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Sample records for peanut flour reduced

  1. Enzymatic Hydrolysis of Peanut Flour Produces Bioactive Peptides with Reduced Allergenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy is one of the most severe food allergies due to its life-threatening nature and persistency. Current immunotherapy methods, though effective, are often accompanied by allergic side-effects. Enzymatic hydrolysis of peanut flour has the potential to produce bioactive peptides with impro...

  2. Peanuts, Peanut Oil and Fat Free Peanut Flour Reduced Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors and the Development of Atherosclerosis in Syrian Golden Hamsters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Human clinical trials have demonstrated the cardiovascular protective properties of peanuts and peanut oil in decreasing total and low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol without reducing high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol. The cardiovascular effects of the non-lipid portion of peanuts has...

  3. Rheological Properties of Aqueous Peanut Flour Dispersions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The rheological behaviors of aqueous peanut flour dispersions were characterized across a range of conditions, including controlled heating and cooling rates under both large and small-strain deformations. Fat content of the dry flours influenced rheological changes, as dispersions of higher fat fl...

  4. Allergenic Properties of Enzymatically Hydrolyzed Peanut Flour Extracts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut flour is a high protein, low oil, powdered material prepared from roasted 21 peanut seed. In addition to being a well-established food ingredient, peanut flour is also the 22 active ingredient in peanut oral immunotherapy trials. Enzymatic hydrolysis was evaluated as a 23 processing strategy ...

  5. Hydrophilic Lipophilic Antioxidant Activities of Commercially Available Peanut Flours and Peanut Seed Roasted to Differing Intensities

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut flours are commercially available, high protein ingredients prepared from partially defatted roasted peanut seed. Peanut flours have differing roast intensities and residual fat contents, which allows for these ingredients to be utilized in a variety of food formulations. Antioxidant proper...

  6. Final report on the safety assessment of Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Oil, Hydrogenated Peanut Oil, Peanut Acid, Peanut Glycerides, and Peanut (Arachis hypogaea) Flour.

    PubMed

    2001-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) Oil is the refined fixed oil obtained from the seed kernels of Arachis hypogaea. Hydrogenated Peanut Oil, Peanut Acid, and Peanut Glycerides are all derived from Peanut Oil. Peanut Flour is a powder obtained by the grinding of peanuts. The oils and glycerides function in cosmetic formulations as skin-conditioning agents. The acid functions as a surfactant-cleansing agent, and the flour functions as an abrasive, bulking agent and/or viscosity-increasing agent. In 1998, only Peanut Oil and Hydrogenated Peanut Oil were reported in use. When applied to the skin, Peanut Oil can enhance the absorption of other compounds. Hepatic changes were noted at microscopic examination of rats fed diets containing 15% edible Peanut Oil for 28 days, although no control group was maintained and the findings were also noted in rats fed fresh corn oil. United States Pharmacopeia (USP)-grade Peanut Oil was considered relatively nonirritating when injected into guinea pigs and monkeys. Technical-grade Peanut Oil was moderately irritating to rabbits and guinea pigs and mildly irritating to rats following dermal exposure. This same oil produced reactions in < or = 10% of 50 human males. Peanut Oil was not an ocular irritant in rabbits. Peanut Oil, either "laboratory expressed" or extracted using a food-grade solvent, was not carcinogenic to mice. Peanut Oil exerted anticarcinogenic activity when tested against known carcinogens. Peanuts are the food most likely to produce allergic and anaphylactic reactions. The major allergen is a protein that does not partition into Peanut Oil, Hydrogenated Peanut Oil, Peanut Acid, and Peanut Glycerides. Aflatoxins can be produced in stored agricultural crops such as peanuts, but do not partition into the oils, acids, or glycerides. Manufacturers were cautioned to make certain that the oils, acids, and glycerides are free of aflatoxins and protein. Formulators were cautioned that the oils, acids, or glycerides may enhance

  7. Mechanism of the discrepancy in the enzymatic hydrolysis efficiency between defatted peanut flour and peanut protein isolate by Flavorzyme.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Lin; Zhao, Yijun; Xiao, Chuqiao; Sun-Waterhouse, Dongxiao; Zhao, Mouming; Su, Guowan

    2015-02-01

    Both defatted peanut flour (DPF) and peanut protein isolate (PPI) are widely used to prepare peanut protein hydrolysates. To compare their enzymatic hydrolysis efficiencies, DPF and PPI were hydrolysed by Alcalase, Neutrase, Papain, Protamex and Flavorzyme. Alcalase and Flavorzyme were found to be the most efficient proteases to hydrolyse both DPF and PPI. The efficiency was comparable to each other when using Alcalase, while PPI was hydrolysed less efficiently than DPF when using Flavorzyme. Analysis of changes in the protein solubility, subunit and conformation, and amino acid composition of DPF, PPI and their Flavorzyme hydrolysis residues indicated that the PPI preparation process had minimal effect on it, but peptide aggregation via non-covalent bonding (including hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds) during hydrolysis and/or thermal treatment after hydrolysis were likely responsible for the reduced hydrolysis efficiency of PPI by Flavorzyme.

  8. Use of peanut and cowpea in wheat-based products containing composite flours.

    PubMed

    McWatters, K H; Resurreccion, A V; Beuchat, L R; Phillips, R D

    1995-01-01

    Cowpeas and peanuts are legumes of major dietary and economic importance. They are favored worldwide because of their palatability, contribution to nutritional status, and low cost as a protein source compared to animal protein. Flours processed from cowpeas and peanuts have unique physico-chemical and sensory properties when used in composite flour mixtures. Appropriate blends of cowpea and peanut flours to replace wheat flour in Chinese-type noodles, muffins, and tortillas were determined using modelling and optimization procedures. For noodles, 15% peanut flour and 8% cowpea flour supplementation produced an acceptable product with high protein content (21%). For wheat flour replacement in muffins, up to 43% cowpea and up to 44% peanut flours may be used. However, when wheat flour replacement is 50% or greater, cassava flour should comprise 56 to 72% of the blend with a few exceptions. In tortillas, 24% cowpea and 46% peanut flours produced products similar in quality characteristics to those made from 100% wheat flour. The systematic approach used in these studies is more efficient than the traditional substitution method to optimize sensory qualities of wheat-based products containing composite flours.

  9. The Potential of Enzymatic Hydrolysis to Improve Immunotherapy and Ingredient Applications of peanut flour.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut flour is currently being used as the active ingredient in oral immunotherapy applications designed to desensitize peanut allergic patients. This strategy for treating peanut allergy is proving quite promising; however, there is a risk for adverse reactions using this approach. In the curren...

  10. The Effect of Transglutaminase Crosslinking on the Rheological Characteristics of Heated Peanut Flour Dispersions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut flour (PF) is a high-protein ingredient prepared after the partial extraction of oil from roasted peanut seed. Microbial transglutaminase (TGase) catalyzes protein crosslinking via acyl-transfer reactions, resulting in the modification of functional properties such as viscosity, gelation, so...

