a series of point or deletion mutations into the CP cistron, and it wa...

  19. Pepino Mosaic Virus on Tomato Seed: Virus Location and Mechanical Transmission

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging disease of tomato which poses a great threat to greenhouse tomato productions in Europe, North America and South America. Although commercial tomato seed is suspected to spread the disease, its importance as an initial virus inoculum for PepMV has not been...

  20. First report of Alfalfa mosaic virus and Soybean dwarf virus on soybean in North Dakota

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) is the major oilseed crop in North Dakota with production concentrated in the eastern half of the state. Only one virus, Soybean mosaic virus, has been reported from soybean in North Dakota. In 2010, 200 soybean fields from 25 counties that have the majority of soybe...

  1. Characterization of crystals of satellite panicum mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Day, J; Ban, N; Patel, S; Larson, S B; McPherson, A

    1994-05-20

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) has been purified from pearl millet and obtained in a variety of different crystal forms, at least two of which appear suitable for high resolution X-ray diffraction analysis. The first is of cubic space group P4(2)32 with a = b = c = 183.1 A and two virus particles in the unit cell. The second is of a primitive orthorhombic space group with a = 166.1 A, b = 266.7 A and c = 269.1 A, with four virus particles in the unit cell. While the cubic crystal has as its asymmetric unit one twelfth of the icosahedron, or five capsid protein subunits, the asymmetric unit of the orthorhombic crystals is an entire particle. The cubic crystals diffract to at least 2.8 A resolution. We have also succeeded in crystallizing, but not yet characterizing the master virus, PMV.

  2. Rapid evolutionary dynamics of zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Heather E; Holmes, Edward C; Stephenson, Andrew G

    2008-04-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an economically important virus of cucurbit crops. However, little is known about the rate at which this virus has evolved within members of the family Cucurbitaceae, or the timescale of its epidemiological history. Herein, we present the first analysis of the evolutionary dynamics of ZYMV. Using a Bayesian coalescent approach we show that the coat protein of ZYMV has evolved at a mean rate of 5.0 x 10(-4) nucleotide substitutions per site, per year. Notably, this rate is equivalent to those observed in animal RNA viruses. Using the same approach we show that the lineages of ZYMV sampled here have an ancestry that dates back no more than 800 years, suggesting that human activities have played a central role in the dispersal of ZYMV. Finally, an analysis of phylogeographical structure provides strong evidence for the in situ evolution of ZYMV within individual countries.

  3. First report of occurrence of two viruses on pea field in Iran.

    PubMed

    Esfandiari, N; Kohi Habibi, M; Mosahebi, G H; Mozafari, J

    2005-01-01

    An intensive survey was conducted to identify virus diseases affecting pea crops in Tehran province of Iran. A total of 270 pea samples were collected randomly from pea fields. samples were tested by Double Antibody Sandwich Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (DAS-ELISA) using polyclonal antisera prepared against PSBMV (AS-0129, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany) and TSWV (AS-0580, DSMZ, Braunschweig, Germany). Virus disease incidence in pea samples was followed by PSBMV (33%) TSWV (24.4%) and PSBMV+TSWV (17.77). The positive samples with PSBMV were extracted in 0.05M phosphate buffer pH 6.5-7 containing 2% pvp and inoculated on Pisum sativum, Vicia faba, Chenopodium quinoa, Chenopodium amaranticolor. That produced in Pisum sativum; leaflets roll downwards, shoots curl, internodes shorten and plants are rosetted. Early infections reduce flower and fruit formation or eliminate their development. Broad bean has symptoms accompanied by a certain margin rolling and leaflet distortion. In Chenopodium amaranticolor necrotic local lesions and Chenopodium quinoa chlorotic local lesions had produced. The positive samples with TSWV were extracted in 0.01 M phosphate buffer containing 1% Na2 SO3 and inoculated on Petunia hybrida, Pisum sativum. TSWV causes several symptoms in infected peas, including brown leaf petiole and stem coloration, leaflet spotting, vein necrosis. In petunia hybrida after approximately 5 days showed local necrotic lesion. Biological purification in TSWV with chlorotic local lesions in Petunia hybrida and in PSBMV; chlorotic local lesions in Chenopodium quinoa were done. In PSBMV, back inoculated on Pisum sativum and Vicia faba also tested with DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR confirmed the results. This is the first report of PSBMV and TSWV naturally infecting pea in Iran.

  4. Engineering Resistance Against Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus Using Antisense RNA.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2010-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease of cultivated legumes in South-East Asia, is caused by Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. Efforts to engineer resistance against the genus Begomovirus are focused mainly on silencing of complementary-sense virus genes involved in virus replication. Here we have targeted a complementary-sense gene (ACI) encoding Replication initiation Protein (Rep) to develop resistance against soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999], a bipartite begomovirus prevalent throughout the Indian subcontinent. We show that the legume host plants co-agroinoculated with infectious constructs of soybean isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus [India:New Delhi:Soybean 2:1999] along with this antisense Rep gene construct show resistance to the virus.

  5. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  6. First report of Apple necrotic mosaic virus infecting apple trees in Korea

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In September 2016, two apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) cv. Shinano Sweet showing bright cream spot and mosaic patterns on leaves were observed in Pocheon, South Korea. Mosaic symptoms are common on leaves of apple trees infected with Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). Symptomatic leaves were tested by e...

  7. Properties of a virus causing mosaic and leaf curl disease of Celosia argentea L. in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, T A; Taiwo, M A; Thottappilly, G A; Shoyinka, S A; Proll, E; Rabenstein, F

    1998-06-01

    A sap transmissible virus, causing mosaic and leaf curl disease of Celosia argentea, was isolated at vegetable farms in Amuwo Odofin, Tejuoso, and Abule Ado, Lagos, Nigeria. The virus had a restricted host range confined to a few species of the Amaranthaceae, Chenopodiaceae and Solanaceae families. It failed to infect several other species of the Aizoaceae, Brassicaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Lamiaceae, Malvaceae, Poaceae and Tiliaceae families. The virus was transmitted in a non-persistent manner by Aphis spiraecola and Toxoptera citricidus but not by eight other aphid species tested. There was no evidence of transmission by seeds of C. argentae varieties. The viral coat protein had a relative molecular mass (M(r)) of about 30.2 K. Electron microscopy of purified virus preparations revealed flexuous rod shaped particles of about 750 nm in length. Serological studies were performed using the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) and Western blot analysis. The virus reacted positively with an universal potyvirus group monoclonal antibody (MoAb) and MoAb P-3-3H8 raised against peanut stripe potyvirus. It also reacted with polyclonal antibodies raised against several potyviruses including asparagus virus-1 (AV-1), turnip mosaic virus (TuMV), maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV-2), plum pox virus (PPV), soybean mosaic virus (SoyMV), lettuce mosaic virus (LMV), bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and beet mosaic virus (BMV) in at least one of the serological assays used. On the basis of host range, mode of transmission, and available literature data, the celosia virus seems to be different from potyviruses previously reported to infect vegetables in Nigeria. The name celosia mosaic virus (CIMV) has been proposed for this virus.

  8. RELATION OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS TO THE HOST CELLS

    PubMed Central

    Esau, Katherine; Cronshaw, James

    1967-01-01

    The relation of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to host cells was studied in leaves of Nicotiana tabacum L. systemically infected with the virus. The typical TMV inclusions, striate or crystalline material and ameboid or X-bodies, which are discernible with the light microscope, and/or particles of virus, which are identifiable with the electron microscope, were observed in epidermal cells, mesophyll cells, parenchyma cells of the vascular bundles, differentiating and mature tracheary elements, and immature and mature sieve elements. Virus particles were observed in the nuclei and the chloroplasts of parenchyma cells as well as in the ground cytoplasm, the vacuole, and between the plasma membrane and the cell wall. The nature of the conformations of the particle aggregates in the chloroplasts was compatible with the concept that some virus particles may be assembled in these organelles. The virus particles in the nuclei appeared to be complete particles. Under the electron microscope the X-body constitutes a membraneless assemblage of endoplasmic reticulum, ribosomes, virus particles, and of virus-related material in the form of wide filaments indistinctly resolvable as bundles of tubules. Some parenchyma cells contained aggregates of discrete tubules in parallel arrangement. These groups of tubules were relatively free from components of host protoplasts. PMID:6036529

  9. Reactions of some cucurbitaceous species Tozucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV).

    PubMed

    Csorba, R; Kiss, E F; Molnár, L

    2004-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is a widespread serious pathogen of cucurbitaceous plants. ZYMV was first detected in Hungary in 1995. Since then it has become one of the most dangerous viruses of the Cucurbitaceae family causing serious epidemics. The virus has many hosts, which - particularly perennial ones - may play important role as virus reservoirs and infection sources in virus epidemiology. On the other hand wild weed species maybe sources of resistance to viruses. Our research was carried out on a total of 15 wild species from 8 genera (Cucumis, Cucurbita, Cyclanthera, Ecballium Momordica, Lagenaria, Zehneria, Bryonia). Test plants were mechanically inoculated with ZYMV. Local and systemic symptoms were determined and 5 weeks after inoculation DAS-ELISA tests were also carried out. Symptomless plants were reinoculated to Cucumis sativus cv. Accordia test plants. On the basis of the results we determined the percentages of infections and so we classified the test-plants into sensitive and resistance categories. On the basis of the results new host plants of ZYMV are the followings: Bryonia dioica, Cyclanthera pedata, Ecballium elaterium, Momordica balsamina, Momordica rostrata, and Zehneria scabra. Among them Momordica balsamina and Ecballium elaterium showed latent to ZYMV. Bryonia alba and Zehneria indica are especially remarkable, because they proved resistant to ZYMV on the basis of symptomatology and serology. Our results might have significant role in the field of research of host range, virus resistance and virus differentiation.

  10. Structural Lability of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Virions

    PubMed Central

    Semenyuk, Pavel I.; Abashkin, Dmitry A.; Kalinina, Natalya O.; Arutyunyan, Alexsandr M.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Dobrov, Eugeny N.

    2013-01-01

    Virions of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) were neglected for more than thirty years after their basic properties were determined. In this paper, the physicochemical characteristics of BSMV virions and virion-derived viral capsid protein (CP) were analyzed, namely, the absorption and intrinsic fluorescence spectra, circular dichroism spectra, differential scanning calorimetry curves, and size distributions by dynamic laser light scattering. The structural properties of BSMV virions proved to be intermediate between those of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a well-characterized virus with rigid rod-shaped virions, and flexuous filamentous plant viruses. The BSMV virions were found to be considerably more labile than expected from their rod-like morphology and a distant sequence relation of the BSMV and TMV CPs. The circular dichroism spectra of BSMV CP subunits incorporated into the virions, but not subunits of free CP, demonstrated a significant proportion of beta-structure elements, which were proposed to be localized mostly in the protein regions exposed on the virion outer surface. These beta-structure elements likely formed during virion assembly can comprise the N- and C-terminal protein regions unstructured in the non-virion CP and can mediate inter-subunit interactions. Based on computer-assisted structure modeling, a model for BSMV CP subunit structural fold compliant with the available experimental data was proposed. PMID:23613760

  11. Differentiation of celosia mosaic virus and asparagus virus 1 based on biological properties.

    PubMed

    Owolabi, A T; Proll, E

    2000-01-01

    An attempt was made to distinguish between celosia mosaic virus (CIMV) and asparagus virus 1 (AV-1) based on biological properties, which hitherto was obscured from serological data from previous work. The host range of AV-1 was found to be a subset of that of CIMV and AV-1 was transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae which, on the other hand, did not transmit CIMV. No evidence of cross-protection was obtained between these two viruses.

  12. Molecular identification of Cucumber mosaic virus isolates of subgroup IB associated with mosaic disease of eggplant in India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Susheel; Gautam, Karmveer Kumar; Raj, Shri Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Association of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) with severe mosaic disease of eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) collected from Lucknow and Kanpur, India was initially detected by host reaction and serological assay and confirmed by RT-PCR employing coat protein gene specific primers. Further, molecular identification of the virus isolates was done by cloning and sequence analysis of the complete RNA3 genome. Based on 97-99 % identities and phylogenetic relationships, the virus isolates infecting eggplant were identified as members of CMV subgroup IB.

  13. Quasispecies nature of Pepino mosaic virus and its evolutionary dynamics.

    PubMed

    Hasiów-Jaroszewska, Beata; Jackowiak, Paulina; Borodynko, Natasza; Figlerowicz, Marek; Pospieszny, Henryk

    2010-10-01

    Genetic variability is an essential feature of RNA viruses. It allows them to adapt to the ever-changing environmental conditions. Important biological properties of the viruses, their infectivity, adaptability, and host range, may also depend on the level of quasispecies diversity. Here, we present the analysis of the genetic polymorphism of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). The examined populations were isolated from the naturally infected tomato plants (Solanum lycopersicum). In order to determine the complexity of the PepMV populations, the number of different viral variants and their genetic diversity was established. Moreover, phylogenetic trees were created to depict relations between the identified variants. For the first time we have shown that the PepMV exists as a quasispecies. The observed level of genetic variability allows PepMV for a quick and flexible adaptation to different hosts. Our results suggest that the level of PepMV variability possibly influences the course of infection.

  14. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed Central

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region. PMID:3671088

  15. Analysis of figwort mosaic virus (plant pararetrovirus) polyadenylation signal.

    PubMed

    Sanfaçon, H

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal has revealed several striking differences to poly(A) signals from animal genes such as the absence of activating sequences downstream from the cleavage site. Instead, upstream sequences were shown to induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence. To test whether these features are representative of other plant pararetrovirus poly(A) signals, a characterization of the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) poly(A) signal is presented here. The FMV RNAs were isolated from infected plants and mapped, and the different elements composing the FMV poly(A) signal were identified. Multiple upstream sequences were found to be essential for efficient processing at the FMV poly(A) site and could be replaced by the CaMV upstream elements. The FMV upstream sequences showed homologies to other characterized upstream sequences from CaMV, from animal viruses, and from plant poly(A) signals. Surprisingly, neither the FMV nor the CaMV upstream elements could induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence present in the FMV poly(A) signal, instead a UAUAAA sequence 55 nucleotides further downstream was utilized. It is proposed that additional features may be required for appropriate cleavage such as the context of the AAUAAA-like sequence or perhaps the cleavage site itself.

  16. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-10-26

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region.

  17. Chayote mosaic virus, a New Tymovirus Infecting Cucurbitaceae.

    PubMed

    Bernal, J J; Jiménez, I; Moreno, M; Hord, M; Rivera, C; Koenig, R; Rodríguez-Cerezo, E

    2000-10-01

    ABSTRACT Chayote mosaic virus (ChMV) is a putative tymovirus isolated from chayote crops in Costa Rica. ChMV was characterized at the host range, serological, and molecular levels. ChMV was transmitted mechanically and induced disease symptoms mainly in Cucurbitaceae hosts. Asymptomatic infections were detected in other host families. Serologically, ChMV is related to the Andean potato latent virus (APLV) and the Eggplant mosaic virus (EMV), both members of the genus Tymovirus infecting solanaceous hosts in the Caribbean Basin and South America. The sequence of the genomic RNA of ChMV was determined and its genetic organization was typical of tymoviruses. Comparisons with other tymoviral sequences showed that ChMV was a new member of the genus Tymovirus. The phylogenetic analyses of the coat protein gene were consistent with serological comparisons and positioned ChMV within a cluster of tymoviruses infecting mainly cucurbit or solanaceous hosts, including APLV and EMV. Phylogenetic analyses of the replicase protein gene confirmed the close relationship of ChMV and EMV. Our results suggest that ChMV is related to two tymoviruses (APLV and EMV) of proximal geographical provenance but with different natural host ranges. ChMV is the first cucurbit-infecting tymovirus to be fully characterized at the genomic level.

  18. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. © 2016 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  19. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  20. The population genetics of maize dwarf mosaic virus in Spain.

    PubMed

    Achon, M A; Larrañaga, A; Alonso-Dueñas, N

    2012-12-01

    The population genetics of maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) in Spain was assessed by analysis of the P1-HC region. Restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of 363 isolates revealed that the MDMV population consisted of 69 haplotypes. Sequence analysis of 112 isolates confirmed a high degree of nucleotide sequence diversity (0.143), which was higher for P1 than for the HC. Twelve sequences showed a single different recombination event. Selection pressure analysis revealed that the P1-HC region was under strong negative selection. The MDMV population was spatially structured but not structured temporally or by host. Phylogenetic analysis split the sequences into five major groups.

  1. Engineering of Brome mosaic virus for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Yildiz, Ibrahim; Tsvetkova, Irina; Wen, Amy M.; Shukla, Sourabh; Masarapu, M. Hema; Dragnea, Bogdan; Steinmetz, Nicole F.

    2016-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles (VNPs) are becoming versatile tools in platform technology development. Their well-defined structures as well as their programmability through chemical and genetic modification allow VNPs to be engineered for potential imaging and therapeutic applications. In this article, we report the application of a variety of bioconjugation chemistries to the plant VNP Brome mosaic virus (BMV). Functional BMV nanoparticles displaying multiple copies of fluorescent dyes, PEG molecules, chemotherapeutic drug moieties, targeting proteins and cell penetrating peptides were formulated. This opens the door for the application of BMV in nanomedicine. PMID:28018580

  2. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are exempt...

  3. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are exempt...

  4. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are exempt...

  5. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are exempt...

  6. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are exempt...

  7. Winter wheat cultivars with temperature sensitive resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus do not recover from early season infections

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus, all vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, frequently cause devastating losses to winter wheat production throughout the central and western Great Plains. Resistant 'Mace' and 'RonL' are commercially ...

  8. The polarity of assembly of papaya mosaic virus and tobacco mosaic virus RNAs with PMV-protein under conditions of nonspecificity.

    PubMed

    Abouhaidar, M G; Bancroft, J B

    1980-11-01

    The problem of the rapid multiinitiation of papaya mosaic virus or tobacco mosaic virus RNA by PMV-protein near pH 7.0 at low ionic strength has been overcome. If NaCl is added to 0.1 M, both RNAs are first encapsidated at their respective 5' ends. This shows that the initial site of helix formation depends on the protein rather than the RNA.

  9. Ecological and Genetic Determinants of Pepino Mosaic Virus Emergence

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Pérez, Manuel G.; Pagán, Israel; Aragón-Caballero, Liliana; Cáceres, Fátima; Fraile, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Virus emergence is a complex phenomenon, which generally involves spread to a new host from a wild host, followed by adaptation to the new host. Although viruses account for the largest fraction of emerging crop pathogens, knowledge about their emergence is incomplete. We address here the question of whether Pepino Mosaic Virus (PepMV) emergence as a major tomato pathogen worldwide could have involved spread from wild to cultivated plant species and host adaptation. For this, we surveyed natural populations of wild tomatoes in southern Peru for PepMV infection. PepMV incidence, genetic variation, population structure, and accumulation in various hosts were analyzed. PepMV incidence in wild tomatoes was high, and a strain not yet reported in domestic tomato was characterized. This strain had a wide host range within the Solanaceae, multiplying efficiently in most assayed Solanum species and being adapted to wild tomato hosts. Conversely, PepMV isolates from tomato crops showed evidence of adaptation to domestic tomato, possibly traded against adaptation to wild tomatoes. Phylogenetic reconstructions indicated that the most probable ancestral sequence came from a wild Solanum species. A high incidence of PepMV in wild tomato relatives would favor virus spread to crops and its efficient multiplication in different Solanum species, including tomato, allowing its establishment as an epidemic pathogen. Later, adaptation to tomato, traded off against adaptation to other Solanum species, would isolate tomato populations from those in other hosts. IMPORTANCE Virus emergence is a complex phenomenon involving multiple ecological and genetic factors and is considered to involve three phases: virus encounter with the new host, virus adaptation to the new host, and changes in the epidemiological dynamics. We analyze here if this was the case in the recent emergence of Pepino Mosaic Virus (PepMV) in tomato crops worldwide. We characterized a new strain of PepMV infecting

  10. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers.

  11. Genetically engineered Tobacco mosaic virus as nanoparticle vaccines.

    PubMed

    McCormick, Alison A; Palmer, Kenneth E

    2008-02-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is an RNA virus that typically infects plants but has recently been adapted for vaccine development, owing to the suitability of the virions for modifications as nanoparticles. TMV also has a simple functional structure of a 6.4 Kb (+)-strand RNA encapsidated by a single coat protein, which permits facile genetic manipulation. In this review, we describe recent advances in the manipulation of TMV for the development of several different types of vaccines, including ones that induce antibody and T-cell responses that are protective in pathogen and tumor challenge animal models. Lastly, we describe how TMV self-assembly properties are being used to make a new mammalian RNA pseudovirus, that has unique characteristics for RNA and protein antigen delivery to antigen-presenting cells.

  12. Host Factors in the Infection Cycle of Bamboo mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ying-Ping; Chen, I-Hsuan; Tsai, Ching-Hsiu

    2017-01-01

    To complete the infection cycle efficiently, the virus must hijack the host systems in order to benefit for all the steps and has to face all the defense mechanisms from the host. This review involves a discussion of how these positive and negative factors regulate the viral RNA accumulation identified for the Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV), a single-stranded RNA virus. The genome of BaMV is approximately 6.4 kb in length, encoding five functional polypeptides. To reveal the host factors involved in the infection cycle of BaMV, a few different approaches were taken to screen the candidates. One of the approaches is isolating the viral replicase-associated proteins by co-immunoprecipitation with the transiently expressed tagged viral replicase in plants. Another approach is using the cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique to screen the differentially expressed genes derived from N. benthamiana plants after infection. The candidates are examined by knocking down the expression in plants using the Tobacco rattle virus-based virus-induced gene silencing technique following BaMV inoculation. The positive or negative regulators could be described as reducing or enhancing the accumulation of BaMV in plants when the expression levels of these proteins are knocked down. The possible roles of these host factors acting on the accumulation of BaMV will be discussed. PMID:28360904

  13. Development of expression vectors based on pepino mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant viruses are useful expression vectors because they can mount systemic infections allowing large amounts of recombinant protein to be produced rapidly in differentiated plant tissues. Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) (genus Potexvirus, family Flexiviridae), a widespread plant virus, is a promising candidate expression vector for plants because of its high level of accumulation in its hosts and the absence of severe infection symptoms. We report here the construction of a stable and efficient expression vector for plants based on PepMV. Results Agroinfectious clones were produced from two different PepMV genotypes (European and Chilean), and these were able to initiate typical PepMV infections. We explored several strategies for vector development including coat protein (CP) replacement, duplication of the CP subgenomic promoter (SGP) and the creation of a fusion protein using the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide. We found that CP replacement vectors were unable to move systemically and that vectors with duplicated SGPs (even heterologous SGPs) suffered from significant transgene instability. The fusion protein incorporating the FMDV 2A catalytic peptide gave by far the best results, maintaining stability through serial passages and allowing the accumulation of GFP to 0.2-0.4 g per kg of leaf tissue. The possible use of PepMV as a virus-induced gene silencing vector to study gene function was also demonstrated. Protocols for the use of this vector are described. Conclusions A stable PepMV vector was generated by expressing the transgene as a CP fusion using the sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide to separate them. We have generated a novel tool for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants and for the functional analysis of virus and plant genes. Our experiments have also highlighted virus requirements for replication in single cells as well as intercellular and long

  14. Evolutionary liberties of the Abutilon mosaic virus cluster.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alexander; Strohmeier, Stephan; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2015-02-01

    Two new strains of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV; Geminiviridae) from Germany (Stuttgart) and France (Paris) have been characterized by circomics, direct pyrosequencing of rolling circle amplification (RCA) products, as well as conventional cloning and Sanger sequencing. RCA combined with an analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms confirmed the completeness of the sequence determination and a close relationship of both isolates for DNA A with 99 % nucleotide sequence identity. Phylogenetic tree reconstruction supported their clustering with other AbMV strains in a clade with Middle American begomoviruses, whereas South American begomoviruses that infect Abutilon or Sida micrantha are less closely related. Comparing the coat protein (CP) genes of the AbMV cluster, with those of related Middle and South American begomoviruses revealed a remarkable overrepresentation for non-synonymous nucleotide exchanges for certain amino acid positions in the AbMV cluster. Projection of these positions to a structural model of the African cassava mosaic virus CP yielded a non-random distribution at the periphery and, most importantly, highlighted those amino acids that had been identified in whitefly-transmission experiments before. These results establish the basis for an analysis of the evolutionary liberty of certain amino acid positions of the CP, and their impact on the deciphering of insect transmission determinants is discussed.

  15. Sida micrantha mosaic is associated with a complex infection of begomoviruses different from Abutilon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jovel, J; Reski, G; Rothenstein, D; Ringel, M; Frischmuth, T; Jeske, H

    2004-04-01

    We report on the nucleotide sequences of geminiviruses of the genus Bemogovirus infecting Sida micrantha Schr., a common weed in Brazil. For decades, the mosaic frequently associated with Sida plants was considered to be caused by a Brazilian strain of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV). By infection studies and sequence comparisons, we demonstrate that it is associated with a complex of at least two begomoviruses as different from AbMV as most South American geminiviruses. Two molecules of DNA A (A1, A2) and three of DNA B (B1, B2, B3) were cloned and sequenced. According to the high homology in their common regions, DNA A1 and DNA B3, as well as DNA A2 and DNA B2, are cognate components of two begomoviruses, which were infectious in Nicotiana benthamiana plants. No trans-replication was found for any other A/B combination. The intergenic region of DNA B2 appears to be the product of the recombination between DNA B1 and DNA A2. These results show that a coinfection of begomoviruses can persist over decades, producing a reservoir of partially recombined but distinct geminiviruses.

  16. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... different genetic makeup. This condition can affect any type of cell, including: Blood cells Egg and sperm cells Skin cells Causes Mosaicism is caused by an error in cell division very early in the development of the unborn baby. Examples of mosaicism include: ...

  17. Polyamine biosynthesis and the replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By seven days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly-emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. These protoplasts contain 1-2 x 10/sup 6/ virions per cell and continue to produce virus in culture for at least 48 hours. (/sup 14/C)-Spermidine (10 ..mu..M) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hours. However, the spermidine content of the cell was only marginally affected, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)-spermidine was also readily incorporated into the nucleic acid-containing component of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. Thus, newly-formed virions contained predominantly newly-synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) led to incorporation of pre-existing spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly-formed virions. The latter results were tested and confirmed in a second cellular system, consisting of health protoplasts infected with TYMC in vitro.

  18. Encapsidation of nanoparticles by red clover necrotic mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Loo, LiNa; Guenther, Richard H; Lommel, Steven A; Franzen, Stefan

    2007-09-12

    Icosahedral virus capsids demonstrate a high degree of selectivity in packaging cognate nucleic acid genome components during virion assembly. The 36 nm icosahedral plant virus Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) packages its two genomic ssRNAs via a specific capsid protein (CP) genomic RNA interaction. A 20-nucleotide hairpin structure within the genomic RNA-2 hybridizes with RNA-1 to form a bimolecular complex, which is the origin of assembly (OAS) in RCNMV that selectively recruits and orients CP subunits initiating virion assembly. In this Article, an oligonucleotide mimic of the OAS sequence was attached to Au, CoFe2O4, and CdSe nanoparticles ranging from 3 to 15 nm, followed by addition of RNA-1 to form a synthetic OAS to direct the virion-like assembly by RCNMV CP. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements were consistent with the formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) comparable in size to native RCNMV. Attempts to encapsidate nanoparticles with diameters larger than 17 nm did not result in well-formed viral capsids. These results are consistent with the presence of a 17 nm cavity in native RCNMV. Covalent linkage of the OAS to nanoparticles directs RNA-dependent encapsidation and demonstrates that foreign cargo can be packaged into RCNMV virions. The flexibility of the RCNMV CP to encapsidate different materials, as long as it is within encapsidation constraint, is a critical factor to be considered as a drug delivery and diagnostic vehicle in biomedical applications.

  19. Gold nanostructures using tobacco mosaic viruses for optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Tomita, Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in aligning gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three-dimensions using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in order to realize new optical properties. TMV is a tube-shaped plant virus about 300 nm in length with an outer- and inner-diameter of 18 nm and 4 nm. We genetically fused material-binding peptides that can promote metal crystallization, namely a gold-binding peptide (GBP) and a titanium-binding peptide (TBP), to the outer-surface of TMV. By reducing potassium chloroaurate with sodium borohydride in the presence of the engineered viruses in 5% acetic acid solution, Au NPs were deposited on the outer-surface of the viruses. Using TBP-fused TMV, NPs of 5 nm were obtained, with a standard deviation smaller than those deposited on wild-type TMV. The diameter of the NPs on GBP-fused TMV was 10 nm. These results indicate that genetically-modified TMVs are promising templates for the construction of optical metamaterials.

  20. Immunological detection of bean common mosaic virus in French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) leaves.

    PubMed

    Verma, Poonam; Gupta, U P

    2010-09-01

    Bean common mosaic potyvirus (BCMV) is an important seed borne pathogen of French bean. Differential inoculation with bean common mosaic virus at cotylodonary trifoliate leaf stage and pre-flowering stage of crop growth revealed that cotyledonary leaf infection favored maximum disease expression. Under immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) the virus particles of filamentous structure having a diameter of 750 nm (l) and 15 nm (w) were observed. These particles gave positive precipitin tests with polyclonal antiserum of Potato virus Y.

  1. Co-infection and disease severity of Ohio Maize dwarf mosaic virus and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Two major maize viruses have been reported in the United States: Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) and Maize chlorotic dwarf virus (MCDV). These viruses co-occur in regions where maize is grown such that co-infections are likely. Co-infection of different strains of MCDV is also observed frequently...

  2. Lettuce mosaic virus: from pathogen diversity to host interactors.

    PubMed

    German-Retana, Sylvie; Walter, Jocelyne; Le Gall, Olivier

    2008-03-01

    Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) belongs to the genus Potyvirus (type species Potato virus Y) in the family Potyviridae. The virion is filamentous, flexuous with a length of 750 nm and a width of 15 nm. The particles are made of a genomic RNA of 10 080 nucleotides, covalently linked to a viral-encoded protein (the VPg) at the 5' end and with a 3' poly A tail, and encapsidated in a single type of capsid protein. The molecular weight of the capsid protein subunit has been estimated electrophoretically to be 34 kDa and estimated from the amino acid sequence to be 31 kDa. The genome is expressed as a polyprotein of 3255 amino-acid residues, processed by three virus-specific proteinases into ten mature proteins. LMV has a worldwide distribution and a relatively broad host range among several families. Weeds and ornamentals can act as local reservoirs for lettuce crops. In particular, many species within the family Asteraceae are susceptible to LMV, including cultivated and ornamental species such as common (Lactuca sativa), prickly (L. serriola) or wild (L. virosa) lettuce, endive/escarole (Cichorium endiva), safflower (Carthamus tinctorius), starthistle (Centaurea solstitialis), Cape daisy (Osteospermum spp.) and gazania (Gazania rigens). In addition, several species within the families Brassicaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae, Solanaceae and Chenopodiaceae are natural or experimental hosts of LMV. Genetic control of resistance to LMV: The only resistance genes currently used to protect lettuce crops worldwide are the recessive genes mo1(1) and mo1(2) corresponding to mutant alleles of the gene encoding the translation initiation factor eIF4E in lettuce. It is believed that at least one intact copy of eIF4E must be present to ensure virus accumulation. LMV is transmitted in a non-persistent manner by a high number of aphid species. Myzus persicae and Macrosiphum euphorbiae are particularly active in disseminating this virus in the fields. LMV is also seedborne in lettuce. The

  3. [Distribution of soybean mosaic virus antigen in the leaves of soybean plants with different reaction to virus infection].

    PubMed

    Sapotskiĭ, M V; Andreeva, I V; Kakareka, N N; Poliakova, A M; Malinovskiĭ, V I

    2002-01-01

    The distribution and accumulation of soybean mosaic virus antigen in the leaves of sensitive plants with well expressed mosaic symptoms and symptomless tolerant soybean plants Glycine max (L.) Merr. were similar. Low concentration of virus antigen was found in extremely resistant soybean plants in mechanically inoculated leaves and those of the 2-4 circles two-three weeks after inoculation but 5 weeks later the virus antigen was detected only in the top leaves.

  4. The sequence of carnation etched ring virus DNA: comparison with cauliflower mosaic virus and retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.; Sadler, J.; Longstaff, M.

    1986-01-01

    Carnation etched ring virus (CERV) DNA comprises 7932 bp. CERV primer binding sites and overall genome organization are similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). The six open reading frames of CERV showed amino acid homology (50-80%) with CaMV ORFs I-VI; no homologues of CaMV ORFs VII or VIII were found. CERV ORFs 1-5 interface each other with the sequence ATGA. The comparison of CERV ORF5 with CaMV ORFV highlighted regions which show homologies to retrovirus gag/pol protease, RNase H and DNA polymerase domains; the possibility that the DNA polymerase domain comprises two subdomains, operating off different templates, is discussed. Both CERV and CaMV ORFs I have sequence homology to tobacco mosaic virus P30 and plastocyanin. PMID:16453731

  5. Association of a cucumber mosaic virus strain with mosaic disease of banana, Musa paradisiaca--an evidence using immuno/nucleic acid probe.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Raj, S K; Haq, Q M; Srivastava, K M; Singh, B P; Sane, P V

    1995-12-01

    Virus causing severe chlorosis/mosaic disease of banana was identified as a strain of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Association of CMV with the disease was established by Western immunoblot using polyclonal antibodies to CMV-T and slot blot hybridization with nucleic acid probe of CMV-P genome.

  6. The assembly of papaya mosaic virus coat protein with DNA.

    PubMed

    Erickson, J W; Bancroft, J B

    1980-01-01

    Products of specific (pH 8.0-8.5) and nonspecific (pH 6.0) assembly reactions of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) coat protein with DNA are described. The strandedness, topology, and sugar moiety of the nucleic acid are important parameters for assembly in nonspecific conditions. The linear, single-stranded form of lambda DNA, but not the double-stranded form, reacted with PMV protein to form multiply initiated particles whose helical segments apparently annealed to produce continuous tubular particles. With the circular, single-stranded DNA of phi X174, partially tubular, partially extended particles were made. Poly(dA), unlike poly(A) [Erickson JW, AbouHaidar M, Bancroft JB: Virology 90:60, 1978], was not encapsidated by PMV protein under specific assembly conditions. With all DNAs tested, extended particles were the only products formed in specific conditions at pH 8.5.

