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Sample records for pea mosaic virus

  1. Early embryo invasion as a determinant in pea of the seed transmission of pea seed-borne mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Maule, A J

    1992-07-01

    Seed transmission of an isolate of pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV) in several pea genotypes has been studied. Cross-pollination experiments showed that pollen transmission of PSbMV did not occur and accordingly, virus was not detected in pollen grains by ELISA or electron microscopy. Comparative studies between two pea cultivars, one with a high incidence of seed transmission and one with none, showed that PSbMV infected the floral tissues (sepals, petals, anther and carpel) of both cultivars, but was not detected in ovules prior to fertilization. Virus was detected equally well in seed coats of the progeny in both cultivars. Analysis of virus incidence and concentration in pea seeds of different developmental stages demonstrated that in the cultivar with a high incidence of seed transmission, PSbMV directly invaded immature embryos, multiplied in the embryonic tissues and persisted during seed maturation. In contrast, the cultivar without seed transmission did not show invasion of immature embryos by the virus; there was no evidence for virus multiplication or persistence during embryo development and seed maturation. Hence seed transmission of PSbMV resulted from direct invasion of immature pea embryos by the virus and the block to seed transmission in the non-permissive cultivar probably occurred at this step.

  2. A peptide that binds the pea aphid gut impedes entry of Pea enation mosaic virus into the aphid hemocoel

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Sijun; Sivakumar, S.; Sparks, Wendy O.; Miller, W. Allen; Bonning, Bryony C.

    2010-05-25

    Development of ways to block virus transmission by aphids could lead to novel and broad-spectrum means of controlling plant viruses. Viruses in the Luteoviridae enhanced are obligately transmitted by aphids in a persistent manner that requires virion accumulation in the aphid hemocoel. To enter the hemocoel, the virion must bind and traverse the aphid gut epithelium. By screening a phage display library, we identified a 12-residue gut binding peptide (GBP3.1) that binds to the midgut and hindgut of the pea aphid Acyrthosiphon pisum. Binding was confirmed by labeling the aphid gut with a GBP3.1-green fluorescent protein fusion. GBP3.1 reduced uptake of Pea enation mosaic virus (Luteoviridae) from the pea aphid gut into the hemocoel. GBP3.1 also bound to the gut epithelia of the green peach aphid and the soybean aphid. These results suggest a novel strategy for inhibiting plant virus transmission by at least three major aphid pest species.

  3. Baculovirus expressed virus-like particles of Pea eation mosaic virus vary in size and encapsidate baculovirus mRNAs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV: family Luteoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent, circulative manner by aphids. We inserted cDNAs encoding the structural proteins of PEMV, the coat protein (CP) and coat protein-read through domain (CPRT) into the genome of the baculovirus Autographa californica m...

  4. Apple latent spherical virus vector as vaccine for the prevention and treatment of mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants by bean yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-11-07

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases.

  5. Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector as Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Mosaic Diseases in Pea, Broad Bean, and Eustoma Plants by Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Satoh, Nozomi; Kon, Tatsuya; Yamagishi, Noriko; Takahashi, Tsubasa; Natsuaki, Tomohide; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV) harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases. PMID:25386843

  6. Conditional Facilitation of an Aphid Vector, Acyrthosiphon pisum, by the Plant Pathogen, Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Hodge, Simon; Powell, Glen

    2010-01-01

    Plant pathogens can induce symptoms that affect the performance of insect herbivores utilizing the same host plant. Previous studies examining the effects of infection of tic bean, Vicia faba L. (Fabales: Fabaceae), by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV), an important disease of legume crops, indicated there were no changes in the growth and reproductive rate of its primary vector the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris) (Hemiptera: Aphididae). Here, we report the results of laboratory experiments investigating how A. pisum responded to PEMV infection of a different host plant, Pisum sativum L., at different stages of symptom development. Aphid growth rate was negatively related to the age of the host plant, but when they were introduced onto older plants with well-developed PEMV symptoms they exhibited a higher growth rate compared to those developing on uninfected plants of the same age. In choice tests using leaf discs A. pisum showed a strong preference for discs from PEMV-infected peas, probably in response to visual cues from the yellowed and mottled infected leaves. When adults were crowded onto leaves using clip-cages they produced more winged progeny on PEMV-infected plants. The results indicate that PEMV produces symptoms in the host plant that can enhance the performance of A. pisum as a vector, modify the production of winged progeny and affect their spatial distribution. The findings provide further evidence that some insect vector/plant pathogen interactions could be regarded as mutualistic rather than commensal when certain conditions regarding the age, stage of infection and species of host plant are met. PMID:21067425

  7. Analysis of the accumulation of Pea enation mosaic virus genomes in seed tissues and lack of evidence for seed transmission in pea (Pisum sativum).

    PubMed

    Timmerman-Vaughan, Gail; Larsen, Richard; Murray, Sarah; McPhee, Kevin; Coyne, Clarice

    2009-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) is an important virus disease of pea. International movement of commercial pea cultivars and germplasm can be problematic due to uncertainty about seed transmission of the viruses responsible for the disease. Whether PEMV is seedborne was assessed by collecting developing seed from infected plants and determining the relative concentrations of the PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 viral genomes using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. The relative accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 was approximately 1,240 and 13,000 times higher, respectively, in leaf than in embryo tissues. Accumulation of PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 RNA was also significantly higher in pod walls and seed coats than in cotyledons or embryo axes. No evidence was obtained for seed transmission of PEMV in pea. Although PEMV-1 and PEMV-2 genomic RNAs were found in developing seed, no PEMV symptoms were observed in the field on more than 50,000 plants from seed derived from PEMV-infected source plants. These data demonstrate that PEMV is seedborne in pea but do not support a previous report that PEMV is seed transmitted. Absence of seed transmission may result from the low abundance of PEMV viral genomes in embryo tissue.

  8. Multiple Cis-acting elements modulate programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting in Pea enation mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Simon, Anne E.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed -1 ribosomal frameshifting (-1 PRF) is used by many positive-strand RNA viruses for translation of required products. Despite extensive studies, it remains unresolved how cis-elements just downstream of the recoding site promote a precise level of frameshifting. The Umbravirus Pea enation mosaic virus RNA2 expresses its RNA polymerase by -1 PRF of the 5′-proximal ORF (p33). Three hairpins located in the vicinity of the recoding site are phylogenetically conserved among Umbraviruses. The central Recoding Stimulatory Element (RSE), located downstream of the p33 termination codon, is a large hairpin with two asymmetric internal loops. Mutational analyses revealed that sequences throughout the RSE and the RSE lower stem (LS) structure are important for frameshifting. SHAPE probing of mutants indicated the presence of higher order structure, and sequences in the LS may also adapt an alternative conformation. Long-distance pairing between the RSE and a 3′ terminal hairpin was less critical when the LS structure was stabilized. A basal level of frameshifting occurring in the absence of the RSE increases to 72% of wild-type when a hairpin upstream of the slippery site is also deleted. These results suggest that suppression of frameshifting may be needed in the absence of an active RSE conformation. PMID:26578603

  9. Photosynthetic alterations of pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus: A coordinated decrease in efficiencies of CO(2) assimilation and photosystem II photochemistry.

    PubMed

    Kyseláková, Helena; Prokopová, Jitka; Nauš, Jan; Novák, Ondřej; Navrátil, Milan; Safářová, Dana; Spundová, Martina; Ilík, Petr

    2011-11-01

    We have investigated photosynthetic changes of fully expanded pea leaves infected systemically by pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) that often attacks legumes particularly in northern temperate regions. A typical compatible virus-host interaction was monitored during 40 post-inoculation days (dpi). An initial PEMV-induced decrease in photosynthetic CO(2) assimilation was detected at 15 dpi, when the virus appeared in the measured leaves. This decrease was not induced by stomata closure and corresponded with a decrease in the efficiency of photosystem II photochemistry (Φ(PSII)). Despite of a slight impairment of oxygen evolution at this stage, PSII function was not primarily responsible for the decrease in Φ(PSII). Chlorophyll fluorescence imaging revealed that Φ(PSII) started to decrease from the leaf tip to the base. More pronounced symptoms of PEMV disease appeared at later stages, when a typical mosaic and enations appeared in the infected leaves and oxidative damage of cell membranes was detected. From 30 dpi, a degradation of photosynthetic pigments accelerated, stomata were closing and corresponding pronounced decline in CO(2) assimilation was observed. A concomitant photoprotective responses, i.e. an increase in non-photochemical quenching and accumulation of de-epoxidized xanthophylls, were also detected. Interestingly, alternative electron sinks in chloroplasts were not stimulated by PEMV infection, which is in contradiction to earlier reports dealing with virus-induced plant stresses. The presented results show that the PEMV-induced alterations in mature pea leaves accelerated leaf senescence during which a decrease in Φ(PSII) took place in coordinated manner with an inhibition of CO(2) assimilation.

  10. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)—a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids—causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV–aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan–PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  11. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid. PMID:26457763

  12. Automated Solution-Phase Synthesis of Insect Glycans to Probe the Binding Affinity of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Tang, Shu-Lun; Linz, Lucas B; Bonning, Bryony C; Pohl, Nicola L B

    2015-11-01

    Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV)--a plant RNA virus transmitted exclusively by aphids--causes disease in multiple food crops. However, the aphid-virus interactions required for disease transmission are poorly understood. For virus transmission, PEMV binds to a heavily glycosylated receptor aminopeptidase N in the pea aphid gut and is transcytosed across the gut epithelium into the aphid body cavity prior to release in saliva as the aphid feeds. To investigate the role of glycans in PEMV-aphid interactions and explore the possibility of viral control through blocking a glycan interaction, we synthesized insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides by automated solution-phase synthesis. The route features a mannose building block with C-5 ester enforcing a β-linkage, which also provides a site for subsequent chain extension. The resulting insect N-glycan terminal trimannosides with fluorous tags were used in a fluorous microarray to analyze binding with fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled PEMV; however, no specific binding between the insect glycan and PEMV was detected. To confirm these microarray results, we removed the fluorous tag from the trimannosides for isothermal titration calorimetry studies with unlabeled PEMV. The ITC studies confirmed the microarray results and suggested that this particular glycan-PEMV interaction is not involved in virus uptake and transport through the aphid.

  13. Structure-Based Mutational Analysis of eIF4E in Relation to sbm1 Resistance to Pea Seed-Borne Mosaic Virus in Pea

    PubMed Central

    Ashby, Jamie A.; Stevenson, Clare E. M.; Jarvis, Gavin E.; Lawson, David M.; Maule, Andrew J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pea encodes eukaryotic translation initiation factor eIF4E (eIF4ES), which supports the multiplication of Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV). In common with hosts for other potyviruses, some pea lines contain a recessive allele (sbm1) encoding a mutant eIF4E (eIF4ER) that fails to interact functionally with the PSbMV avirulence protein, VPg, giving genetic resistance to infection. Methodology/Principal Findings To study structure-function relationships between pea eIF4E and PSbMV VPg, we obtained an X-ray structure for eIF4ES bound to m7GTP. The crystallographic asymmetric unit contained eight independent copies of the protein, providing insights into the structurally conserved and flexible regions of eIF4E. To assess indirectly the importance of key residues in binding to VPg and/or m7GTP, an extensive range of point mutants in eIF4E was tested for their ability to complement PSbMV multiplication in resistant pea tissues and for complementation of protein translation, and hence growth, in an eIF4E-defective yeast strain conditionally dependent upon ectopic expression of eIF4E. The mutants also dissected individual contributions from polymorphisms present in eIF4ER and compared the impact of individual residues altered in orthologous resistance alleles from other crop species. The data showed that essential resistance determinants in eIF4E differed for different viruses although the critical region involved (possibly in VPg-binding) was conserved and partially overlapped with the m7GTP-binding region. This overlap resulted in coupled inhibition of virus multiplication and translation in the majority of cases, although the existence of a few mutants that uncoupled the two processes supported the view that the specific role of eIF4E in potyvirus infection may not be restricted to translation. Conclusions/Significance The work describes the most extensive structural analysis of eIF4E in relation to potyvirus resistance. In addition to defining functional

  14. The 3′ Untranslated Region of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Contains Two T-Shaped, Ribosome-Binding, Cap-Independent Translation Enhancers

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Kasprzak, Wojciech K.; Szarko, Christine; Shapiro, Bruce A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Many plant viruses without 5′caps or 3′ poly(A) tails contain 3′ proximal, cap-independent translation enhancers (3′CITEs) that bind to ribosomal subunits or translation factors thought to assist in ribosome recruitment. Most 3′CITEs participate in a long-distance kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin to deliver ribosomal subunits to the 5′ end for translation initiation. Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) contains two adjacent 3′CITEs in the center of its 703-nucleotide 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR), the ribosome-binding, kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS) and eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding Panicum mosaic virus-like translation enhance (PTE). We now report that PEMV contains a third, independent 3′CITE located near the 3′ terminus. This 3′CITE is composed of three hairpins and two pseudoknots, similar to the TSS 3′CITE of the carmovirus Turnip crinkle virus (TCV). As with the TCV TSS, the PEMV 3′TSS is predicted to fold into a T-shaped structure that binds to 80S ribosomes and 60S ribosomal subunits. A small hairpin (kl-H) upstream of the 3′TSS contains an apical loop capable of forming a kissing-loop interaction with a 5′ proximal hairpin and is critical for the accumulation of full-length PEMV in protoplasts. Although the kl-H and 3′TSS are dispensable for the translation of a reporter construct containing the complete PEMV 3′UTR in vitro, deleting the normally required kl-TSS and PTE 3′CITEs and placing the kl-H and 3′TSS proximal to the reporter termination codon restores translation to near wild-type levels. This suggests that PEMV requires three 3′CITEs for proper translation and that additional translation enhancers may have been missed if reporter constructs were used in 3′CITE identification. IMPORTANCE The rapid life cycle of viruses requires efficient translation of viral-encoded proteins. Many plant RNA viruses contain 3′ cap-independent translation

  15. The Tobacco Mosaic Virus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sulzinski, Michael A.

    1992-01-01

    Explains how the tobacco mosaic virus can be used to study virology. Presents facts about the virus, procedures to handle the virus in the laboratory, and four laboratory exercises involving the viruses' survival under inactivating conditions, dilution end point, filterability, and microscopy. (MDH)

  16. The kissing-loop T-shaped structure translational enhancer of Pea enation mosaic virus can bind simultaneously to ribosomes and a 5' proximal hairpin.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D; Shapiro, Bruce A; Simon, Anne E

    2013-11-01

    The Pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) 3' translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5'-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5' and 3' PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3' translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5' hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5' end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation.

  17. The Kissing-Loop T-Shaped Structure Translational Enhancer of Pea Enation Mosaic Virus Can Bind Simultaneously to Ribosomes and a 5′ Proximal Hairpin

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Feng; Gulay, Suna P.; Kasprzak, Wojciech; Dinman, Jonathan D.

    2013-01-01

    The Pea Enation Mosaic Virus (PEMV) 3′ translational enhancer, known as the kissing-loop T-shaped structure (kl-TSS), binds to 40S subunits, 60S subunits, and 80S ribosomes, whereas the Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) TSS binds only to 60S subunits and 80S ribosomes. Using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assay (EMSA)-based competition assays, the kl-TSS was found to occupy a different site in the ribosome than the P-site-binding TCV TSS, suggesting that these two TSS employ different mechanisms for enhancing translation. The kl-TSS also engages in a stable, long-distance RNA-RNA kissing-loop interaction with a 12-bp 5′-coding-region hairpin that does not alter the structure of the kl-TSS as revealed by molecular dynamics simulations. Addition of the kl-TSS in trans to a luciferase reporter construct containing either wild-type or mutant 5′ and 3′ PEMV sequences suppressed translation, suggesting that the kl-TSS is required in cis to function, and both ribosome-binding and RNA interaction activities of the kl-TSS contributed to translational inhibition. Addition of the kl-TSS was more detrimental for translation than an adjacent eIF4E-binding 3′ translational enhancer known as the PTE, suggesting that the PTE may support the ribosome-binding function of the kl-TSS. Results of in-line RNA structure probing, ribosome filter binding, and high-throughput selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (hSHAPE) of rRNAs within bound ribosomes suggest that kl-TSS binding to ribosomes and binding to the 5′ hairpin are compatible activities. These results suggest a model whereby posttermination ribosomes/ribosomal subunits bind to the kl-TSS and are delivered to the 5′ end of the genome via the associated RNA-RNA interaction, which enhances the rate of translation reinitiation. PMID:23986599

  18. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using proteins crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the unexpected hypothesis that the virus releases its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have fairly flat coats, but in TYNV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early stuties of TYMV, but McPherson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central void on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides linked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the void. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine

  19. Cucumber mosaic virus in Rubus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has been reported on red raspberry in Chile, Scotland and the Soviet Union and in Chile on blackberry. Its occurrence in Rubus is rare and seems to cause little damage. Except for one early, unconfirmed report, CMV has not been reported on Rubus in North America. This vir...

  20. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The bumpy exterior of the turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) protein coat, or capsid, was defined in detail by Dr. Alexander McPherson of the University of California, Irvin using protein crystallized in space for analysis on Earth. TYMV is an icosahedral virus constructed from 180 copies of the same protein arranged into 12 clusters of five proteins (pentamers), and 20 clusters of six proteins (hexamers). The final TYMV structure led to the enexpected hypothesis that the virus release its RNA by essentially chemical-mechanical means. Most viruses have farly flat coats, but in TYMV, the fold in each protein, called the jellyroll, is clustered at the points where the protein pentamers and hexamers join. The jellyrolls are almost standing on end, producing a bumpy surface with knobs at all of the pentamers and hexamers. At the inside surface of the pentamers is a void that is not present at the hexamers. The coating had been seen in early studies of TYMV, but McPhereson's atomic structure shows much more detail. The inside surface is strikingly, and unexpectedly, different than the outside. While the pentamers contain a central viod on the inside, the hexameric units contain peptides liked to each other, forming a ring or, more accurately, rings to fill the voild. Credit: Dr. Alexander McPherson, University of California, Irvine.

  1. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully deduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the same time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystal grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were viusally perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This computer model shows the external coating or capsid. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, Univeristy of California at Irvin.

  2. Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Virus Structure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The structure of the Satellite Tobacco Mosaic Viurus (STMV)--one of the smallest viruses known--has been successfully reduced using STMV crystals grown aboard the Space Shuttle in 1992 and 1994. The STMV crystals were up to 30 times the volume of any seen in the laboratory. At the time they gave the best resolution data ever obtained on any virus crystal. STMV is a small icosahedral plant virus, consisting of a protein shell made up of 60 identical protein subunits of molecular weight 17,500. Particularly noteworthy is the fact that, in contrast to the crystals grown on Earth, the crystals grown under microgravity conditions were visually perfect, with no striations or clumping of crystals. Furthermore, the x-ray diffraction data obtained from the space-grown crystals was of a much higher quality than the best data available at that time from ground-based crystals. This stylized ribbon model shows the protein coat in white and the nucleic acid in yellow. STMV is used because it is a simple protein to work with; studies are unrelated to tobacco. Credit: Dr. Alex McPherson, University of California at Irvin.

  3. Incidence of Wheat streak mosaic virus, Triticum mosaic virus, and Wheat mosaic virus in wheat curl mites recovered from maturing winter wheat spikes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat curl mites (WCM; Aceria tosichella) transmit Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), and Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV) to wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains region of the United States. These viruses can be detected in single, double, or triple combinations i...

  4. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  5. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  6. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  7. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  8. 40 CFR 174.514 - Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic... Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus; exemption from the requirement for a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Watermelon Mosaic Virus-2 and Zucchini Yellow...

  9. Predation Determines Different Selective Pressure on Pea Aphid Host Races in a Complex Agricultural Mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Balog, Adalbert; Schmitz, Oswald J.

    2013-01-01

    Field assessments were conducted to examine the interplay between host plant and predation in complex agricultural mosaic on pea aphid clover and alfalfa races. In one experiment, we examined the relative fitness on clover race (CR) and alfalfa race (AR) pea aphids on broad bean, red clover and alfalfa alone. But because clover is typically grown in a more complex agricultural mosaic with alfalfa and broad bean, a second experiment was conducted to assess the fitness consequences under predation in a more complex agricultural field setting that also included potential apparent competition with AR pea aphids. In a third experiment we tested for the effect of differential host race density on the fitness of the other host race mediated by a predator effect. CR pea aphids always had fitness losses when on broad bean (had lower fitness on broad bean relative to red clover) and fitness benefits when on red clover (higher fitness on red clover relative to broad bean), whether or not in apparent competition with alfalfa race aphids on bean and alfalfa. AR suffered fitness loss on both alfalfa and bean in apparent competition with CR on clover. Therefore we can conclude that the predation rate between host races was highly asymmetrical. The complexity of the agricultural mosaic thus can influence prey selection by predators on different host plants. These may have evolutionary consequences through context dependent fitness benefits on particular host plants. PMID:23409081

  10. Sequence diversity of wheat mosaic virus isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    High Plains disease of wheat and maize emerged in the United States in 1993 and its distribution has expanded in subsequent years. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), transmitted by eriophyid wheat curl mites (Aceria tosichella) is the causal agent of disease. WMoV and other members of the genus Emaravirus...

  11. Tobacco mosaic virus: Proof by synthesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A linear, non-self-replicating DNA molecule encoding Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was enzymatically synthesized in vitro from DNA templates made from overlapping oligonucleotides. The molecule was a replica of the alphabetic text rendering of the first TMV genome sequence elucidated by Goelet et al. ...

  12. Resistance to wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus in wheat lines carrying Wsm1 and Wsm3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) are important viruses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) in the Great Plains of United States. In addition to agronomic practices to prevent damage from these viruses, temperature sensitive resistance genes Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3, have bee...

  13. A 2014 nationwide survey of the distribution of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) major viruses in South Korean soybean fields, and changes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2014 symptomatic soybean samples were collected throughout Korea, and were tested for the most important soybean viruses found in Korea, namely Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV). SYMMV was most commonly detected,...

  14. Response of maize (Zea mays L.) lines carrying Wsm1, Wsm2 and Wsm3 to the potyviruses Johnsongrass mosaic virus and Sorghum mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize dwarf mosaic disease is one of the most important viral diseases of maize throughout the world. It is caused by a set of related viruses in the family Potyviridae, genus Potyvirus, including Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV), Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV), Johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV), and S...

  15. Attempts to Improve the Method of Screening Cowpea Germplasm for Resistance to Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Use of visual symptom screening for cowpea plants in field plots improved screening for Blackeye Cowpea Mosaic Virus (BICMV)-resistance. However, the method failed to improve the speed or accuracy of screening for Cucumber Mosaic Virus (CMV)-resistance. Plants that displayed few visual virus sympt...

  16. Barley stripe mosaic virus: Structure and relationship to the tobamoviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; Williams, Dewight; Bian, Wen; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Stubbs, Gerald

    2013-09-01

    Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) is the type member of the genus Hordeivirus, rigid, rod-shaped viruses in the family Virgaviridae. We have used fiber diffraction and cryo-electron microscopy to determine the helical symmetry of BSMV to be 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix, and to obtain a low-resolution model of the virus by helical reconstruction methods. Features in the model support a structural relationship between the coat proteins of the hordeiviruses and the tobamoviruses. - Highlights: • We report a low-resolution structure of barley stripe mosaic virus. • Barley stripe mosaic virus has 23.2 subunits per turn of the viral helix. • We compare barley stripe mosaic virus with tobacco mosaic virus.

  17. Micromechanical properties of tobacco mosaic viruses.

    PubMed

    Schmatulla, Alexander; Maghelli, Nicola; Marti, Othmar

    2007-03-01

    A tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) subject to local forces can be viewed as an uniform beam with local loads. We used a custom built Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) to determine the curvature induced in the TMV by concentrated load or by distributed forces. Local forces were created by the AFM tip. Distributed forces were applied to the virus via the surface tension of receding droplets. The experimental results of both methods can be described when we attribute a Young modulus of 6 +/- 3 GPa to the virus. Our value is about five times larger than published data. We compare our results to the literature and work out possible error sources in our experiment and in published one.

  18. Comparison of barley stripe mosaic virus strains.

    PubMed

    Hafez, Elsayed E; Abdel Aleem, Engy E; Fattouh, Faiza A

    2008-01-01

    BSMV (barley stripe mosaic virus) particles were obtained in a pure state from infected host plant tissues of Hordeum vulgare. The three genomic parities (alpha, beta and gamma) were amplified by PCR using specific primers for each particle; each was cloned. Partial sequence of the alpha, beta and gamma segments was determined for the Egyptian isolate of barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV AE1). Alignment of nucleotide sequences with that of other known strains of the virus, BSMV type strains (CV17, ND18 and China), and the generation of phylogenetic trees was performed. A low level of homology was detected comparing 467 bp of the a and 643 bp of the segments to that of the other strains, and thus BSMV alpha and beta segments were in separate clusters. However, 1154 bp of the gamma segments of BSMV AE1 showed a high level of homology especially to strain BSMV ND18, as they both formed a distinct cluster. Northern blotting of pure BSMV AE1 virus and H. vulgare-infected tissue were compared using an alpha ND18 specific probe. Western blotting using antibodies specific for the coat protein (CP) and the triple gene block 1 (TGB1) protein, which are both encoded by the beta ND18 segment, still indicated a high level of similarity between proteins produced by BSMV ND18 and AE1. We suggest that the BSMV AE1 isolate is a distinct strain of BSMV which reflects the genetic evolutionary divergence among BSMV strains and members of the Hordeivirus group. PMID:18533473

  19. Evaluation of Seed Transmission of Turnip yellow mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    de Assis Filho, F M; Sherwood, J L

    2000-11-01

    ABSTRACT The mechanism of virus transmission through seed was studied in Arabidopsis thaliana infected with Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) and Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Serological and biological tests were conducted to identify the route by which the viruses reach the seed and subsequently are located in the seed. Both TYMV and TMV were detected in seed from infected plants, however only TYMV was seed-transmitted. This is the first report of transmission of TYMV in seed of A. thaliana. Estimating virus seed transmission by grow-out tests was more accurate than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay due to the higher frequency of antigen in the seed coat than in the embryo. Virus in the seed coat did not lead to seedling infection. Thus, embryo invasion is necessary for seed transmission of TYMV in A. thaliana. Crosses between healthy and virus-infected plants indicated that TYMV from either the female or the male parent could invade the seed. Conversely, invasion from maternal tissue was the only route for TMV to invade the seed. Pollination of flowers on healthy A. thaliana with pollen from TYMV-infected plants did not result in systemic infection of healthy plants, despite TYMV being carried by pollen to the seed.

  20. The antigenicity of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1999-01-01

    The antigenic properties of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been studied extensively for more than 50 years. Distinct antigenic determinants called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified at the surface of intact virions and dissociated coat protein subunits, respectively, indicating that the quaternary structure of the virus influences the antigenic properties. A correlation has been found to exist between the location of seven to ten residue-long continuous epitopes in the TMV coat protein and the degree of segmental mobility along the polypeptide chain. Immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies specific for the bottom surface of the protein subunit, showed that these antibodies reacted with both ends of the stacked-disk aggregates of viral protein. This finding indicates that the stacked disks are bipolar and cannot be converted directly into helical viral rods as has been previously assumed. TMV epitopes have been mapped at the surface of coat protein subunits using biosensor technology. The ability of certain monoclonal antibodies to block the cotranslational disassembly of virions during the infection process was found to be linked to the precise location of their complementary epitopes and not to their binding affinity. Such blocking antibodies, which act by sterically preventing the interaction between virions and ribosomes may, when expressed in plants, be useful for controlling virus infection. PMID:10212935

  1. The antigenicity of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H

    1999-03-29

    The antigenic properties of the tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been studied extensively for more than 50 years. Distinct antigenic determinants called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified at the surface of intact virions and dissociated coat protein subunits, respectively, indicating that the quaternary structure of the virus influences the antigenic properties. A correlation has been found to exist between the location of seven to ten residue-long continuous epitopes in the TMV coat protein and the degree of segmental mobility along the polypeptide chain. Immunoelectron microscopy, using antibodies specific for the bottom surface of the protein subunit, showed that these antibodies reacted with both ends of the stacked-disk aggregates of viral protein. This finding indicates that the stacked disks are bipolar and cannot be converted directly into helical viral rods as has been previously assumed. TMV epitopes have been mapped at the surface of coat protein subunits using biosensor technology. The ability of certain monoclonal antibodies to block the cotranslational disassembly of virions during the infection process was found to be linked to the precise location of their complementary epitopes and not to their binding affinity. Such blocking antibodies, which act by sterically preventing the interaction between virions and ribosomes may, when expressed in plants, be useful for controlling virus infection.

  2. The Use of Green Fluorescent Protein-Tagged Recombinant Viruses to Test Lettuce mosaic virus Resistance in Lettuce.

    PubMed

    Candresse, T; Le Gall, O; Maisonneuve, B; German-Retana, S; Redondo, E

    2002-02-01

    ABSTRACT Seed certification and the use of cultivars containing one of two, probably allelic, recessive genes, mo1(1) and mo1(2), are the principal control methods for Lettuce mosaic virus (LMV) in lettuce. Although for a few LMV isolates, mo1(2) confers resistance with most isolates, the genes mo1(1) or mo1(2) confer a tolerance, and virus accumulation is readily detected in mo1-carrying plants. This phenotype complicates evaluation of the resistance status, in particular for mo1(1), for which there are no viral strains against which a true resistance is expressed. Two green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged viruses were constructed, derived from a non-resistance breaking isolate (LMV-0) and from a resistance-breaking isolate (LMV-E). An evaluation of 101 cultivars of known status was carried out with these recombinant viruses. Using the LMV-0-derived recombinant, identification of mo1-carrying cultivars was simple because, contrary to its wild-type parent, systemic movement of LMV-0-GFP was abolished in resistant plants. This assay detected four cases of misidentification of resistance status. In all these cases, further tests confirmed that the prior resistance status information was incorrect, so that a 100% correlation was observed between LMV-0-GFP behavior and the mo1 resistance status. Similarly, the LMV-E-derived recombinant allowed the identification of mo1(2) lettuce lines because its systemic movement was restricted in mo1(2) lines but not in susceptible or in mo1(1) lines. The tagged viruses were able to systemically invade another host, pea, irrespective of its resistance status against another member of the genus Potyvirus, Pea seed-borne mosaic virus. The use of these recombinant viruses could therefore greatly facilitate LMV resistance evaluation and speed up lettuce breeding programs. PMID:18943090

  3. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses.

  4. Bean Common Mosaic Virus and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus: Relationships, Biology, and Prospects for Control.

    PubMed

    Worrall, Elizabeth A; Wamonje, Francis O; Mukeshimana, Gerardine; Harvey, Jagger J W; Carr, John P; Mitter, Neena

    2015-01-01

    The closely related potyviruses Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are major constraints on common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) production. Crop losses caused by BCMV and BCMNV impact severely not only on commercial scale cultivation of this high-value crop but also on production by smallholder farmers in the developing world, where bean serves as a key source of dietary protein and mineral nutrition. In many parts of the world, progress has been made in combating BCMV through breeding bean varieties possessing the I gene, a dominant gene conferring resistance to most BCMV strains. However, in Africa, and in particular in Central and East Africa, BCMNV is endemic and this presents a serious problem for deployment of the I gene because this virus triggers systemic necrosis (black root disease) in plants possessing this resistance gene. Information on these two important viruses is scattered throughout the literature from 1917 onward, and although reviews on resistance to BCMV and BCMNV exist, there is currently no comprehensive review on the biology and taxonomy of BCMV and BCMNV. In this chapter, we discuss the current state of our knowledge of these two potyviruses including fundamental aspects of classification and phylogeny, molecular biology, host interactions, transmission through seed and by aphid vectors, geographic distribution, as well as current and future prospects for the control of these important viruses. PMID:26111585

  5. Occurrance in Korea of three major soybean viruses, Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYCMV), and Soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) revealed by a nationwide survey of soybean fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybean yellow mottle mosaic virus (SYMMV) and soybean yellow common mosaic virus (SYCMV) were recently isolated in Korea, and it hasn’t been reported how these two viruses were dispersed in Korea. In 2012, we performed a nationwide survey of subsistence soybean farms in Korea. Leaves that appeared ...

  6. Cucumber mosaic virus, a model for RNA virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Roossinck, M J

    2001-03-01

    Summary Taxonomic relationships: Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is the type member of the Cucumovirus genus, in the family Bromoviridae. Additional members of the genus are Peanut stunt virus (PSV) and Tomato aspermy virus (TAV). The RNAs 3 of all members of the genus can be exchanged and still yield a viable virus, while the RNAs 1 and 2 can only be exchanged within a species. Physical properties: The virus particles are about 29 nm in diameter, and are composed of 180 subunits (T = 3 icosahedral symmetry). The particles sediment with an s value of approximately 98. The virions contain 18% RNA, and are highly labile, relying on RNA-protein interactions for their integrity. The three genomic RNAs, designated RNA 1 (3.3 kb in length), RNA 2 (3.0 kb) and RNA 3 (2.2 kb) are packaged in individual particles; a subgenomic RNA, RNA 4 (1.0 kb), is packaged with the genomic RNA 3, making all the particles roughly equivalent in composition. In some strains an additional subgenomic RNA, RNA 4A is also encapsidated at low levels. The genomic RNAs are single stranded, plus sense RNAs with 5' cap structures, and 3' conserved regions that can be folded into tRNA-like structures. Satellite RNAs: CMV can harbour molecular parasites known as satellite RNAs (satRNAs) that can dramatically alter the symptom phenotype induced by the virus. The CMV satRNAs do not encode any proteins but rely on the RNA for their biological activity. Hosts: CMV infects over 1000 species of hosts, including members of 85 plant families, making it the broadest host range virus known. The virus is transmitted from host to host by aphid vectors, in a nonpersistent manner. Useful web sites: http://mmtsb.scripps.edu/viper/1f15.html (structure); http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/ICTVdb/ICTVdB/10040001.htm (general information).

  7. Characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Solanki, Vikas; Verma, H N; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-10-01

    Frangipani mosaic virus (FrMV) is known to infect frangipani tree (Plumeria rubra f. acutifolia) in India but the virus has not been characterized at genomic level and diagnosis is not available. In the present study, an isolate of FrMV (FrMV-Ind-1) showing greenish mosaic and vein-banding symptoms in P. rubra f. acutifolia in New Delhi was characterized based on host reactions, serology and genome sequence. The virus isolate induced local symptoms on several new experimental host species: Capsicum annuum (chilli), Nicotiana benthamiana, Solanum lycopersicum and S. melongena. N. benthamiana could be used as an efficient propagation host as it developed systemic mottle mosaic symptoms all round the year. The genome of FrMV-Ind-1 was 6643 (JN555602) nucleotides long with genome organization similar to tobamoviruses. The Indian isolate of FrMV shared a very close genome sequence identity (98.3 %) with the lone isolate of FrMV-P from Australia. FrMV-Ind-1 together with FrMV-P formed a new phylogenetic group i.e. Apocynaceae-infecting tobamovirus. The polyclonal antiserum generated through the purified virus preparation was successfully utilized to detect the virus in field samples of frangipani by ELISA. Of the eight different tobamoviruses tested, FrMV-Ind-1 shared distant serological relationships with only cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, bell pepper mottle virus and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus. RT-PCR based on coat protein gene primer successfully detected the virus in frangipani plants. This study is the first comprehensive description of FrMV occurring in India.

  8. Characterisation and diagnosis of frangipani mosaic virus from India.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Alok; Solanki, Vikas; Verma, H N; Mandal, Bikash

    2015-10-01

    Frangipani mosaic virus (FrMV) is known to infect frangipani tree (Plumeria rubra f. acutifolia) in India but the virus has not been characterized at genomic level and diagnosis is not available. In the present study, an isolate of FrMV (FrMV-Ind-1) showing greenish mosaic and vein-banding symptoms in P. rubra f. acutifolia in New Delhi was characterized based on host reactions, serology and genome sequence. The virus isolate induced local symptoms on several new experimental host species: Capsicum annuum (chilli), Nicotiana benthamiana, Solanum lycopersicum and S. melongena. N. benthamiana could be used as an efficient propagation host as it developed systemic mottle mosaic symptoms all round the year. The genome of FrMV-Ind-1 was 6643 (JN555602) nucleotides long with genome organization similar to tobamoviruses. The Indian isolate of FrMV shared a very close genome sequence identity (98.3 %) with the lone isolate of FrMV-P from Australia. FrMV-Ind-1 together with FrMV-P formed a new phylogenetic group i.e. Apocynaceae-infecting tobamovirus. The polyclonal antiserum generated through the purified virus preparation was successfully utilized to detect the virus in field samples of frangipani by ELISA. Of the eight different tobamoviruses tested, FrMV-Ind-1 shared distant serological relationships with only cucumber green mottle mosaic virus, tobacco mosaic virus, bell pepper mottle virus and kyuri green mottle mosaic virus. RT-PCR based on coat protein gene primer successfully detected the virus in frangipani plants. This study is the first comprehensive description of FrMV occurring in India. PMID:26239043

  9. Variants of Triticum mosaic virus isolated from wheat in Colorado

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) is a recently discovered virus infecting wheat. We compared the Colorado isolates C10-492 and C11-775 with the 06-123 isolate of TriMV from Kansas (TriMV-K). Comparisons were made using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), infectivity assay, host range, dry weig...

  10. Zucchini tigre mosaic virus infection of cucurbits in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini tigre mosaic virus (ZTMV) was identified infecting cucurbits in Florida in 2002 and again in 2015. This is the first report of ZTMV in the U.S. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants, and research and regulatory scientists....

  11. EXPRESSION OF THE MAIZE MOSAIC VIRUS GLYCOPROTEIN IN INSECT CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize mosaic virus (genus Nucleorhabdovirus, family Rhabdoviridae) is transmitted in a persistent-propagative manner by Peregrinus maidis, the corn planthopper. Like other rhabdoviruses, the MMV genome encodes a surface glycoprotein that is likely involved in virus attachment and entry into host ce...

  12. Translation of tobacco mosaic virus RNA In Acetabularia cell cytoplasm.

    PubMed

    Cairns, E; Sarkar, S; Schweiger, H G

    1978-11-01

    Isolated Acetabularia nuclei were microinjected with Tobacco Mosaic Virus RNA and then implanted into an anucleate posterior fragment of an Acetabularia cell. Injected RNA was translated in the Acetabularia cytoplasm from the first to twelfth day after implantation of the nuclei. The production of specific virus proteins was detected and localized in the Acetabularia cytoplasm by an immunofluorescence precipitation technique.

  13. Transmission of Switchgrass mosaic virus by Graminella aureovitatta

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Switchgrass mosaic virus (SwMV) was identified in switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) and was proposed as a new marafivirus based on its genome sequence and comparison with its closest relative, Maize rayado fino virus (MRFV), a type member of the genus, Marafivirus. MRFV only infects maize (Zea mays) an...

  14. First Complete Genome Sequence of a Watermelon Mosaic Virus Isolated from Watermelon in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Rajbanshi, Naveen

    2016-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic virus was first reported in 1965 from the Rio Grande Valley, TX. We report here the first complete genome sequence of a watermelon mosaic virus isolate from watermelon collected from the Rio Grande Valley of Texas. PMID:27103724

  15. Cloned Cauliflower Mosaic Virus DNA Infects Turnips (Brassica rapa).

    PubMed

    Howell, S H; Walker, L L; Dudley, R K

    1980-06-13

    Cauliflower mosaic virus DNA cloned in the Sal I site of bacterial plasmid pBR322 infects turnip plants. The cloned viral DNA must be excised from the recombinant plasmid to infect, but need not be circularized and ligated in vitro. The cloned viral DNA lacks site-specific single-strand breaks found in DNA obtained directly from the virus. However, these breaks are reintroduced into the viral genome during multiplication of the virus in the plant host.

  16. Detection of Corchorus golden mosaic virus Associated with Yellow Mosaic Disease of Jute (Corchorus capsularis).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Palit, Paramita; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2012-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease, caused by a whitefly transmitted New World Begomovirus, named Corchorus golden mosaic virus (CoGMV), is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for jute fibre production in Asia. For rapid and sensitive diagnosis of the Begomovirus associated with this disease, a non-radiolabelled diagnostic probe, developed against the DNA A component of the east Indian isolate of CoGMV, detected the presence of the virus in infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies following Southern hybridization and nucleic acid spot hybridization tests. Presence of the virus was also confirmed when polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using virus-specific primers on DNA templates isolated from infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies.

  17. Detection of Corchorus golden mosaic virus Associated with Yellow Mosaic Disease of Jute (Corchorus capsularis).

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Raju; Palit, Paramita; Paul, Sujay; Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Roy, Anirban

    2012-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease, caused by a whitefly transmitted New World Begomovirus, named Corchorus golden mosaic virus (CoGMV), is emerging as a serious biotic constraint for jute fibre production in Asia. For rapid and sensitive diagnosis of the Begomovirus associated with this disease, a non-radiolabelled diagnostic probe, developed against the DNA A component of the east Indian isolate of CoGMV, detected the presence of the virus in infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies following Southern hybridization and nucleic acid spot hybridization tests. Presence of the virus was also confirmed when polymerase chain reaction amplification was performed using virus-specific primers on DNA templates isolated from infected plants and viruliferous whiteflies. PMID:23730007

  18. The use of tobacco mosaic virus and cowpea mosaic virus for the production of novel metal nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Love, Andrew J; Makarov, Valentine; Yaminsky, Igor; Kalinina, Natalia O; Taliansky, Michael E

    2014-01-20

    Due to the nanoscale size and the strictly controlled and consistent morphologies of viruses, there has been a recent interest in utilizing them in nanotechnology. The structure, surface chemistries and physical properties of many viruses have been well elucidated, which have allowed identification of regions of their capsids which can be modified either chemically or genetically for nanotechnological uses. In this review we focus on the use of such modifications for the functionalization and production of viruses and empty viral capsids that can be readily decorated with metals in a highly tuned manner. In particular, we discuss the use of two plant viruses (Cowpea mosaic virus and Tobacco mosaic virus) which have been extensively used for production of novel metal nanoparticles (<100nm), composites and building blocks for 2D and 3D materials, and illustrate their applications.

  19. Wheat streak mosaic virus-Structural parameters for a Potyvirus

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, Lauren; Kendall, Amy; Berger, P.H.; Shiel, P.J.; Stubbs, Gerald . E-mail: gerald.stubbs@vanderbilt.edu

    2005-09-15

    Wheat streak mosaic virus is a Tritimovirus, a member of the Potyviridae family, which includes the very large Potyvirus genus. We have examined wheat streak mosaic virus by electron microscopy and fiber diffraction from partially oriented sols, and analyzed the results to estimate the symmetry and structural parameters of the viral helix. The virions have an apparent radius of 63 {+-} 5 A. The viral helix has a pitch of 33.4 A {+-} 0.6 A. There appear to be 6.9 subunits per turn of the helix, although we cannot completely eliminate values of 5.9 or 7.9 for this parameter.

  20. In Vitro Evidence Supports Membrane Alanyl Aminopeptidase N as a Receptor for a Plant Virus in the Pea Aphid Vector

    PubMed Central

    Linz, Lucas B.; Liu, Sijun; Chougule, Nanasaheb P.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Insect-borne plant viruses cause significant agricultural losses and jeopardize sustainable global food production. Although blocking plant virus transmission would allow for crop protection, virus receptors in insect vectors are unknown. Here we identify membrane alanyl aminopeptidase N (APN) as a receptor for pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) coat protein (CP) in the gut of the pea aphid, Acyrthosiphon pisum, using a far-Western blot method. Pulldown and immunofluorescence binding assays and surface plasmon resonance were used to confirm and characterize CP-APN interaction. PEMV virions and a peptide comprised of PEMV CP fused to a proline-rich hinge (-P-) and green fluorescent protein (CP-P-GFP) specifically bound to APN. Recombinant APN expressed in Sf9 cells resulted in internalization of CP-P-GFP, which was visualized by confocal microscopy; such internalization is an expected hallmark of a functional gut receptor. Finally, in assays with aphid gut-derived brush border membrane vesicles, binding of CP-P-GFP competed with binding of GBP3.1, a peptide previously demonstrated to bind to APN in the aphid gut and to impede PEMV uptake into the hemocoel; this finding supports the hypothesis that GBP3.1 and PEMV bind to and compete for the same APN receptor. These in vitro data combined with previously published in vivo experiments (S. Liu, S. Sivakumar, W. O. Sparks, W. A. Miller, and B. C. Bonning, Virology 401:107–116, 2010, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.virol.2010.02.009) support the identification of APN as the first receptor in a plant virus vector. Knowledge of this receptor will provide for technologies based on PEMV-APN interaction designed to block plant virus transmission and to suppress aphid populations. IMPORTANCE A significant proportion of global food production is lost to insect pests. Aphids, in addition to weakening plants by feeding on their sap, are responsible for transmitting about half of the plant viruses vectored by insects. Growers

  1. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus infection by quercetin and vitexin.

    PubMed

    Krcatović, E; Rusak, G; Bezić, N; Krajacić, M

    2008-01-01

    The flavonoids, quercetin and vitexin were proved to reduce lesion number in the local hosts Datura stramonium and Chenopodium amaranticolor infected with Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Both flavonoids also reduced the virus concentration in systemically infected tobacco plants. This effect was restricted to an early stage of infection and correlated with an induced synthesis of salicylic acid (SA) and kaempferol suggesting their possible defensive role in the infected plant tissue. Since the tested flavonoids did not bind to the virus particles, their antiphytoviral activity was probably not based on a direct virus inactivation.

  2. A DNA polymerase activity is associated with Cauliflower Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed Central

    Menissier, J; Laquel, P; Lebeurier, G; Hirth, L

    1984-01-01

    A DNA polymerase activity is found within the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) particle. Analysis of the reaction product reveals that the linear form of the virion DNA is preferentially labelled. The molecular weight of the DNA polymerase as determined on an "activity gel" is 76 kDa. Images PMID:6514573

  3. RNAi mediated, stable resistance to Triticum mosaic virus in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV), discovered in 2006, affects wheat production systems in the Great Plains of the United States. There are no available TriMV resistant commercial varieties. RNA interference (RNAi) was evaluated as an alternative strategy to generate resistance to TriMV. An RNAi pANDA...

  4. Capsicum annum, a new host of watermelon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hajizadeh, Mohammad; Mohammadi, Kazhal

    2016-03-01

    The occurrence of Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in sweet pepper (Capsicum annuum L.) in Kurdistan province, Iran was confirmed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and partial characterization of coat protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of WMV infecting C. annuum, adding a new host to list of more than 170 species infected by this virus.

  5. Spiranthes Mosaic Virus 3 and Bidens Mottle Virus,Two Potyviruses Detected in Phlox divaricata

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This is the first report of Spiranthes mosaic virus in Florida and the first report of Bidens mottle virus in Phlox divaricata. This report provides an overview of this virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scientists....

  6. First report of Sugarcane mosaic virus infecting Columbus Grass (Sorghum almum) in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mosaic symptoms in sorghum can be caused by several potyviruses [family Potyviridae], including Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV) and Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV). SrMV and SCMV are responsible for global economic losses in sorghum, maize, and sugarcane. Ten plants of Columbus grass (Sorghum almum) exhib...

  7. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is a bipartite single stranded positive sense RNA virus with rigid-rod shaped virions. Taxonomically the virus is in the family Viragviridae, as are commonly used gene silencing or expression viral vectors, Tobacco rattle virus (TRV) and Barley stripe mosaic viru...

  8. Development of transgenic watermelon resistant to Cucumber mosaic virus and Watermelon mosaic virus by using a single chimeric transgene construct.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ching-Yi; Ku, Hsin-Mei; Chiang, Yi-Hua; Ho, Hsiu-Yin; Yu, Tsong-Ann; Jan, Fuh-Jyh

    2012-10-01

    Watermelon, an important fruit crop worldwide, is prone to attack by several viruses that often results in destructive yield loss. To develop a transgenic watermelon resistant to multiple virus infection, a single chimeric transgene comprising a silencer DNA from the partial N gene of Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV) fused to the partial coat protein (CP) gene sequences of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) and Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) was constructed and transformed into watermelon (cv. Feeling) via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Single or multiple transgene copies randomly inserted into various locations in the genome were confirmed by Southern blot analysis. Transgenic watermelon R(0) plants were individually challenged with CMV, CGMMV or WMV, or with a mixture of these three viruses for resistance evaluation. Two lines were identified to exhibit resistance to CMV, CGMMV, WMV individually, and a mixed inoculation of the three viruses. The R(1) progeny of the two resistant R(0) lines showed resistance to CMV and WMV, but not to CGMMV. Low level accumulation of transgene transcripts in resistant plants and small interfering (si) RNAs specific to CMV and WMV were readily detected in the resistant R(1) plants by northern blot analysis, indicating that the resistance was established via RNA-mediated post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS). Loss of the CGMMV CP-transgene fragment in R1 progeny might be the reason for the failure to resistant CGMMV infection, as shown by the absence of a hybridization signal and no detectable siRNA specific to CGMMV in Southern and northern blot analyses. In summary, this study demonstrated that fusion of different viral CP gene fragments in transgenic watermelon contributed to multiple virus resistance via PTGS. The construct and resistant watermelon lines developed in this study could be used in a watermelon breeding program for resistance to multiple viruses.

  9. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:25252813

  10. Genome sequence of vanilla distortion mosaic virus infecting Coriandrum sativum.

    PubMed

    Adams, I P; Rai, S; Deka, M; Harju, V; Hodges, T; Hayward, G; Skelton, A; Fox, A; Boonham, N

    2014-12-01

    The 9573-nucleotide genome of a potyvirus was sequenced from a Coriandrum sativum plant from India with viral symptoms. On analysis, this virus was shown to have greater than 85 % nucleotide sequence identity to vanilla distortion mosaic virus (VDMV). Analysis of the putative coat protein sequence confirmed that this virus was in fact VDMV, with greater than 91 % amino acid sequence identity. The genome appears to encode a 3083-amino-acid polyprotein potentially cleaved into the 10 mature proteins expected in potyviruses. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that VDMV is a distinct but ungrouped member of the genus Potyvirus.

  11. Recombination analysis of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Sebestyén, Endre; Balázs, Ervin

    2015-02-01

    Recombination among RNA viruses is a natural phenomenon that appears to have played a significant role in the species development and the evolution of many strains. It also has particular significance for the risk assessment of plants which have been genetically modified for disease resistance by incorporating viral sequences into their genomes. However, the exact recombination events taking place in viral genomes are not investigated in detail for many virus groups. In this analysis, different single-stranded positive-sense RNA potyviruses were compared using various in silico recombination detection methods and new recombination events in the Sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup were detected. For an extended in silico recombination analysis, two of the analyzed Maize dwarf mosaic virus full-length genomes were sequenced additionally during this work. These results strengthen the evidence that recombination is a major driving force in virus evolution, and the emergence of new virus variants in the SCMV subgroup, paired with mutations, could generate viruses with altered biological properties. The intra- and interspecific homolog recombinations seem to be a general trait in this virus group, causing little or no changes to the amino acid of the progenies. However, we found a few breakpoints between the members of SCMV subgroup and the weed-infecting distant relatives, but only a few methods of the RDP3 package predicted these events with low significance level.

  12. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  13. Precise determination of the helical repeat of tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, Amy; McDonald, Michele; Stubbs, Gerald

    2007-12-05

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 A. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-} 0.03 A by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  14. Precise Determination of the Helical Repeat of Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, A.; McDonald, M.; Stubbs, G.

    2009-06-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is widely used as a distance standard in electron microscopy, fiber diffraction, and other imaging techniques. The dimension used as a reference is the pitch of the viral helix, 23 {angstrom}. This distance, however, has never been measured with any great degree of precision. The helical pitch of TMV has been determined to be 22.92 {+-}0.03 {angstrom} by X-ray fiber diffraction methods using highly collimated synchrotron radiation.

  15. Beijerinck's work on tobacco mosaic virus: historical context and legacy.

    PubMed Central

    Bos, L

    1999-01-01

    Beijerinck's entirely new concept, launched in 1898, of a filterable contagium vivum fluidum which multiplied in close association with the host's metabolism and was distributed in phloem vessels together with plant nutrients, did not match the then prevailing bacteriological germ theory. At the time, tools and concepts to handle such a new kind of agent (the viruses) were non-existent. Beijerinck's novel idea, therefore, did not revolutionize biological science or immediately alter human understanding of contagious diseases. That is how bacteriological dogma persisted, as voiced by Loeffler and Frosch when showing the filterability of an animal virus (1898), and especially by Ivanovsky who had already in 1892 detected filterability of the agent of tobacco mosaic but kept looking for a microbe and finally (1903) claimed its multiplication in an artificial medium. The dogma was also strongly advocated by Roux in 1903 when writing the first review on viruses, which he named 'so-called "invisible" microbes', unwittingly including the agent of bovine pleuropneumonia, only much later proved to be caused by a mycoplasma. In 1904, Baur was the first to advocate strongly the chemical view of viruses. But uncertainty about the true nature of viruses, with their similarities to enzymes and genes, continued until the 1930s when at long last tobacco mosaic virus particles were isolated as an enzyme-like protein (1935), soon to be better characterized as a nucleoprotein (1937). Physicochemical virus studies were a key element in triggering molecular biology which was to provide further means to reveal the true nature of viruses 'at the threshold of life'. Beijerinck's 1898 vision was not appreciated or verified during his lifetime. But Beijerinck already had a clear notion of the mechanism behind the phenomena he observed. Developments in virology and molecular biology since 1935 indicate how close Beijerinck (and even Mayer, Beijerinck's predecessor in research on tobacco

  16. Beijerinck's work on tobacco mosaic virus: historical context and legacy.

    PubMed

    Bos, L

    1999-03-29

    Beijerinck's entirely new concept, launched in 1898, of a filterable contagium vivum fluidum which multiplied in close association with the host's metabolism and was distributed in phloem vessels together with plant nutrients, did not match the then prevailing bacteriological germ theory. At the time, tools and concepts to handle such a new kind of agent (the viruses) were non-existent. Beijerinck's novel idea, therefore, did not revolutionize biological science or immediately alter human understanding of contagious diseases. That is how bacteriological dogma persisted, as voiced by Loeffler and Frosch when showing the filterability of an animal virus (1898), and especially by Ivanovsky who had already in 1892 detected filterability of the agent of tobacco mosaic but kept looking for a microbe and finally (1903) claimed its multiplication in an artificial medium. The dogma was also strongly advocated by Roux in 1903 when writing the first review on viruses, which he named 'so-called "invisible" microbes', unwittingly including the agent of bovine pleuropneumonia, only much later proved to be caused by a mycoplasma. In 1904, Baur was the first to advocate strongly the chemical view of viruses. But uncertainty about the true nature of viruses, with their similarities to enzymes and genes, continued until the 1930s when at long last tobacco mosaic virus particles were isolated as an enzyme-like protein (1935), soon to be better characterized as a nucleoprotein (1937). Physicochemical virus studies were a key element in triggering molecular biology which was to provide further means to reveal the true nature of viruses 'at the threshold of life'. Beijerinck's 1898 vision was not appreciated or verified during his lifetime. But Beijerinck already had a clear notion of the mechanism behind the phenomena he observed. Developments in virology and molecular biology since 1935 indicate how close Beijerinck (and even Mayer, Beijerinck's predecessor in research on tobacco

  17. Molecular, serological and biological characterization of the emerging tomato mottle mosaic virus on tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    For many years, Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) are the two major tobamoviruses that have a serious impact on tomato productions worldwide. These seed-borne and mechanically transmitted viruses are difficult to control. The most effective disease management has been the u...

  18. Triticum Mosaic Virus: A New Virus Isolated From Wheat in Kansas

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2006 a mechanically-transmissible and previously uncharacterized virus was isolated in Kansas from wheat with mosaic symptoms. The physio-chemical properties of the virus were examined by purification on cesium chloride density gradients, electron microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylalmid...