  11. Sensory evaluation ratings and moisture contents show that soy is acceptable as a partial replacement for all-purpose wheat flour in peanut butter graham crackers.

    PubMed

    Romanchik-Cerpovicz, Joelle E; Abbott, Amy E; Dent, Laura A

    2011-12-01

    Fortification can help individuals achieve adequate nutritional intake. Foods may be fortified with soy flour as a source of protein for individuals limiting their intake of animal products, either due to personal dietary preference or to reduce their intake of saturated fat, a known risk factor for heart disease. This study determined the feasibility of fortifying peanut butter graham crackers by substituting soy flour for all-purpose wheat flour at 25%, 50%, 75%, or 100% weight/weight. Graham crackers fortified with soy flour were compared to similarly prepared nonfortified peanut butter graham crackers. Moisture contents of all graham crackers were similar. Consumers (n=102) evaluated each graham cracker using a hedonic scale and reported liking the color, smell, and texture of all products. However, unlike peanut butter graham crackers fortified with lower levels of soy, graham crackers fortified with 100% weight/weight soy flour had less than desirable flavor, aftertaste, and overall acceptability. Overall, this study shows that fortification of peanut butter graham crackers up to 75% weight/weight with soy flour for all-purpose wheat flour is acceptable.

  12. Degradation of aflatoxins in peanut kernels/flour by gaseous ozonation and mild heat treatment.

    PubMed

    Proctor, A D; Ahmedna, M; Kumar, J V; Goktepe, I

    2004-08-01

    Aflatoxins occur naturally in many agricultural crops causing health hazards and economic losses. Despite improved handling, processing and storage, they remain a problem in the peanut industry. Therefore, new ways to detoxify contaminated products are needed to limit economic/health impacts and add value to the peanut industry. The study was conducted (1) to evaluate the effectiveness of ozonation and mild heat in breaking down aflatoxins in peanut kernels and flour, and (2) to quantify aflatoxin destruction compared with untreated samples. Peanut samples were inoculated with known concentrations of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2. Samples were subjected to gaseous ozonation and under various temperatures (25, 50, 75 degrees C) and exposure times (5, 10, 15 min). Ozonated and non-ozonated samples were extracted in acetonitrile/water, derivatized in a Kobra cell and quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography. Ozonation efficiency increased with higher temperatures and longer treatment times. Regardless of treatment combinations, aflatoxins B1 and G1 exhibited the highest degradation levels. Higher levels of toxin degradation were achieved in peanut kernels than in flour. The temperature effect lessened as the exposure time increased, suggesting that ozonation at room temperature for 10-15 min could yield degradation levels similar to those achieved at higher temperatures while being more economical.

  13. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2). Because high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts were treated with each of th...

  14. The effects of transglutaminase catalysis on the functional and immunoglobulin binding properties of peanut flour dispersions containing casein.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The functionality of light roasted peanut flour (PF) dispersions containing supplemental casein (CN), was altered after polymerization with microbial transglutaminase (TGase). The formation of high molecular weight covalent cross-links was observed with potential formation of PF-PF, PF-CN, and CN-CN...

  15. [Immunoproteomics of non water-soluble allergens from 4 legumes flours: peanut, soybean, sesame and lentil].

    PubMed

    Bouakkadia, Hayette; Boutebba, Aissa; Haddad, Iman; Vinh, Joëlle; Guilloux, Laurence; Sutra, Jean-Pierre; Sénéchal, Hélène; Poncet, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Peanut, soybean, sesame and lentil are members of legumes worldwide consumed by human that can induce food allergy in genetically predisposed individuals. Several protein allergens, mainly water-soluble, have been described. We studied the non water-soluble fraction from these 4 food sources using immunoproteomics tools and techniques. Flour extracts were solubilized in detergent and chaotropes and analysed in 1 and 2 dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D). Results showed numerous proteins exhibiting wide ranges of isoelectric points and relative molecular masses. When IgE immunoreactivities of 18 food allergy patients were individually tested in 1 and 2D western-blots, a very diversified IgE repertoire was observed, reflecting extensive cross-reactivities but also co-sensitizations. Besides already well known and characterized allergens, mass spectrometry analysis allowed the identification of 22 allergens undescribed until now: 10 in peanut, 2 in soybean, 3 in sesame and 7 in lentil. Three allergens are legume storage proteins and the others belong to transport proteins, nucleotide binding proteins and proteins involved in the regulation of metabolism. Seven proteins are potentially similar to allergens described in plants and fungi and 11 are not related to any known allergen. Our results contribute to increase the repertoire of legume allergens that may improve the diagnosis, categorize patients and thus provide a better treatment of patients.

  16. Sequential hypoallergenic boiled peanut and roasted peanut oral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tao, Billy; Morris, Scott; Grzeskowiak, Luke; Smith, William; Forsyth, Kevin; Chataway, Tim

    2017-09-05

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) using roasted peanut flour can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic children [1] but is considered not to be ready for clinical practice [2] due to high rates (≥45%) of adverse events (AEs) [3] [4]. This necessitates medically supervised up-dosing in hospital and limits the number of patients that can be treated. In 2001 Beyer et. al proposed that the prevalence of peanut allergy in China was lower than that of the Western world because peanuts consumed in China were boiled, not roasted [5]. They demonstrated that boiling peanuts for 20 minutes reduced IgE binding in vitro when compared to roasted peanut. We have subsequently shown that extended boiling progressively reduced peanut IgE binding to 12.5% at 2 hours and to 5.3% at 12 hours compared to raw peanut while still retaining T cell reactivity [6]. Further, Inhibition ELISAs demonstrated that boiled peanuts have restricted ability (2-h ~70%, 12-h ~50%) to block the binding of patient IgE to raw peanut [6] suggesting boiled peanuts possess an incomplete repertoire of epitopes. This indicates that boiled peanuts alone are unlikely to expose a patient to the full spectrum of peanut epitopes and will therefore require a roasted peanut phase following the initial boiled peanut therapy. We hypothesize that AEs can be reduced by commencing OIT with hypoallergenic boiled peanut. Here we describe a pilot study that aims to characterize the incidence of AEs and successful desensitization in mild/moderate peanut allergic children using hypoallergenic 2-hour boiled peanut prior to roasted peanut OIT. Due to the home-based up-dosing procedure, a cautious approach was adopted which excluded severely allergic children. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  17. Reducing peanut allergens by high pressure combined with polyphenol oxidase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Si-Yin; Houska, Milan; Reed, Shawndrika

    2013-12-01

    Polyphenol oxidase (PPO) has been shown to reduce major peanut allergens. Since high pressure (HP) can increase enzyme activity, we postulated that further reduction of peanut allergens can be achieved through HP combined with PPO. Peanut extracts containing caffeic acid were treated with each of the following: (1) HP; (2) HP+PPO; (3) PPO; and (4) none. HP was conducted at 300 and 500 MPa, each for 3 and 10 min, 37 °C. After treatment, SDS-PAGE was performed and allergenic capacity (IgE binding) was determined colorimetrically in inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and Western blots, using a pooled plasma from peanut-allergic patients. Data showed that HP alone had no effect on major peanut allergens. However, HP at 500 MPa combined with PPO (HP500/PPO) induced a higher (approximately twofold) reduction of major peanut allergens and IgE binding than PPO alone or HP300/PPO. There was no difference between treatment times. We concluded that HP500/PPO at 3-min enhanced a twofold reduction of the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts, as compared to PPO itself.