  7. Effect of abscissic acid on tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mishra, M D; Ghosh, A; Verma, V S; Dattagupta, M

    1983-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) did not affect the infectivity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in vitro. The same dilutions of ABA when applied on the leaves of Chenopodium amaranticolor Coste and Reyn. at different intervals before inoculation affected development of local lesions variably at different dilutions. The inhibition of local lesion formation was reduced at other intervals leading to stimulation at thirty minutes and six hours intervals. Post-inoculation treatments with 2 mg/l of ABA gave stimulation of local lesion formation, though other dilutions gave inhibition. Viral concentration was stimulated in the tomato seedlings root dipped in 0.2 mg/l of ABA for 6 hours and inoculated 24 hours after transplantation. Incorporation of different concentrations of ABA into tissue culture medium reduced the growth of the TMV infected tobacco callus tissue and stimulated the infectivity of the tissue grown over it assayed after three weeks.

  8. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins.

  9. Proton dependence of tobacco mosaic virus dissociation by pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Bispo, Jose A C; Landini, Gustavo F; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is an intensely studied model of viruses. This paper reports an investigation into the dissociation of TMV by pH and pressure up to 220 MPa. The viral solution (0.25 mg/ml) incubated at 277 K showed a significant decrease in light scattering with increasing pH, suggesting dissociation. This observation was confirmed by HPLC gel filtration and electron microscopy. The calculated volume change of dissociation (DeltaV) decreased (absolute value) from -49.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 3.8 to -21.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 9.0. The decrease from pH 9.0 to 3.8 caused a stabilization of 14.1 kJ/mol of TMV subunit. The estimated proton release calculated from pressure-induced dissociation curves was 0.584 mol H(+)/mol of TMV subunit. These results suggest that the degree of virus inactivation by pressure and the immunogenicity of the inactivated structures can be optimized by modulating the surrounding pH.

  10. A model for the structure of satellite tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yingying; Larson, Steven B; Heitsch, Christine E; McPherson, Alexander; Harvey, Stephen C

    2012-10-01

    Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is an icosahedral T=1 single-stranded RNA virus with a genome containing 1058 nucleotides. X-ray crystallography revealed a structure containing 30 double-helical RNA segments, with each helix having nine base pairs and an unpaired nucleotide at the 3' end of each strand. Based on this structure, Larson and McPherson proposed a model of 30 hairpin-loop elements occupying the edges of the icosahedron and connected by single-stranded regions. More recently, Schroeder et al. have combined the results of chemical probing with a novel helix searching algorithm to propose a specific secondary structure for the STMV genome, compatible with the Larson-McPherson model. Here we report an all-atom model of STMV, using the complete protein and RNA sequences and the Schroeder RNA secondary structure. As far as we know, this is the first all-atom model for the complete structure of any virus (100% of the atoms) using the natural genomic sequence.

  11. Tobacco mosaic virus and the virescence of biotechnology.

    PubMed Central

    Turpen, T H

    1999-01-01

    There is a growing realization that a modern combination of molecular biology and agriculture will provide a photosynthetic basis for the biosynthesis of an increasing variety of complex and valuable molecules. This 'greening' of biotechnology may impact on the global environment in many beneficial ways, but will perhaps have its most significant impact on human health. In the past decade, the capacity to use plants as an expanded source of therapeutics has grown through the accelerated development of effective viral transfection vectors for gene transfer to cultivated crops. Recombinant vectors based on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and other members of the Tobamovirus genus are now used to transfect commercially meaningful quantities of plant biomass cultivated in enclosed greenhouses and multiacre fields. Viral RNA promoters are effectively manipulated for the synthesis of recombinant messenger RNAs in whole plants. Chimeric plant virus and virus-like particles are designed for peptide production and display from recombinant structural protein-gene fusions. Gene functions are assessed and modified by either virus-mediated expression or cytosolic inhibition of expression at the RNA level. Recombinant virus populations, propagated by inoculating plants with infectious RNA transcripts or recombinant virions, have proved to be genetically stable over product-manufacturing cycles. Large volumes of highly purified protein products isolated from transfected foliage conform reproducibly to the specifications required for well-characterized biologics. In some cases, they exceed the specific activities of molecules purified from alternative recombinant and native sources. The resulting products are then formulated according to the developing national regulatory guidelines appropriate for agriculture-based manufacturing. Each of these innovations was first realized by researchers using clones of tobamovirus genes and recombinant genomes. This progress is founded on the

  12. Tobacco mosaic virus and the virescence of biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Turpen, T H

    1999-03-29

    There is a growing realization that a modern combination of molecular biology and agriculture will provide a photosynthetic basis for the biosynthesis of an increasing variety of complex and valuable molecules. This 'greening' of biotechnology may impact on the global environment in many beneficial ways, but will perhaps have its most significant impact on human health. In the past decade, the capacity to use plants as an expanded source of therapeutics has grown through the accelerated development of effective viral transfection vectors for gene transfer to cultivated crops. Recombinant vectors based on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and other members of the Tobamovirus genus are now used to transfect commercially meaningful quantities of plant biomass cultivated in enclosed greenhouses and multiacre fields. Viral RNA promoters are effectively manipulated for the synthesis of recombinant messenger RNAs in whole plants. Chimeric plant virus and virus-like particles are designed for peptide production and display from recombinant structural protein-gene fusions. Gene functions are assessed and modified by either virus-mediated expression or cytosolic inhibition of expression at the RNA level. Recombinant virus populations, propagated by inoculating plants with infectious RNA transcripts or recombinant virions, have proved to be genetically stable over product-manufacturing cycles. Large volumes of highly purified protein products isolated from transfected foliage conform reproducibly to the specifications required for well-characterized biologics. In some cases, they exceed the specific activities of molecules purified from alternative recombinant and native sources. The resulting products are then formulated according to the developing national regulatory guidelines appropriate for agriculture-based manufacturing. Each of these innovations was first realized by researchers using clones of tobamovirus genes and recombinant genomes. This progress is founded on the

  13. Dynamics of small RNAs of virus and host origin from wheat streak mosaic virus and/or triticum mosaic virus infected susceptible and temperature-sensitive resistant wheat cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous an...

  14. Daphne mosaic virus (DapMV), a new potyvirus from Daphne mezereum in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Fránová, J; Petrzik, K; Lesemann, D-E; Navrátil, M

    2006-04-01

    Daphne shrubs with light green rings and mosaic on leaves contained flexuous filamentous virions (696 x 13 nm) and cylindrical inclusions typical of the subdivision III of Edwardson's classification for inclusions induced by members of the family Potyviridae. Decoration tests using antisera to 67 potyviruses revealed distant serological relations among chilli veinal mottle virus, Colombian datura virus, papaya ringspot virus, tobacco vein mottling virus and yam mosaic virus. The 3' terminal region of the virus genome was amplified by RT-PCR using primers specific for cloned and sequenced members of the family Potyviridae. The most similar sequences in the GenBank were those of isolates of wild potato mosaic virus (WPMV) and yam mild mosaic virus (YMMV), originating from Peru and Guadeloupe, respectively. The new sequence had 63.2% and 61.9% nucleotide identity to WPMV and YMMV in the coat protein gene. The results suggest that the Czech isolate from daphne should be regarded as a new member of the genus Potyvirus. The name daphne mosaic virus (DapMV) is suggested for this virus.

  15. Genetic Composition of Pepino mosaic virus Population in North American Greenhouse Tomatoes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus within the family Flexiviridae. Pepino mosaic is an emerging disease in greenhouse tomato in Europe, North America and South America. Previous research in several laboratories suggests that PepMV consists of numerous sequence variants...

  16. First Report of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Infecting Gherkin (Cucumis anguira) in India.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Vidya, T; Papaiah, S; Srinivasulu, M; Mandal, Bikash; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-09-01

    A field visit in September 2011 to the Cucumis anguira (Gherkin) growing regions of Kuppam, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh, India revealed occurrence of mosaic, blistering and fruit malformation leading to the crop losses. Analysis of field samples revealed association of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) with the disease. This is the first confirmed report of natural occurrence of ZYMV on Gherkin in India.

  17. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus.

  18. Odontonema cuspidatum and Psychotria punctata, two new cucumber mosaic virus hosts identified in Florida

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The wide host range of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been expanded by the identification of Odontonema cuspidatum (firespike) and Psychotria punctata (dotted wild coffee) as CMV hosts in Florida....

  19. Effectiveness of chemo- and thermo-therapeutic treatments on Pepino mosaic virus in tomato seed

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a seed-borne virus of importance in greenhouse tomatoes. The ease of mechanical transmission of PepMV from contaminated tomato seeds to seedlings makes commercial tomato seed a potential source of initial virus inoculum. The objective of this study was to evaluate th...

  20. First report of tomato mottle mosaic virus infecting tomato in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus was identified in tomato in Florida, the first report of this virus in the U.S. Host range and genetic diversity were characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scien...

  1. Wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded NIa-Pro and coat protein are involved in virus superinfection exclusion

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cross protection or superinfection exclusion (SE) is defined as the phenomenon whereby initial infection by one virus prevents subsequent infection by closely related viruses. The mechanisms of SE are just beginning to be understood. Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus: Tritimovirus; family: Poty...

  2. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-09

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development.

  3. Endothelial Targeting of Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) via Surface Vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Destito, Giuseppe; Plummer, Emily M.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Siuzdak, Gary; Manchester, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is a plant comovirus in the picornavirus superfamily, and is used for a wide variety of biomedical and material science applications. Although its replication is restricted to plants, CPMV binds to and enters mammalian cells, including endothelial cells and particularly tumor neovascular endothelium in vivo. This natural capacity has lead to the use of CPMV as a sensor for intravital imaging of vascular development. Binding of CPMV to endothelial cells occurs via interaction with a 54 kD cell-surface protein, but this protein has not previously been identified. Here we identify the CPMV binding protein as a cell-surface form of the intermediate filament vimentin. The CPMV-vimentin interaction was established using proteomic screens and confirmed by direct interaction of CPMV with purified vimentin, as well as inhibition in a vimentin-knockout cell line. Vimentin and CPMV were also co-localized in vascular endothelium of mouse and rat in vivo. Together these studies indicate that surface vimentin mediates binding and may lead to internalization of CPMV in vivo, establishing surface vimentin as an important vascular endothelial ligand for nanoparticle targeting to tumors. These results also establish vimentin as a ligand for picornaviruses in both the plant and animal kingdoms of life. Since bacterial pathogens and several other classes of viruses also bind to surface vimentin, these studies suggest a common role for surface vimentin in pathogen transmission. PMID:19412526

  4. Multiple interspecies recombination events within RNA2 of Grapevine fanleaf virus and Arabis mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Vigne, E; Marmonier, A; Fuchs, M

    2008-01-01

    Sequence alignments and SISCAN analyses inferred multiple interspecies recombination events within RNA2 of strains GHu of Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Ta of Arabis mosaic virus (ArMV), two closely related subgroup A nepoviruses in the family Comoviridae. Interspecies recombination events were identified in the 5' untranslated region, the putative homing protein and movement protein genes but not in the coat protein gene and 3' untranslated region. These findings suggest a dynamic relationship between GFLV and ArMV, and a differential selection pressure on RNA2-encoded proteins with constraints in terms of function and co-adaptation that limit interspecies recombination to certain gene segments.

  5. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic.

  6. Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV): a new potyvirus species in the PRSV cluster.

    PubMed

    Yakoubi, Soumaya; Lecoq, Hervé; Desbiez, Cécile

    2008-08-01

    A potyvirus was isolated from a naturally infected squash plant in Algeria in 1986. Biological and serological data have revealed that the virus, initially described as H4, is related to other cucurbit-infecting potyviruses, particularly Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV) and Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV). To establish unequivocally the taxonomic status of H4, its full-length genome sequence was established. H4 shared identities of 70% and 65% at the amino acid level with MWMV and PRSV, respectively, indicating that H4 is a distinct species of the PRSV cluster. The name Algerian watermelon mosaic virus (AWMV) is proposed for this new potyvirus species.

  7. Zucchini green mottle mosaic virus is a new tobamovirus; comparison of its coat protein gene with that of kyuri green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ryu, K H; Min, B E; Choi, G S; Choi, S H; Kwon, S B; Noh, G M; Yoon, J Y; Choi, Y M; Jang, S H; Lee, G P; Cho, K H; Park, W M

    2000-01-01

    A novel virus we call zucchini green mottle mosaic virus (ZGMMV) was isolated from zucchini squash and its properties were determined. The size and shape of its virions, and other properties suggest that the virus is a tobamovirus. The coat protein (CP) genes of ZGMMV and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus (KGMMV), which also infects zucchini squash plants, were cloned and their nucleotides sequences were determined. The CP genes of ZGMMV and KGMMV are composed of 161 amino acid residues, and they share 77.6% amino acid identity. Western blot analysis showed that the two viruses are serologically related but not identical. Comparison of the sequences with those of sixteen other tobamoviruses revealed that the two viruses had much higher identity to cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), another tobamovirus infectious to cucurbit plants, than other tobamoviruses. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of ZGMMV were from 29.5 to 78.4% and from 29.3 to 77.6% identical, respectively, to those of other tobamoviruses. The predicted virion assembly origins of the two tobamoviruses were located in the CP region of the genomic RNAs, and the predicted secondary structures were more similar to that of CGMMV than those of other tobamoviruses. The seventeen tobamo-viruses could be classified into three main subgroups based on the phylogenetic tree analysis on the CP gene, and ZGMMV and KGMMV formed a third subgroup together with CGMMV and sunn-hemp mosaic virus (SHMV). These results show that ZGMMV is a previously unknown member of the Tobamovirus genus.

  8. Biological properties of pseudorecombinant and recombinant strains created with cucumber mosaic virus and tomato aspermy virus.

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, K; Carrère, I; Jacquemond, M; Balázs, E; Tepfer, M

    1997-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and tomato aspermy virus (TAV) are closely related cucumoviruses. We have made pseudorecombinant viruses in which the RNAs 3 of these two viruses have been exchanged and recombinant viruses containing chimeric RNA 3 molecules, in which the coat proteins and the 3'-end regions of CMV and TAV have been exchanged, giving rise to recombinants designated RT3 and TR3. The replication properties and the cell-to-cell and long-distance movement patterns of these pseudorecombinant and recombinant viruses were examined in different hosts. All the viruses were able to replicate and accumulate RNA 4 in protoplasts. The pseudorecombinants and the R1R2RT3 recombinant infected tobacco systemically, but the R1R2TR3 recombinant was not detectable, even in the inoculated leaves. Comparison of the abilities of the viruses to replicate in protoplasts and intact cucumber plants suggests that cell-to-cell movement factors are also encoded by RNAs 1 and/or 2. Major determinants of symptom severity in Nicotiana glutinosa are localized on the 3' part of RNA 3, and in Nicotiana benthamiana, more severe symptoms were observed with the T1T2R3 strain than with the others tested. PMID:9094632

  9. Making a Virus Visible: Francis O. Holmes and a biological assay for tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2014-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, viruses had yet to be defined in a material way. Instead, they were known better by what they were not - not bacteria, not culturable, and not visible with a light microscope. As with the ill-defined "gene" of genetics, viruses were microbes whose nature had not been revealed. Some clarity arrived in 1929 when Francis O. Holmes, a scientist at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Yonkers, NY) reported that Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) could produce local necrotic lesions on tobacco plants and that these lesions were in proportion to dilutions of the inoculum. Holmes' method, the local lesion assay, provided the first evidence that viruses were discrete infectious particles, thus setting the stage for physicochemical studies of plant viruses. In a field where there are few eponymous methods or diseases, Holmes' assay continues to be a useful tool for the study of plant viruses. TMV was a success because the local lesion assay "made the virus visible" and standardized the work of virology towards determining the nature of the virus.

  10. Molecular characterization and experimental host range of an isolate of Wissadula golden mosaic St. Thomas virus.

    PubMed

    Collins, A M; Mujaddad-ur-Rehman, Malik; Brown, J K; Reddy, C; Wang, A; Fondong, V; Roye, M E

    2009-12-01

    Partial genome segments of a begomovirus were previously amplified from Wissadula amplissima exhibiting yellow-mosaic and leaf-curl symptoms in the parish of St. Thomas, Jamaica and this isolate assigned to a tentative begomovirus species, Wissadula golden mosaic St. Thomas virus. To clone the complete genome of this isolate of Wissadula golden mosaic St. Thomas virus, abutting primers were designed to PCR amplify its full-length DNA-A and DNA-B components. Sequence analysis of the complete begomovirus genome obtained, confirmed that it belongs to a distinct begomovirus species and this isolate was named Wissadula golden mosaic St. Thomas virus-[Jamaica:Albion:2005] (WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05]). The genome of WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05] is organized similar to that of other bipartite Western Hemisphere begomoviruses. Phylogenetic analyses placed the genome components of WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05] in the Abutilon mosaic virus clade and showed that the DNA-A component is most closely related to four begomovirus species from Cuba, Tobacco leaf curl Cuba virus, Tobacco leaf rugose virus, Tobacco mottle leaf curl virus, and Tomato yellow distortion leaf virus. The putative Rep-binding-site motif in the common region of WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05] was observed to be identical to that of Chino del tomate virus-Tomato [Mexico:Sinaloa:1983], Sida yellow mosaic Yucatan virus-[Mexico:Yucatan:2005], and Tomato leaf curl Sinaloa virus-[Nicaragua:Santa Lucia], suggesting that WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05] is capable of forming viable pseudo-recombinants with these begomoviruses, but not with other members of the Abutilon mosaic virus clade. Biolistic inoculation of test plant species with partial dimers of the WGMSTV-[JM:Alb:05] DNA-A and DNA-B components showed that the virus was infectious to Nicotiana benthamiana and W. amplissima and the cultivated species Phaseolus vulgaris (kidney bean) and Lycopersicon esculentum (tomato). Infected W. amplissima plants developed symptoms similar to symptoms observed under field

  11. Specific sequence changes in the 5'-terminal region of the genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus are required for adaptation to tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ngon A Yassi, M; Dodds, J A

    1998-04-01

    The genome of satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) adapted to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), tomato mosaic virus or green tomato atypical mosaic virus consistently had two single base deletions at positions 1 and 61, corresponding to bases A and G, respectively, as compared to the type-strain genome which is naturally adapted to tobacco mild green mosaic virus (TMGMV). Transcript RNAs (STMV(TMV)) from clone pSTMV(TMV) which captured the deletions at positions 1 and 61 were infectious when co-inoculated to tobacco plants with either TMV or TMGMV at infection frequencies of > 90%. Two new STMV variants were created to investigate whether both deletions were essential for adaptation to TMV. These were STMV(TMGMV) deltaA1, which had the A at position 1 (A1) deleted, and STMV(TMGMV) deltaG61, which lacked G61. STMV(TMGMV) deltaA1 was infectious (75% frequency) in the presence of either TMV or TMGMV. Virion RNA of STMV(TMGMV) deltaA1 lost G61 after one infection cycle with TMV. This deletion did not occur in co-infections with TMGMV. STMV(TMGMV) deltaG61, like the clone STMV(TMGMV), was infectious (100% frequency) with TMGMV but TMV did not support this clone. When Nicotiana benthamiana protoplasts were transfected with STMV(TMGMV), STMV(TMGMV) deltaA1 or STMV(TMV), STMV replicated when TMGMV was the helper virus. STMV(TMV) and STMV(TMGMV) deltaA1 replicated in the presence of helper TMV, but STMV(TMGMV) did not, the same result as in whole plants. The deletion of A1 is thus essential for initial STMV adaptation to TMV and the eventual deletion of G61 is a predicted additional change.

  12. Genetic mapping of turnip mosaic virus resistance in Lactuca sativa.

    PubMed

    Robbins, M A; Witsenboer, H; Michelmore, R W; Laliberte, J F; Fortin, M G

    1994-11-01

    Presence of the dominant Tu gene in Lactuca sativa is sufficient to confer resistance to infection by turnip mosaic virus (TuMV). In order to obtain an immunological assay for the presence of TuMV in inoculated plants, the TuMV coat protein (CP) gene was cloned by amplification of a cDNA corresponding to the viral genome using degenerate primers designed from conserved potyvirus CP sequences. The TuMV CP was overexpressed in Escherichia coli, and polyclonal antibodies were produced. To locate Tu on the L. sativa genetic map, F3 families from a cross between cvs "Cobbham Green" (resistant to TuMV) and "Calmar" (susceptible) were genotyped for Tu. Families known to be recombinant in the region containing Tu were infected with TuMV and tested by the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using the anti-CP serum. This assay placed Tu between two random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers and 3.2 cM from Dm5/8 (which confers resistance to Bremia lactucae). Also, bulked segregant analysis was used to screen for additional RAPD markers tightly linked to the Tu locus. Five new markers linked to Tu were identified in this region, and their location on the genetic map was determined using informative recombinants in the region. Six markers were identified as being linked within 2.5 cM of Tu.

  13. Seeing tobacco mosaic virus through direct electron detectors.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Simon A; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Jakobi, Arjen J; Hagen, Wim J H; Sachse, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    With the introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to the field of electron cryo-microscopy, a wave of atomic-resolution structures has become available. As the new detectors still require comparative characterization, we have used tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a test specimen to study the quality of 3D image reconstructions from data recorded on the two direct electron detector cameras, K2 Summit and Falcon II. Using DED movie frames, we explored related image-processing aspects and compared the performance of micrograph-based and segment-based motion correction approaches. In addition, we investigated the effect of dose deposition on the atomic-resolution structure of TMV and show that radiation damage affects negative carboxyl chains first in a side-chain specific manner. Finally, using 450,000 asymmetric units and limiting the effects of radiation damage, we determined a high-resolution cryo-EM map at 3.35Å resolution. Here, we provide a comparative case study of highly ordered TMV recorded on different direct electron detectors to establish recording and processing conditions that enable structure determination up to 3.2Å in resolution using cryo-EM. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Magnetic birefringence study of isotropic suspensions of tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Photinos, P.; Rosenblatt, C.; Schuster, T. M.; Saupe, A.

    1987-12-01

    The magnetic field induced birefringence in isotropic aqueous suspensions of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was measured as a function of temperature and concentration in high magnetic fields (100 kG). The temperature range was between 15 and 50 °C and the concentration range was between 4 and 20 mg/cm3. We find that the Cotton-Mouton constant (C) increases with decreasing temperature by 15%-20% over the entire range and extrapolates to infinity at a finite temperature of 110 to 150 K. At constant temperature, the measured ρ/C(ρ=number of TMV particles per cm3 of suspension) can be expanded in a power series of ρ, where the coefficients are expressed by the irreducible cluster integrals. At 20 °C the experimental values can be fitted to the linear form: ρ/λC=(2.09×1030-1.35×1015ρ)G2/cm3. For rigid cylindrical particles with l=3000 Å and d=180 Å, and using the rigid hard particle interaction model, we find for the first order coefficient 0.62×1015, i.e., a significant deviation for the rigid hard-rod model. This deviation is also indicated by the variation of C with temperature. We discuss the results on TMV and of similar measurements on phage fd in terms of the interparticle interaction and rigidity of the particles.

  15. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  16. Xray Fiber Diffraction Studies of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufman, Anthony; Chatterjee, Arunava; Caspar, Donald L. D.; van Winkle, David H.

    1996-03-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a helical rod-like biopolymer comprised of a RNA chain surrounded by 49 protein subunits for every 3 turns of the RNA helix. The assembly displays a repeat length of 69 ÅColloidal suspensions of TMV exhibit isotropic, nematic, hexagonal-columnar, and smectic phases. The phase diagram is most strongly dependent on concentration. To our knowledge, fiber samples while used for other biopolymers, have not been prepared using TMV. Five microliter droplets of TMV solution were suspended between two glass rods. The droplets were allowed to dehydrate in a controlled humidity environment in a 5 Tesla magnetic field, resulting in fibers which exhibited highly oriented hexagonal-columnar liquid crystalline ordering. X-ray diffraction studies of the fibers shows data corresponding to 2.5 Åspacing. In addition, syncrotron x-ray studies on samples of nematic liquid crystal TMV (originally prepared in 1959) have shown data corresponding to 1.25 Åspacing. We present data analysis and structure modeling using simulation and angular deconvolution of the x-ray diffraction patterns.

  17. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  18. THE PREPARATION AND USE OF TOBACCO MOSAIC VIRUS CONTAINING RADIOACTIVE PHOSPHORUS

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, W. M.

    1942-01-01

    Normal and tobacco mosaic-diseased Turkish tobacco plants were grown in sand for a period of several weeks, during which they were fed daily a complete nutrient solution to which had been added disodium phosphate containing radioactive phosphorus. Determinations were made of the distribution of radioactive phosphorus in different fractions such as the wash from the sand and roots, the press cake obtained on pressing the juice from the plants, the protein and protein-free portions of the supernatant liquids obtained on ultracentrifugation of the juices, and the purified tobacco mosaic virus isolated from the diseased plants. Chemical analyses as well as radiographs of the normal and diseased leaves indicated that they contained the same amount of phosphorus. Approximately 30 per cent of the radioactive phosphorus absorbed by the diseased plants was found to be combined with the purified tobacco mosaic virus that was isolated from these plants. Following the inoculation of purified tobacco mosaic virus possessing high radioactivity to normal Turkish tobacco plants, most of the radioactivity was found to be associated with non-virus components of which about 40 per cent was in the inoculated and 60 per cent in the uninoculated portions of the plants. Although a small amount of radioactive virus was isolated from the uninoculated portions of the plants, it was impossible, because of a number of complicating factors which have been discussed, to draw from the results any reliable conclusions regarding the mode of reproduction of tobacco mosaic virus. PMID:19873320

  19. A Game-Theoretic Model of Interactions between Hibiscus Latent Singapore Virus and Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yi; Niu, Shengniao; Wong, Sek-Man

    2012-01-01

    Mixed virus infections in plants are common in nature and their interactions affecting host plants would depend mainly on plant species, virus strains, the order of infection and initial amount of inoculum. Hence, the prediction of outcome of virus competition in plants is not easy. In this study, we applied evolutionary game theory to model the interactions between Hibiscus latent Singapore virus (HLSV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana under co-infection in a plant host. The accumulation of viral RNA was quantified using qPCR at 1, 2 and 8 days post infection (dpi), and two different methods were employed to predict the dominating virus. TMV was predicted to dominate the game in the long run and this prediction was confirmed by both qRT-PCR at 8 dpi and the death of co-infected plants after 15 dpi. In addition, we validated our model by using data reported in the literature. Ten out of fourteen reported co-infection outcomes agreed with our predictions. Explanations were given for the four interactions that did not agree with our model. Hence, it serves as a valuable tool in making long term predictions using short term data obtained in virus co-infections. PMID:22623970

  20. Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; Junn, Justin; McCullough, Ian; Gore, David; Stubbs, Gerald

    2007-01-20

    Narcissus mosaic virus is a Potexvirus, a member of the Flexiviridae family of filamentous plant viruses. Fiber diffraction patterns from oriented sols of narcissus mosaic virus have been used to determine the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have a radius of 55+/-5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 34.45+/-0.5 A, with 7.8 subunits per turn of the helix. We conclude that all members of the Potexvirus genus have close to 8 subunits per helical turn.

  1. Radial density distribution and symmetry of a Potexvirus, narcissus mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Bian, Wen; Junn, Justin; McCullough, Ian; Gore, David; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2007-01-20

    Narcissus mosaic virus is a Potexvirus, a member of the Flexiviridae family of filamentous plant viruses. Fiber diffraction patterns from oriented sols of narcissus mosaic virus have been used to determine the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have a radius of 55 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 34.45 {+-} 0.5 A, with 7.8 subunits per turn of the helix. We conclude that all members of the Potexvirus genus have close to 8 subunits per helical turn.

  2. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  3. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Florida stain (ZYMV-FL) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. Inheritance of resistance to ZYMV-FL is conferred by a single recessive gene. Described here is single-reaction, polymerase chain reaction-based marker l...

  4. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  5. Genome Sequence of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Identified in Earwigs (Doru luteipes) through a Metagenomic Approach.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Márcio Tadeu; Paula, Débora Pires; Varsani, Arvind; Ribeiro, Simone Graça

    2017-03-16

    Here we report the first complete genome sequence of a cauliflower mosaic virus from Brazil, obtained from the gut content of the predator earwig (Doru luteipes). This virus has a genome of 8,030 nucleotides (nt) and shares 97% genome-wide identity with an isolate from Argentina.

  6. Stable Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus in wheat mediated by RNAi

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is one of the major wheat viruses in the Great Plains of the United States. Cultural practices are the primary method of disease management, though not fully effective. Genetic resistance is available but is temperature sensitive. Alternative approaches to viral res...

  7. Genome Sequence of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Identified in Earwigs (Doru luteipes) through a Metagenomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Godinho, Márcio Tadeu; Paula, Débora Pires; Varsani, Arvind

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Here we report the first complete genome sequence of a cauliflower mosaic virus from Brazil, obtained from the gut content of the predator earwig (Doru luteipes). This virus has a genome of 8,030 nucleotides (nt) and shares 97% genome-wide identity with an isolate from Argentina. PMID:28302781

  8. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tomato-Infecting Tomato Mottle Mosaic Virus in New York

    PubMed Central

    Padmanabhan, Chellappan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Rugang; Martin, Gregory B.; Fei, Zhangjun

    2015-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of an isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting tomatoes in New York was obtained using small RNA (sRNA) deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity with isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader distribution of this emerging virus is a cause for concern to the tomato industry. PMID:26701086

  9. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. The ZYMV-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL) is considered a major limitation to commercial watermelon production in the entire United States. Experiments with F2 and BC1 plants, d...

  10. Simultaneous identification and molecular characterization of viruses associated with an apple tree with mosaic symptom

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We conducted genomic sequencing to identify viruses associated with mosaic disease of an apple tree using the high-throughput sequencing (HTS) Illumina RNA-seq platform. The objective was to examine if rapid identification and characterization of viruses could be effectively achieved by RNA-seq anal...

  11. Genome sequencing, genetic diversity and field detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus using LAMP technology

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The recent outbreaks of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus on cucumber, melon and watermelon in Australia, Canada, and the U.S. highlight the importance in implementing a cleaned seed program to manage this seed-borne virus from introduction. Both Canadian and Australian isolates were closely relate...

  12. Identification of the Wheat Curl Mite as the Vector of Triticum Mosaic Virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a newly discovered virus found infecting wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in Kansas. This study was conducted to determine if the wheat curl mite (WCM, Aceria tosichella Keifer) and the bird cherry oat aphid (Rhopalosiphum padi L. ) could transmit TriMV. Using diffe...

  13. Economic impact of wheat streak mosaic virus in the Texas High Plains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), vectored by the wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella Keifer, is a major limiting factor in wheat production in the Texas Panhandle. It is the most frequently encountered virus in the region, affecting both shoot and root biomass, and consequently it can drastically red...

  14. Complete genome sequence of a Tomato mottle mosaic virus isolate from the United States

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) was first identified in the U.S. in tomatoes in Florida in 2010. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a U.S. ToMMV isolate from 2010. The full genome sequence of this emerging virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific ...

  15. Occurrence and distribution of pepper veinal mottle virus and cucumber mosaic virus in pepper in Ibadan, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Viral diseases constitute obstacles to pepper production in the world. In Nigeria, pepper plants are primarily affected by pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Pepper leaf curl Virus (TLCV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Pepper mottle virus (PMV) and a host of other viruses. The experiment was carried out with a diagnostic survey on the experimental field of the National Horticultural Research Institute, Ibadan, Nigeria and on pepper farms in six local government areas within Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria, forty samples were collected from each of the farms. Diseased samples were obtained from the field and taken to the laboratory for indexing. In ELISA test some of the samples from the pepper farms showed positive reaction to single infection with PVMV (36.79%), CMV (22.14%) while some others showed positive reaction to mixed infection of the two viruses (10%) but some also negative reaction to PVMV and CMV antisera (31.07). PMID:22495040

  16. First Report of Pepino Mosaic Virus Infecting Tomato in Mexico

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic has become endemic greenhouse tomato disease in many countries around the world. Its occurrence in Mexico has yet to be determined. In early spring of 2010, symptoms of yellow mosaic, chlorotic patches and fruit marbling were observed in approximately 50% of tomato plants in a commerc...

  17. Transgenic virus resistance in crop-wild Cucurbita pepo does not prevent vertical transmission of zucchini yellow mosaic virus

    Treesearch

    H. E. Simmons; Holly Prendeville; J. P. Dunham; M. J. Ferrari; J. D. Earnest; D. Pilson; G. P. Munkvold; E. C. Holmes; A. G. Stephenson

    2015-01-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an economically important pathogen of cucurbits that is transmitted both horizontally and vertically. Although ZYMV is seed-transmitted in Cucurbita pepo, the potential for seed transmission in virus-resistant transgenic cultivars is not known. We crossed and backcrossed a transgenic...

  18. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  19. Properties of satellite tobacco mosaic virus phenotypes expressed in the presence and absence of helper virus.

    PubMed

    Sivanandam, Venkatesh; Mathews, Deborah; Rao, A L N

    2015-09-01

    In this study, we assembled an Agrobacterium-based transient expression system for the ectopic expression of Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) (+) or (-) transcripts and their biological activity was confirmed when Nicotiana benthamiana plants were co-expressed with helper Tobacco mosaic virus replicase. Characterization of STMV in the presence and absence of its HV revealed: (i) HV-dependent expression of STMV (+) in N. benthamiana, but not in N. tabacum, generated a replication-deficient but translation and encapsidation competent variant lacking the highly conserved 3' 150 nucleotides (nt) (STMVΔ150); (ii) mutational analysis demonstrated that a conserved 3' stem-loop structure in wild type and STMVΔ150 located between nt 874 and 897 is essential for translation of CP; (iii) helper virus-independent expression of CP from wt STMV was competent for the assembly of empty aberrant virion-like particles; whereas, CP translated from STMVΔ150 resulted in disorganized CP aggregates suggesting a role for the 3'tRNA-like structure in STMV assembly.

  20. Rhizobacteria-mediated resistance against the blackeye cowpea mosaic strain of bean common mosaic virus in cowpea (Vigna unguiculata).

    PubMed

    Udaya Shankar, Arakere Chunchegowda; Chandra Nayaka, Siddaiah; Niranjan-Raj, Sathyanarayana; Bhuvanendra Kumar, Hanumanthaiah; Reddy, Munagala S; Niranjana, Siddapura Ramachandrappa; Prakash, Harishchandra Sripathy

    2009-10-01

    The present study investigated the effect of seven Bacillus-species plant-growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) seed treatments on the induction of disease resistance in cowpea against mosaic disease caused by the blackeye cowpea mosaic strain of bean common mosaic virus (BCMV). Initially, although all PGPR strains recorded significant enhancement of seed germination and seedling vigour, GBO3 and T4 strains were very promising. In general, all strains gave reduced BCMV incidence compared with the non-bacterised control, both under screen-house and under field conditions. Cowpea seeds treated with Bacillus pumilus (T4) and Bacillus subtilis (GBO3) strains offered protection of 42 and 41% against BCMV under screen-house conditions. Under field conditions, strain GBO3 offered 34% protection against BCMV. The protection offered by PGPR strains against BCMV was evaluated by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), with lowest immunoreactive values recorded in cowpea seeds treated with strains GBO3 and T4 in comparison with the non-bacterised control. In addition, it was observed that strain combination worked better in inducing resistance than individual strains. Cowpea seeds treated with a combination of strains GBO3 + T4 registered the highest protection against BCMV. PGPR strains were effective in protecting cowpea plants against BCMV under both screen-house and field conditions by inducing resistance against the virus. Thus, it is proposed that PGPR strains, particularly GBO3, could be potential inducers against BCMV and growth enhancers in cowpea. Copyright 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya.