  19. [Amplification and cloning of dahlia mosaic virus and carnation etched ring virus promoters].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Chemeris, A V

    2007-12-01

    Amplification and cloning of dahlia mosaic virus promoter were carried out for the first time. Sequence analysis showed homology between this promoter and the promoters of other caulimoviruses. In addition, amplification and cloning of the carnation etched ring virus promoter was performed. PMID:18592695

  20. Redox-active ferrocene-modified Cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Aljabali, Alaa A A; Barclay, J Elaine; Butt, Julea N; Lomonossoff, George P; Evans, David J

    2010-08-28

    A naturally occurring nanoparticle, the plant virus Cowpea mosaic virus, can be decorated with ferrocene derivatives, of various linker lengths with amine and carboxylate groups, on the external surface using a range of conjugation strategies. The multiple, organometallic, redox-active ferrocene moieties on the outer surface of the virus are electrochemically independent with reduction potentials that span a potential window of 0.16 V that are dependent on the site of modification and the nature of the ferrocene derivative. The number of ferrocenes coupled to each virus ranges from about 100 to 240 depending upon the conjugation site and the linker length and these redox active units can provide multielectron reservoirs. PMID:20623052

  1. Use of superparamagnetic beads for the isolation of a peptide with specificity to cymbidium mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Diana Jia Miin; Dzulkurnain, Adriya; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Lim, Saw Hoon; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2006-09-01

    A modified method for the rapid isolation of specific ligands to whole virus particles is described. Biopanning against cymbidium mosaic virus was carried out with a commercial 12-mer random peptide display library. A solution phase panning method was devised using streptavidin-coated superparamagnetic beads. The solution based panning method was more efficient than conventional immobilized target panning when using whole viral particles of cymbidium mosaic virus as a target. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of cymbidium mosaic virus-binding peptides isolated from the library identified seven peptides with affinity for cymbidium mosaic virus and one peptide which was specific to cymbidium mosaic virus and had no significant binding to odontoglossum ringspot virus. This method should have broad application for the screening of whole viral particles towards the rapid development of diagnostic reagents without the requirement for cloning and expression of single antigens.

  2. Quantitative and qualitative involvement of P3N-PIPO in overcoming recessive resistance against Clover yellow vein virus in pea carrying the cyv1 gene.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sun Hee; Hagiwara-Komoda, Yuka; Nakahara, Kenji S; Atsumi, Go; Shimada, Ryoko; Hisa, Yusuke; Naito, Satoshi; Uyeda, Ichiro

    2013-07-01

    In pea carrying cyv1, a recessive gene for resistance to Clover yellow vein virus (ClYVV), ClYVV isolate Cl-no30 was restricted to the initially infected cells, whereas isolate 90-1 Br2 overcame this resistance. We mapped the region responsible for breaking of cyv1-mediated resistance by examining infection of cyv1 pea with chimeric viruses constructed from parts of Cl-no30 and 90-1 Br2. The breaking of resistance was attributed to the P3 cistron, which is known to produce two proteins: P3, from the main open reading frame (ORF), and P3N-PIPO, which has the N-terminal part of P3 fused to amino acids encoded by a small open reading frame (ORF) called PIPO in the +2 reading frame. We introduced point mutations that were synonymous with respect to the P3 protein but nonsynonymous with respect to the P3N-PIPO protein, and vice versa, into the chimeric viruses. Infection of plants with these mutant viruses revealed that both P3 and P3N-PIPO were involved in overcoming cyv1-mediated resistance. Moreover, P3N-PIPO quantitatively affected the virulence of Cl-no30 in cyv1 pea. Additional expression in trans of the P3N-PIPO derived from Cl-no30, using White clover mosaic virus as a vector, enabled Cl-no30 to move to systemic leaves in cyv1 pea. Susceptible pea plants infected with chimeric ClYVV possessing the P3 cistron of 90-1 Br2, and which were therefore virulent toward cyv1 pea, accumulated more P3N-PIPO than did those infected with Cl-no30, suggesting that the higher level of P3N-PIPO in infected cells contributed to the breaking of resistance by 90-1 Br2. This is the first report showing that P3N-PIPO is a virulence determinant in plants resistant to a potyvirus.

  3. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed Central

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region. PMID:3671088

  4. Analysis of figwort mosaic virus (plant pararetrovirus) polyadenylation signal.

    PubMed

    Sanfaçon, H

    1994-01-01

    Analysis of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) polyadenylation (poly(A)) signal has revealed several striking differences to poly(A) signals from animal genes such as the absence of activating sequences downstream from the cleavage site. Instead, upstream sequences were shown to induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence. To test whether these features are representative of other plant pararetrovirus poly(A) signals, a characterization of the figwort mosaic virus (FMV) poly(A) signal is presented here. The FMV RNAs were isolated from infected plants and mapped, and the different elements composing the FMV poly(A) signal were identified. Multiple upstream sequences were found to be essential for efficient processing at the FMV poly(A) site and could be replaced by the CaMV upstream elements. The FMV upstream sequences showed homologies to other characterized upstream sequences from CaMV, from animal viruses, and from plant poly(A) signals. Surprisingly, neither the FMV nor the CaMV upstream elements could induce recognition of an AAUAAA sequence present in the FMV poly(A) signal, instead a UAUAAA sequence 55 nucleotides further downstream was utilized. It is proposed that additional features may be required for appropriate cleavage such as the context of the AAUAAA-like sequence or perhaps the cleavage site itself.

  5. Sequence of figwort mosaic virus DNA (caulimovirus group).

    PubMed

    Richins, R D; Scholthof, H B; Shepherd, R J

    1987-10-26

    The nucleotide sequence of an infectious clone of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) was determined using the dideoxynucleotide chain termination method. The double-stranded DNA genome (7743 base pairs) contained eight open reading frames (ORFs), seven of which corresponded approximately in size and location to the ORFs found in the genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) and carnation etched ring virus (CERV). ORFs I and V of FMV demonstrated the highest degrees of nucleotide and amino acid sequence homology with the equivalent coding regions of CaMV and CERV. Regions II, III and IV showed somewhat less homology with the analogous regions of CaMV and CERV, and ORF VI showed homology with the corresponding gene of CaMV and CERV in only a short segment near the middle of the putative gene product. A 16 nucleotide sequence, complementary to the 3' terminus of methionine initiator tRNA (tRNAimet) and presumed to be the primer binding site for initiation of reverse transcription to produce minus strand DNA, was found in the FMV genome near the discontinuity in the minus strand. Sequences near the three interruptions in the plus strand of FMV DNA bear strong resemblance to similarly located sequences of 3 other caulimoviruses and are inferred to be initiation sites for second strand DNA synthesis. Additional conserved sequences in the small and large intergenic regions are pointed out including a highly conserved 35 bp sequence that occurs in the latter region.

  6. Location of Grapevine Fardeaf and Yellow Mosaic Virus Particles in Xiphinema index.

    PubMed

    Raski, D J; Maggenti, A R; Jones, N O

    1973-07-01

    Particles of fanleaf and yellow mosaic viruses are reported in the lumen of the esophagus of Xiphinerna index. Differences in cuticular morphology suggest differences in charged receptor sites which may offer an explanation for virus location and orderly arrangement.

  7. [Kidney bean "Pervomayskaya" as the indicator plant for tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Kraiev, V H

    2005-01-01

    It was shown that garden beans of "Pervomayskaya" variety respond to mechanical inoculation of leaves with tobacco mosaic virus by formation of local lesions, and thus it may be the indicator plant for the virus. PMID:16250238

  8. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Yu; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Hill, John H.

    2016-01-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  9. A Foxtail mosaic virus Vector for Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Maize.

    PubMed

    Mei, Yu; Zhang, Chunquan; Kernodle, Bliss M; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Plant viruses have been widely used as vectors for foreign gene expression and virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS). A limited number of viruses have been developed into viral vectors for the purposes of gene expression or VIGS in monocotyledonous plants, and among these, the tripartite viruses Brome mosaic virus and Cucumber mosaic virus have been shown to induce VIGS in maize (Zea mays). We describe here a new DNA-based VIGS system derived from Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV), a monopartite virus that is able to establish systemic infection and silencing of endogenous maize genes homologous to gene fragments inserted into the FoMV genome. To demonstrate VIGS applications of this FoMV vector system, four genes, phytoene desaturase (functions in carotenoid biosynthesis), lesion mimic22 (encodes a key enzyme of the porphyrin pathway), iojap (functions in plastid development), and brown midrib3 (caffeic acid O-methyltransferase), were silenced and characterized in the sweet corn line Golden × Bantam. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the FoMV infectious clone establishes systemic infection in maize inbred lines, sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), and green foxtail (Setaria viridis), indicating the potential wide applications of this viral vector system for functional genomics studies in maize and other monocots. PMID:27208311

  10. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  11. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  12. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  13. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  14. 40 CFR 174.516 - Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus...-INCORPORATED PROTECTANTS Tolerances and Tolerance Exemptions § 174.516 Coat protein of cucumber mosaic virus; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. Residues of Coat Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus are...

  15. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers.

  16. Vanilla mosaic virus isolates from French Polynesia and the Cook Islands are Dasheen mosaic virus strains that exclusively infect vanilla.

    PubMed

    Farreyrol, K; Pearson, M N; Grisoni, M; Cohen, D; Beck, D

    2006-05-01

    Sequence was determined for the coat protein (CP) gene and 3' non-translated region (3'NTR) of two vanilla mosaic virus (VanMV) isolates from Vanilla tahitensis, respectively from the Cook Islands (VanMV-CI) and French Polynesia (VanMV-FP). Both viruses displayed distinctive features in the N-terminal region of their CPs; for VanMV-CI, a 16-amino-acid deletion including the aphid transmission-related DAG motif, and for VanMV-FP, a stretch of GTN repeats that putatively belongs to the class of natively unfolded proteins. VanMV-FP CP also has a novel DVG motif in place of the DAG motif, and an uncommon Q//V protease cleavage site. The sequences were compared to a range of Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) strains and to potyviruses infecting orchids. Identity was low to DsMV strains across the entire CP coding region and across the 3'NTR, but high across the CP core and the CI-6K2-NIa region. In accordance with current ICTV criteria for species demarcation within the family Potyviridae, VanMV-CI and VanMV-FP are strains of DsMV that exclusively infect vanilla.

  17. The entry of cucumber mosaic virus into cucumber xylem is facilitated by co-infection with zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Tomofumi; Nobuhara, Shinya; Nishimura, Miho; Ryang, Bo-Song; Naoe, Masaki; Matsumoto, Tadashi; Kosaka, Yoshitaka; Ohki, Satoshi T

    2016-10-01

    We investigated the synergistic effects of co-infection by zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) and cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on viral distribution in the vascular tissues of cucumber. Immunohistochemical observations indicated that ZYMV was present in both the phloem and xylem tissues. ZYMV-RNA was detected in both the xylem wash and guttation fluid of ZYMV-inoculated cucumber. Steam treatment at a stem internode indicated that ZYMV enters the xylem vessels and moves through them but does not cause systemic infection in the plant. CMV distribution in singly infected cucumbers was restricted to phloem tissue. By contrast, CMV was detected in the xylem tissue of cotyledons in plants co-infected with CMV and ZYMV. Although both ZYMV-RNA and CMV-RNA were detected in the xylem wash and upper internodes of steam-treated, co-infected cucumbers grown at 24 °C, neither virus was detected in the upper leaves using an ELISA assay. Genetically modified CMV harboring the ZYMV HC-Pro gene was distributed in the xylem and phloem tissues of singly inoculated cucumber cotyledons. These results indicate that the ZYMV HC-Pro gene facilitates CMV entry into the xylem vessels of co-infected cucumbers. PMID:27400992

  18. Development of expression vectors based on pepino mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant viruses are useful expression vectors because they can mount systemic infections allowing large amounts of recombinant protein to be produced rapidly in differentiated plant tissues. Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) (genus Potexvirus, family Flexiviridae), a widespread plant virus, is a promising candidate expression vector for plants because of its high level of accumulation in its hosts and the absence of severe infection symptoms. We report here the construction of a stable and efficient expression vector for plants based on PepMV. Results Agroinfectious clones were produced from two different PepMV genotypes (European and Chilean), and these were able to initiate typical PepMV infections. We explored several strategies for vector development including coat protein (CP) replacement, duplication of the CP subgenomic promoter (SGP) and the creation of a fusion protein using the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide. We found that CP replacement vectors were unable to move systemically and that vectors with duplicated SGPs (even heterologous SGPs) suffered from significant transgene instability. The fusion protein incorporating the FMDV 2A catalytic peptide gave by far the best results, maintaining stability through serial passages and allowing the accumulation of GFP to 0.2-0.4 g per kg of leaf tissue. The possible use of PepMV as a virus-induced gene silencing vector to study gene function was also demonstrated. Protocols for the use of this vector are described. Conclusions A stable PepMV vector was generated by expressing the transgene as a CP fusion using the sequence encoding the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A catalytic peptide to separate them. We have generated a novel tool for the expression of recombinant proteins in plants and for the functional analysis of virus and plant genes. Our experiments have also highlighted virus requirements for replication in single cells as well as intercellular and long

  19. A PH-INDUCED STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN BROMEGRASS MOSAIC VIRUS.

    PubMed

    INCARDONA, N L; KAESBERG, P

    1964-01-01

    Bromegrass mosaic virus undergoes a reversible decrease in its sedimentation coefficient when the pH is raised above pH 6.7. At pH 6 the sedimentation coefficient is 87 S, at pH 7 it is 79 S. Intrinsic viscosities determined at pH 6 and 7 are 3.64 and 5.5 x 10(-2) dl/gm. Diffusion coefficients are 1.56 x 10(-7) cm(2)/sec. and 1.44 x 10(-7) cm(2)/sec., respectively. Radii of gyration, measured by x-ray scattering, are 106 and 128 A. However, appropriate combination of sedimentation, diffusion, and viscosity coefficients at pH 6 and 7 yield the same molecular weight. Also, the zero-angle value of x-ray-scattered intensity, which is a function of molecular weight, is the same at the two pH's. These results suggest that bromegrass mosaic virus particles undergo a pH-induced change in structure. This change causes, among other things, an increase in the susceptibility of the particles to degradation by pancreatic ribonuclease. The shape of the titration curve between pH 6.3 and 6.9 is anomalous.

  20. Pepper yellow mosaic virus, a new potyvirus in sweetpepper, Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Inoue-Nagata, A K; Fonseca, M E N; Resende, R O; Boiteux, L S; Monte, D C; Dusi, A N; de Avila, A C; van der Vlugt, R A A

    2002-04-01

    A potyvirus was found causing yellow mosaic and veinal banding in sweetpepper in Central and Southeast Brazil. The sequence analysis of the 3' terminal region of the viral RNA revealed a coat protein of 278 amino acids, followed by 275 nucleotides in the 3'-untranslated region preceding a polyadenylated tail. The virus shared 77.4% coat protein amino acid identity with Pepper severe mosaic virus, the closest Potyvirus species. The 3'-untranslated region was highly divergent from other potyviruses. Based on these results, the virus found in sweetpepper plants could be considered as a new potyvirus. The name Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) is suggested.

  1. Polyamine biosynthesis and the replication of turnip yellow mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.F.

    1984-01-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By seven days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly-emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. These protoplasts contain 1-2 x 10/sup 6/ virions per cell and continue to produce virus in culture for at least 48 hours. (/sup 14/C)-Spermidine (10 ..mu..M) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hours. However, the spermidine content of the cell was only marginally affected, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)-spermidine was also readily incorporated into the nucleic acid-containing component of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. Thus, newly-formed virions contained predominantly newly-synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine (DCHA) led to incorporation of pre-existing spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly-formed virions. The latter results were tested and confirmed in a second cellular system, consisting of health protoplasts infected with TYMC in vitro.

  2. Gold nanostructures using tobacco mosaic viruses for optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Mime; Yamashita, Ichiro; Uraoka, Yukiharu; Shiba, Kiyotaka; Tomita, Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    We have succeeded in aligning gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) in three-dimensions using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in order to realize new optical properties. TMV is a tube-shaped plant virus about 300 nm in length with an outer- and inner-diameter of 18 nm and 4 nm. We genetically fused material-binding peptides that can promote metal crystallization, namely a gold-binding peptide (GBP) and a titanium-binding peptide (TBP), to the outer-surface of TMV. By reducing potassium chloroaurate with sodium borohydride in the presence of the engineered viruses in 5% acetic acid solution, Au NPs were deposited on the outer-surface of the viruses. Using TBP-fused TMV, NPs of 5 nm were obtained, with a standard deviation smaller than those deposited on wild-type TMV. The diameter of the NPs on GBP-fused TMV was 10 nm. These results indicate that genetically-modified TMVs are promising templates for the construction of optical metamaterials.

  3. The sequence of carnation etched ring virus DNA: comparison with cauliflower mosaic virus and retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Hull, R.; Sadler, J.; Longstaff, M.

    1986-01-01

    Carnation etched ring virus (CERV) DNA comprises 7932 bp. CERV primer binding sites and overall genome organization are similar to those of the related cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV). The six open reading frames of CERV showed amino acid homology (50-80%) with CaMV ORFs I-VI; no homologues of CaMV ORFs VII or VIII were found. CERV ORFs 1-5 interface each other with the sequence ATGA. The comparison of CERV ORF5 with CaMV ORFV highlighted regions which show homologies to retrovirus gag/pol protease, RNase H and DNA polymerase domains; the possibility that the DNA polymerase domain comprises two subdomains, operating off different templates, is discussed. Both CERV and CaMV ORFs I have sequence homology to tobacco mosaic virus P30 and plastocyanin. PMID:16453731

  4. Seed transmission of Cucumber mosaic virus in pepper.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Kobayashi, Michelle

    2010-02-01

    Infection caused by Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is one of the most important viral diseases of pepper worldwide. Young pepper seedlings were inoculated mechanically with CMV-Fny (Fast New York) isolate and were kept in growth chambers at 20-25 degrees C for symptom and fruit development. All inoculated plants developed severe mosaic symptoms and produced fruit except one. Mature seeds were isolated from fruits harvested from CMV-infected plants. Total RNA was extracted from pepper seeds and analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using CMV sub-group IA specific primers. Analysis of individual whole seeds showed that seed-borne infection of CMV in pepper ranged from 95 to 100%. Further seed-growth tests were performed in Petri dishes and CMV was detected in both seed coat and embryo. Seed coat infection of CMV ranged from 53 to 83% while that of the embryo ranged from 10 to 46%. Seed-growth tests in pots were also performed and the rate of seed transmission was approximately 10 to 14%. This is the first report of CMV seed transmission in pepper.

  5. Proton dependence of tobacco mosaic virus dissociation by pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Bispo, Jose A C; Landini, Gustavo F; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is an intensely studied model of viruses. This paper reports an investigation into the dissociation of TMV by pH and pressure up to 220 MPa. The viral solution (0.25 mg/ml) incubated at 277 K showed a significant decrease in light scattering with increasing pH, suggesting dissociation. This observation was confirmed by HPLC gel filtration and electron microscopy. The calculated volume change of dissociation (DeltaV) decreased (absolute value) from -49.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 3.8 to -21.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 9.0. The decrease from pH 9.0 to 3.8 caused a stabilization of 14.1 kJ/mol of TMV subunit. The estimated proton release calculated from pressure-induced dissociation curves was 0.584 mol H(+)/mol of TMV subunit. These results suggest that the degree of virus inactivation by pressure and the immunogenicity of the inactivated structures can be optimized by modulating the surrounding pH. PMID:15450375

  6. Proton dependence of tobacco mosaic virus dissociation by pressure.

    PubMed

    Santos, Jose L R; Bispo, Jose A C; Landini, Gustavo F; Bonafe, Carlos F S

    2004-09-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) is an intensely studied model of viruses. This paper reports an investigation into the dissociation of TMV by pH and pressure up to 220 MPa. The viral solution (0.25 mg/ml) incubated at 277 K showed a significant decrease in light scattering with increasing pH, suggesting dissociation. This observation was confirmed by HPLC gel filtration and electron microscopy. The calculated volume change of dissociation (DeltaV) decreased (absolute value) from -49.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 3.8 to -21.7 ml/mol of subunit at pH 9.0. The decrease from pH 9.0 to 3.8 caused a stabilization of 14.1 kJ/mol of TMV subunit. The estimated proton release calculated from pressure-induced dissociation curves was 0.584 mol H(+)/mol of TMV subunit. These results suggest that the degree of virus inactivation by pressure and the immunogenicity of the inactivated structures can be optimized by modulating the surrounding pH.

  7. The nucleotide sequence of cowpea mosaic virus B RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lomonossoff, G.P.; Shanks, M.

    1983-01-01

    The complete sequence of the bottom component RNA (B RNA) of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) has been determined. Restriction enzyme fragments of double-stranded cDNA were cloned in M13 and the sequence of the inserts was determined by a combination of enzymatic and chemical sequencing techniques. Additional sequence information was obtained by primed synthesis on first strand cDNA. The complete sequence deduced is 5889 nucleotides long excluding the 3' poly(A), and contains an open reading frame sufficient to code for a polypeptide of mol. wt. 207 760. The coding region is flanked by a 5' leader sequence of 206 nucleotides and a 3' non-coding region of 82 residues which does not contain a polyadenylation signal. PMID:16453487

  8. The RNA of turnip yellow mosaic virus exhibits icosahedral order

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, Steven B.; Lucas, Robert W.; Greenwood, Aaron; McPherson, Alexander . E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu

    2005-04-10

    Difference electron density maps, based on structure factor amplitudes and experimental phases from crystals of wild-type turnip yellow mosaic virus and those of empty capsids prepared by freeze-thawing, show a large portion of the encapsidated RNA to have an icosahedral distribution. Four unique segments of base-paired, double-helical RNA, one to two turns in length, lie between 33-A and 101-A radius and are organized about either 2-fold or 5-fold icosahedral axes. In addition, single-stranded loops of RNA invade the pentameric and hexameric capsomeres where they contact the interior capsid surface. The remaining RNA, not seen in electron density maps, must serve as connecting links between these secondary structural elements and is likely icosahedrally disordered. The distribution of RNA observed crystallographically appears to be in agreement with models based on biochemical data and secondary structural analyses.

  9. Genetic diversity of Hungarian Maize dwarf mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Gell, Gyöngyvér; Balázs, Ervin; Petrik, Kathrin

    2010-04-01

    The genetic diversity of the coat-protein (CP) region and the untranslated C-terminal region (3'UTR) of Maize dwarf mosaic virus (MDMV) was analyzed to evaluate the variability between isolates (inter-isolate sequence diversity). The results of inter-isolate sequence diversity analysis showed that the diversity of the MDMV CP gene is fairly high (p-distance: up to 0.136). During sequence analysis, a 13 amino-acid residue insertion and an 8 amino-acid residue deletion were found within the N-terminal region of the CP gene. The phylogenetic analysis showed that-unlike other potyvirus species in this subgroup-the MDMV isolates could not be distinguished on the basis of their host plants or geographic origins.

  10. Mosaicism

    MedlinePlus

    ... A diagnosis of mosaicism may cause confusion and uncertainty. A genetic counselor may help answer any questions ... member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health on the Net Foundation (www. ...

  11. The discovery of the chemical nature of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Pennazio, S; Roggero, P

    2000-01-01

    The path to arrive at the elucidation of the chemical nature of plant viruses was greatly facilitated by the availability of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as biological tool. The first hypothesis on the chemical nature of TMV was advanced in 1899 by the American Albert Wood, who suggested an enzyme nature. This hypothesis, severely questioned by Harry Hallard in 1915, was re-proposed by several virologists. In 1926, the American Maurice Mulvania concluded that the virus might be a protein with the biological characteristics of an autocatalytic enzyme. Before arriving at the experimental evidence it was necessary to resolve two questions: the estimation of virus infectivity in quantitative terms, performed by Francis Holmes in 1928, and the purification of the virus, performed by Carl George Vinson between 1927 and 1934. Vinson gave a conclusive contribution to solve the question of the chemical nature of TMV by settling the protocol of TMV purification. He put forward the hypothesis of the protein nature in the early 1930s but had not the required firm belief to gave the final experimental evidence of it. Who first arrived at the experimental evidence of the protein nature of the virus was the American Wendell Meredith Stanley, in 1935. His celebrated work, a classic of the fundamental Virology, was followed by several papers in which this result was firmly reaffirmed. The heuristic value of Stanley's discovery held out a year: the decisive evidence of the actual chemical nature of TMV was offered in the late 1936 by an English group under the leadership of Frederick Charles Bawden. In their short paper, Bawden and co-operators demonstrated that TMV had a ribonucleoprotein nature, a result that was confirmed in the following years for several TMV strains and other viruses. Stanley and his group did accept this result only after a year of reticence and contradictions. The conversion to the ribonucleoprotein nature raised a dignified protest by Bawden and the sarcasm of

  12. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus.

  13. Genetic Composition of Pepino mosaic virus Population in North American Greenhouse Tomatoes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is a member of the genus Potexvirus within the family Flexiviridae. Pepino mosaic is an emerging disease in greenhouse tomato in Europe, North America and South America. Previous research in several laboratories suggests that PepMV consists of numerous sequence variants...

  14. First Report of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Infecting Gherkin (Cucumis anguira) in India.

    PubMed

    Anthony Johnson, A M; Vidya, T; Papaiah, S; Srinivasulu, M; Mandal, Bikash; Sai Gopal, D V R

    2013-09-01

    A field visit in September 2011 to the Cucumis anguira (Gherkin) growing regions of Kuppam, Chittoor district of Andhra Pradesh, India revealed occurrence of mosaic, blistering and fruit malformation leading to the crop losses. Analysis of field samples revealed association of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) with the disease. This is the first confirmed report of natural occurrence of ZYMV on Gherkin in India.

  15. First report of tomato mottle mosaic virus infecting tomato in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus was identified in tomato in Florida, the first report of this virus in the U.S. Host range and genetic diversity were characterized. This report provides an overview of this emerging virus for growers, extension workers, crop consultants and research and regulatory scien...

  16. Wheat streak mosaic virus-encoded NIa-Pro and coat protein are involved in virus superinfection exclusion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cross protection or superinfection exclusion (SE) is defined as the phenomenon whereby initial infection by one virus prevents subsequent infection by closely related viruses. The mechanisms of SE are just beginning to be understood. Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV; genus: Tritimovirus; family: Poty...

  17. Host regulation of the cauliflower mosaic virus multiplication cycle.

    PubMed

    Covey, S N; Turner, D S; Lucy, A P; Saunders, K

    1990-03-01

    The DNA genome of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) replicates in the cytoplasm of infected plant cells by reverse transcription of an RNA template. Viral RNA is generated in the nucleus by transcription of an episomal minichromosome containing supercoiled DNA. We have assessed the relative activities of the nuclear and cytoplasmic phases of the CaMV multiplication cycle by monitoring unencapsidated viral DNA forms and polyadenylylated RNAs in different organs of one host plant and in different host species. Systemically infected leaves of a highly susceptible host, turnip (Brassica rapa), contained abundant 35S RNA and 19S RNA transcripts and unencapsidated reverse transcription products but relatively little supercoiled DNA. In contrast, supercoiled DNA accumulated in roots and other tissues of turnip plants but without significant amounts of steady-state viral RNA. Infected but asymptomatic leaves of a less susceptible CaMV host, kohlrabi (Brassica oleracea), contained supercoiled DNA almost exclusively but negligible viral RNA and DNA products of reverse transcription. An allotetraploid species, rape (Brassica napus), exhibited infection characteristics and minichromosome expression levels intermediate between the other two species from which it was derived. We conclude that expression of the CaMV minichromosome is a key phase of the virus multiplication cycle, which is regulated differentially in organs of a highly susceptible host species. Furthermore, this regulation exhibits genetic variation among different Brassica species and controls host susceptibility to CaMV infection.

  18. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development. PMID:26891174

  19. Molecular dissection of the cauliflower mosaic virus translation transactivator.

    PubMed Central

    De Tapia, M; Himmelbach, A; Hohn, T

    1993-01-01

    The cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) transactivator (TAV) is a complex protein that appears to be involved in many aspects of the virus life cycle. One of its roles is to control translation from the polycistronic CaMV 35S RNA. Here we report a molecular dissection of TAV in relation to its ability to enhance dicistronic translation in transient expression experiments. We have identified a protein domain that is responsible and sufficient for that activity. This 'MiniTAV domain' consists of only 140 of the 520 amino acids in the full-length sequence. A further domain located outside the MiniTAV, and therefore dispensable for transactivation, is probably involved in interactions with other molecules. This was identified by its ability to compete with wild-type TAV and some of its deletion mutants. We found, furthermore, that the TAV protein binds RNA. Two regions needed for RNA-binding properties were defined outside the MiniTAV domain and RNA binding seems not to be directly involved in the transactivation mechanism. Images PMID:8344266

  20. Potentiating Cancer Immunotherapy Using Papaya Mosaic Virus-Derived Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lebel, Marie-Ève; Chartrand, Karine; Tarrab, Esther; Savard, Pierre; Leclerc, Denis; Lamarre, Alain

    2016-03-01

    The recent development of novel immunotherapies is revolutionizing cancer treatment. These include, for example, immune checkpoint blockade, immunomodulation, or therapeutic vaccination. Although effective on their own, combining multiple approaches will most likely be required in order to achieve the maximal therapeutic benefit. In this regard, the papaya mosaic virus nanoparticle (PapMV) has shown tremendous potential as (i) an immunostimulatory molecule, (ii) an adjuvant, and (iii) a vaccine platform through its intrinsic capacity to activate the innate immune response in an IFN-α-dependent manner. Here, we demonstrate that intratumor administration of PapMV significantly slows down melanoma progression and prolongs survival. This correlates with enhanced chemokine and pro-inflammatory-cytokine production in the tumor and increased immune-cell infiltration. Proportions of total and tumor-specific CD8(+) T cells dramatically increase following PapMV treatment whereas those of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) concomitantly decrease. Moreover, systemic PapMV administration prevents metastatic tumor-implantation in the lungs. Importantly, PapMV also synergistically improves the therapeutic benefit of dendritic cell (DC)-based vaccination and PD-1 blockade by potentiating antitumor immune responses. This study illustrates the immunostimulatory potential of a plant virus-derived nanoparticle for cancer therapy either alone or in conjunction with other promising immunotherapies in clinical development.

  1. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo; Liu, Yule

    2016-07-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  2. Endothelial Targeting of Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) via Surface Vimentin

    PubMed Central

    Koudelka, Kristopher J.; Destito, Giuseppe; Plummer, Emily M.; Trauger, Sunia A.; Siuzdak, Gary; Manchester, Marianne

    2009-01-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is a plant comovirus in the picornavirus superfamily, and is used for a wide variety of biomedical and material science applications. Although its replication is restricted to plants, CPMV binds to and enters mammalian cells, including endothelial cells and particularly tumor neovascular endothelium in vivo. This natural capacity has lead to the use of CPMV as a sensor for intravital imaging of vascular development. Binding of CPMV to endothelial cells occurs via interaction with a 54 kD cell-surface protein, but this protein has not previously been identified. Here we identify the CPMV binding protein as a cell-surface form of the intermediate filament vimentin. The CPMV-vimentin interaction was established using proteomic screens and confirmed by direct interaction of CPMV with purified vimentin, as well as inhibition in a vimentin-knockout cell line. Vimentin and CPMV were also co-localized in vascular endothelium of mouse and rat in vivo. Together these studies indicate that surface vimentin mediates binding and may lead to internalization of CPMV in vivo, establishing surface vimentin as an important vascular endothelial ligand for nanoparticle targeting to tumors. These results also establish vimentin as a ligand for picornaviruses in both the plant and animal kingdoms of life. Since bacterial pathogens and several other classes of viruses also bind to surface vimentin, these studies suggest a common role for surface vimentin in pathogen transmission. PMID:19412526

  3. Phylogenetic and serological analysis of turnip ringspot virus and radish mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Koloniuk, Igor; Petrzik, Karel

    2012-03-01

    Turnip ringspot virus (TuRSV) has been proposed to be a member of a new species in the genus Comovirus. Its remarkable host-range similarity to radish mosaic virus (RaMV) may have led to its misrecognition in the past. Findings from both sequence analysis and serological tests support the assignment of TuRSV to a new comovirus species. In addition, phylogenetic analysis suggests that the two genome segments of some TuRSV isolates have a heterogeneous origin. PMID:22160585

  4. Complete genome sequence of a dahlia common mosaic virus isolate from New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Hadfield, James; Linderme, Daphné; Shepherd, Dionne N; Bezuidenhout, Marion; Lefeuvre, Pierre; Martin, Darren P; Varsani, Arvind

    2011-12-01

    Dahlia mosaic disease of the ornamental flowering plant Dahlia is caused by two caulimoviruses, dahlia mosaic virus (DMV) and dahlia common mosaic virus (DCMV). We used a rolling-circle amplification method to amplify, clone and determine for the first time the full genome sequence of a DCMV isolate from New Zealand (DCMV-NZ). Within the 7949-bp circular double-stranded retro-transcribing DCMV-NZ DNA, we identified six putative open reading frames, typical of all genomes in the family Caulimoviridae. The availability of the complete DCMV sequence provides a reference genome against which all others can be compared. PMID:21960043

  5. Quantification of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV-UG) in single and mixed infected Cassava (Manihot esculenta Crantz) using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Naseem, Saadia; Winter, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    The quantity of genomic DNA-A and DNA-B of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic virus Uganda (Uganda variant, EACMV-UG) was analysed using quantitative PCR to assess virus concentrations in plants from susceptible and tolerant cultivars. The concentrations of genome components in absolute and relative quantification experiments in single and mixed viral infections were determined. Virus concentration was much higher in symptomatic leaf tissues compared to non-symptomatic leaves and corresponded with the severity of disease symptoms. In general, higher titres were recorded for EACMV-UG Ca055 compared to ACMV DRC6. The quantitative assessment also showed that the distribution of both viruses in the moderately resistant cassava cv. TMS 30572 was not different from the highly susceptible cv. TME 117. Natural mixed infections with both viruses gave severe disease symptoms. Relative quantification of virus genomes in mixed infections showed higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-A compared to ACMV DNA-A, but a marked reduction of EACMV-UG DNA-B. The higher concentrations of EACMV-UG DNA-B compared to EACMV DNA-A accumulation in single infections were consistent. Since DNA-B is implicated in virus cell-to-cell spread and systemic movement, the abundance of the EACMV-UG DNA-B may be an important factor driving cassava mosaic disease epidemic.

  6. Making a Virus Visible: Francis O. Holmes and a biological assay for tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, Karen-Beth G

    2014-01-01

    In the early twentieth century, viruses had yet to be defined in a material way. Instead, they were known better by what they were not - not bacteria, not culturable, and not visible with a light microscope. As with the ill-defined "gene" of genetics, viruses were microbes whose nature had not been revealed. Some clarity arrived in 1929 when Francis O. Holmes, a scientist at the Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research (Yonkers, NY) reported that Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) could produce local necrotic lesions on tobacco plants and that these lesions were in proportion to dilutions of the inoculum. Holmes' method, the local lesion assay, provided the first evidence that viruses were discrete infectious particles, thus setting the stage for physicochemical studies of plant viruses. In a field where there are few eponymous methods or diseases, Holmes' assay continues to be a useful tool for the study of plant viruses. TMV was a success because the local lesion assay "made the virus visible" and standardized the work of virology towards determining the nature of the virus. PMID:23494396

  7. RNA recombination in the genome of barley stripe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M C; Petty, I T; Jackson, A O

    1992-07-01

    Barley stripe mosaic Hordeivirus (BSMV) is a positive-strand RNA virus requiring three single-stranded RNAs (alpha, beta, and gamma) for infectivity. A terminal-sequence-dependent cloning strategy was used to clone the entire genome of the CV17 strain. Full-length gamma cDNA clones were obtained when oligonucleotides specific for the 5'-terminal sequence of RNA alpha were used in the cloning procedure, but not when RNA gamma-specific oligonucleotides were used. Sequence analysis of six putative gamma cDNA clones revealed that nucleotides 1-70 possess 89% homology with the first 70 nucleotides of RNA alpha. This leader region is separated from the gamma-specific coding region by an eight-base intervening sequence common to both CV17 RNAs alpha and gamma. Northern and Southern hybridization with oligonucleotide probes specific for either alpha or gamma leader sequences indicated that CV17 gamma cDNA clones are representative of native CV17 gamma RNAs. Furthermore, bioassays indicated that in vitro transcripts derived from these gamma cDNA clones were infectious when coinoculated with in vitro transcripts of full-length alpha and beta cDNA clones. Thus, the evidence suggests that RNA gamma of BSMV strain CV17 is a recombinant molecule which may have arisen as a result of natural recombination between RNAs alpha and gamma. PMID:1604824

  8. Seeing tobacco mosaic virus through direct electron detectors

    PubMed Central

    Fromm, Simon A.; Bharat, Tanmay A.M.; Jakobi, Arjen J.; Hagen, Wim J.H.; Sachse, Carsten

    2015-01-01

    With the introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to the field of electron cryo-microscopy, a wave of atomic-resolution structures has become available. As the new detectors still require comparative characterization, we have used tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a test specimen to study the quality of 3D image reconstructions from data recorded on the two direct electron detector cameras, K2 Summit and Falcon II. Using DED movie frames, we explored related image-processing aspects and compared the performance of micrograph-based and segment-based motion correction approaches. In addition, we investigated the effect of dose deposition on the atomic-resolution structure of TMV and show that radiation damage affects negative carboxyl chains first in a side-chain specific manner. Finally, using 450,000 asymmetric units and limiting the effects of radiation damage, we determined a high-resolution cryo-EM map at 3.35 Å resolution. Here, we provide a comparative case study of highly ordered TMV recorded on different direct electron detectors to establish recording and processing conditions that enable structure determination up to 3.2 Å in resolution using cryo-EM. PMID:25528571

  9. Titration behaviour of three strains of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Hendry, D A; Durham, A C

    1980-01-15

    Hydrogen ion titration curves of the virions and proteins of three strains of tobacco mosaic virus (Y-TAMV, U2, and cowpea) were measured in the absence and the presence of Ca2+, Mg2+, or Mn2+ ions, and compared with the analogous curves for the type strain (vulgare). Extinction coefficients were also measured for all four strains' virions and proteins. Y-TAMV is very like vulgare in its cation affinities: the virion has probably three groups per protein subunit that titrate near neutral pH and significantly bind metal ions; the RNA-free protein has very little affinity for Ca2+, although moderate Ca2+ concentrations favour the existence of larger polymers. U2 and cowpea strain virions bind cations significantly more strongly than do Y-TAMV or vulgare virions: their polymerized proteins, too, have significant affinities for Ca2+ ions, which make their titration and sedimentation behaviours relatively sensitive to added calcium. These cation-binding differences correspond well with the differences between the strains' protein sequences. The features common to all four strains are that the virions are apparently structurally invariant and have at least one site per subunit with Ca2+ affinity in the region of 10(-5)M, while the RNA-free proteins lack the high-affinity sites but have weaker Ca2+ affinities in the region of 10(-3)M. Some of the cation-binding sites probably lie near the central holes of the virions.

  10. Seeing tobacco mosaic virus through direct electron detectors.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Simon A; Bharat, Tanmay A M; Jakobi, Arjen J; Hagen, Wim J H; Sachse, Carsten

    2015-02-01

    With the introduction of direct electron detectors (DED) to the field of electron cryo-microscopy, a wave of atomic-resolution structures has become available. As the new detectors still require comparative characterization, we have used tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as a test specimen to study the quality of 3D image reconstructions from data recorded on the two direct electron detector cameras, K2 Summit and Falcon II. Using DED movie frames, we explored related image-processing aspects and compared the performance of micrograph-based and segment-based motion correction approaches. In addition, we investigated the effect of dose deposition on the atomic-resolution structure of TMV and show that radiation damage affects negative carboxyl chains first in a side-chain specific manner. Finally, using 450,000 asymmetric units and limiting the effects of radiation damage, we determined a high-resolution cryo-EM map at 3.35Å resolution. Here, we provide a comparative case study of highly ordered TMV recorded on different direct electron detectors to establish recording and processing conditions that enable structure determination up to 3.2Å in resolution using cryo-EM. PMID:25528571

  11. Trastuzumab-binding peptide display by Tobacco mosaic virus

    SciTech Connect

    Frolova, Olga Y.; Petrunia, Igor V.; Komarova, Tatiana V.; Kosorukov, Vyacheslav S.; Sheval, Eugene V.; Gleba, Yuri Y.; Dorokhov, Yuri L.

    2010-11-10

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2/neu) is a target for the humanized monoclonal antibody trastuzumab. Recently, trastuzumab-binding peptides (TBP) of HER2/neu that inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells were identified. We have now studied conditions of efficient assembly in vivo of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV)-based particles displaying TBP on its surface. The system is based on an Agrobacterium-mediated co-delivery of binary vectors encoding TMV RNA and coat protein (CP) with TBP in its C-terminal extension into plant leaves. We show how the fusion of amino acid substituted TBP (sTBP) to CP via a flexible peptide linker can improve the manufacturability of recombinant TMV (rTMV). We also reveal that rTMV particles with exposed sTBP retained trastuzumab-binding capacity but lost an anti-HER2/neu immunogenic scaffold function. Mouse antibodies against rTMV did not recognize HER2/neu on surface of human SK-BR-3 cells.

  12. Cauliflower mosaic virus Transcriptome Reveals a Complex Alternative Splicing Pattern

    PubMed Central

    Bouton, Clément; Geldreich, Angèle; Ramel, Laëtitia; Ryabova, Lyubov A.; Dimitrova, Maria; Keller, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The plant pararetrovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) uses alternative splic-ing to generate several isoforms from its polycistronic pregenomic 35S RNA. This pro-cess has been shown to be essential for infectivity. Previous works have identified four splice donor sites and a single splice acceptor site in the 35S RNA 5’ region and sug-gested that the main role of CaMV splicing is to downregulate expression of open read-ing frames (ORFs) I and II. In this study, we show that alternative splicing is a conserved process among CaMV isolates. In Cabb B-JI and Cabb-S isolates, splicing frequently leads to different fusion between ORFs, particularly between ORF I and II. The corresponding P1P2 fusion proteins expressed in E. coli interact with viral proteins P2 and P3 in vitro. However, they are detected neither during infection nor upon transient expression in planta, which suggests rapid degradation after synthesis and no important biological role in the CaMV infectious cycle. To gain a better understanding of the functional relevance of 35S RNA alternative splicing in CaMV infectivity, we inactivated the previously described splice sites. All the splicing mutants were as pathogenic as the corresponding wild-type isolate. Through RT-PCR-based analysis we demonstrate that CaMV 35S RNA exhibits a complex splicing pattern, as we identify new splice donor and acceptor sites whose selection leads to more than thirteen 35S RNA isoforms in infected turnip plants. Inactivating splice donor or acceptor sites is not lethal for the virus, since disrupted sites are systematically rescued by the activation of cryptic and/or seldom used splice sites. Taken together, our data depict a conserved, complex and flexible process, involving multiple sites, that ensures splicing of 35S RNA. PMID:26162084

  13. Virus factories of cauliflower mosaic virus are virion reservoirs that engage actively in vector transmission.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Gargani, Daniel; Macia, Jean-Luc; Malouvet, Enrick; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) forms two types of inclusion bodies within infected plant cells: numerous virus factories, which are the sites for viral replication and virion assembly, and a single transmission body (TB), which is specialized for virus transmission by aphid vectors. The TB reacts within seconds to aphid feeding on the host plant by total disruption and redistribution of its principal component, the viral transmission helper protein P2, onto microtubules throughout the cell. At the same time, virions also associate with microtubules. This redistribution of P2 and virions facilitates transmission and is reversible; the TB reforms within minutes after vector departure. Although some virions are present in the TB before disruption, their subsequent massive accumulation on the microtubule network suggests that they also are released from virus factories. Using drug treatments, mutant viruses, and exogenous supply of viral components to infected protoplasts, we show that virions can rapidly exit virus factories and, once in the cytoplasm, accumulate together with the helper protein P2 on the microtubule network. Moreover, we show that during reversion of this phenomenon, virions from the microtubule network can either be incorporated into the reverted TB or return to the virus factories. Our results suggest that CaMV factories are dynamic structures that participate in vector transmission by controlled release and uptake of virions during TB reaction.

  14. Virus factories of cauliflower mosaic virus are virion reservoirs that engage actively in vector transmission.

    PubMed

    Bak, Aurélie; Gargani, Daniel; Macia, Jean-Luc; Malouvet, Enrick; Vernerey, Marie-Stéphanie; Blanc, Stéphane; Drucker, Martin

    2013-11-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) forms two types of inclusion bodies within infected plant cells: numerous virus factories, which are the sites for viral replication and virion assembly, and a single transmission body (TB), which is specialized for virus transmission by aphid vectors. The TB reacts within seconds to aphid feeding on the host plant by total disruption and redistribution of its principal component, the viral transmission helper protein P2, onto microtubules throughout the cell. At the same time, virions also associate with microtubules. This redistribution of P2 and virions facilitates transmission and is reversible; the TB reforms within minutes after vector departure. Although some virions are present in the TB before disruption, their subsequent massive accumulation on the microtubule network suggests that they also are released from virus factories. Using drug treatments, mutant viruses, and exogenous supply of viral components to infected protoplasts, we show that virions can rapidly exit virus factories and, once in the cytoplasm, accumulate together with the helper protein P2 on the microtubule network. Moreover, we show that during reversion of this phenomenon, virions from the microtubule network can either be incorporated into the reverted TB or return to the virus factories. Our results suggest that CaMV factories are dynamic structures that participate in vector transmission by controlled release and uptake of virions during TB reaction. PMID:24006440

  15. First Complete Genome Sequence of Bean common mosaic necrosis virus from East Timor

    PubMed Central

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R.; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel

    2016-01-01

    We present here the first complete Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) genomic sequence isolated from virus-infected common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Timor, and compare it with six complete BMCNV genomes from the Netherlands, and one each from the United States, Tanzania, and an unspecified country. It most resembled the Netherlands strain NL-8 genome. PMID:27688343

  16. First Complete Genome Sequence of Bean common mosaic necrosis virus from East Timor.

    PubMed

    Maina, Solomon; Edwards, Owain R; de Almeida, Luis; Ximenes, Abel; Jones, Roger A C

    2016-01-01

    We present here the first complete Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) genomic sequence isolated from virus-infected common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in East Timor, and compare it with six complete BMCNV genomes from the Netherlands, and one each from the United States, Tanzania, and an unspecified country. It most resembled the Netherlands strain NL-8 genome. PMID:27688343

  17. Genome sequencing, genetic diversity and field detection of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus using LAMP technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The recent outbreaks of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus on cucumber, melon and watermelon in Australia, Canada, and the U.S. highlight the importance in implementing a cleaned seed program to manage this seed-borne virus from introduction. Both Canadian and Australian isolates were closely relate...

  18. Complete genome sequence of Tomato mosaic virus isolated from jasmine in the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) was first identified in jasmine in the U.S. in Florida in 1999. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a ToMV isolate from jasmine. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific diagnostic tests for ...

  19. Complete genome sequence of a Tomato mottle mosaic virus isolate from the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) was first identified in the U.S. in tomatoes in Florida in 2010. This report provides the first full genome sequence of a U.S. ToMMV isolate from 2010. The full genome sequence of this emerging virus will enable research scientists to develop additional specific ...

  20. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV) was first identified in tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum), a noxious weed, in Florida in 2002. This report provides the first full genome sequence of TSAMV. The full genome sequence of this virus will enable research scientists to develop additional spec...

  1. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. The ZYMV-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL) is considered a major limitation to commercial watermelon production in the entire United States. Experiments with F2 and BC1 plants, d...

  2. Identification and Utility of Markers Linked to the Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus Resistance Gene in Watermelon

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus Florida stain (ZYMV-FL) is one of the most economically important viruses affecting watermelon in the United States. Inheritance of resistance to ZYMV-FL is conferred by a single recessive gene. Described here is single-reaction, polymerase chain reaction-based marker l...

  3. Occurrence and distribution of pepper veinal mottle virus and cucumber mosaic virus in pepper in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Arogundade, Olawale; Balogun, Olusegun Samuel; Kareem, Kehinde Titilope

    2012-04-11

    Viral diseases constitute obstacles to pepper production in the world. In Nigeria, pepper plants are primarily affected by pepper veinal mottle virus (PVMV), Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Pepper leaf curl Virus (TLCV), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Pepper mottle virus (PMV) and a host of other viruses. The experiment was carried out with a diagnostic survey on the experimental field of the National Horticultural Research Institute, Ibadan, Nigeria and on pepper farms in six local government areas within Ibadan Oyo State, Nigeria, forty samples were collected from each of the farms. Diseased samples were obtained from the field and taken to the laboratory for indexing. In ELISA test some of the samples from the pepper farms showed positive reaction to single infection with PVMV (36.79%), CMV (22.14%) while some others showed positive reaction to mixed infection of the two viruses (10%) but some also negative reaction to PVMV and CMV antisera (31.07).

  4. Virus-induced gene silencing in diverse maize lines using the Brome Mosaic virus-based silencing vector

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a widely used tool for gene function studies in many plant species, though its use in monocots has been limited. Using a Brome mosaic virus (BMV) vector designed to silence the maize phytoene desaturase gene, a genetically diverse set of maize inbred lines was ...

  5. First Report of Pepino Mosaic Virus Infecting Tomato in Mexico

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic has become endemic greenhouse tomato disease in many countries around the world. Its occurrence in Mexico has yet to be determined. In early spring of 2010, symptoms of yellow mosaic, chlorotic patches and fruit marbling were observed in approximately 50% of tomato plants in a commerc...

  6. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya.

  7. Simultaneous detection of papaya ringspot virus, papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus, and papaya mosaic virus by multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Shen, W T; Yan, P; Tuo, D C; Li, X Y; Zhou, P

    2015-12-01

    Both the single infection of papaya ringspot virus (PRSV), papaya leaf distortion mosaic virus (PLDMV) or papaya mosaic virus (PapMV) and double infection of PRSV and PLDMV or PapMV which cause indistinguishable symptoms, threaten the papaya industry in Hainan Island, China. In this study, a multiplex real-time reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR) was developed to detect simultaneously the three viruses based on their distinctive melting temperatures (Tms): 81.0±0.8°C for PRSV, 84.7±0.6°C for PLDMV, and 88.7±0.4°C for PapMV. The multiplex real-time RT-PCR method was specific and sensitive in detecting the three viruses, with a detection limit of 1.0×10(1), 1.0×10(2), and 1.0×10(2) copies for PRSV, PLDMV, and PapMV, respectively. Indeed, the reaction was 100 times more sensitive than the multiplex RT-PCR for PRSV, and 10 times more sensitive than multiplex RT-PCR for PLDMV. Field application of the multiplex real-time RT-PCR demonstrated that some non-symptomatic samples were positive for PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR but negative by multiplex RT-PCR, whereas some samples were positive for both PRSV and PLDMV by multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay but only positive for PLDMV by multiplex RT-PCR. Therefore, this multiplex real-time RT-PCR assay provides a more rapid, sensitive and reliable method for simultaneous detection of PRSV, PLDMV, PapMV and their mixed infections in papaya. PMID:26666186

  8. Surface mineralization and characterization of tobacco mosaic virus biotemplated nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freer, Alexander S.

    The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been utilized as a biotemplate in the formation of nanoparticles with the intent of furthering the understanding of the biotemplated nanoparticles formed in the absence of an external reducing agent. Specifically, the work aims to provide better knowledge of the final particle characteristics and how these properties could be altered to better fit the need of functional devices. Three achievements have been accomplished including a method for controlling final particle size, characterizing the resistivity of palladium coated TMV, and the application of TMV as an additive in nanometric calcium carbonate synthesis. Until the last 5 years, formation of metal nanoparticles on the surface of TMV has always occurred with the addition of an external reducing agent. The surface functionalities of genetically engineered TMV allow for the reduction of palladium in the absence of an external reducing agent. This process has been furthered to understand how palladium concentration affects the final coating uniformity and thickness. By confirming an ideal ratio of palladium and TMV concentrations, a uniform coat of palladium is formed around the viral nanorod. Altering the number of palladium coating cycles at these concentrations allows for a controllable average diameter of the final nanorods. The average particle diameter was determined by small angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis by comparing the experimental results to the model of scattering by an infinitely long cylinder. The SAXS results were confirmed through transmission electron microscopy images of individual Pd-TMV nanorods. Secondly, methodologies to determine the electrical resistivity of the genetically engineered TMV biotemplated palladium nanoparticles were created to provide valuable previously missing information. Two fairly common nanoelectronic characterization techniques were combined to create the novel approach to obtain the desired

  9. Chemical reactivity of brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Running, W E; Ni, P; Kao, C C; Reilly, J P

    2012-10-12

    Viral particles are biological machines that have evolved to package, protect, and deliver the viral genome into the host via regulated conformational changes of virions. We have developed a procedure to modify lysine residues with S-methylthioacetimidate across the pH range from 5.5 to 8.5. Lysine residues that are not completely modified are involved in tertiary or quaternary structural interactions, and their extent of modification can be quantified as a function of pH. This procedure was applied to the pH-dependent structural transitions of brome mosaic virus (BMV). As the reaction pH increases from 5.5 to 8.5, the average number of modified lysine residues in the BMV capsid protein increases from 6 to 12, correlating well with the known pH-dependent swelling behavior of BMV virions. The extent of reaction of each of the capsid protein's lysine residues has been quantified at eight pH values using coupled liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Each lysine can be assigned to one of three structural classes identified by inspection of the BMV virion crystal structure. Several lysine residues display reactivity that indicates their involvement in dynamic interactions that are not obvious in the crystal structure. The influence of several capsid protein mutants on the pH-dependent structural transition of BMV has also been investigated. Mutant H75Q exhibits an altered swelling transition accompanying solution pH increases. The H75Q capsids show increased reactivity at lysine residues 64 and 130, residues distal from the dimer interface occupied by H75, across the entire pH range.

  10. Complete genome sequencing of two causative viruses of cassava mosaic disease in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Oteng-Frimpong, R; Levy, Y; Torkpo, S K; Danquah, E Y; Offei, S K; Gafni, Y

    2012-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease (CMV), caused by one or a combination of cassava mosaic geminiviruses, is ranked among the most important constraints to profitable and efficient production of cassava. Effective control measures require in-depth knowledge of the viral causative agent. Using rolling-circle amplification and unique enzymes, the full genome of two species of cassava mosaic geminivirus isolated from infected cassava plants in Ghana were cloned into pCambia 1300 and pET-28b. The sequences of the genome were determined on an ABI sequencer and a pairwise comparison was performed with other cassava-infecting geminiviruses from different countries. It was revealed that cassava grown in Ghana is attacked by two species of geminivirus in either single or mixed infections. These are the African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and the East African cassava mosaic virus (EACMV)-like, with high sequence similarity of 94% and 80%, respectively, between the DNA-A and DNA-B components of each virus, and 66% and 41% similarity of the common region (CR) (for A and B accordingly). The DNA-A of ACMV and EACMV-like contained 2781 and 2800 nucleotides, respectively, while their DNA-B components had 2725 and 2734 nucleotides, respectively. ACMV DNA-A was over 97% similar to those of other ACMVs from the continent. In contrast, EACMV-like DNA-A was over 98% similar to the isolates from Cameroon and other West African countries, and less than 88% similar to other EACMV species. Thus ACMV and EACMV-like were named African cassava mosaic virus-Ghana and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus-Ghana. Computer analysis revealed that their genome arrangement follows the typical old world bipartite begomovirus genome. The association of these two species and their interaction might account for the severe symptoms observed on infected plants in the field and in the greenhouse.