  18. Peanut varieties with reduced Ara h 1 content indicating no reduced allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Krause, Susanne; Latendorf, Ties; Schmidt, Hendrik; Darcan-Nicolaisen, Yasemin; Reese, Gerald; Petersen, Arnd; Janssen, Ottmar; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard

    2010-03-01

    Peanut allergy is a major cause of food-induced severe anaphylactic reactions. To date, no medical care is available to prevent and treat peanut allergy and therefore hypoallergenic peanut varieties are of considerable health political and economic interest. Major allergens that induce IgE-responses in peanut-sensitive patients are Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3/4. In order to identify hypoallergenic peanuts, commercially locally available peanut varieties were screened for their allergen content. Ara h 1-deficient peanuts from Southeast Asia were identified by SDS-PAGE, immunoblotting, inhibition assays and ELISA. 2-D PAGE analyses demonstrated the different compositions of the tested extracts and revealed a number of variations of the allergen patterns of peanuts from different varieties. Mediator release experiments of these peanut extracts demonstrated similar allergenicities as compared with standard peanut extract. These results indicate that the allergenicity of peanuts with reduced Ara h 1 content might be compensated by the other allergens, and thus do not necessarily cause a reduction of allergenicity.

  19. Reduced risk of peanut sensitization following exposure through breast-feeding and early peanut introduction.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Tracy J; Becker, Allan B; Chan-Yeung, Moira; Chan, Edmond S; Watson, Wade T A; Chooniedass, Rishma; Azad, Meghan B

    2017-08-22

    Recent trials have shown that avoiding peanuts during infancy increases the risk of peanut allergy; however, these studies did not address maternal peanut consumption. We sought to investigate the relationship between maternal peanut consumption while breast-feeding, timing of direct peanut introduction, and peanut sensitization at age 7 years. Secondary analysis of a nested cohort within the 1995 Canadian Asthma Primary Prevention Study intervention study was performed. Breast-feeding and maternal and infant peanut consumption were captured by repeated questionnaires during infancy. Skin prick testing for peanut sensitization was performed at age 7 years. Overall, 58.2% of mothers consumed peanuts while breast-feeding and 22.5% directly introduced peanuts to their infant by 12 months. At 7 years, 9.4% of children were sensitized to peanuts. The lowest incidence (1.7%) was observed among children whose mothers consumed peanuts while breast-feeding and directly introduced peanuts before 12 months. Incidence was significantly higher (P < .05) if mothers consumed peanuts while breast-feeding but delayed introducing peanuts to their infant beyond 12 months (15.1%), or if mothers avoided peanuts themselves but directly introduced peanuts by 12 months (17.6%). Interaction analyses controlling for study group and maternal atopy confirmed that maternal peanut consumption while breast-feeding and infant peanut consumption by 12 months were protective in combination, whereas either exposure in isolation was associated with an increased risk of sensitization (P interaction = .003). In this secondary analysis, maternal peanut consumption while breast-feeding paired with direct introduction of peanuts in the first year of life was associated with the lowest risk of peanut sensitization, compared with all other combinations of maternal and infant peanut consumption. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All

  20. Minimal effects of high-pressure treatment on Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium inoculated into peanut butter and peanut products.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Elizabeth M; Somerville, Jeremy A; Balasubramaniam, V M; Lee, Ken

    2010-10-01

    About 1.2 billion pounds of peanut butter are consumed annually in the United States. In 2008 to 2009, an outbreak involving Salmonella Typhimurium in peanut butter led to a recall of over 3900 products by over 200 companies. More than 700 people became sick, 100 were hospitalized, and 9 people died from this outbreak. This study examines the efficacy of high-pressure processing (HPP) to decrease S. Typhimurium American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) 53647 inoculated into peanut butter and model systems. The viability of S. Typhimurium in peanut butter stored at room temperature was investigated. A culture of S. Typhimurium (6.88 log CFU/g) was inoculated into peanut butter. Following 28 d at 20 °C there was a 1.23-log reduction. Approximately 10(6) to 10(7) CFU/g S. Typhimurium were inoculated into 4 brands of peanut butter, 3 natural peanut butters and peanut flour slurries at 2, 5, and 10% peanut flour protein in peanut oil and in distilled water. All were treated at 600 MPa for 5 min at 45 °C. While significant differences were found between natural peanut butter and peanut protein mixtures, the reduction was <1.0 log. The peanut flour/oil mixtures had a 1.7, 1.6, and 1.0-log reduction from HPP (2, 5, and 10% protein, respectively) whereas peanut flour/water mixtures had a 6.7-log reduction for all protein levels. Oil had a protective effect indicating HPP may not help the microbial safety of water-in-oil food emulsions including peanut butter. Practical Application: There have been multiple outbreaks of foodborne illness involving peanut butter products. This study looks at the potential use of high-pressure processing to reduce the bacteria that may be in peanut butter.

  1. True phosphorus digestibility of black-eyed pea and peanut flour without or with phytase supplementation in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Iyayi, E A; Fru-Nji, F; Adeola, O

    2013-06-01

    Two studies were conducted to determine the true P digestibility (TPD) of black-eyed pea (BEP) and peanut flour (PNF) and the TPD response to phytase supplementation using the regression method. Sequential diets containing 115, 230, or 345 g of BEP/kg (experiment 1) and 115, 230, or 345 g of PNF/kg (experiment 2) without or with 1,000 units of phytase/kg were formulated. Chromic oxide was added to the diets at the rate of 5 g/kg as an indigestible marker. At 20 d posthatch in each study, 384 male broiler chickens (Ross 708) were weighed and allotted to the diets with 8 replicates of 8 birds each in a randomized complete block design. The birds had free access to the experimental diets until d 26 posthatch. In both studies, dietary P increase and phytase supplementation improved (P < 0.001) growth performance of the broiler chickens. There were linear increases (P < 0. 001) in ileal and excreta P output but a linear decrease (P < 0.001) in apparent P digestibility with an increase in dietary P levels. Phytase supplementation reduced (P < 0.001) ileal P and excreta P output and increased (P < 0.001) apparent P digestibility and retention. Apparent Ca digestibility was affected (P < 0.01) by P level and phytase addition in BEP and by P level (P < 0.05) in PNF. Apparent Ca retention in BEP increased (P < 0.05) with phytase addition. The TPD in the BEP increased (P < 0.01) from 29 without phytase to 83% with the addition of 1,000 units of phytase/kg. There was an increase (P < 0.01) in TPD of PNF from 67 without phytase to 75% with phytase supplementation. There was a corresponding increase (P < 0.01) in true P retention from 10% without phytase to 61% with phytase in birds on BEP diets and an equivalent increase (P < 0.01) in true P retention from 74% without phytase to 84% with phytase in birds that received the PNF diets.