  2. Nucleotide sequence of the coat protein genes of alstroemeria mosaic virus and amazon lily mosaic virus, a tentative species of genus potyvirus.

    PubMed

    Fuji, S; Terami, F; Furuya, H; Naito, H; Fukumoto, F

    2004-09-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the 3' terminal region of the genomes of Alstroemeria mosaic virus (AlsMV) and the Amazon lily mosaic virus (ALiMV) have been determined. These sequences contain the complete coding region of the viral coat protein (CP) gene followed by a 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR). AlsMV and ALiMV share 74.9% identity in the amino acid sequence of the CP, and 55.6% identity in the nucleotide sequence of the 3'-UTR. Phylogenetic analysis of these CP genes and 3'-UTRs in relation to those of 79 potyvirus species revealed that AlsMV and ALiMV should be assigned to the Potato virus Y (PVY) subgroup. AlsMV and ALiMV were concluded to have arisen independently within the PVY subgroup.

  3. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  4. Surface mineralization and characterization of tobacco mosaic virus biotemplated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Alexander S.

    The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been utilized as a biotemplate in the formation of nanoparticles with the intent of furthering the understanding of the biotemplated nanoparticles formed in the absence of an external reducing agent. Specifically, the work aims to provide better knowledge of the final particle characteristics and how these properties could be altered to better fit the need of functional devices. Three achievements have been accomplished including a method for controlling final particle size, characterizing the resistivity of palladium coated TMV, and the application of TMV as an additive in nanometric calcium carbonate synthesis. Until the last 5 years, formation of metal nanoparticles on the surface of TMV has always occurred with the addition of an external reducing agent. The surface functionalities of genetically engineered TMV allow for the reduction of palladium in the absence of an external reducing agent. This process has been furthered to understand how palladium concentration affects the final coating uniformity and thickness. By confirming an ideal ratio of palladium and TMV concentrations, a uniform coat of palladium is formed around the viral nanorod. Altering the number of palladium coating cycles at these concentrations allows for a controllable average diameter of the final nanorods. The average particle diameter was determined by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis by comparing the experimental results to the model of scattering by an infinitely long cylinder. The SAXS results were confirmed through transmission electron microscopy images of individual Pd-TMV nanorods. Secondly, methodologies to determine the electrical resistivity of the genetically engineered TMV biotemplated palladium nanoparticles were created to provide valuable previously missing information. Two fairly common nanoelectronic characterization techniques were combined to create the novel approach to obtain the desired

  5. Temperature-dependent Wsm1 and Wsm2 gene-specific blockage of viral long-distance transport provides resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are economically important viral pathogens of wheat. Wheat cultivars Mace with the resistance gene Wsm1 and Snowmass with the resistance gene Wsm2 are resistant to WSMV and TriMV, and WSMV, respectively. Viral resistance in both cult...

  6. Homoeologous recombination-based transfer and molecular cytogenetic mapping of a wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm3 from Thinopyrum intermedium to wheat.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Tatiana V; Zhang, Guorong; Liu, Wenxuan; Friebe, Bernd; Gill, Bikram S

    2017-03-01

    Here, we report the production of a wheat- Thinopyrum intermedium recombinant stock conferring resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus. Wheat streak mosaic caused by the wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an important disease of bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) worldwide. To date, only three genes conferring resistance to WSMV have been named and two, Wsm1 and Wsm3, were derived from the distantly related wild relative Thinopyrum intermedium. Wsm3 is only available in the form of a compensating wheat-Th. intermedium whole-arm Robertsonian translocation T7BS·7S#3L. Whole-arm alien transfers usually suffer from linkage drag, which prevents their use in cultivar improvement. Here, we report ph1b-induced homoeologous recombination to shorten the Th. intermedium segment and recover a recombinant chromosome consisting of the short arm of wheat chromosome 7B, part of the long arm of 7B, and the distal 43% of the long arm derived from the Th. intermedium chromosome arm 7S#3L. The recombinant chromosome T7BS·7BL-7S#3L confers resistance to WSMV at 18 and 24 °C and also confers resistance to Triticum mosaic virus, but only at 18 °C. Wsm3 is the only gene conferring resistance to WSMV at a high temperature level of 24 °C. We also developed a user-friendly molecular marker that will allow to monitor the transfer of Wsm3 in breeding programs. Wsm3 is presently being transferred to adapted hard red winter wheat cultivars and can be used directly in wheat improvement.

  7. Chemical reactivity of brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Running, W E; Ni, P; Kao, C C; Reilly, J P

    2012-10-12

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine residues with S-methylthioacetimidate across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of brome mosaic virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from 6 to 12, correlating well with the known pH-dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein's lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range.

  8. Artificial NS4 mosaic antigen of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Chang, J C; Ruedinger, B; Cong, M; Lambert, S; Lopareva, E; Purdy, M; Holloway, B P; Jue, D L; Ofenloch, B; Fields, H A; Khudyakov, Y E

    1999-12-01

    An artificial antigen composed of 17 small antigenic regions derived from the NS4-protein of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1 through 5 was designed and constructed. Eleven antigenic regions were derived from the 5-1-1 region, and 6 others were derived from the C-terminus of the NS4-protein of different genotypes. The gene encoding for this artificial antigen was assembled from synthetic oligonucleotides by a new approach designated as restriction enzyme-assisted ligation (REAL). The full-length synthetic gene was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione S-transferase. By the use of site-specific antibodies raised against synthetic peptides, it was shown that all regions for which sequence-specific antibodies were obtained were accessible to antibody binding. The diagnostic relevance of the NS4 artificial antigen was demonstrated by testing this antigen with 4 HCV seroconversion panels and a panel of previously tested and stored serum specimens. The artificial antigen was found to specifically detect anti-NS4 antibodies in a number of specimens that were previously found to be anti-NS4 negative. Furthermore, this antigen detected anti-NS4 activity earlier in 2 of 4 seroconversion panels than did the antigen used in a commercially available supplemental assay. Equally important is the observation that the artificial NS4 antigen demonstrated equivalent anti-NS4 immunoreactivity with serum specimens obtained from patients infected with different HCV genotypes, whereas the NS4 recombinant protein derived from genotype 1, used in the commercial supplemental test, was less immunoreactive with serum specimens containing HCV genotypes 2, 3, and 4. Collectively, these data support the significant diagnostic potential of the NS4 mosaic antigen. The strategy employed in this study may be applied to the design and construction of other artificial antigens with improved diagnostically pertinent properties. J. Med. Virol. 59:437-450 1999. Copyright

  9. Chemical Reactivity of Brome Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein

    PubMed Central

    Running, W. E.; Ni, P.; Kao, C. C.; Reilly, J. P.

    2012-01-01

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine resides with S-methylthioacetimidate (SMTA) across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of Brome Mosaic Virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from six to twelve, correlating well with the known pH dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein’s lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range. PMID:22750573

  10. Complete genome sequencing of two causative viruses of cassava mosaic disease in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Oteng-Frimpong, R; Levy, Y; Torkpo, S K; Danquah, E Y; Offei, S K; Gafni, Y

    2012-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMV), caused by one or a combination of cassava mosaic geminiviruses, is ranked among the most important constraints to profitable and efficient production of cassava. Effective control measures require in-depth knowledge of the viral causative agent. Using rolling-circle amplification and unique enzymes, the full genome of two species of cassava mosaic geminivirus isolated from infected cassava plants in Ghana were cloned into pCambia 1300 and pET-28b. The sequences of the genome were determined on an ABI sequencer and a pairwise comparison was performed with other cassava-infecting geminiviruses from different countries. It was revealed that cassava grown in Ghana is attacked by two species of geminivirus in either single or mixed infections. These are the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and the East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV)-like, with high sequence similarity of 94% and 80%, respectively, between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of each virus, and 66% and 41% similarity of the common region (CR) (for A and B accordingly). The DNA-A of ACMV and EACMV-like contained 2781 and 2800 nucleotides, respectively, while their DNA-B components had 2725 and 2734 nucleotides, respectively. ACMV DNA-A was over 97% similar to those of other ACMVs from the continent. In contrast, EACMV-like DNA-A was over 98% similar to the isolates from Cameroon and other West African countries, and less than 88% similar to other EACMV species. Thus ACMV and EACMV-like were named African cassava mosaic virus-Ghana and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus-Ghana. Computer analysis revealed that their genome arrangement follows the typical old world bipartite begomovirus genome. The association of these two species and their interaction might account for the severe symptoms observed on infected plants in the field and in the greenhouse.

  11. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  12. Infectivity analysis of a blackgram isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus and genetic assortment with MYMIV in selective hosts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Rouhibakhsh, A; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2011-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent is caused by two important virus species viz. Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. The genomic components of a begomovirus causing yellow mosaic disease in blackgram in southern India were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison of DNA A component shows the virus isolate to be a variant of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus:-(MYMV-[IN:Vam:05]). However, DNA B component of the present virus isolate has greater similarity (92%) to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus. Agroinoculations of the viral clones produced typical yellow mosaic symptoms in blackgram and mungbean, severe leaf curl and stunting in French bean, similar to blackgram isolate of MYMIV. Blackgram isolates of both the virus species were only mildly infectious on cowpea, produced atypical leaf curl symptoms and not yellow or golden mosaic. In agroinoculations done by exchanging genomic components, symptom expression was seen only in French bean. In cowpea, blackgram and mungbean there was no visible symptoms though viral DNA could be detected by PCR.

  13. Satellite panicum mosaic virus coat protein enhances the performance of plant virus gene vectors.

    PubMed

    Everett, Anthany L; Scholthof, Herman B; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2010-01-05

    The coat protein of satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPCP) is known to effectively protect its cognate RNA from deleterious events, and here, we tested its stabilizing potential for heterologous virus-based gene vectors in planta. In support of this, a Potato virus X (PVX) vector carrying the SPMV capsid protein (PVX-SPCP) gene was stable for at least three serial systemic passages through Nicotiana benthamiana. To test the effect of SPCP in trans, PVX-SPCP was co-inoculated onto N. benthamiana together with a Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) vector carrying a green fluorescent protein (GFP) gene that normally does not support systemic GFP expression. In contrast, co-inoculation of TBSV-GFP plus PVX-SPCP resulted in GFP accumulation and concomitant green fluorescent spots in upper, non-inoculated leaves in a temperature-responsive manner. These results suggest that the multifaceted SPMV CP has intriguing effects on virus-host interactions that surface in heterologous systems.

  14. Production of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Antigens in Plants Using Bamboo Mosaic Virus-Based Vector

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Yi-Ling; Huang, Ying-Wen; Lin, Na-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Ling; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is among the major threats to public health in Asia. For disease control and prevention, the efficient production of safe and effective vaccines against JEV is in urgent need. In this study, we produced a plant-made JEV vaccine candidate using a chimeric virus particle (CVP) strategy based on bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) for epitope presentation. The chimeric virus, designated BJ2A, was constructed by fusing JEV envelope protein domain III (EDIII) at the N-terminus of BaMV coat protein, with an insertion of the foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A peptide to facilitate the production of both unfused and epitope-presenting for efficient assembly of the CVP vaccine candidate. The strategy allowed stable maintenance of the fusion construct over long-term serial passages in plants. Immuno-electron microscopy examination and immunization assays revealed that BJ2A is able to present the EDIII epitope on the surface of the CVPs, which stimulated effective neutralizing antibodies against JEV infection in mice. This study demonstrates the efficient production of an effective CVP vaccine candidate against JEV in plants by the BaMV-based epitope presentation system. PMID:28515719

  15. Production of Japanese Encephalitis Virus Antigens in Plants Using Bamboo Mosaic Virus-Based Vector.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsung-Hsien; Hu, Chung-Chi; Liao, Jia-Teh; Lee, Yi-Ling; Huang, Ying-Wen; Lin, Na-Sheng; Lin, Yi-Ling; Hsu, Yau-Heiu

    2017-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) is among the major threats to public health in Asia. For disease control and prevention, the efficient production of safe and effective vaccines against JEV is in urgent need. In this study, we produced a plant-made JEV vaccine candidate using a chimeric virus particle (CVP) strategy based on bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) for epitope presentation. The chimeric virus, designated BJ2A, was constructed by fusing JEV envelope protein domain III (EDIII) at the N-terminus of BaMV coat protein, with an insertion of the foot-and-mouth disease virus 2A peptide to facilitate the production of both unfused and epitope-presenting for efficient assembly of the CVP vaccine candidate. The strategy allowed stable maintenance of the fusion construct over long-term serial passages in plants. Immuno-electron microscopy examination and immunization assays revealed that BJ2A is able to present the EDIII epitope on the surface of the CVPs, which stimulated effective neutralizing antibodies against JEV infection in mice. This study demonstrates the efficient production of an effective CVP vaccine candidate against JEV in plants by the BaMV-based epitope presentation system.

  16. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    DOEpatents

    Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos, NM; Perkins, Simon [Los Alamos, NM; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy [Los Alamos, NM; Fischer, William M [Los Alamos, NM; Theiler, James [Los Alamos, NM; Letvin, Norman [Boston, MA; Haynes, Barton F [Durham, NC; Hahn, Beatrice H [Birmingham, AL; Yusim, Karina [Los Alamos, NM; Kuiken, Carla [Los Alamos, NM

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  17. Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus and Banana bract mosaic virus in cardamom using SYBR Green based reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Siljo, A; Bhat, A I; Biju, C N

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom being perennial, propagated vegetatively, detecting viruses in planting material is important to check the spread of viruses through infected material. Thus development of effective and sensitive assay for detection of viruses is need of the time. In this view, assay for the detection of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), infecting cardamom was developed using SYBR Green one step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The RT-qPCR assay amplified all isolates of CdMV and BBrMV tested but no amplification was obtained with RNA of healthy plants. Recombinant plasmids carrying target virus regions corresponding to both viruses were quantified, serially diluted and used as standards in qPCR to develop standard curve to enable quantification. When tenfold serial dilutions of the total RNAs from infected plants were tested through RT-qPCR, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to be 16 copies for CdMV and 10 copies for BBrMV, which was approximately 1,000-fold higher than the conventional RT-PCR. The RT-qPCR assay was validated by testing field samples collected from different cardamom growing regions of India. This is the first report of RT-qPCR assay for the detection of CdMV and BBrMV in cardamom.

  18. First report of blueberry mosaic disease caused by blueberry mosaic associated virus in Kentucky

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In 2011, a grower in Casey County Kentucky observed persistent yellow, green, and red mosaic patterns on leaves of highbush blueberry plants. Twenty-three randomly-scattered ‘Bluecrop’ plants out of approximately 1,400 5-year-old plants showed symptoms, with coverage ranging from 5% to 100%. Asympto...

  19. First report of Sorghum mosaic virus causing mosaic in Miscanthus sinesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Miscanthus is being evaluated as a bioenergy feedstock because of its potentially significant biomass production, perennial habit, and lack of major diseases and pests. It is also a valuable parent in the sugarcane breeding program as source of cold tolerance. Mosaic symptoms were observed on a clo...

  20. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L.; Borah, Basanta K.; Resmi, Thulasi R.; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-01-01

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A. PMID:27690084

  1. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L; Borah, Basanta K; Resmi, Thulasi R; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-09-28

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A.

  2. PeaT1-induced systemic acquired resistance in tobacco follows salicylic acid-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Yang, Xiufen; Qiu, Dewen; Guo, Lihua; Zeng, Hongmei; Mao, Jianjun; Gao, Qiufeng

    2011-04-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is an inducible defense mechanism which plays a central role in protecting plants from pathogen attack. A new elicitor, PeaT1 from Alternaria tenuissima, was expressed in Escherichia coil and characterized with systemic acquired resistance to tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). PeaT1-treated plants exhibited enhanced systemic resistance with a significant reduction in number and size of TMV lesions on wild tobacco leaves as compared with control. The quantitative analysis of TMV CP gene expression with real-time quantitative PCR showed there was reduction in TMV virus concentration after PeaT1 treatment. Similarly, peroxidase (POD) activity and lignin increased significantly after PeaT1 treatment. The real-time quantitative PCR revealed that PeaT1 also induced the systemic accumulation of pathogenesis-related gene, PR-1a and PR-1b which are the markers of systemic acquired resistance (SAR), NPR1 gene for salicylic acid (SA) signal transduction pathway and PAL gene for SA synthesis. The accumulation of SA and the failure in development of similar level of resistance as in wild type tobacco plants in PeaT1 treated nahG transgenic tobacco plants indicated that PeaT1-induced resistance depended on SA accumulation. The present work suggested that the molecular mechanism of PeaT1 inducing disease resistance in tobacco was likely through the systemic acquired resistance pathway mediated by salicylic acid and the NPR1 gene.

  3. Complete genome sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus, a potyvirus, occurring in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucinda, N; da Rocha, W B; Inoue-Nagata, A K; Nagata, T

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, was determined. The sequence was 9745 nucleotides long, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. The genome contained a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3085 amino acids, which contained the typically conserved motifs found in members of the genus Potyvirus and an additional P3-PIPO (pretty interesting potyvirus ORF). In a pairwise comparison with other potyvirus sequences, the full genome of PepYMV shared a maximum of 63.84 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mottle virus (PepMoV), followed by verbena virus Y (VVY, 62.11 %), potato virus Y (PVY, 62.07 %) and Peru tomato mosaic virus (PTV, 62.00 %). Based upon a phylogenetic analysis, PepYMV was most closely related to PepMoV and PTV, within the PVY subgroup cluster, like most potyviruses isolated in solanaceous hosts in South America.

  4. Generation of transgenic watermelon resistant to Zucchini yellow mosaic virus and Papaya ringspot virus type W.

    PubMed

    Yu, Tsong-Ann; Chiang, Chu-Hui; Wu, Hui-Wen; Li, Chin-Mei; Yang, Ching-Fu; Chen, Jun-Han; Chen, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Shyi-Dong

    2011-03-01

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Papaya ringspot virus type W (PRSV W) are major limiting factors for production of watermelon worldwide. For the effective control of these two viruses by transgenic resistance, an untranslatable chimeric construct containing truncated ZYMV coat protein (CP) and PRSV W CP genes was transferred to commercial watermelon cultivars by Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Using our protocol, a total of 27 putative transgenic lines were obtained from three cultivars of 'Feeling' (23 lines), 'China baby' (3 lines), and 'Quality' (1 line). PCR and Southern blot analyses confirmed that the chimeric construct was incorporated into the genomic DNA of the transformants. Greenhouse evaluation of the selected ten transgenic lines of 'Feeling' cultivar revealed that two immune lines conferred complete resistance to ZYMV and PRSV W, from which virus accumulation were not detected by Western blotting 4 weeks after inoculation. The transgenic transcript was not detected, but small interfering RNA (siRNA) was readily detected from the two immune lines and T(1) progeny of line ZW 10 before inoculation, indicating that RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS) is the underlying mechanism for the double-virus resistance. The segregation ratio of T(1) progeny of the immune line ZW10 indicated that the single inserted transgene is nuclearly inherited and associated with the phenotype of double-virus resistance as a dominant trait. The transgenic lines derived from the commercial watermelon cultivars have great potential for control of the two important viruses and can be implemented directly without further breeding.

  5. Novel N Gene-Associated, Temperature-Independent Resistance to the Movement of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Vectors Neutralized by a Cucumber Mosaic Virus RNA1 Transgene

    PubMed Central

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2002-01-01

    The N gene conditions for resistance to Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) but only below 28°C. However, a TMV-based vector expressing green fluorescent protein (TMV-GFP) showed only limited movement at 33°C in tobacco plants harboring the N gene and other genes cointrogressed from Nicotiana glutinosa. TMV-GFP moved efficiently in tobacco plants that either lacked these genes or that contained the N gene but were transgenic for RNA1 of Cucumber mosaic virus. These findings identified novel temperature-independent resistance to the movement of TMV-GFP which could be neutralized by a different viral transgene. Using the N gene and nahG gene-transgenic tobacco, we show that this novel resistance is manifested specifically by the N gene itself and operates via a pathway independent of salicylic acid. PMID:12438616

  6. Cucumber mosaic virus as a presentation system for a double hepatitis C virus-derived epitope.

    PubMed

    Nuzzaci, M; Piazzolla, G; Vitti, A; Lapelosa, M; Tortorella, C; Stella, I; Natilla, A; Antonaci, S; Piazzolla, P

    2007-01-01

    Chimeric plant viruses are emerging as promising vectors for use in innovative vaccination strategies. In this context, cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has proven to be a suitable carrier of the hepatitis C virus (HCV)-derived R9 mimotope. In the present work, a new chimeric CMV, expressing on its surface the HCV-derived R10 mimotope, was produced but lost the insert after the first passage on tobacco. A comparative analysis between R10- and R9-CMV properties indicated that R9-CMV stability was related to structural features typical of the foreign insert. Thus, in order to combine high virus viability with strong immuno-stimulating activity, we doubled R9 copies on each of the 180 coat protein (CP) subunits of CMV. One of the chimeras produced by this approach (2R9-CMV) was shown to systemically infect the host, stably maintaining both inserts. Notably, it was strongly recognized by sera of HCV-infected patients and, as compared with R9-CMV, displayed an enhanced ability to stimulate lymphocyte IFN-gamma production. The high immunogen levels achievable in plants or fruits infected with 2R9-CMV suggest that this chimeric form of CMV may be useful in the development of oral vaccines against HCV.

  7. Pea-derived vaccines demonstrate high immunogenicity and protection in rabbits against rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    PubMed

    Mikschofsky, Heike; Schirrmeier, Horst; Keil, Günther M; Lange, Bodo; Polowick, Patricia L; Keller, Wilf; Broer, Inge

    2009-08-01

    Vaccines against rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus (RHDV) are commercially produced in experimentally infected rabbits. A genetically engineered and manufactured version of the major structural protein of RHDV (VP60) is considered to be an alternative approach for vaccine production. Plants have the potential to become an excellent recombinant production system, but the low expression level and insufficient immunogenic potency of plant-derived VP60 still hamper its practical use. In this study, we analysed the expression of a novel multimeric VP60-based antigen in four different plant species, including Nicotiana tabacum L., Solanum tuberosum L., Brassica napus L. and Pisum sativum L. Significant differences were detected in the expression patterns of the novel fusion antigen cholera toxin B subunit (CTB)::VP60 (ctbvp60(SEKDEL)) at the mRNA and protein levels. Pentameric CTB::VP60 molecules were only detected in N. tabacum and P. sativum, and displayed equal levels of CTB, at approximately 0.01% of total soluble protein (TSP), and traces of detectable VP60. However, strong enhancement of the CTB protein content via self-fertilization was only observed in P. sativum, where it reached up to 0.7% of TSP. In rabbits, a strong decrease in the protective vaccine dose required from 48-400 microg potato-derived VP60 [Castanon, S., Marin, M.S., Martin-Alonso, J.M., Boga, J.A., Casais, R., Humara, J.M., Ordas, R.J. and Parra, F. (1999) Immunization with potato plants expressing VP60 protein protects against rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus. J. Virol. 73, 4452-4455; Castanon, S., Martin-Alonso, J.M., Marin, M.S., Boga, J.A., Alonso, P., Parra, F. and Ordas, R.J. (2002) The effect of the promoter on expression of VP60 gene from rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus in potato plants. Plant Sci. 162, 87-95] to 0.56-0.28 microg antigenic VP60 (measured with VP60 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay) of crude CTB::VP60 pea extracts was demonstrated. Rabbits immunized with pea-derived CTB

  8. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts.

  9. Identification by immunoprecipitation of cauliflower mosaic virus in vitro major translation product with a specific serum against viroplasm protein

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Muller, S.; Lebeurier, G.; Hirth, L.

    1982-01-01

    A highly specific antiserum was prepared against purified cauliflower mosaic virus viroplasm-protein (VmP). A virus specific in vitro major translation product (TPmaj), encoded by the 19S poly(A)+ RNA fraction from cauliflower mosaic virus infected turnip leaves, was recognized by this antiserum. The N-terminal sequence of TPmaj corresponds to the sequence following the first in-phase initiation codon in gene VI of the cauliflower mosaic virus genome. Both VmP and TPmaj have blocked termini and probably start from the same AUG codon. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 3.Fig. 5. PMID:16453427

  10. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  11. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

  12. THE Bct-1 LOCUS FOR RESISTANCE TO BEET CURLY TOP VIRUS IS ASSOCIATED WITH QUANTITATIVE RESISTANCE TO BEAN DWARF MOSAIC VIRUS IN COMMON BEAN

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Host resistance provides effective control of some diseases induced by geminiviruses in common bean. A recessive gene bgm-1 conditions resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and is located on linkage group B3 near the bc-12 gene for resistance to Bean common mosaic virus. The dominan...

  13. Contact transmission of Tobacco mosaic virus: a quantitative analysis of parameters relevant for virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Soledad; Díaz, Maira; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2011-05-01

    Transmission between hosts is required for the maintenance of parasites in the host population and determines their ultimate evolutionary success. The transmission ability of parasites conditions their evolution in two ways: on one side, it affects the genetic structure of founded populations in new hosts. On the other side, parasite traits that increase transmission efficiency will be selected for. Therefore, knowledge of the factors and parameters that determine transmission efficiency is critical to predict the evolution of parasites. For plant viruses, little is known about the parameters of contact transmission, a major way of transmission of important virus genera and species. Here, we analyze the factors determining the efficiency of contact transmission of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) that may affect virus evolution. As it has been reported for other modes of transmission, the rate of TMV transmission by contact depended on the contact opportunities between an infected and a noninfected host. However, TMV contact transmission differed from other modes of transmission, in that a positive correlation between the virus titer in the source leaf and the rate of transmission was not found within the range of our experimental conditions. Other factors associated with the nature of the source leaf, such as leaf age and the way in which it was infected, had an effect on the rate of transmission. Importantly, contact transmission resulted in severe bottlenecks, which did not depend on the host susceptibility to infection. Interestingly, the effective number of founders initiating the infection of a new host was highly similar to that reported for aphid-transmitted plant viruses, suggesting that this trait has evolved to an optimum value.

  14. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed.

  15. Host Adaptation of Soybean Dwarf Virus Following Serial Passages on Pea (Pisum sativum) and Soybean (Glycine max).

    PubMed

    Tian, Bin; Gildow, Frederick E; Stone, Andrew L; Sherman, Diana J; Damsteegt, Vernon D; Schneider, William L

    2017-06-21

    Soybean Dwarf Virus (SbDV) is an important plant pathogen, causing economic losses in soybean. In North America, indigenous strains of SbDV mainly infect clover, with occasional outbreaks in soybean. To evaluate the risk of a US clover strain of SbDV adapting to other plant hosts, the clover isolate SbDV-MD6 was serially transmitted to pea and soybean by aphid vectors. Sequence analysis of SbDV-MD6 from pea and soybean passages identified 11 non-synonymous mutations in soybean, and six mutations in pea. Increasing virus titers with each sequential transmission indicated that SbDV-MD6 was able to adapt to the plant host. However, aphid transmission efficiency on soybean decreased until the virus was no longer transmissible. Our results clearly demonstrated that the clover strain of SbDV-MD6 is able to adapt to soybean crops. However, mutations that improve replication and/or movement may have trade-off effects resulting in decreased vector transmission.

  16. Nucleotide sequence of the bean strain of southern bean mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Othman, Y; Hull, R

    1995-01-10

    The genome of the bean strain of southern bean mosaic virus (SBMV-B) comprises 4109 nucleotides and thus is slightly shorter than those of the two other sequenced sobemoviruses (southern bean mosaic virus, cowpea strain (SBMV-C) and rice yellow mottle virus (RYMV)). SBMV-B has an overall sequence similarity with SBMV-C of 55% and with RYMV of 45%. Three potential open reading frames (ORFs) were recognized in SBMV-B which were in similar positions in the genomes of SBMV-C and RYMV. However, there was no analog of SBMV-C and RYMV ORF 3. From a comparison of the predicted sequences of the ORFs of these three sobemoviruses and of the noncoding regions, it is suggested that the two SBMV strains differ from one another as much as they do from RYMV and that they should be considered as different viruses.

  17. Comparison of the Oilseed rape mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus movement proteins (MP) reveals common and dissimilar MP functions for tobamovirus spread.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Pasquier, Adrien; Ferriol, Inmaculada; Mély, Yves; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-05-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is a longstanding model for studying virus movement and macromolecular transport through plasmodesmata (PD). Its movement protein (MP) interacts with cortical microtubule (MT)-associated ER sites (C-MERs) to facilitate the formation and transport of ER-associated viral replication complexes (VRCs) along the ER-actin network towards PD. To investigate whether this movement mechanism might be conserved between tobamoviruses, we compared the functions of Oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) MP with those of MP(TMV). We show that MP(ORMV) supports TMV movement more efficiently than MP(TMV). Moreover, MP(ORMV) localizes to C-MERs like MP(TMV) but accumulates to lower levels and does not localize to larger inclusions/VRCs or along MTs, patterns regularly seen for MP(TMV). Our findings extend the role of C-MERs in viral cell-to-cell transport to a virus commonly used for functional genomics in Arabidopsis. Moreover, accumulation of tobamoviral MP in inclusions or along MTs is not required for virus movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. USVL-370, A zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant watermelon breeding line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the development of a novel watermelon line ‘USVL-370’ [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] containing resistance to the zucchini yellow mosaic virus-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL). This breeding line is homozygous for the recessive eukaryotic elongation factor eIF4E allele associated wit...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates. PMID:27516509

  1. Study and Characterization of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Head-to-tail Assembly Assisted by Aniline Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Niu,Z.; Bruckman, M.; Kotakadi, V.; He, J.; Emrick, T.; Russell, T.; Yang, L.; Wang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional composite nanofibres with narrow dispersity, high aspect ratio and high processibility have been fabricated by head-to-tail self-assembly of rod-like tobacco mosaic virus assisted by aniline polymerization, which can promote many potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing and biomedical engineering.

  2. Complete Genome Sequence of a Tobacco-Infecting, Tomato-Blistering Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Melo, Fernando Lucas; Fernandes, Jhon Eric Alves; Ribeiro, Bergmann Morais

    2014-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a new tomato-blistering mosaic virus (ToBMV) isolate was determined. This tymovirus isolate was first described infecting tobacco during the 1980s, but it also infects other Solanaceae members experimentally. The genome has 6,257 nucleotides and shares 88% nucleotide identity with the ToBMV isolated from tomato. PMID:25103753

  3. Surprising results from a search for effective disinfectants for Tobacco mosaic virus-contaminated tools

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and four other tobamoviruses infected multiple petunia cultivars without producing obvious viral symptoms. A single cutting event on a TMV-infected plant was sufficient for transmission to many plants subsequently cut with the same clippers. A number of 'old standbys' an...

  4. Development and validation of kasp markers for wheat streak mosaic virus resistance gene Wsm2

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) can cause significant yield loss in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of North America. A recently identified WSMV resistance gene, Wsm2, was mapped to chromosome 3BS in germplasm line ‘CO960293–2’. Effective genetic markers tightly linked to the gene ...

  5. Genome Sequence of Euphorbia mosaic virus from Passionfruit and Euphorbia heterophylla in Florida.

    PubMed

    Polston, J E; Londoño, M A; Cohen, A L; Padilla-Rodriguez, M; Rosario, K; Breitbart, M

    2017-03-02

    Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) was found in a symptomatic passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) plant from Homestead, Florida, USA, as well as in the symptomatic weed Euphorbia heterophylla This is the first identification of EuMV in Florida and the United States and the first report of a natural infection of passionfruit by EuMV.

  6. Molecular and biological characterization of Tomato mottle mosaic virus and development of RT-PCR detection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its first identification as a new species infecting tomato in Mexico in 2013, Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) has shown to distribute broadly in the world. It this study, we intended to evaluate its genetic diversity, characterize its serological and biological properties, and compare them ...

  7. First Complete Genome Sequence of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus Isolated from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roger A. C.; Coutts, Brenda A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT We present here the first complete genome sequence of the tobamovirus Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) from Australia, obtained from an infected cucumber plant. Compared with other CGMMV genomes, its closest nucleotide identities were 99.6% to KP772568, 99.3% to KF155229, and 99.1% to DQ767631 from Canada, Israel, and India, respectively. PMID:28336589

  8. Complete genome sequence of a divergent strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus from China

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A novel strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus (JYMV-CN) was identified in a yam plant with foliar mottle symptoms in China. The complete genomic sequence of JYMV-CN was determined. Its genomic sequence of 9701 nucleotides encodes a polyprotein of 3247 amino acids. Its organization was virtually identi...

  9. USVL-380, A zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant watermelon breeding line

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the development of a novel watermelon line ‘USVL-380’ [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] resistant to the zucchini yellow mosaic virus-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL). This breeding line is homozygous for the recessive eukaryotic elongation factor eIF4E allele associated with ZYMV-resis...

  10. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  11. Inter- and intramolecular recombinations in the cucumber mosaic virus genome related to adaptation to alstroemeria.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuh-Kun; Goldbach, Rob; Prins, Marcel

    2002-04-01

    In four distinct alstroemeria-infecting cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolates, additional sequences of various lengths were present in the 3' nontranslated regions of their RNAs 2 and 3, apparently the result of intra- and intermolecular recombination events. Competition experiments revealed that these recombined RNA 2 and 3 segments increased the biological fitness of CMV in alstroemeria.

  12. Multiple loci condition seed transmission of Soybean mosaic virus in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Infection of soybean plants with Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), which is transmitted by aphids and through seed, can cause significant reductions in seed production and quality. Because seed-borne infections are the primary sources of inoculum for SMV infections in North America, host-plant resistance ...

  13. Role of Soybean mosaic virus-encoded proteins in seed and aphid transmission in soybean

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is seed and aphid transmitted and can cause significant reductions in yield and seed quality in soybean, Glycine max. The roles in seed and aphid transmission of selected SMV-encoded proteins were investigated by constructing chimeric recombinants between SMV 413 (efficien...

  14. Genetic diversity, host range and disease resistance to the emerging Tomato mottle mosaic virus on tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since its first discovery in 2013 in Mexico, Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV), a new tomato-infecting tobamovirus is now present in a number of countries (i.e., Brazil, China, and Israel) and several states in the U.S. There is little information available on the molecular and biological properti...

  15. Alternanthera mosaic virus – an alternative ‘model’ potexvirus of broad relevance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus which has been known for less than twenty years, but has already become widespread in many ornamental crops, and has been detected in Australasia, Europe, North and South America, and Asia. The natural host range to date includes...