  11. Pepino mosaic virus and Tomato torrado virus: two emerging viruses affecting tomato crops in the Mediterranean basin.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Pedro; Sempere, Raqueln; Aranda, Miguel A

    2012-01-01

    The molecular biology, epidemiology, and evolutionary dynamics of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) are much better understood than those of Tomato torrado virus (ToTV). The earliest descriptions of PepMV suggest a recent jump from nontomato species (e.g., pepino; Solanum muricatum) to tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Its stability in contaminated plant tissues, its transmission through seeds, and the global trade of tomato seeds and fruits may have facilitated the global spread of PepMV. Stability and seed transmission also probably account for the devastating epidemics caused by already-established PepMV strains, although additional contributing factors may include the efficient transmission of PepMV by contact and the often-inconspicuous symptoms in vegetative tomato tissues. The genetic variability of PepMV is likely to have promoted the first phase of emergence (i.e., the species jump) and it continues to play an important role as the virus becomes more pervasive, progressing from regional outbreaks to pandemics. In contrast, the long-term progression of ToTV outbreaks is not yet clear and this may reflect factors such as the limited accumulation of the virus in infected plants, which has been shown to be approximately two orders of magnitude less than PepMV. The efficient dispersion of ToTV may therefore depend on dense populations of its principal vectors, Bemisia tabaci and Trialeurodes vaporariorum, as has been proposed for the necrogenic satellite RNA of Cucumber mosaic virus.

  12. Red clover necrotic mosaic virus: Biophysics and Biotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lockney, Dustin M.

    Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV) is a highly robust (Tm=60 °C), 36 nm icosahedral plant virus. The capsid of RCNMV is assembled from 180 chemically equivalent coat proteins (CPs). The CPs arrange in a T=3 symmetry, in 1 of 3 conformations forming the asymmetric subunit (ASU). There are two Ca(II) binding sites per CP; the removal of divalent cations causes the CP subunits of the ASU to rotate away from each other forming a ˜13 A channel. These channels lead to the highly organized bipartite genome of RCNMV and can be closed by adding back Ca(II). Titrimetric analysis and tryptophan fluorescence was used to determine the affinity of RCNMV for Ca(II) to be ˜Kd < 300 nM. It has been shown that doxorubicin (Dox) can be infused into the capsid at a mole ratio of ˜1000:1, Dox-to-virus, and unlike other nanoparticles, there is no detectable leakage. The high loading of Dox is most likely due to intercalation into the genome and significant intercalation or exposure to denaturants was observed to cause loss of capsid stability. To better understand the limitations of cargo loading, Dox and other intercalating molecules (rhodamine 800, ethidium bromide, and propidium iodide) were assayed to determine optimum infusion conditions. Dox was observed to have a propensity to aggregate. In order to manage the Dox aggregation, the infusion buffer was changed from 50 mM Tris-HCl/50 mM NaOAc/50 mM EDTA or 200 mM EDTA at pH 8.0 to 5 mM HEPES/5 mM Na4EDTA/10 mM NaCl pH 7.8. The Dox:RCNMV infusion mole ratio was also lowered from 5000:1 to 500:1 and the incubation temperature was changed from 4 °C to 22 °C for <12 hours, opposed to 24 hours. To impart targeting functionality to RCNMV, biomimetic peptides were conjugated to either the surface capsid lysines or cysteines using standard bioconjugation methods. For all of the biomimetic peptides screened, sulfosuccinimidyl 4-(N-maleimidomethyl) cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (sulfo-SMCC) was used to orthogonally attach the

  13. Tobacco mosaic virus: a model antigen to study virus-antibody interactions.

    PubMed

    Van Regenmortel, M H; Altschuh, D; Zeder-Lutz, G

    1993-01-01

    For more than 50 years, tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) has been used as a model system for studying various aspects of virus-antibody interactions. Distinct epitopes called neotopes and cryptotopes have been identified in intact TMV particles and dissociated viral protein respectively and a correlation has been found to exist between the location of continuous epitopes and the extent of segmental mobility along the viral polypeptide chain. The occurrence of bivalent antibody binding was shown to influence the observed affinity of TMV antibodies and kinetic measurements of antibody binding to viral peptides made it possible to analyze the mechanism of binding of monoclonal antibodies. It seems likely that the TMV model will continue to yield a rich harvest of immunochemical data relevant to many viral systems.

  14. [Synthesis of virus-specific products following introduction of tobacco mosaic virus RNA pereparations and the native virus into acetabularia].

    PubMed

    Beliaev, N D; Gavrilovskaia, I N; Gorbunova, E E; Sandakhchiev, L S

    1978-01-01

    The possibility to synthesize the viral-specific products after microinjection of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) preparations and the TMV RNA into the single-celled seaweed Acetabularia was studied. The accumulation of the newly synthesized protein and double-stranded RNA 24 hours after injection of TMV RNA and native virus preparations was demonstrated by immunological and immunofluorescent methods. The virus titer sharply dropped 3--4 hours after introduction into Acetabularia and in 48 hours it reached a maximum level. The presented data showed the possibility of TMW RNA replication and translation involving formation of viral-specific proteins and the production of a virus of full value in the Acetabularia cell.

  15. Transcription of the cauliflower mosaic virus genome in isolated nuclei from turnip leaves.

    PubMed

    Guilfoyle, T J

    1980-11-01

    Nuclei isolated from turnip (Brassica rapa L. c.v. Just Right) leaves infected with cauliflower mosaic virus synthesize RNA in vitro which hybridizes to purified cauliflower mosaic virus DNA. Nuclei isolated from uninfected leaves do not produce these viral transcripts in vitro. Viral-specific transcription in isolated nuclei is catalyzed by endogenous DNA-dependent RNA polymerase 11 based on sensitivity to alpha-amanitin and ionic strength optima. Only one strand of the viral genome is transcribed in vitro in isolated nuclei. The RNA synthesized in vitro hybridizes to the same strand and EcoRI restriction fragments of cauliflower mosaic virus DNA as the viral-specific RNA that accumulates in vivo in infected turnip leaves.

  16. Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus and Banana bract mosaic virus in cardamom using SYBR Green based reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Siljo, A; Bhat, A I; Biju, C N

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom being perennial, propagated vegetatively, detecting viruses in planting material is important to check the spread of viruses through infected material. Thus development of effective and sensitive assay for detection of viruses is need of the time. In this view, assay for the detection of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), infecting cardamom was developed using SYBR Green one step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The RT-qPCR assay amplified all isolates of CdMV and BBrMV tested but no amplification was obtained with RNA of healthy plants. Recombinant plasmids carrying target virus regions corresponding to both viruses were quantified, serially diluted and used as standards in qPCR to develop standard curve to enable quantification. When tenfold serial dilutions of the total RNAs from infected plants were tested through RT-qPCR, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to be 16 copies for CdMV and 10 copies for BBrMV, which was approximately 1,000-fold higher than the conventional RT-PCR. The RT-qPCR assay was validated by testing field samples collected from different cardamom growing regions of India. This is the first report of RT-qPCR assay for the detection of CdMV and BBrMV in cardamom. PMID:24426323

  17. Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus and Banana bract mosaic virus in cardamom using SYBR Green based reverse transcription-quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Siljo, A; Bhat, A I; Biju, C N

    2014-01-01

    Cardamom being perennial, propagated vegetatively, detecting viruses in planting material is important to check the spread of viruses through infected material. Thus development of effective and sensitive assay for detection of viruses is need of the time. In this view, assay for the detection of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) and Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), infecting cardamom was developed using SYBR Green one step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). The RT-qPCR assay amplified all isolates of CdMV and BBrMV tested but no amplification was obtained with RNA of healthy plants. Recombinant plasmids carrying target virus regions corresponding to both viruses were quantified, serially diluted and used as standards in qPCR to develop standard curve to enable quantification. When tenfold serial dilutions of the total RNAs from infected plants were tested through RT-qPCR, the detection limit of the assay was estimated to be 16 copies for CdMV and 10 copies for BBrMV, which was approximately 1,000-fold higher than the conventional RT-PCR. The RT-qPCR assay was validated by testing field samples collected from different cardamom growing regions of India. This is the first report of RT-qPCR assay for the detection of CdMV and BBrMV in cardamom.

  18. Infectivity analysis of a blackgram isolate of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus and genetic assortment with MYMIV in selective hosts.

    PubMed

    Haq, Q M I; Rouhibakhsh, A; Ali, Arif; Malathi, V G

    2011-06-01

    Yellow mosaic disease in grain legumes in Indian subcontinent is caused by two important virus species viz. Mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) and Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), belonging to the genus Begomovirus of the family Geminiviridae. The genomic components of a begomovirus causing yellow mosaic disease in blackgram in southern India were cloned and sequenced. Nucleotide sequence comparison of DNA A component shows the virus isolate to be a variant of Mungbean yellow mosaic virus:-(MYMV-[IN:Vam:05]). However, DNA B component of the present virus isolate has greater similarity (92%) to Mungbean yellow mosaic India virus. Agroinoculations of the viral clones produced typical yellow mosaic symptoms in blackgram and mungbean, severe leaf curl and stunting in French bean, similar to blackgram isolate of MYMIV. Blackgram isolates of both the virus species were only mildly infectious on cowpea, produced atypical leaf curl symptoms and not yellow or golden mosaic. In agroinoculations done by exchanging genomic components, symptom expression was seen only in French bean. In cowpea, blackgram and mungbean there was no visible symptoms though viral DNA could be detected by PCR.

  19. Immunogenic compositions comprising human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mosaic Nef proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Korber, Bette T.; Perkins, Simon; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Fischer, William M.; Theiler, James; Letvin, Norman; Haynes, Barton F.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Yusim, Karina; Kuiken, Carla

    2012-02-21

    The present invention relates to mosaic clade M HIV-1 Nef polypeptides and to compositions comprising same. The polypeptides of the invention are suitable for use in inducing an immune response to HIV-1 in a human.

  20. Development of a multiplexed PCR detection method for Barley and Cereal yellow dwarf viruses, Wheat spindle streak virus, Wheat streak mosaic virus and Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Deb, Mahua; Anderson, Joseph M

    2008-03-01

    Barley and Cereal yellow dwarf viruses (B/CYDVs), Wheat spindle streak mosaic (WSSMV), Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) and Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) constitute the most economically important group of wheat viruses. In this paper, a multiplex reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (M-RT-PCR) method was developed for the simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight viruses: five strains of B/CYDVs, WSSMV, SBWMV and WSMV. The protocol uses specific primer sets for each virus producing five distinct fragments 295, 175, 400, 237, and 365 bp, indicating the presence of two strains of BYDVs, -PAV, -MAV, CYDV-RPV and two unassigned Luteoviridae BYDV-SGV and -RMV, respectively. This system also readily detected WSSMV, SBWMV and WSMV specific amplicons at 154, 219 and 193 bp, respectively. The amplification specificity of these primers was tested against a range of field samples from different parts of United States. The protocol also utilizes fluorescently tagged primers that can streamline the detection of each virus through capillary electrophoresis. This study fulfills the need for a rapid and specific wheat virus diagnostic tool that also has the potential for investigating the epidemiology of these viral diseases.

  1. First report of blueberry mosaic disease caused by blueberry mosaic associated virus in Kentucky

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 2011, a grower in Casey County Kentucky observed persistent yellow, green, and red mosaic patterns on leaves of highbush blueberry plants. Twenty-three randomly-scattered ‘Bluecrop’ plants out of approximately 1,400 5-year-old plants showed symptoms, with coverage ranging from 5% to 100%. Asympto...

  2. Emergence of a Latent Indian Cassava Mosaic Virus from Cassava Which Recovered from Infection by a Non-Persistent Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Karthikeyan, Chockalingam; Patil, Basavaprabhu L.; Borah, Basanta K.; Resmi, Thulasi R.; Turco, Silvia; Pooggin, Mikhail M.; Hohn, Thomas; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2016-01-01

    The major threat for cassava cultivation on the Indian subcontinent is cassava mosaic disease (CMD) caused by cassava mosaic geminiviruses which are bipartite begomoviruses with DNA A and DNA B components. Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV) cause CMD in India. Two isolates of SLCMV infected the cassava cultivar Sengutchi in the fields near Malappuram and Thiruvananthapuram cities of Kerala State, India. The Malappuram isolate was persistent when maintained in the Madurai Kamaraj University (MKU, Madurai, Tamil Nadu, India) greenhouse, whereas the Thiruvananthapuram isolate did not persist. The recovered cassava plants with the non-persistent SLCMV, which were maintained vegetative in quarantine in the University of Basel (Basel, Switzerland) greenhouse, displayed re-emergence of CMD after a six-month period. Interestingly, these plants did not carry SLCMV but carried ICMV. It is interpreted that the field-collected, SLCMV-infected cassava plants were co-infected with low levels of ICMV. The loss of SLCMV in recovered cassava plants, under greenhouse conditions, then facilitated the re-emergence of ICMV. The partial dimer clones of the persistent and non-persistent isolates of SLCMV and the re-emerged isolate of ICMV were infective in Nicotiana benthamiana upon agroinoculation. Studies on pseudo-recombination between SLCMV and ICMV in N. benthamiana provided evidence for trans-replication of ICMV DNA B by SLCMV DNA A. PMID:27690084

  3. Complete genome sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus, a potyvirus, occurring in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Lucinda, N; da Rocha, W B; Inoue-Nagata, A K; Nagata, T

    2012-07-01

    The complete genomic sequence of pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, was determined. The sequence was 9745 nucleotides long, excluding the 3' poly(A) tail. The genome contained a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3085 amino acids, which contained the typically conserved motifs found in members of the genus Potyvirus and an additional P3-PIPO (pretty interesting potyvirus ORF). In a pairwise comparison with other potyvirus sequences, the full genome of PepYMV shared a maximum of 63.84 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mottle virus (PepMoV), followed by verbena virus Y (VVY, 62.11 %), potato virus Y (PVY, 62.07 %) and Peru tomato mosaic virus (PTV, 62.00 %). Based upon a phylogenetic analysis, PepYMV was most closely related to PepMoV and PTV, within the PVY subgroup cluster, like most potyviruses isolated in solanaceous hosts in South America.

  4. A defective replicase gene induces resistance to cucumber mosaic virus in transgenic tobacco plants.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, J M; Palukaitis, P; Zaitlin, M

    1992-01-01

    Nicotiana tabacum cv. Turkish Samsun NN plants were transformed with a modified and truncated replicase gene encoded by RNA-2 of cucumber mosaic virus strain Fny. The replicase gene had been modified by deleting a 94-base-pair region spanning nucleotides 1857-1950; the deletion also caused a shift in the open reading frame, resulting in a truncated translation product approximately 75% as large as the full-length protein. Upon transformation via Agrobacterium tumefaciens, transgenic plants were obtained that were resistant to virus disease when challenged with either cucumber mosaic virus virions or RNA at concentrations up to 500 micrograms/ml or 50 micrograms/ml, respectively, the highest concentrations tested. This resistance was absolute, as neither symptoms nor virus could be detected in uninoculated leaves, even after prolonged incubation (120 days after inoculation). These data suggest, therefore, that such a "replicase-mediated" resistance strategy may be applicable to other plant and animal viruses. Images PMID:1528890

  5. Opium poppy mosaic virus, a new umbravirus isolated from Papaver somniferum in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Tang, Joe; Lebas, Bénédicte; Liefting, Lia; Veerakone, Stella; Wei, Ting; Ward, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    A novel virus, tentatively named "opium poppy mosaic virus" (OPMV), was isolated from Papaver somniferum (opium poppy) with leaf mosaic and mottling symptoms in Auckland, New Zealand, in 2006. The virus was mechanically transmitted to herbaceous plants of several species, in which it induced local and/or systemic symptoms. No virus particles were observed by electron microscopy in the diseased P. somniferum or any of the symptomatic herbaceous plants. The complete genomic sequence of 4230 nucleotides contains four open reading frames (ORF) and is most closely related (59.3 %) to tobacco bushy top virus, a member of the genus Umbravirus. These data suggest that OPMV is a new umbravirus. PMID:26514844

  6. Molecular characterization of Hop mosaic virus: its serological and molecular relationships to Hop latent virus.

    PubMed

    Hataya, T; Arimoto, R; Suda, N; Uyeda, I

    2001-10-01

    The 3'-terminal sequence of hop mosaic virus (HpMV) genomic RNA was determined. A cDNA of approximately 1.8 kbp was amplified from the HpMV genome by 3' RACE using a degenerate primer, which was designed to anneal to the overlapping region of open reading frames (ORFs) 2 and 3 of eight carlavirus genomes. The sequence contained three ORFs, encoding proteins of 7-, 34-, and 11-kDa, which corresponded to ORFs 4, 5, and 6 of the carlavirus genome, respectively. The amino acid sequence of ORF 5, encoding the coat protein (CP) of HpMV, shows the highest identity (67%) to that of Hop latent virus (HpLV). The HpMV CP N-terminal sequence differs from that of HpLV, but the central and C-terminal sequences of the CP of both viruses are similar. The sequence similarity possibly causes the cross-reaction of heterologous antibodies of HpMV and HpLV. Phylogenetic analyses based on the CP amino acid and 3' non-coding region sequences indicate close relationships among HpMV, HpLV, and Potato virus M. We report here the first molecular characterization of HpMV genomic RNA. PMID:11722015

  7. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts.

  8. Association of tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus DNA-B with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus in okra showing yellow vein mosaic disease symptoms.

    PubMed

    Venkataravanappa, V; Lakshminarayana Reddy, C N; Jalali, S; Krishna Reddy, M

    2015-06-01

    Okra samples showing yellow vein mosaic, vein twisting and bushy appearance were collected from different locations of India during the surveys conducted between years 2005-2009. The dot blot and PCR detection revealed that 75.14% of the samples were associated with monopartite begomovirus and remaining samples with bipartite virus. Whitefly transmission was established for three samples representing widely separated geographical locations which are negative to betasatellites and associated with DNA-B. Genome components of these three representative isolates were cloned and sequenced. The analysis of DNA-A-like sequence revealed that three begomovirus isolates shared more than 93% nucleotide sequence identity with bhendi yellow vein mosaic virus from India (BYVMV), a monopartite begomovirus species that was reported previously as causative agent of bhendi yellow mosaic disease in association of bhendi yellow vein mosaic betasatellite. Further, the DNA-B-like sequences associated with the three virus isolates shared no more than 90% sequence identity with tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV). Analyses of putative iteron-binding sequence required for trans-replication suggests that begomovirus sequences shared compatible rep-binding iterons with DNA-B of ToLCNDV. Our data suggest that the monopartite begomovirus associated with okra yellow vein disease has captured DNA-B of ToLCNDV to infect okra. Widespread distribution of the complex shows the increasing trend of the capturing of DNA-B of ToLCNDV by monopartite begomoviruses in the Indian subcontinent. The recombination analysis showed that the DNA-A might have been derived from the inter-specific recombination of begomoviruses, while DNA-B was derived from the ToLCNDV infecting different hosts. PMID:26104329

  9. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-01-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. ‘Sorok’, ‘Sodam’ and ‘Somyeong’. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1–100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  10. First Report of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolated from Wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Jeong, Rae-Dong; Kwak, Hae-Ryun; Lee, Su-Heon; Kim, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cha, Byeongjin; Choi, Hong-Soo

    2014-06-01

    A viral disease causing severe mosaic, necrotic, and yellow symptoms on Vigna angularis var. nipponensis was prevalent around Suwon area in Korea. The causal virus was characterized as Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) on the basis of biological and nucleotide sequence properties of RNAs 1, 2 and 3 and named as CMV-wVa. CMV-wVa isolate caused mosaic symptoms on indicator plants, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi-nc, Petunia hybrida, and Cucumis sativus. Strikingly, CMV-wVa induced severe mosaic and malformation on Cucurbita pepo, and Solanum lycopersicum. Moreover, it caused necrotic or mosaic symptoms on V. angularis and V. radiate of Fabaceae. Symptoms of necrotic local or pin point were observed on inoculated leaves of V. unguiculata, Vicia fava, Pisum sativum and Phaseolus vulgaris. However, CMV-wVa isolate failed to infect in Glycine max cvs. 'Sorok', 'Sodam' and 'Somyeong'. To assess genetic variation between CMV-wVa and the other known CMV isolates, phylogenetic analysis using 16 complete nucleotide sequences of CMV RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 including CMV-wVa was performed. CMV-wVa was more closely related to CMV isolates belonging to CMV subgroup I showing about 85.1-100% nucleotide sequences identity to those of subgroup I isolates. This is the first report of CMV as the causal virus infecting wild Vigna angularis var. nipponensis in Korea. PMID:25289004

  11. Contact transmission of Tobacco mosaic virus: a quantitative analysis of parameters relevant for virus evolution.

    PubMed

    Sacristán, Soledad; Díaz, Maira; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2011-05-01

    Transmission between hosts is required for the maintenance of parasites in the host population and determines their ultimate evolutionary success. The transmission ability of parasites conditions their evolution in two ways: on one side, it affects the genetic structure of founded populations in new hosts. On the other side, parasite traits that increase transmission efficiency will be selected for. Therefore, knowledge of the factors and parameters that determine transmission efficiency is critical to predict the evolution of parasites. For plant viruses, little is known about the parameters of contact transmission, a major way of transmission of important virus genera and species. Here, we analyze the factors determining the efficiency of contact transmission of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) that may affect virus evolution. As it has been reported for other modes of transmission, the rate of TMV transmission by contact depended on the contact opportunities between an infected and a noninfected host. However, TMV contact transmission differed from other modes of transmission, in that a positive correlation between the virus titer in the source leaf and the rate of transmission was not found within the range of our experimental conditions. Other factors associated with the nature of the source leaf, such as leaf age and the way in which it was infected, had an effect on the rate of transmission. Importantly, contact transmission resulted in severe bottlenecks, which did not depend on the host susceptibility to infection. Interestingly, the effective number of founders initiating the infection of a new host was highly similar to that reported for aphid-transmitted plant viruses, suggesting that this trait has evolved to an optimum value. PMID:21367909

  12. Nucleotide sequence and phylogenetic analysis of a new potexvirus: Malva mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Côté, Fabien; Paré, Christine; Majeau, Nathalie; Bolduc, Marilène; Leblanc, Eric; Bergeron, Michel G; Bernardy, Michael G; Leclerc, Denis

    2008-01-01

    A filamentous virus isolated from Malva neglecta Wallr. (common mallow) and propagated in Chenopodium quinoa was grown, cloned and the complete nucleotide sequence was determined (GenBank accession # DQ660333). The genomic RNA is 6858 nt in length and contains five major open reading frames (ORFs). The genomic organization is similar to members and the viral encoded proteins shared homology with the group of the Potexvirus genus in the Flexiviridae family. Phylogenetic analysis revealed a close relationship with narcissus mosaic virus (NMV), scallion virus X (ScaVX) and, to a lesser extent, to Alstroemeria virus X (AlsVX) and pepino mosaic virus (PepMV). A novel putative pseudoknot structure is predicted in the 3'-UTR of a subgroup of potexviruses, including this newly described virus. The consensus GAAAA sequence is detected at the 5'-end of the genomic RNA and experimental data strongly suggest that this motif could be a distinctive hallmark of this genus. The name Malva mosaic virus is proposed. PMID:18054524

  13. Soil-borne wheat mosaic virus infectious clone and manipulation for gene-carrying capacity.

    PubMed

    Jarugula, Sridhar; Charlesworth, Steven R; Qu, Feng; Stewart, Lucy R

    2016-08-01

    A full-length infectious cDNA clone of soil-borne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV; genus Furovirus; family Virgaviridae) was developed for agrobacterium delivery. The cloned virus can be agroinfiltrated to Nicotiana benthamiana for subsequent infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum, L.). The utility of the virus as a vector for gene silencing and expression was assessed through sequence insertions in multiple sites of RNA2. Virus-induced photobleaching was observed in N. benthamiana but not in wheat, despite the stability of the inserts. The SBWMV infectious clone can be used for further studies to investigate the biology of SBWMV through mutagenesis. PMID:27236459

  14. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea. PMID:26823577

  15. Interaction of elongation factor 1 with aminoacylated brome mosaic virus and tRNA's.

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, M; Hall, T C

    1976-01-01

    Tyrosylated Brome mosaic virus RNA was found to interact with a binary complex of wheat germ, elongation factor 1 and [3H]GTP. Increasing amounts of the aminoacylated viral RNA proportionately reduced radioactivity bound to a nitrocellulose filter, as has previously been noted by others for the charged forms of tobacco mosaic virus, turnip yellow mosaic virus, and tRNA's. However, Sephadex chromatography of the products showed that instead of forming the ternary complex elongation factor-GTP-aminoacyl RNA, the viral RNA caused release of GTP from its complex with elongation factor. Acetylated tyrosyl Brome mosaic virus RNA did not react with the binary complex,and only a slight degree, if any, of stabilization of tyrosine bound to viral RNA was observed after interaction with elongation factor 1. Although such interactions are similar to the reaction of elongation factor with aminoacyl-tRNA , the release of GTP is different and accentuates the possible role for aminoacylation in transcription rather than in translation events. PMID:978788

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In

    2016-01-01

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates. PMID:27516509

  17. Resistance to Wheat streak mosaic virus identified in synthetic wheat lines

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is a significant pathogen in wheat that causes economic loss each year. WSMV is typically controlled using cultural practices such as the removal of volunteer wheat. Genetic resistance is limited. Until recently, no varieties have been available with major resista...

  18. Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of squash mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of a novel genotype of Squash mosaic virus (SqMV) infecting squash plants in Spain was obtained using deep sequencing of small ribonucleic acids and assembly. The low nucleotide sequence identities, with 87-88% on RNA1 and 84-86% on RNA2 to known SqMV isolates, suggest a new...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing. PMID:27609926

  20. Complete Genome Sequence of Alternanthera mosaic virus, Isolated from Achyranthes bidentata in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Iwabuchi, Nozomu; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yusa, Akira; Nishida, Shuko; Tanno, Kazuyuki; Keima, Takuya; Nijo, Takamichi; Yamaji, Yasuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) infecting Achyranthes bidentata was first detected in Asia, and the complete genome sequence (6,604 nucleotides) was determined. Sequence identity analysis and phylogenetic analysis confirmed that this isolate is the most phylogenetically distant AltMV isolate worldwide. PMID:26988034

  1. A novel cassava-infecting begomovirus from Madagascar: cassava mosaic Madagascar virus.

    PubMed

    Harimalala, Mireille; Lefeuvre, Pierre; De Bruyn, Alexandre; Tiendrébéogo, Fidèle; Hoareau, Murielle; Villemot, Julie; Ranomenjanahary, Sahondramalala; Andrianjaka, Alice; Reynaud, Bernard; Lett, Jean-Michel

    2012-10-01

    Cassava mosaic geminiviruses (CMGs) are implicated in cassava mosaic disease (CMD), the main constraint to cassava production in Africa. Here, we report the complete nucleotide sequences of the DNA-A and DNA-B of a newly characterized CMG found infecting cassava in Madagascar, for which we propose the tentative name cassava mosaic Madagascar virus. With the exception of two recombinant regions that resembled a CMG, we determined that the non-recombinant part of the DNA-A component is distantly related to the other CMGs. Whereas the DNA-B component possesses one recombinant region originating from an unidentified virus, the rest of the genome was seen to be closely related to members of the species East African cassava mosaic Zanzibar virus (EACMZV). Phylogenetic analysis based on complete genome sequences demonstrated that DNA-A and DNA-B components are outliers related to the clade of EACMV-like viruses and that DNA-A is related to the monopartite tomato leaf curl begomoviruses described in islands in the south-west Indian Ocean.

  2. USVL-370, A zucchini yellow mosaic virus resistant watermelon breeding line

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We report the development of a novel watermelon line ‘USVL-370’ [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] containing resistance to the zucchini yellow mosaic virus-Florida strain (ZYMV-FL). This breeding line is homozygous for the recessive eukaryotic elongation factor eIF4E allele associated wit...

  3. Surprising results from a search for effective disinfectants for Tobacco mosaic virus-contaminated tools

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and four other tobamoviruses infected multiple petunia cultivars without producing obvious viral symptoms. A single cutting event on a TMV-infected plant was sufficient for transmission to many plants subsequently cut with the same clippers. A number of 'old standbys' an...

  4. First report of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus infecting greenhouse cucumber in Canada

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), in the genus Tobamovirus and family Virgaviridae, is a seed-borne pathogen on cucurbits. In early 2013, serious viral disease outbreaks on greenhouse cucumber crops were experienced by greenhouse vegetable growers in Alberta, Canada. CGMMV was detected i...

  5. Gladiolus plants transformed with single-chain variable fragment antibodies to Cucumber mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transgenic plants of Gladiolus ‘Peter Pears’ or ‘Jenny Lee’ were developed that contain single-chain variable fragments (scFv) to Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) subgroup I or II. The CMV subgroup I heavy and light chain scFv fragments were placed under control of either the duplicated CaMV 35S or suga...

  6. Genetic diversity, host range and disease resistance to the emerging Tomato mottle mosaic virus on tomato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since its first discovery in 2013 in Mexico, Tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV), a new tomato-infecting tobamovirus is now present in a number of countries (i.e., Brazil, China, and Israel) and several states in the U.S. There is little information available on the molecular and biological properti...

  7. Population Structure of Blueberry Mosaic Associated Virus: Evidence of Genetic Exchange in Geographically Distinct Isolates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The population structure of blueberry mosaic associated virus (BlMaV), a putative member of the family Ophioviridae, was examined using 59 isolates collected from North America and Slovenia. The studied isolates displayed low genetic diversity in the movement and nucleoprotein regions and low ratios...

  8. Sources of Resistance to Pepino Mosaic Virus in Solanum habrochaites (Lycopersicon hirsutum)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging disease on greenhouse tomato. A major tomato germplasm core collection was evaluated for its resistance against PepMV. These accessions included 23 Solanum lycopersicum L., 8 S. pimpinellifolium L., 33 S. peruvianum L., 18 S. chilense (Dunal) Reiche, and ...

  9. Complete genome sequence of a divergent strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus from China

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A novel strain of Japanese yam mosaic virus (JYMV-CN) was identified in a yam plant with foliar mottle symptoms in China. The complete genomic sequence of JYMV-CN was determined. Its genomic sequence of 9701 nucleotides encodes a polyprotein of 3247 amino acids. Its organization was virtually identi...

  10. Study and Characterization of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Head-to-tail Assembly Assisted by Aniline Polymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Niu,Z.; Bruckman, M.; Kotakadi, V.; He, J.; Emrick, T.; Russell, T.; Yang, L.; Wang, Q.

    2006-01-01

    One-dimensional composite nanofibres with narrow dispersity, high aspect ratio and high processibility have been fabricated by head-to-tail self-assembly of rod-like tobacco mosaic virus assisted by aniline polymerization, which can promote many potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing and biomedical engineering.

  11. Complete Genome Sequence of Rehmannia Mosaic Virus Infecting Rehmannia glutinosa in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Yoo, Ran Hee; Igori, Davaajargal; Jeong, Jae Cheol; Lee, Haeng-Soon; Kwak, Sang-Soo; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-28

    The complete genome sequence of a South Korean isolate of Rehmannia mosaic virus (ReMV) infecting Rehmannia glutinosa was determined through next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a natural infection of R. glutinosa by ReMV in South Korea.

  12. Complete genome sequence of a tomato infecting tomato mottle mosaic virus in New York

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Complete genome sequence of an emerging isolate of tomato mottle mosaic virus (ToMMV) infecting experimental nicotianan benthamiana plants in up-state New York was obtained using small RNA deep sequencing. ToMMV_NY-13 shared 99% sequence identity to ToMMV isolates from Mexico and Florida. Broader d...

  13. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. Here, we report the transcriptional respo...

  14. First complete genome sequence of an emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus isolate in North America

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genome sequence (6,423 nt) of an emerging Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolate on cucumber in North America was determined through deep sequencing of sRNA and rapid amplification of cDNA ends. It shares 99% nucleotide sequence identity to the Asian genotype, but only 90% t...

  15. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom

    2016-01-01

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing. PMID:27609926

  16. Complete Genome Sequence of Ornithogalum Mosaic Virus Infecting Gladiolus spp. in South Korea.

    PubMed

    Cho, Sang-Yun; Lim, Seungmo; Kim, Hongsup; Yi, Seung-In; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-11

    We report here the first complete genome sequence of Ornithogalum mosaic virus (OrMV) isolated from Taean, South Korea, in 2011, which was obtained by next-generation sequencing and Sanger sequencing. The sequence information provided here may serve as a potential reference for other OrMV isolates.

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of a South Korean Isolate of Habenaria mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Igori, Davaajargal; Lim, Seungmo; Zhao, Fumei; Baek, Dasom; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-09-08

    Habenaria mosaic virus (HaMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae, was first discovered from Habenaria radiata in Japan. The complete genomic sequence of a South Korean isolate (PA1) of HaMV infecting Plantago asiatica L. was determined with high-throughput RNA sequencing.

  18. Sources of Resistance to Zucchini Yellow Mosaic Virus in Lagenaria Siceraria Germplasm

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One hundred ninety United States Plant Introductions (PIs) of bottlegourd, Lagenaria siceraria (Mol.) Standl., were evaluated for their resistance against the Florida strain of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV-FL). Two-week old seedlings were mechanically inoculated on cotyledons and the first tr...

  19. Physiological responses of hard red winter wheat to infection by wheat streak mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) causes significant yield loss in hard red winter wheat in the U.S. Southern High Plains. Despite the prevalence of this pathogen, little is known about the physiological response of wheat to WSMV infection. A 2-year study was initiated to (i) investigate the effect o...

  20. Intracellular delivery of antibodies by chimeric Sesbania mosaic virus (SeMV) virus like particles

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, Ambily; Natraj, Usha; Karande, Anjali A.; Gulati, Ashutosh; Murthy, Mathur R. N.; Murugesan, Sathyabalan; Mukunda, Pavithra; Savithri, Handanahal S.

    2016-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of antibodies has not been fully exploited as they fail to cross cell membrane. In this article, we have tested the possibility of using plant virus based nanoparticles for intracellular delivery of antibodies. For this purpose, Sesbania mosaic virus coat protein (CP) was genetically engineered with the B domain of Staphylococcus aureus protein A (SpA) at the βH-βI loop, to generate SeMV loop B (SLB), which self-assembled to virus like particles (VLPs) with 43 times higher affinity towards antibodies. CP and SLB could internalize into various types of mammalian cells and SLB could efficiently deliver three different monoclonal antibodies–D6F10 (targeting abrin), anti-α-tubulin (targeting intracellular tubulin) and Herclon (against HER2 receptor) inside the cells. Such a mode of delivery was much more effective than antibodies alone treatment. These results highlight the potential of SLB as a universal nanocarrier for intracellular delivery of antibodies. PMID:26905902

  1. Replication and packaging of Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNA containing Flock house virus RNA1 sequence.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Bae; Kim, Do-Yeong; Cho, Tae-Ju

    2014-06-01

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) is a spherical plant virus that has a single 6.3 kb positive strand RNA as a genome. In this study, RNA1 sequence of Flock house virus (FHV) was inserted into the TYMV genome to test whether TYMV can accommodate and express another viral entity. In the resulting construct, designated TY-FHV, the FHV RNA1 sequence was expressed as a TYMV subgenomic RNA. Northern analysis of the Nicotiana benthamiana leaves agroinfiltrated with the TY-FHV showed that both genomic and subgenomic FHV RNAs were abundantly produced. This indicates that the FHV RNA1 sequence was correctly expressed and translated to produce a functional FHV replicase. Although these FHV RNAs were not encapsidated, the FHV RNA having a TYMV CP sequence at the 3'-end was efficiently encapsidated. When an eGFP gene was inserted into the B2 ORF of the FHV sequence, a fusion protein of B2-eGFP was produced as expected.

  2. Dissection of Cauliflower Mosaic Virus Transactivator/Viroplasmin Reveals Distinct Essential Functions in Basic Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kappei; Hohn, Thomas

    2003-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) transactivator/viroplasmin (Tav) is an essential multifunctional viral protein. Dissection of Tav by deletion mutagenesis revealed that the central region is essential for CaMV replication in single cells but that the N- and C-terminal parts are not. Strains with mutations in the central region were defective in the translational transactivator function and could be complemented by coexpressing Gag (capsid protein precursor) and Pol (polyprotein with protease, reverse transcriptase, and RNase H activity) from separate monocistronic plasmids. In contrast, total omission of Tav was only partially complemented by Gag and Pol overexpression from separate plasmids. These results indicate that CaMV basic replication requires both Tav-activated polycistronic translation and some posttranslational function(s) of Tav that is not affected by the deletions in the central region of Tav. PMID:12857928

  3. Mosaic protein and nucleic acid vaccines against hepatitis C virus

    SciTech Connect

    Yusim, Karina; Korber, Bette T. M.; Kuiken, Carla L.; Fischer, William M.

    2013-06-11

    The invention relates to immunogenic compositions useful as HCV vaccines. Provided are HCV mosaic polypeptide and nucleic acid compositions which provide higher levels of T-cell epitope coverage while minimizing the occurrence of unnatural and rare epitopes compared to natural HCV polypeptides and consensus HCV sequences.

  4. Association of a distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite with yellow vein mosaic disease of hollyhock (Alcea rosea) in India.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Kumar, S; Raj, S K; Pande, S S

    2014-10-01

    A distinct strain of hollyhock yellow vein mosaic virus (HoYVMV) and Ludwigia leaf distortion betasatellite (LuLDB) were associated with yellow vein mosaic of hollyhock. The viral DNA genome (JQ911766) and betasatellite (JQ408216) shared highest nucleotide sequence identity (89.2 %) with HoYVMV (the only available sequence in GenBank) and 92 % identity with LuLDB. Agroinfiltration of HoYVMV and LuLDB induced yellow vein mosaic symptoms on hollyhock, thereby demonstrating causality of the disease.

  5. Identification of distinct functions of Wheat streak mosaic virus coat protein in virion assembly and virus movement

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the type member of Tritimovirus genus of the family Potyviridae. The WSMV coat protein (CP) was subjected to point and deletion mutation analyses. WSMV mutants changing aspartic acid residues at amino acid (aa) positions 289, 290, 326, 333, and 334 to alanine elic...

  6. First report of Potato virus V and Peru tomato mosaic virus on tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) orchards of Ecuador

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In Ecuador, tamarillo (Solanum betaceum) represents an important cash crop for hundreds of small farmers. In 2013, leaves from tamarillo plants showing severe virus-like symptoms (mosaic, mottling and leaf deformation) were collected from old orchards in Pichincha and Tungurahua. Double-stranded RN...

  7. The complete nucleotide sequence and genome organization of pea streak virus (genus Carlavirus).

    PubMed

    Su, Li; Li, Zhengnan; Bernardy, Mike; Wiersma, Paul A; Cheng, Zhihui; Xiang, Yu

    2015-10-01

    Pea streak virus (PeSV) is a member of the genus Carlavirus in the family Betaflexiviridae. Here, the first complete genome sequence of PeSV was determined by deep sequencing of a cDNA library constructed from dsRNA extracted from a PeSV-infected sample and Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends (RACE) PCR. The PeSV genome consists of 8041 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains six open reading frames (ORFs). The putative peptide encoded by the PeSV ORF6 has an estimated molecular mass of 6.6 kDa and shows no similarity to any known proteins. This differs from typical carlaviruses, whose ORF6 encodes a 12- to 18-kDa cysteine-rich nucleic-acid-binding protein.

  8. Expressing a whitefly GroEL protein in Nicotiana benthamiana plants confers tolerance to tomato yellow leaf curl virus and cucumber mosaic virus, but not to grapevine virus A or tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Edelbaum, Dagan; Gorovits, Rena; Sasaki, Sonoko; Ikegami, Masato; Czosnek, Henryk

    2009-01-01

    Transgenesis offers many ways to obtain virus-resistant plants. However, in most cases resistance is against a single virus or viral strain. We have taken a novel approach based on the ability of a whitefly endosymbiotic GroEL to bind viruses belonging to several genera, in vivo and in vitro. We have expressed the GroEL gene in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, postulating that upon virus inoculation, GroEL will bind to virions, thereby interfering with pathogenesis. The transgenic plants were inoculated with the begomovirus tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) and the cucumovirus cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), both of which interacted with GroEL in vitro, and with the trichovirus grapevine virus A (GVA) and the tobamovirus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), which did not. While the transgenic plants inoculated with TYLCV and CMV presented a high level of tolerance, those inoculated with GVA and TMV were susceptible. The amounts of virus in tolerant transgenic plants was lower by three orders of magnitude than those in non-transgenic plants; in comparison, the amounts of virus in susceptible transgenic plants were similar to those in non-transgenic plants. Leaf extracts of the tolerant plants contained GroEL-virus complexes. Hence, tolerance was correlated with trapping of viruses in planta. This study demonstrated that multiple resistances to viruses belonging to several different taxonomic genera could be achieved. Moreover, it might be hypothesized that plants expressing GroEL will be tolerant to those viruses that bind to GroEL in vitro, such as members of the genera Begomovirus, Cucumovirus, Ilarvirus, Luteovirus, and Tospovirus. PMID:19184338

  9. A bench-scale, cost effective and simple method to elicit Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus attack using ozone-mediated inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum.

    PubMed

    Sudhakar, N; Nagendra-Prasad, D; Mohan, N; Murugesan, K

    2007-12-01

    Studies were undertaken to evaluate ozone for inactivation of Cucumber mosaic virus present in the inoculum and to stimulate Lycopersicon esculentum cv. PKM1 (tomato) plants against Cucumber mosaic virus infection by using the inactivated Cucumber mosaic virus inoculum. Application of a T(4) (0.4mg/l) concentration of ozone to the inoculum containing Cucumber mosaic virus resulted in complete inactivation of the virus. The inactivated viral inoculum was mixed with a penetrator (delivery agent), referred to as T(4) preparation, and it was evaluated for the development of systemic acquired resistance in the tomato plants. Application of a T(4) preparation 5 days before inoculation with the Cucumber mosaic virus protected tomato plants from the effects of Cucumber mosaic virus. Among the components of the inactivated virus tested, coat protein subunits and aggregates were responsible for the acquired resistance in tomato plants. In field trials, the results of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay revealed that, Cucumber mosaic virus accumulation was significantly less for all the test plants (16%) sprayed with the T(4) preparation than untreated control plants (89.5%) at 28 days postinoculation (dpi). A remarkable increase in the activities of the total soluble phenolics (10-fold) and salicylic acid (16-fold) was detected 5 days after the treatment in foliar extracts of test plants relative to untreated control plants. The results showed that treatment of tomato plants with inactivated viral inoculum led to a significant enhancement of protection against Cucumber mosaic virus attack in a manner that mimics a real pathogen and induces systemic acquired resistance.

  10. Classification of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) infected watermelon seeds using Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hoonsoo; Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Cho, Byoung-Kwan

    2016-05-01

    The Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus (CGMMV) is a globally distributed plant virus. CGMMV-infected plants exhibit severe mosaic symptoms, discoloration, and deformation. Therefore, rapid and early detection of CGMMV infected seeds is very important for preventing disease damage and yield losses. Raman spectroscopy was investigated in this study as a potential tool for rapid, accurate, and nondestructive detection of infected seeds. Raman spectra of healthy and infected seeds were acquired in the 400 cm-1 to 1800 cm-1 wavenumber range and an algorithm based on partial least-squares discriminant analysis was developed to classify infected and healthy seeds. The classification model's accuracies for calibration and prediction data sets were 100% and 86%, respectively. Results showed that the Raman spectroscopic technique has good potential for nondestructive detection of virus-infected seeds.

  11. Controlled immobilisation of active enzymes on the cowpea mosaic virus capsid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aljabali, Alaa A. A.; Barclay, J. Elaine; Steinmetz, Nicole F.; Lomonossoff, George P.; Evans, David J.

    2012-08-01

    Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors.Immobilisation of horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and glucose oxidase (GOX) via covalent attachment of modified enzyme carbohydrate to the exterior of the cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) capsid gave high retention of enzymatic activity. The number of enzymes bound per virus was determined to be about eleven for HRP and 2-3 for GOX. This illustrates that relatively large biomacromolecules can be readily coupled to the virus surface using simple conjugation strategies. Virus-biomacromolecule hybrids have great potential for uses in catalysis, diagnostic assays or biosensors. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Alternative conjugation strategies, agarose gel electrophoresis of CPMV and CPMV-HRP conjugates, UV-vis spectrum of HRP-ADHCPMV, agarose gel electrophoresis of GOX-ADHCPMV particles and corresponding TEM image, calibration curves for HRP-ADHCPMV and GOX-ADHCPMV, DLS data for GOX-ADHCPMV are made available. See DOI: 10.1039/c2nr31485a

  12. Deep sequencing of dsRNAs recovered from mosaic-diseased pigeonpea reveals the presence of a novel emaravirus: pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2015-08-01

    Deep-sequencing analysis of double-stranded RNA extracted from a mosaic-diseased pigeonpea plant (Cajanus cajan L., family Fabaceae) revealed the complete sequence of six emaravirus-like negative-sense RNA segments of 7009, 2229, 1335, 1491, 1833 and 1194 nucleotides in size. In the order from RNA1 to RNA6, these genomic RNAs contained ORFs coding for the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp, p1 of 266 kDa), the glycoprotein precursor (GP, p2 of 74.5 kDa), the nucleocapsid (NC, p3 of 34.9 kDa), and the putative movement protein (MP, p4 of 40.7 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) and p6 (27 kDa) had unknown functions. All RNA segments showed distant relationships to viruses of the genus Emaravirus, and in particular to pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), with which they shared nucleotide sequence identity ranging from 48.5 % (RNA3) to 62.5 % (RNA1). In phylogenetic trees constructed from the sequences of the proteins encoded by RNA1, RNA2 and RNA3 (p1, p2 and p3), this new viral entity showed a consistent grouping with fig mosaic virus (FMV) and rose rosette virus (RRV), which formed a cluster of their own, clearly distinct from PPSMV-1. In experimental greenhouse trials, this novel virus was successfully transmitted to pigeonpea and French bean seedlings by the eriophyid mite Aceria cajani. Preliminary surveys conducted in the Hyderabad region (India) showed that the virus in question is widespread in pigeonpea plants affected by sterility mosaic disease (86.4 %) but is absent in symptomless plants. Based on molecular, biological and epidemiological features, this novel virus is the second emaravirus infecting pigeonpea, for which the provisional name pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus 2 (PPSMV-2) is proposed. PMID:26060057

  13. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-01

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed. PMID:27021160

  14. Nanoparticle Encapsidation of Flock House Virus by Auto Assembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Payal D.; Mallajosyula, Jyothi K.; Lee, Gloria; Thi, Phillip; Zhou, Yiyang; Kearney, Christopher M.; McCormick, Alison A.

    2014-01-01

    Tobacco Mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein is well known for its ability to self-assemble into supramolecular nanoparticles, either as protein discs or as rods originating from the ~300 bp genomic RNA origin-of-assembly (OA). We have utilized TMV self-assembly characteristics to create a novel Flock House virus (FHV) RNA nanoparticle. FHV encodes a viral polymerase supporting autonomous replication of the FHV genome, which makes it an attractive candidate for viral transgene expression studies and targeted RNA delivery into host cells. However, FHV viral genome size is strictly limited by native FHV capsid. To determine if this packaging restriction could be eliminated, FHV was adapted to express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), to allow for monitoring of functional FHV RNA activity. Then TMV OA was introduced in six 3' insertion sites, with only site one supporting functional FHV GFP expression. To create nanoparticles, FHV GFP-OA modified genomic RNA was mixed in vitro with TMV coat protein and monitored for encapsidation by agarose electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The production of TMV-like rod shaped nanoparticles indicated that modified FHV RNA can be encapsidated by purified TMV coat protein by self-assembly. This is the first demonstration of replication-independent packaging of the FHV genome by protein self-assembly. PMID:25318056

  15. Nanoparticle encapsidation of Flock house virus by auto assembly of Tobacco mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed

    Maharaj, Payal D; Mallajosyula, Jyothi K; Lee, Gloria; Thi, Phillip; Zhou, Yiyang; Kearney, Christopher M; McCormick, Alison A

    2014-10-14

    Tobacco Mosaic virus (TMV) coat protein is well known for its ability to self-assemble into supramolecular nanoparticles, either as protein discs or as rods originating from the ~300 bp genomic RNA origin-of-assembly (OA). We have utilized TMV self-assembly characteristics to create a novel Flock House virus (FHV) RNA nanoparticle. FHV encodes a viral polymerase supporting autonomous replication of the FHV genome, which makes it an attractive candidate for viral transgene expression studies and targeted RNA delivery into host cells. However, FHV viral genome size is strictly limited by native FHV capsid. To determine if this packaging restriction could be eliminated, FHV was adapted to express enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP), to allow for monitoring of functional FHV RNA activity. Then TMV OA was introduced in six 3' insertion sites, with only site one supporting functional FHV GFP expression. To create nanoparticles, FHV GFP-OA modified genomic RNA was mixed in vitro with TMV coat protein and monitored for encapsidation by agarose electrophoresis and electron microscopy. The production of TMV-like rod shaped nanoparticles indicated that modified FHV RNA can be encapsidated by purified TMV coat protein by self-assembly. This is the first demonstration of replication-independent packaging of the FHV genome by protein self-assembly.

  16. Crystal Structure and Proteomics Analysis of Empty Virus-like Particles of Cowpea Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Huynh, Nhung T; Hesketh, Emma L; Saxena, Pooja; Meshcheriakova, Yulia; Ku, You-Chan; Hoang, Linh T; Johnson, John E; Ranson, Neil A; Lomonossoff, George P; Reddy, Vijay S

    2016-04-01

    Empty virus-like particles (eVLPs) of Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) are currently being utilized as reagents in various biomedical and nanotechnology applications. Here, we report the crystal structure of CPMV eVLPs determined using X-ray crystallography at 2.3 Å resolution and compare it with previously reported cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) of eVLPs and virion crystal structures. Although the X-ray and cryo-EM structures of eVLPs are mostly similar, there exist significant differences at the C terminus of the small (S) subunit. The intact C terminus of the S subunit plays a critical role in enabling the efficient assembly of CPMV virions and eVLPs, but undergoes proteolysis after particle formation. In addition, we report the results of mass spectrometry-based proteomics analysis of coat protein subunits from CPMV eVLPs and virions that identify the C termini of S subunits undergo proteolytic cleavages at multiple sites instead of a single cleavage site as previously observed.

  17. In planta cloning of geminiviral DNA: the true Sida micrantha mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jeske, Holger; Gotthardt, Diether; Kober, Sigrid

    2010-02-01

    The circular single-stranded DNAs of geminiviruses are multiplied efficiently and preferentially by rolling circle amplification (RCA), and can be diagnosed readily by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and direct sequencing of the RCA product. Two strategies are described for cloning geminiviruses from plants harboring mixed infections by using RCA and RFLP with plant-derived nucleic acids without the need for bacterial amplification. By combining both these approaches, the true Sida micrantha mosaic virus was identified. The advantages of maintaining the quasispecies nature of a virus during in planta cloning is discussed with respect to reliable virus identification and resistance breeding.

  18. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  19. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and rapid genotype identification using loop-mediated isothermal amplification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU genotype ...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1279 - Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Zucchini yellow mosaic virus-weak strain; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1279 Section 180.1279 Protection of... PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1279 Zucchini yellow mosaic...

  4. The Structure of Cucumber Mosaic Virus and Comparison to Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Thomas J.; Chase, Elaine; Schmidt, Timothy; Perry, Keith L.

    2000-01-01

    The structure of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV; strain Fny) has been determined to a 3.2-Å resolution using X-ray crystallography. Despite the fact that CMV has only 19% capsid protein sequence identity (34% similarity) to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV), the core structures of these two members of the Bromoviridae family are highly homologous. As suggested by a previous low-resolution structural study, the 305-Å diameter (maximum) of CMV is ∼12 Å larger than that of CCMV. In CCMV, the structures of the A, B, and C subunits are nearly identical except in their N termini. In contrast, the structures of two loops in subunit A of CMV differ from those in B and C. These loops are 6 and 7 residues longer than the analogous regions in CCMV. Unlike that of CCMV, the capsid of CMV does not undergo swelling at pH 7.0 and is stable at pH 9.0. This may be partly due to the fact that the N termini of the B and C subunits form a unique bundle of six amphipathic helices oriented down into the virion core at the threefold axes. In addition, while CCMV has a cluster of aspartic acid residues at the quasi-threefold axis that are proposed to bind metal in a pH-dependent manner, this cluster is replaced by complementing acids and bases in CMV. Finally, this structure clearly demonstrates that the residues important for aphid transmission lie at the outermost portion of the βH-βI loop and yields details of the portions of the virus that are hypothesized to mediate binding to aphid mouthparts. PMID:10906212

  5. An electrochemical sensor for selective TNT sensing based on Tobacco mosaic virus-like particle binding agents.

    PubMed

    Zang, Faheng; Gerasopoulos, Konstantinos; Fan, Xiao Zhu; Brown, Adam D; Culver, James N; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a selective differential sensing method based on diffusion modulation of the target molecules through suspended Tobacco mosaic virus-like particles modified with binding peptides for TNT sensing in solution.

  6. The genomes of four novel begomoviruses and a new Sida micrantha mosaic virus strain from Bolivian weeds.

    PubMed

    Wyant, Patrícia Soares; Gotthardt, Diether; Schäfer, Benjamin; Krenz, Björn; Jeske, Holger

    2011-02-01

    Begomovirus is the largest genus within the family Geminiviridae and includes economically important plant DNA viruses infecting a broad range of plant species and causing devastating crop diseases, mainly in subtropical and tropical countries. Besides cultivated plants, many weeds act as virus reservoirs. Eight begomovirus isolates from Bolivian weeds were examined using rolling-circle amplification (RCA) and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). An efficient, novel cloning strategy using limited Sau3A digestion to obtain tandem-repeat inserts allowed the sequencing of the complete genomes. The viruses were classified by phylogenetic analysis as typical bipartite New World begomoviruses. Four of them represented distinct new virus species, for which the names Solanum mosaic Bolivia virus, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 1, Sida mosaic Bolivia virus 2, and Abutilon mosaic Bolivia virus are proposed. Three were variants of a new strain of Sida micrantha mosaic virus (SimMV), SimMV-rho[BoVi07], SimMV-rho[Bo:CF1:07] and SimMV-rho[Bo:CF2:07], and one was a new variant of a previously described SimMV, SimMV-MGS2:07-Bo.

  7. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus.

  8. The first complete genome sequence of iris severe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongqiang; Deng, Congliang; Shang, Qiaoxia; Zhao, Xiaoli; Liu, Xingliang; Zhou, Qi

    2016-04-01

    The first complete genome sequence of ISMV was determined by deep sequencing of a small RNA library constructed from ISMV-infected samples and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) PCR. The ISMV genome consists of 10,403 nucleotides excluding the poly(A) tail and contains a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3316 amino acids. Putative proteolytic cleavage sites were identified by BLAST analysis. The ISMV polyprotein showed highest amino acid sequence identity to that encoded by onion yellow dwarf virus. Phylogenetic analysis of the polyprotein amino acid sequence confirmed that ISMV forms a cluster with shallot yellow stripe virus, Cyrtanthus elatus virus A, narcissus degeneration virus and onion yellow dwarf virus. These results confirm that ISMV is a distinct member of the genus Potyvirus. PMID:26729478

  9. Broad Protection against Avian Influenza Virus by Using a Modified Vaccinia Ankara Virus Expressing a Mosaic Hemagglutinin Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K.; Goldberg, Tony L.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. IMPORTANCE Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. PMID:25210173

  10. Comparative analysis of chrysanthemum transcriptome in response to three RNA viruses: Cucumber mosaic virus, Tomato spotted wilt virus and Potato virus X.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoseong; Jo, Yeonhwa; Lian, Sen; Jo, Kyoung-Min; Chu, Hyosub; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Seung-Kook; Kim, Kook-Hyung; Cho, Won Kyong

    2015-06-01

    The chrysanthemum is one of popular flowers in the world and a host for several viruses. So far, molecular interaction studies between the chrysanthemum and viruses are limited. In this study, we carried out a transcriptome analysis of chrysanthemum in response to three different viruses including Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV) and Potato virus X (PVX). A chrysanthemum 135K microarray derived from expressed sequence tags was successfully applied for the expression profiles of the chrysanthemum at early stage of virus infection. Finally, we identified a total of 125, 70 and 124 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) for CMV, TSWV and PVX, respectively. Many DEGs were virus specific; however, 33 DEGs were commonly regulated by three viruses. Gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis identified a total of 132 GO terms, and of them, six GO terms related stress response and MCM complex were commonly identified for three viruses. Several genes functioning in stress response such as chitin response and ethylene mediated signaling pathway were up-regulated indicating their involvement in establishment of host immune system. In particular, TSWV infection significantly down-regulated genes related to DNA metabolic process including DNA replication, chromatin organization, histone modification and cytokinesis, and they are mostly targeted to nucleosome and MCM complex. Taken together, our comparative transcriptome analysis revealed several genes related to hormone mediated viral stress response and DNA modification. The identified chrysanthemums genes could be good candidates for further functional study associated with resistant to various plant viruses.