  2. Using phenolic compounds to reduce the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Since phenolic compounds may form insoluble complexes with proteins, we determined that their interaction with peanut allergens leads to a reduction in the allergenic properties of peanut extracts and peanut butter slurries. Phenolics, such as, caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, and ferulic acid were e...

  3. Anaemia prevalence may be reduced among countries that fortify flour.

    PubMed

    Barkley, Jonathan S; Wheeler, Kathleen S; Pachón, Helena

    2015-07-01

    The effectiveness of flour fortification in reducing anaemia prevalence is equivocal. The goal was to utilise the existing national-level data to assess whether anaemia in non-pregnant women was reduced after countries began fortifying wheat flour, alone or in combination with maize flour, with at least Fe, folic acid, vitamin A or vitamin B12. Nationally representative anaemia data were identified through Demographic and Health Survey reports, the WHO Vitamin and Mineral Nutrition Information System database and other national-level nutrition surveys. Countries with at least two anaemia surveys were considered for inclusion. Within countries, surveys were excluded if altitude was not consistently adjusted for, or if the blood-draw site (e.g. capillary or venous) or Hb quantification method (e.g. HemoCue or Cyanmethaemoglobin) differed. Anaemia prevalence was modelled for countries that had pre- and post-fortification data (n 12) and for countries that never fortified flour (n 20) using logistic regression models that controlled for time effects, human development index (HDI) and endemic malaria. After adjusting for HDI and malaria, each year of fortification was associated with a 2.4% reduction in the odds of anaemia prevalence (PR 0.976, 95% CI 0.975, 0.978). Among countries that never fortified, no reduction in the odds of anaemia prevalence over time was observed (PR 0.999, 95% CI 0.997, 1.002). Among both fortification and non-fortification countries, HDI and malaria were significantly associated with anaemia (P,0.001). Although this type of evidence precludes a definitive conclusion, results suggest that after controlling for time effects, HDI and endemic malaria, anaemia prevalence has decreased significantly in countries that fortify flour with micronutrients, while remaining unchanged in countries that do not.

  4. Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Average yields of peanut in the U.S. set an all time record of 4,695 kg ha-1 in 2012. This far exceeded the previous record yield of 3,837 kg ha-1 in 2008. Favorable weather conditions undoubtedly contributed to the record yields in 2012; however, these record yields would not have been achievable...

  5. Analysis of ingredient functionality and formulation optimization of an instant peanut beverage mix.

    PubMed

    Howard, Brandy M; Hung, Yen-Con; McWatters, S Kay

    2010-01-01

    Powder for an instant shake-style beverage was created using partially defatted peanut flour (12% fat), granulated sugar, and nonfat dry milk (NFDM). The 3 main components, along with constant amounts of stabilizing gums and anti-caking silica, were mixed together and finely milled in a Super Wing Mill to further reduce the particle sizes. Drinks from each formula variation were prepared and analyzed for viscosity (digital viscometer), color (colorimeter), and separation rate. Each beverage was also analyzed by consumers to determine acceptability of flavor, mouth-feel, and color. Physical test results show that viscosity increased with increasing proportion of peanut flour in the formula, and viscosity decreased with increasing levels of sugar and NFDM. For each formula, the samples at refrigerated temperature (4 degrees C) were less viscous than those at ambient temperatures (23 to 25 degrees C). Color values show that the beverage powder color was mostly influenced by peanut flour percentage, becoming darker with increasing levels of peanut flour. Prepared beverage color was influenced by both NFDM and peanut flour percentage; lightness increased with increasing NFDM percentage and decreased with increasing peanut flour percentage. Separation rates were most affected by the proportion of NFDM in the formula; higher levels decreased the rate of separation. Refrigeration slowed the rate of separation in all samples. Response surface analysis of consumer test data showed that the most acceptable formulation for the peanut beverage included approximately equal amounts of peanut flour, sugar, and NFDM.

  6. Chemical modification of peanut conglutin reduces IgE reactivity but not T cell reactivity in peanut-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    van Hoffen, E; van der Kleij, H P M; den Hartog Jager, C F; van Doorn, W A; Knol, E F; Opstelten, D-J; Koppelman, S J; Knulst, A C

    2014-12-01

    Specific immunotherapy for peanut allergy is associated with significant side-effects. Chemically modified allergens may provide a safer alternative. This study aimed to analyse the immunogenicity and allergenicity of modified peanut conglutin. Native peanut conglutin and two modifications thereof were generated (RA and RAGA). Conglutin-specific T cell lines from 11 peanut-allergic patients were analysed for proliferation and cytokine production. Sera from 14 patients were analysed for IgE/IgG1/IgG4 binding by immunoblot and ELISA. IgE reactivity was analysed by direct and indirect basophil activation test (BAT), in presence and absence of patient plasma or CD32-blocking antibodies. T cell proliferation to RA was unchanged, and proliferation to RAGA was reduced compared to native conglutin. Cytokine profiles remained unchanged. IgE, IgG1 and IgG4 binding to RA and RAGA was significantly reduced. In the direct BAT, the relative potency of modified conglutin was decreased in 67% and increased/similar in 33% of the patients. In the indirect BAT, RA and RAGA were 10-100 times less potent than native conglutin. Addition of plasma to the indirect BAT increased the relative potency of modified conglutin in patients with high peanut-specific IgG levels. This was mediated via blocking of the response to native conglutin, most likely by soluble IgG, and not via CD32. Chemical modification of peanut conglutin by RA retains immunogenicity and reduces allergenicity and may be a promising approach for development of a curative treatment for peanut allergy. In a subgroup of patients, where the reactivity of native conglutin is already partially blocked by IgG, the effect of the modification of conglutin is less pronounced. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Nutritional value and acceptability of homemade maize/sorghum-based weaning mixtures supplemented with rojo bean flour, ground sardines and peanut paste.