  16. Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus identified in synthetic wheat lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is a significant pathogen in wheat that causes economic loss each year. WSMV is typically controlled using cultural practices such as the removal of volunteer wheat. Genetic resistance is limited. Until recently, no varieties have been available with major resista...

  17. Johnsongrass mosaic virus contributes to maize lethal necrosis in East Africa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Maize lethal necrosis (MLN), a severe virus disease of maize, has emerged in East Africa in recent years with devastating effects on production and food security where maize is a staple subsistence crop. In extensive surveys of MLN-symptomatic plants in East Africa, sequences of Johnsongrass mosaic ...

  18. First report of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus infecting greenhouse cucumber in Canada

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), in the genus Tobamovirus and family Virgaviridae, is a seed-borne pathogen on cucurbits. In early 2013, serious viral disease outbreaks on greenhouse cucumber crops were experienced by greenhouse vegetable growers in Alberta, Canada. CGMMV was detected i...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea. PMID:26823577

  20. Genome Sequence of Euphorbia mosaic virus from Passionfruit and Euphorbia heterophylla in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Londoño, M. A.; Cohen, A. L.; Padilla-Rodriguez, M.; Rosario, K.; Breitbart, M.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Euphorbia mosaic virus (EuMV) was found in a symptomatic passionfruit (Passiflora edulis) plant from Homestead, Florida, USA, as well as in the symptomatic weed Euphorbia heterophylla. This is the first identification of EuMV in Florida and the United States and the first report of a natural infection of passionfruit by EuMV. PMID:28254981

  1. Understanding the mechanism of resistance breaking on tomato by Tomato mottle mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) has broadened it’s distribution around the world. In our previous work, we observed a partial resistance breaking by ToMMV on tomato. To understand the mechanism of this resistance breaking, we carried out comparative analysis through Sanger sequencing, genotyping ...

  2. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides (nt) excluding the polyadenylated tail at the 3’ end. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyvirus...

  3. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A Distinct Member of the Family Potyviridae with an Unusually Long Leader Sequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete genome sequence of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a member in the family Potyviridae, has been determined to be 10,266 nucleotides excluding the 3’-polyadenylated tail. The genome encodes a large polyprotein of 3,112 amino acids with the ‘hall-mark proteins’ of potyviruses including a s...

  4. Physiological responses of hard red winter wheat to infection by wheat streak mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) causes significant yield loss in hard red winter wheat in the U.S. Southern High Plains. Despite the prevalence of this pathogen, little is known about the physiological response of wheat to WSMV infection. A 2-year study was initiated to (i) investigate the effect o...

  5. Complete genome sequence of a tomato infecting tomato mottle mosaic virus in New York

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Complete genome sequence of an emerging isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting experimental nicotianan benthamiana plants in up-state New York was obtained using small RNA deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity to ToMMV isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader d...

  6. Occurrence and yield effects of wheat infected with Triticum mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) infects wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. This study determined the occurrence of TriMV at three locations over three years and yield effects of wheat mechanically infected with TriMV. Wheat infection with TriMV, Wheat streak...

  7. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. Here, we report the transcriptional respo...

  8. Gladiolus plants transformed with single-chain variable fragment antibodies to Cucumber mosaic virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic plants of Gladiolus ‘Peter Pears’ or ‘Jenny Lee’ were developed that contain single-chain variable fragments (scFv) to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I or II. The CMV subgroup I heavy and light chain scFv fragments were placed under control of either the duplicated CaMV 35S or suga...

  9. Population Structure of Blueberry Mosaic Associated Virus: Evidence of Genetic Exchange in Geographically Distinct Isolates

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 59 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low genetic diversity in the movement and nucleoprotein regions and low ratios...

  10. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  11. Two biologically distinct isolates of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus lack seed transmissibility in cucumber.

    PubMed

    Glasa, M; Kollerova, E

    2007-01-01

    The seed transmission of the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) was studied in cucumber using two isolates unrelated in their biological characteristics. Although the virus could be readily detected in mature seeds harvested from infected cucumbers, the seedlings obtained from infected germinated seeds tested negative for ZYMV using both ELISA and RT-PCR assays. No evidence was obtained for transmission of two ZYMV isolates through seeds.

  12. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    DOEpatents

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  13. Replication and packaging of Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA containing Flock house virus RNA1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Bae; Kim, Do-Yeong; Cho, Tae-Ju

    2014-06-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) is a spherical plant virus that has a single 6.3 kb positive strand RNA as a genome. In this study, RNA1 sequence of Flock house virus (FHV) was inserted into the TYMV genome to test whether TYMV can accommodate and express another viral entity. In the resulting construct, designated TY-FHV, the FHV RNA1 sequence was expressed as a TYMV subgenomic RNA. Northern analysis of the Nicotiana benthamiana leaves agroinfiltrated with the TY-FHV showed that both genomic and subgenomic FHV RNAs were abundantly produced. This indicates that the FHV RNA1 sequence was correctly expressed and translated to produce a functional FHV replicase. Although these FHV RNAs were not encapsidated, the FHV RNA having a TYMV CP sequence at the 3'-end was efficiently encapsidated. When an eGFP gene was inserted into the B2 ORF of the FHV sequence, a fusion protein of B2-eGFP was produced as expected.

  14. Intracellular delivery of antibodies by chimeric Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) virus like particles

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ambily; Natraj, Usha; Karande, Anjali A.; Gulati, Ashutosh; Murthy, Mathur R. N.; Murugesan, Sathyabalan; Mukunda, Pavithra; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of antibodies has not been fully exploited as they fail to cross cell membrane. In this article, we have tested the possibility of using plant virus based nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of antibodies. For this purpose, Sesbania mosaic virus coat protein (CP) was genetically engineered with the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) at the βH-βI loop, to generate SeMV loop B (SLB), which self-assembled to virus like particles (VLPs) with 43 times higher affinity towards antibodies. CP and SLB could internalize into various types of mammalian cells and SLB could efficiently deliver three different monoclonal antibodies–D6F10 (targeting abrin), anti-α-tubulin (targeting intracellular tubulin) and Herclon (against HER2 receptor) inside the cells. Such a mode of delivery was much more effective than antibodies alone treatment. These results highlight the potential of SLB as a universal nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of antibodies. PMID:26905902

  15. Intracellular delivery of antibodies by chimeric Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) virus like particles.

    PubMed

    Abraham, Ambily; Natraj, Usha; Karande, Anjali A; Gulati, Ashutosh; Murthy, Mathur R N; Murugesan, Sathyabalan; Mukunda, Pavithra; Savithri, Handanahal S

    2016-02-24

    The therapeutic potential of antibodies has not been fully exploited as they fail to cross cell membrane. In this article, we have tested the possibility of using plant virus based nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of antibodies. For this purpose, Sesbania mosaic virus coat protein (CP) was genetically engineered with the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) at the βH-βI loop, to generate SeMV loop B (SLB), which self-assembled to virus like particles (VLPs) with 43 times higher affinity towards antibodies. CP and SLB could internalize into various types of mammalian cells and SLB could efficiently deliver three different monoclonal antibodies-D6F10 (targeting abrin), anti-α-tubulin (targeting intracellular tubulin) and Herclon (against HER2 receptor) inside the cells. Such a mode of delivery was much more effective than antibodies alone treatment. These results highlight the potential of SLB as a universal nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of antibodies.

  16. Proteomic analysis of the plant-virus interaction in cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) resistant transgenic tomato.

    PubMed

    Di Carli, Mariasole; Villani, Maria Elena; Bianco, Linda; Lombardi, Raffaele; Perrotta, Gaetano; Benvenuto, Eugenio; Donini, Marcello

    2010-11-05

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), a member of the Cucumovirus genus, is the causal agent of several plant diseases in a wide range of host species, causing important economic losses in agriculture. Because of the lack of natural resistance genes in most crops, different genetic engineering strategies have been adopted to obtain virus-resistant plants. In a previous study, we described the engineering of transgenic tomato plants expressing a single-chain variable fragment antibody (scFv G4) that are specifically protected from CMV infection. In this work, we characterized the leaf proteome expressed during compatible plant-virus interaction in wild type and transgenic tomato. Protein changes in both inoculated and apical leaves were revealed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE) coupled to differential in gel electrophoresis (DIGE) technology. A total of 2084 spots were detected, and 50 differentially expressed proteins were identified by nanoscale liquid chromatographic-electrospray ionization-ion trap-tandem mass spectrometry (nLC-ESI-IT-MS/MS). The majority of these proteins were related to photosynthesis (38%), primary metabolism (18%), and defense activity (14%) and demonstrated to be actively down regulated by CMV in infected leaves. Moreover, our analysis revealed that asymptomatic apical leaves of transgenic inoculated plants had no protein profile alteration as compared to control wild type uninfected plants demonstrating that virus infection is confined to the inoculated leaves and systemic spread is hindered by the CMV coat protein (CP)-specific scFv G4 molecules. Our work is the first comparative study on compatible plant-virus interactions between engineered immunoprotected and susceptible wild type tomato plants, contributing to the understanding of antibody-mediated disease resistance mechanisms.

  17. Tomato Mosaic Virus Replication Protein Suppresses Virus-Targeted Posttranscriptional Gene Silencing

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Kenji; Tsuda, Shinya; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo

    2003-01-01

    Posttranscriptional gene silencing (PTGS), a homology-dependent RNA degradation system, has a role in defending against virus infection in plants, but plant viruses encode a suppressor to combat PTGS. Using transgenic tobacco in which the expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) is posttranscriptionally silenced, we investigated a tomato mosaic virus (ToMV)-encoded PTGS suppressor. Infection with wild-type ToMV (L strain) interrupted GFP silencing in tobacco, coincident with visible symptoms, whereas some attenuated strains of ToMV (L11 and L11A strains) failed to suppress GFP silencing. Analyses of recombinant viruses containing the L and L11A strains revealed that a single base change in the replicase gene, which causes an amino acid substitution, is responsible for the symptomless and suppressor-defective phenotypes of the attenuated strains. An agroinfiltration assay indicated that the 130K replication protein acts as a PTGS suppressor. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) of 21 to 25 nucleotides accumulated during ToMV infection, suggesting that the major target of the ToMV-encoded suppressor is downstream from the production of siRNAs in the PTGS pathway. Analysis with GFP-tagged recombinant viruses revealed that the suppressor inhibits the establishment of the ToMV-targeted PTGS system in the inoculated leaves but does not detectably suppress the activity of the preexisting, sequence-specific PTGS machinery there. Taken together, these results indicate that it is likely that the ToMV-encoded suppressor, the 130K replication protein, blocks the utilization of silencing-associated small RNAs, so that a homology-dependent RNA degradation machinery is not newly formed. PMID:14512550

  18. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  19. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  20. Crystal structure of the coat protein of the flexible filamentous papaya mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shaoqing; Wang, Tao; Bohon, Jen; Gagné, Marie-Ève Laliberté; Bolduc, Marilène; Leclerc, Denis; Li, Huilin

    2012-09-14

    Papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) is a filamentous plant virus that belongs to the Alphaflexiviridae family. Flexible filamentous viruses have defied more than two decades of effort in fiber diffraction, and no high-resolution structure is available for any member of the Alphaflexiviridae family. Here, we report our structural characterization of PapMV by X-ray crystallography and cryo-electron microscopy three-dimensional reconstruction. We found that PapMV is 135Å in diameter with a helical symmetry of ~10 subunits per turn. Crystal structure of the C-terminal truncated PapMV coat protein (CP) reveals a novel all-helix fold with seven α-helices. Thus, the PapMVCP structure is different from the four-helix-bundle fold of tobacco mosaic virus in which helix bundling dominates the subunit interface in tobacco mosaic virus and conveys rigidity to the rod virus. PapMV CP was crystallized as an asymmetrical dimer in which one protein lassoes the other by the N-terminal peptide. Mutation of residues critical to the inter-subunit lasso interaction abolishes CP polymerization. The crystal structure suggests that PapMV may polymerize via the consecutive N-terminal loop lassoing mechanism. The structure of PapMV will be useful for rational design and engineering of the PapMV nanoparticles into innovative vaccines.

  1. Pepino mosaic virus and Tomato torrado virus: two emerging viruses affecting tomato crops in the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Pedro; Sempere, Raqueln; Aranda, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular biology, epidemiology, and evolutionary dynamics of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) are much better understood than those of Tomato torrado virus (ToTV). The earliest descriptions of PepMV suggest a recent jump from nontomato species (e.g., pepino; Solanum muricatum) to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Its stability in contaminated plant tissues, its transmission through seeds, and the global trade of tomato seeds and fruits may have facilitated the global spread of PepMV. Stability and seed transmission also probably account for the devastating epidemics caused by already-established PepMV strains, although additional contributing factors may include the efficient transmission of PepMV by contact and the often-inconspicuous symptoms in vegetative tomato tissues. The genetic variability of PepMV is likely to have promoted the first phase of emergence (i.e., the species jump) and it continues to play an important role as the virus becomes more pervasive, progressing from regional outbreaks to pandemics. In contrast, the long-term progression of ToTV outbreaks is not yet clear and this may reflect factors such as the limited accumulation of the virus in infected plants, which has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude less than PepMV. The efficient dispersion of ToTV may therefore depend on dense populations of its principal vectors, Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum, as has been proposed for the necrogenic satellite RNA of Cucumber mosaic virus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. A bench-scale, cost effective and simple method to elicit Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus attack using ozone-mediated inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Nagendra-Prasad, D; Mohan, N; Murugesan, K

    2007-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate ozone for inactivation of Cucumber mosaic virus present in the inoculum and to stimulate Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus infection by using the inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum. Application of a T(4) (0.4mg/l) concentration of ozone to the inoculum containing Cucumber mosaic virus resulted in complete inactivation of the virus. The inactivated viral inoculum was mixed with a penetrator (delivery agent), referred to as T(4) preparation, and it was evaluated for the development of systemic acquired resistance in the tomato plants. Application of a T(4) preparation 5 days before inoculation with the Cucumber mosaic virus protected tomato plants from the effects of Cucumber mosaic virus. Among the components of the inactivated virus tested, coat protein subunits and aggregates were responsible for the acquired resistance in tomato plants. In field trials, the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that, Cucumber mosaic virus accumulation was significantly less for all the test plants (16%) sprayed with the T(4) preparation than untreated control plants (89.5%) at 28 days postinoculation (dpi). A remarkable increase in the activities of the total soluble phenolics (10-fold) and salicylic acid (16-fold) was detected 5 days after the treatment in foliar extracts of test plants relative to untreated control plants. The results showed that treatment of tomato plants with inactivated viral inoculum led to a significant enhancement of protection against Cucumber mosaic virus attack in a manner that mimics a real pathogen and induces systemic acquired resistance.

  3. Synergy between cucumber mosaic virus and zucchini yellow mosaic virus on Cucurbitaceae hosts tested by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Rong; Liao, Qiansheng; Feng, Junli; Li, Dingjun; Chen, Jishuang

    2007-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) are two principal viruses infecting cucurbitaceous crops, and their synergy has been repeatedly observed. In our present work, a real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction procedure was established to study the accumulation kinetics of these two viruses in single and combined infections at the molecular level. The accumulations of open reading frames (ORFs) for 1a, 2a, 3a and coat protein (CP) of CMV and CP of ZYMV were tested. In the single infection, CMV-Fny ORFs accumulated to their maxima in cucumber or bottle gourd at 14 d post-inoculation (dpi), and gradually declined thereafter. ZYMV-SD CP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 14 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. However, when co-infected with CMV-Fny and ZYMV-SD, the maximal accumulation levels of all viral ORFs were delayed. CMV-Fny ORFs reached their maxima at 21 dpi on both hosts, and ZYMV-SDCP ORF reached maximal accumulation at 21 and 28 dpi on cucumber and bottle gourd, respectively. Generally, the accumulation levels of CMV-Fny ORFs in the co-infection were higher than those in the single infection, whereas the accumulation of ZYMV-SD CP ORF showed a reverse result.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray analysis of papaya mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Todderud, E; Stubbs, G

    1993-12-05

    Papaya mosaic virus coat protein has been treated with trypsin and a large fragment of the intact protein has been crystallized in space group P3(1)21 or P3(2)21 (unit cell dimensions: a = b = 110 A, c = 237 A). The crystals diffract to 3.5 A resolution. Crystals of the untreated protein have also been grown. The untreated protein crystals diffract to 4 A resolution, but have a large mosaic spread. They have the same space group as the trypsin-treated protein crystals, but a much smaller unit cell (a = b = 72 A, c = 240 A).

  5. Classification of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infected watermelon seeds using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    The Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus (CGMMV) is a globally distributed plant virus. CGMMV-infected plants exhibit severe mosaic symptoms, discoloration, and deformation. Therefore, rapid and early detection of CGMMV infected seeds is very important for preventing disease damage and yield losses. Raman spectroscopy was investigated in this study as a potential tool for rapid, accurate, and nondestructive detection of infected seeds. Raman spectra of healthy and infected seeds were acquired in the 400 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1 wavenumber range and an algorithm based on partial least-squares discriminant analysis was developed to classify infected and healthy seeds. The classification model's accuracies for calibration and prediction data sets were 100% and 86%, respectively. Results showed that the Raman spectroscopic technique has good potential for nondestructive detection of virus-infected seeds.

  6. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  7. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic virus—weak...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic virus—weak...

  9. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic virus—weak...

  10. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic virus—weak...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic virus—weak...

  12. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  13. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Huynh, Nhung T.; Hesketh, Emma L.; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T.; Johnson, John E.; Ranson, Neil A.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Reddy, Vijay S.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed. PMID:27021160

  14. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-05

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed.

  15. Nanoparticle encapsidation of Flock house virus by auto assembly of Tobacco mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Payal D; Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Lee, Gloria; Thi, Phillip; Zhou, Yiyang; Kearney, Christopher M; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-10-14

    Tobacco Mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein is well known for its ability to self-assemble into supramolecular nanoparticles, either as protein discs or as rods originating from the ~300 bp genomic RNA origin-of-assembly (OA). We have utilized TMV self-assembly characteristics to create a novel Flock House virus (FHV) RNA nanoparticle. FHV encodes a viral polymerase supporting autonomous replication of the FHV genome, which makes it an attractive candidate for viral transgene expression studies and targeted RNA delivery into host cells. However, FHV viral genome size is strictly limited by native FHV capsid. To determine if this packaging restriction could be eliminated, FHV was adapted to express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), to allow for monitoring of functional FHV RNA activity. Then TMV OA was introduced in six 3' insertion sites, with only site one supporting functional FHV GFP expression. To create nanoparticles, FHV GFP-OA modified genomic RNA was mixed in vitro with TMV coat protein and monitored for encapsidation by agarose electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The production of TMV-like rod shaped nanoparticles indicated that modified FHV RNA can be encapsidated by purified TMV coat protein by self-assembly. This is the first demonstration of replication-independent packaging of the FHV genome by protein self-assembly.

  16. Electrostatic Properties of Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus and Cucumber Mosaic Virus Capsids

    PubMed Central

    Konecny, Robert; Trylska, Joanna; Tama, Florence; Zhang, Deqiang; Baker, Nathan A.; Brooks, Charles L.; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Electrostatic properties of cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) were investigated using numerical solutions to the Poisson-Boltzmann equation. Experimentally, it has been shown that CCMV particles swell in the absence of divalent cations when the pH is raised from 5 to 7. CMV, although structurally homologous, does not undergo this transition. An analysis of the calculated electrostatic potential confirms that a strong electrostatic repulsion at the calcium binding sites in the CCMV capsid is most likely the driving force for the capsid swelling process during the release of calcium. The binding interaction between the encapsulated genome material (RNA) inside of the capsid and the inner capsid shell is weakened during the swelling transition. This probably aids in the RNA release process, but it is unlikely that the RNA is released through capsid openings due to unfavorable electrostatic interaction between the RNA and capsid inner shell residues at these openings. Calculations of the calcium binding energies show that Ca2+ can bind both to the native and swollen forms of the CCMV virion. Favorable binding to the swollen form suggests that Ca2+ ions can induce the capsid contraction and stabilize the native form. PMID:16278831

  17. [Production of monoclonal antibodies to Cymbidium mosaic virus and application in orchids virus detection].

    PubMed

    Meng, Chun-Mei; Wu, Jian-Xiang; Xie, Li; Zheng, Jin-Kai; Hong, Jian

    2007-10-01

    Three hybridoma cell lines, 2C6, 5B7 and 12G9, secreting monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) were produced by fusing mouse myeloma cells (SP2/0) with spleen cells from BALB/ C immunized by the CymMV particles. The three McAbs could specifically react with CymMV. The titres of ascitic fluids of two McAbs are up to 10(-6) in I-ELISA. Isotypes and subclasses of the the three McAbs belong to IgG1. Isotypes of light strains of the three McAbs all belong to kappa. They were used in antigen-coated plate (ACP)-ELISA for CymMV detection, and ACP-ELISA could successfully detect 0.487 ng of purified CymMV or virus in plant sap diluted 1:10240. The presence of CymMV in field Orchids tissues was investigated with ACP-ELISA.

  18. Natural infection of Viola cornuta (Violaceae) with Cucumber mosaic virus, subgroup I.

    PubMed

    Arneodo, Joel; de Breuil, Soledad; Lenardon, Sergio; Conci, Luis

    2005-08-01

    Plants of Viola cornuta displaying typical virus symptoms were observed during spring 2003 in a plant nursery in Córdoba, central Argentina. Electron microscopic examinations of symptomatic leaf samples revealed the presence of isometric virus-like particles about 30 nm in diameter. Subsequent serological analysis allowed the identification of the pathogen as a subgroup I strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). These results were confirmed by antigen capture--reverse transcription--polymerase chain reaction with specific CMV primers, and digestion with a restriction enzyme. This is the first report of CMV infecting V. cornuta in Argentina.

  19. In planta cloning of geminiviral DNA: the true Sida micrantha mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jeske, Holger; Gotthardt, Diether; Kober, Sigrid

    2010-02-01

    The circular single-stranded DNAs of geminiviruses are multiplied efficiently and preferentially by rolling circle amplification (RCA), and can be diagnosed readily by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and direct sequencing of the RCA product. Two strategies are described for cloning geminiviruses from plants harboring mixed infections by using RCA and RFLP with plant-derived nucleic acids without the need for bacterial amplification. By combining both these approaches, the true Sida micrantha mosaic virus was identified. The advantages of maintaining the quasispecies nature of a virus during in planta cloning is discussed with respect to reliable virus identification and resistance breeding.

  20. Inheritance of resistance to watermelon mosaic virus in the cucumber line TMG-1: tissue-specific expression and relationship to zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Wai, T; Grumet, R

    1995-09-01

    The inbred cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) line TMG-1 is resistant to three potyviruses:zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), and the watermelon strain of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV-W). The genetics of resistance to WMV and the relationship of WMV resistance to ZYMV resistance were examined. TMG-1 was crossed with WI-2757, a susceptible inbred line. F1, F2 and backcross progeny populations were screened for resistance to WMV and/or ZYMV. Two independently assorting factors conferred resistance to WMV. One resistance was conferred by a single recessive gene from TMG-1 (wmv-2). The second resistance was conferred by an epistatic interaction between a second recessive gene from TMG-1 (wmv-3) and either a dominant gene from WI-2757 (Wmv-4) or a third recessive gene from TMG-1 (wmv-4) located 20-30 cM from wmv-3. The two resistances exhibited tissue-specific expression. Resistance conferred by wmv-2 was expressed in the cotyledons and throughout the plant. Resistance conferred by wmv-3 + Wmv-4 (or wmv-4) was expressed only in true leaves. The gene conferring resistance to ZYMV appeared to be the same as, or tightly linked to one of the WMV resistance genes, wmv-3.

  1. Aphid performance changes with plant defense mediated by Cucumber mosaic virus titer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xiaobin; Gao, Yang; Yan, Shuo; Tang, Xin; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Deyong; Liu, Yong

    2016-04-22

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causes appreciable losses in vegetables, ornamentals and agricultural crops. The green peach aphid, Myzus persicae Sulzer (Aphididae) is one of the most efficient vectors for CMV. The transmission ecology of aphid-vectored CMV has been well investigated. However, the detailed description of the dynamic change in the plant-CMV-aphid interaction associated with plant defense and virus epidemics is not well known. In this report, we investigated the relationship of virus titer with plant defense of salicylic acid (SA) and jasmonic acid (JA) during the different infection time and their interaction with aphids in CMV-infected tobacco plants. Our results showed that aphid performance changed with virus titer and plant defense on CMV-inoculated plants. At first, plant defense was low and aphid number increased gradually. The plant defense of SA signaling pathway was induced when virus titer was at a high level, and aphid performance was correspondingly reduced. Additionally, the winged aphids were increased. Our results showed that aphid performance was reduced due to the induced plant defense mediated by Cucumber mosaic virus titer. Additionally, some wingless aphids became to winged aphids. In this way CMV could be transmitted with the migration of winged aphids. We should take measures to prevent aphids in the early stage of their occurrence in the field to prevent virus outbreak.

  2. Humans Have Antibodies against a Plant Virus: Evidence from Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ruolan; Vaishnav, Radhika A.; Roberts, Andrew M.; Friedland, Robert P.

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a widespread plant pathogen, is found in tobacco (including cigarettes and smokeless tobacco) as well as in many other plants. Plant viruses do not replicate or cause infection in humans or other mammals. This study was done to determine whether exposure to tobacco products induces an immune response to TMV in humans. Using a sandwich ELISA assay, we detected serum anti-TMV antibodies (IgG, IgG1, IgG3, IgG4, IgA, and IgM) in all subjects enrolled in the study (20 healthy smokers, 20 smokeless-tobacco users, and 20 non-smokers). Smokers had a higher level of serum anti-TMV IgG antibodies than non-smokers, while the serum level of anti-TMV IgA from smokeless tobacco users was lower than smokers and non-smokers. Using bioinformatics, we also found that the human protein TOMM40L (an outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog – like translocase) contains a strong homology of six contiguous amino acids to the TMV coat protein, and TOMM40L peptide exhibited cross-reactivity with anti-TMV antibodies. People who smoke cigarettes or other tobacco products experience a lower risk of developing Parkinson’s disease, but the mechanism by which this occurs is unclear. Our results showing molecular mimicry between TMV and human TOMM40L raise the question as to whether TMV has a potential role in smokers against Parkinson’s disease development. The potential mechanisms of molecular mimicry between plant viruses and human disease should be further explored. PMID:23573274

  3. The genomes of four novel begomoviruses and a new Sida micrantha mosaic virus strain from Bolivian weeds.

    PubMed

    Wyant, Patrícia Soares; Gotthardt, Diether; Schäfer, Benjamin; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2011-02-01

    Begomovirus is the largest genus within the family Geminiviridae and includes economically important plant DNA viruses infecting a broad range of plant species and causing devastating crop diseases, mainly in subtropical and tropical countries. Besides cultivated plants, many weeds act as virus reservoirs. Eight begomovirus isolates from Bolivian weeds were examined using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). An efficient, novel cloning strategy using limited Sau3A digestion to obtain tandem-repeat inserts allowed the sequencing of the complete genomes. The viruses were classified by phylogenetic analysis as typical bipartite New World begomoviruses. Four of them represented distinct new virus species, for which the names Solanum mosaic Bolivia virus, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 1, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 2, and Abutilon mosaic Bolivia virus are proposed. Three were variants of a new strain of Sida micrantha mosaic virus (SimMV), SimMV-rho[BoVi07], SimMV-rho[Bo:CF1:07] and SimMV-rho[Bo:CF2:07], and one was a new variant of a previously described SimMV, SimMV-MGS2:07-Bo.

  4. Broad Protection against Avian Influenza Virus by Using a Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Expressing a Mosaic Hemagglutinin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. PMID:25210173

  5. Broad protection against avian influenza virus by using a modified vaccinia Ankara virus expressing a mosaic hemagglutinin gene.

    PubMed

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K; Goldberg, Tony L; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-11-01

    A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

  7. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  8. The spread of tobacco mosaic virus infection: insights into the cellular mechanism of RNA transport.

    PubMed

    Heinlein, M

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of plant cells with pathogens or other biotic or abiotic environmental factors can give rise to systemic defense responses that rely upon the cell-to-cell and systemic transport of specific signals. A novel type of systemic signaling was revealed by recent evidence indicating the existence of RNA species that travel cell to cell and through the vasculature. The most compelling evidence for intercellular and systemic transport of RNA in plants is provided by viroids and viruses that apparently use the endogenous transport machinery to spread infection. The cell to cell movement of plant viruses occurs through small pores in the cell wall known as plasmodesmata and depends on virus-encoded 'movement proteins'. This review summarizes current knowledge of Tobacco mosaic virus infection with emphasis on the mechanism by which this virus targets its RNA genome from sites of replication to plasmodesmata to achieve intercellular spread.

  9. Evolution of Wheat streak mosaic virus: dynamics of population growth within plants may explain limited variation.

    PubMed

    French, Roy; Stenger, Drake C

    2003-01-01

    Like many other plant RNA viruses, Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) sequence diversity within and among infected plants is low given the large number of virions produced. This may be explained by considering aspects of plant virus life history. Intracellular replication of RNA viruses is predominately linear, not exponential, which means that the rate at which mutations accumulate also is linear. Bottlenecks during systemic movement further limit diversity. Analysis of mixed infections with two WSMV isolates suggests that about four viral genomes participate in systemic invasion of each tiller. Low effective population size increases the role of stochastic processes on dynamics of plant virus population genetics and evolution. Despite low pair-wise diversity among isolates, the number of polymorphic sites within the U.S. population is about the same as between divergent strains or a sister species. Characteristics of polymorphism in the WSMV coat protein gene suggest that most variation appears neutral.

  10. Cowpea mosaic virus-based systems for the production of antigens and antibodies in plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Cañizares, M Carmen; Monger, Wendy; Perrin, Yolande; Tsakiris, Efstratios; Porta, Claudine; Shariat, Nikki; Nicholson, Liz; Lomonossoff, George P

    2005-03-07

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is a bipartite RNA plant virus which has proved to be useful both for epitope presentation and as a polypeptide expression system. For epitope presentation, short antigenic sequences are expressed on the surface of the assembled virus. Chimaeric virus particles produced in this way can stimulate protective immunity in experimental animals. For polypeptide expression, we have created a vector in which foreign sequences can be inserted near the 3' end of RNA-2 and have successfully expressed a number of polypeptides in plant tissue. To extend the utility of the CPMV-based systems, we have recently developed a combined virus vector/transgenic expression system in which RNA-2 expressed from a transgene is replicated by RNA-1.

  11. Infectivity of Deinbollia mosaic virus, a novel weed-infecting begomovirus in East Africa.

    PubMed

    Kyallo, Martina; Ateka, Elijah Miinda; Sseruwagi, Peter; Ascencio-Ibáñez, José Trinidad; Ssemakula, Mildred-Ochwo; Skilton, Robert; Ndunguru, Joseph

    2017-08-09

    Weed-infecting begomoviruses play an important role in the epidemiology of crop diseases because they can potentially infect crops and contribute to the genetic diversity of crop-infecting begomoviruses. Despite the important epidemiological role that weed-infecting begomoviruses play, they remain insufficiently studied in Africa. Recently, we identified Deinbollia mosaic virus (DMV), a distinct begomovirus found naturally infecting the weed host Deinbollia borbonica (Sapindaceae) in Kenya and Tanzania. In this study, we investigated the capacity of DMV to infect a restricted host range of Solanaceae and Euphorbiaceae species. Biolistic inoculation of Nicotiana benthamiana with concatemeric DNAs resulted in systemic infection associated with yellow mosaic symptoms, while DNA partial dimers caused asymptomatic systemic infection. DMV was not infectious to cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz), suggesting host resistance to the virus. Here, we demonstrate the first experimental infectivity analysis of DMV in N. benthamiana and cassava.

  12. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease.

  13. Seed-borne nature of a begomovirus, Mung bean yellow mosaic virus in black gram.

    PubMed

    Kothandaraman, Satya Vijayalakshmi; Devadason, Alice; Ganesan, Malathi Varagur

    2016-02-01

    The yellow mosaic viruses (YMV) infecting legumes are considered to be the most devastating begomoviruses as they incite considerable yield loss. The yellow discoloration of pods and seeds of infected plants and symptom emergence in the very first trifoliate leaf of the plants in the field were suggestive that the virus may be seed borne, which was investigated in the present study. The distribution of the virus in various parts of the seeds of black gram (Vigna mungo L. Hepper) plants naturally infected in the field was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), Southern blot analysis, and sequencing. Nucleotide sequencing of the PCR amplicons from the seed parts from groups of ten seeds revealed the presence of mung bean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) in the seed coat, cotyledon, and embryonic axes. The presence of virion particles was confirmed through double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) and immunosorbent electron microscopy (ISEM) even in a single whole seed. In confocal microscopy, positive fluorescent signals were obtained using coat protein gene-specific primers in the embryonic axes. However, in the growth tests performed with the same batch of seeds, there was no symptom development in the seedlings though the virus (both DNA A and B components) was detected in 32 % of tested seedlings. In this study, the MYMV was detected in seed coat, cotyledon, and embryo. This study revealed that the MYMV is a seed-borne virus.

  14. Structure and properties of virions and virus-like particles derived from the coat protein of Alternanthera mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Donchenko, Ekaterina K; Pechnikova, Evgeniya V; Mishyna, Maryia Yu; Manukhova, Tatiana I; Sokolova, Olga S; Nikitin, Nikolai A; Atabekov, Joseph G; Karpova, Olga V

    2017-01-01

    Plant viruses and their virus-like particles (VLPs) have a lot of advantages for biotechnological applications including complete safety for humans. Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) is a potentially promising object for design of novel materials. The 3D structures of AltMV virions and its VLPs were obtained by single particle EM at ~13Å resolution. The comparison of the reconstructions and a trypsin treatment revealed that AltMV CPs possesses a different fold in the presence (virions) and absence of viral RNA (VLPs). For the first time, the structure of morphologically similar virions and virus-like particles based on the coat protein of a helical filamentous plant virus is shown to be different. Despite this, both AltMV virions and VLPs are stable in a wide range of conditions. To provide a large amount of AltMV for biotechnology usage the isolation procedure was modified.

  15. [Production of hepatitis B virus core particles protein in plants, by using cowpea mosaic virus-based vector].

    PubMed

    Meshcheriakova, Iu A; El'darov, M A; Beales, L; Skriabin, K G; Lomonossoff, G P

    2008-01-01

    The core antigen of hepatitis B virus (HBcAg) has attracted considerable attention as a carrier for antigenic sequences for various diagnostic and vaccine applications. The hepatitis B core protein has been expressed in different expression systems. At present, for reasons of cost, scale, and safety, the plant-based expression systems are attracting increasing interest. The expression and assembly for the hepatitis B core protein were investigating in N. benthamiana plants using the new expression system based on deleted version of cowpea mosaic virus RNA-2. Analysis of HBcAg expression revealed that the core protein expressed in plants and could self-assemble into virus-like particles. Virus-like particles could be purified by differential and sucrose gradient centrifugation. This expression system has the advantage of biocontainment and can be used for the rapid production of HBcAg virus-like particles for immunological and vaccine applications.