  11. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease. PMID:22888800

  12. Cofolding Organizes Alfalfa Mosaic Virus RNA and Coat Protein for Replication

    PubMed Central

    Guogas, Laura M.; Filman, David J.; Hogle, James M.; Gehrke, Lee

    2006-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus genomic RNAs are infectious only when the viral coat protein binds to the RNA 3´ termini. The crystal structure of an alfalfa mosaic virus RNA-peptide complex reveals that conserved AUGC repeats and Pro-Thr-x-Arg-Ser-x-x-Tyr coat protein amino acids cofold upon interacting. Alternating AUGC residues have opposite orientation, and they base pair in different adjacent duplexes. Localized RNA backbone reversals stabilized by arginine-guanine interactions place the adenosines and guanines in reverse order in the duplex. The results suggest that a uniform, organized 3´ conformation, similar to that found on viral RNAs with transfer RNA-like ends, may be essential for replication. PMID:15604410

  13. Expression, purification and molecular modeling of the NIa protease of Cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Pandaranayaka, Eswari P J; Mahalakshmi, A; Kasin Yadunandam, A; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2013-01-01

    The NIa protease of Potyviridae is the major viral protease that processes potyviral polyproteins. The NIa protease coding region of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is amplified from the viral cDNA, cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. NIa protease forms inclusion bodies in E.coli. The inclusion bodies are solubilized with 8 M urea, refolded and purified by Nickel-Nitrilotriacetic acid affinity chromatography. Three-dimensional modeling of the CdMV NIa protease is achieved by threading approach using the homologous X-ray crystallographic structure of Tobacco etch mosaic virus NIa protease. The model gave an insight in to the substrate specificities of the NIa proteases and predicted the complementation of nearby residues in the catalytic triad (H42, D74 and C141) mutants in the cis protease activity of CdMV NIa protease.

  14. Simplified Assays for Evaluation of Resistance to Alternaria brassicicola and Turnip Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Trusov, Yuri; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Maruta, Natsumi; Botella, Jose R

    2016-01-01

    Studying the natural defense mechanisms developed by model plants such as Arabidopsis is an important approach towards the improvement of crop species. The availability of mutants as well as the relative easiness to silence any gene in Arabidopsis provides an invaluable source of genotypes that can be used to discover new elements involved in the defense response. Here we describe simple and reliable methods to evaluate susceptibility/resistance to the pathogenic fungus Alternaria brassicicola and the viral pathogen Turnip mosaic virus.

  15. Inheritance of resistance to yellow mosaic virus in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper).

    PubMed

    Singh, D P

    1980-09-01

    The inheritance of resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) was studied in blackgram (Vigna mungo (L.) Hepper). The highly resistant donors Pant U-84 and UPU-2 and a highly susceptible line, UL-2, their F1's, F2's and backcrosses were grown with spreader located every 5 to 6 rows. The resistance was found to be digenic and recessive in all the crosses and free from cytoplasmic effect.

  16. Site-selective nucleation and controlled growth of gold nanostructures in tobacco mosaic virus nanotubulars.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Zhang, Jianting; Wang, Qiangbin

    2015-06-01

    Site-selective biomineralization of Au nanostructures in the interior channel of Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) is achieved by mutating threonine 103 in TMV to cysteine (T103C-TMV) to introduce the strong coordination interaction between the arrayed sulfhydryl ligands and gold species. By finely tuning the reaction conditions, Au nanoparticle chains and Au nanorods are successfully and exclusively synthesized inside the T103C-TMV nanotubes. PMID:25612918

  17. Characteristics of a strong promoter from figwort mosaic virus: comparison with the analogous 35S promoter from cauliflower mosaic virus and the regulated mannopine synthase promoter.

    PubMed

    Sanger, M; Daubert, S; Goodman, R M

    1990-03-01

    A segment of DNA from the genome of figwort mosaic virus (FMV) strain M3 possesses promoter activity when tested in electroporated protoplasts from, and transgenic plants of, Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc. The 1.1 kb DNA segment, designated the '34S' promoter, is derived from a position on the FMV genome comparable to the position on the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) genome containing the 35S promoter. The 34S and 35S promoters show approximately 63% nucleotide homology in the TATA, CCACT, and -18 to +1 domains, but in sequences further upstream the homology drops below 50%. Promoter activities were estimated using beta-glucuronidase and neomycin phosphotransferase II reporter gene systems. The activity of the 34S promoter segment approximates that of the 35S promoter in both protoplast transient expression assays and in stably transformed tobacco plants. Truncation of 5' sequences from the 34S promoter indicates that promoter strength depends upon DNA sequences located several hundred nucleotides upstream from the TATA box. In leaf tissue the 34S promoter is 20-fold more active than the mannopine synthase (MAS) promoter from Agrobacterium tumefaciens T-DNA. The 34S promoter lacks the root-specific and wound-stimulated expression of the MAS promoter, showing relatively uniform root, stem, leaf, and floral activities.

  18. Deep sequencing of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus discloses five RNA segments related to emaraviruses.

    PubMed

    Elbeaino, Toufic; Digiaro, Michele; Uppala, Mangala; Sudini, Harikishan

    2014-08-01

    The sequences of five viral RNA segments of pigeonpea sterility mosaic virus (PPSMV), the agent of sterility mosaic disease (SMD) of pigeonpea (Cajanus cajan, Fabaceae), were determined using the deep sequencing technology. Each of the five RNAs encodes a single protein on the negative-sense strand with an open reading frame (ORF) of 6885, 1947, 927, 1086, and 1,422 nts, respectively. In order, from RNA1 to RNA5, these ORFs encode the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (p1, 267.9 kDa), a putative glycoprotein precursor (p2, 74.3 kDa), a putative nucleocapsid protein (p3, 34.6 kDa), a putative movement protein (p4, 40.8 kDa), while p5 (55 kDa) has an unknown function. All RNA segments of PPSMV showed the highest identity with orthologs of fig mosaic virus (FMV) and Rose rosette virus (RRV). In phylogenetic trees constructed with the amino acid sequences of p1, p2 and p3, PPSMV clustered consistently with other emaraviruses, close to clades comprising members of other genera of the family Bunyaviridae. Based on the molecular characteristics unveiled in this study and the morphological and epidemiological features similar to other emaraviruses, PPSMV seems to be the seventh species to join the list of emaraviruses known to date and accordingly, its classification in the genus Emaravirus seems now legitimate. PMID:24685674

  19. Identification and molecular characterization of Bean yellow mosaic virus infecting French bean in Himachal Pradesh.

    PubMed

    Sharma, P N; Sharma, Vivek; Sharma, Anuradha; Rajput, Kajal; Sharma, S K

    2015-12-01

    French bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), is one of the most widely grown vegetable crop. Disease samples showing yellow mosaic symptoms on leaves and pods were collected from Himachal Pradesh and inoculated on common bean cv. Jawala through sap inoculation. The virus successfully transmitted by mechanical inoculation produced yellow mosaic, leaf distortion, curling, wrinkling of leaves followed by stunting of plants. The identity of the virus as Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV) was established through Double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic analysis of the coat protein gene sequence amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The cp gene contained 819 nucleotides potentially coding for 273 amino acids. The sequence showed 83-99 % nucleotide and 89-99 % amino acid sequence identities with other BYMV isolates/strains and shared maximum identity with BYMV strain reported from Gladiolus sp. in Japan. This study constitutes the first report of BYMV occurrence on P. vulgaris in Himachal Pradesh.

  20. Transcriptome Analysis of Nicotiana tabacum Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus during Systemic Symptom Development

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Jun; Chen, Ling-Na; Qiu, Yan-Hong; Li, Gui-Fen; Meng, Xiao-Hua; Zhu, Shui-Fang

    2012-01-01

    Virus infection of plants may induce a variety of disease symptoms. However, little is known about the molecular mechanism of systemic symptom development in infected plants. Here we performed the first next-generation sequencing study to identify gene expression changes associated with disease development in tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum cv. Xanthi nc) induced by infection with the M strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (M-CMV). Analysis of the tobacco transcriptome by RNA-Seq identified 95,916 unigenes, 34,408 of which were new transcripts by database searches. Deep sequencing was subsequently used to compare the digital gene expression (DGE) profiles of the healthy plants with the infected plants at six sequential disease development stages, including vein clearing, mosaic, severe chlorosis, partial and complete recovery, and secondary mosaic. Thousands of differentially expressed genes were identified, and KEGG pathway analysis of these genes suggested that many biological processes, such as photosynthesis, pigment metabolism and plant-pathogen interaction, were involved in systemic symptom development. Our systematic analysis provides comprehensive transcriptomic information regarding systemic symptom development in virus-infected plants. This information will help further our understanding of the detailed mechanisms of plant responses to viral infection. PMID:22952684

  1. Broad-spectrum detection and quantitation methods of Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus isolates.

    PubMed

    Vaïanopoulos, Céline; Legrève, Anne; Moreau, Virginie; Bragard, Claude

    2009-08-01

    A broad-spectrum reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) protocol was developed for detecting Soil-borne cereal mosaic virus (SBCMV) isolates, responsible for mosaic diseases in Europe, using primers targeting the highly conserved 3'-untranslated region of RNA-1 and RNA-2 of SBCMV. The 3'-end region is a privileged target for the detection of a wide range of isolates, because of sequence conservation, of the tRNA-like structure, the major role in viral replication and the signal amplification due to the presence of numerous genomic and subgenomic RNAs. The primers were also designed for virus quantitation using real-time RT-PCR with SYBR-Green chemistry. No cross-reaction with Wheat spindle streak mosaic virus, frequently associated with SBCMV, was observed. The use of RT-PCR and real-time quantitative RT-PCR allowed a more sensitive detection and quantitation of SBCMV to be made than was the case with ELISA. The methods enabled European isolates of SBCMV from Belgium, France, Germany, Italy and the UK to be detected and quantified. Real-time RT-PCR represents a new tool for comparing soil inoculum potential as well as cultivar resistance to SBCMV.

  2. The bean common mosaic virus lineage of potyviruses: where did it arise and when?

    PubMed

    Gibbs, A J; Trueman, J W H; Gibbs, M J

    2008-01-01

    There are more than 30 species in the bean common mosaic virus lineage of the genus Potyvirus. We have used their partial coat protein gene sequences to infer their phylogenies and have compared these with host and provenance information. Members of six species of the lineage have been isolated from crops distributed around the world, but three of these show clear links with South and East Asia. Members of the remaining species have been found in wild plants, minor crop species or ornamentals, and the majority of these have only been found in south-east and East Asia, Oceania or Australia. This phylogeographic pattern suggests that the bean common mosaic virus lineage arose in that region. Maximum-likelihood trees of the sequences were dated using the report that the initial major radiation of all potyviruses was 6,600 years ago. In this way, the bean common mosaic virus lineage was found to have first diverged 3,580 years ago, and one sub-lineage of seven species, found only in Australia, probably diverged there 2005 years ago. We discuss the ways in which the viruses could have moved from south-east Asia to Australia and note that their movement coincided with the spread of the Austronesian sea-faring/farming culture from China/Taiwan throughout the islands of the southern and eastern Pacific Ocean. Our study shows that virus isolates from wild or minimally domesticated plants, and from islands, are probably more useful indicators of the origins of viruses than those from widely grown well-travelled crop species.

  3. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens. PMID:23668610

  4. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India.

  5. Evidence for Possible Flexoelectricity in Tobacco Mosaic Viruses Used as Nanotemplates

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinin, Sergei V; Jesse, Stephen; Liu, W. L.; Balandin, A. A.

    2006-01-01

    Electromechanical coupling in individual tobacco mosaic viruses has been studied using piezoresponse force microscopy. Possible origins of the observed high resolution contrast, including the topographic crosstalk, difference in the elastic properties, and the intrinsic electromechanical coupling due to the piezoelectric and flexoelectric effects are discussed. Using simple estimates, we argue that, due in part to the small size and high symmetry of this particular material system, flexoelectric coupling can dominate the observed electromechanical behavior. The electrical manipulation of the virus particles, essential for nanoelectronic applications for which they are proposed, has also been demonstrated.

  6. Coassembly of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Proteins into Nanotubes with Uniform Length and Improved Physical Stability.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Kun; Eiben, Sabine; Wang, Qiangbin

    2016-06-01

    Using tobacco mosaic virus coat proteins (TMVcp) from both sources of the plant and bacterial expression systems as building blocks, we demonstrate here a coassembly strategy of TMV nanotubes in the presence of RNA. Specifically, plant-expressed cp (cpp) efficiently dominates the genomic RNA encapsidation to determine the length of assembled TMV nanotubes, whereas the incorporated Escherichia coli-expressed cp (cpec) improves the physical stability of TMV nanotubes by introducing disulfide bonds between the interfaces of subunits. We expect this coassembly strategy can be expanded to other virus nanomaterials to obtain desired properties based on rationally designed protein-RNA and protein-protein interfacial interactions. PMID:27188634

  7. Expression and immunological characterization of cardamom mosaic virus coat protein displaying HIV gp41 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Damodharan, Subha; Gujar, Ravindra; Pattabiraman, Sathyamurthy; Nesakumar, Manohar; Hanna, Luke Elizabeth; Vadakkuppattu, Ramanathan D; Usha, Ramakrishnan

    2013-05-01

    The coat protein of cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus, assembles into virus-like particles when expressed in an Escherichia coli expression system. The N and C-termini of the coat protein were engineered with the Kennedy peptide and the 2F5 and 4E10 epitopes of gp41 of HIV. The chimeric proteins reacted with sera from HIV positive persons and also stimulated secretion of cytokines by peripheral blood mononuclear cells from these persons. Thus, a system based on the coat protein of CdMV can be used to display HIV-1 antigens.

  8. Detection and Identification of Dasheen mosaic virus Infecting Colocasia esculenta in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, Binoy; Hegde, Vinayaka; Makeshkumar, T; Jeeva, M L

    2011-06-01

    Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction of the infected leaf samples of Colocasia esculenta plants showing severe whitish feathery symptoms were carried out using Potyvirus group specific primers, resulting in an amplicon of 327 bp, encoding the core region of the coat protein gene. Sequencing and BLAST analysis showed that the virus is distinct, closely related to Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV). Sequence analysis revealed 86 and 96% identity at the nucleotide and amino acid level respectively with the DsMV isolate SY1(accession Number AJ628756). This is the first molecular level characterisation of the DsMV infecting C. esculenta in India. PMID:23637503

  9. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) CIAT germplasm collection for response to common bacterial blight and bean common mosaic necrosis virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyvirus that cause production losses in common and tepary beans. Developing resistance to viruses, specifically BCMV, BCMNV and BGYMV, will be critical for expanding tepary bean production. This stu...

  10. Novel Inter-Subunit Contacts in Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus Revealed by Cryo-Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Clare, Daniel Kofi; Pechnikova, Eugenia V.; Skurat, Eugene V.; Makarov, Valentin V.; Sokolova, Olga S.; Solovyev, Andrey G.; Orlova, Elena V.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV, genus Hordeivirus) is a rod-shaped single-stranded RNA virus similar to viruses of the structurally characterized and well-studied genus Tobamovirus. Here we report the first high-resolution structure of BSMV at 4.1 Å obtained by cryo-electron microscopy. We discovered that BSMV forms two types of virion that differ in the number of coat protein (CP) subunits per turn and interactions between the CP subunits. While BSMV and tobacco mosaic virus CP subunits have a similar fold and interact with RNA using conserved residues, the axial contacts between the CP of these two viral groups are considerably different. BSMV CP subunits lack substantial axial contacts and are held together by a previously unobserved lateral contact formed at the virion surface via an interacting loop, which protrudes from the CP hydrophobic core to the adjacent CP subunit. These data provide an insight into diversity in structural organization of helical viruses. PMID:26278173

  11. Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein in Escherichia coli and its assembly into filamentous aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Usha, R

    2002-06-01

    Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus of Potyviridae, causes a mosaic disease in cardamom. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the purified virus and IgG was prepared. Electron microscopic studies on the purified virus showed flexuous filamentous particles of approximately 800 nm in length, typical of members of Potyviridae. The coat protein (CP) encoding sequence of the virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein purified by affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The viral nature of the expressed CP was confirmed by positive reaction with anti CdMV IgG in a Western blot. The expressed CP aggregated irreversibly upon renaturation at concentrations above 0.07 mg/ml. The expression of the CP led to the formation of filamentous aggregates in E. coli as observed by immuno-gold electron microscopy. The filamentous aggregates were of 100-150 nm in length. Immuno-capture RT-PCR confirmed the absence of coat protein mRNA in the filamentous aggregates. Deletion mutations, which were expected to inhibit virus assembly, were introduced in the core region of the coat protein. However, these mutations did not improve the solubility of the CP in non-denaturing buffers.

  12. Mutation and Recombination Frequencies Reveal a Biological Contrast within Strains of Cucumber Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Pita, Justin S.; Morris, Viktoriya

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent in planta studies have shown that strains Fny and LS of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) display differential genetic diversities, Fny and LS having higher and lower mutation frequencies, respectively (J. S. Pita and M. J. Roossinck, J Virol 87:790–797, 2012 http://dx.doi.org/10.1128/JVI.01891-12). In this article, we show that these virus strains have differential recombination frequencies as well. However, the high-diversity Fny strain is a low-recombination virus, whereas the very-low-diversity LS strain is instead a high-recombination virus. Unlike the mutation frequency that was determined by both RNAs 1 and 2, the control elements of recombination frequency reside predominantly within RNA 2, specifically within the 2a gene. IMPORTANCE Recombination is an important mechanism in virus evolution that can lead to increased or decreased variation and is a major player in virus speciation events that can lead to emerging viruses. Although viral genomes show very frequent evidence of recombination, details of the mechanism involved in these events are still poorly understood. We show here that the reciprocal effects of high mutation frequency and low recombination frequency (and vice versa) involve the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase of the virus, and we speculate that these evolutionary events are related to differences in processivity for two strains of the same virus. PMID:25903331

  13. Switching in the self-assembly of tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Caspar, D L; Namba, K

    1990-01-01

    Experimental observations on the structure and physicochemical properties of TMV protein assemblies have led to a fundamental switch in the model of the self-assembly process: rather than being nucleated by the hypothetical two-layer disk, virus assembly appears to be initiated by interaction of the specific RNA sequence with a short helical aggregate of the coat protein arranged as in the virus. Formation of the 20s nucleating aggregate involves the binding of an average of half a proton per protein subunit. This proton-binding site can be identified with the carboxyl-carboxylate pair that is formed between top and bottom protein surfaces at a radius of 58 A in the virus helix. Because the 20s aggregate consists of about two helical turns, only one carboxyl-carboxylate pair will be formed between each top-bottom pair of protein subunits. Limitation of the length of the 20s helical aggregate at neutral pH can be accounted for by disorder of the inner loop of the protein chain, due to electrostatic repulsion among the carboxyl groups that form the anomalous proton-binding site at 25 A radius in the ordered virus structure. To grow beyond two to three turns, inner loops of the protein at the interior of the helix must be ordered in the close-packed arrangement. The electrostatic repulsion opposing this ordering can be overcome by binding of the viral RNA at neutral pH, by calcium binding, or by proton binding in slightly acid solution. Virus disassembly upon infection appears to result from the low intracellular calcium and proton concentration compared to the extracellular environment, which increases the electrostatic repulsion among the negatively charged groups involved in calcium and proton binding, thereby allowing cellular ribosomes to competitively bind the viral RNA. Disk aggregates of TMV protein, which form at high ionic strength in alkaline solution, do not appear to be involved in virus assembly. The stacked-disc aggregate, which was previously presumed

  14. [Studies on construction of artificial mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA and their biological activity].

    PubMed

    Jin, Bo; Chen, Ji-Shuang; Zhang, Hua-Rong

    2005-08-01

    Based on the full length cDNA clone of a Cucumber mosaic virus satellite RNA, which was 369nt in size, artificial mutants were developed by the method of error-prone PCR and DNA shuffling. The new satellite cDNAs were transcribed in vitro into ssRNA and pseudo-recombined with a helper Cucumber mosaic virus, which contains no satellite RNA. Sequence analysis showed that A to T/G or G to A replacement all the four mutants, named MS1, MS5, MS6 and MS11 respectively, and there is no C to G or G to C replacement, but amongst, only the mutants MS11 could replicated when recombined with the helper virus strain. No satellite RNA could be detected by RT-PCR amplification and double-stranded RNA analysis for those pseudo-recombination constitution of Cucumber mosaic virus strain with mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6.Sequence homological comparison showed that the single replacement of mutants MS1, MS5 and MS6 occurred in the highly conservative regions and the T to A replacement of mutant MS11 was located in the normal-variation region. This is the first artificial mutation of satellite RNA of plant RNA viruses. The results indicated that single base in the region of satellite RNA maybe important to maintaining the biological activity of satellite RNA for its replication and stability. The variation and evolution of satellite RNA could be hopefully studied through combination directed evolution by DNA shuffling with pseudo-recombination in vitro.

  15. Transgenic sugarcane resistant to Sorghum mosaic virus based on coat protein gene silencing by RNA interference.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jinlong; Gao, Shiwu; Lin, Qinliang; Wang, Hengbo; Que, Youxiong; Xu, Liping

    2015-01-01

    As one of the critical diseases of sugarcane, sugarcane mosaic disease can lead to serious decline in stalk yield and sucrose content. It is mainly caused by Potyvirus sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) and/or Sorghum mosaic virus (SrMV), with additional differences in viral strains. RNA interference (RNAi) is a novel strategy for producing viral resistant plants. In this study, based on multiple sequence alignment conducted on genomic sequences of different strains and isolates of SrMV, the conserved region of coat protein (CP) genes was selected as the target gene and the interference sequence with size of 423 bp in length was obtained through PCR amplification. The RNAi vector pGII00-HACP with an expression cassette containing both hairpin interference sequence and cp4-epsps herbicide-tolerant gene was transferred to sugarcane cultivar ROC22 via Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. After herbicide screening, PCR molecular identification, and artificial inoculation challenge, anti-SrMV positive transgenic lines were successfully obtained. SrMV resistance rate of the transgenic lines with the interference sequence was 87.5% based on SrMV challenge by artificial inoculation. The genetically modified SrMV-resistant lines of cultivar ROC22 provide resistant germplasm for breeding lines and can also serve as resistant lines having the same genetic background for study of resistance mechanisms.

  16. Interactions with the actin cytoskeleton are required for cell wall localization of barley stripe mosaic virus TGB proteins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The host cytoskeleton and membrane system are the main routes by which plant viruses move within or between cells. Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) -induced actin filament thickening was visualized in the cytoskeleton of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells expressing DsRed:Talin. ...

  17. Wheat streak mosaic virus P1: Defining the minimal region required for the suppression of RNA silencing activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) is the most economically important wheat virus in the Great Plains region of USA. WSMV is the type species of the genus Tritimovirus in the family Potyviridae, and is transmitted by the wheat curl mite, Aceria tosichella Keifer. Previously, we reported that WSMV P1 f...

  18. 2D exchange 31P NMR spectroscopy of bacteriophage M13 and tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Magusin, P C; Hemminga, M A

    1995-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) exchange 31P nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy is used to study the slow overall motion of the rod-shaped viruses M13 and tobacco mosaic virus in concentrated gels. Even for short mixing times, observed diagonal spectra differ remarkably from projection spectra and one-dimensional spectra. Our model readily explains this to be a consequence of the T2e anisotropy caused by slow overall rotation of the viruses about their length axis. 2D exchange spectra recorded for 30% (w/w) tobacco mosaic virus with mixing times < 1 s do not show any off-diagonal broadening, indicating that its overall motion occurs in the sub-Hz frequency range. In contrast, the exchange spectra obtained for 30% M13 show significant off-diagonal intensity for mixing times of 0.01 s and higher. A log-gaussian distribution around 25 Hz of overall diffusion coefficients mainly spread between 1 and 10(3) Hz faithfully reproduces the 2D exchange spectra of 30% M13 recorded at various mixing times in a consistent way. A small but notable change in diagonal spectra at increasing mixing time is not well accounted for by our model and is probably caused by 31P spin diffusion. PMID:7756532

  19. Occurrence of Cucumber mosaic virus on vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India.

    PubMed

    Madhubala, R; Bhadramurthy, V; Bhat, A I; Hareesh, P S; Retheesh, S T; Bhai, R S

    2005-06-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) causing mosaic, leaf distortion and stunting of vanilla (Vanilla planifolia Andrews) in India was characterized on the basis of biological and coat protein (CP) nucleotide sequence properties. In mechanical inoculation tests, the virus was found to infect members of Chenopodiaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Fabaceae and Solanaceae. Nicotiana benthamiana was found to be a suitable host for the propagation of CMV. The virus was purified from inoculated N. benthamiana plants and negatively stained purified preparations contained isometric particles of about 28 nm in diameter. The molecular weight of the viral coat protein subunits was found to be 25.0 kDa. Polyclonal antiserum was produced in New Zealand white rabbit, immunoglobulin G (IgG) was purified and conjugated with alkaline phosphatase enzyme. Double antibody sandwich-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (DAS-ELISA) method was standardized for the detection of CMV infection in vanilla plants. CP gene of the virus was amplified using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), cloned and sequenced. Sequenced region contained a single open reading frame of 657 nucleotides potentially coding for 218 amino acids. Sequence analyses with other CMV isolates revealed the greatest identity with black pepper isolate of CMV (99%) and the phylogram clearly showed that CMV infecting vanilla belongs to subgroup IB. This is the first report of occurrence of CMV on V. planifolia from India.

  20. Transgenic resistance to Bamboo mosaic virus by expression of interfering satellite RNA.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan-Yu; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Chen, Hsin-Chuan; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2013-09-01

    Plant genetic engineering has broadened the options for plant virus resistance and is mostly based on pathogen-derived resistance. Previously, we have shown that interfering satellite RNA (satRNA) of Bamboo mosaic virus (satBaMV) greatly reduces Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) accumulation and BaMV-induced symptoms in co-inoculated plants. Here, we generated a nonviral source of virus-resistant transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis thaliana by introducing interfering satBaMV. Asymptomatic transgenic N. benthamiana lines were highly resistant to BaMV virion and viral RNA infection, and the expression of the transgene BSL6 was higher in asymptomatic than mildly symptomatic lines. In addition, BaMV- and satBaMV-specific small RNAs were detectable only after BaMV challenge, and their levels were associated with genomic viral RNA or satRNA levels. By transcriptomic analysis, the salicylic acid (SA) signalling pathway was not induced in satBaMV transgenic A. thaliana in mock conditions, suggesting that two major antiviral mechanisms, RNA silencing and SA-mediated resistance, are not involved directly in transgenic satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference. In contrast, resistance is associated with the level of the interfering satBaMV transgene. We propose satBaMV-mediated BaMV interference in transgenic plants by competition for replicase with BaMV. PMID:23675895

  1. Sequencing and computational analysis of complete genome sequences of Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus from acid lime and pummelo.

    PubMed

    Borah, Basanta K; Johnson, A M Anthony; Sai Gopal, D V R; Dasgupta, Indranil

    2009-08-01

    Citrus yellow mosaic badna virus (CMBV), a member of the Family Caulimoviridae, Genus Badnavirus, is the causative agent of Citrus mosaic disease in India. Although the virus has been detected in several citrus species, only two full-length genomes, one each from Sweet orange and Rangpur lime, are available in publicly accessible databases. In order to obtain a better understanding of the genetic variability of the virus in other citrus mosaic-affected citrus species, we performed the cloning and sequence analysis of complete genomes of CMBV from two additional citrus species, Acid lime and Pummelo. We show that CMBV genomes from the two hosts share high homology with previously reported CMBV sequences and hence conclude that the new isolates represent variants of the virus present in these species. Based on in silico sequence analysis, we predict the possible function of the protein encoded by one of the five ORFs.

  2. Mutations in the antiviral RNAi defense pathway modify Brome mosaic virus RNA recombinant profiles.

    PubMed

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Sztuba-Solińska, Joanna; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2012-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) mechanism targets viral RNA for degradation. To test whether RNAi gene products contributed to viral RNA recombination, a series of Arabidopsis thaliana RNAi-defective mutants were infected with Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs that have been engineered to support crossovers within the RNA3 segment. Single-cross RNA3-RNA1, RNA3-RNA2, and RNA3-RNA3 recombinants accumulated in both the wild-type (wt) and all knock-out lines at comparable frequencies. However, a reduced accumulation of novel 3' mosaic RNA3 recombinants was observed in ago1, dcl2, dcl4, and rdr6 lines but not in wt Col-0 or the dcl3 line. A BMV replicase mutant accumulated a low level of RNA3-RNA1 single-cross recombinants in Col-0 plants while, in a dcl2 dcl4 double mutant, the formation of both RNA3-RNA1 and mosaic recombinants was at a low level. A control infection in the cpr5-2 mutant, a more susceptible BMV Arabidopsis host, generated similar-to-Col-0 profiles of both single-cross and mosaic recombinants, indicating that recombinant profiles were, to some extent, independent of a viral replication rate. Also, the relative growth experiments revealed similar selection pressure for recombinants among the host lines. Thus, the altered recombinant RNA profiles have originated at the level of recombinant formation rather than because of altered selection. In conclusion, the viral replicase and the host RNAi gene products contribute in distinct ways to BMV RNA recombination. Our studies reveal that the antiviral RNAi mechanisms are utilized by plant RNA viruses to increase their variability, reminiscent of phenomena previously demonstrated in fungi. PMID:21936664

  3. Role of brassinosteroid signaling in modulating Tobacco mosaic virus resistance in Nicotiana benthamiana

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xing-Guang; Zhu, Tong; Peng, Xing-Ji; Xi, De-Hui; Guo, Hongqing; Yin, Yanhai; Zhang, Da-Wei; Lin, Hong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Plant steroid hormones, brassinosteroids (BRs), play essential roles in plant growth, development and stress responses. However, mechanisms by which BRs interfere with plant resistance to virus remain largely unclear. In this study, we used pharmacological and genetic approaches in combination with infection experiments to investigate the role of BRs in plant defense against Tobacco Mosaic Virus (TMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana. Exogenous applied BRs enhanced plant resistance to virus infection, while application of Bikinin (inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3), which activated BR signaling, increased virus susceptibility. Silencing of NbBRI1 and NbBSK1 blocked BR-induced TMV resistance, and silencing of NbBES1/BZR1 blocked Bikinin-reduced TMV resistance. Silencing of NbMEK2, NbSIPK and NbRBOHB all compromised BR-induced virus resistance and defense-associated genes expression. Furthermore, we found MEK2-SIPK cascade activated while BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production, defense gene expression and virus resistance induced by BRs. Thus, our results revealed BR signaling had two opposite effects on viral defense response. On the one hand, BRs enhanced virus resistance through MEK2-SIPK cascade and RBOHB-dependent ROS burst. On the other hand, BES1/BZR1 inhibited RBOHB-dependent ROS production and acted as an important mediator of the trade-off between growth and immunity in BR signaling. PMID:26838475

  4. Response of Hard Red Winter Wheat to Soilborne wheat mosaic virus Using Novel Inoculation Methods.

    PubMed

    Driskel, Barbara A; Hunger, Robert M; Payton, Mark E; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2002-04-01

    ABSTRACT Soilborne wheat mosaic virus (SBWMV) is an agronomically important pathogen of wheat that is transmitted by the soilborne plasmodiophorid vector Polymyxa graminis. In the laboratory, attempts to generate SBWMV-infected plants are often hampered by poor infectivity of the virus. To analyze the mechanism for virus resistance in wheat cultivars, we developed novel inoculation techniques. A new technique for foliar inoculation of SBWMV was developed that eliminated wound-induced necrosis normally associated with rub inoculating virus to wheat leaves. This new technique is important because we can now uniformly inoculate plants in the laboratory for studies of host resistance mechanisms in the inoculated leaf. Additionally, wheat plants were grown hydroponically in seed germination pouches and their roots were inoculated with SBWMV either by placing P. graminis-infested root material in the pouch or by mechanically inoculating the roots with purified virus. The susceptibility of one SBWMV susceptible and three field resistant wheat cultivars were analyzed following inoculation of plants using these novel inoculation techniques or the conventional inoculation technique of growing plants in P. graminis-infested soil. The results presented in this study suggest that virus resistance in wheat likely functions in the roots to block virus infection. PMID:18942947

  5. Incorporation of radiolabeled polyamines and methionine into turnip yellow mosaic virus in protoplasts from infected plants

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.; Cohen, S.S.

    1985-07-15

    Turnip yellow mosaic virus contains large amounts of nonexchangeable spermidine and induces an accumulation of spermidine in infected Chinese cabbage. By 7 days after inoculation, a majority of protoplasts isolated from newly emerging leaves stain with fluorescent antibody to the virus. (/sup 14/C)Spermidine (10 microM) was taken up by these cells in amounts comparable to the original endogenous pool within 24 hr. However, after an initial rise, the spermidine content of the cell returned to its original level, implying considerable regulation of the endogenous pool(s). Putrescine and spermine were major products of the metabolism of exogenous spermidine. Radioactivity from exogenous (/sup 14/C)spermidine was also readily incorporated into the ribonucleoprotein component(s) of the virus, where it appeared as both spermidine and spermine. The specific radioactivities of the viral polyamines were approximately twice those of spermidine and spermine extracted from the whole cell. Radioactivity from (2-/sup 14/C)methionine was readily incorporated into the protein, spermidine, and spermine of the virus. Again, the specific activities of these amines were substantially higher in the virus than in the whole cell. Thus, newly formed virus contained predominantly newly synthesized spermidine and spermine. However, inhibition of spermidine synthesis by dicyclohexylamine led to incorporation of preexisting spermidine and increased amounts of spermine into newly formed virus.

  6. Estimation of Population Bottlenecks during Systemic Movement of Tobacco Mosaic Virus in Tobacco Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sacristán, Soledad; Malpica, José M.; Fraile, Aurora; García-Arenal, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    More often than not, analyses of virus evolution have considered that virus populations are so large that evolution can be explained by purely deterministic models. However, virus populations could have much smaller effective numbers than the huge reported census numbers, and random genetic drift could be important in virus evolution. A reason for this would be population bottlenecks during the virus life cycle. Here we report a quantitative estimate of population bottlenecks during the systemic colonization of tobacco leaves by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). Our analysis is based on the experimental estimation of the frequency of different genotypes of TMV in the inoculated leaf, and in systemically infected leaves, of tobacco plants coinoculated with two TMV genotypes. A simple model, based on the probability that a leaf in coinoculated plants is infected by just one genotype and on the frequency of each genotype in the source, was used to estimate the effective number of founders for the populations in each leaf. Results from the analysis of three leaves per plant in plants inoculated with different combinations of three TMV genotypes yielded highly consistent estimates. Founder numbers for each leaf were small, in the order of units. This would result in effective population numbers much smaller than the census numbers and indicates that random effects due to genetic drift should be considered for understanding virus evolution within an infected plant. PMID:12941900

  7. Fluorescent Tobacco mosaic virus-Derived Bio-Nanoparticles for Intravital Two-Photon Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Niehl, Annette; Appaix, Florence; Boscá, Sonia; van der Sanden, Boudewijn; Nicoud, Jean-François; Bolze, Frédéric; Heinlein, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    Multi-photon intravital imaging has become a powerful tool to investigate the healthy and diseased brain vasculature in living animals. Although agents for multi-photon fluorescence microscopy of the microvasculature are available, issues related to stability, bioavailability, toxicity, cost or chemical adaptability remain to be solved. In particular, there is a need for highly fluorescent dyes linked to particles that do not cross the blood brain barrier (BBB) in brain diseases like tumor or stroke to estimate the functional blood supply. Plant virus particles possess a number of distinct advantages over other particles, the most important being the multi-valency of chemically addressable sites on the particle surface. This multi-valency, together with biological compatibility and inert nature, makes plant viruses ideal carriers for in vivo imaging agents. Here, we show that the well-known Tobacco mosaic virus is a suitable nanocarrier for two-photon dyes and for intravital imaging of the mouse brain vasculature. PMID:26793221

  8. Genetically improved monolayer-forming tobacco mosaic viruses to generate nanostructured semiconducting bio/inorganic hybrids.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Petia; Stitz, Nina; Sanctis, Shawn; Maurer, Johannes H M; Hoffmann, Rudolf C; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Schneider, Jörg J; Bill, Joachim

    2015-04-01

    The genetically determined design of structured functional bio/inorganic materials was investigated by applying a convective assembly approach. Wildtype tobacco mosaic virus (wt TMV) as well as several TMV mutants were organized on substrates over macroscopic-length scales. Depending on the virus type, the self-organization behavior showed pronounced differences in the surface arrangement under the same convective assembly conditions. Additionally, under varying assembly parameters, the virus particles generated structures encompassing morphologies emerging from single micrometer long fibers aligned parallel to the triple-contact line through disordered but dense films to smooth and uniform monolayers. Monolayers with diverse packing densities were used as templates to form TMV/ZnO hybrid materials. The semiconducting properties can be directly designed and tuned by the variation of the template architecture which are reflected in the transistor performance. PMID:25768914

  9. Evaluation of the minimal replication time of Cauliflower mosaic virus in different hosts

    SciTech Connect

    Khelifa, Mounia; Masse, Delphine; Blanc, Stephane; Drucker, Martin

    2010-01-20

    Though the duration of a single round of replication is an important biological parameter, it has been determined for only few viruses. Here, this parameter was determined for Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in transfected protoplasts from different hosts: the highly susceptible Arabidopsis and turnip, and Nicotiana benthamiana, where CaMV accumulates only slowly. Four methods of differing sensitivity were employed: labelling of (1) progeny DNA and (2) capsid protein, (3) immunocapture PCR,, and (4) progeny-specific PCR. The first progeny virus was detected about 21 h after transfection. This value was confirmed by all methods, indicating that our estimate was not biased by the sensitivity of the detection method, and approximated the actual time required for one round of CaMV replication. Unexpectedly, the replication kinetics were similar in the three hosts; suggesting that slow accumulation of CaMV in Nicotiana plants is determined by non-optimal interactions in other steps of the infection cycle.

  10. Rapid turnover of intra-host genetic diversity in Zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Heather E; Holmes, Edward C; Stephenson, Andrew G

    2011-02-01

    Genetic diversity in RNA viruses is shaped by a variety of evolutionary processes, including the bottlenecks that may occur at inter-host transmission. However, how these processes structure genetic variation at the scale of individual hosts is only partly understood. We obtained intra-host sequence data for the coat protein (CP) gene of Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) from two horizontally transmitted populations - one via aphid, the other without - and with multiple samples from individual plants. We show that although mutations are generated relatively frequently within infected plants, attaining similar levels of genetic diversity to that seen in some animal RNA viruses (mean intra-sample diversity of 0.02%), most mutations are likely to be transient, deleterious, and purged rapidly. We also observed more population structure in the aphid transmitted viral population, including the same mutations in multiple clones, the presence of a sub-lineage, and evidence for the short-term complementation of defective genomes. PMID:21138748

  11. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated. PMID:27226228

  12. Discovery and small RNA profile of Pecan mosaic-associated virus, a novel potyvirus of pecan trees.

    PubMed

    Su, Xiu; Fu, Shuai; Qian, Yajuan; Zhang, Liqin; Xu, Yi; Zhou, Xueping

    2016-01-01

    A novel potyvirus was discovered in pecan (Carya illinoensis) showing leaf mosaic symptom through the use of deep sequencing of small RNAs. The complete genome of this virus was determined to comprise of 9,310 nucleotides (nt), and shared 24.0% to 58.9% nucleotide similarities with that of other Potyviridae viruses. The genome was deduced to encode a single open reading frame (polyprotein) on the plus strand. Phylogenetic analysis based on the whole genome sequence and coat protein amino acid sequence showed that this virus is most closely related to Lettuce mosaic virus. Using electron microscopy, the typical Potyvirus filamentous particles were identified in infected pecan leaves with mosaic symptoms. Our results clearly show that this virus is a new member of the genus Potyvirus in the family Potyviridae. The virus is tentatively named Pecan mosaic-associated virus (PMaV). Additionally, profiling of the PMaV-derived small RNA (PMaV-sRNA) showed that the most abundant PMaV-sRNAs were 21-nt in length. There are several hotspots for small RNA production along the PMaV genome; two 21-nt PMaV-sRNAs starting at 811 nt and 610 nt of the minus-strand genome were highly repeated. PMID:27226228

  13. The interaction between Turnip crinkle virus p38 and Cucumber mosaic virus 2b and its critical domains.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanan; Zhang, Jing; Zhao, Feifei; Ren, Han; Zhu, Lin; Xi, Dehui; Lin, Honghui

    2016-08-15

    Cross protection is a common phenomenon among closely related strain viruses in co-infected plants. However, unrelated viruses, Turnip crinkle virus (TCV) and Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), also show an antagonistic effect in co-infected Arabidopsis plants. In many cases, viral suppressors of RNA silencing (VSRs) have important roles in the interactions between viruses in mixed infections. CMV 2b and TCV p38 are multifunctional proteins and both of them are well characterized VSRs and have important roles in operation synergistic interactions with other viruses. Here, we demonstrated antagonistic effects of TCV toward CMV and showed that RNA silencing-mediated resistance protein, RCY1 and TCV-interacting protein (TIP) of Arabidopsis plants did not affect this antagonism effect. We further showed that TCV p38 and CMV 2b could interact with each other in vivo but not in vitro. Further mutational analysis showed that C-terminal of 2b and middle domains of p38 had more important roles in the interaction between the two viruses. PMID:27288723

  14. Transient protein expression in three Pisum sativum (green pea) varieties.

    PubMed

    Green, Brian J; Fujiki, Masaaki; Mett, Valentina; Kaczmarczyk, Jon; Shamloul, Moneim; Musiychuk, Konstantin; Underkoffler, Susan; Yusibov, Vidadi; Mett, Vadim

    2009-02-01

    The expression of proteins in plants both transiently and via permanently transformed lines has been demonstrated by a number of groups. Transient plant expression systems, due to high expression levels and speed of production, show greater promise for the manufacturing of biopharmaceuticals when compared to permanent transformants. Expression vectors based on a tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) are the most commonly utilized and the primary plant used, Nicotiana benthamiana, has demonstrated the ability to express a wide range of proteins at levels amenable to purification. N. benthamiana has two limitations for its use; one is its relatively slow growth, and the other is its low biomass. To address these limitations we screened a number of legumes for transient protein expression. Using the alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and the cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) vectors, delivered via Agrobacterium, we were able to identify three Pisum sativum varieties that demonstrated protein expression transiently. Expression levels of 420 +/- 26.24 mg GFP/kgFW in the green pea variety speckled pea were achieved. We were also able to express three therapeutic proteins indicating promise for this system in the production of biopharmaceuticals.

  15. Large bottleneck size in Cauliflower Mosaic Virus populations during host plant colonization.

    PubMed

    Monsion, Baptiste; Froissart, Rémy; Michalakis, Yannis; Blanc, Stéphane

    2008-10-01

    The effective size of populations (Ne) determines whether selection or genetic drift is the predominant force shaping their genetic structure and evolution. Despite their high mutation rate and rapid evolution, this parameter is poorly documented experimentally in viruses, particularly plant viruses. All available studies, however, have demonstrated the existence of huge within-host demographic fluctuations, drastically reducing Ne upon systemic invasion of different organs and tissues. Notably, extreme bottlenecks have been detected at the stage of systemic leaf colonization in all plant viral species investigated so far, sustaining the general idea that some unknown obstacle(s) imposes a barrier on the development of all plant viruses. This idea has important implications, as it appoints genetic drift as a constant major force in plant virus evolution. By co-inoculating several genetic variants of Cauliflower mosaic virus into a large number of replicate host plants, and by monitoring their relative frequency within the viral population over the course of the host systemic infection, only minute stochastic variations were detected. This allowed the estimation of the CaMV Ne during colonization of successive leaves at several hundreds of viral genomes, a value about 100-fold higher than that reported for any other plant virus investigated so far, and indicated the very limited role played by genetic drift during plant systemic infection by this virus. These results suggest that the barriers that generate bottlenecks in some plant virus species might well not exist, or can be surmounted by other viruses, implying that severe bottlenecks during host colonization do not necessarily apply to all plant-infecting viruses.

  16. An improved cucumber mosaic virus-based vector for efficient decoying of plant microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Qiansheng; Tu, Yifei; Carr, John P.; Du, Zhiyou

    2015-01-01

    We previously devised a cucumber mosaic virus (CMV)-based vector system carrying microRNA target mimic sequences for analysis of microRNA function in Arabidopsis thaliana. We describe an improved version in which target mimic cloning is achieved by annealing two partly-overlapping complementary DNA oligonucleotides for insertion into an infectious clone of CMV RNA3 (LS strain) fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus-derived 35S promoter. LS-CMV variants carrying mimic sequences were generated by co-infiltrating plants with Agrobacterium tumefaciens cells harboring engineered RNA3 with cells carrying RNA1 and RNA2 infectious clones. The utility of using agroinfection to deliver LS-CMV-derived microRNA target mimic sequences was demonstrated using a miR165/166 target mimic and three solanaceous hosts: Nicotiana benthamiana, tobacco (N. tabacum), and tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). In all three hosts the miR165/166 target mimic induced marked changes in developmental phenotype. Inhibition of miRNA accumulation and increased target mRNA (HD-ZIP III) accumulation was demonstrated in tomato. Thus, a CMV-derived target mimic delivered via agroinfection is a simple, cheap and powerful means of launching virus-based miRNA mimics and is likely to be useful for high-throughput investigation of miRNA function in a wide range of plants. PMID:26278008

  17. Dynamics of small RNA profiles of virus and host origin in wheat cultivars synergistically infected by Wheat streak mosaic virus and Triticum mosaic virus: virus infection caused a drastic shift in the endogenous small RNA profile.

    PubMed

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M; Graybosch, Robert A; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible ('Arapahoe') and temperature-sensitive resistant ('Mace') wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat.

  18. Dynamics of Small RNA Profiles of Virus and Host Origin in Wheat Cultivars Synergistically Infected by Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus and Triticum Mosaic Virus: Virus Infection Caused a Drastic Shift in the Endogenous Small RNA Profile

    PubMed Central

    Tatineni, Satyanarayana; Riethoven, Jean-Jack M.; Graybosch, Robert A.; French, Roy; Mitra, Amitava

    2014-01-01

    Co-infection of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) by Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV, a Tritimovirus) and Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV, a Poacevirus) of the family Potyviridae causes synergistic interaction. In this study, the effects of the synergistic interaction between WSMV and TriMV on endogenous and virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs) were examined in susceptible (‘Arapahoe’) and temperature-sensitive resistant (‘Mace’) wheat cultivars at 18°C and 27°C. Single and double infections in wheat caused a shift in the profile of endogenous small RNAs from 24 nt being the most predominant in healthy plants to 21 nt in infected wheat. Massive amounts of 21 and 22 nt vsiRNAs accumulated in singly and doubly infected Arapahoe at both temperatures and in Mace at 27°C but not 18°C. The plus- and minus-sense vsiRNAs were distributed throughout the genomic RNAs in Arapahoe at both temperature regimens and in Mace at 27°C, although some regions served as hot-spots, spawning an excessive number of vsiRNAs. The vsiRNA peaks were conserved among cultivars, suggesting that the Dicer-like enzymes in susceptible and resistant cultivars similarly accessed the genomic RNAs of WSMV or TriMV. Accumulation of large amounts of vsiRNAs in doubly infected plants suggests that the silencing suppressor proteins encoded by TriMV and WSMV do not prevent the formation of vsiRNAs; thus, the synergistic effect observed is independent from RNA-silencing mediated vsiRNA biogenesis. The high-resolution map of endogenous and vsiRNAs from WSMV- and/or TriMV-infected wheat cultivars may form a foundation for understanding the virus-host interactions, the effect of synergistic interactions on host defense, and virus resistance mechanisms in wheat. PMID:25365307

  19. Hardenbergia mosaic virus: crossing the barrier between native and introduced plant species.

    PubMed

    Kehoe, M A; Coutts, B A; Buirchell, B J; Jones, R A C

    2014-05-12

    Hardenbergia mosaic virus (HarMV), genus Potyvirus, belongs to the bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) potyvirus lineage found only in Australia. The original host of HarMV, Hardenbergia comptoniana, family Fabaceae, is indigenous to the South-West Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR), where Lupinus spp. are grown as introduced grain legume crops, and exist as naturalised weeds. Two plants of H. comptoniana and one of Lupinus cosentinii, each with mosaic and leaf deformation symptoms, were sampled from a small patch of disturbed vegetation at an ancient ecosystem-recent agroecosystem interface. Potyvirus infection was detected in all three samples by ELISA and RT-PCR. After sequencing on an Illumina HiSeq 2000, three complete and two nearly complete HarMV genomes from H. comptoniana and one complete HarMV genome from L. cosentinii were obtained. Phylogenetic analysis which compared (i) the four new complete genomes with the three HarMV genomes on Genbank (two of which were identical), and (ii) coat protein (CP) genes from the six new genomes with the 38 HarMV CP sequences already on Genbank, revealed that three of the complete and one of the nearly complete new genomes were in HarMV clade I, one of the complete genomes in clade V and one nearly complete genome in clade VI. The complete HarMV genome from L. cosentinii differed by only eight nucleotides from one of the HarMV clade I genomes from a nearby H. comptoniana plant, with only one of these nucleotide changes being non-synonymous. Pairwise comparison between all the complete HarMV genomes revealed nucleotide identities ranging between 82.2% and 100%. Recombination analysis revealed evidence of two recombination events amongst the six complete genomes. This study provides the first report of HarMV naturally infecting L. cosentinii and the first example for the SWAFR of virus emergence from a native plant species to invade an introduced plant species.

  20. Sequences enhancing cassava mosaic disease symptoms occur in the cassava genome and are associated with South African cassava mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Maredza, A T; Allie, F; Plata, G; Rey, M E C

    2016-06-01

    Cassava is an important food security crop in Sub-Saharan Africa. Two episomal begomovirus-associated sequences, named Sequences Enhancing Geminivirus Symptoms (SEGS1 and SEGS2), were identified in field cassava affected by the devastating cassava mosaic disease (CMD). The sequences reportedly exacerbated CMD symptoms in the tolerant cassava landrace TME3, and the model plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana benthamiana, when biolistically co-inoculated with African cassava mosaic virus-Cameroon (ACMV-CM) or East African cassava mosaic virus-UG2 (EACMV-UG2). Following the identification of small SEGS fragments in the cassava EST database, the intention of this study was to confirm their presence in the genome, and investigate a possible role for these sequences in CMD. We report that multiple copies of varying lengths of both SEGS1 and SEGS2 are widely distributed in the sequenced cassava genome and are present in several other cassava accessions screened by PCR. The endogenous SEGS1 and SEGS2 are in close proximity or overlapping with cassava genes, suggesting a possible role in regulation of specific biological processes. We confirm the expression of SEGS in planta using EST data and RT-PCR. The sequence features of endogenous SEGS (iSEGS) are unique but resemble non-autonomous transposable elements (TEs) such as MITEs and helitrons. Furthermore, many SEGS-associated genes, some involved in virus-host interactions, are differentially expressed in susceptible (T200) and tolerant TME3) cassava landraces infected by South African cassava mosaic virus (SACMV) of susceptible (T200) and tolerant (TME3) cassava landraces. Abundant SEGS-derived small RNAs were also present in mock-inoculated and SACMV-infected T200 and TME3 leaves. Given the known role of TEs and associated genes in gene regulation and plant immune responses, our observations are consistent with a role of these DNA elements in the host's regulatory response to geminiviruses.

  1. Complete genome sequence of nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus reveals its relationship to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Ravendra P; Rajakaruna, Punsasi; Verchot, Jeanmarie

    2015-03-01

    Complete genome sequences were obtained from nine isolates of canna yellow streak virus (CaYSV). CaYSV belongs to the sugarcane mosaic virus (SCMV) subgroup of potyviruses with johnsongrass mosaic virus (JGMV) as its closest relative. Multiple sequence alignments showed a pattern of amino acid substitutions in the CP sequences, which enabled us to relate these isolates to South East Asian or European isolates. Biological characterization of CaYSV identified Nicotiana benthamiana, Chenopodium quinoa and Phaseolus vulgaris as experimental hosts. Given the popularity and global trade of cannas, a clear picture of the genetic diversity of CaYSV is critical to disease management. PMID:25567205

  2. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor

    PubMed Central

    Love, Andrew J.; Makarov, Valentine V.; Sinitsyna, Olga V.; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V.; Kalinina, Natalia O.; Taliansky, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10–40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  3. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-01-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  4. A Genetically Modified Tobacco Mosaic Virus that can Produce Gold Nanoparticles from a Metal Salt Precursor.

    PubMed

    Love, Andrew J; Makarov, Valentine V; Sinitsyna, Olga V; Shaw, Jane; Yaminsky, Igor V; Kalinina, Natalia O; Taliansky, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    We genetically modified tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) to surface display a characterized peptide with potent metal ion binding and reducing capacity (MBP TMV), and demonstrate that unlike wild type TMV, this construct can lead to the formation of discrete 10-40 nm gold nanoparticles when mixed with 3 mM potassium tetrachloroaurate. Using a variety of analytical physicochemical approaches it was found that these nanoparticles were crystalline in nature and stable. Given that the MBP TMV can produce metal nanomaterials in the absence of chemical reductants, it may have utility in the green production of metal nanomaterials. PMID:26617624

  5. The complete sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus from Vanilla fragrans in Hainan, China.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Jiang, Dongmei; Liu, Aiqin; Sang, Liwei; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Shifang

    2011-06-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) isolated from vanilla in Hainan province, China was determined for the first time. It comprised 6,224 nucleotides; sequence analysis suggested that the isolate we obtained was a member of the genus Potexvirus, and its sequence shared 86.67-96.61% identities with previously reported sequences. Phylogenetic analysis suggested that CymMV from vanilla fragrans was clustered into subgroup A and the isolates in this subgroup displayed little regional difference.