    PubMed

    Mosha, Theobald C E; Vicent, Mary M

    2004-06-01

    Low nutrient density in weaning foods is the major cause of under-nutrition among infants and young children in developing countries. Ten types of composite weaning diets (namely, maize-rojo beans-peanut, maize-peanut-sardines, maize-peanut-sardine-rojo beans, maize-peanut-soaked rojo beans, maize-peanut-germinated rojo beans, sorghum-rojo beans-peanut, sorghum-peanut-sardines, sorghum-peanut-sardine-rojo beans, sorghum-peanut-soaked rojo beans, and sorghum-peanut-germinated rojo beans) were formulated and assayed for proximate composition, energy, mineral density, tannin content and residual urease activity. The diets were also evaluated for storage stability under ambient conditions, sensory quality and overall acceptability. Results of the study indicated that, concentrations of protein, fat, ash, calcium, iron, zinc and copper were significantly (P<0.05) increased when plain maize and sorghum gruels were enriched with rojo beans, peanut paste and/or ground sardines. Soaking and germinating the rojo beans and dehulling the sorghum reduced the concentration of tannins in the gruels significantly (P<0.05). Residual urease activity ranged between 0.00 and 0.07 units, about 10-fold lower than the maximum level (0.8 units) allowed in weaning foods. Both maize and sorghum-based composite gruels had a short shelf-life under ambient conditions (26.4 degrees C) ranging between 4 and 6 h, with gruels containing ground sardines showing a tendency to spoil faster. All composite gruels except those containing germinated rojo beans were highly liked and accepted by consumers (P<0.05), similar to the plain maize and sorghum gruels. The maize and sorghum-based composite products therefore have a potential for use as weaning and/or supplementary foods for older infants and young children. Further investigations are suggested to extend the shelf-life of the composite products and improve the organoleptic quality of the diets containing germinated rojo beans.

  8. Evaluation of reduced allergenicity of irradiated peanut extract using splenocytes from peanut-sensitized mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sejo; Jang, Da-In; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Byun, Myung-Woo; Lee, Soo-Young

    2009-07-01

    Peanut (PN) allergy is one of the most serious forms of IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity. Gamma irradiation has been widely used for the preservation of food. The results of our previous studies showed that the IgE-binding capacity to several antigens were profoundly reduced after gamma irradiation. In this study, we evaluated the changes of allergenecity and cytokine production profiles after exposure of irradiated PN extract in a PN-allergy mouse model. Mice were sensitized to PN extract by intragastric administration on days 0, 1, 2, and 7, and then challenged on day 21. Four weeks later, we evaluated the cytokine production patterns and proliferation responses of splenocytes that were stimulated with intact PN extract, compared to 10 and 50 kGy irradiated PN extract. When the cells were stimulated with 10 kGy of irradiated PN extract, a higher level of production of IFN-γ and IL-10 cytokines was observed. However, stimulation with 50 kGy of irradiated PN extract resulted in a higher level of production of only IFN-γ cytokines. In addition, the Th1/Th2 ratio increased in response to treatment with gamma-irradiated PNs. The results of this study show that the allergenicity of PN extracts could be reduced by gamma irradiation which caused downregulation of Th2 lymphocyte activity in the PN-sensitized mice.

  9. Novel strategy to create hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol edible matrices for oral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Plundrich, Nathalie J; Kulis, Mike; White, Brittany L; Grace, Mary H; Guo, Rishu; Burks, A Wesley; Davis, Jack P; Lila, Mary Ann

    2014-07-23

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated hypersensitivity. Upon peanut consumption by an allergic individual, epitopes on peanut proteins bind and cross-link peanut-specific IgE on mast cell and basophil surfaces triggering the cells to release inflammatory mediators responsible for allergic reactions. Polyphenolic phytochemicals have high affinity to bind proteins and form soluble and insoluble complexes with unique functionality. This study investigated the allergenicity of polyphenol-fortified peanut matrices prepared by complexing various polyphenol-rich plant juices and extracts with peanut flour. Polyphenol-fortified peanut matrices reduced IgE binding to one or more peanut allergens (Ara h 1, Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6). Attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) suggested changes in secondary protein structure. Peanut protein-cranberry polyphenol fortified matrices triggered significantly less basophil degranulation than unmodified flour in an ex vivo assay using human blood and less mast cell degranulation when used to orally challenge peanut-allergic mice. Polyphenol fortification of peanut flour resulted in a hypoallergenic matrix with reduced IgE binding and degranulation capacity, likely due to changes in protein secondary structure or masking of epitopes, suggesting potential applications for oral immunotherapy.

  10. Nutritional and sensory evaluation of a complementary food formulated from rice, faba beans, sweet potato flour, and peanut oil.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Amal H; El Anany, Ayman Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Childhood malnutrition is a common disorder in developing countries. To formulate a complementary food from rice, germinated-decoated faba bean, orange-fleshed sweet potato flour, and peanut oil (RFPP formula) for infants aged 6 to 24 months. The nutritional and sensory characteristics of the RFPP complementary food in comparison with those of a commercial complementary food were determined using standard official procedures. The levels of protein (17.89 g/100 g), fat (10.35 g/100 g), carbohydrate (67.82 g/100 g), and energy (435.99 kcal/100 g) of the RFPP complementary food met the specifications of the Codex standard (1991) and the Egyptian Standard No. 3284 (2005). The essential amino acid contents of the RFPP complementary food were higher than the amino acid profile of the Food and Agriculture Organization/World Health Organization/United Nations University (2002) reference protein for children 0.5 to 1 and 1 to 2 years of age. The RFPP complementary food had high levels (54.00%) of monounsaturated fatty acids. However, the highest level of saturated fatty acids (51.10%) was recorded for the commercial complementary food. The sensory evaluation results, using a nine-point hedonic scale ranging from 1 (dislike extremely) to 9 (like extremely), show that the RFPP complementary food was acceptable in appearance (7.20), color (6.35), aroma (6.75), taste (7.25), and mouthfeel (7.10) and had an overall acceptability of 6.40. The RFPP formulated complementary food was acceptable and adequate in nutrients for weaning purposes.

  11. [Peanut allergy].

    PubMed

    Turcanu, Victor

    2010-01-01

    Peanut allergy currently affects around 1% of the UK and US paediatric population and represents a major healthcare concern because it is outgrown in less than 20% of cases and is a major cause of anaphylaxis. Its main symptoms, triggered by peanut ingestion, are cutaneous (urticaria, erythema, angioedema), gastrointestinal (abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhoea), respiratory (wheezing, dyspnoea) and cardiovascular (hypotension, arrhythmia, shock). The usual onset of symptoms occurs soon after peanut ingestion (minutes to hours); however some patients have biphasic reactions, with exacerbations occurring up to 8 hours later. Peanut allergy diagnostic is based mainly upon the medical history (preferably including a diet diary and elimination diets), skin testing, peanut-specific IgE measurement and ideally a peanut oral challenge. Peanut allergy management includes monitorisation and education for avoiding peanut-containing foods and for recognising and treating anaphylactic episodes (self-injectable adrenalin and rapid-acting antihistamines). In the past, anti-IgE antibodies were shown to decrease the risk of anaphylaxis by reducing the allergic patients' reactivity to peanuts. Recent investigations, driven by the need to develop efficient treatment and prevention strategies for peanut allergy, suggest that oral immunotherapy with peanuts, although exposing the patients to significant risk, may represent a promising therapeutic approach. Furthermore, contrary to the general view that peanut avoidance in infants could prevent peanut allergy, a recent study shows that the opposite may be true as early consumption of peanuts in infancy is associated with a low prevalence of peanut allergy.