  16. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    PubMed

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  17. Chemical modification of the inner and outer surfaces of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Bruckman, Michael A; Steinmetz, Nicole F

    2014-01-01

    Viral nanoparticles derived from tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) find applications in various fields. We report the purification and chemical modification of TMV which is a hollow rod-shaped plant viral nanoparticle with modifiable interior and exterior surfaces. We describe methods to isolate TMV from its tobacco plant host for spatially controlled interior and exterior chemical modification and to characterize the resulting TMV hybrid materials.

  18. Heterogeneity in pepper isolates of cucumber mosaic virus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez-Alvarado, G.; Kurath, G.; Dodds, J.A.

    1995-01-01

    Twenty-four cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) field isolates from pepper crops in Cali-fornia were characterized and compared by nucleic acid hybridization subgrouping, virion electrophoresis, and biological effects in several hosts. Isolates, belonging to subgroup I or subgroup II, were found that induced severe symptoms in mechanically inoculated bell pep-pers. Only two isolates, both from subgroup II, were mild. A group of 19 isolates collected from a single field were all in subgroup II and appeared identical by virion electrophoresis, but they exhibited varying degrees of symptom severity in peppers. As a more detailed indicator of heterogeneity, these 19 isolates were examined by RNase protection assays to delect sequence variation in the coat protein gene region of their genomes. The patterns of bands observed were complex and a high degree of genomic heterogeneity was detected between isolates, with no apparent correlation to symptomatology in bell pepper.

  19. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  20. Characteristics of a strong promoter from figwort mosaic virus: comparison with the analogous 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus and the regulated mannopine synthase promoter.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1990-03-01

    A segment of DNA from the genome of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) strain M3 possesses promoter activity when tested in electroporated protoplasts from, and transgenic plants of, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc. The 1.1 kb DNA segment, designated the '34S' promoter, is derived from a position on the FMV genome comparable to the position on the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) genome containing the 35S promoter. The 34S and 35S promoters show approximately 63% nucleotide homology in the TATA, CCACT, and -18 to +1 domains, but in sequences further upstream the homology drops below 50%. Promoter activities were estimated using beta-glucuronidase and neomycin phosphotransferase II reporter gene systems. The activity of the 34S promoter segment approximates that of the 35S promoter in both protoplast transient expression assays and in stably transformed tobacco plants. Truncation of 5' sequences from the 34S promoter indicates that promoter strength depends upon DNA sequences located several hundred nucleotides upstream from the TATA box. In leaf tissue the 34S promoter is 20-fold more active than the mannopine synthase (MAS) promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA. The 34S promoter lacks the root-specific and wound-stimulated expression of the MAS promoter, showing relatively uniform root, stem, leaf, and floral activities.

  1. Breakage of resistance to Cucumber mosaic virus by co-infection with Zucchini yellow mosaic virus: enhancement of CMV accumulation independent of symptom expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Y; Lee, K C; Gaba, V; Wong, S M; Palukaitis, P; Gal-On, A

    2004-02-01

    Resistance to the cucumovirus Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in cucumber cv. Delila was manifested as a very low level of accumulation of viral RNA and capsid protein, and an absence of CMV-induced symptoms. In addition, resistance was observed at the single cell level, with a reduction in accumulation of CMV RNAs, compared to accumulation in cells of the susceptible cucumber cv. Bet Alpha. Resistance to CMV in cv. Delila was broken by co-infection with the potyvirus Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV). Resistance breakage in cv. Delila plants was manifested by an increase in the accumulation of (+) and (-) CMV RNA as well as CMV capsid protein, with no increase in the level of accumulation of ZYMV. Resistance breakage in the resistant cultivar by ZYMV also occurred at the single cell level. Thus, synergistic interactions known to occur between a potyvirus and a cucumovirus led to resistance breakage during a double infection. However, resistance breakage was not accompanied by an increase in disease symptoms beyond those induced by ZYMV itself. On co-inoculation with an asymptomatic variant of ZYMV-AG an enhancement of CMV infection occurred without disease manifestation. Consequently, intensification of viral RNA and capsid protein accumulation can occur without a corresponding increase in disease development, suggesting that different host genes regulate viral accumulation and disease development in the CMV-resistant cucumber plants.

  2. Optimizing virus-induced gene silencing efficiency with Cymbidium mosaic virus in Phalaenopsis flower.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Hsien; Lu, Hsiang-Chia; Pan, Zhao-Jun; Yeh, Hsin-Hung; Wang, Shyh-Shyan; Chen, Wen-Huei; Chen, Hong-Hwa

    2013-03-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a good way to study floral gene functions of orchids, especially those with a long life cycle. To explore the applicability and improve viral silencing efficiency for application of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced gene silencing, we examined several variables, including the optimal length of the DNA fragment, the effect of developmental maturation status of inflorescence, and suitable inoculation sites. A CymMV-based VIGS system can be used with orchids to silence genes including PeUFGT3, PeMADS5 and PeMADS6 and induce prominent phenotypes with silencing efficiency up to 95.8% reduction. The DNA fragment size used for silencing can be as small as 78-85 bp and still reach 61.5-95.8% reduction. The effect of cDNA location as a target in VIGS varies among genes because of non-target gene influence when using the 5' terminus of the coding region of both PeMADS5 and PeMADS6. Use of VIGS to knock down a B-class MADS-box gene (PeMADS6) in orchids with different maturation status of inflorescence allowed for observing discernable knockdown phenotypes in flowers. Furthermore, silencing effects with Agro-infiltration did not differ with both leaf and inflorescence injections, but injection in the leaf saved time and produced less damage to plants. We propose an optimized approach for VIGS using CymMV as a silencing vector for floral functional genomics in Phalaenopsis orchid with Agro-infiltration: (1) DNA fragment length about 80 bp, (2) a more mature status of inflorescence and (3) leaf injection.

  3. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase.

    PubMed

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT downward arrow AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring > or =6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3'-->5' direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation ( approximately 24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV).

  4. The oligomeric Rep protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) is a likely replicative helicase

    PubMed Central

    Choudhury, Nirupam Roy; Malik, Punjab Singh; Singh, Dharmendra Kumar; Islam, Mohammad Nurul; Kaliappan, Kosalai; Mukherjee, Sunil Kumar

    2006-01-01

    Geminiviruses replicate by rolling circle mode of replication (RCR) and the viral Rep protein initiates RCR by the site-specific nicking at a conserved nonamer (TAATATT↓ AC) sequence. The mechanism of subsequent steps of the replication process, e.g. helicase activity to drive fork-elongation, etc. has largely remained obscure. Here we show that Rep of a geminivirus, namely, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), acts as a replicative helicase. The Rep-helicase, requiring ≥6 nt space for its efficient activity, translocates in the 3′→5′ direction, and the presence of forked junction in the substrate does not influence the activity to any great extent. Rep forms a large oligomeric complex and the helicase activity is dependent on the oligomeric conformation (∼24mer). The role of Rep as a replicative helicase has been demonstrated through ex vivo studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in planta analyses in Nicotiana tabacum. We also establish that such helicase activity is not confined to the MYMIV system alone, but is also true with at least two other begomoviruses, viz., Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV). PMID:17142233

  5. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) CIAT germplasm collection for response to common bacterial blight and bean common mosaic necrosis virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyvirus that cause production losses in common and tepary beans. Developing resistance to viruses, specifically BCMV, BCMNV and BGYMV, will be critical for expanding tepary bean production. This stu...

  6. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India.

  7. Evidence for possible flexoelectricity in tobacco mosaic viruses used as nanotemplates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinin, Sergei V.; Jesse, Stephen; Liu, Weili; Balandin, Alexander A.

    2006-04-01

    Electromechanical coupling in individual tobacco mosaic viruses has been studied using piezoresponse force microscopy. Possible origins of the observed high resolution contrast, including the topographic crosstalk, difference in the elastic properties, and the intrinsic electromechanical coupling due to the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects are discussed. Using simple estimates, we argue that, due in part to the small size and high symmetry of this particular material system, flexoelectric coupling can dominate the observed electromechanical behavior. The electrical manipulation of the virus particles, essential for nanoelectronic applications for which they are proposed, has also been demonstrated.

  8. Evidence for Possible Flexoelectricity in Tobacco Mosaic Viruses Used as Nanotemplates

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Liu, W. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    Electromechanical coupling in individual tobacco mosaic viruses has been studied using piezoresponse force microscopy. Possible origins of the observed high resolution contrast, including the topographic crosstalk, difference in the elastic properties, and the intrinsic electromechanical coupling due to the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects are discussed. Using simple estimates, we argue that, due in part to the small size and high symmetry of this particular material system, flexoelectric coupling can dominate the observed electromechanical behavior. The electrical manipulation of the virus particles, essential for nanoelectronic applications for which they are proposed, has also been demonstrated.

  9. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of red clover necrotic mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Stanton L.; Guenther, Richard H.; Sit, Tim L.; Swartz, Paul D.; Meilleur, Flora; Lommel, Steven A.; Rose, Robert B.

    2010-11-12

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a species that belongs to the Tombusviridae family of plant viruses with a T = 3 icosahedral capsid. RCNMV virions were purified and were crystallized for X-ray analysis using the hanging-drop vapor-diffusion method. Self-rotation functions and systematic absences identified the space group as I23, with two virions in the unit cell. The crystals diffracted to better than 4 {angstrom} resolution but were very radiation-sensitive, causing rapid decay of the high-resolution reflections. The data were processed to 6 {angstrom} in the analysis presented here.

  10. Physical regulation of the self-assembly of tobacco mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Willem K; van der Schoot, Paul

    2006-08-15

    We present a statistical mechanical model based on the principle of mass action that explains the main features of the in vitro aggregation behavior of the coat protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). By comparing our model to experimentally obtained stability diagrams, titration experiments, and calorimetric data, we pin down three competing factors that regulate the transitions between the different kinds of aggregated state of the coat protein. These are hydrophobic interactions, electrostatic interactions, and the formation of so-called "Caspar" carboxylate pairs. We suggest that these factors could be universal and relevant to a large class of virus coat proteins.

  11. Asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus: a novel bipartite begomovirus infecting the weed Asystasia gangetica in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    De Bruyn, Alexandre; Harimalala, Mireille; Hoareau, Murielle; Ranomenjanahary, Sahondramalala; Reynaud, Bernard; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2015-06-01

    Here, we describe for the first time the complete genome sequence of a new bipartite begomovirus in Madagascar isolated from the weed Asystasia gangetica (Acanthaceae), for which we propose the tentative name asystasia mosaic Madagascar virus (AMMGV). DNA-A and -B nucleotide sequences of AMMGV were only distantly related to known begomovirus sequence and shared highest nucleotide sequence identity of 72.9 % (DNA-A) and 66.9 % (DNA-B) with a recently described bipartite begomovirus infecting Asystasia sp. in West Africa. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated that this novel virus from Madagascar belongs to a new lineage of Old World bipartite begomoviruses.

  12. Novel Inter-Subunit Contacts in Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Revealed by Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Daniel Kofi; Pechnikova, Eugenia V.; Skurat, Eugene V.; Makarov, Valentin V.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Orlova, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV, genus Hordeivirus) is a rod-shaped single-stranded RNA virus similar to viruses of the structurally characterized and well-studied genus Tobamovirus. Here we report the first high-resolution structure of BSMV at 4.1 Å obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. We discovered that BSMV forms two types of virion that differ in the number of coat protein (CP) subunits per turn and interactions between the CP subunits. While BSMV and tobacco mosaic virus CP subunits have a similar fold and interact with RNA using conserved residues, the axial contacts between the CP of these two viral groups are considerably different. BSMV CP subunits lack substantial axial contacts and are held together by a previously unobserved lateral contact formed at the virion surface via an interacting loop, which protrudes from the CP hydrophobic core to the adjacent CP subunit. These data provide an insight into diversity in structural organization of helical viruses. PMID:26278173

  13. Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein in Escherichia coli and its assembly into filamentous aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Usha, R

    2002-06-01

    Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus of Potyviridae, causes a mosaic disease in cardamom. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the purified virus and IgG was prepared. Electron microscopic studies on the purified virus showed flexuous filamentous particles of approximately 800 nm in length, typical of members of Potyviridae. The coat protein (CP) encoding sequence of the virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein purified by affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The viral nature of the expressed CP was confirmed by positive reaction with anti CdMV IgG in a Western blot. The expressed CP aggregated irreversibly upon renaturation at concentrations above 0.07 mg/ml. The expression of the CP led to the formation of filamentous aggregates in E. coli as observed by immuno-gold electron microscopy. The filamentous aggregates were of 100-150 nm in length. Immuno-capture RT-PCR confirmed the absence of coat protein mRNA in the filamentous aggregates. Deletion mutations, which were expected to inhibit virus assembly, were introduced in the core region of the coat protein. However, these mutations did not improve the solubility of the CP in non-denaturing buffers.

  14. Tobacco mosaic virus infection disproportionately impacts phloem associated translatomes in Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Culver, James N

    2017-10-01

    In this study we use vascular specific promoters and a translating ribosome affinity purification strategy to identify phloem associated translatome responses to infection by tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in systemic hosts Arabidopsis thaliana ecotype Shahdara and Nicotiana benthamiana. Results demonstrate that in both hosts the number of translatome gene alterations that occurred in response to infection is at least four fold higher in phloem specific translatomes than in non-phloem translatomes. This finding indicates that phloem functions as a key responsive tissue to TMV infection. In addition, host comparisons of translatome alterations reveal both similarities and differences in phloem responses to infection, representing both conserved virus induced phloem alterations involved in promoting infection and virus spread as well as host specific alterations that reflect differences in symptom responses. Combined these results suggest phloem tissues play a disproportion role in the mediation and control of host responses to virus infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Potential threat of a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus infecting transgenic papaya resistant to Papaya ringspot virus.

    PubMed

    Bau, H-J; Kung, Y-J; Raja, J A J; Chan, S-J; Chen, K-C; Chen, Y-K; Wu, H-W; Yeh, S-D

    2008-07-01

    A virus identified as a new pathotype of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV, P-TW-WF) was isolated from diseased papaya in an isolated test-field in central Taiwan, where transgenic papaya lines resistant to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) were evaluated. The infected plants displayed severe mosaic, distortion and shoe-stringing on leaves; stunting in apex; and water-soaking on petioles and stems. This virus, which did not react in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the antiserum to the PRSV coat protein, infected only papaya, but not the other 18 plant species tested. Virions studied under electron microscope exhibited morphology and dimensions of potyvirus particles. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction conducted using potyvirus-specific primers generated a 1,927-nucleotide product corresponding to the 3' region of a potyvirus, showing high sequence identity to the CP gene and 3' noncoding region of PLDMV. Search for similar isolates with the antiserum against CP of P-TW-WF revealed scattered occurrence of PLDMV in Taiwan. Phylogenetic analysis of PLDMV isolates of Taiwan and Japan indicated that the Taiwan isolates belong to a separate genetic cluster. Since all the Taiwan isolates infected only papaya, unlike the cucurbit-infecting Japanese P type isolates, the Taiwan isolates are considered a new pathotype of PLDMV. Susceptibility of all our PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya lines to PLDMV indicates that the virus is an emerging threat for the application of PRSV-resistant transgenic papaya in Taiwan and elsewhere.

  16. Maize Elongin C interacts with the viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of Sugarcane mosaic virus and facilitates virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Yuting; Ding, Xin Shun; Webb, Stephen L; Zhou, Tao; Nelson, Richard S; Fan, Zaifeng

    2014-09-01

    The viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of potyviruses is involved in viral genome replication and translation. To determine host proteins that interact with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) VPg, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used and a maize (Zea mays) Elongin C (ZmElc) protein was identified. ZmELC transcript was observed in all maize organs, but most highly in leaves and pistil extracts, and ZmElc was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus of maize cells in the presence or absence of SCMV. ZmELC expression was increased in maize tissue at 4 and 6 d post SCMV inoculation. When ZmELC was transiently overexpressed in maize protoplasts the accumulation of SCMV RNA was approximately doubled compared with the amount of virus in control protoplasts. Silencing ZmELC expression using a Brome mosaic virus-based gene silencing vector (virus-induced gene silencing) did not influence maize plant growth and development, but did decrease RNA accumulation of two isolates of SCMV and host transcript encoding ZmeIF4E during SCMV infection. Interestingly, Maize chlorotic mottle virus, from outside the Potyviridae, was increased in accumulation after silencing ZmELC expression. Our results describe both the location of ZmElc expression in maize and a new activity associated with an Elc: support of potyvirus accumulation. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Maize Elongin C interacts with the viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of Sugarcane mosaic virus and facilitates virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Min; Chen, Yuting; Ding, Xin Shun; Webb, Stephen L; Zhou, Tao; Nelson, Richard S; Fan, Zaifeng

    2014-01-01

    The viral genome-linked protein, VPg, of potyviruses is involved in viral genome replication and translation. To determine host proteins that interact with Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) VPg, a yeast two-hybrid screen was used and a maize (Zea mays) Elongin C (ZmElc) protein was identified. ZmELC transcript was observed in all maize organs, but most highly in leaves and pistil extracts, and ZmElc was present in the cytoplasm and nucleus of maize cells in the presence or absence of SCMV. ZmELC expression was increased in maize tissue at 4 and 6 d post SCMV inoculation. When ZmELC was transiently overexpressed in maize protoplasts the accumulation of SCMV RNA was approximately doubled compared with the amount of virus in control protoplasts. Silencing ZmELC expression using a Brome mosaic virus-based gene silencing vector (virus-induced gene silencing) did not influence maize plant growth and development, but did decrease RNA accumulation of two isolates of SCMV and host transcript encoding ZmeIF4E during SCMV infection. Interestingly, Maize chlorotic mottle virus, from outside the Potyviridae, was increased in accumulation after silencing ZmELC expression. Our results describe both the location of ZmElc expression in maize and a new activity associated with an Elc: support of potyvirus accumulation. PMID:24954157

  18. The Complete Nucleotide Sequence and Biotype Variability of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Maoka, Tetsuo; Hataya, Tatsuji

    2005-02-01

    ABSTRACT The complete nucleotide sequence of the genome of Papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) was determined. The viral RNA genome of strain LDM (leaf distortion mosaic) comprised 10,153 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tail, and contained one long open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3,269 amino acids (molecular weight 373,347). The polyprotein contained nine putative proteolytic cleavage sites and some motifs conserved in other potyviral polyproteins with 44 to 50% identities, indicating that PLDMV is a distinct species in the genus Potyvirus. Like the W biotype of Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), the non-papaya-infecting biotype of PLDMV (PLDMV-C) was found in plants of the family Cucurbitaceae. The coat protein (CP) sequence of PLDMV-C in naturally infected-Trichosanthes bracteata was compared with those of three strains of the P biotype (PLDMV-P), LDM and two additional strains M (mosaic) and YM (yellow mosaic), which are biologically different from each other. The CP sequences of three strains of PLDMV-P share high identities of 95 to 97%, while they share lower identities of 88 to 89% with that of PLDMV-C. Significant changes in hydrophobicity and a deletion of two amino acids at the N-terminal region of the CP of PLDMV-C were observed. The finding of two biotypes of PLDMV implies the possibility that the papaya-infecting biotype evolved from the cucurbitaceae-infecting potyvirus, as has been previously suggested for PRSV. In addition, a similar evolutionary event acquiring infectivity to papaya may arise frequently in viruses in the family Cucurbitaceae.

  19. [Studies on construction of artificial mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA and their biological activity].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Chen, Ji-Shuang; Zhang, Hua-Rong

    2005-08-01

    Based on the full length cDNA clone of a Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA, which was 369nt in size, artificial mutants were developed by the method of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. The new satellite cDNAs were transcribed in vitro into ssRNA and pseudo-recombined with a helper Cucumber mosaic virus, which contains no satellite RNA. Sequence analysis showed that A to T/G or G to A replacement all the four mutants, named MS1, MS5, MS6 and MS11 respectively, and there is no C to G or G to C replacement, but amongst, only the mutants MS11 could replicated when recombined with the helper virus strain. No satellite RNA could be detected by RT-PCR amplification and double-stranded RNA analysis for those pseudo-recombination constitution of Cucumber mosaic virus strain with mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6.Sequence homological comparison showed that the single replacement of mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6 occurred in the highly conservative regions and the T to A replacement of mutant MS11 was located in the normal-variation region. This is the first artificial mutation of satellite RNA of plant RNA viruses. The results indicated that single base in the region of satellite RNA maybe important to maintaining the biological activity of satellite RNA for its replication and stability. The variation and evolution of satellite RNA could be hopefully studied through combination directed evolution by DNA shuffling with pseudo-recombination in vitro.

  20. Characterization of Synergy Between Cucumber mosaic virus and Potyviruses in Cucurbit Hosts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzeng; Gaba, Victor; Yang, Jie; Palukaitis, Peter; Gal-On, Amit

    2002-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mixed infections of cucurbits by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and potyviruses exhibit a synergistic interaction. Zucchini squash and melon plants coinfected by the potyvirus Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and either Fny-CMV (subgroup IA) or LS-CMV (subgroup II) displayed strong synergistic pathological responses, eventually progressing to vascular wilt and plant death. Accumulation of Fny- or LS-CMV RNAs in a mixed infection with ZYMV in zucchini squash was slightly higher than infection with CMV strains alone. There was an increase in CMV (+) strand RNA levels, but no increase in CMV (-) RNA3 levels during mixed infection with ZYMV. Moreover, only the level of capsid protein from LS-CMV increased in mixed infection. ZYMV accumulated to similar levels in singly and mixed infected zucchini squash and melon plants. Coinfection of squash with the potyvirus Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) and CMV strains increased both the Fny-CMV RNA levels and the LS-CMV RNA levels. However, CMV (-) strand RNA3 levels were increased little or not at all for CMV on coinfection with WMV. Infection of CMV strains (LS and Fny) containing satellite RNAs (WL47-sat RNA and B5*-sat RNA) reduced the accumulation of the helper virus RNA, except when B5*-sat RNA was mixed with LS- CMV. However, mixed infection containing ZYMV and the CMV strains with satellites reversed the suppression effect of satellite RNAs on helper virus accumulation and increased satellite RNA accumulation. The synergistic interaction between CMV and potyviruses in cucurbits exhibited different features from that documented in tobacco, indicating there are differences in the mechanisms of potyvirus synergistic phenomena.

  1. Influence of host chloroplast proteins on Tobacco mosaic virus accumulation and intercellular movement.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Sumana; Folimonova, Svetlana Y; Cole, Anthony B; Ballard, Kimberly D; Lei, Zhentian; Watson, Bonnie S; Sumner, Lloyd W; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) forms dense cytoplasmic bodies containing replication-associated proteins (virus replication complexes [VRCs]) upon infection. To identify host proteins that interact with individual viral components of VRCs or VRCs in toto, we isolated viral replicase- and VRC-enriched fractions from TMV-infected Nicotiana tabacum plants. Two host proteins in enriched fractions, ATP-synthase γ-subunit (AtpC) and Rubisco activase (RCA) were identified by matrix-assisted laser-desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry or liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Through pull-down analysis, RCA bound predominantly to the region between the methyltransferase and helicase domains of the TMV replicase. Tobamovirus, but not Cucumber mosaic virus or Potato virus X, infection of N. tabacum plants resulted in 50% reductions in Rca and AtpC messenger RNA levels. To investigate the role of these host proteins in TMV accumulation and plant defense, we used a Tobacco rattle virus vector to silence these genes in Nicotiana benthamiana plants prior to challenge with TMV expressing green fluorescent protein. TMV-induced fluorescent lesions on Rca- or AtpC-silenced leaves were, respectively, similar or twice the size of those on leaves expressing these genes. Silencing Rca and AtpC did not influence the spread of Tomato bushy stunt virus and Potato virus X. In AtpC- and Rca-silenced leaves TMV accumulation and pathogenicity were greatly enhanced, suggesting a role of both host-encoded proteins in a defense response against TMV. In addition, silencing these host genes altered the phenotype of the TMV infection foci and VRCs, yielding foci with concentric fluorescent rings and dramatically more but smaller VRCs. The concentric rings occurred through renewed virus accumulation internal to the infection front.

  2. The Tobacco mosaic virus Movement Protein Associates with but Does Not Integrate into Biological Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Ana; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Tamborero, Silvia; Pallás, Vicente

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Plant positive-strand RNA viruses require association with plant cell endomembranes for viral translation and replication, as well as for intra- and intercellular movement of the viral progeny. The membrane association and RNA binding of the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) are vital for orchestrating the macromolecular network required for virus movement. A previously proposed topological model suggests that TMV MP is an integral membrane protein with two putative α-helical transmembrane (TM) segments. Here we tested this model using an experimental system that measured the efficiency with which natural polypeptide segments were inserted into the ER membrane under conditions approximating the in vivo situation, as well as in planta. Our results demonstrated that the two hydrophobic regions (HRs) of TMV MP do not span biological membranes. We further found that mutations to alter the hydrophobicity of the first HR modified membrane association and precluded virus movement. We propose a topological model in which the TMV MP HRs intimately associate with the cellular membranes, allowing maximum exposure of the hydrophilic domains of the MP to the cytoplasmic cellular components. IMPORTANCE To facilitate plant viral infection and spread, viruses encode one or more movement proteins (MPs) that interact with ER membranes. The present work investigated the membrane association of the 30K MP of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), and the results challenge the previous topological model, which predicted that the TMV MP behaves as an integral membrane protein. The current data provide greatly needed clarification of the topological model and provide substantial evidence that TMV MP is membrane associated only at the cytoplasmic face of the membrane and that neither of its domains is integrated into the membrane or translocated into the lumen. Understanding the topology of MPs in the ER is vital for understanding the role of the ER in plant virus transport

  3. Temperature affects expression of symptoms induced by soybean mosaic virus in homozygous and heterozygous plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Dexiao; Chen, Pengyin; Shi, Ainong; Shakiba, Ehsan; Gergerich, Rose; Chen, Yaofeng

    2009-01-01

    Seven strains (G1 to G7) of soybean mosaic virus (SMV) and 3 resistance loci (Rsv1, Rsv3, and Rsv4) have been identified in soybean. The interaction of SMV strains and host resistance genes results in resistant (symptomless), susceptible (mosaic), or necrotic (leaf and stem necrosis) reactions. The necrotic reaction may be gene dosage dependent and influenced by temperature. Using a set of soybean isolines and hybrids containing homozygous or heterozygous alleles of rsv, Rsv1, Rsv1-n, Rsv3, or Rsv4, this study has explored the relationship of SMV-induced symptoms and resistance gene dosage at different temperatures. Results showed that SMV-inoculated plants carrying Rsv3 or Rsv4 were symptomless at both homozygous and heterozygous states at all temperature regimes. Threshold temperatures for symptoms changing from stem tip necrosis (STN) to mosaic were 30, 33, and 33 degrees C in G7-inoculated homozygous genotypes V94-3971(Rsv1) and PI 96983 (Rsv1) and G1-inoculated V262 (Rsv1-n), respectively. However, at the heterozygous state, threshold temperature was 30 degrees C in G7-inoculated V94-3971 x Essex F(1) for the symptom change from STN to mosaic, 31 degrees C in G7-inoculated Essex x PI 96983 F(1) from STN to mixture of necrosis and mosaic (N-M), and 32 degrees C in G1-inoculated V262 x Essex F(1) from N-M to mosaic. Incomplete necrosis was observed in the heterozygous state in G1-inoculated V262 x Essex F(1) and G7-inoculated PI 96983 x Essex F(1) where necrotic and mosaic symptoms were mixed. High temperature (37 degrees C) tends to mask the expression of mosaic symptoms in both homozygous and heterozygous plants. STN expression in response to temperature was affected by resistance gene, gene dosage, host genetic background, and specific SMV strains. Thus, Rsv3 and Rsv4 are a better choice as source of genetic resistance for breeding SMV-resistant cultivars.

  4. Deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of cucumber mosaic virus movement protein enables a chimeric brome mosaic virus to move from cell to cell.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Okuno, T; Mise, K; Furusawa, I

    1997-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) gene of brome mosaic virus (BMV) was precisely replaced with that of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). Infectivity tests of the chimeric BMV on Chenopodium quinoa, a permissive host for cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV, showed that the chimeric BMV failed to move from cell to cell even though it replicated in protoplasts. A spontaneous mutant of the chimeric BMV that displayed cell-to-cell movement was subsequently obtained from a local lesion during one of the experiments. A cloned cDNA representing the genomic RNA encoding the MP of the chimeric BMV mutant was analyzed and found to contain a mutation in the CMV MP gene resulting in deletion of the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the MP. Directed mutagenesis of the CMV MP gene showed that the C-terminal deletion was responsible for the movement capability of the mutant. When the mutation was introduced into CMV, the CMV mutant moved from cell to cell in C. quinoa, though the movement was less efficient than that of the wild-type CMV. These results indicate that the CMV MP, except the C-terminal 33 amino acids, potentiates cell-to-cell movement of both BMV and CMV in C. quinoa. In addition, since C. quinoa is a common host for both BMV and CMV, these results suggest that the CMV MP has specificity for the viral genomes during cell-to-cell movement of the virus and that the C-terminal 33 amino acids of the CMV MP are involved in that specificity. PMID:9032362

  5. Behavior of RNAi suppressor protein 2b of Cucumber mosaic virus in planta in presence and absence of virus.

    PubMed

    Praveen, Shelly; Mangrauthia, Satendra K; Singh, Priyanka; Mishra, Anil K

    2008-08-01

    The 2b protein encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been shown as a virus counter defense factor that interferes with the RNAi pathway. The 2b gene from CMV-banana, New Delhi isolate (CMV-NDLS) was amplified from CMV infected cucumber plants to generate the sense and antisense binary vector constructs for 2b expression and repression in planta. Constitutive expression of 2b gene in healthy Nicotiana tabacum caused phenotypic aberrations during somatic embryogenesis, which were not observed when expressed in CMV infected N. tabacum. Further, the established virus population in CMV infected N. tabacum was not affected by constitutive expression and repression of 2b gene. Thus, indicating its role in initiation of gene silencing, at the early stage of viral infection. This is the first demonstration of differential behavior of 2b suppressor protein in host development in the absence and presence of virus.

  6. Mosaic H5 Hemagglutinin Provides Broad Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses against Influenza Viruses.

    PubMed

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Osorio, Jorge E

    2016-08-01

    The most effective way to prevent influenza virus infection is via vaccination. However, the constant mutation of influenza viruses due to antigenic drift and shift compromises vaccine efficacy. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. Using the modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus, we had previously generated a recombinant vaccine against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) based on an in silico mosaic approach. This MVA-H5M construct protected mice against multiple clades of H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. We have now further characterized the immune responses using immunodepletion of T cells and passive serum transfer, and these studies indicate that antibodies are the main contributors in homosubtypic protection (H5N1 clades). Compared to a MVA construct expressing hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus A/VN/1203/04 (MVA-HA), the MVA-H5M vaccine markedly increased and broadened B cell and T cell responses against H5N1 virus. The MVA-H5M also provided effective protection with no morbidity against H5N1 challenge, whereas MVA-HA-vaccinated mice showed clinical signs and experienced significant weight loss. In addition, MVA-H5M induced CD8(+) T cell responses that play a major role in heterosubtypic protection (H1N1). Finally, expression of the H5M gene as either a DNA vaccine or a subunit protein protected mice against H5N1 challenge, indicating the effectiveness of the mosaic sequence without viral vectors for the development of a universal influenza vaccine. Influenza viruses infect up to one billion people around the globe each year and are responsible for 300,000 to 500,000 deaths annually. Vaccines are still the main intervention to prevent infection, but they fail to provide effective protection against heterologous strains of viruses. We developed broadly reactive H5N1 vaccine based on an in silico mosaic approach and previously demonstrated that

  7. Mosaic H5 Hemagglutinin Provides Broad Humoral and Cellular Immune Responses against Influenza Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The most effective way to prevent influenza virus infection is via vaccination. However, the constant mutation of influenza viruses due to antigenic drift and shift compromises vaccine efficacy. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. Using the modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) virus, we had previously generated a recombinant vaccine against highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (H5N1) based on an in silico mosaic approach. This MVA-H5M construct protected mice against multiple clades of H5N1 and H1N1 viruses. We have now further characterized the immune responses using immunodepletion of T cells and passive serum transfer, and these studies indicate that antibodies are the main contributors in homosubtypic protection (H5N1 clades). Compared to a MVA construct expressing hemagglutinin (HA) from influenza virus A/VN/1203/04 (MVA-HA), the MVA-H5M vaccine markedly increased and broadened B cell and T cell responses against H5N1 virus. The MVA-H5M also provided effective protection with no morbidity against H5N1 challenge, whereas MVA-HA-vaccinated mice showed clinical signs and experienced significant weight loss. In addition, MVA-H5M induced CD8+ T cell responses that play a major role in heterosubtypic protection (H1N1). Finally, expression of the H5M gene as either a DNA vaccine or a subunit protein protected mice against H5N1 challenge, indicating the effectiveness of the mosaic sequence without viral vectors for the development of a universal influenza vaccine. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses infect up to one billion people around the globe each year and are responsible for 300,000 to 500,000 deaths annually. Vaccines are still the main intervention to prevent infection, but they fail to provide effective protection against heterologous strains of viruses. We developed broadly reactive H5N1 vaccine based on an in silico mosaic approach and previously

  8. Transgenic Sugarcane Resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus Based on Coat Protein Gene Silencing by RNA Interference

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jinlong; Gao, Shiwu; Lin, Qinliang; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP) genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms. PMID:25685813

  9. Wheat streak mosaic virus P1: Defining the minimal region required for the suppression of RNA silencing activity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the most economically important wheat virus in the Great Plains region of USA. WSMV is the type species of the genus Tritimovirus in the family Potyviridae, and is transmitted by the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer. Previously, we reported that WSMV P1 f...

  10. Effect of temperature on wheat streak mosaic virus replication and movement in resistant and susceptible wheat cultivars

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is an economically important virus causing annual average yield losses of ~2-3% in winter wheat across the Great Plains. Temperature is one of the most important environmental factors that influences disease development and severity. The objective of this study was t...

  11. Sugarcane mild mosaic virus: towards the full characterization of this sugarcane Ampelovirus re-discovered using metagenomics-based approaches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sugarcane mild mosaic virus (SCMMV) is a closterovirus-like virus that was discovered by Lockhart et al. (1992). SCMMV is provisionally assigned to the genus Ampelovirus, family Closteroviridae (Martelli et al 2002). Since the initial serological and microscopical studies, no new information about S...