  6. A genetically novel, narrow-host-range isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) from rosemary.

    PubMed

    Tepfer, Mark; Girardot, Gregory; Fénéant, Lucie; Ben Tamarzizt, Hana; Verdin, Eric; Moury, Benoît; Jacquemond, Mireille

    2016-07-01

    An isolate of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), designated CMV-Rom, was isolated from rosemary (Rosmarinus officinalis) plants in several locations near Avignon, France. Laboratory studies showed that, unlike typical CMV isolates, CMV-Rom has a particularly narrow host range. It could be transmitted by aphids Aphis gossypii and Myzus persicae, but with low efficacy compared to a typical CMV isolate. Phylogenetic analysis of the nucleotide sequences of the CMV-Rom genomic RNAs shows that this isolate does not belong to any of the previously described CMV subgroups, IA, IB, II or III. PMID:27138549

  7. First report of Turnip mosaic virus occurrence in cole crops (Brssica spp) from Arunachal Pradesh, India.

    PubMed

    Singh, Raghuveer; Banerjee, Amrita; Sharma, Susheel Kumar; Bhagawati, R; Baruah, Sikimoni; Ngachan, S V

    2015-09-01

    The occurrence of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in cole crops (Brassica spp) grown in Basar, Arunachal Pradesh, India was confirmed by symptomatology, transmission electron microscopy, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and partial characterization of cytoplasmic inclusion protein and coat protein (CP) domains. Phylogenetic analysis of the partial CP sequences of the new TuMV isolates from Indian mustard (AR-IndM), broad leaved mustard (AR-BrLM) and broccoli (AR-Broc) revealed their closest relationship with members of the World-B genogroup of TuMV. This is the first molecular evidence of TuMV infection in Brassica spp from India. PMID:26396991

  8. Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification Assay to Rapidly Detect Wheat Streak Mosaic Virus in Quarantined Plants.

    PubMed

    Lee, Siwon; Kim, Jin-Ho; Choi, Ji-Young; Jang, Won-Cheoul

    2015-12-01

    We developed a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) method to rapidly diagnose Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) during quarantine inspections of imported wheat, corn, oats, and millet. The LAMP method was developed as a plant quarantine inspection method for the first time, and its simplicity, quickness, specificity and sensitivity were verified compared to current reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and nested PCR quarantine methods. We were able to quickly screen for WSMV at quarantine sites with many test samples; thus, this method is expected to contribute to plant quarantine inspections. PMID:26674930

  9. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread. PMID:27640432

  10. Yellow mosaic symptom caused by the nuclear shuttle protein gene of mungbean yellow mosaic virus is associated with single-stranded DNA accumulation and mesophyll spread of the virus.

    PubMed

    Kuruba, B L; Buvani, A P; Veluthambi, K

    2016-01-01

    Mungbean yellow mosaic virus-[India:Vigna] (MYMV-[IN:Vig]), a blackgram isolate of MYMV, causes yellow mosaic disease in blackgram and mungbean. Two variable DNA-B components, KA22 and KA27, cause distinct symptoms in blackgram [V. mungo (L.) Hepper] with the same DNA-A component. KA22 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed yellow mosaic symptom and accumulated high levels of viral single-stranded (ss) DNA. KA27 + DNA-A-agroinoculated blackgram plants displayed severe stunting symptom and accumulated very low levels of viral ssDNA. However, in mungbean [V. radiata (L.) Wilczek], KA27 + DNA-A caused yellow mosaic symptom and a high level of viral ssDNA accumulated. Swapping of KA27 DNA-B with the nuclear shuttle protein gene (NSP) of KA22 DNA-B (KA27xKA22 NSP) caused yellow mosaic symptom in blackgram, suggesting that KA22 NSP is the determinant of yellow mosaic symptom. Interestingly, KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram plants accumulated high levels of viral ssDNA, comparable to that of KA22 DNA-B infection, suggesting that the KA22 NSP is responsible for accumulation of high levels of viral ssDNA. MYMV distribution was studied in blackgram and mungbean plants by leaf tissue hybridization, which showed mesophyll spread of the virus in KA22-infected blackgram leaflets and in KA27-infected mungbean leaflets, both of which displayed yellow mosaic symptom. However, the virus did not accumulate in the mesophyll in the case of KA27-infected blackgram leaflets. Interestingly, the swapped KA27xKA22 NSP-infected blackgram leaflets showed mesophyll accumulation of the virus, suggesting that KA22 NSP determines its mesophyll spread.

  11. Influence of High Hydrostatic Pressure on Epitope Mapping of Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein

    PubMed Central

    Bonafe, Carlos Francisco Sampaio; Arns, Clarice Weis

    2014-01-01

    Abstract In this study, we investigated the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) on tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), a model virus in immunology and one of the most studied viruses to date. Exposure to HHP significantly altered the recognition epitopes when compared to sera from mice immunized with native virus. These alterations were studied further by combining HHP with urea or low temperature and then inoculating the altered virions into Balb-C mice. The antibody titers and cross-reactivity of the resulting sera were determined by ELISA. The antigenicity of the viral particles was maintained, as assessed by using polyclonal antibodies against native virus. The antigenicity of canonical epitopes was maintained, although binding intensities varied among the treatments. The patterns of recognition determined by epitope mapping were cross checked with the prediction algorithms for the TMVcp amino acid sequence to infer which alterations had occurred. These findings suggest that different cleavage sites were exposed after the treatments and this was confirmed by epitope mapping using sera from mice immunized with virus previously exposed to HHP. PMID:24605789

  12. Why mosaic? Gene expression profiling of African cassava mosaic virus-infected cassava reveals the effect of chlorophyll degradation on symptom development.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Yang, Jun; Bi, Huiping; Zhang, Peng

    2014-02-01

    Cassava mosaic disease, caused by cassava begomoviruses, is the most serious disease for cassava in Africa. However, the pathogenesis of this disease is poorly understood. We employed high throughput digital gene expression profiling based on the Illumina Solexa sequencing technology to investigate the global transcriptional response of cassava to African cassava mosaic virus infection. We found that 3,210 genes were differentially expressed in virus-infected cassava leaves. Gene ontology term and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway analysis indicated that genes implicated in photosynthesis were most affected, consistent with the chlorotic symptoms observed in infected leaves. The upregulation of chlorophyll degradation genes, including the genes encoding chlorophyllase, pheophytinase, and pheophorbide a oxygenase, and downregulation of genes encoding the major apoproteins in light-harvesting complex II were confirmed by qRT-PCR. These findings, together with the reduction of chlorophyll b content and fewer grana stacks in the infected leaf cells, reveal that the degradation of chlorophyll plays an important role in African cassava mosaic virus symptom development. This study will provide a road map for future investigations into viral pathogenesis.

  13. Turnip yellow mosaic virus: transfer RNA mimicry, chloroplasts and a C-rich genome.

    PubMed

    Dreher, Theo W

    2004-09-01

    SUMMARY Taxonomy: Turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) is the type species of the genus Tymovirus, family Tymoviridae. TYMV is a positive strand RNA virus of the alphavirus-like supergroup. Physical properties: Virions are non-enveloped 28-nm T = 3 icosahedrons composed of a single 20-kDa coat protein that is clustered in 20 hexameric and 12 pentameric subunits. Infectious particles and empty capsids coexist in infected tissue. The genomic RNA is 6.3 kb long, with a 5'(m7)GpppG cap and a 3' untranslated region ending in a tRNA-like structure to which valine can be covalently added. The genome has a distinctive skewed C-rich, G-poor composition (39% C, 17% G). Viral proteins: Two proteins, whose open reading frames extensively overlap, are translated from the genomic RNA. p206, which contains sequences indicative of RNA capping, NTPase/helicase and polymerase activities, is the only viral protein that is necessary for genome replication in single cells. It is produced as a polyprotein and self-cleaved to yield 141- and 66-kDa proteins. p69 is required for virus movement within the plant and is also a suppressor of gene silencing. The coat protein is expressed from the single subgenomic RNA. Hosts and symptoms: TYMV has a narrow host range almost completely restricted to the Cruciferae. Experimental host species are Brassica pekinensis (Chinese cabbage) or B. rapa (turnip), in which diffuse chlorotic local lesions and systemic yellow mosaic symptoms appear. Arabidopsis thaliana can also be used. Clumping of chloroplasts and the accumulation of vesicular invaginations of the chloroplast outer membranes are distinctive cytopathological symptoms. High yields of virus are produced in all leaf tissues, and the virus is readily transmissible by mechanical inoculation. Localized transmission by flea beetles may occur in the field.

  14. Unique nature of an attenuated strain of tobacco mosaic virus: autoregulation.

    PubMed

    Kiho, Y; Nishiguchi, M

    1984-01-01

    An attenuated strain L11A of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) multiplied like wild type strain L at an early stage of infection in tomato leaves. Four days after inoculation, however, multiplication of L11A was drastically reduced (autoregulation) compared with the constant multiplication of L. In mixed infections, L11A strongly inhibited the multiplication of homologous strain L. Experiments with cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) or tobacco plants revealed that the inhibitory mechanism of L11A is not host-specific but virus-specific, and the autoregulatory mechanism is effective only for TMV. RNA synthesis in L11A infected leaves 4 days after inoculation was studied by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Synthesis of TMV-RNA and its replicative intermediate were strongly inhibited, whereas the replicative form of TMV-RNA and ribosomal RNA were synthesized as in the case of L infection. Synthesis of non-coat-protein was studied by the incorporation of radioactive histidine into subcellular fractions derived from leaves infected with L or L11A for 4 days. Different patterns of the two strains in protein synthesis were noted. At least three proteins were predominantly synthesized in L11A infection. One of them was observed in the mitochondria fraction. From its position in polyacrylamide gel, it could be viral coded 165K protein which is considered to be involved in viral RNA replication. These results suggest that the unique nature of attenuated virus L11A, i.e. autoregulation, resulted from the inhibitory mechanism of viral RNA synthesis due to overproduction of 165K protein and is quite distinct from interferon, intrinsic interference or interference by defective virus. PMID:6472136

  15. Prevalence and genetic diversity of fig mosaic virus isolates infecting fig tree in Iran.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Amuz, S; Rakhshandehroo, F; Rezaee, S

    2014-01-01

    Commercial and outdoor fig orchards in four Iranian provinces were surveyed for the incidence of fig mosaic virus (FMV), fig leaf mottle associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2) and fig mild mottle associated virus (FMMaV) from March 2011 to October 2012. A total of 350 asymptomatic and symptomatic fig samples were collected and tested by dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) for the fig mosaic disease (FMD) using a polyclonal antiserum. According to DIBA results, FMD was present in 73% of the collected symptomatic samples from all visited regions. Samples with positive reactions in DIBA were then analyzed by RT-PCR using with specific primers. PCR results showed that about 14.8% of the FMD-positive samples from three inspected provinces are infected with at least one virus. FMV was the most widely spread virus (14%) followed by FLMaV-2 (1.5%), whereas FMMaV was not found. Phylogenetic analysis of the glycoprotein nucleotide and amino acid sequences of known FMV isolates showed two independent groups with high bootstrap values, with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in group I, subgroup IA beside those reported in Turkey. Nucleotide diversity was high within but low between different selected geographic regions and except for Europe, nucleotide distance within geographic regions was low. Statistical analyses indicated a correlation between the genetic structure of the FMV isolates and the geographical origin of isolation. Our analyses suggested that the FMV population is in a state of increase following a bottleneck or founder event in Iran. PMID:25283859

  16. tRNA-like structure regulates translation of Brome mosaic virus RNA.

    PubMed

    Barends, Sharief; Rudinger-Thirion, Joëlle; Florentz, Catherine; Giegé, Richard; Pleij, Cornelis W A; Kraal, Barend

    2004-04-01

    For various groups of plant viruses, the genomic RNAs end with a tRNA-like structure (TLS) instead of the 3' poly(A) tail of common mRNAs. The actual function of these TLSs has long been enigmatic. Recently, however, it became clear that for turnip yellow mosaic virus, a tymovirus, the valylated TLS(TYMV) of the single genomic RNA functions as a bait for host ribosomes and directs them to the internal initiation site of translation (with N-terminal valine) of the second open reading frame for the polyprotein. This discovery prompted us to investigate whether the much larger TLSs of a different genus of viruses have a comparable function in translation. Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a bromovirus, has a tripartite RNA genome with a subgenomic RNA4 for coat protein expression. All four RNAs carry a highly conserved and bulky 3' TLS(BMV) (about 200 nucleotides) with determinants for tyrosylation. We discovered TLS(BMV)-catalyzed self-tyrosylation of the tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase but could not clearly detect tyrosine incorporation into any virus-encoded protein. We established that BMV proteins do not need TLS(BMV) tyrosylation for their initiation. However, disruption of the TLSs strongly reduced the translation of genomic RNA1, RNA2, and less strongly, RNA3, whereas coat protein expression from RNA4 remained unaffected. This aberrant translation could be partially restored by providing the TLS(BMV) in trans. Intriguingly, a subdomain of the TLS(BMV) could even almost fully restore translation to the original pattern. We discuss here a model with a central and dominant role for the TLS(BMV) during the BMV infection cycle.

  17. Prevalence and genetic diversity of fig mosaic virus isolates infecting fig tree in Iran.

    PubMed

    Danesh-Amuz, S; Rakhshandehroo, F; Rezaee, S

    2014-01-01

    Commercial and outdoor fig orchards in four Iranian provinces were surveyed for the incidence of fig mosaic virus (FMV), fig leaf mottle associated virus 2 (FLMaV-2) and fig mild mottle associated virus (FMMaV) from March 2011 to October 2012. A total of 350 asymptomatic and symptomatic fig samples were collected and tested by dot-immunobinding assay (DIBA) for the fig mosaic disease (FMD) using a polyclonal antiserum. According to DIBA results, FMD was present in 73% of the collected symptomatic samples from all visited regions. Samples with positive reactions in DIBA were then analyzed by RT-PCR using with specific primers. PCR results showed that about 14.8% of the FMD-positive samples from three inspected provinces are infected with at least one virus. FMV was the most widely spread virus (14%) followed by FLMaV-2 (1.5%), whereas FMMaV was not found. Phylogenetic analysis of the glycoprotein nucleotide and amino acid sequences of known FMV isolates showed two independent groups with high bootstrap values, with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in group I, subgroup IA beside those reported in Turkey. Nucleotide diversity was high within but low between different selected geographic regions and except for Europe, nucleotide distance within geographic regions was low. Statistical analyses indicated a correlation between the genetic structure of the FMV isolates and the geographical origin of isolation. Our analyses suggested that the FMV population is in a state of increase following a bottleneck or founder event in Iran.

  18. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region.

    PubMed

    Al-Saleh, Mohammed A; Amer, Mahmoud A

    2013-12-01

    In 2011-2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  19. Biological and Molecular Variability of Alfalfa mosaic virus Affecting Alfalfa Crop in Riyadh Region

    PubMed Central

    AL-Saleh, Mohammed A.; Amer, Mahmoud A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2011–2012, sixty nine samples were collected from alfalfa plants showing viral infection symptoms in Riyadh region. Mechanical inoculation with sap prepared from two collected samples out of twenty five possitive for Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) by ELISA were produced systemic mosaic on Vigna unguiculata and Nicotiana tabacum, local lesion on Chenopodium amaranticolor and C. quinoa. Vicia faba indicator plants that induce mosaic and mottle with AMV-Sagir isolate and no infection with AMV-Wadi aldawasser isolate. Approximately 700-bp was formed by RT-PCR using AMV coat protein specific primer. Samples from infected alfalfa gave positive results, while healthy plant gave negative result using dot blot hybridization assay. The nucleotide sequences of the Saudi isolates were compared with corresponding viral nucleotide sequences reported in GenBank. The obtained results showed that the AMV from Australia, Brazil, Puglia and China had the highest similarity with AMV-Sajer isolate. While, the AMV from Spain and New Zealaland had the lowest similarity with AMV-Sajer and Wadi aldawasser isolates. The data obtained in this study has been deposited in the GenBank under the accession numbers KC434083 and KC434084 for AMV-Sajer and AMV- Wadialdawasser respectively. This is the first report regarding the gnetic make up of AMV in Saudi Arabia. PMID:25288969

  20. Tobacco mosaic virus-directed reprogramming of auxin/indole acetic acid protein transcriptional responses enhances virus phloem loading.

    PubMed

    Collum, Tamara D; Padmanabhan, Meenu S; Hsieh, Yi-Cheng; Culver, James N

    2016-05-10

    Vascular phloem loading has long been recognized as an essential step in the establishment of a systemic virus infection. In this study, an interaction between the replication protein of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and phloem-specific auxin/indole acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional regulators was found to modulate virus phloem loading in an age-dependent manner. Promoter expression studies show that in mature tissues TMV 126/183-kDa-interacting Aux/IAAs predominantly express and accumulate within the nuclei of phloem companion cells (CCs). Furthermore, CC Aux/IAA nuclear localization is disrupted upon infection with an interacting virus. In situ analysis of virus spread shows that the inability to disrupt Aux/IAA CC nuclear localization correlates with a reduced ability to load into the vascular tissue. Subsequent systemic movement assays also demonstrate that a virus capable of disrupting Aux/IAA localization is significantly more competitive at moving out of older plant tissues than a noninteracting virus. Similarly, CC expression and overaccumulation of a degradation-resistant Aux/IAA-interacting protein was found to inhibit TMV accumulation and phloem loading selectively in flowering plants. Transcriptional expression studies demonstrate a role for Aux/IAA-interacting proteins in the regulation of salicylic and jasmonic acid host defense responses as well as virus-specific movement factors, including pectin methylesterase, that are involved in regulating plasmodesmata size-exclusion limits and promoting virus cell-to-cell movement. Combined, these findings indicate that TMV directs the reprogramming of auxin-regulated gene expression within the vascular phloem of mature tissues as a means to enhance phloem loading and systemic spread. PMID:27118842

  1. [Morphological features of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the Dahlia mosaic virus promoter].

    PubMed

    Kuluev, B R; Kniazev, A V; Cheremis, A V; Vakhitov, V A

    2013-01-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants expressing the AINTEGUMENTA gene of rape under control of the 35S promoter and the promoter of dahlia mosaic virus were obtained. The transgenic plants were characterized by increase in the length of the leaves, flower sizes, stem height, and weight of seeds; at the same time, the degree of increase was greater in the case of use of the dahlia mosaic virus promoter as a regulator of transcription. Ectopic expression of the AINTEGUMENTA gene promoted prolongation of leaf growth, while sizes of epidermal cells of the leaves remained unchanged. PMID:23785848

  2. Partial biological and molecular characterization of a Cucumber mosaic virus isolate naturally infecting Cucumis melo in Iran.

    PubMed

    Rasoulpour, Rasoul; Afsharifar, Alireza; Izadpanah, Keramat

    2016-06-01

    Melon seedlings showing systemic chlorotic spots and mosaic symptoms were collected in central part of Iran, and a virus was isolated from diseased plants by mechanical inoculation. The virus systemically infected the most inoculated test plants by inducing mosaic symptoms, while, in the members of Fabaceae family and Chenopodium quinoa induced local lesions. Agar gel diffusion test using a polyclonal antiserum against a squash Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate showed the presence of CMV in the mechanically inoculated plants (designated CMV-Me). The virus was purified by polyethylene glycol precipitation and differential centrifugation. A polyclonal antiserum was produced against the virus that reacted specifically with virus antigen in ELISA and agar gel diffusion tests. The virus was molecularly characterized by PCR amplification of the full length of the coat protein gene using cucumovirus genus specific primer pair CPTALL-3/CPTALL-5 and sequence analysis of the resulting product. No RNA satellite was detected using the primer pair CMVsat3H/sat5T7P. Phylogenetic analysis based on the coat protein amino acid sequences showed that CMV-Me belongs to Subgroup IB. These results may be helpful in melon breeding programs, focusing on plant resistance to plant viruses including CMV. PMID:27366772

  3. The cognate coat protein is required for cell-to-cell movement of a chimeric brome mosaic virus mediated by the cucumber mosaic virus movement protein.

    PubMed

    Nagano, H; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1999-12-20

    Cucumber mosaic cucumovirus (CMV) and brome mosaic bromovirus (BMV) have many similarities, including the three-dimensional structure of virions, genome organizations, and requirement of the coat protein (CP) for cell-to-cell movement. We have shown that a chimeric BMV with the CMV 3a movement protein (MP) gene instead of its own cannot move from cell to cell in Chenopodium quinoa, a common permissive host for both BMV and CMV. Another chimeric BMV was constructed by replacing both MP and CP genes of BMV with those of CMV (MP/CP-chimera) and tested for its infectivity in C. quinoa, to determine whether the CMV CP has some functions required for the CMV MP-mediated cell-to-cell movement and to exhibit functional difference between CPs of BMV and CMV. Cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera occurred, and small local lesions were induced on the inoculated leaves. A frameshift mutation introduced in the CMV CP gene of the MP/CP-chimera resulted in a lack of cell-to-cell movement of the chimeric virus. These results indicate that the viral movement mediated by the CMV MP requires its cognate CP. Deletion of the amino-terminal region in CMV CP, which is not obligatory for CMV movement, also abolished cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera. This may suggest some differences in cell-to-cell movement of the MP/CP-chimera and CMV. On the other hand, the sole replacement of BMV CP gene with that of CMV abolished viral cell-to-cell movement, suggesting a possibility that the viral movement mediated by the BMV MP may also require its cognate CP. Functional compatibility between MP and CP in viral cell-to-cell movement is discussed.

  4. The complete nucleotide sequence and genomic characterization of tropical soda apple mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Fillmer, Kornelia; Adkins, Scott; Pongam, Patchara; D'Elia, Tom

    2016-08-01

    We report the first complete genome sequence of tropical soda apple mosaic virus (TSAMV), a tobamovirus originally isolated from tropical soda apple (Solanum viarum) collected in Okeechobee, Florida. The complete genome of TSAMV is 6,350 nucleotides long and contains four open reading frames encoding the following proteins: i) 126-kDa methyltransferase/helicase (3354 nt), ii) 183-kDa polymerase (4839 nt), iii) movement protein (771 nt) and iv) coat protein (483 nt). The complete genome sequence of TSAMV shares 80.4 % nucleotide sequence identity with pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) and 71.2-74.2 % identity with other tobamoviruses naturally infecting members of the Solanaceae plant family. Phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences of the 126-kDa and 183-kDa proteins and the complete genome sequence place TSAMV in a subcluster with PMMoV within the Solanaceae-infecting subgroup of tobamoviruses.

  5. Infection and RNA recombination of Brome mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Dzianott, Aleksandra; Bujarski, Jozef J

    2004-01-20

    Ecotypes of Arabidopsis thaliana supported the replication and systemic spread of Brome mosaic virus (BMV) RNAs. Infection was induced either by manual inoculation with viral RNA or by BMV virions, demonstrating that virus disassembly did not prevent infection. When in vitro-transcribed BMV RNAs 1-3 were used, production of subgenomic RNA4 was observed, showing that BMV RNA replication and transcription had occurred. Furthermore, inoculations of the transgenic Arabidopsis line that expressed a suppressor of RNA interference (RNAi) pathway markedly increased the BMV RNA concentrations. Inoculations with designed BMV RNA3 recombination vectors generated both homologous and nonhomologous BMV RNA-RNA recombinants. Thus, all cellular factors essential for BMV RNA replication, transcription, and RNA recombination were shown to be present in Arabidopsis. The current scope of understanding of the model Arabidopsis plant system should facilitate the identification of these factors governing the BMV life cycle.

  6. Phase behavior of mixtures of rods (tobacco mosaic virus) and spheres (polyethylene oxide, bovine serum albumin).

    PubMed Central

    Adams, M; Fraden, S

    1998-01-01

    Aqueous suspensions of mixtures of the rodlike virus tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) with globular macromolecules such as polyethylene oxide (PEO) or bovine serum albumin (BSA) phase separate and exhibit rich and strikingly similar phase behavior. Isotropic, nematic, lamellar, and crystalline phases are observed as a function of the concentration of the constituents and ionic strength. The observed phase behavior is considered to arise from attractions between the two particles induced by the presence of BSA or PEO. For the TMV/BSA mixtures, the BSA adsorbs to the TMV and bridging of the BSA between TMV produces the attractions. For TMV/PEO mixtures, attractions are entropically driven via excluded volume effects known alternatively as the "depletion interaction" or "macromolecular crowding." PMID:9449368

  7. Genetic bottlenecks during systemic movement of Cucumber mosaic virus vary in different host plants

    SciTech Connect

    Ali, Akhtar; Roossinck, Marilyn J.

    2010-09-01

    Genetic bottlenecks are stochastic events that narrow variation in a population. We compared bottlenecks during the systemic infection of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in four host plants. We mechanically inoculated an artificial population of twelve CMV mutants to young leaves of tomato, pepper, Nicotiana benthamiana, and squash. The inoculated leaves and primary and secondary systemically infected leaves were sampled at 2, 10, and 15 days post-inoculation. All twelve mutants were detected in all of the inoculated leaves. The number of mutants recovered from the systemically infected leaves of all host species was reduced significantly, indicating bottlenecks in systemic movement. The recovery frequencies of a few of the mutants were significantly different in each host probably due to host-specific selective forces. These results have implications for the differences in virus population variation that is seen in different host plants.

  8. Atomic force microscopy investigation of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus capsid disruption and RNA extrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, Yu. G.; McPherson, Alexander . E-mail: amcphers@uci.edu

    2006-09-01

    Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV) was subjected to a variety of procedures which disrupted the protein capsids and produced exposure of the ssRNA genome. The results of the treatments were visualized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Both in situ and ex situ freeze-thawing produced RNA emission, though at low efficiency. The RNA lost from such particles was evident, in some cases in the process of exiting the virions. More severe disruption of TYMV and extrusion of intact RNA onto the substrate were produced by drying the virus and rehydrating with neutral buffer. Similar products were also obtained by heating TYMV to 70-75 deg. C and by exposure to alkaline pH. Experiments showed the nucleic acid to have an elaborate secondary structure distributed linearly along its length.

  9. Digital memory device based on tobacco mosaic virus conjugated with nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Ricky J; Tsai, Chunglin; Ma, Liping; Ouyang, Jianyong; Ozkan, Cengiz S; Yang, Yang

    2006-10-01

    Nanostructured viruses are attractive for use as templates for ordering quantum dots to make self-assembled building blocks for next-generation electronic devices. So far, only a few types of electronic devices have been fabricated from biomolecules due to the lack of charge transport through biomolecular junctions. Here, we show a novel electronic memory effect by incorporating platinum nanoparticles into tobacco mosaic virus. The memory effect is based on conductance switching, which leads to the occurrence of bistable states with an on/off ratio larger than three orders of magnitude. The mechanism of this process is attributed to charge trapping in the nanoparticles for data storage and a tunnelling process in the high conductance state. Such hybrid bio-inorganic nanostructures show promise for applications in future nanoelectronics.

  10. Delay of Disease Development in Transgenic Plants that Express the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell Abel, Patricia; Nelson, Richard S.; de, Barun; Hoffmann, Nancy; Rogers, Stephen G.; Fraley, Robert T.; Beachy, Roger N.

    1986-05-01

    A chimeric gene containing a cloned cDNA of the coat protein (CP) gene of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) was introduced into tobacco cells on a Ti plasmid of Agrobacterium tumefaciens from which tumor inducing genes had been removed. Plants regenerated from transformed cells expressed TMV mRNA and CP as a nuclear trait. Seedlings from self-fertilized transgenic plants were inoculated with TMV and observed for development of disease symptoms. The seedlings that expressed the CP gene were delayed in symptom development and 10 to 60 percent of the transgenic plants failed to develop symptoms for the duration of the experiments. Increasing the concentration of TMV in the inoculum shortened the delay in appearance of symptoms. The results of these experiments indicate that plants can be genetically transformed for resistance to virus disease development.

  11. Analysis of the autoproteolytic activity of the recombinant helper component proteinase from zucchini yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Boonrod, Kajohn; Füllgrabe, Marc W; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-10-01

    The multifunctional helper component proteinase (HC-Pro) of potyviruses contains an autoproteolytic function that, together with the protein 1 (P1) and NIa proteinase, processes the polyprotein into mature proteins. In this study, we analysed the autoproteolytic active domain of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro. Several Escherichia coli-expressed MBP:HC-Pro:GFP mutants containing deletions or point mutations at either the N- or C-terminus of the HC-Pro protein were examined. Our results showed that amino acids essential for the proteolytic activity of ZYMV HC-Pro are distinct from those of the tobacco etch virus HC-Pro, although the amino acid sequences in the proteolytic active domain are conserved among potyviruses.

  12. A coiled-coil interaction mediates cauliflower mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stavolone, Livia; Villani, Maria Elena; Leclerc, Denis; Hohn, Thomas

    2005-04-01

    The function of the virion-associated protein (VAP) of cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has long been only poorly understood. VAP is associated with the virion but is dispensable for virus morphogenesis and replication. It mediates virus transmission by aphids through simultaneous interaction with both the aphid transmission factor and the virion. However, although insect transmission is not fundamental to CaMV survival, VAP is indispensable for spreading the virus infection within the host plant. We used a GST pull-down technique to demonstrate that VAP interacts with the viral movement protein through coiled-coil domains and surface plasmon resonance to measure the interaction kinetics. We mapped the movement protein coiled-coil to the C terminus of the protein and proved that it self-assembles as a trimer. Immunogold labeling/electron microscopy revealed that the VAP and viral movement protein colocalize on CaMV particles within plasmodesmata. These results highlight the multifunctional potential of the VAP protein conferred by its efficient coiled-coil interaction system and show a plant virus possessing a surface-exposed protein (VAP) mediating viral entry into host cells. movement protein | virion-associated protein | Biacore

  13. RNA viruses and their silencing suppressors boost Abutilon mosaic virus, but not the Old World Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus.

    PubMed

    Sardo, Luca; Wege, Christina; Kober, Sigrid; Kocher, Conny; Accotto, Gian Paolo; Noris, Emanuela

    2011-11-01

    Mixed viral infections can induce different changes in symptom development, genome accumulation and tissue tropism. These issues were investigated for two phloem-limited begomoviruses, Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) and Tomato yellow leaf curl Sardinia virus (TYLCSV) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants doubly infected by either the potyvirus Cowpea aphid-borne mosaic virus (CABMV) or the tombusvirus Artichoke mottled crinkle virus (AMCV). Both RNA viruses induced an increase of the amount of AbMV, led to its occasional egress from the phloem and induced symptom aggravation, while the amount and tissue tropism of TYLCSV were almost unaffected. In transgenic plants expressing the silencing suppressors of CABMV (HC-Pro) or AMCV (P19), AbMV was supported to a much lesser extent than in the mixed infections, with the effect of CABMV HC-Pro being superior to that of AMCV P19. Neither of the silencing suppressors influenced TYLCSV accumulation. These results demonstrate that begomoviruses differentially respond to the invasion of other viruses and to silencing suppression. PMID:21843560

  14. Brome mosaic virus RNA syntheses in vitro and in barley protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Sivakumaran, K; Hema, M; Kao, C Cheng

    2003-05-01

    The RNA replicase extracted from Brome mosaic virus (BMV)-infected plants has been used to characterize the cis-acting elements for RNA synthesis and the mechanism of RNA synthesis. Minus-strand RNA synthesis in vitro requires a structure named stem-loop C (SLC) that contains a clamped adenine motif. In vitro, there are several specific requirements for SLC recognition. We examined whether these requirements also apply to BMV replication in barley protoplasts. BMV RNA3s with mutations in SLC were transfected into barley protoplasts, and the requirements for minus- and plus-strand replication were found to correlate well with the requirements in vitro. Furthermore, previous analysis of replicase recognition of the Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) and BMV SLCs indicates that the requirements in the BMV SLC are highly specific. In protoplasts, we found that BMV RNA3s with their SLCs replaced with two different CMV SLCs were defective for replication. In vitro results generated with the BMV replicase and minimal-length RNAs generally agreed with those of in vivo BMV RNA replication. To extend this conclusion, we determined that, corresponding with the process of infection, the BMV replicases extracted from plants at different times after infection have different levels of recognition of the minimal promoters for plus- and minus-strand RNA syntheses.

  15. Establishment of an Agrobacterium-mediated Inoculation System for Cucumber Green Mottle Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minji; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Song, Dami; Choi, Hong-Soo; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2015-12-01

    The infectious full-length cDNA clones of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) isolates KW and KOM, which were isolated from watermelon and oriental melon, respectively, were constructed under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter. We successfully inoculated Nicotiana benthamiana with the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM by Agrobacterium-mediated infiltration. Virulence and symptomatic characteristics of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM were tested on several indicator plants. No obvious differences between two cloned isolates in disease development were observed on the tested indicator plants. We also determined full genome sequences of the cloned CGMMV isolates KW and KOM. Sequence comparison revealed that only four amino acids (at positions 228, 699, 1212, and 1238 of the replicase protein region) differ between the cloned isolates KW and KOM. A previous study reported that the isolate KOM could not infect Chenopodium amaranticolor, but the cloned KOM induced chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves. When compared with the previously reported sequence of the original KOM isolate, the cloned KOM contained one amino acid mutation (Ala to Thr) at position 228 of the replicase protein, suggesting that this mutation might be responsible for induction of chlorotic spots on the inoculated leaves of C. amaranticolor. PMID:26674677

  16. Normal modes of symmetric protein assemblies. Application to the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk.

    PubMed Central

    Simonson, T; Perahia, D

    1992-01-01

    We use group theoretical methods to study the molecular dynamics of symmetric protein multimers in the harmonic or quasiharmonic approximation. The method explicitly includes the long-range correlations between protein subunits. It can thus address collective dynamic effects, such as cooperativity between subunits. The n lowest-frequency normal modes of each individual subunit are combined into symmetry coordinates for the entire multimer. The Hessian of the potential energy is thereby reduced to a series of blocks of order n or 2n. In the quasiharmonic approximation, the covariance matrix of the atomic oscillations is reduced to the same block structure by an analogous set of symmetry coordinates. The method is applied to one layer of the tobacco mosaic virus protein disk in vacuo, to gain insight into the role of conformational fluctuations and electrostatics in tobacco mosaic virus assembly. The system has 78,000 classical, positional, degrees of freedom, yet the calculation is reduced by symmetry to a problem of order 4,600. Normal modes in the 0-100 cm-1 range were calculated. The calculated correlations extend mainly from each subunit to its nearest neighbors. The network of core helices has weak correlations with the rest of the structure. Similarly, the inner loops 90-108 are uncorrelated with the rest of the structure. Thus, the model predicts that the dielectric response in the RNA-binding region is mainly due to the loops alone. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 PMID:1547329

  17. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus

    PubMed Central

    Elbeshehy, Esam K.F.; Metwali, Ehab M.R.; Almaghrabi, Omar A.

    2014-01-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g−1 fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L−1 recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L−1 as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus. PMID:25737655

  18. Mapping regions of the cauliflower mosaic virus ORF III product required for infectivity.

    PubMed

    Jacquot, E; Geldreich, A; Keller, M; Yot, P

    1998-03-15

    The open reading frame (ORF) III product (PIII) of the pararetrovirus cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) has nucleic acid-binding properties in vitro, but its biological role is not yet determined. ORF III is closely linked to ORF II and overlaps ORF IV out of frame in the CaMV genome. A new CaMV-derived vector (Ca delta) devoid of ORF III and containing unique restriction sites between ORFs II and IV was designed. Introduction of the wild-type CaMV ORF III into Ca delta results in a clone (Ca3) infectious in turnip plants. Truncated or point-mutated versions of ORF III were then inserted into Ca delta and tested in vivo. Inoculation of the different mutants into turnip revealed that the four C-terminal amino acid residues of PIII are dispensable for infectivity as well as an internal domain (amino acids 61 to 80). Taken together the results show that PIII possesses a functional two-domain organization. Moreover, the CaMV PIII function(s) cannot be replaced either by the PIII protein of another caulimovirus, the figwort mosaic virus, or by the P2 protein of the cacao swollen shoot badnavirus, a member of the second plant pararetrovirus group.

  19. Sequence analysis and genetic diversity of five new Indian isolates of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, S; Gautam, K K; Raj, S K

    2015-12-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) is an important virus since it causes severe losses to many economically important crops worldwide. Five new isolates of CMV were isolated from naturally infected Hippeastrum hybridum, Dahlia pinnata, Hemerocallis fulva, Acorus calamus and Typhonium trilobatum plants, all exhibiting severe leaf mosaic symptoms. For molecular identification and sequence analyses, the complete coat protein (CP) gene of these isolates was amplified by RT-PCR. The resulting amplicons were cloned and sequenced and isolates were designated as HH (KP698590), DP (JF682239), HF (KP698589), AC (KP698588) and TT (JX570732). For study of genetic diversity among these isolates, the sequence data were analysed by BLASTn, multiple alignment and generating phylogenetic trees along with the respective sequences of other CMV isolates available in GenBank Database were done. The isolates under study showed 82-99% sequence diversity among them at nucleotide and amino acid levels; however they showed close relationships with CMV isolates of subgroup IB. In alignment analysis of amino acid sequences of HH and AC isolates, we have found fifteen and twelve unique substitutions, compared to HF, DP and TT isolates, suggesting the cause of high genetic diversity. PMID:26666188

  20. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus.

    PubMed

    Elbeshehy, Esam K F; Metwali, Ehab M R; Almaghrabi, Omar A

    2015-03-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g(-1) fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L(-1) recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L(-1) as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus. PMID:25737655

  1. Genetic variation of wheat streak mosaic virus in the United States Pacific Northwest.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Megan D; Murray, Timothy D

    2013-01-01

    Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV), the cause of wheat streak mosaic, is a widespread and damaging pathogen of wheat. WSMV is not a chronic problem of annual wheat in the United States Pacific Northwest but could negatively affect the establishment of perennial wheat, which is being developed as an alternative to annual wheat to prevent soil erosion. Fifty local isolates of WSMV were collected from 2008 to 2010 near Lewiston, ID, Pullman, WA, and the United States Department of Agriculture Central Ferry Research Station, near Pomeroy, WA to determine the amount of genetic variation present in the region. The coat protein gene from each isolate was sequenced and the data subjected to four different methods of phylogenetic analyses. Two well-supported clades of WSMV were identified. Isolates in clade I share sequence similarity with isolates from Central Europe; this is the first report of isolates from Central Europe being reported in the United States. Isolates in clade II are similar to isolates originating from Australia, Argentina, and the American Pacific Northwest. Nine isolates showed evidence of recombination and the same two well-supported clades were observed when recombinant isolates were omitted from the analysis. More polymorphic sites, parsimony informative sites, and increased diversity were observed in clade II than clade I, suggesting more recent establishment of the virus in the latter. The observed diversity within both clades could make breeding for durable disease resistance in perennial wheat difficult if there is a differential response of WSMV resistance genes to isolates from different clades.

  2. Antiviral activity of Thuja orientalis extracts against watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) on Citrullus lanatus.

    PubMed

    Elbeshehy, Esam K F; Metwali, Ehab M R; Almaghrabi, Omar A

    2015-03-01

    Watermelon mosaic potyvirus (WMV) is considered as an important virus infecting watermelon and causing adverse effects on crop productivity. To overcome this problem one of the main objectives of plant breeders is to make these strains less effective in the ability to infect plants by treatment with plant extracts. Due to the advantages of plant tissue culture, in vitro, in the process of the selection of different cultivars under biotic stress, this study was conducted to achieve this aim by evaluating the effect of three concentrations of Thuja extract on the multiplication of WMV in watermelon by measuring callus fresh weight and soluble proteins (mg g(-1) fresh weight) of healthy and infected hypocotyl explants. Also, WMV was isolated from naturally infected watermelon and characterized as potyvirus by serological and molecular analyses. The isolated virus gave a positive reaction with WMV antiserum compared with other antibodies of CMV, ZYMV and SqMV using DAS-ELISA. RT-PCR, with the specific primer for WMV-cp. gene, yielded 825 base pair DNA fragments. The results that belong to soluble protein analysis indicated that infected hypocotyl explants treated with 6 g L(-1) recorded the highest rate in the number of soluble protein bands compared with the rest of treatments. As a conclusion of these results, we can recommend to apply the Thuja extract at 6 g L(-1) as a optimum dosage to decrease the infection caused by watermelon mosaic potyvirus.

  3. Zucchini tigré mosaic virus is a distinct potyvirus in the papaya ringspot virus cluster: molecular and biological insights.

    PubMed

    Romay, G; Lecoq, H; Desbiez, C

    2014-02-01

    In recent years, three new potyviruses have been described in the papaya ringspot virus (PRSV) cluster. In addition, two types of PRSV are recognized, type W, infecting cucurbit plants, and type P, infecting papaya and also cucurbits. A third type, PRSV-T, was also partially described in Guadeloupe. Complete genome sequencing of four PRSV-T isolates showed that this virus is a related virus that is distinct from PRSV, and the name zucchini tigré mosaic virus (ZTMV) is proposed, in reference to the typical symptoms observed in zucchini squash. Eleven other viral isolates from different geographic origins were confirmed as ZTMV isolates using the complete sequence of the cylindrical inclusion (CI) coding region, whereas pairwise sequence similarities in the coat protein (CP) coding region did not unambiguously distinguish ZTMV isolates from PRSV isolates. The use of the CI coding region for species demarcation appears more suitable than the CP coding region for closely related viruses. Principal coordinates analysis based on the biological behavior of the viral isolates studied clustered PRSV-P, PRSV-W and ZTMV isolates into three different groups. Therefore, ZTMV is different from PRSV in its molecular and biological properties.

  4. Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase proteins, P1 and P2, localize to the tonoplast in the presence of virus RNA

    SciTech Connect

    Ibrahim, Amr; Hutchens, Heather M.; Howard Berg, R.; Sue Loesch-Fries, L.

    2012-11-25

    To identify the virus components important for assembly of the Alfalfa mosaic virus replicase complex, we used live cell imaging of Arabidopsis thaliana protoplasts that expressed various virus cDNAs encoding native and GFP-fusion proteins of P1 and P2 replicase proteins and full-length virus RNAs. Expression of P1-GFP alone resulted in fluorescent vesicle-like bodies in the cytoplasm that colocalized with FM4-64, an endocytic marker, and RFP-AtVSR2, RabF2a/Rha1-mCherry, and RabF2b/Ara7-mCherry, all of which localize to multivesicular bodies (MVBs), which are also called prevacuolar compartments, that mediate traffic to the lytic vacuole. GFP-P2 was driven from the cytosol to MVBs when expressed with P1 indicating that P1 recruited GFP-P2. P1-GFP localized on the tonoplast, which surrounds the vacuole, in the presence of infectious virus RNA, replication competent RNA2, or P2 and replication competent RNA1 or RNA3. This suggests that a functional replication complex containing P1, P2, and a full-length AMV RNA assembles on MVBs to traffic to the tonoplast.

  5. Colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils is associated with the presence of Narcissus mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Daffodils (Narcissus pseudonarcissus) are one of the world's most popular ornamentals. They also provide a scientific model for studying the carotenoid pigments responsible for their yellow and orange flower colours. In reverse bicolour daffodils, the yellow flower trumpet fades to white with age. The flowers of this type of daffodil are particularly prone to colour break whereby, upon opening, the yellow colour of the perianth is observed to be 'broken' into patches of white. This colour break symptom is characteristic of potyviral infections in other ornamentals such as tulips whose colour break is due to alterations in the presence of anthocyanins. However, reverse bicolour flowers displaying colour break show no other virus-like symptoms such as leaf mottling or plant stunting, leading some to argue that the carotenoid-based colour breaking in reverse bicolour flowers may not be caused by virus infection. Results Although potyviruses have been reported to cause colour break in other flower species, enzyme-linked-immunoassays with an antibody specific to the potyviral family showed that potyviruses were not responsible for the occurrence of colour break in reverse bicolour daffodils. Colour break in this type of daffodil was clearly associated with the presence of large quantities of rod-shaped viral particles of lengths 502-580 nm in tepals. Sap from flowers displaying colour break caused red necrotic lesions on Gomphrena globosa, suggesting the presence of potexvirus. Red necrotic lesions were not observed in this indicator plant when sap from reverse bicolour flowers not showing colour break was used. The reverse transcriptase polymerase reactions using degenerate primers to carla-, potex- and poty-viruses linked viral RNA with colour break and sequencing of the amplified products indicated that the potexvirus Narcissisus mosaic virus was the predominant virus associated with the occurrence of the colour break. Conclusions High viral counts were

  6. Vascular invasion routes and systemic accumulation patterns of tobacco mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Cheng, N H; Su, C L; Carter, S A; Nelson, R S

    2000-08-01

    Plant viruses must enter the host vascular system in order to invade the young growing parts of the plant rapidly. Functional entry sites into the leaf vascular system for rapid systemic infection have not been determined for any plant/virus system. Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) entry into minor, major and transport veins from non-vascular cells of Nicotiana benthamiana in source tissue and its exit from veins in sink tissue was studied using a modified virus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP). Using a surgical procedure that isolated specific leaf and stem tissues from complicating vascular tissues, we determined that TMV could enter minor, major or transport veins directly from non-vascular cells to produce a systemic infection. TMV first accumulated in abaxial or external phloem-associated cells in major veins and petioles of the inoculated leaf and stems below the inoculated leaf. It also initially accumulated exclusively in internal or adaxial phloem-associated cells in stems above the inoculated leaf and petioles or major veins of sink leaves. This work shows the functional equivalence of vein classes in source leaves for entry of TMV, and the lack of equivalence of vein classes in sink leaves for exit of TMV. Thus, the specialization of major veins for transport rather than loading of photoassimilates in source tissue does not preclude virus entry. During transport, the virus initially accumulates in specific vascular-associated cells, indicating that virus accumulation in this tissue is highly regulated. These findings have important implications for studies on the identification of symplasmic domains and host macromolecule vascular transport. PMID:10929128

  7. After the double helix: Rosalind Franklin's research on Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H; Morgan, Gregory J

    2008-06-01

    Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. During the next five years, while making significant headway on the structural determination of TMV, Franklin maintained an active correspondence with both Watson and Crick, who were also studying aspects of virus structure. Developments in TMV research during the 1950s illustrate the connections in the emerging field of molecular biology between structural studies of nucleic acids and of proteins and viruses. They also reveal how the protagonists of the "race for the double helix" continued to interact personally and professionally during the years when Watson and Crick's model for the double-helical structure of DNA was debated and confirmed. PMID:18702397

  8. Advances in alfalfa mosaic virus-mediated expression of anthrax antigen in planta

    SciTech Connect

    Brodzik, R.; Bandurska, K.; Deka, D.; Golovkin, M.; Koprowski, H. . E-mail: h_koprowski@jefferson.edu

    2005-12-16

    Plant viruses show great potential for production of pharmaceuticals in plants. Such viruses can harbor a small antigenic peptide(s) as a part of their coat proteins (CP) and elicit an antigen-specific immune response. Here, we report the high yield and consistency in production of recombinant alfalfa mosaic virus (AlMV) particles for specific presentation of the small loop 15 amino acid epitope from domain-4 of the Bacillus anthracis protective antigen (PA-D4s). The epitope was inserted immediately after the first 25 N-terminal amino acids of AlMV CP to retain genome activation and binding of CP to viral RNAs. Recombinant AlMV particles were efficiently produced in tobacco, easily purified for immunological analysis, and exhibited extended stability and systemic proliferation in planta. Intraperitional injections of mice with recombinant plant virus particles harboring the PA-D4s epitope elicited a distinct immune response. Western blotting and ELISA analysis showed that sera from immunized mice recognized both native PA antigen and the AlMV CP.

  9. Optimized expression, solubilization and purification of nuclear inclusion protein b of cardamom mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jebasingh, T; Jacob, T; Shah, M; Das, D; Krishnaswamy, S; Usha, R

    2008-04-01

    All RNA viruses encode an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRP) that is required for replication of the viral genome. Nuclear inclusion b (NIb) gene codes for the RdRp in Potyviridae viruses. In this study, expression, solubilization and purification of NIb protein of Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is reported. The objective of the present study was to express and purify the NIb protein of CdMV on a large scale for structural characterization, as the structure of the RdRp from a plant virus is yet to be determined. However, the expression of NIb protein with hexa-histidine tag in Escherichia coli led to insoluble aggregates. Out of all the approaches [making truncated versions to reduce the size of protein; replacing an amino acid residue likely to be involved in hydrophobic intermolecular interactions with a hydrophilic one; expressing the protein along with chaperones; expression in Origami cells for proper disulphide bond formation, in E. coli as a fusion with maltose-binding protein (MBP) and in Nicotiana tabacum] to obtain the RdRp in a soluble form, only expression in E. coli as a fusion with MBP and its expression in N. tabacum were successful. The NIb expressed in plant or as a fusion with MBP in E. coli can be scaled up for further work.

  10. Satellite tobacco mosaic virus refined to 1.4 Å resolution

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Steven B.; Day, John S.; McPherson, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Satellite tobacco mosaic virus (STMV) is among the smallest viruses, having 60 identical subunits arranged with T = 1 icosahedral symmetry. Its crystal structure was solved at 290 K and was refined using, in part, crystals grown in microgravity. Electron-density maps revealed nearly 57% of the genomic ssRNA. Using six flash-cooled crystals, diffraction data were recorded to 1.4 Å resolution and independent refinements of the STMV model were carried out versus the previous 1.8 Å resolution data representing merged data from 21 crystals (271 689 unique reflections), data consisting of corresponding reflections to 1.8 Å resolution from the cooled crystals and 1.4 Å resolution data from the cooled crystals comprised of 570 721 unique reflections. Models were independently refined with full NCS constraints using the program CNS and in restrained mode using the programs CNS, REFMAC5 and SHELX-97, with the latter two procedures including anisotropic temperature factors. Significant additional structural detail emerged from the analyses, including a unique cation and anion arrangement on fivefold axes and a precise assessment of icosahedral symmetry exactness in the crystal lattice. STMV represents the highest resolution native virus structure currently known by a substantial margin, and it permits the evaluation of a precise atomic model of a spherical virus at near-atomic resolution for the first time. PMID:25195746

  11. After the double helix: Rosalind Franklin's research on Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Creager, Angela N H; Morgan, Gregory J

    2008-06-01

    Rosalind Franklin is best known for her informative X-ray diffraction patterns of DNA that provided vital clues for James Watson and Francis Crick's double-stranded helical model. Her scientific career did not end when she left the DNA work at King's College, however. In 1953 Franklin moved to J. D. Bernal's crystallography laboratory at Birkbeck College, where she shifted her focus to the three-dimensional structure of viruses, obtaining diffraction patterns of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) of unprecedented detail and clarity. During the next five years, while making significant headway on the structural determination of TMV, Franklin maintained an active correspondence with both Watson and Crick, who were also studying aspects of virus structure. Developments in TMV research during the 1950s illustrate the connections in the emerging field of molecular biology between structural studies of nucleic acids and of proteins and viruses. They also reveal how the protagonists of the "race for the double helix" continued to interact personally and professionally during the years when Watson and Crick's model for the double-helical structure of DNA was debated and confirmed.

  12. Early Function of the Abutilon Mosaic Virus AC2 Gene as a Replication Brake

    PubMed Central

    Krenz, Björn; Deuschle, Kathrin; Deigner, Tobias; Unseld, Sigrid; Kepp, Gabi; Wege, Christina; Kleinow, Tatjana

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The C2/AC2 genes of monopartite/bipartite geminiviruses of the genera Begomovirus and Curtovirus encode important pathogenicity factors with multiple functions described so far. A novel function of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) AC2 as a replication brake is described, utilizing transgenic plants with dimeric inserts of DNA B or with a reporter construct to express green fluorescent protein (GFP). Their replicational release upon AbMV superinfection or the individual and combined expression of epitope-tagged AbMV AC1, AC2, and AC3 was studied. In addition, the effects were compared in the presence and in the absence of an unrelated tombusvirus suppressor of silencing (P19). The results show that AC2 suppresses replication reproducibly in all assays and that AC3 counteracts this effect. Examination of the topoisomer distribution of supercoiled DNA, which indicates changes in the viral minichromosome structure, did not support any influence of AC2 on transcriptional gene silencing and DNA methylation. The geminiviral AC2 protein has been detected here for the first time in plants. The experiments revealed an extremely low level of AC2, which was slightly increased if constructs with an intron and a hemagglutinin (HA) tag in addition to P19 expression were used. AbMV AC2 properties are discussed with reference to those of other geminiviruses with respect to charge, modification, and size in order to delimit possible reasons for the different behaviors. IMPORTANCE The (A)C2 genes encode a key pathogenicity factor of begomoviruses and curtoviruses in the plant virus family Geminiviridae. This factor has been implicated in the resistance breaking observed in agricultural cotton production. AC2 is a multifunctional protein involved in transcriptional control, gene silencing, and regulation of basal biosynthesis. Here, a new function of Abutilon mosaic virus AC2 in replication control is added as a feature of this protein in viral multiplication, providing a novel

  13. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape. PMID:24486486

  14. Comparative molecular epidemiology provides new insights into Zucchini yellow mosaic virus occurrence in France.

    PubMed

    Lecoq, H; Wipf-Scheibel, C; Nozeran, K; Millot, P; Desbiez, C

    2014-06-24

    Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, genus Potyvirus) causes important crop losses in cucurbits worldwide. In France, ZYMV epidemics are sporadic but occasionally very severe. This contrasts with Watermelon mosaic virus (WMV, genus Potyvirus) which causes regular and early epidemics. Factors influencing ZYMV epidemiology are still poorly understood. In order to gain new insights on the ecology and epidemiology of this virus, a 5-year multilocation trial was conducted in which ZYMV spread and populations were studied in each of the 20 plot/year combinations and compared with WMV. Search for ZYMV alternative hosts was conducted by testing weeds growing naturally around one plot and also by checking ZYMV natural infections in selected ornamental species. Although similar ZYMV populations were observed occasionally in the same plot in two successive years suggesting the occurrence of overwintering hosts nearby, only two Lamium amplexicaule plants were found to be infected by ZYMV of 3459 weed samples that were tested. The scarcity of ZYMV reservoirs contrasts with the frequent detection of WMV in the same samples. Since ZYMV and WMV have many aphid vectors in common and are transmitted with similar efficiencies, the differences observed in ZYMV and WMV reservoir abundances could be a major explanatory factor for the differences observed in the typology of ZYMV and WMV epidemics in France. Other potential ZYMV alternative hosts have been identified in ornamental species including begonia. Although possible in a few cases, exchanges of populations between different plots located from 500 m to 4 km apart seem uncommon. Therefore, the potential dissemination range of ZYMV by its aphid vectors seems to be rather limited in a fragmented landscape.

  15. Triticum mosaic virus exhibits limited population variation yet shows evidence of parallel evolution after replicated serial passage in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An infectious cDNA clone of Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus; family Potyviridae) was used to establish three independent lineages in wheat to examine intra-host population diversity levels within protein 1 (P1) and coat protein (CP) cistrons over time. Genetic variation was assessed ...

  16. Next generation sequencing technology: a powerful tool for the genome characterization of sugarcane mosaic virus from Sorghum almum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to analyze the occurrence of viruses in Sorghum almum plants in Florida exhibiting mosaic symptoms. Total RNA was extracted from symptomatic leaves and used as a template for cDNA library preparation. The resulting library was sequenced on an Illu...

  17. Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease, is present in Ohio wheat fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Wheat mosaic virus (WMoV), the causal agent of High Plains disease in wheat, was found in wheat fields in three western counties in Ohio: Auglaize, Miami, and Paulding. WMoV nucleoprotein sequence was identified from Illumina deep sequencing of RNA collected from symptomatic and asymptomatic wheat s...

  18. Complete genome sequence of Pokeweed mosaic virus and its relationship to other members of the genus Potyvirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic sequences of two isolates of Pokeweed mosaic virus (PkMV) were determined to be 9512 nucleotides in length, excluding the poly(A) tail. The two PkMV isolates are virtually the same in their genomic sequences. The PkMV genome contains a single large open reading frame encoding a ...

  19. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea

    PubMed Central

    Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-01-01

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita. This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea. PMID:27492000

  20. Complete genome sequence of Celery mosaic virus and its relationship to other members of the genus Potyvirus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The complete genomic sequence of Celery mosaic virus (CeMV) was determined to be 9999 nucleotides in length, excluding the 3’ poly(A) tail. The genome comprises a large open reading frame encoding a polyprotein of 3181 amino acid residues. Its genomic organization is typical of potyviruses, and cont...

  1. Genetic diversity and serological specificity of emerging cucumber green mottle mosaic virus and development of a broad spectrum LAMP assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV), first described in England, 1935, is a well-known, seed-borne Tobamovirus on cucurbits in Asia, Europe, and the Middle East. The recent outbreaks of CGMMV in Australia and North America (Canada and U.S.) received great concerns from the vegetable seed com...