  12. Streptomyces sp. ASBV-1 reduces aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus parasiticus in peanut grains.

    PubMed

    Zucchi, T D; de Moraes, L A B; de Melo, I S

    2008-12-01

    To evaluate the ability of Streptomyces sp. (strain ASBV-1) to restrict aflatoxin accumulation in peanut grains. In the control of many phytopathogenic fungi the Streptomyces sp. ASBV-1 strain showed promise. An inhibitory test using this strain and A. parasiticus was conducted in peanut grains to evaluate the effects of this interaction on spore viability and aflatoxin accumulation. In some treatments the Streptomyces sp ASBV-1 strain reduced the viability of A. parasiticus spores by c. 85%, and inhibited aflatoxin accumulation in peanut grains. The values of these reductions ranged from 63 to 98% and from 67% to 96% for aflatoxins B(1) and G(1), respectively. It was demonstrated that Streptomyces sp. ASBV-1 is able to colonize peanut grains and thus inhibit the spore viability of A. parasiticus, as well as reducing aflatoxin production. The positive finding for aflatoxin accumulation reduction in peanut grains seems promising and suggests a wider use of this actinobacteria in biological control programmes.

  13. Peanut allergen exposure through saliva: assessment and interventions to reduce exposure.

    PubMed

    Maloney, Jennifer M; Chapman, Martin D; Sicherer, Scott H

    2006-09-01

    Exposure to food allergens through saliva (kissing, utensils) can cause local and systemic allergic reactions. To determine the time course of peanut allergen (Ara h 1) persistence in saliva after ingestion of peanut butter and to evaluate mouth cleansing interventions to reduce salivary peanut allergen. Thirty-eight individuals ingested 2 tablespoons of peanut butter, and saliva was collected at various time points. At another time, samples were collected after 5 interventions (brushing teeth, brushing and rinsing, rinsing, waiting then brushing, waiting then chewing gum). Detection of Ara h 1 was performed by a monoclonal-based ELISA (detection limit, 15-20 ng/mL). Salivary Ara h 1 varied considerably immediately after ingestion, but included levels expected to invoke reactions (as much as 40 microg/mL). Most (87%) subjects with detectable peanut after a meal had undetectable levels by 1 hour with no interventions. None had detectable levels several hours later after a peanut-free lunch. This result indicates (95% confidence) that 90% would have undetectable Ara h 1 in saliva under these circumstances. All of the interventions reduced salivary Ara h 1, in some cases by >95%, but Ara h 1 remained detectable in approximately 40% of samples (though typically below thresholds reported to induce reactions). Patients with peanut allergy require counseling regarding risks of kissing or sharing utensils, even if partners have brushed teeth or chewed gum. Advice to reduce risks, though not as ideal as total avoidance, includes waiting a few hours plus eating a peanut-free meal. Waiting several hours and ingesting a peanut-free meal were more effective at reducing salivary peanut protein concentration than simple, immediate interventions.

  14. Reducing the allergenic capacity of peanut extracts and liquid peanut butter by phenolic compounds.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Phenolic compounds are known to form soluble and insoluble complexes with proteins. The objective of this study was to determine if phenolics, such as, caffeic, chlorogenic, and ferulic acids form insoluble and irreversible complexes with major peanut allergens. We also tested whether such complexat...

  15. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons; Daniel F. Caufield

    2005-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture”. Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  16. Wood flour

    Treesearch

    Craig M. Clemons

    2010-01-01

    The term “wood flour” is somewhat ambiguous. Reineke states that the term wood flour “is applied somewhat loosely to wood reduced to finely divided particles approximating those of cereal flours in size, appearance, and texture.” Though its definition is imprecise, the term wood flour is in common use. Practically speaking, wood flour usually refers to wood particles...

  17. Chia flour supplementation reduces blood pressure in hypertensive subjects.

    PubMed

    Toscano, Luciana Tavares; da Silva, Cássia Surama Oliveira; Toscano, Lydiane Tavares; de Almeida, Antônio Eduardo Monteiro; Santos, Amilton da Cruz; Silva, Alexandre Sérgio

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of chia supplementation (Salvia hispanica L.) on blood pressure (BP) and its associated cardiometabolic factors in treated and untreated hypertensive individuals. The subjects were randomly assigned to one of the following groups: the hypertensive-drug treated (CHIA-MD, n = 10), hypertensive untreated (CHIA-NM, n = 9) and placebo (PLA-MD, n = 7) groups. The subjects consumed 35 g/day of either chia flour or a placebo for 12 weeks. The clinical and ambulatory BP, inflammation, oxidative stress and markers for nitric oxide were measured. While the PLA-MD group showed no changes in BP, there was a reduction in the mean clinical blood pressure (MBP) in the CHIA (111.5 ± 1.9 to 102.7 ± 1.5 mmHg, p < 0.001) and CHIA-MD (111.3 ± 2.2 to 100.1 ± 1.8 mmHg, p < 0.001) groups. The CHIA-NM group showed no reduction in the MBP but did show a decreased systolic BP (146.8 ± 3.8 to 137.3 ± 3.1 mmHg, p < 0.05). The clinical BP reduction was demonstrated by a 24 h ambulatory systolic reduction in all of the supplemented groups. However, the mean ambulatory BP was reduced only in the CHIA (98.1 ± 2.4 to 92.8 ± 2.2 mmHg, p < 0.05) group, and there was no change in the diastolic component in either of the CHIA groups. The lipid peroxidation was reduced in the CHIA (p = 0.04) and CHIA-NM (p = 0.02) groups compared with the PLA-MD group. A reduction in the plasma nitrite levels was observed only in the CHIA group (p = 0.02). Chia flour has the ability to reduce ambulatory and clinical BP in both treated and untreated hypertensive individuals.

  18. Reducing retrogradation and lipid oxidation of normal and glutinous rice flours by adding mango peel powder.

    PubMed

    Siriamornpun, Sirithon; Tangkhawanit, Ekkarat; Kaewseejan, Niwat

    2016-06-15

    Green and ripe mango peel powders (MPP) were added to normal rice flour (NRF) and glutinous rice flour (GRF) at three levels (400, 800 and 1200 ppm) and their effects on physicochemical properties and lipid oxidation inhibition were investigated. Overall, MPP increased the breakdown viscosity and reduced the final viscosity in rice flours when compared to the control. Decreasing in retrogradation was observed in both NRF and GRF with MPP added of all levels. MPP addition also significantly inhibited the lipid oxidation of all flours during storage (30 days). Retrogradation values were strongly negatively correlated with total phenolic and flavonoid contents, but not with fiber content. The hydrogen bonds and hydrophilic interactions between phenolic compounds with amylopectin molecule may be involved the decrease of starch retrogradation, especially GRF. We suggest that the addition of MPP not only reduced the retrogradation but also inhibited the lipid oxidation of rice flour.