  12. Characterization and Field Studies of a Cucumber Mosaic Virus Isolate from Spinach in the Winter Garden Area of Texas

    Treesearch

    A. Dan Wilson; R.S. Halliwell

    1985-01-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) was identified from spinach in the Winter Garden area of Texas. The isolate was very closely related serologically to strain S of CMVand is designated the Texas spinach isolate of CMV-S. The virus infected 39 species of crop plants and wild hosts in 12 of 13 families tested. The green peach aphid efficiently transmitted the...

  13. Interactions with the actin cytoskeleton are required for cell wall localization of barley stripe mosaic virus TGB proteins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The host cytoskeleton and membrane system are the main routes by which plant viruses move within or between cells. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) -induced actin filament thickening was visualized in the cytoskeleton of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells expressing DsRed:Talin. ...

  14. Association study of resistance to soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) in U.S. winter wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is one of the most important winter wheat pathogens worldwide. To identify genes for resistance to the virus in U.S. winter wheat, association study was conducted using a selected panel of 205 elite experimental lines and cultivars from U.S. hard and soft winter...

  15. Developing an Alternanthera mosaic virus vector for efficient clonging of Whitefly cDNA RNAi to screen gene function

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV; genus Potexvirus) is distinguished from the type member of the genus, Potato virus X by features of viral movement and variation within triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1). AltMV TGB1 variants TGB1L88 and TGB1P88 confer strong and weak silencing suppression, respect...

  16. Evaluating the ability of the barley stripe mosaic virus-induced gene silencing system to simultaneously silence two wheat genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  17. Evaluating the Ability of the Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing System to Simultaneously Silence Two Wheat Genes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an important tool for rapid assessment of gene function in plants. The ability of the Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) VIGS system to simultaneously silence two genes was assessed by comparing the extent of down-regulation of the wheat PDS and SGT1 genes afte...

  18. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    PubMed

    Martin, Kathleen; Singh, Jugpreet; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-08-11

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. The molecular responses in Phaseolus to BCMV infection have not yet been well characterized. We report the transcriptional responses of a widely susceptible variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar 'Stringless green refugee') to two BCMV strains, in a time-course experiment. We also report the genome sequence of a previously unreported BCMV strain. The interaction with the known strain NL1-Iowa causes moderate symptoms and large transcriptional responses, and the newly identified strain (Strain 2 or S2) causes severe symptoms and moderate transcriptional responses. The transcriptional profiles of host plants infected with the two isolates are distinct, and involve numerous differences in splice forms in particular genes, and pathway specific expression patterns. We identified differential host transcriptome response after infection of two different strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Virus infection initiated a suite of changes in gene expression level and patterns in the host plants. Pathways related to defense, gene regulation, metabolic processes, photosynthesis were specifically altered after virus infection. Results presented in this study can increase the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and provide resources for further investigations of the biological mechanisms in BCMV infection and defense.

  19. Genetic identification of multiple biological roles associated with the capsid protein of satellite panicum mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Qiu, W; Scholthof, K B

    2001-01-01

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV), an 824-nucleotide, positive-sense, single-stranded RNA virus, depends on Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and spread in host plants. Compared with PMV infection alone, symptoms are intensified and develop faster on millet plants infected with SPMV and PMV. SPMV encodes a 157 amino acid capsid protein (CP) (17.5 kDa) to encapsidate SPMV RNA and form T = 1 satellite virions. The present study identifies additional biological activities of the SPMV CP, including the induction of severe chlorosis on proso millet plants (Panicum miliaceum cv. Sunup or Red Turghai). Initial deletion mutagenesis experiments mapped the chlorosis-inducing domain to amino acids 50 to 157 on the C-terminal portion of the SPMV CP. More defined analyses revealed that amino acids 124 to 135 comprised a critical domain associated with chlorosis induction and virion formation, whereas the extreme C-terminal residues 148 to 157 were not strictly essential for either role. The results also demonstrated that the absence of SPMV CP tended to stimulate the accumulation of defective RNAs. This suggests that the SPMV CP plays a significant role in maintaining the structural integrity of the full-length satellite virus RNA and harbors multiple functions associated with pathogenesis in SPMV-infected host plants.

  20. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  1. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  2. Tobacco mosaic virus RNA as genetic determinant: genesis of a discovery.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, S; Roggero, P

    2000-01-01

    It is generally held that the American geneticists Alfred Hershey and Martha Chase were the first to elucidate, in 1952, the genetic functions of phage DNA. The discovery of the genetic functions of RNA in a plant virus (Tobacco mosaic virus, TMV) is commonly attributed to the American plant virologist Heinz Fraenkel-Conrat, and to the Germans Alfred Gierer and Gerhard Schramm, who came to the same conclusion independently in 1956. In reality, the first understandings dated back to about 1940, when several scientists discovered that TMV infectivity was closely related to the presence of undamaged RNA in the virus particles. A very important but underestimated contribution came from the English group of Roy Markham, Kenneth Smith and Richard Matthews in 1948. This group purified and characterized an isometric plant virus, Turnip yellow mosaic virus, and first showed that virus infectivity depended on the presence of the RNA, concluding that nucleic acid was essential for virus multiplication. This finding was confirmed by the same group one year later but it laid neglected. After a five year period, in which several groups attempted to solve the question of the function of TMV RNA, the American electron microscopist Roger Hart offered, in 1955, further direct evidence which correlated RNA to TMV infectivity. One year later, three research groups (Fraenkel-Conrat; Gierer and Schramm; Max Lauffer, David Trkule and Anne Buzzell) obtained evidence that put an end to the question, which was (and is) fundamental to molecular Genetics because it demonstrated that RNA can function independently of DNA.

  3. Transiently expressed short hairpin RNA targeting 126 kDa protein of tobacco mosaic virus interferes with virus infection.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming-Min; An, De-Rong; Zhao, Jian; Huang, Guang-Hua; He, Zu-Hua; Chen, Jiang-Ye

    2006-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) silences gene expression by guiding mRNA degradation in a sequence-specific fashion. Small interfering RNA (siRNA), an intermediate of the RNAi pathway, has been shown to be very effective in inhibiting virus infection in mammalian cells and cultured plant cells. Here, we report that Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transient expression of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) could inhibit tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA accumulation by targeting the gene encoding the replication-associated 126 kDa protein in intact plant tissue. Our results indicate that transiently expressed shRNA efficiently interfered with TMV infection. The interference observed is sequence-specific, and time- and site-dependent. Transiently expressed shRNA corresponding to the TMV 126 kDa protein gene did not inhibit cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), an unrelated tobamovirus. In order to interfere with TMV accumulation in tobacco leaves, it is essential for the shRNA constructs to be infiltrated into the same leaves as TMV inoculation. Our results support the view that RNAi opens the door for novel therapeutic procedures against virus diseases. We propose that a combination of the RNAi technique and Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression could be employed as a potent antiviral treatment in plants.nt antiviral treatment in plants.

  4. Identification and molecular tagging of two complementary dominant resistance genes to maize dwarf mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jian-Yu; Ding, Jun-Qiang; Du, Yan-Xiu; Chen, Wei-Cheng

    2002-12-01

    Maize dwarf mosaic is one of the devastating and widespread viral diseases in the world. So far, only a few genes were identified and mapped in the resistant materials. A new resistant elite inbred line Siyi was identified with resistance to maize dwarf mosaic virus strain B at early and adult stage. Two complementary dominant genes conditioned the resistance, with a new genetic model, of the maize inbred line were found at adult stage by the genetic analysis based on parents, F1, F2 and backcrosses in two years. The microsatellite analysis of a F2 population from the cross between Siyi and Mo17 was used to identify the two resistance genes on chromosome 3 and 6 respectively by 87 pairs of microsatellite markers. The linkage distance between phi029 and the one resistance gene on chromosome 3 is 14.5 cM, and phi126 to the other on chromosome 6 is 7.2 cM.

  5. Enhanced nicking activity of Rep in presence of pre-coat protein of Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus.

    PubMed

    Rouhibakhsh, A; Choudhury, N R; Mukherjee, S K; Malathi, V G

    2012-04-01

    Yellow mosaic disease causes severe yield loss in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent and south east Asia. The disease is caused by two virus species, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV). They have genome organization typical of Old World begomoviruses, the unique feature being the presence of an open reading frame (ORF) AV2 upstream of coat protein gene. In order to elucidate its function, ORF AV2 of blackgram isolate, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Blackgram 3:1991] MYMIV-[IN:ND:Bg3:91] and cowpea isolate, Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus-[India:New Delhi:Cowpea7:1998] MYMIV-[IN:ND:Cp7:98], respectively, were over expressed in Escherichia coli in fusion with maltose binding protein (MBP). The recombinant protein did not show efficient binding to DNA. However, both MBP-BgAV2 and MBP-CpAV2 proteins modulated nicking and ATPase activity of replication initiation protein (Rep). Even low concentration, 20 ng of MBP-BgAV2 and MBP-CpAV2 could bring 20 folds increase in nicking activity of Rep. Similarly in the presence of AV2 protein, two to three fold increase in ATPase activity was observed. It is hypothesized that AV2 protein may play a role of accessory protein modulating Rep activities.

  6. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  7. Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus, a new sobemovirus isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii) in Japan.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hideki; Takemoto, Shogo; Maruyama, Kazuyuki; Chiba, Sotaro; Andika, Ida Bagus; Suzuki, Nobuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Cymbidium chlorotic mosaic virus (CyCMV), isolated from a spring orchid (Cymbidium goeringii), was characterized molecularly. CyCMV isometric virions comprise a single, positive-strand RNA genome of 4,083 nucleotides and 30-kDa coat protein. The virus genome contains five overlapping open reading frames with a genomic organization similar to that of sobemoviruses. BLAST searches and phylogenetic analysis revealed that CyCMV is most closely related to papaya lethal yellowing virus, a proposed dicot-infecting sobemovirus (58.8 % nucleotide sequence identity), but has a relatively distant relationship to monocot-infecting sobemoviruses, with only modest sequence identities. This suggests that CyCMV is a new monocot-infecting member of the floating genus Sobemovirus.

  8. Determination of set potential voltages for cucumber mosaic virus detection using screen printed carbon electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uda, M. N. A.; Hasfalina, C. M.; Samsuzana, A. A.; Faridah, S.; Rafidah A., R.; Hashim, U.; Ariffin, Shahrul A. B.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.

    2017-03-01

    Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV) is a most dangerous pathogen among the cucurbit plant which it striking cucumbers, zucchinis, squashes, watermelons but it also striking to non-cucurbit such as peppers, tobaccos, celeries, beans and tomatoes. Symptoms shown by this virus when they starting to strike are very significant and at the end can kill the hosts they infected. In order to detect these viruses, biosensor such as screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) is developed and fixes a set potential voltage is defined using Chronoamperometry (CM) immunosensor technique. For short introduction, CM is a process which is a constant applied potential voltage between the working and reference electrode is maintained in order to create an electrons transfer for the oxidation or reduction species taking place at the surface of working electrode is measured and in this manuscript, complete details about measurement were used to finding the stable set potential voltages will be pointed out.

  9. Evaluation of the minimal replication time of Cauliflower mosaic virus in different hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Khelifa, Mounia; Masse, Delphine; Blanc, Stephane; Drucker, Martin

    2010-01-20

    Though the duration of a single round of replication is an important biological parameter, it has been determined for only few viruses. Here, this parameter was determined for Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in transfected protoplasts from different hosts: the highly susceptible Arabidopsis and turnip, and Nicotiana benthamiana, where CaMV accumulates only slowly. Four methods of differing sensitivity were employed: labelling of (1) progeny DNA and (2) capsid protein, (3) immunocapture PCR,, and (4) progeny-specific PCR. The first progeny virus was detected about 21 h after transfection. This value was confirmed by all methods, indicating that our estimate was not biased by the sensitivity of the detection method, and approximated the actual time required for one round of CaMV replication. Unexpectedly, the replication kinetics were similar in the three hosts; suggesting that slow accumulation of CaMV in Nicotiana plants is determined by non-optimal interactions in other steps of the infection cycle.

  10. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging.

    PubMed

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature.

  11. Genetically improved monolayer-forming tobacco mosaic viruses to generate nanostructured semiconducting bio/inorganic hybrids.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Petia; Stitz, Nina; Sanctis, Shawn; Maurer, Johannes H M; Hoffmann, Rudolf C; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Schneider, Jörg J; Bill, Joachim

    2015-04-07

    The genetically determined design of structured functional bio/inorganic materials was investigated by applying a convective assembly approach. Wildtype tobacco mosaic virus (wt TMV) as well as several TMV mutants were organized on substrates over macroscopic-length scales. Depending on the virus type, the self-organization behavior showed pronounced differences in the surface arrangement under the same convective assembly conditions. Additionally, under varying assembly parameters, the virus particles generated structures encompassing morphologies emerging from single micrometer long fibers aligned parallel to the triple-contact line through disordered but dense films to smooth and uniform monolayers. Monolayers with diverse packing densities were used as templates to form TMV/ZnO hybrid materials. The semiconducting properties can be directly designed and tuned by the variation of the template architecture which are reflected in the transistor performance.

  12. Improved metal cluster deposition on a genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus template

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sang-Yup; Royston, Elizabeth; Culver, James N.; Harris, Michael T.

    2005-07-01

    Improved depositions of various metal clusters onto a biomolecular template were achieved using a genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Wild-type TMV was genetically altered to display multiple solid metal binding sites through the insertion of two cysteine residues within the amino-terminus of the virus coat protein. Gold, silver, and palladium clusters synthesized through in situ chemical reductions could be readily deposited onto the genetically modified template via the exposed cysteine-derived thiol groups. Metal cluster coatings on the cysteine-modified template were more densely deposited and stable than similar coatings on the unmodified wild-type template. Combined, these results confirm that the introduction of cysteine residues onto the outer surface of the TMV coat protein enhances the usefulness of this virus as a biotemplate for the deposition of metal clusters.

  13. Rapid turnover of intra-host genetic diversity in Zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Heather E; Holmes, Edward C; Stephenson, Andrew G

    2011-02-01

    Genetic diversity in RNA viruses is shaped by a variety of evolutionary processes, including the bottlenecks that may occur at inter-host transmission. However, how these processes structure genetic variation at the scale of individual hosts is only partly understood. We obtained intra-host sequence data for the coat protein (CP) gene of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) from two horizontally transmitted populations - one via aphid, the other without - and with multiple samples from individual plants. We show that although mutations are generated relatively frequently within infected plants, attaining similar levels of genetic diversity to that seen in some animal RNA viruses (mean intra-sample diversity of 0.02%), most mutations are likely to be transient, deleterious, and purged rapidly. We also observed more population structure in the aphid transmitted viral population, including the same mutations in multiple clones, the presence of a sub-lineage, and evidence for the short-term complementation of defective genomes.

  14. Incorporation of radiolabeled polyamines and methionine into turnip yellow mosaic virus in protoplasts from infected plants

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.; Cohen, S.S.

    1985-07-15

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By 7 days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. (/sup 14/C)Spermidine (10 microM) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hr. However, after an initial rise, the spermidine content of the cell returned to its original level, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)spermidine was also readily incorporated into the ribonucleoprotein component(s) of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. The specific radioactivities of the viral polyamines were approximately twice those of spermidine and spermine extracted from the whole cell. Radioactivity from (2-/sup 14/C)methionine was readily incorporated into the protein, spermidine, and spermine of the virus. Again, the specific activities of these amines were substantially higher in the virus than in the whole cell. Thus, newly formed virus contained predominantly newly synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine led to incorporation of preexisting spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly formed virus.

  15. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  16. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-02-03

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling.

  17. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated. PMID:27226228

  18. Occurrence, distribution and relative incidence of mosaic viruses infecting field--grown squash in Tehran province, Iran.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, S Hosseini; Mosahebi, G; Habibi, M Koohi; Okhovvat, S M

    2004-01-01

    Squash (Cucurbita pepo) belongs to Cucurbitaceae family. Every year Cucurbitaceae are planted world wide. They are one of the most important economic crops. Cucurbitaceae are threatened by viruses. Many viruses damage the plants of this family. Since nine viruses have been reported on squash from Iran. In this survey, during 2002--2003, to determine the distribution of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV), 466 samples were collected from squash field in Tehran province. Infected plants showing symptoms such as: mosaic, yellowing, deformation, shoestring of leaves and fruit deformation and yield reduction. Distribution of CMV, ZYMV and WMV were determined by DAS-ELISA. Thepercentage of ZYMV, WMV and CMV were 35.6, 26.1 and 25.1% respectively. Triple infection (CMV+ZYMV+WMV) were found in 6.4% of samples. ZYMV were found the most frequently the viruses. This is the first report of WMV on squash in Tehran province.

  19. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-05-26

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated.

  20. Tobacco Mosaic Virus in the Lungs of Mice following Intra-Tracheal Inoculation

    PubMed Central

    Balique, Fanny; Colson, Philippe; Barry, Abdoulaye Oury; Nappez, Claude; Ferretti, Audrey; Moussawi, Khatoun Al; Ngounga, Tatsiana; Lepidi, Hubert; Ghigo, Eric; Mege, Jean-Louis; Lecoq, Hervé; Raoult, Didier

    2013-01-01

    Plant viruses are generally considered incapable of infecting vertebrates. Accordingly, they are not considered harmful for humans. However, a few studies questioned the certainty of this paradigm. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) RNA has been detected in human samples and TMV RNA translation has been described in animal cells. We sought to determine if TMV is detectable, persists, and remains viable in the lung tissues of mice following intratracheal inoculation, and we attempted to inoculate mouse macrophages with TMV. In the animal model, mice were intratracheally inoculated with 1011 viral particles and were sacrificed at different time points. The virus was detected in the mouse lungs using immunohistochemistry, electron microscopy, real-time RT-PCR and sequencing, and its viability was studied with an infectivity assay on plants. In the cellular model, the culture medium of murine bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) was inoculated with different concentrations of TMV, and the virus was detected with real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. In addition, anti-TMV antibodies were detected in mouse sera with ELISA. We showed that infectious TMV could enter and persist in mouse lungs via the intratracheal route. Over 14 days, the TMV RNA level decreased by 5 log10 copies/ml in the mouse lungs and by 3.5 log10 in macrophages recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage. TMV was localized to lung tissue, and its infectivity was observed on plants until 3 days after inoculation. In addition, anti-TMV antibody seroconversions were observed in the sera from mice 7 days after inoculation. In the cellular model, we observed that TMV persisted over 15 days after inoculation and it was visualized in the cytoplasm of the BMDM. This work shows that a plant virus, Tobacco mosaic virus, could persist and enter in cells in mammals, which raises questions about the potential interactions between TMV and human hosts. PMID:23383021

  1. [Observation of cells tolerant of tobacco mosaic virus in virus-induced local lesions in Datura stramonium L. leaves].

    PubMed

    Reunov, A V; Lega, S N; Nagorskaia, V P; Lapshina, L A

    2011-01-01

    Ultrastructural examination of tobacco mosaic virus-induced local lesions developing in leaves of Datura stramonium plants demonstrated that, in the central area of the lesions, the cell response to viral invasion was not uniform. Most cells exhibited an acute hypersensitive reaction and underwent rapid and complete necrosis. However, some cells, despite considerable virus accumulation and immediate contact with completely collapsed cells, maintained a certain degree of structural integrity. Analysis performed showed that the proportion of collapsed and uncollapsed cells in the lesion centre 3 to 5 days after infection did not change essentially. These data suggest that the absence of hypersensitive response in some cells in the lesion centre is not due to an early stage of infection but is likely caused by cell tolerance of the virus.

  2. Evaluation of Reference Genes for the Relative Quantification of Apple stem grooving virus and Apple mosaic virus in Apple Trees.

    PubMed

    Gadiou, S; Kundu, J K

    2012-06-01

    A SYBR Green(®)-based one step RT-qPCR assay was developed for the detection and quantification of Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). The RT-qPCR assay employed seven plant-expressed genes-glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), 18S ribosomal RNA, ubiquitin, ribosomal protein S19, Rubisco, RNA polymerase subunit II and β-actin-as internal reference housekeeping genes in a relative quantification system in three apple cultivars (i.e. Idared, Champion, Fragrance). The average expression stability (M) found by GeNorm software suggest that GAPDH and S19 were the most stable reference genes. We propose employing GAPDH and S19 as housekeeping genes for accurate quantification of ASGV and ApMV in apple leaf samples. The detection limit for both viruses was found around 70 copies of viral genome by one-step RT-qPCR.

  3. The Interaction between Bamboo Mosaic Virus Replication Protein and Coat Protein Is Critical for Virus Movement in Plant Hosts ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheng-Cheng; Ho, Yuan-Ning; Hu, Rei-Hsing; Yen, Yu-Ting; Wang, Zheng-Cheng; Lee, Ya-Chien; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Meng, Menghsiao

    2011-01-01

    Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) is a positive-sense RNA virus belonging to the genus Potexvirus. Open reading frame 1 (ORF1) encodes the viral replication protein that consists of a capping enzyme domain, a helicase-like domain (HLD), and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase domain from the N to C terminus. ORF5 encodes the viral coat protein (CP) required for genome encapsidation and the virus movement in plants. In this study, application of a yeast-two hybrid assay detected an interaction between the viral HLD and CP. However, the interaction did not affect the NTPase activity of the HLD. To identify the critical amino acids of CP interacting with the HLD, a random mutational library of CP was created using error-prone PCR, and the mutations adversely affecting the interaction were screened by a bacterial two-hybrid system. As a result, the mutations A209G and N210S in CP were found to weaken the interaction. To determine the significance of the interaction, the mutations were introduced into a BaMV infectious clone, and the mutational effects on viral replication, movement, and genome encapsidation were investigated. There was no effect on accumulations of BaMV CP and genomic RNAs within protoplasts; however, the virus cell-to-cell movement in plants was restricted. Sequence alignment revealed that A209 of BaMV CP is conserved in many potexviruses. Mutation of the corresponding residue in Foxtail mosaic virus CP also reduced the viral HLD-CP interaction and restricted the virus movement, suggesting that interaction between CP and a widely conserved HLD in the potexviral replication protein is crucial for viral trafficking through plasmodesmata. PMID:21917973

  4. The complete genome sequence and genome structure of passion fruit mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Song, Yeon Sook; Ryu, Ki Hyun

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we determined the complete sequence of the genomic RNA of a Florida isolate of maracuja mosaic virus (MarMV-FL) and compared it to that of a Peru isolate of the virus (MarMV-P) and those of other known tobamoviruses. Complete sequence analysis revealed that the isolate should be considered a member of a new species and named passion fruit mosaic virus (PafMV). The genomic RNA of PafMV consists of 6,791 nucleotides and encodes four open reading frames (ORFs) coding for proteins of 125 kDa (1,101 aa), 184 kDa (1,612 aa), 34 kDa (311 aa) and 18 kDa (164 aa) in consecutive order from the 5' to the 3' end. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV were from 78.8% to 81.6% to those of MarMV-P at the amino acid level. The sequence homologies of the four ORFs of PafMV ranged from 36.0% to 77.9% and from 21.7% to 81.6% to those of other tobamoviruses, at the nucleotide and amino acid level, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that these PafMV-encoded proteins are closely related to those of MarMV-P. In conclusion, the results indicate that PafMV and MarMV-P belong to different species within the genus Tobamovirus.

  5. Analysis of the N Gene Hypersensitive Response Induced by a Fluorescently Tagged Tobacco Mosaic Virus1

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Kathryn M.; Duncan, George H.; Pradel, Katja S.; Carr, Fiona; Wood, Susannah; Oparka, Karl J.; Cruz, Simon Santa

    2000-01-01

    The hypersensitive response (HR) triggered on Nicotiana edwardsonii by tobacco mosaic virus was studied using a modified viral genome that directed expression of the green fluorescent protein. Inoculated plants were initially incubated at 32°C to inhibit the N gene-mediated HR. Transfer to 20°C initiated the HR, and fluorescent infection foci were monitored for early HR-associated events. Membrane damage, which preceded visible cell collapse by more than 3 h, was accompanied by a transient restriction of the xylem within infection sites. Following cell collapse and the rapid desiccation of tissue undergoing the HR, isolated, infected cells were detected at the margin of necrotic lesions. These virus-infected cells were able to reinitiate infection on transfer to 32°C, however, if maintained at 20°C they eventually died. The results indicate that the tobacco mosaic virus-induced HR is a two-phase process with an early stage culminating in rapid cell collapse and tissue desiccation followed by a more extended period during which the remaining infected cells are eliminated. PMID:10938355

  6. Molecular evidence that zucchini yellow fleck virus is a distinct and variable potyvirus related to papaya ringspot virus and Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Desbiez, C; Justafre, I; Lecoq, H

    2007-02-01

    Zucchini yellow fleck virus (ZYFV, genus Potyvirus) infects cultivated or wild cucurbits in the Mediterranean basin and occasionally causes severe damage in crops. Biological and serological data tend to indicate that ZYFV is related to other cucurbit-infecting potyviruses, mainly papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) and Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV). In order to establish unambiguously the taxonomic status of ZYFV, the sequence of the 3' part of the genome - encompassing the CP coding region - of two ZYFV strains originating from Italy and France was obtained and compared with other potyviruses. The results obtained indicate that ZYFV belongs to a distinct potyvirus species, related to but different from PRSV and MWMV.

  7. Sequences enhancing cassava mosaic disease symptoms occur in the cassava genome and are associated with South African cassava mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Maredza, A T; Allie, F; Plata, G; Rey, M E C

    2016-06-01

    Cassava is an important food security crop in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two episomal begomovirus-associated sequences, named Sequences Enhancing Geminivirus Symptoms (SEGS1 and SEGS2), were identified in field cassava affected by the devastating cassava mosaic disease (CMD). The sequences reportedly exacerbated CMD symptoms in the tolerant cassava landrace TME3, and the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana, when biolistically co-inoculated with African cassava mosaic virus-Cameroon (ACMV-CM) or East African cassava mosaic virus-UG2 (EACMV-UG2). Following the identification of small SEGS fragments in the cassava EST database, the intention of this study was to confirm their presence in the genome, and investigate a possible role for these sequences in CMD. We report that multiple copies of varying lengths of both SEGS1 and SEGS2 are widely distributed in the sequenced cassava genome and are present in several other cassava accessions screened by PCR. The endogenous SEGS1 and SEGS2 are in close proximity or overlapping with cassava genes, suggesting a possible role in regulation of specific biological processes. We confirm the expression of SEGS in planta using EST data and RT-PCR. The sequence features of endogenous SEGS (iSEGS) are unique but resemble non-autonomous transposable elements (TEs) such as MITEs and helitrons. Furthermore, many SEGS-associated genes, some involved in virus-host interactions, are differentially expressed in susceptible (T200) and tolerant TME3) cassava landraces infected by South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) of susceptible (T200) and tolerant (TME3) cassava landraces. Abundant SEGS-derived small RNAs were also present in mock-inoculated and SACMV-infected T200 and TME3 leaves. Given the known role of TEs and associated genes in gene regulation and plant immune responses, our observations are consistent with a role of these DNA elements in the host's regulatory response to geminiviruses.

  8. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  9. Dynamics of Small RNA Profiles of Virus and Host Origin in Wheat Cultivars Synergistically Infected by Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus: Virus Infection Caused a Drastic Shift in the Endogenous Small RNA Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Graybosch, Robert A.; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible (‘Arapahoe’) and temperature-sensitive resistant (‘Mace’) wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat. PMID:25365307

  10. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  11. Deletions in the coat protein cistron of wheat streak mosaic virus induced more severe symptoms than the wild-type virus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), an economically important virus in the Great Plains region, is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The role of coat protein (CP) in WSMV biology was examined by introducing a series of deletions covering SGSGS motifs (aa 36-40, 43-47 an...

  12. Why mosaic? Gene expression profiling of African cassava mosaic virus-infected cassava reveals the effect of chlorophyll degradation on symptom development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Yang, Jun; Bi, Huiping; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-01

    Cassava mosaic disease, caused by cassava begomoviruses, is the most serious disease for cassava in Africa. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood. We employed high throughput digital gene expression profiling based on the Illumina Solexa sequencing technology to investigate the global transcriptional response of cassava to African cassava mosaic virus infection. We found that 3,210 genes were differentially expressed in virus-infected cassava leaves. Gene ontology term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis indicated that genes implicated in photosynthesis were most affected, consistent with the chlorotic symptoms observed in infected leaves. The upregulation of chlorophyll degradation genes, including the genes encoding chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and pheophorbide a oxygenase, and downregulation of genes encoding the major apoproteins in light-harvesting complex II were confirmed by qRT-PCR. These findings, together with the reduction of chlorophyll b content and fewer grana stacks in the infected leaf cells, reveal that the degradation of chlorophyll plays an important role in African cassava mosaic virus symptom development. This study will provide a road map for future investigations into viral pathogenesis. © 2013 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  13. Population genetics of cucumber mosaic virus infecting medicinal, aromatic and ornamental plants from northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Davino, Salvatore; Panno, Stefano; Rangel, Ezequiel A; Davino, Mario; Bellardi, Maria Grazia; Rubio, Luis

    2012-04-01

    The genetic variation and evolution of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) from aromatic, medicinal and ornamental plants in northern Italy was studied by sequence analysis of the movement protein gene and comparison with equivalent sequences of isolates from other countries. Comparison of nonsynonymous and synonymous substitutions suggested that 30% of amino acid sites were under negative selection and only one was under positive selection. Phylogenetic, nucleotide diversity and genetic differentiation analyses suggested that long-distance migration plays a role in the evolution and determination of the genetic structure and diversity of CMV in northern Italy and other areas.

  14. The primary structure of papaya mosaic virus coat protein: a revision.

    PubMed

    Verde, C; Malorni, A; Parente, A

    1989-12-01

    The presence of an acetyl blocking group at the N-terminus of the coat protein of papaya mosaic virus has been identified by FAB mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we have found that the N-terminal sequence of the protein is four amino-acid residues (AC-Ser-Lys-Ser-Ser-) longer than that previously reported, while Glu instead of Gln is the C-terminal residue. The present paper shows that PMV-protein is made up of 215 amino acid residues, with a molecular mass of 22,960 Da.

  15. Challenging the role of microtubules in Tobacco mosaic virus movement by drug treatments is disputable.

    PubMed

    Seemanpillai, Mark; Elamawi, Rabab; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-07-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus interacts with microtubules during infection. Although this interaction is correlated with the function of MP in the cell-to-cell transport of viral RNA, a direct role of microtubules in the movement process was recently challenged by studies involving the treatment of plants with inhibitors of microtubule polymerization. Here, we report evidence suggesting that such treatments may not efficiently disrupt all microtubules. Thus, results obtained from studies using microtubule inhibitors may have to remain open to interpretation with regard to the involvement of microtubules in viral RNA trafficking.

  16. Challenging the Role of Microtubules in Tobacco Mosaic Virus Movement by Drug Treatments Is Disputable

    PubMed Central

    Seemanpillai, Mark; Elamawi, Rabab; Ritzenthaler, Christophe; Heinlein, Manfred

    2006-01-01

    The movement protein (MP) of Tobacco mosaic virus interacts with microtubules during infection. Although this interaction is correlated with the function of MP in the cell-to-cell transport of viral RNA, a direct role of microtubules in the movement process was recently challenged by studies involving the treatment of plants with inhibitors of microtubule polymerization. Here, we report evidence suggesting that such treatments may not efficiently disrupt all microtubules. Thus, results obtained from studies using microtubule inhibitors may have to remain open to interpretation with regard to the involvement of microtubules in viral RNA trafficking. PMID:16775361

  17. Detection in vivo of a new gene product (gene III) of cauliflower mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, C.; Lebeurier, G.; Hirth, L.

    1984-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA contains six major open reading frames (ORFs). As only the mRNA corresponding to the transcription of gene VI and its translation product have been isolated, the identification in infected plants of products corresponding to the five other putative genes remains to be established. The present paper reports the detection of an ORF III product by means of antibodies raised against an NH2-terminal synthetic peptide of 19 amino acids corresponding to a sequence predicted from the nucleotide sequence of ORF III. The detection of this gene product raises the question of the mechanism of its expression. Images PMID:16593524

  18. Nucleotide sequences of the coat protein genes of two Japanese zucchini yellow mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Kundu, A K; Ohshima, K; Sako, N

    1997-10-01

    The nucleotide (nt) sequences of the coat protein (CP) genes of two Japanese zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) isolates (ZYMV-169 and ZYMV-M) were determined. The CP genes of both isolates were 837 nt long and encoded 279 amino acids (aa). The nt and deduced aa sequence similarities between the two isolates were 92% and 94.6%, respectively. The deduced aa sequences of CPs of the Japanese isolates were compared with those of previously reported ZYMV isolates by phylogenetic analysis. This comparison lead us to divide all ZMYV isolates into 3 groups in which ZYMV-169 formed its own distinct group.

  19. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Love, Andrew J.; Makarov, Valentine V.; Sinitsyna, Olga V.; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Taliansky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10–40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  20. Physical mapping and molecular cloning of mung bean yellow mosaic virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Morinaga, T; Ikegami, M; Miura, K

    1990-01-01

    Viral single-stranded DNA of mung bean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was converted to the double-stranded state in vitro, and physical mapping was carried out. The genome of MYMV was found to consist of two major components (designated as DNA 1 and DNA 2). In addition, some minor components were detected. Molecular cloning of the major components was carried out, using in vitro double-stranded DNA and replicative intermediate DNAs. DNA 1 is about 2.72 and DNA 2 about 2.67 kilobase pairs. No similarities were observed when the two restriction maps of DNA 1 and 2 were compared.

  1. Characterization of the 3′ Termini of the RNAs of Cowpea Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Kathleen P.; Frist, Ramsey H.

    1978-01-01

    A sequence of polyadenylic acid, homogeneous in composition but heterogeneous in length, was isolated from complete pancreatic RNase digests of both middle and bottom RNAs of cowpea mosaic virus. The polyadenylic acid was 3′-terminal and occurred once per molecule. A fragment consisting of the polyadenylic acid and approximately the next 25 nucleotides could be isolated from complete T1 RNase digests of either RNA. The region adjacent to the polyadenylic acid in both RNAs was rich in pyrimidines. The mobilities of the fragments in 12.4% polyacrylamide-8 M urea gels were used to estimate their lengths and to calculate number average and weight average molecular weights. PMID:16789170

  2. Flavones from Cassia siamea and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Min; Zhou, Kun; Xiang, Neng-Jun; Yang, Liu; Zhang, Cheng-Ming; Wang, Yue-De; Dong, Wei; Lou, Jie; Ji, Bing-Kun; Gao, Xue-Mei; Miao, Ming-Ming; Hu, Qiu-Fen

    2015-01-01

    Two new flavones, siameflavones A and B (1 and 2), together with five known flavones (3-7) were isolated from the stem of Cassia siamea. Their structures were elucidated by spectroscopic methods including extensive 1D and 2D NMR techniques. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for their anti-tobacco mosaic virus (Anti-TMV) activity. The results showed that compounds 1-5 showed weak anti-TMV activity with inhibition rates in the range of 11.6-18.5%.