  2. Detection of cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected watermelon seeds using short wave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral imaging system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The cucurbit diseases caused by cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) have led to a serious problem to growers and seed producers because it is difficult to prevent spreading through causal agent of seeds. Conventional detection methods for infected seed such as a biological, serological, and m...

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Chinese Yam Necrotic Mosaic Virus from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Hwan; Son, Chang-Gi; Kwon, Joong-Bae; Nam, Hyo-Hun; Kim, Yeongtae; Lee, Su-Heon; Zhao, Fumei; Moon, Jae Sun

    2016-08-04

    The complete genome sequence of Chinese yam necrotic mosaic virus (ChYNMV) consisting of 8,213 nucleotides containing one open reading frame was determined by the transcriptome data generated from Discorea opposita This is the first report of the complete nucleotide sequence of ChYNMV from Dioscorea opposita in the Republic of Korea.

  4. Introgression of chromosome segments from multiple alien species in wheat breeding lines with wheat streak mosaic virus resistance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pyramiding of alien-derived Wheat streak mosaic virus (WSMV) resistance and resistance enhancing genes in wheat is a costeffective and environmentally safe strategy for disease control. PCR-based markers and cytogenetic analysis with genomic in situ hybridisation were applied to identify alien chrom...

  5. Role of cucumber mosaic virus and its satellite RNA in the etiology of tomato fruit necrosis in Italy.

    PubMed

    Crescenzi, A; Barbarossa, L; Cillo, F; Di Franco, A; Vovlas, N; Gallitelli, D

    1993-01-01

    A cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) isolate supporting a natural 390-ribonucleotide satellite was used to reproduce under experimental conditions a disease of processing tomatoes called fruit necrosis. The virus induced incomplete differentiation of the vascular tissue of fruit stalks, which was the likely cause of the disease. On the other hand, the satellite RNA attenuated viral symptoms on tomato leaves reproducing the disease pattern typically observed in the field. The biological properties of this seemingly new variant of cucumoviral satellite RNAs were determined.

  6. Development a of multiplex TaqMan real-time RT-PCR assay for simultaneous detection of Asian prunus viruses, plum bark necrosis stem pitting associated virus, and peach latent mosaic virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Asian prunus viruses (APV 1, APV 2 and APV 3) and Plum bark necrosis stem pitting associated virus (PBNSPaV) are two recently described viruses infecting Prunus spp., and Peach latent mosaic viroid (PLMVd) is a viroid that infects the same species. A single-tube multiplex, TaqMan real-time RT-PCR as...

  7. Excision and episomal replication of cauliflower mosaic virus integrated into a plant genome.

    PubMed

    Squires, Julie; Gillespie, Trudi; Schoelz, James E; Palukaitis, Peter

    2011-04-01

    Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants containing a monomeric copy of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) genome exhibited the generation of infectious, episomally replicating virus. The circular viral genome had been split within the nonessential gene II for integration into the Arabidopsis genome by Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation. Transgenic plants were assessed for episomal infections at flowering, seed set, and/or senescence. The infections were confirmed by western blot for the CaMV P6 and P4 proteins, electron microscopy for the presence of icosahedral virions, and through polymerase chain reaction across the recombination junction. By the end of the test period, a majority of the transgenic Arabidopsis plants had developed episomal infections. The episomal form of the virus was infectious to nontransgenic plants, indicating that no essential functions were lost after release from the Arabidopsis chromosome. An analysis of the viral genomes recovered from either transgenic Arabidopsis or nontransgenic turnip (Brassica rapa var rapa) revealed that the viruses contained deletions within gene II, and in some cases, the deletions extended to the beginning of gene III. In addition, many of the progeny viruses contained small regions of nonviral sequence derived from the flanking transformation vector. The nature of the nucleotide sequences at the recombination junctions in the circular progeny virus indicated that most were generated by nonhomologous recombination during the excision event. The release of the CaMV viral genomes from an integrated copy was not dependent upon the application of environmental stresses but occurred with greater frequency with either age or the late stages of plant maturation.

  8. Movement Protein of Cucumber Mosaic Virus Associates with Apoplastic Ascorbate Oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Reenu; Kumar, Surender; Singh, Lakhmir; Hallan, Vipin

    2016-01-01

    Plant viral movement proteins facilitate virion movement mainly through interaction with a number of factors from the host. We report the association of a cell wall localized ascorbate oxidase (CsAO4) from Cucumis sativus with the movement protein (MP) of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). This was identified first in a yeast two-hybrid screen and validated by in vivo pull down and bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assays. The BiFC assay showed localization of the bimolecular complexes of these proteins around the cell wall periphery as punctate spots. The expression of CsAO4 was induced during the initial infection period (up to 72 h) in CMV infected Nicotiana benthamiana plants. To functionally validate its role in viral spread, we analyzed the virus accumulation in CsAO4 overexpressing Arabidopsis thaliana and transiently silenced N. benthamiana plants (through a Tobacco rattle virus vector). Overexpression had no evident effect on virus accumulation in upper non-inoculated leaves of transgenic lines in comparison to WT plants at 7 days post inoculation (dpi). However, knockdown resulted in reduced CMV accumulation in systemic (non-inoculated) leaves of NbΔAO-pTRV2 silenced plants as compared to TRV inoculated control plants at 5 dpi (up to 1.3 fold difference). In addition, functional validation supported the importance of AO in plant development. These findings suggest that AO and viral MP interaction helps in early viral movement; however, it had no major effect on viral accumulation after 7 dpi. This study suggests that initial induction of expression of AO on virus infection and its association with viral MP helps both towards targeting of the MP to the apoplast and disrupting formation of functional AO dimers for spread of virus to nearby cells, reducing the redox defense of the plant during initial stages of infection. PMID:27668429

  9. Characterisation of a satellite RNA of Cucumber mosaic virus that induces chlorosis in Capsicum annuum.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Kook; Jeon, Yong-Woon; Yoon, Ju-Yeon; Choi, Jang-Kyung

    2011-08-01

    The presence of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) satellite RNA dramatically changes symptoms on some hosts. A satellite RNA present in a strain of CMV (PepY-CMV) that induced chlorosis in pepper (Capsicum annuum) was shown to induce chlorosis in pepper in combination with another strain (Fny-CMV) that by itself induced a green mosaic symptom. The location of sequences within the PepY satellite RNA (PepY-satRNA) of CMV that conferred the ability to induce chlorosis on pepper plants were analyzed by exchanging sequence domains between cDNA clones of PepY-satRNA and an attenuated mosaic satellite RNA (Paf-satRNA), as well as site-directed mutagenesis of various clusters of the 22-nt sequence differences between the two satellite RNAs in the delimited central domain. The symptoms induced by site-directed mutants of PepY-satRNA and Paf-satRNA in the presence of Fny-CMV demonstrated an insertion within PepY-satRNA of 11 nt at positions 86-96 relative to Paf-satRNA determined the chlorosis-inducing phenotype. Within the chlorosis-inducing domain, deletion of nucleotides did not affect the satRNA replication but abolished the ability of PepY-satRNA to elicit chlorosis symptom. Conversely, a mutant satellite RNA derived from Paf-satRNA in which eleven nucleotides were inserted indicated that sequences of 11 nucleotides were found to be sufficient for chlorosis induction in pepper.

  10. Survey and RT-PCR Based Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus Affecting Small Cardamom in India.

    PubMed

    Biju, C N; Siljo, A; Bhat, A I

    2010-10-01

    Mosaic or marble or katte disease caused by Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is an important production constraint in all cardamom growing regions of the world. In the present study, 84 cardamom plantations in 44 locations of Karnataka and Kerala were surveyed. The incidence of the disease ranged from 0 to 85%. The incidence was highest in Madikeri (Karnataka) while no incidence was recorded in Peermade (Kerala). In general, incidence and severity of the disease was higher in cardamom plantations of Karnataka. A procedure for total RNA isolation from cardamom and detection of CdMV through reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers targeting the conserved region of coat protein was standardized and subsequently validated by testing more than 50 field cardamom samples originating from Karnataka and Kerala states. The method can be used for indexing the planting material and identifying resistant lines/cultivars before either they are further multiplied in large scale or incorporated in breeding. PMID:23637495

  11. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis in the coat protein gene of Banana bract mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Selvarajan, R

    2014-06-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, is the causal agent of the bract mosaic disease (BBrMD) that causes serious yield losses in banana and plantain in India and the Philippines. In this study, global genetic diversity and molecular evolution of BBrMV based on the capsid protein (CP) gene were investigated. Multiple alignments of CP gene of 49 BBrMV isolates showed nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity of 79-100 and 80-100 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that except two Indians isolates (TN14 and TN16), all isolates clustered together. Eleven recombination events were detected using Recombination Detection Program. Codon-based maximum-likelihood methods revealed that most of the codons in the CP gene were under negative or neutral selection except for codons 28, 43, and 92 which were under positive selection. Gene flow between BBrMV populations of banana and cardamom was relatively frequent but not between two different populations of banana infecting isolates identified in this study. This is the first report on genetic diversity, and evolution of BBrMV isolates based on recombination and phylogenetic analysis in India. PMID:24691817

  12. Genetic diversity and recombination analysis in the coat protein gene of Banana bract mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Balasubramanian, V; Selvarajan, R

    2014-06-01

    Banana bract mosaic virus (BBrMV), a member of the genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae, is the causal agent of the bract mosaic disease (BBrMD) that causes serious yield losses in banana and plantain in India and the Philippines. In this study, global genetic diversity and molecular evolution of BBrMV based on the capsid protein (CP) gene were investigated. Multiple alignments of CP gene of 49 BBrMV isolates showed nucleotide (nt) and amino acid (aa) identity of 79-100 and 80-100 %, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that except two Indians isolates (TN14 and TN16), all isolates clustered together. Eleven recombination events were detected using Recombination Detection Program. Codon-based maximum-likelihood methods revealed that most of the codons in the CP gene were under negative or neutral selection except for codons 28, 43, and 92 which were under positive selection. Gene flow between BBrMV populations of banana and cardamom was relatively frequent but not between two different populations of banana infecting isolates identified in this study. This is the first report on genetic diversity, and evolution of BBrMV isolates based on recombination and phylogenetic analysis in India.

  13. Survey and RT-PCR Based Detection of Cardamom mosaic virus Affecting Small Cardamom in India.

    PubMed

    Biju, C N; Siljo, A; Bhat, A I

    2010-10-01

    Mosaic or marble or katte disease caused by Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV) is an important production constraint in all cardamom growing regions of the world. In the present study, 84 cardamom plantations in 44 locations of Karnataka and Kerala were surveyed. The incidence of the disease ranged from 0 to 85%. The incidence was highest in Madikeri (Karnataka) while no incidence was recorded in Peermade (Kerala). In general, incidence and severity of the disease was higher in cardamom plantations of Karnataka. A procedure for total RNA isolation from cardamom and detection of CdMV through reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) using primers targeting the conserved region of coat protein was standardized and subsequently validated by testing more than 50 field cardamom samples originating from Karnataka and Kerala states. The method can be used for indexing the planting material and identifying resistant lines/cultivars before either they are further multiplied in large scale or incorporated in breeding.

  14. Multifaceted capsid proteins: multiple interactions suggest multiple roles for Pepino mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Matthaios M; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Sempere, Raquel Navarro; Aranda, Miguel A; Livieratos, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) (family Alphaflexiviridae, genus Potexvirus) is a mechanically transmitted tomato pathogen that, over the last decade, has evolved from emerging to endemic worldwide. Here, two heat-shock cognate (Hsc70) isoforms were identified as part of the coat protein (CP)/Hsc70 complex in vivo, following full-length PepMV and CP agroinoculation. PepMV accumulation was severely reduced in Hsp70 virus-induced gene silenced and in quercetin-treated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Similarly, in vitro-transcribed as well as virion RNA input levels were reduced in quercetin-treated protoplasts, suggesting an essential role for Hsp70 in PepMV replication. As for Potato virus X, the PepMV CP and triple gene-block protein 1 (TGBp1) self-associate and interact with each other in vitro but, unlike in the prototype, both PepMV proteins represent suppressors of transgene-induced RNA silencing with different modes of action; CP is a more efficient suppressor of RNA silencing, sequesters the silencing signal by preventing its spread to neighboring cells and its systemic movement. Here, we provide evidence for additional roles of the PepMV CP and host-encoded Hsp70 in viral infection, the first as a truly multifunctional protein able to specifically bind to a host chaperone and to counterattack an RNA-based defense mechanism, and the latter as an essential factor for PepMV infection. PMID:25162316

  15. Pepino mosaic virus capsid protein interacts with a tomato heat shock protein cognate 70.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Matthaios M; Veiga, Rita; Ghita, Melania; Tsikou, Daniela; Medina, Vicente; Canto, Tomas; Makris, Antonios M; Livieratos, Ioannis C

    2012-01-01

    Plant viral capsid proteins (CP) can be involved in virus movement, replication and symptom development as a result of their interaction with host factors. The identification of such interactions may thus provide information about viral pathogenesis. In this study, Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) CP was used as bait to screen a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) cDNA library for potential interactors in yeast. Of seven independent interacting clones, six were predicted to encode the C-termini of the heat shock cognate 70 (Hsc70) proteins. Three full length tomato Hsc70s (named Hsc70.1, .2, .3) were used to confirm the interaction in the yeast two hybrid assay and bimolecular fluorescent complementation (BiFC) in planta. The PepMV CP-Hsc70 interaction was confirmed only in the case of Hsc70.3 for both assays. In BiFC, the interaction was visualized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of agroinfiltrated Nicotiana benthamiana epidermal cells. During PepMV infection, Hsc70.3 mRNA levels were induced and protein accumulation increased at 48 and 72 h post inoculation. In transmission electron microscopy using immunogold labelling techniques, Hsc70 was detected to co-localize with virions in the phloem of PepMV-infected tomato leaves. These observations, together with the co-purification of Hsc70 with PepMV virions further support the notion of a PepMV CP/Hsc70 interaction during virus infection. PMID:21884738

  16. Development of a lateral-flow assay (LFA) for rapid detection of Soybean mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Zhang, Wen-Na; Tian, Jin-Yan; Zhao, Wen-Yang; Chen, Zheng-Qiang; Sun, Li-Hua; Xue, Fan; Liu, Yong; Tan, Xin-Qiu; Wang, Li-Min; Liu, Feng-Quan; Tao, Xiao-Rong

    2016-09-01

    Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) is the most common virus in soybean and poses a serious threat to crop production and germplasm recession in many countries worldwide. In this study, a highly practical and rapid lateral-flow assay (LFA) was developed for the detection of SMV. The SMV coat protein (CP) was prokaryotically expressed and purified to immunize mice. After generation of hybridoma cell lines, four anti-SMV monoclonal antibodies were selected. The LFA-strip was then assembled using a double-antibody sandwich strategy. When the SMV-infected leaf sample was assayed using the assembled LFA-strip, the positive pink color appeared in the test line within 5-10min. The strip only gave positive results with SMV and not other viruses tested and could be used to detect 800 fold dilutions of infected leaf samples. The LFA could be used to detect SMV in infected leaf tissue as well as soybean seeds. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the development of a LFA for the detection of SMV. The practical, rapid and specific assay that was developed in this study can be widely applied to the diagnosis and surveillance of SMV in the laboratory and the field. PMID:27235541

  17. Isolation and characterization of ZH14 with antiviral activity against Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Wen; Zhang, Li-Xiang; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Fei; Liang, Zhi-Hong; Niu, Tian-Gui

    2008-06-01

    A large number of bacteria were isolated from plant samples and screened for antiviral activity against the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The bacterium ZH14, which was isolated from Chinese Anxi oolong tea, secreted the antiviral substances, having 94.2% virus inhibition when the bacterial culture filtrate and TMV extract were mixed at a ratio of 1:1. The ZH14 strain is a gram-positive, spore-forming rod and has the ability to degrade ribonucleic acid. Based on its effectiveness on virus inhibition, ZH14 was selected for characterization and was identified as a strain of the Bacillus cereus group based on phenotypic tests and comparative analysis of its 16S rDNA sequence. At the same time, we determined the antiviral product of ZH14 as an extracellular protein with high molecular mass, having an optimum temperature of 15-60 degrees C and an optimum pH of 6-10. Hence, the ZH14 strain and its culture filtrate have potential application in controlling plant diseases caused by TMV.

  18. Multifaceted capsid proteins: multiple interactions suggest multiple roles for Pepino mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Mathioudakis, Matthaios M; Rodríguez-Moreno, Luis; Sempere, Raquel Navarro; Aranda, Miguel A; Livieratos, Ioannis

    2014-12-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) (family Alphaflexiviridae, genus Potexvirus) is a mechanically transmitted tomato pathogen that, over the last decade, has evolved from emerging to endemic worldwide. Here, two heat-shock cognate (Hsc70) isoforms were identified as part of the coat protein (CP)/Hsc70 complex in vivo, following full-length PepMV and CP agroinoculation. PepMV accumulation was severely reduced in Hsp70 virus-induced gene silenced and in quercetin-treated Nicotiana benthamiana plants. Similarly, in vitro-transcribed as well as virion RNA input levels were reduced in quercetin-treated protoplasts, suggesting an essential role for Hsp70 in PepMV replication. As for Potato virus X, the PepMV CP and triple gene-block protein 1 (TGBp1) self-associate and interact with each other in vitro but, unlike in the prototype, both PepMV proteins represent suppressors of transgene-induced RNA silencing with different modes of action; CP is a more efficient suppressor of RNA silencing, sequesters the silencing signal by preventing its spread to neighboring cells and its systemic movement. Here, we provide evidence for additional roles of the PepMV CP and host-encoded Hsp70 in viral infection, the first as a truly multifunctional protein able to specifically bind to a host chaperone and to counterattack an RNA-based defense mechanism, and the latter as an essential factor for PepMV infection.

  19. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem.

  20. A complete ancient RNA genome: identification, reconstruction and evolutionary history of archaeological Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Oliver; Clapham, Alan; Rose, Pam; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Allaby, Robin G.

    2014-01-01

    The origins of many plant diseases appear to be recent and associated with the rise of domestication, the spread of agriculture or recent global movements of crops. Distinguishing between these possibilities is problematic because of the difficulty of determining rates of molecular evolution over short time frames. Heterochronous approaches using recent and historical samples show that plant viruses exhibit highly variable and often rapid rates of molecular evolution. The accuracy of estimated evolution rates and age of origin can be greatly improved with the inclusion of older molecular data from archaeological material. Here we present the first reconstruction of an archaeological RNA genome, which is of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) isolated from barley grain ~750 years of age. Phylogenetic analysis of BSMV that includes this genome indicates the divergence of BSMV and its closest relative prior to this time, most likely around 2000 years ago. However, exclusion of the archaeological data results in an apparently much more recent origin of the virus that postdates even the archaeological sample. We conclude that this viral lineage originated in the Near East or North Africa, and spread to North America and East Asia with their hosts along historical trade routes. PMID:24499968

  1. Inhibition of pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) by turnip mosaic virus genome-linked protein (VPg).

    PubMed

    Domashevskiy, Artem V; Miyoshi, Hiroshi; Goss, Dixie J

    2012-08-24

    Pokeweed antiviral protein (PAP) from Phytolacca americana is a ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP) and an RNA N-glycosidase that removes specific purine residues from the sarcin/ricin loop of large rRNA, arresting protein synthesis at the translocation step. PAP is also a cap-binding protein and is a potent antiviral agent against many plant, animal, and human viruses. To elucidate the mechanism of RNA depurination, and to understand how PAP recognizes and targets various RNAs, the interactions between PAP and turnip mosaic virus genome-linked protein (VPg) were investigated. VPg can function as a cap analog in cap-independent translation and potentially target PAP to uncapped IRES-containing RNA. In this work, fluorescence spectroscopy and HPLC techniques were used to quantitatively describe PAP depurination activity and PAP-VPg interactions. PAP binds to VPg with high affinity (29.5 nm); the reaction is enthalpically driven and entropically favored. Further, VPg is a potent inhibitor of PAP depurination of RNA in wheat germ lysate and competes with structured RNA derived from tobacco etch virus for PAP binding. VPg may confer an evolutionary advantage by suppressing one of the plant defense mechanisms and also suggests the possible use of this protein against the cytotoxic activity of ribosome-inactivating proteins.

  2. Subcellular localization and rearrangement of endoplasmic reticulum by Brome mosaic virus capsid protein.

    PubMed

    Bamunusinghe, Devinka; Seo, Jang-Kyun; Rao, A L N

    2011-03-01

    Genome packaging in the plant-infecting Brome mosaic virus (BMV), a member of the alphavirus-like superfamily, as well as in other positive-strand RNA viruses pathogenic to humans (e.g., poliovirus) and animals (e.g., Flock House virus), is functionally coupled to replication. Although the subcellular localization site of BMV replication has been identified, that of the capsid protein (CP) has remained elusive. In this study, the application of immunofluorescence confocal microscopy to Nicotiana benthamiana leaves expressing replication-derived BMV CP as a green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion, in conjunction with antibodies to the CP and double-stranded RNA, a presumed marker of RNA replication, revealed that the subcellular localization sites of replication and CP overlap. Our temporal analysis by transmission electron microscopy of ultrastructural modifications induced in BMV-infected N. benthamiana leaves revealed a reticulovesicular network of modified endoplasmic reticulum (ER) incorporating large assemblies of vesicles derived from ER accumulated in the cytoplasm during BMV infection. Additionally, for the first time, we have found by ectopic expression experiments that BMV CP itself has the intrinsic property of modifying ER to induce vesicles similar to those present in BMV infections. The significance of CP-induced vesicles in relation to CP-organized viral functions that are linked to replication-coupled packaging is discussed.

  3. Turnip mosaic virus Moves Systemically through Both Phloem and Xylem as Membrane-Associated Complexes1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Huanquan

    2015-01-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  4. A complete ancient RNA genome: identification, reconstruction and evolutionary history of archaeological Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Oliver; Clapham, Alan; Rose, Pam; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Allaby, Robin G

    2014-02-06

    The origins of many plant diseases appear to be recent and associated with the rise of domestication, the spread of agriculture or recent global movements of crops. Distinguishing between these possibilities is problematic because of the difficulty of determining rates of molecular evolution over short time frames. Heterochronous approaches using recent and historical samples show that plant viruses exhibit highly variable and often rapid rates of molecular evolution. The accuracy of estimated evolution rates and age of origin can be greatly improved with the inclusion of older molecular data from archaeological material. Here we present the first reconstruction of an archaeological RNA genome, which is of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) isolated from barley grain ~750 years of age. Phylogenetic analysis of BSMV that includes this genome indicates the divergence of BSMV and its closest relative prior to this time, most likely around 2000 years ago. However, exclusion of the archaeological data results in an apparently much more recent origin of the virus that postdates even the archaeological sample. We conclude that this viral lineage originated in the Near East or North Africa, and spread to North America and East Asia with their hosts along historical trade routes.

  5. Mechanistic study of the hydrothermal reduction of palladium on the Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Oluwamayowa O; Freer, Alexander S; Miller, Jeffrey T; Loesch-Fries, L Sue; Kim, Bong Suk; Harris, Michael T

    2015-07-15

    The fundamental mechanisms governing reduction and growth of palladium on the genetically engineered Tobacco mosaic virus in the absence of an external reducer have been elucidated via in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In recent years, many virus-inorganic materials have been synthesized as a means to produce high quality nanomaterials. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in virus coating have not been sufficiently studied to allow for directed synthesis. We combined XAS, via XANES and EXAFS analysis, with TEM to confirm an autocatalytic reduction mechanism mediated by the TMV1Cys surface. This reduction interestingly proceeds via two first order regimes which result in two linear growth regimes as spherical palladium nanoparticles are formed. By combining this result with particle growth data, it was discovered that the first regime describes growth of palladium nanoparticles on the virion while the second regime describes a second layer of larger particles which grew sporadically on the first palladium nanoparticle layer. Subsequent aggregation of free solution based spherical particles and metallized nanorods characterize a third and final regime. At the end of the second reduction regime, the average particle diameter of particles tethered to the TMV1Cys surface are approximately 4.5 nm. The use of XAS to simultaneously monitor the kinetics of biotemplated reactions along with growth of metal nanoparticles will provide insight into the pertinent reduction and growth mechanisms so that nanorod properties can be controlled through their populating nanoparticles.

  6. Complex Spatial Responses to Cucumber Mosaic Virus Infection in Susceptible Cucurbita pepo Cotyledons

    PubMed Central

    Havelda, Zoltan; Maule, Andrew J.

    2000-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus infection of its susceptible host Cucurbita pepo results in a program of biochemical changes after virus infection. Applying a spatial analysis to expanding infected lesions, we investigated the relationship between the changes in enzyme activity and gene expression. Patterns of altered expression were seen that could not be detected by RNA gel blot analysis. For all the host genes studied, there was a downregulation (shutoff) of expression within the lesion. In addition, two distinct types of upregulation were observed. The expression of heat shock protein 70 (HSP70) and NADP+-dependent malic enzyme (NADP-ME) showed induction in apparently uninfected cells ahead of the infection. This response was more localized than the upregulation exhibited by catalase expression, which occurred throughout the uninfected regions of the tissue. The experiments showed that virus infection induced immediate and subsequent changes in gene expression by the host and that the infection has the potential to give advance signaling of the imminent infection. PMID:11041891

  7. Tobacco mosaic virus infection induces severe morphological changes of the endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Reichel, Christoph; Beachy, Roger N.

    1998-01-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) facilitates transport of virus infection between adjacent cells by modifying plasmodesmata. Previous studies suggested that the cytoskeleton and the endomembrane system are involved in this transport. We examined the effects of TMV infection on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) in transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana that accumulate the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the ER. Fluorescence microscopy was used to show that early in infection the ER undergoes dramatic morphological changes that include the conversion of tubular ER into large aggregates that revert to tubular ER in later stages of infection. These changes parallel MP accumulation and degradation. Furthermore, a fusion protein comprising MP fused to GFP accumulates in or on these large aggregates of ER. Expression of MP-GFP in the absence of virus infection led to the production of fluorescent aggregates of the same apparent form and size. Microsomes isolated from infected leaves contain MP. We show that the MP appears to behave as an integral ER membrane protein and is exposed on the cytosolic face of the ER. The importance of the association of MP with ER and its possible role in intracellular and intercellular spread of infection is discussed. PMID:9736708

  8. Turnip mosaic virus moves systemically through both phloem and xylem as membrane-associated complexes.

    PubMed

    Wan, Juan; Cabanillas, Daniel Garcia; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2015-04-01

    Plant viruses move systemically in plants through the phloem. They move as virions or as ribonucleic protein complexes, although it is not clear what these complexes are made of. The approximately 10-kb RNA genome of Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) encodes a membrane protein, known as 6K2, that induces endomembrane rearrangements for the formation of viral replication factories. These factories take the form of vesicles that contain viral RNA (vRNA) and viral replication proteins. In this study, we report the presence of 6K2-tagged vesicles containing vRNA and the vRNA-dependent RNA polymerase in phloem sieve elements and in xylem vessels. Transmission electron microscopy observations showed the presence in the xylem vessels of vRNA-containing vesicles that were associated with viral particles. Stem-girdling experiments, which leave xylem vessels intact but destroy the surrounding tissues, confirmed that TuMV could establish a systemic infection of the plant by going through xylem vessels. Phloem sieve elements and xylem vessels from Potato virus X-infected plants also contained lipid-associated nonencapsidated vRNA, indicating that the presence of membrane-associated ribonucleic protein complexes in the phloem and xylem may not be limited to TuMV. Collectively, these studies indicate that viral replication factories could end up in the phloem and the xylem. PMID:25717035

  9. Mechanistic study of the hydrothermal reduction of palladium on the Tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Adigun, Oluwamayowa O; Freer, Alexander S; Miller, Jeffrey T; Loesch-Fries, L Sue; Kim, Bong Suk; Harris, Michael T

    2015-07-15

    The fundamental mechanisms governing reduction and growth of palladium on the genetically engineered Tobacco mosaic virus in the absence of an external reducer have been elucidated via in situ X-ray absorption spectroscopy. In recent years, many virus-inorganic materials have been synthesized as a means to produce high quality nanomaterials. However, the underlying mechanisms involved in virus coating have not been sufficiently studied to allow for directed synthesis. We combined XAS, via XANES and EXAFS analysis, with TEM to confirm an autocatalytic reduction mechanism mediated by the TMV1Cys surface. This reduction interestingly proceeds via two first order regimes which result in two linear growth regimes as spherical palladium nanoparticles are formed. By combining this result with particle growth data, it was discovered that the first regime describes growth of palladium nanoparticles on the virion while the second regime describes a second layer of larger particles which grew sporadically on the first palladium nanoparticle layer. Subsequent aggregation of free solution based spherical particles and metallized nanorods characterize a third and final regime. At the end of the second reduction regime, the average particle diameter of particles tethered to the TMV1Cys surface are approximately 4.5 nm. The use of XAS to simultaneously monitor the kinetics of biotemplated reactions along with growth of metal nanoparticles will provide insight into the pertinent reduction and growth mechanisms so that nanorod properties can be controlled through their populating nanoparticles. PMID:25801128

  10. Cell-free construction of disarmed Abutilon mosaic virus-based gene silencing vectors.

    PubMed

    Krenz, Björn; Wege, Christina; Jeske, Holger

    2010-10-01

    The bipartite Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) was engineered as a versatile silencing vector in which the coat protein gene of DNA A was deleted and replaced by sequences of interest. Plants transgenic for the dimeric AbMV DNA B component were used as test hosts to minimize the risk of unintended release of the recombinant DNA. The vector construct was stable genetically upon systemic infection and, in common with the parental virus, the vector remained phloem-limited. For virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS), a phytoene desaturase gene fragment was isolated from Nicotiana benthamiana (NbPDS) and inserted into the vector. After agroinfection, phytoene desaturase silencing was triggered efficiently in all leaf tissues without interference by viral symptoms. In order to facilitate further the use of the system, a technique for cell-free construction of recombinants was established using rolling circle amplification and biolistic inoculation of DNA B-transgenic plants. This novel procedure provides a convenient and safe way for delivering VIGS constructs for functional genomics. PMID:20638413

  11. A complete ancient RNA genome: identification, reconstruction and evolutionary history of archaeological Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus.

    PubMed

    Smith, Oliver; Clapham, Alan; Rose, Pam; Liu, Yuan; Wang, Jun; Allaby, Robin G

    2014-01-01

    The origins of many plant diseases appear to be recent and associated with the rise of domestication, the spread of agriculture or recent global movements of crops. Distinguishing between these possibilities is problematic because of the difficulty of determining rates of molecular evolution over short time frames. Heterochronous approaches using recent and historical samples show that plant viruses exhibit highly variable and often rapid rates of molecular evolution. The accuracy of estimated evolution rates and age of origin can be greatly improved with the inclusion of older molecular data from archaeological material. Here we present the first reconstruction of an archaeological RNA genome, which is of Barley Stripe Mosaic Virus (BSMV) isolated from barley grain ~750 years of age. Phylogenetic analysis of BSMV that includes this genome indicates the divergence of BSMV and its closest relative prior to this time, most likely around 2000 years ago. However, exclusion of the archaeological data results in an apparently much more recent origin of the virus that postdates even the archaeological sample. We conclude that this viral lineage originated in the Near East or North Africa, and spread to North America and East Asia with their hosts along historical trade routes. PMID:24499968

  12. A cucumber mosaic virus based expression system for the production of porcine circovirus specific vaccines.

    PubMed

    Gellért, Akos; Salánki, Katalin; Tombácz, Kata; Tuboly, Tamás; Balázs, Ervin

    2012-01-01

    Potential porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid protein epitopes, suitable for expression on the surface of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) particles were determined by a thorough analysis of the predicted PCV capsid protein structure. The ab initio protein structure prediction was carried out with fold recognition and threading methods. The putative PCV epitopes were selected on the basis of PCV virion models and integrated into the plant virus coat protein, after amino acid position 131. The recombinants were tested for infectivity and stability on different Nicotiana species and stable recombinant virus particles were purified. The particles were tested for their ability to bind to PCV induced porcine antibodies and used for specific antibody induction in mice and pigs. The results showed that PCV epitopes expressed on the CMV surface were recognized by the porcine antibodies and they were also able to induce PCV specific antibody response. Challenge experiment with PCV2 carried out in immunized pigs showed partial protection against the infection. Based on these results it was concluded that specific antiviral vaccine production for the given pathogen was feasible, offering an inexpensive way for the mass production of such vaccines. PMID:23285149

  13. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-04-10

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV.

  14. Proteomic analysis of the plasma membrane-movement tubule complex of cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Paulus W; de Sousa Geraldino Duarte, Priscilla; Bloksma, Hanke; Boeren, Sjef; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus forms tubules constructed from the movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (PD) to achieve cell-to-cell movement of its virions. Similar tubules, delineated by the plasma membrane (PM), are formed protruding from the surface of infected protoplasts. These PM-tubule complexes were isolated from protoplasts by immunoprecipitation and analysed for their protein content by tandem mass spectrometry to identify host proteins with affinity for the movement tubule. Seven host proteins were abundantly present in the PM-tubule complex, including molecular chaperonins and an AAA protein. Members of both protein families have been implicated in establishment of systemic infection. The potential role of these proteins in tubule-guided cell-cell transport is discussed. PMID:26780773

  15. Mechanistic study of the hydrothermal reduction of palladium on the Tobacco Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adigun, Oluwamayowa O.

    Synthesis of nanorods and nanowires is becoming more and more important due to interest in them in a wide range of disciplines. The genetically engineered tobacco mosaic virus (TMV1Cys) provides a template for synthesis of uniform metal nanorods at mild operating conditions and without the use of any expensive technology compared to conventional synthetic methods. The discovery of the hydrothermal synthetic scheme has allowed the production of higher quality nanorods on the TMV template. However, the mechanism for reduction and growth in this process is still not understood. In this paper, the mechanism of synthesis for producing uniform, controllable palladium nanorods via the hydrothermal synthesis is studied using in situ X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy. Reduction and growth mechanisms are analyzed and valuable information about the nature of the process is acquired. Results in this paper serve as an entryway into fundamentally understanding the relationship between the underlying reduction and growth processes governing mineralization on biotemplates.

  16. Genetic transformation of Brassica campestris var. rapa protoplasts with an engineered cauliflower mosaic virus genome.

    PubMed

    Paszkowski, J; Pisan, B; Shillito, R D; Hohn, T; Hohn, B; Potrykus, I

    1986-09-01

    A hybrid Cauliflower Mosaic Virus (CaMV) genome containing a selectable marker gene was constructed by replacing the gene VI coding region with the aminoglycoside (neomycin) phosphotransferase type II [APH(3')II] gene from Tn5. This modified viral genome was tested for its infectivity both in planta and in a protoplast transformation system of Brassica campestris var. rapa. Stable, genetically transformed cell lines of B. campestris var. rapa were obtained after transformation. DNA of the hybrid CaMV genome was found to be integrated into high molecular weight plant genomic DNA. Transformation was achieved only when the hybrid genome was supplied together with wild type viral DNA. A possible complementation of the modified CaMV genome with the wild type viral DNA as a helper molecule in planta and in the protoplast system is discussed.

  17. Identification of Novel Inhibitors for Tobacco Mosaic Virus Infection in Solanaceae Plants.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Swaminathan, Subashini; Loganathan, Arul; Jegadeesan, Ramalingam

    2015-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) infects several crops of economic importance (e.g., tomato) and remains as one of the major concerns to the farmers. TMV enters the host cell and produces the capping enzyme RNA polymerase. The viral genome replicates further to produce multiple mRNAs which encodes several proteins, including the coat protein and an RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), as well as the movement protein. TMV replicase domain was chosen for the virtual screening studies against small molecules derived from ligand databases such as PubChem and ChemBank. Catalytic sites of the RdRp domain were identified and subjected to docking analysis with screened ligands derived from virtual screening LigandFit. Small molecules that interact with the target molecule at the catalytic domain region amino acids, GDD, were chosen as the best inhibitors for controlling the TMV replicase activity. PMID:26557141

  18. Diterpene alkaloids and diterpenes from Spiraea japonica and their anti-tobacco mosaic virus activity.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuan; Mao, Xin-Ying; Huang, Lie-Jun; Fan, Yi-Min; Gu, Wei; Yan, Chen; Huang, Tao; Zhang, Jian-Xin; Yuan, Chun-Mao; Hao, Xiao-Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Five new naturally occurring natural products, including two atisine-type diterpene alkaloids (1 and 2), two atisane-type diterpenes (3 and 4), and a new natural product spiramine C2 (5), along with nine known ones (6-14), were isolated from the ethanolic extracts of the whole plant of Spiraea japonica var. acuminata Franch. Their structures were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analysis. The anti-tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities of all the compounds were evaluated by the conventional half-leaf method. Six compounds (2, 3, 6, 7, 11, and 12) exhibited moderate activities at 100 μg/mL with inhibition rates in the range of 69.4-92.9%, which were higher than that of the positive control, ningnanmycin. Their preliminary structure-activity relationships were also discussed.

  19. Calcium and potassium ion binding by tobacco mosaic virus ribonucleic acid.

    PubMed

    Gastfriend, H H; Lauffer, M A

    1983-11-15

    Calcium and potassium ion titration experiments were performed on solutions of tobacco mosaic virus RNA using ion-specific electrodes. The data obtained were analyzed using Scatchard and Klotz plots for the number of binding sites per nucleotide (n), and the apparent stability constant for complex formation, beta Me. The experimental design also allowed for the determination of the number of protons released per metal ion bound, chi. The calcium ion titration in water yielded values of 0.45 for n, 6.03 for log beta Ca and 0.24 for chi. When this titration was repeated in 0.01 M-KCl, the values were found to be 0.11 for n, 5.08 for log beta Ca and zero for chi. An aqueous potassium titration was also performed, with values for n, log beta K and chi of 0.25, 2.96 and less than 0.10, respectively.

  20. Polymerization of tobacco mosaic virus protein without and with hydrogen ion binding.

    PubMed

    Shalaby, R A; Lauffer, M A

    1983-05-01

    When tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) protein is polymerized at pH values above 7 in unbuffered solutions, either by raising temperature at constant ionic strength or by increasing ionic strength at constant temperature, a 20 S component is formed having bound only the very small amount of H+ ion supplied by the unpolymerized protein. When hydrogen ion is added by titration during polymerization so as to keep pH constant, as would occur automatically if a buffer were present, a 20 S component is formed with one H+ ion bound each for half of the subunits. Thus, a 20 S form with and a 20 S form without bound H+ ion exist. Furthermore, the 20 S form without bound H+ ion binds H+ ion when supplied by titration to produce a 20 S form with the same amount of bound H+ ion as when H+ ion is supplied during the polymerization.

  1. Hydrogen-ion binding by tobacco-mosaic-virus protein polymers.

    PubMed

    Durham, A C; Vogel, D; de Marcillac, G D

    1977-09-15

    Hydrogen ion titration curves of tobacco mosaic virus protein have been measured in various conditions of protein concentration, temperature, ionic strength, and rate of pH change. The polymers present at each stage are deduced from turbidity and sedimentation data, plus published information. A simple semi-quantitative analysis of the curves is given, and the pK values of the two abnormal carboxylates in single helix are estimated as 6.4 and about 7.0. Disks, and some faster-forming unknown polymers in the same size range, have been abnormal carboxylate with pK 6.9. These results are most easily interpreted in terms of electrostatic interactions between carboxylates, probably at the axial ends of the protein subunits.

  2. Characterisation of several heterogeneous species of defective RNAs derived from RNA 3 of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    López, C; Aramburu, J; Galipienso, L; Nuez, F

    2007-01-01

    Preparations of double-stranded RNAs (dsRNAs) extracted from Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi plants infected with a subgroup IB isolate of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) were found to contain a heterogeneous population of defective RNAs (D-RNAs) derived from RNA 3. Characterised D-RNAs ranged in size from 1.5 to 1.9 kb and were derived either by a single in-frame deletion within the 3a or 3b genes or by means of double in-frame deletions within both genes. Also, northern blot hybridisation showed two other types of RNA derived from RNA 3: (a) RNA species of ca. 0.7 kb containing the 3'-terminus but lacking the 5'-terminus, which could be 3'-coterminal subgenomic of D-RNAs derived from the 3b gene and (b) RNA species of unknown origin of ca. 0.8 kb containing the 5'-terminus but lacking the 3'-terminus.

  3. The Effects of Chondroitin Sulfate on the Tobacco Mosaic Virus Configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urakami, N.; Imai, M.; Sano, Y.; Takasu, M.

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) particles show the isotropic-nematic (I-N) transition as a function of Chondroitin sulfate (Chs) concentration, which brings a high inhibitory activity against TMV infection. In our previous paper, we demonstrated that the depletion force induced by TMV particles and Chs chains played an important role in the I-N transition, using Monte Carlo simulations for hard spherocylinders and semirigid polymer chains system. In this study, we modify the rigidity of polymer chain in order to examine the role of the depletion force in the I-N transition. The Chs chain concentration giving the I-N transition is increased with decreasing the rigidity of the chain, and this indicates that the entropic force governs the phase behavior of TMV+polymer system.

  4. Inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Bento, C S; Rodrigues, R; Gonçalves, L S A; Oliveira, H S; Santos, M H; Pontes, M C; Sudré, C P

    2013-01-01

    We investigated inheritance of resistance to Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV) in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum accessions UENF 1616 (susceptible) crossed with UENF 1732 (resistant). Plants from generations P1, P2, F1, F2, BC1:1, and BC1:2 were inoculated and the symptoms were evaluated for 25 days. Subsequently, an area under the disease progress curve was calculated and subjected to generation means analysis. Only the average and epistatic effects were significant. The broad and narrow sense heritability estimates were 35.52 and 21.79%, respectively. The estimate of the minimum number of genes that control resistance was 7, indicating that resistance is polygenic and complex. Thus, methods to produce segregant populations that advocate selection in more advanced generations would be the most appropriate to produce chili pepper cultivars resistant to PepYMV. PMID:23661433

  5. Subcellular distribution of mutant movement proteins of Cucumber mosaic virus fused to green fluorescent proteins.

    PubMed

    Canto, Tomas; Palukaitis, Peter

    2005-04-01

    The subcellular distribution of the movement proteins (MPs) of nine alanine-scanning mutants of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP) and expressed from CMV, was determined by confocal microscopy of infected epidermal cells of Nicotiana tabacum and Nicotiana benthamiana, as well as infected N. benthamiana protoplasts. Only those mutant MPs that were functional for movement in all host species tested localized to plasmodesmata of infected epidermal cells and to tubules extending from the surface of infected protoplasts, as for wild-type CMV 3a MP. Various mutant MPs that were either conditionally functional for movement or dysfunctional for movement did not localize to plasmodesmata and did not form tubules on the surface of infected protoplasts. Rather, they showed distribution to different extents throughout the infected cells, including the cytoplasm, nucleus or the plasma membrane. The CMV 3a MP also did not associate with microtubules.

  6. Proteomic analysis of the plasma membrane-movement tubule complex of cowpea mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    den Hollander, Paulus W; de Sousa Geraldino Duarte, Priscilla; Bloksma, Hanke; Boeren, Sjef; van Lent, Jan W M

    2016-05-01

    Cowpea mosaic virus forms tubules constructed from the movement protein (MP) in plasmodesmata (PD) to achieve cell-to-cell movement of its virions. Similar tubules, delineated by the plasma membrane (PM), are formed protruding from the surface of infected protoplasts. These PM-tubule complexes were isolated from protoplasts by immunoprecipitation and analysed for their protein content by tandem mass spectrometry to identify host proteins with affinity for the movement tubule. Seven host proteins were abundantly present in the PM-tubule complex, including molecular chaperonins and an AAA protein. Members of both protein families have been implicated in establishment of systemic infection. The potential role of these proteins in tubule-guided cell-cell transport is discussed.

  7. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in a suspension of tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Lednev, V. N.; Mironova, T. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.; Petrova, E. K.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. Ruby laser pulses of 20 ns duration have been used for excitation. The spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of a Fabry–Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, but for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer a second line appeared, corresponding to stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. The frequency shift of the SLFRS by 2 cm‑1 (60 GHz), the conversion efficiency and the threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  8. RNA-controlled assembly of tobacco mosaic virus-derived complex structures: from nanoboomerangs to tetrapods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eber, Fabian J.; Eiben, Sabine; Jeske, Holger; Wege, Christina

    2014-11-01

    The in vitro assembly of artificial nanotubular nucleoprotein shapes based on tobacco mosaic virus-(TMV-)-derived building blocks yielded different spatial organizations of viral coat protein subunits on genetically engineered RNA molecules, containing two or multiple TMV origins of assembly (OAs). The growth of kinked nanoboomerangs as well as of branched multipods was determined by the encapsidated RNAs. A largely simultaneous initiation at two origins and subsequent bidirectional tube elongation could be visualized by transmission electron microscopy of intermediates and final products. Collision of the nascent tubes' ends produced angular particles with well-defined arm lengths. RNAs with three to five OAs generated branched multipods with a maximum of four arms. The potential of such an RNA-directed self-assembly of uncommon nanotubular architectures for the fabrication of complex multivalent nanotemplates used in functional hybrid materials is discussed.

  9. Stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering in a suspension of tobacco mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, O. V.; Kudryavtseva, A. D.; Lednev, V. N.; Mironova, T. V.; Oshurko, V. B.; Pershin, S. M.; Petrova, E. K.; Tcherniega, N. V.; Zemskov, K. I.

    2016-08-01

    The interaction of laser pulses with tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer and in water has been investigated. Ruby laser pulses of 20 ns duration have been used for excitation. The spectrum of the light passing through the sample was registered with the help of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. In the case of TMV in water we observed in the spectrum only one line of the exciting laser light, but for TMV in Tris-HCl pH7.5 buffer a second line appeared, corresponding to stimulated low-frequency Raman scattering (SLFRS) on the breathing radial mode of TMV. The frequency shift of the SLFRS by 2 cm-1 (60 GHz), the conversion efficiency and the threshold are measured for the first time to the best of our knowledge.

  10. Solid flexible electrochemical supercapacitor using Tobacco mosaic virus nanostructures and ALD ruthenium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnerlich, M.; Pomerantseva, E.; Gregorczyk, K.; Ketchum, D.; Rubloff, G.; Ghodssi, R.

    2013-11-01

    An all-solid electrochemical supercapacitor has been developed using a nanostructured nickel and titanium nitride template that is coated with ruthenium oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD). The electrode morphology was based on a high surface area biotemplate of genetically modified Tobacco mosaic virus. The biotemplate automatically self-assembles at room temperature in aqueous solution. Nafion® perfluorosulfonate ionomer dispersion was cast on the electrodes and used as a solid proton-conducting electrolyte. A 5.8 F g-1 gravimetric capacity (578 µF cm-2 based on footprint) was achieved in Nafion electrolyte, and the device retained 80% of its capacity after 25 000 cycles. The technology presented here will enable thin, solid, flexible supercapacitors that are compatible with standard microfabrication techniques.

  11. The limonoids and their antitobacco mosaic virus (TMV) activities from Munronia unifoliolata Oliv.

    PubMed

    Ge, Yong-hui; Liu, Kai-xing; Zhang, Jian-xin; Mu, Shu-zhen; Hao, Xiao-jiang

    2012-05-01

    Five new limonoids, named munronoids K-O (1-5), together with three known limonoids were isolated from Munronia unifoliola Oliv. These limonoids were involved in the skeletons of evodulone, gedunin, and peieurianin types of limonoids, and their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic data. Compound 5 featuring a γ-lactone ring instead of the β-substituted furan ring was found in the peieurianin type for the first time. The antitobacco mosaic virus (anti-TMV) activities of compounds 1-8 were also evaluated with half-leaf, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and Western blot methods, and limonoids 1, 5, and 8 showed stronger anti-TMV treatment activities than the positive control ningnanmycin. Six compounds (1-5 and 8) exhibited infection inhibition activities against TMV. PMID:22500574

  12. The 'emergence' of turnip mosaic virus was probably a 'gene-for-quasi-gene' event.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Adrian J; Nguyen, Huy Duc; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2015-02-01

    Turnip mosaic potyvirus is a virus of brassicas that emerged from a lineage of monocotyledon-infecting potyviruses about 1000 years ago. In vivo and in silico studies all indicate that sites, primarily in its protein 3 (P3) and cylindrical inclusion protein (CI) genes, but also its small 6 kDa 2 protein (6K2) and genome-linked viral protein (VPg) genes, control host specificity in a dynamic way. It is most likely that non-unique combinations of transient viral genomic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), not all of them non-synonymous, allowed the host switch to occur. These SNPs were probably ephemeral and replaced over time by other combinations as the population subsequently diverged within, and adapted to, the brassica host population. PMID:25559881

  13. Enhanced amplified spontaneous emission using layer-by-layer assembled cowpea mosaic virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Deng, Zhaoqi; Lin, Yuan; Zhang, Xiaojie; Geng, Yanhou; Ma, Dongge; Su, Zhaohui

    2009-01-01

    Layer-by-layer assembly technique was used to construct ultrathin film of cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) by electrostatic interactions, and the film was employed as a precursor on which an OF8T2 film was deposited by spin coating. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) was observed and improved for the OF8T2 film. Compared with OF8T2 film on quartz, the introduction of CPMV nanoparticles reduced the threshold and loss, and remarkably increased the net gain. The threshold, loss, and gain reached 0.05 mJ/pulse, 6.9 cm-1, and 82 cm-1, respectively. CPMV nanoparticles may enormously scatter light, resulting in a positive feedback, thus the ASE is easily obtained and improved.

  14. Compensatory capsid protein mutations in cucumber mosaic virus confer systemic infectivity in squash (Cucurbita pepo).

    PubMed

    Thompson, Jeremy R; Doun, Stephanie; Perry, Keith L

    2006-08-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) systemically infects both tobacco and zucchini squash. CMV capsid protein loop mutants with single-amino-acid substitutions are unable to systemically infect squash, but they revert to a wild-type phenotype in the presence of an additional, specific single-site substitution. The D118A, T120A, D192A, and D197A loop mutants reverted to a wild-type phenotype but did so in combination with P56S, P77L, A162V, and I53F or T124I mutations, respectively. The possible effect of these compensatory mutations on other, nonsystemically infecting loop mutants was tested with the F117A mutant and found to be neutral, thus indicating a specificity to the observed changes.

  15. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C.; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488” (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow’s milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue’s health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to

  16. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Susheel; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to combat

  17. Paenibacillus lentimorbus Inoculation Enhances Tobacco Growth and Extenuates the Virulence of Cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Susheel; Chauhan, Puneet Singh; Agrawal, Lalit; Raj, Rashmi; Srivastava, Ashish; Gupta, Swati; Mishra, Shashank Kumar; Yadav, Sumit; Singh, Poonam C; Raj, Shri Krishna; Nautiyal, Chandra Shekhar

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies with Paenibacillus lentimorbus B-30488" (hereafter referred as B-30488), a plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) isolated from cow's milk, revealed its capabilities to improve plant quality under normal and stress conditions. Present study investigates its potential as a biocontrol agent against an economically important virus, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), in Nicotiana tabacum cv. White Burley plants and delineates the physical, biophysical, biochemical and molecular perturbations due to the trilateral interactions of PGPR-host-CMV. Soil inoculation of B-30488 enhanced the plant vigor while significantly decreased the virulence and virus RNA accumulation by ~12 fold (91%) in systemic leaves of CMV infected tobacco plants as compared to the control ones. Histology of these leaves revealed the improved tissue's health and least aging signs in B-30488 inoculated tobacco plants, with or without CMV infection, and showed lesser intercellular spaces between collenchyma cells, reduced amount of xyloglucans and pectins in connecting primary cells, and higher polyphenol accumulation in hypodermis layer extending to collenchyma cells. B-30488 inoculation has favorably maneuvered the essential biophysical (ion leakage and photosynthetic efficiency) and biochemical (sugar, proline, chlorophyll, malondialdehyde, acid phosphatase and alkaline phosphatase) attributes of tobacco plants to positively regulate and release the virus stress. Moreover, activities of defense related enzymes (ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase and catalase) induced due to CMV-infection were ameliorated with inoculation of B-30488, suggesting systemic induced resistance mediated protection against CMV in tobacco. The quantitative RT-PCR analyses of the genes related to normal plant development, stress and pathogenesis also corroborate well with the biochemical data and revealed the regulation (either up or down) of these genes in favor of plant to combat

  18. Metabolome of Vanilla planifolia (Orchidaceae) and related species under Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV) infection.

    PubMed

    Palama, Tony Lionel; Grisoni, Michel; Fock-Bastide, Isabelle; Jade, Katia; Bartet, Laetitia; Choi, Young Hae; Verpoorte, Robert; Kodja, Hippolyte

    2012-11-01

    The genus Vanilla which belongs to the Orchidaceae family comprises more than 110 species of which two are commercially cultivated (Vanilla planifolia and Vanilla xtahitensis). The cured pods of these species are the source of natural vanilla flavor. In intensive cultivation systems the vines are threatened by viruses such as Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV). In order to investigate the effect of CymMV on the growth and metabolome of vanilla plants, four accessions grown in intensive cultivation systems under shadehouse, CR01 (V. planifolia), CR17 (V. xtahitensis), CR03 (V. planifolia × V. xtahitensis) and CR18 (Vanilla pompona), were challenged with an isolate of CymMV. CymMV infected plants of CR01, CR03 and CR17 had a reduced growth compared to healthy plants, while there was no significant difference in the growth of CR18 vines. Interestingly, CR18 had qualitatively more phenolic compounds in leaves and a virus titre that diminished over time. No differences in the metabolomic profiles of the shadehouse samples obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) were observed between the virus infected vs. healthy plants. However, using in- vitro V. planifolia plants, the metabolomic profiles were affected by virus infection. Under these controlled conditions the levels of amino acids and sugars present in the leaves were increased in CymMV infected plants, compared to uninfected ones, whereas the levels of phenolic compounds and malic acid were decreased. The metabolism, growth and viral status of V. pompona accession CR18 contrasted from that of the other species suggesting the existence of partial resistance to CymMV in the vanilla germplasm.

  19. Human T-cell Lymphotropic Virus Type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated Bronchioloalveolar Disorder Presenting with Mosaic Perfusion.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Hideaki; Yoshida, Masahiro; Yabe, Masami; Ishikawa, Takeo; Takagi, Masamichi; Tanoue, Susumu; Sano, Koji; Nishiwaki, Kaichi; Sato, Shun; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1)-associated bronchioloalveolar disorder (HABA) is a specific state with chronic and progressive respiratory symptoms caused by bronchiolar or alveolar disorder characterized by smoldering adult T-cell leukemia or the HTLV-I carrier state. We herein report a rare case of HABA with an initial presentation of mosaic perfusion in the lung. The diagnosis was made according to the results of a flow cytometry analysis of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and pathological findings. Clinicians must be careful to recognize that mosaic perfusion may be a radiological finding of HABA. PMID:26631889

  20. Genetic structure of populations of sugarcane streak mosaic virus in China: Comparison with the populations in India.

    PubMed

    He, Zhen; Yasaka, Ryosuke; Li, Wenfeng; Li, Shifang; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2016-01-01

    Sugarcane streak mosaic virus (SCSMV) causes mosaic and streak symptoms on sugarcane and sorghum crops, and has a broad host range. SCSMV is a member of the genus Poacevirus in the family Potyviridae.Ten SCSMV isolates were collected from sugarcane plants showing mosaic and streaking in Southern China from 2009-2011. Sequence-based phylogenetic and population genetic analyses were conducted using four partial genomic sequences covering the full genomes. These analyses were used to estimate the subpopulation differentiation and divergence within the Chinese virus population, and were compared with isolates from India. SCSMV-infected sugarcane plants in the field commonly harbor virus quasispecies (mutant cloud), and often have mixed infections with the same virus isolates. Inter- and intra-lineage recombination sites were identified in the protein 1, helper-component proteinase, coat protein and 3' non-coding regions of the Chinese isolates. All the Chinese non-recombinant isolates fell into at least nine lineages, and many clustered with Indian isolates. However, estimates of genetic differentiation and gene flow indicated that the SCSMV populations in China and India are genetically independent. Our genetic study of a poacevirus population in South Asia regions indicates the importance of the evolutionary-based design to control viruses.