  19. Increased water activity reduces the thermal resistance of Salmonella enterica in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Zhang, Wei

    2013-08-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90 °C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126 °C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil.

  20. Increased Water Activity Reduces the Thermal Resistance of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Butter

    PubMed Central

    He, Yingshu; Li, Ye; Salazar, Joelle K.; Yang, Jingyun; Tortorello, Mary Lou

    2013-01-01

    Increased water activity in peanut butter significantly (P < 0.05) reduced the heat resistance of desiccation-stressed Salmonella enterica serotypes treated at 90°C. The difference in thermal resistance was less notable when strains were treated at 126°C. Using scanning electron microscopy, we observed minor morphological changes of S. enterica cells resulting from desiccation and rehydration processes in peanut oil. PMID:23728806

  1. Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins is Retained Following Enzymatic Hydrolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rationale: Hydrolysis of peanut proteins by food-grade enzymes may reduce allergenicity and could lead to safer forms of immunotherapy. Methods: Light roasted peanut flour extracts were digested with pepsin (37°C, pH 2), Alcalase (60°C pH 8), or Flavourzyme (50°C, pH 7) up to 1 hr, or sequentially w...

  2. Survival of four commercial probiotic mixtures in full fat and reduced fat peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Klu, Yaa Asantewaa Kafui; Phillips, Robert D; Chen, Jinru

    2014-12-01

    A well-documented health benefit of probiotics is their ability to reduce the incidence of diarrhea in young, malnourished children in the developing countries. This study was undertaken to determine whether peanut butter, a nutritious, low-moisture food could be a carrier for probiotics by observing the survivability of selected probiotic mixtures in peanut butter under different storage conditions. Commercial probiotic mixtures (B, U, N and S) comprising of multiple strains of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium, Streptococcus and Lactococcus were inoculated into full fat or reduced fat peanut butter at 10(7) CFU/g. Resulting products were stored at 4, 25 or 37 °C for 12 months. Populations of Lactobacillus, Bifidobacterium and Streptococcus/Lactococcus were determined periodically. The average viable cell counts of N and S were significantly lower than those of B and U (p < 0.05). In all probiotic products stored at different temperatures, Bifidobacterium had the greatest survivability, followed by Lactobacillus and Streptococcus/Lactococcus. The probiotics used in the study had different surviving patterns, and their survival was influenced by storage conditions. Fat content of peanut butter had no significant impacts on probiotic viability. Results suggest that peanut butter can be a vehicle to deliver probiotics for preventing diarrhea among malnourished children.

  3. Boiling peanut Ara h 1 results in the formation of aggregates with reduced allergenicity.

    PubMed

    Blanc, Fany; Vissers, Yvonne M; Adel-Patient, Karine; Rigby, Neil M; Mackie, Alan R; Gunning, A Patrick; Wellner, Nikolaus K; Skov, Per S; Przybylski-Nicaise, Laetitia; Ballmer-Weber, Barbara; Zuidmeer-Jongejan, Laurian; Szépfalusi, Zsolt; Ruinemans-Koerts, Janneke; Jansen, Ad P H; Bernard, Hervé; Wal, Jean-Michel; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Wichers, Harry J; Mills, E N Clare

    2011-12-01

    Roasting rather than boiling and Maillard modifications may modulate peanut allergenicity. We investigated how these factors affect the allergenic properties of a major peanut allergen, Ara h 1. Ara h 1 was purified from either raw (N-Ara h 1) or roasted (R-Ara h 1) peanuts. Boiling (100°C 15 min; H-Ara h 1) resulted in a partial loss of Ara h 1 secondary structure and formation of rod-like branched aggregates with reduced IgE-binding capacity and impaired ability to induce mediator release. Glycated Ara h 1 (G-Ara h 1) formed by boiling in the presence of glucose behaved similarly. However, H- and G-Ara h1 retained the T-cell reactivity of N-Ara h 1. R-Ara h 1 was denatured, comprised compact, globular aggregates, and showed no evidence of glycation but retained the IgE-binding capacity of the native protein. Ara h 1 aggregates formed by boiling were morphologically distinct from those formed by roasting and had lower allergenic activity. Glycation had no additional effect on Ara h 1 allergenicity compared with heating alone. Taken together with published data on the loss of Ara h 2/6 from boiled peanuts, this supports the hypothesis that boiling reduces the allergenicity of peanuts. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Use of sunlight to partially detoxify groundnut (peanut) cake flour and casein contaminated with aflatoxin B1

    SciTech Connect

    Shantha, T.; Murthy, V.S.

    1981-03-01

    Sunlight destroyed 83 and 50% of the toxin added to casein and groundnut cake flour, respectively. Equilibrium dialysis revealed that both casein and groundnut protein bind aflatoxin but the toxin bound to casein appeared more photo-labile than that bound to groundnut protein.

  5. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that can reduce post-harvest proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Michael L; Foster, Jamie L

    2013-08-15

    Studies of perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) suggest its hay and haylage have greater levels of rumen undegraded protein (RUP) than other legume forages such as alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.). Greater RUP can result in more efficient nitrogen utilization by ruminant animals with positive economic and environmental effects. We sought to determine whether, like red clover (Trifolium pretense L.), perennial peanut contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that might be responsible for increased RUP. Perennial peanut extracts contain immunologically detectible PPO protein and high levels of PPO activity (>100 nkatal mg(-1) protein). Addition of caffeic acid (PPO substrate) to perennial peanut extracts depleted of endogenous substrates reduced proteolysis by 90%. Addition of phenolics prepared from perennial peanut leaves to extracts of either transgenic PPO-expressing or control (non-expressing) alfalfa showed peanut phenolics could reduce proteolysis >70% in a PPO-dependent manner. Two abundant likely PPO substrates are present in perennial peanut leaves including caftaric acid. Perennial peanut contains PPO and PPO substrates that together are capable of inhibiting post-harvest proteolysis, suggesting a possible mechanism for increased RUP in this forage. Research related to optimizing the PPO system in other forage crops will likely be applicable to perennial peanut. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  6. Characterizing small RNA populations in non-transgenic and aflatoxin-reducing-transgenic peanut lines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aflatoxin contamination is a major constraint in the food production worlwide. In peanut these aflatoxins are mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus (Link) and A. parasiticus (Speare). The use of RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising method to reduce or prevent the accumulation of aflatoxin in pean...