  3. Molecular characterization and detection of a recombinant isolate of bamboo mosaic virus from China.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wenwu; Gao, Fangluan; Yang, Wenting; Yu, Chaowei; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Lingli; Wu, Zujian; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Xie, Lianhui

    2016-04-01

    The complete genome sequences of three isolates of bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) from mainland China were determined and compared to those of BaMV isolates from Taiwan. Sequence analysis showed that isolate BaMV-JXYBZ1 from Fuzhou shares 98 % nucleotide sequence identity with BaMV-YTHSL14 from nucleotides 2586 to 6306, and more than 94 % nucleotide sequence identity with BaMV-MUZHUBZ2 in other regions. Recombination and phylogenetic analyses indicate that BaMV-JXYBZ1 is a recombinant with one recombination breakpoint. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a BaMV recombinant worldwide.

  4. Iranian johnsongrass mosaic virus: the complete genome sequence, molecular and biological characterization, and comparison of coat protein gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zohreh; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Nazifi, Ehsan; Zakiaghl, Mohammad

    2017-02-01

    Iranian johnsongrass mosaic virus (IJMV) is one of the most prevalent viruses causing maize mosaic disease in Iran. An IJMV isolate, Maz-Bah, was obtained from the maize showing mosaic symptoms in Mazandaran, north of Iran. The complete genomic sequence of Maz-Bah is 9544 nucleotides, excluding the poly(A) tail. It contains one single open reading frame of 9165 nucleotides and encodes a large polyprotein of 3054 amino acids, flanked by a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 143 nucleotides and a 3'-UTR of 236 nucleotides. The entire genomic sequence of Maz-Bah isolate shares identities of 84.9 and 94.2 % with the IJMV (Shz) isolate, the lone complete genome sequence available in the GenBank at the nucleotide (nt) and deduced amino acid (aa) levels, respectively. The whole genome sequences share identities of 51.5-69.8 and 44.9-74.3 % with those of other Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup potyviruses at nt and aa levels, respectively. In phylogenetic trees based on the multiple alignments of the entire nt and aa sequences, IJMV isolates formed a separate sublineage of the tree with potyviruses infecting monocotyledons of cereals, indicating that IJMV is a member of SCMV subgroup of potyviruses. IJMV is most closely related to Sorghum mosaic virus and Maize dwarf mosaic virus and less closely related to the Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Cocksfoot streak virus. To further investigate the genetic relationship of IJMV, 9 other isolates from different hosts were cloned and sequenced. The identity of IJMV CP nt and aa sequences of 11 Iranian isolates ranged from 86.4 to 99.8 % and 90.5 to 99.7 %, respectively, indicating a high nt variability in CP gene. Furthermore, in the CP-based phylogenetic tree, IJMV isolates were clustered together with a maize potyvirus described as Zea mosaic virus from Israel (with 86-89 % nt identity), indicating that both isolates probably are the strains of the same virus.

  5. Characterisation of a virus from Australia that is closely related to papaya mosaic potexvirus.

    PubMed

    Geering, A D; Thomas, J E

    1999-01-01

    We have isolated a previously undescribed potexvirus from Alternanthera pungens (Amaranthaceae) in southern Queensland, Australia. This virus was shown to have a moderately wide experimental host range, infecting plants in nine of the twelve families tested. Using specific antibodies, a plate trapped antigen ELISA was developed, allowing detection of virions down to 0.8 microgram/ml of leaf extract. Virions averaged 554 nm long and had a capsid protein with a M(r) of 23.1 x 10(3). A portion of the genome containing the capsid protein ORF and 3' untranslated region was cloned and sequenced. From both serological and amino acid sequence comparisons, the virus was shown to be closely related to papaya mosaic potexvirus (PMV). To determine the taxonomic status of the virus, we assessed variation in the amino acid sequence of capsid proteins of distinct species within the potexvirus genus, as well as variation between strains of the same virus. When the core region of the capsid proteins were compared, distinct species had a maximum of 62.2% sequence identity, whereas strains had a minimum of 88.8% identity. By comparison, the core region of the capsid proteins of the Alternanthera virus and PMV had 79.8% identity. We have concluded that the Alternanthera virus is a different species from PMV, and its relationship with PMV resembles that of potyvirus subgroup members.

  6. Influence of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Epitope Mapping of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model virus in immunology and one of the most studied viruses to date. Exposure to HHP significantly altered the recognition epitopes when compared to sera from mice immunized with native virus. These alterations were studied further by combining HHP with urea or low temperature and then inoculating the altered virions into Balb-C mice. The antibody titers and cross-reactivity of the resulting sera were determined by ELISA. The antigenicity of the viral particles was maintained, as assessed by using polyclonal antibodies against native virus. The antigenicity of canonical epitopes was maintained, although binding intensities varied among the treatments. The patterns of recognition determined by epitope mapping were cross checked with the prediction algorithms for the TMVcp amino acid sequence to infer which alterations had occurred. These findings suggest that different cleavage sites were exposed after the treatments and this was confirmed by epitope mapping using sera from mice immunized with virus previously exposed to HHP. PMID:24605789

  7. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Asencio, José; Wojciechowska, Klaudia; Baskerville, Maia; Gomez, Annika L; Perry, Keith L; Thompson, Jeremy R

    2017-01-02

    In analyzing grapevine clones infected with grapevine red blotch associated virus, we identified a small number of isometric particles of approximately 30nm in diameter from an enriched fraction of leaf extract. A dominant protein of 25kDa was isolated from this fraction using SDS-PAGE and was identified by mass spectrometry as belonging to grapevine asteroid mosaic associated virus (GAMaV). Using a combination of three methods RNA-Seq, sRNA-Seq, and Sanger sequencing of RT- and RACE-PCR products, we obtained a full-length genome sequence consisting of 6719 nucleotides without the poly(A) tail. The virus possesses all of the typical conserved functional domains concordant with the genus Marafivirus and lies evolutionarily between citrus sudden death associated virus and oat blue dwarf virus. A large shift in RNA-Seq coverage coincided with the predicted location of the subgenomic RNA involved in coat protein (CP) expression. Genus wide sequence alignments confirmed the cleavage motif LxG(G/A) to be dominant between the helicase and RNA dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), and the RdRp and CP domains. A putative overlapping protein (OP) ORF lacking a canonical translational start codon was identified with a reading frame context more consistent with the putative OPs of tymoviruses and fig fleck associated virus than with those of marafiviruses. BLAST analysis of the predicted GAMaV OP showed a unique relatedness to the OPs of members of the genus Tymovirus.

  8. Function and Structural Organization of the Replication Protein of Bamboo mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Menghsiao; Lee, Cheng-Cheng

    2017-01-01

    The genus Potexvirus is one of the eight genera belonging to the family Alphaflexiviridae according to the Virus Taxonomy 2015 released by International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (www.ictvonline.org/index.asp). Currently, the genus contains 35 known species including many agricultural important viruses, e.g., Potato virus X (PVX). Members of this genus are characterized by flexuous, filamentous virions of 13 nm in diameter and 470–580 nm in length. A potexvirus has a monopartite positive-strand RNA genome, encoding five open-reading frames (ORFs), with a cap structure at the 5′ end and a poly(A) tail at the 3′ end. Besides PVX, Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) is another potexvirus that has received intensive attention due to the wealth of knowledge on the molecular biology of the virus. In this review, we discuss the enzymatic activities associated with each of the functional domains of the BaMV replication protein, a 155-kDa polypeptide encoded by ORF1. The unique cap formation mechanism, which may be conserved across the alphavirus superfamily, is particularly addressed. The recently identified interactions between the replication protein and the plant host factors are also described. PMID:28400766

  9. Immunogenic compositions assembled from tobacco mosaic virus-generated spherical particle platforms and foreign antigens.

    PubMed

    Karpova, Olga; Nikitin, Nikolai; Chirkov, Sergey; Trifonova, Ekaterina; Sheveleva, Anna; Lazareva, Ekaterina; Atabekov, Joseph

    2012-02-01

    We reported recently that RNA-free spherical particles (SPs) generated by thermal remodelling of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are capable of binding GFP to their surface. Here, we show that SPs represent a universal particle platform that can form compositions by binding a diversity of various foreign proteins/epitopes of viral and non-viral origin to their surface. Numerous molecules of a foreign protein linked to the SP surface were revealed by immunogold electron microscopy. Several SP-based compositions were obtained containing one of the following foreign antigens: antigenic determinant A of rubella virus E1 glycoprotein; a recombinant protein containing the M2e epitope of influenza virus A protein M2; a recombinant antigen consisting of three epitopes of influenza virus A haemagglutinin; potato virus X (PVX) coat protein (CP); BSA; and PVX CP fused with the epitope of plum pox virus CP. The 'mixed' compositions could be also assembled by binding two different foreign antigens to each of the SPs. Immunogenicity of foreign antigens adsorbed or linked covalently to SPs in the SP-based compositions was examined. The antigenic specificity of foreign antigens was retained, whereas their immunogenicity increased significantly. It was inferred that SPs exhibit immunopotentiating activity, in particular in the form of compositions comprising SP and foreign antigen linked covalently to their surface by formaldehyde.

  10. Influence of high hydrostatic pressure on epitope mapping of tobacco mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Ferreira de Lima Neto, Daniel; Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2014-03-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model virus in immunology and one of the most studied viruses to date. Exposure to HHP significantly altered the recognition epitopes when compared to sera from mice immunized with native virus. These alterations were studied further by combining HHP with urea or low temperature and then inoculating the altered virions into Balb-C mice. The antibody titers and cross-reactivity of the resulting sera were determined by ELISA. The antigenicity of the viral particles was maintained, as assessed by using polyclonal antibodies against native virus. The antigenicity of canonical epitopes was maintained, although binding intensities varied among the treatments. The patterns of recognition determined by epitope mapping were cross checked with the prediction algorithms for the TMVcp amino acid sequence to infer which alterations had occurred. These findings suggest that different cleavage sites were exposed after the treatments and this was confirmed by epitope mapping using sera from mice immunized with virus previously exposed to HHP.

  11. Complete nucleotide sequence and taxonomy of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus, member of a novel genus in the family Potyviridae.

    PubMed

    Xu, D-L; Zhou, G-H; Xie, Y-J; Mock, R; Li, R

    2010-06-01

    The complete genomic sequence of a Pakistani isolate of Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV-PAK) is determined to be 9782 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail, and it comprises a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3130 amino acid residues. The deduced polyprotein is likely to be cleaved at nine putative protease sites by three viral proteases to ten mature proteins. Conserved motifs of orthologous proteins of other potyviruses are identified in corresponding positions of SCSMV-PAK. The genomic organization is virtually identical to the genera Ipomovirus, Potyvirus, Rymovirus, and Tritimovirus in the family Potyviridae. Sequence analyses indicate that the SCSMV-PAK genomic sequence is different from those of Sugarcane mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus, two viruses with very similar symptoms and host range to SCSMV-PAK. SCSMV-PAK shares 52.7% identity with Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) and 26.4-31.5% identities with species of the existing genera and unassigned viruses in the Potyviridae at the polyprotein sequence level. Phylogenetic analyses of the polyprotein and deduced mature protein amino acid sequences reveal that SCSMV, together with TriMV, forms a distinct group in the family at the genus level. Therefore, SCSMV should represent a new genus, Susmovirus, in the Potyviridae.

  12. Prevalence and genetic diversity of fig mosaic virus isolates infecting fig tree in Iran.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Amuz, S; Rakhshandehroo, F; Rezaee, S

    2014-01-01

    Commercial and outdoor fig orchards in four Iranian provinces were surveyed for the incidence of fig mosaic virus (FMV), fig leaf mottle associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2) and fig mild mottle associated virus (FMMaV) from March 2011 to October 2012. A total of 350 asymptomatic and symptomatic fig samples were collected and tested by dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) for the fig mosaic disease (FMD) using a polyclonal antiserum. According to DIBA results, FMD was present in 73% of the collected symptomatic samples from all visited regions. Samples with positive reactions in DIBA were then analyzed by RT-PCR using with specific primers. PCR results showed that about 14.8% of the FMD-positive samples from three inspected provinces are infected with at least one virus. FMV was the most widely spread virus (14%) followed by FLMaV-2 (1.5%), whereas FMMaV was not found. Phylogenetic analysis of the glycoprotein nucleotide and amino acid sequences of known FMV isolates showed two independent groups with high bootstrap values, with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in group I, subgroup IA beside those reported in Turkey. Nucleotide diversity was high within but low between different selected geographic regions and except for Europe, nucleotide distance within geographic regions was low. Statistical analyses indicated a correlation between the genetic structure of the FMV isolates and the geographical origin of isolation. Our analyses suggested that the FMV population is in a state of increase following a bottleneck or founder event in Iran.

  13. Barley yellow mosaic virus is overcoming RYM4 resistance in Belgium.

    PubMed

    Vaïanopoulos, C; Legreve, A; Moreau, V; Steyer, S; Maraite, H; Bragard, C

    2007-01-01

    Barley yellow mosaic virus (BaYMV) is the causal agent of a soil-borne systemic mosaic disease on barley. It has been reported in Belgium since the 1980s. The control of this disease is managed almost exclusively through the use of resistant varieties. The resistance of most commercial barley cultivars grown in Europe is conferred mainly by a single recessive gene, rym4. This monogenic resistance provides immunity against BaYMV pathotype 1 and has been mapped on barley chromosome 3HL and shown to be caused by mutations in the translation initiation factor eIF4E. Another pathotype, BaYMV pathotype 2, which appeared in the late 1980s (in Belgium, in the early 1990s), is able to overcome the rym4-controlled resistance. Until recently, this pathotype remained confined to specific locations. During a systematic survey in 2003, mosaic symptoms were observed only on susceptible barley cultivars collected in Belgian fields. BaYMV was detected by ELISA and RT-PCR on the susceptible cultivars and only by RT-PCR on the resistant cultivars. In 2004, mosaic symptoms were observed on susceptible and resistant cultivars. BaYMV was detected by ELISA and RT-PCR on both cultivars. In addition to developing RT-PCR methods for detecting and identifying BaYMV and Barley mild mosaic virus (BaMMV), an RT-PCR targeting the VPg/NIa viral protein part of the genome, known to discriminate the two BaYMV pathotypes, was set up to accurately identify the pathotype(s) now present in Belgium. The sequences from the generated amplicons revealed the single nucleotide substitution resulting in an amino acid change from lysine to asparagine specific to BaYMV pathotype 2. The possible reasons for the change in the BaYMV pathotype situation in Belgium, such as climatic change or a progressive build-up of soil inoculum potential, will be discussed, as well as the use of eIF4E-based resistance.

  14. Complete genome sequence of an isolate of Clerodendron yellow mosaic virus--a new begomovirus from India.

    PubMed

    Sivalingam, P N; Satheesh, V; John, P; Chandramohan, S; Malathi, V G

    2011-01-01

    Clerodendron inerme, a common hedge plant grown in India, is affected by a yellow mosaic disease caused by a begomovirus. In the present study, the complete genome (DNA A) of this virus was cloned and sequenced. The total size of DNA A is 2760 nucleotides. The genome of this virus contains six open reading frames and a non-coding intergenic region of 293 nucleotides. Nucleotide sequence comparison analysis revealed maximum sequence identity with Papaya leaf curl virus-Pakistan [Pakistan:Cotton:2002] (73.9%). As this virus had less than 89% identity with other begomoviruses, it was identified as a new begomovirus species and tentatively, named as Clerodendron yellow mosaic virus-[India:New Delhi:2007] (ClYMV-[IN:ND:07]).

  15. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread.

  16. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading

    PubMed Central

    Collum, Tamara D.; Padmanabhan, Meenu S.; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa–interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  17. Partial biological and molecular characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate naturally infecting Cucumis melo in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasoulpour, Rasoul; Afsharifar, Alireza; Izadpanah, Keramat

    2016-06-01

    Melon seedlings showing systemic chlorotic spots and mosaic symptoms were collected in central part of Iran, and a virus was isolated from diseased plants by mechanical inoculation. The virus systemically infected the most inoculated test plants by inducing mosaic symptoms, while, in the members of Fabaceae family and Chenopodium quinoa induced local lesions. Agar gel diffusion test using a polyclonal antiserum against a squash Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate showed the presence of CMV in the mechanically inoculated plants (designated CMV-Me). The virus was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation and differential centrifugation. A polyclonal antiserum was produced against the virus that reacted specifically with virus antigen in ELISA and agar gel diffusion tests. The virus was molecularly characterized by PCR amplification of the full length of the coat protein gene using cucumovirus genus specific primer pair CPTALL-3/CPTALL-5 and sequence analysis of the resulting product. No RNA satellite was detected using the primer pair CMVsat3H/sat5T7P. Phylogenetic analysis based on the coat protein amino acid sequences showed that CMV-Me belongs to Subgroup IB. These results may be helpful in melon breeding programs, focusing on plant resistance to plant viruses including CMV.

  18. The cognate coat protein is required for cell-to-cell movement of a chimeric brome mosaic virus mediated by the cucumber mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Nagano, H; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1999-12-20

    Cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) and brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV) have many similarities, including the three-dimensional structure of virions, genome organizations, and requirement of the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. We have shown that a chimeric BMV with the CMV 3a movement protein (MP) gene instead of its own cannot move from cell to cell in Chenopodium quinoa, a common permissive host for both BMV and CMV. Another chimeric BMV was constructed by replacing both MP and CP genes of BMV with those of CMV (MP/CP-chimera) and tested for its infectivity in C. quinoa, to determine whether the CMV CP has some functions required for the CMV MP-mediated cell-to-cell movement and to exhibit functional difference between CPs of BMV and CMV. Cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera occurred, and small local lesions were induced on the inoculated leaves. A frameshift mutation introduced in the CMV CP gene of the MP/CP-chimera resulted in a lack of cell-to-cell movement of the chimeric virus. These results indicate that the viral movement mediated by the CMV MP requires its cognate CP. Deletion of the amino-terminal region in CMV CP, which is not obligatory for CMV movement, also abolished cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera. This may suggest some differences in cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera and CMV. On the other hand, the sole replacement of BMV CP gene with that of CMV abolished viral cell-to-cell movement, suggesting a possibility that the viral movement mediated by the BMV MP may also require its cognate CP. Functional compatibility between MP and CP in viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  19. Digital memory device based on tobacco mosaic virus conjugated with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ricky J.; Tsai, Chunglin; Ma, Liping; Ouyang, Jianyong; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Yang, Yang

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured viruses are attractive for use as templates for ordering quantum dots to make self-assembled building blocks for next-generation electronic devices. So far, only a few types of electronic devices have been fabricated from biomolecules due to the lack of charge transport through biomolecular junctions. Here, we show a novel electronic memory effect by incorporating platinum nanoparticles into tobacco mosaic virus. The memory effect is based on conductance switching, which leads to the occurrence of bistable states with an on/off ratio larger than three orders of magnitude. The mechanism of this process is attributed to charge trapping in the nanoparticles for data storage and a tunnelling process in the high conductance state. Such hybrid bio-inorganic nanostructures show promise for applications in future nanoelectronics.

  20. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  1. Cucumber Mosaic Virus D Satellite RNA–Induced Programmed Cell Death in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ping; Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2000-01-01

    D satellite RNA (satRNA) with its helper virus, namely, cucumber mosaic virus, causes systemic necrosis in tomato. The infected plant exhibits a distinct spatial and temporal cell death pattern. The distinct features of chromatin condensation and nuclear DNA fragmentation indicate that programmed cell death is involved. In addition, satRNA localization and terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling show that cell death is initiated from the infected phloem or cambium cells and spreads to other nearby infected cells. Timing of the onset of necrosis after inoculation implicates the involvement of cell developmental processes in initiating tomato cell death. Analysis of the accumulation of minus- and plus-strand satRNAs in the infected plants indicates a correlation between high amounts of minus-strand satRNA and tomato cell death. PMID:10899975

  2. Construction of an agroinfectious clone of bean rugose mosaic virus using Gibson Assembly.

    PubMed

    Bijora, Taise; Blawid, Rosana; Costa, Danielle K T; Aragão, Francisco J L; Souto, Eliezer R; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2017-03-18

    Construction of agroinfectious viral clones usually requires many steps of cloning and sub-cloning and also a binary vector, which makes the process laborious, time-consuming, and frequently susceptible to some degree of plasmid instability. Nowadays, novel methods have been applied to the assembly of infectious viral clones, and here we have applied isothermal, single-step Gibson Assembly (GA) to construct an agroinfectious clone of Bean rugose mosaic virus (BRMV) using a small binary vector. The procedure has drastically reduced the cloning steps, and BRMV could be recovered from agroinfiltrated common bean twenty days after inoculation, indicating that the infectious clone could spread in the plant tissues and efficiently generate a systemic infection. The virus was also recovered from leaves of common bean and soybean cultivars mechanically inoculated with infectious clone two weeks after inoculation, confirming the efficiency of GA cloning procedure to produce the first BRMV agroinfectious clone to bean and soybean.

  3. Genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement of Cucumber mosaic virus vary in different host plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Akhtar; Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2010-09-01

    Genetic bottlenecks are stochastic events that narrow variation in a population. We compared bottlenecks during the systemic infection of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in four host plants. We mechanically inoculated an artificial population of twelve CMV mutants to young leaves of tomato, pepper, Nicotiana benthamiana, and squash. The inoculated leaves and primary and secondary systemically infected leaves were sampled at 2, 10, and 15 days post-inoculation. All twelve mutants were detected in all of the inoculated leaves. The number of mutants recovered from the systemically infected leaves of all host species was reduced significantly, indicating bottlenecks in systemic movement. The recovery frequencies of a few of the mutants were significantly different in each host probably due to host-specific selective forces. These results have implications for the differences in virus population variation that is seen in different host plants.

  4. Folic acid-mediated targeting of cowpea mosaic virus particles to tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Destito, Giuseppe; Yeh, Robert; Rae, Chris S.; Finn, M. G.; Manchester, Marianne

    2007-01-01

    Summary Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is a well-characterized nanoparticle that has been used for a variety of nanobiotechnology applications. CPMV interacts with several mammalian cell lines and tissues in vivo. To overcome natural CPMV targeting and re-direct CPMV particles to cells of interest, we attached a novel folic acid-PEG conjugate using the copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction. PEGylation of CPMV completely eliminated background binding of the virus to tumor cells. The PEG-folate moiety allowed CPMV specific recognition of tumor cells bearing the folate receptor. In addition, by testing CPMV formulations with different amounts of the PEG-FA moiety displayed on the surface, we show that higher-density loading of targeting ligands on CPMV may not be necessary for efficient targeting to tumor cells. These studies help to define the requirements for efficiently targeting nanoparticles and protein cages to tumors. PMID:17961827

  5. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV), a tobamovirus originally isolated from tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) collected in Okeechobee, Florida. The complete genome of TSAMV is 6,350 nucleotides long and contains four open reading frames encoding the following proteins: i) 126-kDa methyltransferase/helicase (3354 nt), ii) 183-kDa polymerase (4839 nt), iii) movement protein (771 nt) and iv) coat protein (483 nt). The complete genome sequence of TSAMV shares 80.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and 71.2-74.2 % identity with other tobamoviruses naturally infecting members of the Solanaceae plant family. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 126-kDa and 183-kDa proteins and the complete genome sequence place TSAMV in a subcluster with PMMoV within the Solanaceae-infecting subgroup of tobamoviruses.

  6. Schisanhenol derivatives and their biological evaluation against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV).

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Yao; Deng, Lu-Lu; Liu, Jia-Ju; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Hao, Xiao-Jiang; Mu, Shu-Zhen

    2015-03-01

    Schisanhenol (Sol) was isolated from Schisandra rubriflora, and a series of derivatives (1-16, 15a-16a, and 15b-16b) were designed and prepared by chemical modification. The curative and protective effects of these dibenzocyclooctadiene lignan analogues against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) were evaluated. Most analogues exhibited stronger protective effects than the positive control ningnanmycin. Dibromoschisanhenol (6) at 0.25mM exhibited the strongest protective activity (83.5±1.8% at 0.25mM), and 14-(3, 5-dibenzyloxy)-benzoyloxyschisanhenol (16) showed a significant curative effect (78.0±3.8% at 0.15mM) that was much stronger than that of the commercial virucide ningnanmycin. This study is the first to demonstrate that natural dibenzocyclooctadiene lignans and analogues are active against plant viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Design, synthesis, anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activity, and SARs of 7-methoxycryptopleurine derivatives.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ziwen; Feng, Anzheng; Cui, Mingbo; Liu, Yuxiu; Wang, Lizhong; Wang, Qingmin

    2014-11-01

    A series of 7-methoxycryptopleurine derivatives 2-23 were prepared and evaluated for their antiviral activity against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) for the first time. The bioassay results showed that most of these compounds exhibited excellent in vivo anti-TMV activity, of which 7-methoxycryptopleurine salt derivatives 16, 19, and 23 displayed significantly higher activity than 7-methoxycryptopleurine (1) and commercial ribavirin and ningnanmycin. Salification, the most commonly employed method for modifying physical-chemical properties, did significantly increase antiviral activity, and different salt forms displayed different antiviral effect. This study provides fundamental support for development and optimization of phenanthroquinolizidine alkaloids as potential inhibitors of plant virus. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  8. Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA is aminoacylated in vivo in Chinese cabbage leaves

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, S.; Chapeville, F.; Haenni, A.L.

    1982-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) contains a tRNA-like structure as an integral part of its genome. This structure is located at the extreme 3' end of the viral RNA and is the acceptor of valine after 3'-terminal adenylation. It is known that in vitro (with bacterial, yeast, or plant systems) and in vivo (upon microinjection into Xenopus laevis oocytes) a series of tRNA-specific enzymes can recognize this structure in the viral RNA. We report that TYMV RNA is valylated and consequently adenylated in vivo in its natural host, Chinese cabbage leaves. This suggests that the acylated form of the viral RNA could play an important role in the life-cycle of the virus. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2. PMID:16453426

  9. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. © 2013 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Analysis of the autoproteolytic activity of the recombinant helper component proteinase from zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, Kajohn; Füllgrabe, Marc W; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The multifunctional helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses contains an autoproteolytic function that, together with the protein 1 (P1) and NIa proteinase, processes the polyprotein into mature proteins. In this study, we analysed the autoproteolytic active domain of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro. Several Escherichia coli-expressed MBP:HC-Pro:GFP mutants containing deletions or point mutations at either the N- or C-terminus of the HC-Pro protein were examined. Our results showed that amino acids essential for the proteolytic activity of ZYMV HC-Pro are distinct from those of the tobacco etch virus HC-Pro, although the amino acid sequences in the proteolytic active domain are conserved among potyviruses.

  11. The complete genome sequences of two naturally occurring recombinant isolates of Sugarcane mosaic virus from Iran.

    PubMed

    Moradi, Zohreh; Mehrvar, Mohsen; Nazifi, Ehsan; Zakiaghl, Mohammad

    2016-04-01

    Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) is the most prevalent virus causing sugarcane mosaic and maize dwarf mosaic diseases. Here, we presented the first two complete genomic sequences of Iranian SCMV isolates, NRA and ZRA from sugarcane and maize. The complete genome sequences of NRA and ZRA were, respectively, 9571 and 9572 nucleotides (nt) in length, excluding the 3'-terminal poly(A) tail. Both isolates contained a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 149 nt, an open reading frame of 9192 nt encoding a polyprotein of 3063 amino acids (aa), and 3'-UTR of 230 nt for NRA and 231 nt for ZRA. SCMV-NRA and -ZRA genome nucleotide sequences were 97.3 % identical and shared nt identities of 79.1-92 % with those of other 21 SCMV isolates available in the GenBank, highest with the isolate Bris-A (AJ278405) (92 and 91.7 %) from Australia. When compared for separate genes, most of their genes shared the highest identities with Australian and Argentinean isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of the complete genomic sequences reveals that SCMV can be clustered to three groups. Both NRA and ZRA were clustered with sugarcane isolates from Australia and Argentina in group III but formed a separate sublineage. Recombination analysis showed that both isolates were intraspecific recombinants, and represented two novel recombination patterns of SCMV (in the P1 coding region). NRA had six recombination sites within the P1, HC-Pro, CI, NIa-Vpg, and NIa-pro coding regions, while ZRA had four within the P1, HC-Pro, NIa-Pro, and NIb coding regions.

  12. Myosins VIII and XI play distinct roles in reproduction and transport of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Amari, Khalid; Di Donato, Martin; Dolja, Valerian V; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-10-01

    Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP) and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD). The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection.

  13. Myosins VIII and XI Play Distinct Roles in Reproduction and Transport of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Amari, Khalid; Di Donato, Martin; Dolja, Valerian V.; Heinlein, Manfred

    2014-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory parasites that depend on host cellular factors for their replication as well as for their local and systemic movement to establish infection. Although myosin motors are thought to contribute to plant virus infection, their exact roles in the specific infection steps have not been addressed. Here we investigated the replication, cell-to-cell and systemic spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) using dominant negative inhibition of myosin activity. We found that interference with the functions of three class VIII myosins and two class XI myosins significantly reduced the local and long-distance transport of the virus. We further determined that the inactivation of myosins XI-2 and XI-K affected the structure and dynamic behavior of the ER leading to aggregation of the viral movement protein (MP) and to a delay in the MP accumulation in plasmodesmata (PD). The inactivation of myosin XI-2 but not of myosin XI-K affected the localization pattern of the 126k replicase subunit and the level of TMV accumulation. The inhibition of myosins VIII-1, VIII-2 and VIII-B abolished MP localization to PD and caused its retention at the plasma membrane. These results suggest that class XI myosins contribute to the viral propagation and intracellular trafficking, whereas myosins VIII are specifically required for the MP targeting to and virus movement through the PD. Thus, TMV appears to recruit distinct myosins for different steps in the cell-to-cell spread of the infection. PMID:25329993

  14. Molecular epidemiology of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus in France: an historical overview.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Chandeysson, C; Lê Van, A; Fabre, F; Desbiez, C

    2009-05-01

    Cucurbit viruses are involved in complex and changing pathosystems in France, with new virus strains or species regularly reported. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is an archetypal emerging virus that was reported in France in 1979. It has since caused sporadic but occasionally very severe economic losses and its epidemiology still remains poorly understood. Partial sequencing of the viral genome has been used to characterize ZYMV isolates that occurred over a 29-year period in experimental plots at Montfavet, France (n=227), or that were received through a national survey for cucurbit viruses conducted in France from 2004 to 2007 (n=198). A total of 34 haplotypes were differentiated belonging to five molecular groups, three including isolates already described in France and two corresponding to isolates that emerged in France within the last 5 years. Comparison of haplotypes found at one location during successive years revealed contrasting situations. When they were either the same or closely related haplotypes, this suggested the availability of overwintering hosts, whereas when they belonged to different molecular groups this indicated shifts in viral populations with possible new introductions. The contribution of molecular epidemiology in tracing the origin of ZYMV in the French West Indies is also reviewed.

  15. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  16. Inactivation and purification of cowpea mosaic virus-like particles displaying peptide antigens from Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed

    Phelps, Jamie P; Dang, Nghiep; Rasochova, Lada

    2007-05-01

    Chimeric cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) particles displaying foreign peptide antigens on the particle surface are suitable for development of peptide-based vaccines. However, commonly used PEG precipitation-based purification methods are not sufficient for production of high quality vaccine candidates because they do not allow for separation of chimeric particles from cleaved contaminating species. Moreover, the purified particles remain infectious to plants. To advance the CPMV technology further, it is necessary to develop efficient and scalable purification strategies and preferably eliminate the infectivity of chimeric viruses. CPMV was engineered to display a 25 amino acid peptide derived from the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen on the surface loop of the large coat protein subunit. The engineered virus was propagated in cowpea plants and assembled into chimeric virus particles displaying 60 copies of the peptide on the surface. An effective inactivation method was developed to produce non-infectious chimeric CPMV virus-like particles (VLPs). Uncleaved VLPs were separated from the contaminating cleaved forms by anion exchange chromatography. The yield of purified chimeric VLPs was 0.3 g kg(-1) of leaf tissue. The results demonstrate the ability to generate multi-gram quantities of non-infectious, chimeric CPMV VLPs in plants for use in the development of peptide-based vaccines.

  17. Mapping regions of the cauliflower mosaic virus ORF III product required for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, E; Geldreich, A; Keller, M; Yot, P

    1998-03-15

    The open reading frame (ORF) III product (PIII) of the pararetrovirus cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has nucleic acid-binding properties in vitro, but its biological role is not yet determined. ORF III is closely linked to ORF II and overlaps ORF IV out of frame in the CaMV genome. A new CaMV-derived vector (Ca delta) devoid of ORF III and containing unique restriction sites between ORFs II and IV was designed. Introduction of the wild-type CaMV ORF III into Ca delta results in a clone (Ca3) infectious in turnip plants. Truncated or point-mutated versions of ORF III were then inserted into Ca delta and tested in vivo. Inoculation of the different mutants into turnip revealed that the four C-terminal amino acid residues of PIII are dispensable for infectivity as well as an internal domain (amino acids 61 to 80). Taken together the results show that PIII possesses a functional two-domain organization. Moreover, the CaMV PIII function(s) cannot be replaced either by the PIII protein of another caulimovirus, the figwort mosaic virus, or by the P2 protein of the cacao swollen shoot badnavirus, a member of the second plant pararetrovirus group.

  18. Molecular characterization of Ramie mosaic virus isolates detected in Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces, China.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Zhang, X Y; Qian, Y J

    2010-01-01

    Virus isolates were obtained from three ramie samples (Boehmeria nivea L.) showing yellow mosaic symptoms collected in Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces, China. Comparison of partial DNA-A fragments amplified with begomovirus universal primers PA/PB revealed that these viral isolates shared a high sequence identity. The complete DNA-A sequences of two isolates J4 and Z1 were determined to be 2736 and 2737 nts, respectively, sharing 94.7% nucleotide sequence identity with each other. Also, the DNA-B components were identified for J4 and Z1 isolates and comprised 2717 and 2719 nts, respectively, sharing 88.6% nucleotide sequence identity with each other. Furthermore, sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis showed that J4 and Z1 isolates had the highest sequence identities (93.6-94.7%) with isolates of Ramie mosaic virus (RamMV) for DNA-A. These molecular data suggested that J4 and Z1 may be two different isolates of RamMV. This is the first report about the occurrence of a bipartite begomovirus in these regions of China.