  1. Mixed Infections of Pepino Mosaic Virus Strains Modulate the Evolutionary Dynamics of this Emergent Virus ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, P.; Sempere, R. N.; Elena, S. F.; Aranda, M. A.

    2009-01-01

    Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV) is an emerging pathogen that causes severe economic losses in tomato crops (Solanum lycopersicum L.) in the Northern hemisphere, despite persistent attempts of control. In fact, it is considered one of the most significant viral diseases for tomato production worldwide, and it may constitute a good model for the analysis of virus emergence in crops. We have combined a population genetics approach with an analysis of in planta properties of virus strains to explain an observed epidemiological pattern. Hybridization analysis showed that PepMV populations are composed of isolates of two types (PepMV-CH2 and PepMV-EU) that cocirculate. The CH2 type isolates are predominant; however, EU isolates have not been displaced but persist mainly in mixed infections. Two molecularly cloned isolates belonging to each type have been used to examine the dynamics of in planta single infections and coinfection, revealing that the CH2 type has a higher fitness than the EU type. Coinfections expand the range of susceptible hosts, and coinfected plants remain symptomless several weeks after infection, so a potentially important problem for disease prevention and management. These results provide an explanation of the observed epidemiological pattern in terms of genetic and ecological interactions among the different viral strains. Thus, mixed infections appear to be contributing to shaping the genetic structure and dynamics of PepMV populations. PMID:19759144

  2. Synergistic interaction between the Potyvirus, Turnip mosaic virus and the Crinivirus, Lettuce infectious yellows virus in plants and protoplasts.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jinbo; Turina, Massimo; Medina, Vicente; Falk, Bryce W

    2009-09-01

    Lettuce infectious yellows virus (LIYV), the type member of the genus Crinivirus in the family Closteroviridae, is specifically transmitted by the sweet potato whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) in a semipersistent manner. LIYV infections result in a low virus titer in plants and protoplasts, impeding reverse genetic efforts to analyze LIYV gene/protein functions. We found that synergistic interactions occurred in mixed infections of LIYV and Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) in Nicotiana benthamiana plants, and these resulted in enhanced accumulation of LIYV. Furthermore, we examined the ability of transgenic plants and protoplasts expressing only the TuMV P1/HC-Pro sequence to enhance the accumulation of LIYV. LIYV RNA and protein titers increased by as much as 8-fold in these plants and protoplasts relative to control plants. LIYV infections remained phloem-limited in P1/HC-Pro transgenic plants, suggesting that enhanced accumulation of LIYV in these plants was due primarily to increased replication efficiency, not to greater spread.

  3. Survival and transmission of potato virus Y, pepino mosaic virus, and potato spindle tuber viroid in water.

    PubMed

    Mehle, N; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I; Prezelj, N; Delic, D; Vidic, U; Ravnikar, M

    2014-02-01

    Hydroponic systems and intensive irrigation are used widely in horticulture and thus have the potential for rapid spread of water-transmissible plant pathogens. Numerous plant viruses have been reported to occur in aqueous environments, although information on their survival and transmission is minimal, due mainly to the lack of effective detection methods and to the complexity of the required transmission experiments. We have assessed the role of water as a source of plant infection using three mechanically transmissible plant pathogens that constitute a serious threat to tomato and potato production: pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), potato virus Y (PVY), and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). PepMV remains infectious in water at 20 ± 4°C for up to 3 weeks, PVY (NTN strain) for up to 1 week, and PSTVd for up to 7 weeks. Experiments using a hydroponic system show that PepMV (Ch2 genotype) and PVY (NTN strain) can be released from plant roots into the nutrient solution and can infect healthy plants through their roots, ultimately spreading to the green parts, where they can be detected after a few months. In addition, tubers developed on plants grown in substrate watered with PSTVd-infested water were confirmed to be the source of viroid infection. Our data indicate that although well-known pathways of virus spread are more rapid than water-mediated infection, like insect or mechanical transmission through leaves, water is a route that provides a significant bridge for rapid virus/viroid spread. Consequently, water should be taken into account in future epidemiology and risk assessment studies.

  4. Survival and transmission of potato virus Y, pepino mosaic virus, and potato spindle tuber viroid in water.

    PubMed

    Mehle, N; Gutiérrez-Aguirre, I; Prezelj, N; Delic, D; Vidic, U; Ravnikar, M

    2014-02-01

    Hydroponic systems and intensive irrigation are used widely in horticulture and thus have the potential for rapid spread of water-transmissible plant pathogens. Numerous plant viruses have been reported to occur in aqueous environments, although information on their survival and transmission is minimal, due mainly to the lack of effective detection methods and to the complexity of the required transmission experiments. We have assessed the role of water as a source of plant infection using three mechanically transmissible plant pathogens that constitute a serious threat to tomato and potato production: pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), potato virus Y (PVY), and potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd). PepMV remains infectious in water at 20 ± 4°C for up to 3 weeks, PVY (NTN strain) for up to 1 week, and PSTVd for up to 7 weeks. Experiments using a hydroponic system show that PepMV (Ch2 genotype) and PVY (NTN strain) can be released from plant roots into the nutrient solution and can infect healthy plants through their roots, ultimately spreading to the green parts, where they can be detected after a few months. In addition, tubers developed on plants grown in substrate watered with PSTVd-infested water were confirmed to be the source of viroid infection. Our data indicate that although well-known pathways of virus spread are more rapid than water-mediated infection, like insect or mechanical transmission through leaves, water is a route that provides a significant bridge for rapid virus/viroid spread. Consequently, water should be taken into account in future epidemiology and risk assessment studies. PMID:24334672

  5. Novel roles for well-known players: from tobacco mosaic virus pests to enzymatically active assemblies.

    PubMed

    Koch, Claudia; Eber, Fabian J; Azucena, Carlos; Förste, Alexander; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Bittner, Alexander M; Jeske, Holger; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania C; Wege, Christina

    2016-01-01

    The rod-shaped nanoparticles of the widespread plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been a matter of intense debates and cutting-edge research for more than a hundred years. During the late 19th century, their behavior in filtration tests applied to the agent causing the 'plant mosaic disease' eventually led to the discrimination of viruses from bacteria. Thereafter, they promoted the development of biophysical cornerstone techniques such as electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation. Since the 1950s, the robust, helically arranged nucleoprotein complexes consisting of a single RNA and more than 2100 identical coat protein subunits have enabled molecular studies which have pioneered the understanding of viral replication and self-assembly, and elucidated major aspects of virus-host interplay, which can lead to agronomically relevant diseases. However, during the last decades, TMV has acquired a new reputation as a well-defined high-yield nanotemplate with multivalent protein surfaces, allowing for an ordered high-density presentation of multiple active molecules or synthetic compounds. Amino acid side chains exposed on the viral coat may be tailored genetically or biochemically to meet the demands for selective conjugation reactions, or to directly engineer novel functionality on TMV-derived nanosticks. The natural TMV size (length: 300 nm) in combination with functional ligands such as peptides, enzymes, dyes, drugs or inorganic materials is advantageous for applications ranging from biomedical imaging and therapy approaches over surface enlargement of battery electrodes to the immobilization of enzymes. TMV building blocks are also amenable to external control of in vitro assembly and re-organization into technically expedient new shapes or arrays, which bears a unique potential for the development of 'smart' functional 3D structures. Among those, materials designed for enzyme-based biodetection layouts, which are routinely applied, e.g., for

  6. Pepino mosaic virus genotype shift in North America and development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification for rapid genotype identification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pepino mosaic, once an emerging disease a decade ago, has become endemic on greenhouse tomatoes worldwide in recent years. Three distinct genotypes of Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), including EU, US1 and CH2 have been recognized. Our earlier study conducted in 2006-2007 demonstrated a predominant EU...

  7. Genetic diversity of Pepino mosaic virus in the U.S. and identification of a tomato infecting strain capable of inducing disease on potato

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growers were once reluctant to remove Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV)-infected tomato plants because its effect on yield was considered mild. Pepino mosaic has now become an endemic disease problem on greenhouse tomatoes in the U. S. Recently, viroids (i.e., Tomato chlorotic dwarf viroid - TCDVd) were...

  8. Effects of dicyclohexylamine on polyamine biosynthesis and incorporation into turnip yellow mosaic virus in Chinese cabbage protoplasts infected in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Balint, R.; Cohen, S.S.

    1985-07-15

    The authors have reported that protoplasts from plants infected with turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) continue to produce virus in culture and that newly formed virus particles contained predominantly newly synthesized spermidine and spermine. They now report similar results with healthy protoplasts infected in vitro, in which essentially all of the virus is newly formed. Again, newly synthesized spermidine and spermine were preferentially incorporated into virus. DCHA inhibited spermidine synthesis by 85%, leading in 20 hr to a 60% depletion of the cellular spermidine and a 30% reduction in the amount of spermidine per virion. Spermine synthesis increased, however, producing a 40% increase in cellular spermine and 50-100% increase in the amount of spermine per virion. Thus, in spite of spermidine depletion, the total positive charge contributed by polyamines to the virus was essentially conserved.

  9. Mapping of the seed transmission determinants of barley stripe mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Edwards, M C

    1995-01-01

    The specific mechanism(s) by which some plant viruses are transmitted through seed, while others are excluded, is not known. Using infectious barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) RNAs transcribed in vitro from full-length cDNA clones, the viral genetic determinants of seed transmission have been mapped. Both pseudorecombinant and chimeric viruses were constructed from BSMV strains ND18 (seed transmitted) and CV17 (not seed transmitted). The markedly different seed transmissibility of these two strains facilitated the identification of RNAgamma as the location of the primary determinants of seed transmission phenotype. RNAbeta also played a role in seed transmission, but to a lesser extent than RNAgamma. Major genetic determinants of seed transmission on RNAgamma included the 5' untranslated leader, a 369-nt repeat in the gammaa gene, and the gammab gene. Important determinants of symptom phenotype mapped to the RNAgamma leader and the gammab gene as well. Some heterologous combinations of the RNAgamma leader and the gammab gene resulted in dramatic changes in symptomatology and seed transmission, depending on the parental source of RNAs alpha and beta. These results suggest that a complex interaction of the RNAgamma leader, the gammab gene, and RNAs alpha and beta are involved in BSMV pathogenesis. Considering the putative regulatory role of the gamma gene (Donald and Jackson 1994, Plant Cell 6:1593-1606) and the trans effects that alterations in the gammab gene have on RNAbeta gene expression (Petty et al., 1990, EMBO J. 9:3453-3457), phenotypic effects attributed to elements of RNAgamma could result from cis or trans interactions involving the RNAgamma leader, the gammab gene, and RNAs alpha and beta. Clearly, virus replication and movement play pivotal roles in the seed transmission of BSMV. PMID:8664501

  10. Genetic Structure and Molecular Variability of Cucumber mosaic virus Isolates in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Nouri, Shahideh; Arevalo, Rafael; Falk, Bryce W.; Groves, Russell L.

    2014-01-01

    Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) has a worldwide distribution and the widest host range of any known plant virus. From 2000 to 2012, epidemics of CMV severely affected the production of snap bean (Phaseulos vulgaris L.) in the Midwest and Northeastern United States. Virus diversity leading to emergence of new strains is often considered a significant factor in virus epidemics. In addition to epidemics, new disease phenotypes arising from genetic exchanges or mutation can compromise effectiveness of plant disease management strategies. Here, we captured a snapshot of genetic variation of 32 CMV isolates collected from different regions of the U.S including new field as well as historic isolates. Nucleotide diversity (π) was low for U.S. CMV isolates. Sequence and phylogenetic analyses revealed that CMV subgroup I is predominant in the US and further showed that the CMV population is a mixture of subgroups IA and IB. Furthermore, phylogenetic analysis suggests likely reassortment between subgroups IA and IB within five CMV isolates. Based on phylogenetic and computational analysis, recombination between subgroups I and II as well as IA and IB in RNA 3 was detected. This is the first report of recombination between CMV subgroups I and II. Neutrality tests illustrated that negative selection was the major force operating upon the CMV genome, although some positively selected sites were detected for all encoded proteins. Together, these data suggest that different regions of the CMV genome are under different evolutionary constraints. These results also delineate composition of the CMV population in the US, and further suggest that recombination and reassortment among strain subgroups does occur but at a low frequency, and point towards CMV genomic regions that differ in types of selection pressure. PMID:24801880

  11. In vitro transcripts of wild-type and fluorescent protein-tagged triticum mosaic virus (family potyviridae) are biologically active in wheat

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Triticum mosaic virus (TriMV) (genus Poacevirus, family Potyviridae) is a recently described eriophyid mite-transmitted wheat virus. In vitro RNA transcripts generated from full-length cDNA clones of TriMV proved infectious on wheat, and the progeny virus was efficiently transmitted by wheat curl m...

  12. Expression of foot-and-mouth disease virus epitopes in tobacco by a tobacco mosaic virus-based vector.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ligang; Jiang, Lubin; Zhou, Zhiai; Fan, Jihua; Zhang, Qingqi; Zhu, Huihui; Han, Qi; Xu, Zhengkai

    2003-10-01

    We expressed two immunogenic dominant epitopes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) serotype O in tobacco plant using a vector based on a recombinant tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). The recombinant viruses TMVF11 and TMVF14 contained peptides of 11 and 14 amino acid residues, respectively, from FMDV VP 1 fused to the open reading frame of TMV coat protein (CP) gene between amino acid residues 154 and 155. TMVF11 and TMVF14 systemically infected tobacco plant and produced large quantities of stable progeny viral particles assembled with the modified CP subunits. Guinea pigs, mice and swine were used to test the protective effects of the recombinant viruses against FMDV infection. Most guinea pigs were protected against FMDV challenge after parenteral injection with TMVF11, TMVF14, or the mixture TMVF11/TMVF14, but not wtTMV. The TMVF11/TMVF14 mixture protected all animals when challenged with 150 guinea pig 50% infection dosage (GPID(50)) FMDV. Oral administration of the TMVF11/TMVF14 mixture (3mg total) protected 3/8 guinea pigs against the same FMDV challenge. Most of the suckling mice parenterally injected with antiserum from guinea pigs immunized with the TMVF11/TMVF14 mixture, but not with wtTMV, were also protected against FMDV challenge with 10 suckling mouse 50% lethal dosage (SMLD(50)), indicating that antibodies produced in guinea pigs immunized with the TMVF11/TMVF14 mixture specifically neutralized FMDV. Western blot analysis indicated that antiserum from those guinea pigs reacted with the FMDV VP1 protein. The protective effect of TMVF11 was also demonstrated in swine, where preliminary tests showed that nine pigs immunized with TMVF11 in three experiments were protected against FMDV challenge with 20 minimal infecting dose (MID). PMID:14505922

  13. Susceptibility of Brassica species to cauliflower mosaic virus infection is related to a specific stage in the virus multiplication cycle.

    PubMed

    Saunders, K; Lucy, A P; Covey, S N

    1990-08-01

    The relative susceptibilities and symptom responses of different Brassica species to infection by cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) have been compared and related to molecular events of the virus multiplication cycle. Variants of B. rapa (genome descriptor aa) were highly susceptible to infection by CaMV strain Cabb B-JI and contained relatively large amounts of virus; B. oleracea (cc) variants showed low susceptibility and contained small amounts of virus. B. nigra (bb) and allotetraploid species. B. juncea (aabb), B. napus (aacc) and B. carinata (bbcc), showed moderate responses to CaMV. CaMV unencapsidated DNA forms were isolated from different Brassica plants and examined by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and blot hybridization. Viral RNA was estimated by dot blot analysis. These analyses showed differences in accumulation of key viral replication cycle intermediates within the broad range of host plants studied. The most susceptible species contained relatively small amounts of supercoiled (SC) DNA, a component of the CaMV mini-chromosome, but abundant viral transcripts and reverse transcription replication products. Tolerant plant hosts contained high levels of SC DNA but low levels of viral transcripts and reverse transcription DNA products. Allotetraploids contained SC DNA, RNA transcripts and replication product levels which were generally intermediate between those of their respective progenitor species. Evidence is presented that accumulation of CaMV SC DNA in the less susceptible host species is probably not due to autonomous DNA replication or tissue-specific expression. We conclude that a major component of the susceptibility of Brassica plants (and probably all CaMV host species) to CaMV infection is the level of viral minichromosome expression, influenced directly by the host genotype.

  14. Raspberry Mosaic Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Raspberry mosaic disease (RMD) is an overarching term used to describe a range of diseases caused by various combinations of different viruses that are each transmitted by aphids. In the scientific literature RMD has been given various alternative names, including red raspberry mosaic, type b mosaic...

  15. Characterization of Rhynchosia yellow mosaic Yucatan virus, a new recombinant begomovirus associated with two fabaceous weeds in Yucatan, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Zepeda, C; Brown, J K; Moreno-Valenzuela, O A; Argüello-Astorga, G; Idris, A M; Carnevali, G; Rivera-Bustamante, R F

    2010-10-01

    Rhynchosia minima (L.) DC. (Fabaceae) plants exhibiting bright golden mosaic symptoms were previously associated with begomovirus infection in Yucatan, México [1]. To characterize the begomovirus infecting these plants, the complete bipartite genome was cloned and sequenced. Sequence comparisons indicated that the virus was distinct from all other begomoviruses known to date, including those previously identified from symptomatic R. minima, and the name Rhynchosia yellow mosaic Yucatan virus (RhYMYuV) is proposed. Pairwise comparisons indicated that RhYMYuV DNA-A [2,597 nt, (EU021216)] and DNA-B [2,542 nt, (FJ792608)] components shared the highest nt sequence identity with Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV), 87% for component A and 71% for component B. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that both components of RhYMYuV are most closely related to other New World begomoviruses, having as closest relatives immediate outliers to the major Squash leaf curl virus (SLCV) clade. Recombination analysis of the RhYMYuV genome indicated that the DNA-A component has arisen through intermolecular recombination. R. minima plants inoculated with the monomeric clones developed a bright yellow mosaic similar to symptoms observed in naturally infected plants, confirming that the clones were infectious. Nicotiana benthamiana plants biolistically inoculated with monomeric clones developed curling and chlorosis in the newly emerging leaves. RhYMYuV was also detected in symptomatic Desmodium sect. Scorpiurus Benth. (Fabaceae) that were collected near the RhYMYuV-infected plants.

  16. Novel roles for well-known players: from tobacco mosaic virus pests to enzymatically active assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Claudia; Eber, Fabian J; Azucena, Carlos; Förste, Alexander; Walheim, Stefan; Schimmel, Thomas; Bittner, Alexander M; Jeske, Holger; Gliemann, Hartmut; Eiben, Sabine; Geiger, Fania C

    2016-01-01

    Summary The rod-shaped nanoparticles of the widespread plant pathogen tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) have been a matter of intense debates and cutting-edge research for more than a hundred years. During the late 19th century, their behavior in filtration tests applied to the agent causing the 'plant mosaic disease' eventually led to the discrimination of viruses from bacteria. Thereafter, they promoted the development of biophysical cornerstone techniques such as electron microscopy and ultracentrifugation. Since the 1950s, the robust, helically arranged nucleoprotein complexes consisting of a single RNA and more than 2100 identical coat protein subunits have enabled molecular studies which have pioneered the understanding of viral replication and self-assembly, and elucidated major aspects of virus–host interplay, which can lead to agronomically relevant diseases. However, during the last decades, TMV has acquired a new reputation as a well-defined high-yield nanotemplate with multivalent protein surfaces, allowing for an ordered high-density presentation of multiple active molecules or synthetic compounds. Amino acid side chains exposed on the viral coat may be tailored genetically or biochemically to meet the demands for selective conjugation reactions, or to directly engineer novel functionality on TMV-derived nanosticks. The natural TMV size (length: 300 nm) in combination with functional ligands such as peptides, enzymes, dyes, drugs or inorganic materials is advantageous for applications ranging from biomedical imaging and therapy approaches over surface enlargement of battery electrodes to the immobilization of enzymes. TMV building blocks are also amenable to external control of in vitro assembly and re-organization into technically expedient new shapes or arrays, which bears a unique potential for the development of 'smart' functional 3D structures. Among those, materials designed for enzyme-based biodetection layouts, which are routinely applied, e.g., for

  17. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-04-26

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum.

  18. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, P H; Wen, A M; Sheen, M R; Fields, J; Rojanasopondist, P; Steinmetz, N F; Fiering, S

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The 'in situ vaccination' immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer. PMID:26689376

  19. New Strategies and Methods to Study Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein and Its Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the targets of anti-viral compounds are hot topics in the field of pesticide research. Various efficient anti-TMV (Tobacco Mosaic Virus) compounds, such as Ningnanmycin (NNM), Antofine (ATF), Dufulin (DFL) and Bingqingxiao (BQX) are available. However, the mechanisms of the action of these compounds on targets remain unclear. To further study the mechanism of the action of the anti-TMV inhibitors, the TMV coat protein (TMV CP) was expressed and self-assembled into four-layer aggregate disks in vitro, which could be reassembled into infectious virus particles with TMV RNA. The interactions between the anti-TMV compounds and the TMV CP disk were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry and native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results revealed that assembly of the four-layer aggregate disk was inhibited by NNM; it changed the four-layer aggregate disk into trimers, and affected the regular assembly of TMV CP and TMV RNA. The four-layer aggregate disk of TMV CP was little inhibited by ATF, DFL and BQX. Our results provide original data, as well as new strategies and methods, for research on the mechanism of action of anti-viral drugs. PMID:26927077

  20. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2015-01-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The “in situ vaccination” immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic anti-tumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from Cowpea Mosaic Virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic anti-tumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity, and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the anti-tumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic anti-tumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer. PMID:26689376

  1. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, P. H.; Wen, A. M.; Sheen, M. R.; Fields, J.; Rojanasopondist, P.; Steinmetz, N. F.; Fiering, S.

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The ‘in situ vaccination’ immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  2. Coding capacity determines in vivo accumulation of a defective RNA of clover yellow mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    White, K A; Bancroft, J B; Mackie, G A

    1992-01-01

    Naturally occurring defective RNAs (D RNAs) derived from the potexvirus clover yellow mosaic virus (CYMV) contain large internal deletions yet maintain a single open reading frame (ORF) representing the in-frame fusion of 5' and 3' terminal ORFs. Capped transcripts of the prototype 1.2-kb D RNA of CYMV were synthesized in vitro and used to inoculate broad bean plants. Progeny D RNA accumulated only if synthetic D RNA transcripts were coinoculated with CYMV RNA. Several experiments showed that helper-dependent accumulation of the D RNA in vivo depended on the maintenance of its encoded fusion ORF. (i) D RNAs with six-residue deletions introduced early in the fusion ORF accumulated, whereas those with four-residue out-of-frame deletions at the same sites were nonviable. (ii) Analysis of D RNAs containing termination codons at different locations showed that only the most 3' stop codon (maintaining over 93% of the fusion ORF) was permissive for D RNA accumulation. (iii) D RNAs with small in-frame deletions and insertions in their 3' coding regions were viable. (iv) Nonviable D RNAs containing disrupted fusion ORFs could not be complemented by the presence in the infection of a D RNA encoding a complete fusion ORF. Taken together, the results indicate that the process of translation, rather than the encoded product, modulates an event(s) which influences the propagation and/or accumulation of this RNA in vivo. This represents a unique requirement among plant virus D RNAs. Images PMID:1560537

  3. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast.

    PubMed

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  4. New Strategies and Methods to Study Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus Coat Protein and Its Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangyang; Chen, Zhuo; Jin, Linhong; Hu, Deyu; Yang, Song

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the targets of anti-viral compounds are hot topics in the field of pesticide research. Various efficient anti-TMV (Tobacco Mosaic Virus) compounds, such as Ningnanmycin (NNM), Antofine (ATF), Dufulin (DFL) and Bingqingxiao (BQX) are available. However, the mechanisms of the action of these compounds on targets remain unclear. To further study the mechanism of the action of the anti-TMV inhibitors, the TMV coat protein (TMV CP) was expressed and self-assembled into four-layer aggregate disks in vitro, which could be reassembled into infectious virus particles with TMV RNA. The interactions between the anti-TMV compounds and the TMV CP disk were analyzed by size exclusion chromatography, isothermal titration calorimetry and native-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results revealed that assembly of the four-layer aggregate disk was inhibited by NNM; it changed the four-layer aggregate disk into trimers, and affected the regular assembly of TMV CP and TMV RNA. The four-layer aggregate disk of TMV CP was little inhibited by ATF, DFL and BQX. Our results provide original data, as well as new strategies and methods, for research on the mechanism of action of anti-viral drugs.

  5. Modeling the helicase domain of Brome mosaic virus 1a replicase.

    PubMed

    Garriga, Damià; Dìez, Juana; Oliva, Baldomero

    2004-12-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) is a representative member of positive-strand RNA viruses. The 1a replicase from BMV is a membrane protein of unknown structure with a methyltransferase N-terminal domain and a putative helicase activity in the C-terminal domain. In order to make a functional prediction of the helicase activity of the BMV 1a C-terminal domain, we have built a model of its structure. The use of fold recognition servers hinted at two different superfamilies of helicases [superfamily 1 (SF1) and superfamily 2 (SF2)] as putative templates for the C-terminal fragment of BMV 1a. A structural model of BMV 1a in SF2 was obtained by means of a fold recognition server (3D-PSSM). On the other hand, we used the helicase motifs described in the literature to construct a model of the structure of the BMV 1a C-terminal domain as a member of the SF1. The biological functionality and statistic potentials were used to discriminate between the two models. The results illustrate that the use of sequence profiles and patterns helps modeling. Accordingly, the C-terminal domain of BMV 1a is a potential member of the SF1 of helicases, and it can be modeled with the structure of a member of the UvrD family of helicases. The helicase mechanism was corroborated by the model and this supports the hypothesis that BMV 1a should have helicase activity.

  6. Analysis of the systemic colonization of cucumber plants by Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Moreno, I M; Thompson, J R; García-Arenal, F

    2004-03-01

    Systemic movement of Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV) in cucumber plants was shown to be from photoassimilate source to sink, thus indicating phloem transport. Nevertheless, CGMMV was not detected by immunocytochemical procedures in the intermediary cell-sieve element complex in inoculated cotyledons, where photoassimilate loading occurs. In stem internodes, CGMMV was first localized in the companion cells of the external phloem and subsequently in all tissues except the medulla, therefore suggesting leakage of the virus from, and reloading into, the transport phloem during systemic movement. In systemically infected sink leaves, CGMMV was simultaneously detected in the xylem and phloem. Interestingly, CGMMV accumulated to high levels in the differentiating tracheids of young leaves implying that the xylem could be involved in the systemic movement of CGMMV. This possibility was tested using plants in which cell death was induced in a portion of the stem by steam treatment. At 24 degrees C, steam treatment effectively prevented the systemic movement of CGMMV, even though viral RNA was detected in washes of the xylem above the steamed internode suggesting that xylem circulation occurred. At 29 degrees C, CGMMV systemically infected steam-treated cucumber plants, indicating that CGMMV can move systemically via the xylem. Xylem transport of CGMMV was, however, less efficient than phloem transport in terms of the time required for systemic infection and the percentage of plants infected.

  7. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India.

  8. Specific RNA binding by amino-terminal peptides of alfalfa mosaic virus coat protein.

    PubMed Central

    Baer, M L; Houser, F; Loesch-Fries, L S; Gehrke, L

    1994-01-01

    Specific RNA-protein interactions and ribonucleoprotein complexes are essential for many biological processes, but our understanding of how ribonucleoprotein particles form and accomplish their biological functions is rudimentary. This paper describes the interaction of alfalfa mosaic virus (A1MV) coat protein or peptides with viral RNA. A1MV coat protein is necessary both for virus particle formation and for the initiation of replication of the three genomic RNAs. We have examined protein determinants required for specific RNA binding and analyzed potential structural changes elicited by complex formation. The results indicate that the amino-terminus of the viral coat protein, which lacks primary sequence homology with recognized RNA binding motifs, is both necessary and sufficient for binding to RNA. Circular dichroism spectra and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments suggest that the RNA conformation is altered when amino-terminal coat protein peptides bind to the viral RNA. The peptide--RNA interaction is functionally significant because the peptides will substitute for A1MV coat protein in initiating RNA replication. The apparent conformational change that accompanies RNA--peptide complex formation may generate a structure which, unlike the viral RNA alone, can be recognized by the viral replicase. Images PMID:8313916

  9. An EDS1 orthologue is required for N-mediated resistance against tobacco mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Peart, Jack R; Cook, Graeme; Feys, Bart J; Parker, Jane E; Baulcombe, David C

    2002-03-01

    In Arabidopsis, EDS1 is essential for disease resistance conferred by a structural subset of resistance (R) proteins containing a nucleotide-binding site, leucine-rich-repeats and amino-terminal similarity to animal Toll and Interleukin-1 (so-called TIR-NBS-LRR proteins). EDS1 is not required by NBS-LRR proteins that possess an amino-terminal coiled-coil motif (CC-NBS-LRR proteins). Using virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) of a Nicotiana benthaminana EDS1 orthologue, we investigated the role of EDS1 in resistance specified by structurally distinct R genes in transgenic N. benthamiana. Resistance against tobacco mosaic virus mediated by tobacco N, a TIR-NBS-LRR protein, was EDS1-dependent. Two other R proteins, Pto (a protein kinase), and Rx (a CC-NBS-LRR protein) recognizing, respectively, a bacterial and viral pathogen did not require EDS1. These data, together with the finding that expression of N. benthamiana and Arabidopsis EDS1 mRNAs are similarly regulated, lead us to conclude that recruitment of EDS1 by TIR-NBS-LRR proteins is evolutionarily conserved between dicotyledenous plant species in resistance against bacterial, oomycete and viral pathogens. We further demonstrate that VIGS is a useful approach to dissect resistance signaling pathways in a genetically intractable plant species.

  10. Foxtail Mosaic Virus-Induced Gene Silencing in Monocot Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Na; Xie, Ke; Jia, Qi; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Tianyuan; Li, Huangai; Wei, Xiang; Diao, Xianmin; Hong, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is a powerful technique to study gene function in plants. However, very few VIGS vectors are available for monocot plants. Here we report that Foxtail mosaic virus (FoMV) can be engineered as an effective VIGS system to induce efficient silencing of endogenous genes in monocot plants including barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), wheat (Triticum aestivum) and foxtail millet (Setaria italica). This is evidenced by FoMV-based silencing of phytoene desaturase (PDS) and magnesium chelatase in barley, of PDS and Cloroplastos alterados1 in foxtail millet and wheat, and of an additional gene IspH in foxtail millet. Silencing of these genes resulted in photobleached or chlorosis phenotypes in barley, wheat, and foxtail millet. Furthermore, our FoMV-based gene silencing is the first VIGS system reported for foxtail millet, an important C4 model plant. It may provide an efficient toolbox for high-throughput functional genomics in economically important monocot crops. PMID:27225900

  11. Entropy and volume change of dissociation in tobacco mosaic virus probed by high pressure.

    PubMed

    Bispo, Jose A C; Bonafe, Carlos F S; Joekes, Ines; Martinez, Ernesto A; Carvalho, Giovani B M; Norberto, Douglas R

    2012-12-27

    Virus dissociation and inactivation by high pressure have been extensively studied in recent decades. Pressure-induced dissociation of viral particles involves a reduction in the Gibbs free energy of dissociation and a negative change in volume. In this work, we investigated the combined effect of high pressure and temperature on the dissociation of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV). We assumed the presence of two states of TMV with different tendencies to dissociate. Thus one form presents a low tendency (L) and the other a high tendency (H) to dissociate. Based on the model described here, the L-H transition was favored by an increase in pressure and a decrease in temperature. The volume change of dissociation was pressure- and temperature-dependent, with a highly negative value of -80 mL/mol being recorded at 0 °C and atmospheric pressure. The entropy and enthalpy of dissociation were very temperature- and pressure-dependent, with values of entropy of 450 to -1300 kJ/mol and values of enthalpy of 5.5 × 10(4) to 2.4 × 10(4) kJ/mol. The dissociation of TMV was enthalpy-driven at all temperatures and pressures investigated. Based on these findings, we conclude that the model presented allows accurate predictions of viral dissociation behavior in different experimental conditions. PMID:23205955

  12. An atomic model of brome mosaic virus using direct electron detection and real-space optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Hryc, Corey F; Bammes, Benjamin; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiangan; Baker, Matthew L; Kao, Cheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Schmid, Michael F; Adams, Paul D; Chiu, Wah

    2014-09-04

    Advances in electron cryo-microscopy have enabled structure determination of macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. However, structure determination, even using de novo methods, remains susceptible to model bias and overfitting. Here we describe a complete workflow for data acquisition, image processing, all-atom modelling and validation of brome mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Data were collected with a direct electron detector in integrating mode and an exposure beyond the traditional radiation damage limit. The final density map has a resolution of 3.8 Å as assessed by two independent data sets and maps. We used the map to derive an all-atom model with a newly implemented real-space optimization protocol. The validity of the model was verified by its match with the density map and a previous model from X-ray crystallography, as well as the internal consistency of models from independent maps. This study demonstrates a practical approach to obtain a rigorously validated atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure.

  13. In situ vaccination with cowpea mosaic virus nanoparticles suppresses metastatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Lizotte, P H; Wen, A M; Sheen, M R; Fields, J; Rojanasopondist, P; Steinmetz, N F; Fiering, S

    2016-03-01

    Nanotechnology has tremendous potential to contribute to cancer immunotherapy. The 'in situ vaccination' immunotherapy strategy directly manipulates identified tumours to overcome local tumour-mediated immunosuppression and subsequently stimulates systemic antitumour immunity to treat metastases. We show that inhalation of self-assembling virus-like nanoparticles from cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) reduces established B16F10 lung melanoma and simultaneously generates potent systemic antitumour immunity against poorly immunogenic B16F10 in the skin. Full efficacy required Il-12, Ifn-γ, adaptive immunity and neutrophils. Inhaled CPMV nanoparticles were rapidly taken up by and activated neutrophils in the tumour microenvironment as an important part of the antitumour immune response. CPMV also exhibited clear treatment efficacy and systemic antitumour immunity in ovarian, colon, and breast tumour models in multiple anatomic locations. CPMV nanoparticles are stable, nontoxic, modifiable with drugs and antigens, and their nanomanufacture is highly scalable. These properties, combined with their inherent immunogenicity and demonstrated efficacy against a poorly immunogenic tumour, make CPMV an attractive and novel immunotherapy against metastatic cancer.

  14. Cauliflower mosaic virus produces an aspartic proteinase to cleave its polyproteins.

    PubMed

    Torruella, M; Gordon, K; Hohn, T

    1989-10-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV), a plant pararetrovirus, produces polyproteins from its adjacent genes for the coat protein (ORF IV) and for enzymatic functions (ORF V). The N-terminal domain of the latter gene includes a sequence showing homology to the active site of other retroviral and acid proteases. We have now shown that this domain does indeed produce a functional aspartic protease that can process both the polyproteins. Mutations in the putative active site abolished virus infectivity. In transient expression studies in protoplasts, the N-terminal domain of ORF V was able to free active CAT enzyme from a precursor containing an N-terminal fusion of a portion of ORF IV. The junction between the two domains of this artificial polyprotein comprised sequences from the ORF IV product that had previously been shown to include a proteolytic processing site. The protease mutants were not able to free active CAT enzyme from this precursor. Direct analysis of cleavage at the same site in the ORF IV product using proteins expressed in Escherichia coli revealed the expected products. In vitro translation of a synthetic transcript covering ORF V was used to study the autocatalytic cleavage of the ORF product. Pulse-chase experiments showed that the 80 kd initial translation product was processed to yield a N-terminal doublet of polypeptides of 22 and 20 kd apparent mol. wt, which cover the protease domain. The mutants in the active site were not processed. PMID:2684630

  15. Prevalence of Tobacco mosaic virus in Iran and Evolutionary Analyses of the Coat Protein Gene

    PubMed Central

    Alishiri, Athar; Rakhshandehroo, Farshad; Zamanizadeh, Hamid-Reza; Palukaitis, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The incidence and distribution of Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and related tobamoviruses was determined using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay on 1,926 symptomatic horticultural crops and 107 asymptomatic weed samples collected from 78 highly infected fields in the major horticultural crop-producing areas in 17 provinces throughout Iran. The results were confirmed by host range studies and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. The overall incidence of infection by these viruses in symptomatic plants was 11.3%. The coat protein (CP) gene sequences of a number of isolates were determined and disclosed to be a high identity (up to 100%) among the Iranian isolates. Phylogenetic analysis of all known TMV CP genes showed three clades on the basis of nucleotide sequences with all Iranian isolates distinctly clustered in clade II. Analysis using the complete CP amino acid sequence showed one clade with two subgroups, IA and IB, with Iranian isolates in both subgroups. The nucleotide diversity within each sub-group was very low, but higher between the two clades. No correlation was found between genetic distance and geographical origin or host species of isolation. Statistical analyses suggested a negative selection and demonstrated the occurrence of gene flow from the isolates in other clades to the Iranian population. PMID:25288953

  16. An atomic model of brome mosaic virus using direct electron detection and real-space optimization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhao; Hryc, Corey F; Bammes, Benjamin; Afonine, Pavel V; Jakana, Joanita; Chen, Dong-Hua; Liu, Xiangan; Baker, Matthew L; Kao, Cheng; Ludtke, Steven J; Schmid, Michael F; Adams, Paul D; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Advances in electron cryo-microscopy have enabled structure determination of macromolecules at near-atomic resolution. However, structure determination, even using de novo methods, remains susceptible to model bias and overfitting. Here we describe a complete workflow for data acquisition, image processing, all-atom modelling and validation of brome mosaic virus, an RNA virus. Data were collected with a direct electron detector in integrating mode and an exposure beyond the traditional radiation damage limit. The final density map has a resolution of 3.8 Å as assessed by two independent data sets and maps. We used the map to derive an all-atom model with a newly implemented real-space optimization protocol. The validity of the model was verified by its match with the density map and a previous model from X-ray crystallography, as well as the internal consistency of models from independent maps. This study demonstrates a practical approach to obtain a rigorously validated atomic resolution electron cryo-microscopy structure. PMID:25185801

  17. Antiviral activity of tenofovir against Cauliflower mosaic virus and its metabolism in Brassica pekinensis plants.

    PubMed

    Spak, Josef; Votruba, Ivan; Pavingerová, Daniela; Holý, Antonín; Spaková, Vlastimila; Petrzik, Karel

    2011-11-01

    The antiviral effect of the acyclic nucleoside phosphonate tenofovir (R)-PMPA on double-stranded DNA Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) in Brassica pekinensis plants grown in vitro on liquid medium was evaluated. Double antibody sandwich ELISA and PCR were used for relative quantification of viral protein and detecting nucleic acid in plants. (R)-PMPA at concentrations of 25 and 50 mg/l significantly reduced CaMV titers in plants within 6-9 weeks to levels detectable neither by ELISA nor by PCR. Virus-free plants were obtained after 3-month cultivation of meristem tips on semisolid medium containing 50 mg/l (R)-PMPA and their regeneration to whole plants in the greenhouse. Studying the metabolism of (R)-PMPA in B. pekinensis revealed that mono- and diphosphate, structural analogs of NDP and/or NTP, are the only metabolites formed. The data indicate very low substrate activity of the enzymes toward (R)-PMPA as substrate. The extent of phosphorylation in the plant's leaves represents only 4.5% of applied labeled (R)-PMPA. In roots, we detected no radioactive peaks of phosphorylated metabolites of (R)-PMPAp or (R)-PMPApp. PMID:21889541

  18. Hitching a ride on vesicles: cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein trafficking in the endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-03-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes. PMID:24477592

  19. Peroxidase is involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance in Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, L S A; Rodrigues, R; Diz, M S S; Robaina, R R; do Amaral Júnior, A T; Carvalho, A O; Gomes, V M

    2013-01-01

    Pathogenesis-related proteins (PRs) are among the defense mechanisms of plants that work as an important barrier to the development of pathogens. These proteins are classified into 17 families according to their amino acid sequences, serology, and/or biological or enzyme activity. The present study aimed to identify PRs associated with the pathosystem of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum: Pepper yellow mosaic virus (PepYMV). Forty-five-day-old plants from accession UENF 1624, previously identified as resistant to PepYMV, were inoculated with the virus. Control and infected leaves were collected for analysis after 24, 48, 72, and 96 h. The inoculated and control plants were grown in cages covered with anti-aphid screens. Proteins were extracted from leaf tissue and the presence of β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, peroxidase, and lipid transport protein was verified. No difference was observed between the protein pattern of control and infected plants when β-1,3-glucanase, chitinase, and lipid transport protein were compared. However, increased peroxidase expression was observed in infected plants at 48 and 72 h after inoculation, indicating that this PR is involved in the response of resistance to PepYMV in C. baccatum var. pendulum. PMID:23661464

  20. 6K2-induced vesicles can move cell to cell during turnip mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Grangeon, Romain; Jiang, Jun; Wan, Juan; Agbeci, Maxime; Zheng, Huanquan; Laliberté, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    To successfully infect plants, viruses replicate in an initially infected cell and then move to neighboring cells through plasmodesmata (PDs). However, the nature of the viral entity that crosses over the cell barrier into non-infected ones is not clear. The membrane-associated 6K2 protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) induces the formation of vesicles involved in the replication and intracellular movement of viral RNA. This study shows that 6K2-induced vesicles trafficked toward the plasma membrane and were associated with plasmodesmata (PD). We demonstrated also that 6K2 moved cell-to-cell into adjoining cells when plants were infected with TuMV. 6K2 was then fused to photo-activable GFP (6K2:PAGFP) to visualize how 6K2 moved intercellularly during TuMV infection. After activation, 6K2:PAGFP-tagged vesicles moved to the cell periphery and across the cell wall into adjacent cells. These vesicles were shown to contain the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and viral RNA. Symplasmic movement of TuMV may thus be achieved in the form of a membrane-associated viral RNA complex induced by 6K2. PMID:24409170

  1. A naturally occurring deletion mutant of figwort mosaic virus (caulimovirus) is generated by RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Scholthof, H B; Wu, F C; Richins, R D; Shepherd, R J

    1991-09-01

    A naturally occurring deletion mutant is observed in plants infected with figwort mosaic virus (FMV), a caulimovirus. The encapsidated mutant genome is formed spontaneously in association with two different strains of FMV in four host plant species. The mutant also appears when cloned wild-type viral DNA is used as the inoculum. The deletion mutant alone is not infectious and it appears unable to replicate after its formation, even in the presence of wild-type virus. The gene for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase was inserted at different positions in the deletion mutant genome, and subsequent transient assays showed that gene expression of the mutant occurs despite the deletion. Sequence analyses of the mutant genome revealed a deletion of 1237-bp segment encompassing a major portion of the coat protein gene and the 5' end of the downstream reverse transcriptase gene. This deletion is associated with consensus signals for RNA splicing including the conserved 5' and 3' splice sites plus surrounding sequences, putative branch point(s) for lariat formation, and an extremely high adenosine content (41%) of the removed fragment. This suggests that splicing of the FMV full-length transcript has occurred prior to reverse transcription and this accounts for the presence and accumulation of encapsidated DNAs with the same deletion.

  2. Splicing of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA is essential for viral infectivity.

    PubMed Central

    Kiss-László, Z; Blanc, S; Hohn, T

    1995-01-01

    A splicing event essential for the infectivity of a plant pararetrovirus has been characterized. Transient expression experiments using reporter constructs revealed a splice donor site in the leader sequence of the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S RNA and three additional splice donor sites within open reading frame (ORF) I. All four donors use the same splice acceptor within ORF II. Splicing between the leader and ORF II produces an mRNA from which ORF III and, in the presence of the CaMV translational transactivator, ORF IV can be translated efficiently. The other three splicing events produce RNAs encoding ORF I-II in-frame fusions. All four spliced CaMV RNAs were detected in CaMV-infected plants. Virus mutants in which the splice acceptor site in ORF II is inactivated are not infectious, indicating that splicing plays an essential role in the CaMV life cycle. The results presented here suggest a model for viral gene expression in which RNA splicing is required to provide appropriate substrate mRNAs for the specialized translation mechanisms of CaMV. Images PMID:7628455

  3. Participation of the Cowpea mosaic virus protease in eliciting extreme resistance.

    PubMed

    Fan, Qiuling; Niroula, Mohan; Feldstein, Paul A; Bruening, George

    2011-08-15

    Extreme resistance of Arlington line cowpea (Vigna unguiculata) to Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV) is under control of a dominant locus designated Cpa. We transiently expressed, using Tomato bushy stunt virus (TBSV) vectors and Agrobacterium tumefaciens, in nearly isogenic Cpa/Cpa and cpa/cpa cowpea lines, sequences from RNA1, the larger of two CPMV genomic RNAs. Activation of a Cpa-specific response mapped to the CPMV 24K protease (24KPro). Mutational analysis of the 24KPro gene implicated protease activity, rather than 24KPro structure, in Cpa-mediated recognition of CPMV invasion. A 24KPro with alanine replacing the active site cysteine [24KPro(C-A)], but not wildtype 24KPro, accumulated after agroinfiltration of the corresponding binary vector constructions into Cpa/Cpa cowpea. In cpa/cpa cowpea, both protease versions accumulated, with 24KPro(C-A) in greater abundance. Thus, enzymically active 24KPro was recognized by both cowpea genotypes, but in Cpa/Cpa cowpea the suppression of 24KPro accumulation was very strong, consistent with extreme resistance to CPMV.

  4. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories.

  5. Hitching a ride on vesicles: cauliflower mosaic virus movement protein trafficking in the endomembrane system.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Anna Vittoria; Zicca, Stefania; Stavolone, Livia

    2014-03-01

    The transport of a viral genome from cell to cell is enabled by movement proteins (MPs) targeting the cell periphery to mediate the gating of plasmodesmata. Given their essential role in the development of viral infection, understanding the regulation of MPs is of great importance. Here, we show that cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) MP contains three tyrosine-based sorting signals that interact with an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) μA-adaptin subunit. Fluorophore-tagged MP is incorporated into vesicles labeled with the endocytic tracer N-(3-triethylammoniumpropyl)-4-(6-(4-(diethylamino)phenyl)hexatrienyl)pyridinium dibromide. The presence of at least one of the three endocytosis motifs is essential for internalization of the protein from the plasma membrane to early endosomes, for tubule formation, and for CaMV infection. In addition, we show that MP colocalizes in vesicles with the Rab GTPase AtRAB-F2b, which is resident in prevacuolar late endosomal compartments that deliver proteins to the vacuole for degradation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that CaMV MP traffics in the endocytic pathway and that virus viability depends on functional host endomembranes.

  6. Rapid and specific detection of Yam mosaic virus by reverse-transcription recombinase polymerase amplification.

    PubMed

    Silva, Gonçalo; Bömer, Moritz; Nkere, Chukwuemeka; Kumar, P Lava; Seal, Susan E

    2015-09-15

    Yam mosaic virus (YMV; genus Potyvirus) is considered to cause the most economically important viral disease of yams (Dioscorea spp.) in West Africa which is the dominant region for yam production globally. Yams are a vegetatively propagated crop and the use of virus-free planting material forms an essential component of disease control. Current serological and PCR-based diagnostic methods for YMV are time consuming involving a succession of target detection steps. In this study, a novel assay for specific YMV detection is described that is based on isothermal reverse transcription-recombinase polymerase amplification (RT-exoRPA). This test has been shown to be reproducible and able to detect as little as 14 pg/μl of purified RNA obtained from an YMV-infected plant, a sensitivity equivalent to that obtained with the reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in current general use. The RT-exoRPA assay has, however, several advantages over the RT-PCR; positive samples can be detected in less than 30 min, and amplification only requires a single incubation temperature (optimum 37°C). These features make the RT-exoRPA assay a promising candidate for adapting into a field test format to be used by yam breeding programmes or certification laboratories. PMID:26115609

  7. Genetic variability and evolutionary analyses of the coat protein gene of Tomato mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Rangel, E A; Alfaro-Fernández, A; Font-San-Ambrosio, M I; Luis-Arteaga, M; Rubio, L

    2011-12-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV), a member of the genus Tobamovirus, infects several ornamental and horticultural crops worldwide. In this study, the nucleotide sequences of the coat protein gene of worldwide ToMV isolates were analyzed to estimate the genetic structure and diversity of this virus and the involved evolutionary forces. The phylogenetic analysis showed three clades with high bootstrap support: Clade I contained three ToMV isolates from Brazil collected from pepper, Clade II comprised one Brazilian ToMV isolate from pepper, and Clade III was composed of ToMV isolates collected from different plant hosts (pepper, tomato, eggplant, lilac, camellia, dogwood, red spruce, etc.) and water (from melting ice, lakes and streams) from different countries: USA, Brazil, Korea, Germany, Spain, Denmark (Greenland), China, Taiwan, Malaysia, Iran, and Kazakhstan. With the exception of Brazil, nucleotide diversity within and between different geographic regions was very low, although statistical analyses suggested some gene flow between most of these regions. Our analyses also suggested a strong negative selection which could have contributed to the genetic stability of ToMV. PMID:21881940

  8. Molecular characterization of Dasheen mosaic virus isolates infecting edible aroids in India.

    PubMed

    Babu, B; Hegde, V

    2014-01-01

    Dasheen mosaic virus (DsMV) infecting three major edible aroids namely Amorphophallus paeoniifolius, Colocasia esculenta, and Xanthosoma sagittifolium cultivated in India was characterized. Infected plants showing typical DsMV symptoms were subjected to reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and an amplification of a 963 bp fragment which encoded the coat protein (CP) gene was obtained. BLAST analysis of the cloned DNA amplicon revealed the identity of the virus to be that of DsMV. Sequence identity matrix of the nucleotide sequences among the three isolates showed that the DsMV isolate infecting A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta shared an identity as high as 93%, while the DsMV isolate from X. sagittifolium shared an identity of only 73% and 76% with the DsMV isolates from A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta, respectively. Comparative analysis of the coat protein of the three DsMV isolates showed the presence of DVG motif (A. paeoniifolius and C. esculenta) and DTG motif in X. sagittifolium and several varying potential threonine and asparagine rich N-glycosylation motifs. Single amino acid substitution of the several conserved motifs occurs in all the three DsMV isolates. This is the first characterization of DsMV isolates infecting A. paeoniifolius, C. esculenta, and X. sagittifolium plants in India. PMID:24717027

  9. Trichoderma harzianum T-22 Induces Systemic Resistance in Tomato Infected by Cucumber mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Vitti, Antonella; Pellegrini, Elisa; Nali, Cristina; Lovelli, Stella; Sofo, Adriano; Valerio, Maria; Scopa, Antonio; Nuzzaci, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the induction of plant defenses against viruses using biocontrol agents is essential for developing new strategies against these pathogens, given the ineffectiveness of chemical treatments. The ability of Trichoderma harzianum, strain T-22 (T22) to control Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) in Solanum lycopersicum var. cerasiforme plants and the changes in the physiology of tomato treated/infected with T22/CMV were examined. Plant growth-promoting effects, photosynthetic performance, reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, and phytohormones were investigated. T22 improved tomato growth in terms of plant height and improved photosynthesis, total chlorophyll content and plant gas exchange. In contrast, CMV induced a negative effect on dry matter accumulation and inhibited the photosynthetic capacity. The analysis of plant hormones demonstrated that treating with T22 before or simultaneously to CMV infection, led to a systemic resistance by jasmonic acid/ethylene and salicylic acid signaling pathways. Conversely, systemic resistance was abscissic acid-dependent when T22 treatment was administered after the CMV infection. In conclusion, the data reported here indicate that the T22-based strategy may be the most effective measure against CMV. PMID:27777581

  10. Genetic and Phenotypic Analysis of Soybean mosaic virus Resistance in PI 88788 Soybean.

    PubMed

    Gunduz, Irfan; Buss, Glenn R; Chen, Pengyin; Tolin, Sue A

    2004-07-01

    ABSTRACT Resistance to Soybean mosaic virus (SMV) was identified in PI 88788 soybean, a germ plasm accession from China that is used widely as a source of resistance to soybean cyst nematode. Strains SMV-G1 through -G7 infected the inoculated leaves of PI 88788 but were not detected in upper, noninoculated trifoliolate leaves. Inheritance of resistance was determined by inoculating progenies of crosses of PI 88788 with susceptible cvs. Essex and Lee 68 with SMV strains G1 and G7. Allelomorphic relationships with known genes for resistance to SMV were tested in crosses with the resistant genotypes PI 96983, L29, and V94-5152, possessing Rsv1, Rsv3, and Rsv4 genes, respectively. Data analyses showed that resistance in PI 88788 to SMV-G1 is controlled by a single, partially dominant gene; however, to SMV-G7, the same gene was completely dominant. The PI 88788 gene was independent of the Rsv1 and Rsv3 loci, but allelic to Rsv4 in V94-5152. Expression of the Rsv4 gene in PI 88788 resulted in a reduced number of infection sites and restricted short- and long-distance movement of virus, rather than hypersensitivity. A unique late susceptible phenotype was strongly associated with heterozygosity. This gene has potential value for use in gene pyramiding to achieve resistance to several SMV strains, as well as for rate-reducing resistance. PMID:18943900

  11. Properties of African Cassava Mosaic Virus Capsid Protein Expressed in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hipp, Katharina; Schäfer, Benjamin; Kepp, Gabi; Jeske, Holger

    2016-01-01

    The capsid proteins (CPs) of geminiviruses combine multiple functions for packaging the single-stranded viral genome, insect transmission and shuttling between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) CP was expressed in fission yeast, and purified by SDS gel electrophoresis. After tryptic digestion of this protein, mass spectrometry covered 85% of the amino acid sequence and detected three N-terminal phosphorylation sites (threonine 12, serines 25 and 62). Differential centrifugation of cell extracts separated the CP into two fractions, the supernatant and pellet. Upon isopycnic centrifugation of the supernatant, most of the CP accumulated at densities typical for free proteins, whereas the CP in the pellet fraction showed a partial binding to nucleic acids. Size-exclusion chromatography of the supernatant CP indicated high order complexes. In DNA binding assays, supernatant CP accelerated the migration of ssDNA in agarose gels, which is a first hint for particle formation. Correspondingly, CP shifted ssDNA to the expected densities of virus particles upon isopycnic centrifugation. Nevertheless, electron microscopy did not reveal any twin particles, which are characteristic for geminiviruses. PMID:27399762

  12. Tomato Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Fusarium Wilt and Tomato Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Andolfo, Giuseppe; Ferriello, Francesca; Tardella, Luca; Ferrarini, Alberto; Sigillo, Loredana; Frusciante, Luigi; Ercolano, Maria Raffaella

    2014-01-01

    Since gene expression approaches constitute a starting point for investigating plant–pathogen systems, we performed a transcriptional analysis to identify a set of genes of interest in tomato plants infected with F. oxysporum f. sp. lycopersici (Fol) and Tomato Mosaic Virus (ToMV). Differentially expressed tomato genes upon inoculation with Fol and ToMV were identified at two days post-inoculation. A large overlap was found in differentially expressed genes throughout the two incompatible interactions. However, Gene Ontology enrichment analysis evidenced specific categories in both interactions. Response to ToMV seems more multifaceted, since more than 70 specific categories were enriched versus the 30 detected in Fol interaction. In particular, the virus stimulated the production of an invertase enzyme that is able to redirect the flux of carbohydrates, whereas Fol induced a homeostatic response to prevent the fungus from killing cells. Genomic mapping of transcripts suggested that specific genomic regions are involved in resistance response to pathogen. Coordinated machinery could play an important role in prompting the response, since 60% of pathogen receptor genes (NB-ARC-LRR, RLP, RLK) were differentially regulated during both interactions. Assessment of genomic gene expression patterns could help in building up models of mediated resistance responses. PMID:24804963

  13. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Castro, Ruth M; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R; Gilbertson, Robert L; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-09-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere.

  14. Occurrence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus and Pepper golden mosaic virus in Potential New Hosts in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Ruth M.; Moreira, Lisela; Rojas, María R.; Gilbertson, Robert L.; Hernández, Eduardo; Mora, Floribeth; Ramírez, Pilar

    2013-01-01

    Leaf samples of Solanum lycopersicum, Capsicum annuum, Cucurbita moschata, Cucurbita pepo, Sechium edule and Erythrina spp. were collected. All samples were positive for begomoviruses using polymerase chain reaction and degenerate primers. A sequence of ∼1,100 bp was obtained from the genomic component DNA-A of 14 samples. In addition, one sequence of ∼580 bp corresponding to the coat protein (AV1) was obtained from a chayote (S. edule) leaf sample. The presence of Squash yellow mild mottle virus (SYMMoV) and Pepper golden mosaic virus (PepGMV) were confirmed. The host range reported for SYMMoV includes species of the Cucurbitaceae, Caricaceae and Fabaceae families. This report extends the host range of SYMMoV to include the Solanaceae family, and extends the host range of PepGMV to include C. moschata, C. pepo and the Fabaceae Erythrina spp. This is the first report of a begomovirus (PepGMV) infecting chayote in the Western Hemisphere. PMID:25288955

  15. Molecular characterization of the first commercial transgenic common bean immune to the Bean golden mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Aragão, Francisco J L; Nogueira, Elsa O P L; Tinoco, Maria Laine P; Faria, Josias C

    2013-06-20

    Golden mosaic of common bean is caused by the Bean golden mosaic virus (BGMV). The disease is one of the greatest constraints on bean production in Latin America and causes significant yield losses. The RNAi concept was explored to silence the rep (AC1) viral gene and a transgenic bean line immune to BGMV upon inoculation at high pressure was previously generated. Identification of the transgene insert confirmed the presence of a single locus corresponding to two intact copies of the RNAi cassette in opposite orientation and three intact copies of the AtAhas gene. It is flanked by Phaseolus genomic sequences and interspersed by one nuclear and three chloroplastic genomic sequences. Southern analyses showed that the transgenes were structurally stable for eight self-pollinated generations and after backcrosses with a non transgenic commercial variety. Transgene expression analyses revealed similar levels of siRNA in leaves of transgenic plants cultivated under field conditions in three distinct regions. siRNA were also analyzed during seed development in common bean transgenic plants. siRNA signals were also detected in seeds, albeit at significantly lower levels than those observed in leaves, and could not be detected in seeds cooked during 10 min. This information is relevant to demonstrate that GM beans are free of siRNA signals after cooking and therefore suitable for human consumption. Additionally, characterization of the locus where the transgene was integrated in the common bean genome provides a valuable tool to trace this GM bean material in the field and in the market.

  16. The mode of cauliflower mosaic virus propagation in the plant allows rapid amplification of viable mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Riederer, M A; Grimsley, N H; Hohn, B; Jiricny, J

    1992-06-01

    We inoculated the leaves of turnip plants (Brassica campestris spp. rapa cv. Just Right) with two cauliflower mosaic viruses (CaMVs) with different small mutations in a dispensable region of the viral genome, and followed the spread of the virus infection through the plant. Surprisingly, analysis of viral DNA in single primary chlorotic lesions revealed the presence of both mutants. In contrast, the secondary chlorotic lesions and systemically infected leaves contained virus molecules of either one or the other type only. Infection of plants with different ratios of the two reporter viruses showed that this ratio is not conserved during systemic virus spread. Infection with CaMV DNA in the form of heteroduplexes containing a single mismatched base pair, in which each strand carried a distinct diagnostic marker, provided us with evidence that the mismatch was subjected to a repair process in the host plant.

  17. Mutational bias of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus in the context of host anti-viral gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinmin; Pallett, Denise; Jiang, Hui; Hou, Yong; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Plant Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes exhibit a GC-preference during anti-viral post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), delivering an evolutionary selection pressure resulting in plant viruses with GC-poor genomes. However, some viruses, e.g. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV, genus Tymovirus) have GC-rich genomes, raising the question as to whether or not DCL derived selection pressure affects these viruses. In this study we analyzed the virus-derived small interfering RNAs from TYMV-infected leaves of Brassica juncea showed that the TYMV population accumulated a mutational bias with AU replacing GC (GC-AU), demonstrating PTGS pressure. Interestingly, at the highly polymorphic sites the GC-AU bias was no longer observed. This suggests the presence of an unknown mechanism preventing mutational drift of the viral population and maintaining viral genome stability, despite the host PTGS pressure.

  18. Mutational bias of Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus in the context of host anti-viral gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jinmin; Pallett, Denise; Jiang, Hui; Hou, Yong; Wang, Hui

    2015-12-01

    Plant Dicer-like (DCL) enzymes exhibit a GC-preference during anti-viral post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), delivering an evolutionary selection pressure resulting in plant viruses with GC-poor genomes. However, some viruses, e.g. Turnip Yellow Mosaic Virus (TYMV, genus Tymovirus) have GC-rich genomes, raising the question as to whether or not DCL derived selection pressure affects these viruses. In this study we analyzed the virus-derived small interfering RNAs from TYMV-infected leaves of Brassica juncea showed that the TYMV population accumulated a mutational bias with AU replacing GC (GC-AU), demonstrating PTGS pressure. Interestingly, at the highly polymorphic sites the GC-AU bias was no longer observed. This suggests the presence of an unknown mechanism preventing mutational drift of the viral population and maintaining viral genome stability, despite the host PTGS pressure. PMID:26379088

  19. [Transgenic Expression of Serratia marcescens Native and Mutant Nucleases Modulates Tobacco Mosaic Virus Resistance in Nicotiana tabacum L].

    PubMed

    Trifonova, E A; Saveleva, A V; Romanova, A V; Filipenko, E A; Sapotsky, M V; Malinovsky, V I; Kochetov, A V; Shumny, V K

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular Serratia marcescens nuclease is an extremely active enzyme which non-specifically degrades RNA and DNA. Its antiviral activity was previously shown both in animals and in plants when applied exogenously. Transgenic tobacco plants (Nicotiana tabacum L cv. SR1) expressing S. marcescens chimeric, mutant, and intracellular mutant nuclease gene variants were regenerated and challenged with tobacco mosaic virus. The transgenic plants exhibited a higher level of resistance to the virus infection than the control non-transgenic plants. The resistance was evidenced by the delay of the appearance of mosaic symptoms and the retarded accumulation of viral antigen. Thus, these results reveal that modulations of both extracellular nuclease activity and intracellular RNA/DNA binding can protect plants against viral diseases. PMID:26410939

  20. Evolutionary trajectory of turnip mosaic virus populations adapting to a new host.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, Kazusato; Akaishi, Sadayuki; Kajiyama, Hiromi; Koga, Ryoko; Gibbs, Adrian J

    2010-03-01

    Little is known about how some plant viruses establish successful cross-species transmission whilst others do not; the genetic basis for adaptation is largely unknown. This study investigated the genetic changes that occurred using the progeny of an infectious clone, p35Tunos, derived from the turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) UK 1 isolate, which has a Brassica host type, but rarely infects Raphanus systemically and then only asymptomatically. The genetic trajectory leading to viral adaptation was studied in a TuMV isolate passaged in Nicotiana benthamiana (parental), Brassica rapa, the old (susceptible) host and Raphanus sativus, the new (almost insusceptible) host. Almost-complete consensus genomic sequences were obtained by RT-PCR of viral populations passaged up to 35 times together with 59 full sequences of 578,200 nt. There were significant differences in the nucleotide and encoded amino acid changes in the consensus genomes from the old and new hosts. Furthermore, a 3264 nt region corresponding to nt 3222-6485 of the UK 1 genome was cloned, and 269 clones from 23 populations were sequenced; this region covered 33 % of the genome and represented a total of 878,016 nt. The results showed that the nucleotide diversity and the non-synonymous/synonymous ratio of the populations from the new host were higher than those from the old host. An analysis of molecular variance showed significant differences among the populations from the old and new hosts. As far as is known, this is the first report comparing the evolutionary trajectory dynamics of plant virus populations in old and new hosts.

  1. Genetic Diversity and Evolution of Satellite RNAs Associated with the Bamboo Mosaic Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ing-Nang; Hu, Chung-Chi; Lee, Ching-Wei; Yen, Sih-Min; Yeh, Wen-Bing; Hsu, Yau-Heiu; Lin, Na-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Satellite RNAs (satRNAs) are subviral agents that depend on cognate helper viruses for genome replication and encapsidation. Their negative impacts on helper viruses have been exploited to control plant viral diseases. SatBaMV is a commonly found satRNA associated with Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV) that infects diverse bamboo species in the field. To investigate the genetic diversity and evolution of satRNAs, we examined seven satBaMV populations derived from five bamboo species and cultivars from Taiwan, China, and India and one from the greenhouse. We found 3 distinct clades among the seven populations. Clade I is consisted of all satBaMV isolates, except for those from Dendrocalamus latiflorus in Taiwan and Bambusa vulgaris in India, which belong to Clades II and III, respectively. Interestingly, nucleotide diversity was lower for Clade I than II and III. However, the nucleotide diversity did not seem to depend on bamboo species or geographic location. Our population genetic analyses revealed the presence of excessive low-frequency polymorphic sites, which suggests that the satBaMV population was under purifying selection and/or population expansion. Further analysis of P20, the only satBaMV gene that encodes a non-structural protein involved in the long-distance movement of satBaMV, showed evidence of purifying selection. Taken together, our results suggest that purifying selection against defective P20 protein is responsible at least in part for the evolution of the satBaMV genome. PMID:25275532

  2. The Temporal Evolution and Global Spread of Cauliflower mosaic virus, a Plant Pararetrovirus

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Simon Y. W.; Duchêne, Sebastián; Korkmaz, Savas; Katis, Nikolaos; Takahashi, Hideki; Gibbs, Adrian J.; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2014-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a plant pararetrovirus with a double-stranded DNA genome. It is the type member of the genus Caulimovirus in the family Caulimoviridae. CaMV is transmitted by sap inoculation and in nature by aphids in a semi-persistent manner. To investigate the patterns and timescale of CaMV migration and evolution, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 67 isolates of CaMV collected mostly in Greece, Iran, Turkey, and Japan together with nine published sequences. We identified the open-reading frames (ORFs) in the genomes and inferred their phylogeny. After removing recombinant sequences, we estimated the substitution rates, divergence times, and phylogeographic patterns of the virus populations. We found that recombination has been a common feature of CaMV evolution, and that ORFs I–V have a different evolutionary history from ORF VI. The ORFs have evolved at rates between 1.71 and 5.81×10−4 substitutions/site/year, similar to those of viruses with RNA or ssDNA genomes. We found four geographically confined lineages. CaMV probably spread from a single population to other parts of the world around 400–500 years ago, and is now widely distributed among Eurasian countries. Our results revealed evidence of frequent gene flow between populations in Turkey and those of its neighboring countries, with similar patterns observed for Japan and the USA. Our study represents the first report on the spatial and temporal spread of a plant pararetrovirus. PMID:24465629

  3. Structure and Dynamics of the tRNA-like Structure Domain of Brome Mosaic Virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieweger, Mario; Nesbitt, David

    2014-03-01

    Conformational switching is widely accepted as regulatory mechanism in gene expression in bacterial systems. More recently, similar regulation mechanisms are emerging for viral systems. One of the most abundant and best studied systems is the tRNA-like structure domain that is found in a number of plant viruses across eight genera. In this work, the folding dynamics of the tRNA-like structure domain of Brome Mosaic Virus are investigated using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer techniques. In particular, Burst fluorescence is applied to observe metal-ion induced folding in freely diffusing RNA constructs resembling the 3'-terminal 169nt of BMV RNA3. Histograms of EFRET probabilities reveal a complex equilibrium of three distinct populations. A step-wise kinetic model for TLS folding is developed in accord with the evolution of conformational populations and structural information in the literature. In this mechanism, formation of functional TLS domains from unfolded RNAs requires two consecutive steps; 1) hybridization of a long-range stem interaction followed by 2) formation of a 3' pseudoknot. This three-state equilibrium is well described by step-wise dissociation constants K1(328(30) μM) and K2(1092(183) μM) for [Mg2+] and K1(74(6) mM) and K2(243(52) mM) for [Na+]-induced folding. The kinetic model is validated by oligo competition with the STEM interaction. Implications of this conformational folding mechanism are discussed in regards to regulation of virus replication.

  4. The temporal evolution and global spread of Cauliflower mosaic virus, a plant pararetrovirus.

    PubMed

    Yasaka, Ryosuke; Nguyen, Huy D; Ho, Simon Y W; Duchêne, Sebastián; Korkmaz, Savas; Katis, Nikolaos; Takahashi, Hideki; Gibbs, Adrian J; Ohshima, Kazusato

    2014-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) is a plant pararetrovirus with a double-stranded DNA genome. It is the type member of the genus Caulimovirus in the family Caulimoviridae. CaMV is transmitted by sap inoculation and in nature by aphids in a semi-persistent manner. To investigate the patterns and timescale of CaMV migration and evolution, we sequenced and analyzed the genomes of 67 isolates of CaMV collected mostly in Greece, Iran, Turkey, and Japan together with nine published sequences. We identified the open-reading frames (ORFs) in the genomes and inferred their phylogeny. After removing recombinant sequences, we estimated the substitution rates, divergence times, and phylogeographic patterns of the virus populations. We found that recombination has been a common feature of CaMV evolution, and that ORFs I-V have a different evolutionary history from ORF VI. The ORFs have evolved at rates between 1.71 and 5.81×10(-4) substitutions/site/year, similar to those of viruses with RNA or ssDNA genomes. We found four geographically confined lineages. CaMV probably spread from a single population to other parts of the world around 400-500 years ago, and is now widely distributed among Eurasian countries. Our results revealed evidence of frequent gene flow between populations in Turkey and those of its neighboring countries, with similar patterns observed for Japan and the USA. Our study represents the first report on the spatial and temporal spread of a plant pararetrovirus. PMID:24465629

  5. Viral Coat Protein Peptides with Limited Sequence Homology Bind Similar Domains of Alfalfa Mosaic Virus and Tobacco Streak Virus RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, Maud M.; Ansel-McKinney, Patricia; Houser-Scott, Felicia; Yusibov, Vidadi; Loesch-Fries, L. Sue; Gehrke, Lee

    1998-01-01

    An unusual and distinguishing feature of alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) and ilarviruses such as tobacco streak virus (TSV) is that the viral coat protein is required to activate the early stages of viral RNA replication, a phenomenon known as genome activation. AMV-TSV coat protein homology is limited; however, they are functionally interchangeable in activating virus replication. For example, TSV coat protein will activate AMV RNA replication and vice versa. Although AMV and TSV coat proteins have little obvious amino acid homology, we recently reported that they share an N-terminal RNA binding consensus sequence (Ansel-McKinney et al., EMBO J. 15:5077–5084, 1996). Here, we biochemically compare the binding of chemically synthesized peptides that include the consensus RNA binding sequence and lysine-rich (AMV) or arginine-rich (TSV) environment to 3′-terminal TSV and AMV RNA fragments. The arginine-rich TSV coat protein peptide binds viral RNA with lower affinity than the lysine-rich AMV coat protein peptides; however, the ribose moieties protected from hydroxyl radical attack by the two different peptides are localized in the same area of the predicted RNA structures. When included in an infectious inoculum, both AMV and TSV 3′-terminal RNA fragments inhibited AMV RNA replication, while variant RNAs unable to bind coat protein did not affect replication significantly. The data suggest that RNA binding and genome activation functions may reside in the consensus RNA binding sequence that is apparently unique to AMV and ilarvirus coat proteins. PMID:9525649

  6. Fine mapping of the Bsr1 barley stripe mosaic virus resistance gene in the model grass Brachypodium distachyon.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yu; Lee, Mi Yeon; Huo, Naxin; Bragg, Jennifer; Yan, Lijie; Yuan, Cheng; Li, Cui; Holditch, Sara J; Xie, Jingzhong; Luo, Ming-Cheng; Li, Dawei; Yu, Jialin; Martin, Joel; Schackwitz, Wendy; Gu, Yong Qiang; Vogel, John P; Jackson, Andrew O; Liu, Zhiyong; Garvin, David F

    2012-01-01

    The ND18 strain of Barley stripe mosaic virus (BSMV) infects several lines of Brachypodium distachyon, a recently developed model system for genomics research in cereals. Among the inbred lines tested, Bd3-1 is highly resistant at 20 to 25 °C, whereas Bd21 is susceptible and infection results in an intense mosaic phenotype accompanied by high levels of replicating virus. We generated an F(6:7) recombinant inbred line (RIL) population from a cross between Bd3-1 and Bd21 and used the RILs, and an F(2) population of a second Bd21 × Bd3-1 cross to evaluate the inheritance of resistance. The results indicate that resistance segregates as expected for a single dominant gene, which we have designated Barley stripe mosaic virus resistance 1 (Bsr1). We constructed a genetic linkage map of the RIL population using SNP markers to map this gene to within 705 Kb of the distal end of the top of chromosome 3. Additional CAPS and Indel markers were used to fine map Bsr1 to a 23 Kb interval containing five putative genes. Our study demonstrates the power of using RILs to rapidly map the genetic determinants of BSMV resistance in Brachypodium. Moreover, the RILs and their associated genetic map, when combined with the complete genomic sequence of Brachypodium, provide new resources for genetic analyses of many other traits.

  7. Inhibition of brome mosaic virus (BMV) amplification in protoplasts from transgenic tobacco plants expressing replicable BMV RNAs.

    PubMed

    Kaido, M; Mori, M; Mise, K; Okuno, T; Furusawa, I

    1995-11-01

    Transgenic tobacco plants (V123 plants) expressing a set of full-length brome mosaic virus (BMV) genomic RNAs from the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter were produced. The accumulation level of BMV RNAs in V123 plant cells was approximately 1% of that in nontransgenic tobacco protoplasts inoculated with BMV RNAs. The level of BMV RNA in V123 protoplasts did not increase after inoculating the protoplasts with BMV RNAs, whereas V123 protoplasts supported the accumulation of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV) RNAs to a level similar to that in non-transgenic tobacco protoplasts after inoculation with CMV RNA. Such BMV-specific resistance was also observed in protoplasts from V12 plants expressing full-length BMV RNA1 and RNA2, both of which are required and sufficient for BMV RNA replication. On the other hand, protoplasts from M12 plants, expressing truncated BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in which the 3' 200 nucleotides required for BMV RNA replication were deleted, exhibited weaker resistance to infection with BMV RNA than V12 protoplasts, although the accumulation level of truncated BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in M12 protoplasts was higher than that of BMV RNA1 and RNA2 in V12 protoplasts. These results suggest that expression of BMV RNA replicons is involved in the induction of resistance, rather than high-level accumulation of BMV RNAs and/or their encoded proteins.

  8. Turnip yellow mosaic virus RNAs with anticodon loop substitutions that result in decreased valylation fail to replicate efficiently.

    PubMed

    Tsai, C H; Dreher, T W

    1991-06-01

    Single and multiple nucleotide substitutions have been introduced into the anticodon loop of the tRNA-like structure of turnip yellow mosaic virus (TYMV) genomic RNA. We studied the effects of these mutations on in vitro valylation and on replication in Chinese cabbage protoplasts and plants. Only those mutants capable of efficient and complete valylation showed efficient replication in protoplasts and gave rise to systemic symptoms in whole plants. Mutants that accepted valine inefficiently (in some cases Vmax/Km values were less than 10(-3) relative to wild-type values) replicated to levels 200- to 500-fold below wild-type levels in protoplasts (estimated on the basis of coat protein and genomic RNA levels). These mutants could not support systemic spread in plants. In one plant inoculated with TYMC-A55 RNA, which replicates poorly in protoplasts, systemic symptoms developed after a delay. The reversion in replication was accompanied by improved valine acceptance and the appearance of a U57 second-site mutation. Our results indicate a correlation between valine acceptance activity and viral yield. Possible roles for valylation are discussed, and the results are compared with those of similar studies with brome mosaic virus which suggested that tyrosylation is not crucial for brome mosaic virus replication (T. W. Dreher, A. L. N. Rao, and T. C. Hall, J. Mol. Biol. 206:425-438, 1989).

  9. Serological and Molecular Studies of a Novel Virus Isolate Causing Yellow Mosaic of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth

    PubMed Central

    Zaim, Mohammad; Ali, Ashif; Joseph, Jomon; Khan, Feroz

    2013-01-01

    Here we have identified and characterized a devastating virus capable of inducing yellow mosaic on the leaves of Patchouli [Pogostemon cablin (Blanco) Benth]. The diagnostic tools used were host range, transmission studies, cytopathology, electron microscopy, serology and partial coat protein (CP) gene sequencing. Evidence from biological, serological and sequence data suggested that the causal virus belonged to genus Potyvirus, family Potyviridae. The isolate, designated as Patchouli Yellow Mosaic Virus (PaYMV), was transmitted through grafting, sap and the insect Myzus persicae (Sulz.). Flexuous rod shaped particles with a mean length of 800 nm were consistently observed in leaf-dip preparations from natural as well as alternate hosts, and in purified preparation. Cytoplasmic cylindrical inclusions, pinwheels and laminar aggregates were observed in ultra-thin sections of infected patchouli leaves. The purified capsid protein has a relative mass of 43 kDa. Polyclonal antibodies were raised in rabbits against the coat protein separated on SDS – PAGE; which were used in ELISA and western blotting. Using specific antibodies in ELISA, PaYMV was frequently detected at patchouli plantations at Lucknow and Bengaluru. Potyvirus-specific degenerate primer pair (U335 and D335) had consistently amplified partial CP gene from crude preparations of infected tissues by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Comparison of the PCR product sequence (290 bp) with the corresponding regions of established potyviruses showed 78–82% and 91–95% sequence similarity at the nucleotide and amino acid levels, respectively. The results clearly established that the virus under study has close homology with watermelon mosaic virus (WMV) in the coat protein region and therefore could share a common ancestor family. Further studies are required to authenticate the identity of PaYMV as a distinct virus or as an isolate of WMV. PMID:24386278

  10. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants

    PubMed Central

    Resmi, Thulasi Raveendrannair; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-01-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases. PMID:26008704

  11. The Agrobacterium tumefaciens Ti Plasmid Virulence Gene virE2 Reduces Sri Lankan Cassava Mosaic Virus Infection in Transgenic Nicotiana benthamiana Plants.

    PubMed

    Resmi, Thulasi Raveendrannair; Hohn, Thomas; Hohn, Barbara; Veluthambi, Karuppannan

    2015-05-01

    Cassava mosaic disease is a major constraint to cassava cultivation worldwide. In India, the disease is caused by Indian cassava mosaic virus (ICMV) and Sri Lankan cassava mosaic virus (SLCMV). The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid virulence gene virE2, encoding a nuclear-localized, single-stranded DNA binding protein, was introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana to develop tolerance against SLCMV. Leaf discs of transgenic N. benthamiana plants, harboring the virE2 gene, complemented a virE2 mutation in A. tumefaciens and produced tumours. Three tested virE2 transgenic plants displayed reduction in disease symptoms upon agroinoculation with SLCMV DNA A and DNA B partial dimers. A pronounced reduction in viral DNA accumulation was observed in all three virE2 transgenic plants. Thus, virE2 is an effective candidate gene to develop tolerance against the cassava mosaic disease and possibly other DNA virus diseases. PMID:26008704

  12. Evaluation of the tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius) diversity panel for response to the NL 3 strain of Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and for biological nitrogen fixation with Bradyrhizobium strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aphid-transmitted Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV) and Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) are potyviruses that are seed transmitted in tepary bean. Developing resistance to these viruses will be critical for expanding production in areas where they are endemic. Biological nitrogen fixation (BN...

  13. Construction and analysis of infectious transcripts synthesized from full-length cDNA clones of both genomic RNAs of pea early browning virus.

    PubMed

    MacFarlane, S A; Wallis, C V; Taylor, S C; Goulden, M G; Wood, K R; Davies, J W

    1991-05-01

    Full-length cDNA clones of both RNAs of pea early browning virus have been constructed. Synthetic transcripts derived in vitro from these clones are infectious when inoculated onto plants. Electron microscopy revealed the presence of virions in transcript-inoculated plants, and both purified RNA and virions isolated from such plants could be used to infect other plants. Transcripts of RNA1 alone were able to replicate and spread systemically which is a characteristic of members of the tobravirus group of plant viruses.

  14. [A point mutation in the coat protein gene affects long distance transport of the tobacco mosaic virus].

    PubMed

    Koshkina, T E; Baranova, E N; Zavriev, S K

    2003-01-01

    A mutation resulting in substitution of positively charged Lys53 with negatively charged Glu in the coat protein was introduced in the infectious cDNA copy of the genome of wild-type tobacco mosaic virus strain U1. Kinetic analysis of long-distance virus transport in plants showed that systemic distribution of the mutant virus was delayed by 5-6 days as compared with the wild-type one. On evidence of RNA sequencing in the mutant progeny, Glu50 of the coat protein was substituted with Lys after passage I to compensate for the loss of the positive charge at position 53. Electron microscopy revealed atypical inclusions (rodlike structures, multiple electron-dense globular particles) in the nuclear interchromatin space of leaf mesophyll cells infected with the mutant but not with the wild-type virus. PMID:12942648

  15. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-11-07

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem.

  16. Localization of the N-terminal domain of cauliflower mosaic virus coat protein precursor.

    PubMed

    Champagne, Julie; Benhamou, Nicole; Leclerc, Denis

    2004-07-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) open reading frame (ORF) IV encodes a coat protein precursor (pre-CP) harboring an N-terminal extension that is cleaved off by the CaMV-encoded protease. In transfected cells, pre-CP is present in the cytoplasm, while the processed form (p44) of CP is targeted to the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal extension might be involved in keeping the pre-CP in the cytoplasm for viral assembly. This study reports for the first time the intracellular localization of the N-terminal extension during CaMV infection in Brassica rapa. Immunogold-labeling electron microscopy using polyclonal antibodies directed to the N-terminal extension of the pre-CP revealed that this region is closely associated with viral particles present in small aggregates, which we called small bodies, adjacent to the main inclusion bodies typical of CaMV infection. Based on these results, we propose a model for viral assembly of CaMV.

  17. Comparisons of the genetic structure of populations of Turnip mosaic virus in West and East Eurasia

    SciTech Connect

    Tomimura, Kenta; Spak, Josef; Katis, Nikos; Jenner, Carol E.; Walsh, John A.; Gibbs, Adrian J.; Ohshima, Kazusato . E-mail: ohshimak@cc.saga-u.ac.jp

    2004-12-20

    The genetic structure of populations of Turnip mosaic virus in Eurasia was assessed by making host range and gene sequence comparisons of 142 isolates. Most isolates collected in West Eurasia infected Brassica plants whereas those from East Eurasia infected both Brassica and Raphanus plants. Analyses of recombination sites (RSs) in five regions of the genome (one third of the full sequence) showed that the protein 1 (P1 gene) had recombined more frequently than the other gene regions in both subpopulations, but that the RSs were located in different parts of the genomes of the subpopulations. Estimates of nucleotide diversity showed that the West Eurasian subpopulation was more diverse than the East Eurasian subpopulation, but the Asian-BR group of the genes from the latter subpopulation had a greater nonsynonymous/synonymous substitution ratio, especially in the P1, viral genome-linked protein (VPg) and nuclear inclusion a proteinase (NIa-Pro) genes. These subpopulations seem to have evolved independently from the ancestral European population, and their genetic structure probably reflects founder effects.

  18. Differentially expressed genes of Chenopodium amaranticolor in response to cymbidium mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Min; Baek, Eseul; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced expressed sequence tag (EST) clones from Chenopodium amaranticolor were identified. CymMV was mechanically inoculated onto C. amaranticolor, and local lesion symptoms were observed. Inoculated leaves were collected on serial days post inoculation (dpi) to identify activated or suppressed genes. mRNA isolation and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were then performed to identify differentially expressed genes related to the local lesion response. Fifty-three ESTs, including genes related to defense and stress responses (e.g., lipoxygenase, jasmonate-induced protein, and heat shock protein), were generated. In addition, a large proportion of the ESTs were found to be involved in photosynthesis, as determined by their functional categories. Expression levels of several EST genes were observed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the evaluated genes showed varying levels of expression during the experimental period. In this study, differentially expressed sequences via SSH were identified from CymMV-infected C. amaranticolor, and profiling and annotation were carried out to determine the expression pattern of CymMV and its interaction with C. amaranticolor. PMID:27364083

  19. Nanomechanical characterization of rod-like superlattice assembled from tobacco mosaic viruses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haoran; Wang, Xinnan; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and TMV-derived materials have demonstrated their great potential in biomedical applications, where the mechanical properties are determining factors for their proper functionalities and structural integrity. Recently, it has been found that a superlattice structure can be formed by two-dimensional hexagonal packing TMV self-assembly in Barium ions solution. In parallel to the exploration of possible applications of TMV superlattice, the mechanical properties were characterized by the atomic force microscopy based nanoindentation. The elastic modulus of 2.14 GPa was obtained by application of the extended Johnson-Kendall-Roberts (JKR) model with the force vs sample deformation data. The adhesion force was taken into consideration, and an easy-to-implement approach of using the extended JKR model was proposed by processing both the theoretical model and the experimental data. Finite element analysis was conducted to evaluate the reinforcing effect of the like-charge forces between the TMVs and the mechanical properties of the TMV superlattice. Using the Halpin-Tsai model, the transverse elastic modulus of the superlattice sample varied within 2.00-4.38 GPa, depending on the indentation locations. Attraction-repulsion equilibrium was found to maintain the packing of TMVs. This provides useful information to address the sources of the attraction and repulsion forces to control the TMV assembly.

  20. The reverse transcriptase gene of cauliflower mosaic virus is translated separately from the capsid gene.

    PubMed Central

    Schultze, M; Hohn, T; Jiricny, J

    1990-01-01

    Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) possesses start codons at the beginning of its reverse transcriptase (RT) gene (ORF V) suggesting that, unlike in retroviruses and retrotransposons, it is translated independently from the capsid gene (ORF IV). To test this hypothesis a mutational analysis of the CaMV ORF IV/V overlapping region was performed. Mutants in which both ORFs are separated by stop codons in all three reading frames are viable and stable, while mutations affecting the first two AUG codons of ORF V are either lethal or unstable, giving rise to true and second site reversions. Mutants in which the AUG codons were replaced by ACG or AAG reverted only slowly and ACG could direct the synthesis of small amounts of reporter enzyme in transfected plant protoplasts, showing that this codon can act in plant cells as a weak start codon. CaMV has apparently developed a strategy for translation of the RT gene different from that in retroviruses and retrotransposons, but similar to that of hepadnaviruses, another group of pararetroviruses. The separate translation of the RT gene as a common feature of pararetroviruses might reflect the difference in their life cycle in comparison with retroviruses. Images Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:1691094

  1. Brome mosaic virus Infection of Rice Results in Decreased Accumulation of RNA1.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, Masahiko; Hoover, Haley; Middleton, Stefani; Kao, C Cheng

    2015-05-01

    Brome mosaic virus (BMV) (the Russian strain) infects monocot plants and has been studied extensively in barley and wheat. Here, we report BMV can systemically infect rice (Oryza sativa var. japonica), including cultivars in which the genomes have been determined. The BMV capsid protein can be found throughout the inoculated plants. However, infection in rice exhibits delayed symptom expression or no symptoms when compared with wheat (Triticum aestivum). The sequences of BMV RNAs isolated from rice did not reveal any nucleotide changes in RNA1 or RNA2, while RNA3 had only one synonymous nucleotide change from the inoculum sequence. Preparations of purified BMV virions contained RNA1 at a significantly reduced level relative to the other two RNAs. Analysis of BMV RNA replication in rice revealed that minus-strand RNA1 was replicated at a reduced rate when compared with RNA2. Thus, rice appears to either inhibit RNA1 replication or lacks a sufficient amount of a factor needed to support efficient RNA1 replication.

  2. ALFALFA MOSAIC VIRUS COAT PROTEIN BRIDGES RNA AND RNA-DEPENDENT RNA POLYMERASE IN VITRO

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Choi, Mehee; Petrillo, Jessica E.; Gehrke, Lee

    2007-01-01

    Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV) RNA replication requires the viral coat protein (CP). AMV CP is an integral component of the viral replicase; moreover, it binds to the viral RNA 3' termini and induces the formation of multiple new base pairs that organize the RNA conformation. The results described here suggest that AMV coat protein binding defines template selection by organizing the 3'-terminal RNA conformation and by positioning the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) at the initiation site for minus strand synthesis. RNA-protein interactions were analyzed by using a modified northwestern blotting protocol that included both viral coat protein and labeled RNA in the probe solution (“far-northwestern blotting”). We observed that labeled RNA alone bound the replicase proteins poorly; however, complex formation was enhanced significantly in the presence of AMV CP. The RNA-replicase bridging function of the AMV CP may represent a mechanism for accurate de novo initiation in the absence of canonical 3' transfer RNA signals. PMID:17400272

  3. Inhibition of tobacco mosaic virus movement by expression of an actin-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Christina; Niehl, Annette; Sambade, Adrian; Steinmetz, André; Heinlein, Manfred

    2009-04-01

    The tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) movement protein (MP) required for the cell-to-cell spread of viral RNA interacts with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) as well as with the cytoskeleton during infection. Whereas associations of MP with ER and microtubules have been intensely investigated, research on the role of actin has been rather scarce. We demonstrate that Nicotiana benthamiana plants transgenic for the actin-binding domain 2 of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) fimbrin (AtFIM1) fused to green fluorescent protein (ABD2:GFP) exhibit a dynamic ABD2:GFP-labeled actin cytoskeleton and myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking. These plants also support the movement of TMV. In contrast, both myosin-dependent Golgi trafficking and TMV movement are dominantly inhibited when ABD2:GFP is expressed transiently. Inhibition is mediated through binding of ABD2:GFP to actin filaments, since TMV movement is restored upon disruption of the ABD2:GFP-labeled actin network with latrunculin B. Latrunculin B shows no significant effect on the spread of TMV infection in either wild-type plants or ABD2:GFP transgenic plants under our treatment conditions. We did not observe any binding of MP along the length of actin filaments. Collectively, these observations demonstrate that TMV movement does not require an intact actomyosin system. Nevertheless, actin-binding proteins appear to have the potential to exert control over TMV movement through the inhibition of myosin-associated protein trafficking along the ER membrane.

  4. Accumulation of helper component/proteinase and coat protein of turnip mosaic virus in intact plants.

    PubMed

    Ohshima, K

    1999-02-01

    The helper component/proteinase (HC/Pro) protein of turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) was fused with glutathione S-transferase (GST) and expressed as a fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The quality of antiserum raised against the GST-HC/Pro fusion protein was compared to that of antiserum raised against coat protein (CP) by image analyser. The result showed that these antisera were of similar quality. Then the both antisera were used to follow the time course of accumulation of HC/Pro protein and CP in intact TuMV-infected leaves. CP appeared first at day 3 post inoculation (p.i.) and gradually accumulated in uninoculated upper leaves, whereas HC/Pro protein appeared first at day 4 p.i., accumulated up to day 7 p.i. and then gradually decreased. Potyvirus proteins are encoded by a single translation unit spanning most of the genome and are presumably synthesized in equimolar ratios. Therefore, the reduced accumulation of HC/Pro protein in relation to CP at one month p.i. in infected plants is presumed to be the result of its degradation. PMID:10672341

  5. Trypsin inhibitors from Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum leaves involved in Pepper yellow mosaic virus resistance.

    PubMed

    Moulin, M M; Rodrigues, R; Ribeiro, S F F; Gonçalves, L S A; Bento, C S; Sudré, C P; Vasconcelos, I M; Gomes, V M

    2014-01-01

    Several plant organs contain proteinase inhibitors, which are produced during normal plant development or are induced upon pathogen attack to suppress the enzymatic activity of phytopathogenic microorganisms. In this study, we examined the presence of proteinase inhibitors, specifically trypsin inhibitors, in the leaf extract of Capsicum baccatum var. pendulum inoculated with PepYMV (Pepper yellow mosaic virus). Leaf extract from plants with the accession number UENF 1624, which is resistant to PepYMV, was collected at 7 different times (0, 24, 48, 72, 96, 120, and 144 h). Seedlings inoculated with PepYMV and control seedlings were grown in a growth chamber. Protein extract from leaf samples was partially purified by reversed-phase chromatography using a C2/C18 column. Residual trypsin activity was assayed to detect inhibitors followed by Tricine-SDS-PAGE analysis to determine the N-terminal peptide sequence. Based on trypsin inhibitor assays, trypsin inhibitors are likely constitutively synthesized in C. baccatum var. pendulum leaf tissue. These inhibitors are likely a defense mechanism for the C. baccatum var. pendulum- PepYMV pathosystem. PMID:25501145

  6. DNA forms indicate rolling circle and recombination-dependent replication of Abutilon mosaic virus.

    PubMed

    Jeske, H; Lütgemeier, M; Preiss, W

    2001-11-01

    Geminiviruses have spread worldwide and have become increasingly important in crop plants during recent decades. Recombination among geminiviruses was one major source of new variants. Geminiviruses replicate via rolling circles, confirmed here by electron microscopic visualization and two-dimensional gel analysis of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) DNA. However, only a minority of DNA intermediates are consistent with this model. The majority are compatible with recombination-dependent replication (RDR). During development of naturally infected leaves, viral intermediates compatible with both models appeared simultaneously, whereas agro-infection of leaf discs with AbMV led to an early appearance of RDR forms but no RCR intermediates. Inactivation of viral genes ac2 and ac3 delayed replication, but produced the same DNA types as after wild-type infection, indicating that these genes were not essential for RDR in leaf discs. In conclusion, host factors alone or in combination with the viral AC1 protein are necessary and sufficient for the production of RDR intermediates. The consequences of an inherent geminiviral recombination activity for the use of pathogen-derived resistance traits are discussed.

  7. The study of Turnip Mosaic virus coat protein by surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hongying; He, Qizhi; Xu, Zhisan; Wang, Xiaohua; Sheng, Rongsheng

    1993-11-01

    Using Turnip Mosaic virus (TuMV) coat protein as material, the secondary structure has been studied by both normal Raman spectroscopy (NRS) and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). The NRS of TuMV coat protein under certain conditions showed the α-helix, β-sheet and random coil structure. The CSSC comformations are trans—gauche—gauche and gauche—gauche—gauche. The SERS spectrum of TuMV coat protein under certain conditions reveals the α-helix structure. By studying SERS at different adsorbing times, we have observed the amide III vibration of α-helix, β-sheet and random coil structure. The CSSC conformations drawn from the SERS spectra are trans—gauche—gauche and trans—gauche—trans. Besides the amide I, amide III and CSSC bands, the CαCN band, aromatic amino acid bands and some other bands can also be seen in the SERS spectra.

  8. Induction of Systemic Resistance against Cucumber mosaic virus in Arabidopsis thaliana by Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1

    PubMed Central

    Elsharkawy, Mohsen Mohamed; Shimizu, Masafumi; Takahashi, Hideki; Ozaki, Kouichi; Hyakumachi, Mitsuro

    2013-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum SKT-1 is a microbial pesticide that is very effective against various diseases. Our study was undertaken to evaluate T. asperellum SKT-1 for induction of resistance against yellow strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV-Y) in Arabidopsis plants. Disease severity was rated at 2 weeks post inoculation (WPI). CMV titre in Arabidopsis leaves was determined by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) at 2 WPI. Our results demonstrated that among all Arabidopsis plants treated with barley grain inoculum (BGI) of SKT-1 NahG and npr1 plants showed no significant reduction in disease severity and CMV titre as compared with control plants. In contrast, disease severity and CMV titre were significantly reduced in all Arabidopsis plants treated with culture filtrate (CF) of SKT-1 as compared with control plants. RT-PCR results showed increased expression levels of SA-inducible genes, but not JA/ET-inducible genes, in leaves of BGI treated plants. Moreover, expression levels of SA- and JA/ET-inducible genes were increased in leaves of CF treated plants. In conclusion, BGI treatment induced systemic resistance against CMV through SA signaling cascade in Arabidopsis plants. While, treatment with CF of SKT-1 mediated the expression of a majority of the various pathogen related genes, which led to the increased defense mechanism against CMV infection. PMID:25288946

  9. Assembly of tobacco mosaic virus into fibrous and macroscopic bundled arrays mediated by surface aniline polymerization.

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, Z.; Bruckman, M.; Li, S.; Lee, A.; Lee, B.; Pingali, S.-V.; Thiyagarajan, P.; Wang, Q.; Univ. of South Carolina

    2007-06-05

    One-dimensional (1D) polyaniline/tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) composite nanofibers and macroscopic bundles of such fibers were generated via a self-assembly process of TMV assisted by in-situ polymerization of polyaniline on the surface of TMV. At near-neutral reaction pH, branched polyaniline formed on the surface of TMV preventing lateral association. Therefore, long 1D nanofibers were observed with high aspect ratios and excellent processibility. At a lower pH, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed that initially long nanofibers were formed which resulted in bundled structures upon long-time reaction, presumably mediated by the hydrophobic interaction because of the polyaniline on the surface of TMV. In-situ time-resolved small-angle X-ray scattering study of TMV at different reaction conditions supported this mechanism. This novel strategy to assemble TMV into 1D and 3D supramolecular composites could be utilized in the fabrication of advanced materials for potential applications including electronics, optics, sensing, and biomedical engineering.

  10. Measuring Surface Diffusion of Organic Glasses Using Tobacco Mosaic Virus as Probe Nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yue; Potter, Richard; Fakhraai, Zahra

    Recent studies have shown that diffusion on the surface of organic glasses can be many orders of magnitude faster than bulk diffusion, with lower activation barrier. Developing new probes that can readily measure the diffusion at the surface of an organic glass can help study the effect of chemical structure and molecule's size on the enhanced surface diffusion. In this study, surface diffusion coefficient of molecular glass (TPD) is measured using tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) as probe particles. TMV is placed on the surface of bulk TPD films. The evolution of the meniscus formed around TMV, driven by curvature gradient, is probed at various temperatures. TMV has a well-defined cylindrical shape, with a large aspect ratio (18 nm wide, 300 nm long). As such, the shape of the meniscus around the center of TMV is semi-one dimensional. Based on the self-similarity nature of surface diffusion flow in one dimension, the surface diffusion coefficient and its temperature dependence are measured. It is found that the surface diffusion is greatly enhanced and has weak temperature dependence compared to bulk counterpart, consistent with previous studies, showing that TMV probes serve as an efficient method of measuring surface diffusion. NSF-CAREER DMR-1350044.

  11. Evaluation of Mungbean Genotypes Based on Yield Stability and Reaction to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Alam, AKM Mahbubul; Somta, Prakit; Jompuk, Choosak; Chatwachirawong, Prasert; Srinives, Peerasak

    2014-01-01

    This work was conducted to identify mungbean genotypes showing yield stability and resistance to mungbean yellow mosaic virus (MYMV) disease. Sixteen genotypes were evaluated in a randomized complete block design with two replications for two years (2011 and 2012) at three locations (Gazipur, Ishurdi and Madaripur) of the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute. An analysis of variance exhibited significant effects of genotype (G), environment (E), and genotype × environment (G×E) on grain yield. Among eight agronomic characters, the principal component 1 (PC1) was always higher than the PC2. Considering G×E interaction, BM6 was the best genotype at all three locations in both years. Based on grain yield and stability performance, BM6 ranked first while the worst performing genotypes were BM1 and G10. Based on discrimination and representation, Gazipur was identified as an ideal environment for these mungbeans. Relationship between soil-plant analysis developments (SPAD) value was positive with yield but negative with MYMV severity. BM6, G1 and G2 were considered as promising sources of resistance for low disease score and stable response across the environments. The environment proved to have an influence on MYMV infection under natural infestation. A positive correlation was observed between disease score and the temperature under natural growing condition. PMID:25289012

  12. Differentially expressed genes of Chenopodium amaranticolor in response to cymbidium mosaic virus infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Su Min; Baek, Eseul; Ryu, Ki Hyun; Choi, Sun Hee

    2016-09-01

    Cymbidium mosaic virus (CymMV)-induced expressed sequence tag (EST) clones from Chenopodium amaranticolor were identified. CymMV was mechanically inoculated onto C. amaranticolor, and local lesion symptoms were observed. Inoculated leaves were collected on serial days post inoculation (dpi) to identify activated or suppressed genes. mRNA isolation and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) were then performed to identify differentially expressed genes related to the local lesion response. Fifty-three ESTs, including genes related to defense and stress responses (e.g., lipoxygenase, jasmonate-induced protein, and heat shock protein), were generated. In addition, a large proportion of the ESTs were found to be involved in photosynthesis, as determined by their functional categories. Expression levels of several EST genes were observed using quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and the evaluated genes showed varying levels of expression during the experimental period. In this study, differentially expressed sequences via SSH were identified from CymMV-infected C. amaranticolor, and profiling and annotation were carried out to determine the expression pattern of CymMV and its interaction with C. amaranticolor.

  13. Diversity among isolates of cowpea severe mosaic virus infecting cowpeas in northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Abreu, E F M; Tinoco, M L P; Andrade, E C; Aragão, F J L

    2012-09-03

    Eleven isolates of cowpea severe mosaic virus (CPSMV), a member of the genus Comovirus, were selected from 50 samples collected of nine cowpea fields in Northeastern Brazil (Piauí, Ceará, Rio Grande do Norte, Paraíba, Pernambuco, Alagoas, Sergipe, Bahia, and Distrito Federal) and partially sequenced. The RNA1 partial sequence, corresponding to the helicase, viral genome-linked protein, picornain 3C-like protease, and the RNA-directed RNA polymerase genes from CPSMV, had high identity among isolates, varying from 98 to 100%. No evidence was found for intermolecular or intramolecular recombination. Phylogenetic analysis confirmed that the Brazilian CPSMV isolates are substantially different from the CPSMV strain USA. Despite the low variability found among Brazilian CPSMV isolates, there were notable differences in the symptomatology of infected cowpea plants, ranging from mild to moderate. Previous reports have demonstrated an association between CPSMV symptom determinants and helicase. However, we found no correlation between the helicase mutations and symptoms caused by CPSMV. Nevertheless, all isolates with mutation R to K in the protease provoked severe symptoms. This type of information can provide a foundation for the development of strategies to produce durable resistant cowpea lines. It is crucial for strategies based on DNA sequence-dependent technologies, such as inhibition with RNAi.

  14. Comparison of cauliflower mosaic virus 35S and nopaline synthase promoters in transgenic plants.

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, P R; Winter, J A; Barnason, A R; Rogers, S G; Fraley, R T

    1987-01-01

    We have compared the level of expression of the Cauliflower Mosaic Virus 35S promoter and the nopaline synthase promoter when fused to a common reporter gene. A cassette containing the neomycin phosphotransferase (type II) coding sequence followed by the nopaline synthase 3' nontranslated region was used for transcriptional and translational evaluation of the two different promoters. These chimeric genes were introduced into petunia plants and the copy number of the gene, the steady state level of NPTII transcript and the levels of NPTII enzyme activity were determined. In this paper, we report that the NPT II transcript levels are on the average 30 fold higher in plants containing CaMV 35S promoter and leader sequences than in plants containing the same reporter gene but nopaline synthase promoter and leader sequences. Similarly, plants containing the CaMV 35S promoter had an average of 110 fold higher levels of NPTII enzyme activity than those containing the nopaline synthase promoter. The significance of these results for expression of foreign genes in plants is discussed. In addition, we describe the construction of a convenient plant expression cassette vector (pMON316) which utilizes the CaMV 35S promoter. Images PMID:3029718

  15. DNA forms indicate rolling circle and recombination-dependent replication of Abutilon mosaic virus

    PubMed Central

    Jeske, Holger; Lütgemeier, Martin; Preiß, Werner

    2001-01-01

    Geminiviruses have spread worldwide and have become increasingly important in crop plants during recent decades. Recombination among geminiviruses was one major source of new variants. Geminiviruses replicate via rolling circles, confirmed here by electron microscopic visualization and two-dimensional gel analysis of Abutilon mosaic virus (AbMV) DNA. However, only a minority of DNA intermediates are consistent with this model. The majority are compatible with recombination-dependent replication (RDR). During development of naturally infected leaves, viral intermediates compatible with both models appeared simultaneously, whereas agro-infection of leaf discs with AbMV led to an early appearance of RDR forms but no RCR intermediates. Inactivation of viral genes ac2 and ac3 delayed replication, but produced the same DNA types as after wild-type infection, indicating that these genes were not essential for RDR in leaf discs. In conclusion, host factors alone or in combination with the viral AC1 protein are necessary and sufficient for the production of RDR intermediates. The consequences of an inherent geminiviral recombination activity for the use of pathogen-derived resistance traits are discussed. PMID:11689455

  16. Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV, Potyvirus): vertical transmission, seed infection and cryptic infections.

    PubMed

    Simmons, H E; Dunham, J P; Zinn, K E; Munkvold, G P; Holmes, E C; Stephenson, A G

    2013-09-01

    The role played by seed transmission in the evolution and epidemiology of viral crop pathogens remains unclear. We determined the seed infection and vertical transmission rates of zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV), in addition to undertaking Illumina sequencing of nine vertically transmitted ZYMV populations. We previously determined the seed-to-seedling transmission rate of ZYMV in Cucurbita pepo ssp. texana (a wild gourd) to be 1.6%, and herein observed a similar rate (1.8%) in the subsequent generation. We also observed that the seed infection rate is substantially higher (21.9%) than the seed-to-seedling transmission rate, suggesting that a major population bottleneck occurs during seed germination and seedling growth. In contrast, that two thirds of the variants present in the horizontally transmitted inoculant population were also present in the vertically transmitted populations implies that the bottleneck at vertical transmission may not be particularly severe. Strikingly, all of the vertically infected plants were symptomless in contrast to those infected horizontally, suggesting that vertical infection may be cryptic. Although no known virulence determining mutations were observed in the vertically infected samples, the 5' untranslated region was highly variable, with at least 26 different major haplotypes in this region compared to the two major haplotypes observed in the horizontally transmitted population. That the regions necessary for vector transmission are retained in the vertically infected populations, combined with the cryptic nature of vertical infection, suggests that seed transmission may be a significant contributor to the spread of ZYMV.

  17. Extensive sequence homology at the 3'-termini of the four RNAs of cucumber mosaic virus.

    PubMed Central

    Symons, R H

    1979-01-01

    The sequences of 270 residues from the 3'-termini of the four RNAs of cucumber mosaic virus have been determined by copying the in vitro polyadenylated RNAs with reverse transcriptase using d(pT8G) as primer and the 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside 5'-triphosphates as specific chain terminators. The terminal sequences of RNAs 3 and 4 were identical; this was expected since hybridization data has shown that the sequence of RNA 4 was present at the 3'-end of RNA 3 (Gould and Symons (1978) Eur. J. Biochem. 91, 269-278). The first 138 residues of RNAs 1 and 2 were identical to those of RNAs 3 and 4 except for one residue in RNA 1 and three residues in RNA 2. From residue 139 to 270 from the 3'-terminus, RNAs 1 and 2 showed, relative to RNAs 3 and 4, a non-homologous region of 33 residues, a homologous region of 40 residues, a partially homologous region of 14 residues which probably extended to about residue 300. There were 11 residues different between RNAs 1 and 2. Images PMID:92011

  18. Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein-mediated protein transport between trichome cells.

    PubMed Central

    Waigmann, E; Zambryski, P

    1995-01-01

    Tobacco mosaic virus movement protein (TMV MP) is required to mediate viral spread between plant cells via plasmodesmata. Plasmodesmata are cytoplasmic bridges that connect individual plant cells and ordinarily limit molecular diffusion to small molecules and metabolites with a molecular mass up to 1 kD. Here, we characterize functional properties of Nicotiana clevelandii trichome plasmodesmata and analyze their interaction with TMV MP. Trichomes constitute a linear cellular system and provide a predictable pathway of movement. Their plasmodesmata are functionally distinct from plasmodesmata in other plant cel types; they allow cell-to-cell diffusion of dextrans with a molecular mass up to 7 kD, and TMV MP does not increase this size exclusion limit for dextrans. In contrast, the 30-kD TMV MP itself moves between trichome cells and specifically mediates the translocation of a 90-kD beta-glucuronidase (GUS) reporter protein as a GUS::TMV MP fusion. Neither GUS by itself nor GUS in the presence of TMV MP moves between cells. These data imply that a plasmodesmal transport signal resides within TMV MP and is essential for movement. This signal confers selectivity to the translocated protein and cannot function in trans to support movement of other molecules. PMID:8718620

  19. Expression, purification and functional characterization of recombinant Zucchini yellow mosaic virus HC-Pro.

    PubMed

    Fuellgrabe, Marc W; Boonrod, Kajohn; Jamous, Rana; Moser, Mirko; Shiboleth, Yoel; Krczal, Gabi; Wassenegger, Michael

    2011-01-01

    HC-Pro is a helper component-proteinase which acts as a multifunctional protein in the potyviral life cycle. Apart from its proteolytic activity, HC-Pro has the capacity to bind duplex small RNAs (sRNAs). To investigate HC-Pro-mediated sRNA binding in vitro, high amounts of purified protein are required. For this purpose, the Zucchini yellow mosaic virus (ZYMV) HC-Pro was expressed as a fusion with hexa-histidine (6xHis) or maltose-binding protein (MBP) in Escherichia coli. The expressed fusion proteins were purified by affinity chromatography. 6xHis:HC-Pro and MBP:HC-Pro were partially soluble. Electrophoretic mobility-shift assays demonstrated that only MBP:HC-Pro exhibits the sRNA binding activity. The recombinant HC-Pro bound 21 bp siRNAs as well as 19 bp and 24 bp siRNAs. A point mutation in the highly conserved FRNK box produced the HC-Pro(FINK) protein, previously shown to be associated with reduced viral symptoms and weak sRNA binding. In this study, sRNA binding of the MBP:HA-HC-Pro(FINK) was not detectable. The high yield of purified HC-Pro offers the possibility to study the biochemistry of the protein in detail.

  20. Proteomic analysis of salicylic acid induced resistance to Mungbean Yellow Mosaic India Virus in Vigna mungo.

    PubMed

    Kundu, Subrata; Chakraborty, Dipjyoti; Pal, Amita

    2011-03-01

    The role of salicylic acid (SA) in inducing resistance to MYMIV infection in Vigna mungo has been elucidated by proteomics. Twenty-nine proteins identified by MALDI-TOF/TOF, predicted to be involved in stress responses, metabolism, photosynthesis, transport and signal transduction, showed increased abundance upon SA treatment. Susceptible plants showed characteristic yellow mosaic symptoms upon MYMIV infection. A concentration dependent decrease in physiological symptoms associated with MYMIV was observed upon exogenous SA treatment prior to viral inoculation; and no visible symptom was observed at 100 μM SA. SA treatment stimulated SOD and GPX activity and inhibited CAT activity thus preventing ROS mediated damage. Significant increase in chlorophyll, protein, carbohydrate, phenolic content and H(2)O(2) were observed. Involvement of calmodulin for transmission of defense signal by SA is suggested. A metabolic reprogramming leading to enhanced synthesis of proteins involved in primary and secondary metabolisms is necessary for SA mediated resistance to MYMIV. Identification of proteins showing increased abundance, involved in photosynthetic process is a significant finding which restores virus-induced degradation of the photosynthetic apparatus and provides enhanced metabolites required for repartition of resources towards defense.