  19. Local infection with oilseed rape mosaic virus promotes genetic rearrangements in systemic Arabidopsis tissue.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2011-05-10

    We have previously shown that local infection of tobacco plants with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) or oilseed rape mosaic virus (ORMV) results in a systemic increase in the homologous recombination frequency (HRF). Here, we analyzed what other changes in the genome are triggered by pathogen infection. For the analysis of HRF, mutation frequency (MF) and microsatellite instability (MI), we used three different transgenic Arabidopsis lines carrying β-glucuronidase (GUS)-based substrates in their genome. We found that local infection of Arabidopsis with ORMV resulted in an increase of all three frequencies, albeit to differing degrees. The most prominent increase was observed in microsatellite instability. The increase in HRF was the lowest, although still statistically significant. The analysis of methylation of the 35S promoter and transgene expression showed that the greater instability of the transgene was not attributed to these changes. Strand breaks brought about a significant increase in non-treated tissues of infected plants. The expression of genes associated with various repair processes, such as KU70, RAD51, MSH2, DNA POL α and DNA POL δ, was also increased. To summarize, our data demonstrate that local ORMV infection destabilizes the genome in systemic tissues of Arabidopsis plants in various ways resulting in large rearrangements, point mutations and microsatellite instability.

  20. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus

    PubMed Central

    Elbeshehy, Esam K.F.; Metwali, Ehab M.R.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g−1 fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L−1 recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L−1 as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus. PMID:25737655

  1. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus.

    PubMed

    Elbeshehy, Esam K F; Metwali, Ehab M R; Almaghrabi, Omar A

    2015-03-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g(-1) fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L(-1) recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L(-1) as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus.

  2. Establishment of an Agrobacterium-mediated Inoculation System for Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Minji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Song, Dami; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-01-01

    The infectious full-length cDNA clones of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolates KW and KOM, which were isolated from watermelon and oriental melon, respectively, were constructed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We successfully inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana with the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM by Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration. Virulence and symptomatic characteristics of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM were tested on several indicator plants. No obvious differences between two cloned isolates in disease development were observed on the tested indicator plants. We also determined full genome sequences of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM. Sequence comparison revealed that only four amino acids (at positions 228, 699, 1212, and 1238 of the replicase protein region) differ between the cloned isolates KW and KOM. A previous study reported that the isolate KOM could not infect Chenopodium amaranticolor, but the cloned KOM induced chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves. When compared with the previously reported sequence of the original KOM isolate, the cloned KOM contained one amino acid mutation (Ala to Thr) at position 228 of the replicase protein, suggesting that this mutation might be responsible for induction of chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves of C. amaranticolor. PMID:26674677

  3. Inhibitory effect of esterified lactoferin and lactoferrin against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jie; Wang, Hong-Yan; Xia, Xiao-Ming; Li, Peng-peng; Wang, Kai-Yun

    2013-01-01

    The inhibitory effects of esterified lactoferrin (ELF) and lactoferrin (LF) against tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in tobacco seedlings and the underlying mechanism were investigated. ELF and LF significantly inhibited viral infection and TMV multiplication in tobacco plants. ELF showed a higher inhibition effect against TMV than LF treatment in a dose and time-dependent way. Moreover, ELF induced a higher increase in the levels of transcription of pathogenesis-related (PR) protein genes [acidic PRs (PR-1a, PR-2, PR-3, PR-5) and basic PR-1] and defense-related enzymes [phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL, EC 4.3.1.5), and 5-epi-aristolochene synthase (EAS, EC 2.5.1.35)] both locally and systemically, in correlation with the induction of resistance against tobacco mosaic virus. Furthermore, ELF also induced accumulation of salicylic acid, SA 2-O-β-D-glucoside and H2O2. These results suggested that ELF and LF could control TMV incidence and the mechanism might attribute to activate the expression of a number of defense genes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Prediction of MHC binding peptides and epitopes from alfalfa mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Gomase, Virendra S; Kale, Karbhari V; Chikhale, Nandkishor J; Changbhale, Smruti S

    2007-08-01

    Peptide fragments from alfalfa mosaic virus involved multiple antigenic components directing and empowering the immune system to protect the host from infection. MHC molecules are cell surface proteins, which take active part in host immune reactions and involvement of MHC class-I & II in response to almost all antigens. Coat protein of alfalfa mosaic virus contains 221 aa residues. Analysis found five MHC ligands in coat protein as 64-LSSFNGLGV-72; 86- RILEEDLIY-94; 96-MVFSITPSY-104; 100- ITPSYAGTF-108; 110- LTDDVTTED-118; having rescaled binding affinity and c-terminal cleavage affinity more than 0.5. The predicted binding affinity is normalized by the 1% fractil. The MHC peptide binding is predicted using neural networks trained on c-terminals of known epitopes. In analysis predicted MHC/peptide binding is a log transformed value related to the IC50 values in nM units. Total numbers of peptides found are 213. Predicted MHC binding regions act like red flags for antigen specific and generate immune response against the parent antigen. So a small fragment of antigen can induce immune response against whole antigen. This theme is implemented in designing subunit and synthetic peptide vaccines. The sequence analysis method allows potential drug targets to identify active sites against plant diseases. The method integrates prediction of peptide MHC class I binding; proteosomal c-terminal cleavage and TAP transport efficiency.

  5. Normal modes of symmetric protein assemblies. Application to the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk.

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, T; Perahia, D

    1992-01-01

    We use group theoretical methods to study the molecular dynamics of symmetric protein multimers in the harmonic or quasiharmonic approximation. The method explicitly includes the long-range correlations between protein subunits. It can thus address collective dynamic effects, such as cooperativity between subunits. The n lowest-frequency normal modes of each individual subunit are combined into symmetry coordinates for the entire multimer. The Hessian of the potential energy is thereby reduced to a series of blocks of order n or 2n. In the quasiharmonic approximation, the covariance matrix of the atomic oscillations is reduced to the same block structure by an analogous set of symmetry coordinates. The method is applied to one layer of the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk in vacuo, to gain insight into the role of conformational fluctuations and electrostatics in tobacco mosaic virus assembly. The system has 78,000 classical, positional, degrees of freedom, yet the calculation is reduced by symmetry to a problem of order 4,600. Normal modes in the 0-100 cm-1 range were calculated. The calculated correlations extend mainly from each subunit to its nearest neighbors. The network of core helices has weak correlations with the rest of the structure. Similarly, the inner loops 90-108 are uncorrelated with the rest of the structure. Thus, the model predicts that the dielectric response in the RNA-binding region is mainly due to the loops alone. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:1547329

  6. Single-Molecule FRET Reveals Three Conformations for the TLS Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus Genome.

    PubMed

    Vieweger, Mario; Holmstrom, Erik D; Nesbitt, David J

    2015-12-15

    Metabolite-dependent conformational switching in RNA riboswitches is now widely accepted as a critical regulatory mechanism for gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar gene regulation mechanisms have been found to be important for viral systems as well. One of the most abundant and best-studied systems is the tRNA-like structure (TLS) domain, which has been found to occur in many plant viruses spread across numerous genera. In this work, folding dynamics for the TLS domain of Brome Mosaic Virus have been investigated using single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer techniques. In particular, burst fluorescence methods are exploited to observe metal-ion ([M(n+)])-induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the minimal TLS element of brome mosaic virus RNA3. The results of these experiments reveal a complex equilibrium of at least three distinct populations. A stepwise, or consecutive, thermodynamic model for TLS folding is developed, which is in good agreement with the [M(n+)]-dependent evolution of conformational populations and existing structural information in the literature. Specifically, this folding pathway explains the metal-ion dependent formation of a functional TLS domain from unfolded RNAs via two consecutive steps: 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction, followed by 2) formation of a 3'-terminal pseudoknot. These two conformational transitions are well described by stepwise dissociation constants for [Mg(2+)] (K1 = 328 ± 30 μM and K2 = 1092 ± 183 μM) and [Na(+)] (K1 = 74 ± 6 mM and K2 = 243 ± 52 mM)-induced folding. The proposed thermodynamic model is further supported by inhibition studies of the long-range stem interaction using a complementary DNA oligomer, which effectively shifts the dynamic equilibrium toward the unfolded conformation. Implications of this multistep conformational folding mechanism are discussed with regard to regulation of virus replication.

  7. Field Performance of Transgenic Sugarcane Lines Resistant to Sugarcane Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Wei; Ruan, Miaohong; Qin, Lifang; Yang, Chuanyu; Chen, Rukai; Chen, Baoshan; Zhang, Muqing

    2017-01-01

    Sugarcane mosaic disease is mainly caused by the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), which can significantly reduce stalk yield and sucrose content of sugarcane in the field. Coat protein mediated protection (CPMP) is an effective strategy to improve virus resistance. A 2-year field study was conducted to compare five independent transgenic sugarcane lines carrying the SCMV-CP gene (i.e., B2, B36, B38, B48, and B51) with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT). Agronomic performance, resistance to SCMV infection, and transgene stability were evaluated and compared with the wild-type parental clone Badila (WT) at four experimental locations in China across two successive seasons, i.e., plant cane (PC) and 1st ratoon cane (1R). All transgenic lines derived from Badila had significantly greater tons of cane per hectare (TCH) and tons of sucrose per hectare (TSH) as well as lower SCMV disease incidence than those from Badila in the PC and 1R crops. The transgenic line B48 was highly resistant to SCMV with less than 3% incidence of infection. The recovery phenotype of transgenic line B36 was infected soon after virus inoculation, but the subsequent leaves showed no symptoms of infection. Most control plants developed symptoms that persisted and spread throughout the plant with more than 50% incidence. B48 recorded an average of 102.72 t/ha, which was 67.2% more than that for Badila. The expression of the transgene was stable over many generations with vegetative propagation. These results show that SCMV-resistant transgenic lines derived from Badila can provide resistant germplasm for sugarcane breeding and can also be used to study virus resistance mechanisms. This is the first report on the development and field performance of transgenic sugarcane plants that are resistant to SCMV infection in China. PMID:28228765

  8. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  9. Zucchini tigré mosaic virus is a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: molecular and biological insights.

    PubMed

    Romay, G; Lecoq, H; Desbiez, C

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, three new potyviruses have been described in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster. In addition, two types of PRSV are recognized, type W, infecting cucurbit plants, and type P, infecting papaya and also cucurbits. A third type, PRSV-T, was also partially described in Guadeloupe. Complete genome sequencing of four PRSV-T isolates showed that this virus is a related virus that is distinct from PRSV, and the name zucchini tigré mosaic virus (ZTMV) is proposed, in reference to the typical symptoms observed in zucchini squash. Eleven other viral isolates from different geographic origins were confirmed as ZTMV isolates using the complete sequence of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) coding region, whereas pairwise sequence similarities in the coat protein (CP) coding region did not unambiguously distinguish ZTMV isolates from PRSV isolates. The use of the CI coding region for species demarcation appears more suitable than the CP coding region for closely related viruses. Principal coordinates analysis based on the biological behavior of the viral isolates studied clustered PRSV-P, PRSV-W and ZTMV isolates into three different groups. Therefore, ZTMV is different from PRSV in its molecular and biological properties.

  10. The capsid protein of satellite Panicum mosaic virus contributes to systemic invasion and interacts with its helper virus.

    PubMed

    Omarov, Rustem T; Qi, Dong; Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2005-08-01

    Satellite panicum mosaic virus (SPMV) depends on its helper Panicum mosaic virus (PMV) for replication and spread in host plants. The SPMV RNA encodes a 17-kDa capsid protein (CP) that is essential for formation of its 16-nm virions. The results of this study indicate that in addition to the expression of the full-length SPMV CP from the 5'-proximal AUG start codon, SPMV RNA also expresses a 9.4-kDa C-terminal protein from the third in-frame start codon. Differences in solubility between the full-length protein and its C-terminal product were observed. Subcellular fractionation of infected plant tissues showed that SPMV CP accumulates in the cytosol, cell wall-, and membrane-enriched fractions. However, the 9.4-kDa protein exclusively cofractionated with cell wall- and membrane-enriched fractions. Earlier studies revealed that the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) from nucleotides 63 to 104 was associated with systemic infection in a host-specific manner in millet plants. This study shows that nucleotide deletions and insertions in the 5'-UTR plus simultaneous truncation of the N-terminal part of the CP impaired SPMV spread in foxtail millet, but not in proso millet plants. In contrast, the expression of the full-length version of SPMV CP efficiently compensated the negative effect of the 5'-UTR deletions in foxtail millet. Finally, immunoprecipitation assays revealed the presence of a specific interaction between the capsid proteins of SPMV and its helper virus (PMV). Our findings show that the SPMV CP has several biological functions, including facilitating efficient satellite virus infection and movement in millet plants.

  11. Colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils is associated with the presence of Narcissus mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) are one of the world's most popular ornamentals. They also provide a scientific model for studying the carotenoid pigments responsible for their yellow and orange flower colours. In reverse bicolour daffodils, the yellow flower trumpet fades to white with age. The flowers of this type of daffodil are particularly prone to colour break whereby, upon opening, the yellow colour of the perianth is observed to be 'broken' into patches of white. This colour break symptom is characteristic of potyviral infections in other ornamentals such as tulips whose colour break is due to alterations in the presence of anthocyanins. However, reverse bicolour flowers displaying colour break show no other virus-like symptoms such as leaf mottling or plant stunting, leading some to argue that the carotenoid-based colour breaking in reverse bicolour flowers may not be caused by virus infection. Results Although potyviruses have been reported to cause colour break in other flower species, enzyme-linked-immunoassays with an antibody specific to the potyviral family showed that potyviruses were not responsible for the occurrence of colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils. Colour break in this type of daffodil was clearly associated with the presence of large quantities of rod-shaped viral particles of lengths 502-580 nm in tepals. Sap from flowers displaying colour break caused red necrotic lesions on Gomphrena globosa, suggesting the presence of potexvirus. Red necrotic lesions were not observed in this indicator plant when sap from reverse bicolour flowers not showing colour break was used. The reverse transcriptase polymerase reactions using degenerate primers to carla-, potex- and poty-viruses linked viral RNA with colour break and sequencing of the amplified products indicated that the potexvirus Narcissisus mosaic virus was the predominant virus associated with the occurrence of the colour break. Conclusions High viral counts were

  12. Colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils is associated with the presence of Narcissus mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Donald A; Fletcher, John D; Davies, Kevin M; Zhang, Huaibi

    2011-08-21

    Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) are one of the world's most popular ornamentals. They also provide a scientific model for studying the carotenoid pigments responsible for their yellow and orange flower colours. In reverse bicolour daffodils, the yellow flower trumpet fades to white with age. The flowers of this type of daffodil are particularly prone to colour break whereby, upon opening, the yellow colour of the perianth is observed to be 'broken' into patches of white. This colour break symptom is characteristic of potyviral infections in other ornamentals such as tulips whose colour break is due to alterations in the presence of anthocyanins. However, reverse bicolour flowers displaying colour break show no other virus-like symptoms such as leaf mottling or plant stunting, leading some to argue that the carotenoid-based colour breaking in reverse bicolour flowers may not be caused by virus infection. Although potyviruses have been reported to cause colour break in other flower species, enzyme-linked-immunoassays with an antibody specific to the potyviral family showed that potyviruses were not responsible for the occurrence of colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils. Colour break in this type of daffodil was clearly associated with the presence of large quantities of rod-shaped viral particles of lengths 502-580 nm in tepals. Sap from flowers displaying colour break caused red necrotic lesions on Gomphrena globosa, suggesting the presence of potexvirus. Red necrotic lesions were not observed in this indicator plant when sap from reverse bicolour flowers not showing colour break was used. The reverse transcriptase polymerase reactions using degenerate primers to carla-, potex- and poty-viruses linked viral RNA with colour break and sequencing of the amplified products indicated that the potexvirus Narcissisus mosaic virus was the predominant virus associated with the occurrence of the colour break. High viral counts were associated with the reverse

  13. A Unique 5′ Translation Element Discovered in Triticum Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Robyn; Zhang, Jincan; Mayberry, Laura K.; Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Browning, Karen S.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several plant viruses encode elements at the 5′ end of their RNAs, which, unlike most cellular mRNAs, can initiate translation in the absence of a 5′ m7GpppG cap. Here, we describe an exceptionally long (739-nucleotide [nt]) leader sequence in triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), a recently emerged wheat pathogen that belongs to the Potyviridae family of positive-strand RNA viruses. We demonstrate that the TriMV 5′ leader drives strong cap-independent translation in both wheat germ extract and oat protoplasts through a novel, noncanonical translation mechanism. Translation preferentially initiates at the 13th start codon within the leader sequence independently of eIF4E but involves eIF4G. We truncated the 5′ leader to a 300-nucleotide sequence that drives cap-independent translation from the 5′ end. We show that within this sequence, translation activity relies on a stem-loop structure identified at nucleotide positions 469 to 490. The disruption of the stem significantly impairs the function of the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) in driving translation and competing against a capped RNA. Additionally, the TriMV 5′ UTR can direct translation from an internal position of a bicistronic mRNA, and unlike cap-driven translation, it is unimpaired when the 5′ end is blocked by a strong hairpin in a monocistronic reporter. However, the disruption of the identified stem structure eliminates such a translational advantage. Our results reveal a potent and uniquely controlled translation enhancer that may provide new insights into mechanisms of plant virus translational regulation. IMPORTANCE Many members of the Potyviridae family rely on their 5′ end for translation. Here, we show that the 739-nucleotide-long triticum mosaic virus 5′ leader bears a powerful translation element with features distinct from those described for other plant viruses. Despite the presence of 12 AUG start codons within the TriMV 5′ UTR, translation initiates primarily at the 13

  14. The c-terminus of wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein is involved in differential infection of wheat and maize through host-specific long-distance transport

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Multifunctional viral coat proteins (CPs) play important roles in the virus life-cycle. The CP determinants and mechanisms involved in extension of host range of monocot-infecting viruses are poorly understood. The role of the C-terminal region of Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) CP in virus transpo...

  15. After the double helix: Rosalind Franklin's research on Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H; Morgan, Gregory J

    2008-06-01

    Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. During the next five years, while making significant headway on the structural determination of TMV, Franklin maintained an active correspondence with both Watson and Crick, who were also studying aspects of virus structure. Developments in TMV research during the 1950s illustrate the connections in the emerging field of molecular biology between structural studies of nucleic acids and of proteins and viruses. They also reveal how the protagonists of the "race for the double helix" continued to interact personally and professionally during the years when Watson and Crick's model for the double-helical structure of DNA was debated and confirmed.

  16. Approaching the cellular mechanism that supports the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Sambade, Adrian

    2009-01-01

    Plant viruses spread cell-to-cell in infected plants by exploiting plasmodesmata (PD), gatable channels in the cell wall that provide cytoplasmic passageways for the trafficking of informational macromolecules. Since it became known that the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), the mechanism by which this protein mediates in the targeting of this virus to PD is subject to intense studies. TMV movement occurs in a non-encapsidated form and thus promises to reveal important host functions involved in the intra-and intercellular trafficking of RNA molecules. We have recently presented new evidence that the cell-to-cell trafficking of TMV RNA (vRNA) involves the formation and intracellular trafficking of distinct MP particles. Upon assembly, these particles detach from cortical microtubule (MT) sites and then move with the flow of ER through the cell. During passage the particles continue to undergo transient interactions with MT which may guide the particles to their destination. The comprehensive analysis of particle composition may lead to important insights into the regulation of RNA transport in plants and may also reveal potential similarities to RNA transport mechanisms in animals and humans. PMID:19704702

  17. Approaching the cellular mechanism that supports the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Sambade, Adrian; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-01-01

    Plant viruses spread cell-to-cell in infected plants by exploiting plasmodesmata (PD), gatable channels in the cell wall that provide cytoplasmic passageways for the trafficking of informational macromolecules. Since it became known that the intercellular spread of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) depends on virus-encoded movement protein (MP), the mechanism by which this protein mediates in the targeting of this virus to PD is subject to intense studies. TMV movement occurs in a non-encapsidated form and thus promises to reveal important host functions involved in the intra-and intercellular trafficking of RNA molecules. We have recently presented new evidence that the cell-to-cell trafficking of TMV RNA (vRNA) involves the formation and intracellular trafficking of distinct MP particles. Upon assembly, these particles detach from cortical microtubule (MT) sites and then move with the flow of ER through the cell. During passage the particles continue to undergo transient interactions with MT which may guide the particles to their destination. The comprehensive analysis of particle composition may lead to important insights into the regulation of RNA transport in plants and may also reveal potential similarities to RNA transport mechanisms in animals and humans.

  18. Biological characterization and complete nucleotide sequence of a Tunisian isolate of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Yakoubi, S; Desbiez, C; Fakhfakh, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Marrakchi, M; Lecoq, H

    2008-01-01

    During a survey conducted in October 2005, cucurbit leaf samples showing virus-like symptoms were collected from the major cucurbit-growing areas in Tunisia. DAS-ELISA showed the presence of Moroccan watermelon mosaic virus (MWMV, Potyvirus), detected for the first time in Tunisia, in samples from the region of Cap Bon (Northern Tunisia). MWMV isolate TN05-76 (MWMV-Tn) was characterized biologically and its full-length genome sequence was established. MWMV-Tn was found to have biological properties similar to those reported for the MWMV type strain from Morocco. Phylogenetic analysis including the comparison of complete amino-acid sequences of 42 potyviruses confirmed that MWMV-Tn is related (65% amino-acid sequence identity) to Papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) isolates but is a member of a distinct virus species. Sequence analysis on parts of the CP gene of MWMV isolates from different geographical origins revealed some geographic structure of MWMV variability, with three different clusters: one cluster including isolates from the Mediterranean region, a second including isolates from western and central Africa, and a third one including isolates from the southern part of Africa. A significant correlation was observed between geographic and genetic distances between isolates. Isolates from countries in the Mediterranean region where MWMV has recently emerged (France, Spain, Portugal) have highly conserved sequences, suggesting that they may have a common and recent origin. MWMV from Sudan, a highly divergent variant, may be considered an evolutionary intermediate between MWMV and PRSV.

  19. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzik, R.; Bandurska, K.; Deka, D.; Golovkin, M.; Koprowski, H. . E-mail: h_koprowski@jefferson.edu

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP.

  20. A Vicilin-Like Seed Storage Protein, PAP85, Is Involved in Tobacco Mosaic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Cheng-En; Yeh, Kuo-Chen; Wu, Shu-Hsing; Wang, Hsiang-Iu

    2013-01-01

    One striking feature of viruses with RNA genomes is the modification of the host membrane structure during early infection. This process requires both virus- and host-encoded proteins; however, the host factors involved and their role in this process remain largely unknown. On infection with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a positive-strand RNA virus, the filamentous and tubular endoplasmic reticulum (ER) converts to aggregations at the early stage and returns to filamentous at the late infectious stage, termed the ER transition. Also, membrane- or vesicle-packaged viral replication complexes (VRCs) are induced early during infection. We used microarray assays to screen the Arabidopsis thaliana gene(s) responding to infection with TMV in the initial infection stage and identified an Arabidopsis gene, PAP85 (annotated as a vicilin-like seed storage protein), with upregulated expression during 0.5 to 6 h of TMV infection. TMV accumulation was reduced in pap85-RNA interference (RNAi) Arabidopsis and restored to wild-type levels when PAP85 was overexpressed in pap85-RNAi Arabidopsis. We did not observe the ER transition in TMV-infected PAP85-knockdown Arabidopsis protoplasts. In addition, TMV accumulation was reduced in PAP85-knockdown protoplasts. VRC accumulation was reduced, but not significantly (P = 0.06), in PAP85-knockdown protoplasts. Coexpression of PAP85 and the TMV main replicase (P126), but not their expression alone in Arabidopsis protoplasts, could induce ER aggregations. PMID:23576511

  1. Rapid immunohistochemical diagnosis of tobacco mosaic virus disease by microwave-assisted plant sample preparation

    PubMed Central

    Zellnig, Günther; Möstl, Stefan; Zechmann, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Immunoelectron microscopy is a powerful method to diagnose viral diseases and to study the distribution of the viral agent within plant cells and tissues. Nevertheless, current protocols for the immunological detection of viral diseases with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) in plants take between 3 and 6 days and are therefore not suited for rapid diagnosis of virus diseases in plants. In this study, we describe a method that allows rapid cytohistochemical detection of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in leaves of tobacco plants. With the help of microwave irradiation, sample preparation of the leaves was reduced to 90 min. After sample sectioning, virus particles were stained on the sections by immunogold labelling of the viral coat protein, which took 100 min. After investigation with the TEM, a clear visualization of TMV in tobacco cells was achieved altogether in about half a day. Comparison of gold particle density by image analysis revealed that samples prepared with the help of microwave irradiation yielded significantly higher gold particle density as samples prepared conventionally at room temperature. This study clearly demonstrates that microwave-assisted plant sample preparation in combination with cytohistochemical localization of viral coat protein is well suited for rapid diagnosis of plant virus diseases in altogether about half a day by TEM. PMID:23580761

  2. Optimized expression, solubilization and purification of nuclear inclusion protein b of cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Jacob, T; Shah, M; Das, D; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2008-04-01

    All RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for replication of the viral genome. Nuclear inclusion b (NIb) gene codes for the RdRp in Potyviridae viruses. In this study, expression, solubilization and purification of NIb protein of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is reported. The objective of the present study was to express and purify the NIb protein of CdMV on a large scale for structural characterization, as the structure of the RdRp from a plant virus is yet to be determined. However, the expression of NIb protein with hexa-histidine tag in Escherichia coli led to insoluble aggregates. Out of all the approaches [making truncated versions to reduce the size of protein; replacing an amino acid residue likely to be involved in hydrophobic intermolecular interactions with a hydrophilic one; expressing the protein along with chaperones; expression in Origami cells for proper disulphide bond formation, in E. coli as a fusion with maltose-binding protein (MBP) and in Nicotiana tabacum] to obtain the RdRp in a soluble form, only expression in E. coli as a fusion with MBP and its expression in N. tabacum were successful. The NIb expressed in plant or as a fusion with MBP in E. coli can be scaled up for further work.

  3. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta.

    PubMed

    Brodzik, R; Bandurska, K; Deka, D; Golovkin, M; Koprowski, H

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP.

  4. Complete genome sequence of Celery mosaic virus and its relationship to other members of the genus Potyvirus

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The complete genomic sequence of Celery mosaic virus (CeMV) was determined to be 9999 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3’ poly(A) tail. The genome comprises a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3181 amino acid residues. Its genomic organization is typical of potyviruses, and cont...

  5. Triticum mosaic virus exhibits limited population variation yet shows evidence of parallel evolution after replicated serial passage in wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An infectious cDNA clone of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus; family Potyviridae) was used to establish three independent lineages in wheat to examine intra-host population diversity levels within protein 1 (P1) and coat protein (CP) cistrons over time. Genetic variation was assessed ...

  6. Next generation sequencing technology: a powerful tool for the genome characterization of sugarcane mosaic virus from Sorghum almum

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to analyze the occurrence of viruses in Sorghum almum plants in Florida exhibiting mosaic symptoms. Total RNA was extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as a template for cDNA library preparation. The resulting library was sequenced on an Illu...

  7. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  8. Complete Nucleotide Sequence of an Australian Isolate of Turnip mosaic virus before and after Seven Years of Serial Passaging

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Lara; Moyle, Richard L.; Dalton-Morgan, Jessica; Hussein, Nasser

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of an Australian isolate of Turnip mosaic virus was determined by Sanger sequencing. After seven years of serial passaging by mechanical inoculation, the isolate was resequenced by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). Eighteen single nucleotide polymorphisms were identified between the isolates. Both isolates had 96% identity to isolate AUST10. PMID:27856582

  9. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat, was found in wheat fields in three western counties in Ohio: Auglaize, Miami, and Paulding. WMoV nucleoprotein sequence was identified from Illumina deep sequencing of RNA collected from symptomatic and asymptomatic wheat s...

  10. Detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected watermelon seeds using short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The cucurbit diseases caused by cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) have led to a serious problem to growers and seed producers because it is difficult to prevent spreading through causal agent of seeds. Conventional detection methods for infected seed such as a biological, serological, and m...

  11. A conserved locus conditioning Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus resistance on 5DL in common wheat

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is considered one of the most important diseases in winter wheat regions of the central and southeastern United States. Utilization of resistant cultivars is the only practical and environmentally friendly means of control. To identify QTL for SBWMV resistance, ...

  12. Functional characterization of the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) gene of Pepino mosaic virus in tomato

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) has caused serious economic losses to many greenhouse tomato productions around the world. This potexvirus genome contains five major open reading frames (ORFs) encoding for a 164-kDa RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), three triple gene block (TGB) proteins of 26, 14 an...

  13. Fine mapping of the Bsrl barley stripe mosaic virus resistance gene in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ND18 strain of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) infects several lines of Brachypodium distachyon, a recently developed model system for genomics research in cereals. Among the inbred lines tested, Bd3-1 is highly resistant at 20 to 25 °C, whereas Bd21 is susceptible and infection results in a...

  14. Genetic diversity and serological specificity of emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus and development of a broad spectrum LAMP assay

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), first described in England, 1935, is a well-known, seed-borne Tobamovirus on cucurbits in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The recent outbreaks of CGMMV in Australia and North America (Canada and U.S.) received great concerns from the vegetable seed com...

  15. Selective interaction between Chloroplast B ATPase and TGB1 retards severe symptoms caused by Alternanthera mosaic virus infection

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The multifunctional triple gene block protein 1 (TGB1) of the Potexvirus Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) has been reported to have silencing suppressor, cell-to-cell movement, and helicase functions. Yeast two hybrid screening using an Arabidopsis thaliana cDNA library with TGB1 as bait, and co-p...

  16. Functional analysis of the Cucumber mosaic virus 2b protein: pathogenicity and nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yongzeng; Tzfira, Tzvi; Gaba, Victor; Citovsky, Vitaly; Palukaitis, Peter; Gal-On, Amit

    2004-10-01

    The 2b protein encoded by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been shown to be a silencing suppressor and pathogenicity determinant in solanaceous hosts, but a movement determinant in cucumber. In addition, synergistic interactions between CMV and Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) have been described in several cucurbit species. Here, it was shown that deletion of the 2b gene from CMV prevented extensive systemic movement of the virus in zucchini squash, which could not be complemented by co-infection with ZYMV. Thus, ZYMV expressing a silencing suppressor with a different target could not complement the CMV 2b-specific movement function. Expression of the 2b protein from an attenuated ZYMV vector resulted in a synergistic response, largely restoring infection symptoms of wild-type ZYMV in several cucurbit species. Deletion or alteration of either of two nuclear localization signals (NLSs) did not affect nuclear localization in two assays, but did affect pathogenicity in several cucurbit species, whilst deletion of both NLSs led to loss of nuclear localization. The 2b protein interacted with an Arabidopsis thaliana karyopherin alpha protein (AtKAPalpha) in the yeast two-hybrid system, as did each of the two single NLS-deletion mutants. However, 2b protein containing a deletion of both NLSs was unable to interact with AtKAPalpha. These data suggest that the 2b protein localizes to the nucleus by using the karyopherin alpha-mediated system, but demonstrate that nuclear localization was insufficient for enhancement of the 2b-mediated pathogenic response in cucurbit hosts. Thus, the sequences corresponding to the two NLSs must have another role leading to pathogenicity enhancement.

  17. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. A high throughput barley stripe mosaic virus vector for virus induced gene silencing in monocots and dicots.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Cheng; Li, Cui; Yan, Lijie; Jackson, Andrew O; Liu, Zhiyong; Han, Chenggui; Yu, Jialin; Li, Dawei

    2011-01-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is a single-stranded RNA virus with three genome components designated alpha, beta, and gamma. BSMV vectors have previously been shown to be efficient virus induced gene silencing (VIGS) vehicles in barley and wheat and have provided important information about host genes functioning during pathogenesis as well as various aspects of genes functioning in development. To permit more effective use of BSMV VIGS for functional genomics experiments, we have developed an Agrobacterium delivery system for BSMV and have coupled this with a ligation independent cloning (LIC) strategy to mediate efficient cloning of host genes. Infiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana leaves provided excellent sources of virus for secondary BSMV infections and VIGS in cereals. The Agro/LIC BSMV VIGS vectors were able to function in high efficiency down regulation of phytoene desaturase (PDS), magnesium chelatase subunit H (ChlH), and plastid transketolase (TK) gene silencing in N. benthamiana and in the monocots, wheat, barley, and the model grass, Brachypodium distachyon. Suppression of an Arabidopsis orthologue cloned from wheat (TaPMR5) also interfered with wheat powdery mildew (Blumeria graminis f. sp. tritici) infections in a manner similar to that of the A. thaliana PMR5 loss-of-function allele. These results imply that the PMR5 gene has maintained similar functions across monocot and dicot families. Our BSMV VIGS system provides substantial advantages in expense, cloning efficiency, ease of manipulation and ability to apply VIGS for high throughput genomics studies.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of gold nano-wires templated on virus-like arrays of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wnęk, M; Górzny, M Ł; Ward, M B; Wälti, C; Davies, A G; Brydson, R; Evans, S D; Stockley, P G

    2016-01-01

    The rod-shaped plant virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a nano-fabrication template, and chimeric peptide expression on its major coat protein has extended its potential applications. Here we describe a simple bacterial expression system for production and rapid purification of recombinant chimeric TMV coat protein carrying C-terminal peptide tags. These proteins do not bind TMV RNA or form disks at pH 7. However, they retain the ability to self-assemble into virus-like arrays at acidic pH. C-terminal peptide tags in such arrays are exposed on the protein surface, allowing interaction with target species. We have utilized a C-terminal His-tag to create virus coat protein-templated nano-rods able to bind gold nanoparticles uniformly. These can be transformed into gold nano-wires by deposition of additional gold atoms from solution, followed by thermal annealing. The resistivity of a typical annealed wire created by this approach is significantly less than values reported for other nano-wires made using different bio-templates. This expression construct is therefore a useful additional tool for the creation of chimeric TMV-like nano-rods for bio-templating. PMID:23220929

  20. Fabrication and characterization of gold nano-wires templated on virus-like arrays of tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wnęk, M.; Górzny, M. Ł.; Ward, M. B.; Wälti, C.; Davies, A. G.; Brydson, R.; Evans, S. D.; Stockley, P. G.

    2013-01-01

    The rod-shaped plant virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a nano-fabrication template, and chimeric peptide expression on its major coat protein has extended its potential applications. Here we describe a simple bacterial expression system for production and rapid purification of recombinant chimeric TMV coat protein carrying C-terminal peptide tags. These proteins do not bind TMV RNA or form disks at pH 7. However, they retain the ability to self-assemble into virus-like arrays at acidic pH. C-terminal peptide tags in such arrays are exposed on the protein surface, allowing interaction with target species. We have utilized a C-terminal His-tag to create virus coat protein-templated nano-rods able to bind gold nanoparticles uniformly. These can be transformed into gold nano-wires by deposition of additional gold atoms from solution, followed by thermal annealing. The resistivity of a typical annealed wire created by this approach is significantly less than values reported for other nano-wires made using different bio-templates. This expression construct is therefore a useful additional tool for the creation of chimeric TMV-like nano-rods for bio-templating.