  7. An autoclave treatment reduces the solubility and antigenicity of an allergenic protein found in buckwheat flour.

    PubMed

    Tomotake, Hiroyuki; Yamazaki, Rikio; Yamato, Masayuki

    2012-06-01

    The effects of an autoclave treatment of buckwheat flour on a 24-kDa allergenic protein were investigated by measuring reduction in solubility and antibody binding. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis showed that the intensity of the major bands, including that of the 24-kDa allergen, was reduced by the autoclave treatment. The protein solubility in buckwheat flour was variably decreased by the autoclave treatment. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis using a monoclonal antibody specific for buckwheat 24-kDa protein showed that the reactivity of protein extracts (10 μg/ml) from buckwheat flour was lowered by the autoclave treatment. The autoclave treatment may reduce the major allergen content of buckwheat. Future studies will determine if autoclaving treatments affect the allergenicity of the 24-kDa buckwheat protein.

  8. Effect of high hydrostatic pressure on Salmonella inoculated into creamy peanut butter with modified composition.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Tanya; Karwe, Mukund; Schaffner, Donald W

    2014-10-01

    Peanut butter has been associated with several large foodborne salmonellosis outbreaks. This research investigates the potential of high hydrostatic pressure processing (HPP) for inactivation of Salmonella in peanut butter of modified composition, both by modifying its water activity as well by the addition of various amounts of nisin. A cocktail of six Salmonella strains associated with peanut butter and nut-related outbreaks was used for all experiments. Different volumes of sterile distilled water were added to peanut butter to increase water activity, and different volumes of peanut oil were added to decrease water activity. Inactivation in 12% fat, light roast, partially defatted peanut flour, and peanut oil was also quantified. Nisaplin was incorporated into peanut butter at four concentrations corresponding to 2.5, 5.0, 12.5, and 25.0 ppm of pure nisin. All samples were subjected to 600 MPa for 18 min. A steady and statistically significant increase in log reduction was seen as added moisture was increased from 50 to 90%. The color of all peanut butter samples containing added moisture contents darkened after high pressure processing. The addition of peanut oil to further lower the water activity of peanut butter further reduced the effectiveness of HPP. Just over a 1-log reduction was obtained in peanut flour, while inactivation to below detection limits (2 log CFU/g) was observed in peanut oil. Nisin alone without HPP had no effect. Recovery of Salmonella after a combined nisin and HPP treatment did show increased log reduction with longer storage times. The maximum log reduction of Salmonella achieved was 1.7 log CFU/g, which was comparable to that achieved by noncycling pressure treatment alone. High pressure processing alone or with other formulation modification, including added nisin, is not a suitable technology to manage the microbiological safety of Salmonella-contaminated peanut butter.

  9. Transglutaminase polymerization of peanut proteins.

    PubMed

    Clare, D A; Gharst, G; Sanders, T H

    2007-01-24

    Transglutaminase promotes protein cross-linking reactions through an acyl transferase mechanism involving protein-bound glutaminyl residues and primary amines including the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues in soy, myosin, gluten, oat globulin, casein, and whey. Herein, we present a first report of exogenous transglutaminase catalysis of several peanut protein fractions, including purified Ara h 1. In most cases, SDS-PAGE banding patterns revealed the formation of high molecular weight polymers while catalysis of Ara h 1 resulted in distinct dimer formation. Cross-linking effects were accomplished in the presence and absence of the reducing reagent, dithiothreitol. Ortho-phthaldialdehyde assays, used to quantify the degree of polymerization, indicated approximately 21% and approximately 30% coupling over a similar time interval, using either cold hexane extracted peanut protein fractions or lightly roasted flour dispersions, respectively. Rheological measurements established that transglutaminase-modified peanut extracts exhibited lowered viscosity readings compared to nontreated dispersions. Peanut protein polymers and glycoprotein conjugates, created by covalent linkage between protein substrates and monosaccharide amino sugars, exhibited similar IgE binding activity, compared to control solutions. These results suggested that potential allergic responses were not enhanced after enzymatic modification. Ultimately, these approaches may provide novel peanut-based food ingredients with unique functional characteristics for expanded applications within the world marketplace.

  10. Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children.

    PubMed

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L; Platts-Mills, Thomas A; Workman, Lisa; Sordillo, Joanne E; Camargo, Carlos A; Gillman, Matthew W; Gold, Diane R; Litonjua, Augusto A

    2014-05-01

    Maternal diet during pregnancy may affect childhood allergy and asthma. We sought to examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a US prebirth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age, 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum-specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood. Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least 1 food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (odds ratio [OR], 0.53; 95% CI, 0.30-0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.69-0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR, 0.85; 95% CI, 0.74-0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.46-0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs, 3.6 to 8.1). Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Peanut, milk, and wheat intake during pregnancy is associated with reduced allergy and asthma in children

    PubMed Central

    Bunyavanich, Supinda; Rifas-Shiman, Sheryl L.; Platts-Mills, Thomas A.; Workman, Lisa; Sordillo, Joanne E.; Camargo, Carlos A.; Gillman, Matthew W.; Gold, Diane R.; Litonjua, Augusto A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Maternal diet during pregnancy may influence childhood allergy and asthma. Objective To examine the associations between maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during early pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. Methods We studied 1277 mother-child pairs from a United States pre-birth cohort unselected for any disease. Using food frequency questionnaires administered during the first and second trimesters, we assessed maternal intake of common childhood food allergens during pregnancy. In mid-childhood (mean age 7.9 years), we assessed food allergy, asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis by questionnaire and serum specific IgE levels. We examined the associations between maternal diet during pregnancy and childhood allergy and asthma. We also examined the cross-sectional associations between specific food allergies, asthma, and atopic conditions in mid-childhood. Results Food allergy was common (5.6%) in mid-childhood, as was sensitization to at least one food allergen (28.0%). Higher maternal peanut intake (each additional z-score) during the first trimester was associated with 47% reduced odds of peanut allergic reaction (OR 0.53, 95%CI 0.30–0.94). Higher milk intake during the first trimester was associated with reduced asthma (OR 0.83, 95%CI 0.69–0.99) and allergic rhinitis (OR 0.85, 95%CI 0.74–0.97). Higher maternal wheat intake during the second trimester was associated with reduced atopic dermatitis (OR 0.64, 95%CI 0.46–0.90). Peanut, wheat, and soy allergy were each cross-sectionally associated with increased childhood asthma, atopic dermatitis, and allergic rhinitis (ORs 3.6 to 8.1). Conclusion Higher maternal intake of peanut, milk, and wheat during early pregnancy was associated with reduced odds of mid-childhood allergy and asthma. PMID:24522094

  12. Characterization of small RNA populations in non-transgenic and aflatoxin-reducing-transformed peanut.

    PubMed

    Power, Imana L; Dang, Phat M; Sobolev, Victor S; Orner, Valerie A; Powell, Joseph L; Lamb, Marshall C; Arias, Renee S

    2017-04-01

    Aflatoxin contamination is a major constraint in food production worldwide. In peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), these toxic and carcinogenic aflatoxins are mainly produced by Aspergillus flavus Link and A. parasiticus Speare. The use of RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising method to reduce or prevent the accumulation of aflatoxin in peanut seed. In this study, we performed high-throughput sequencing of small RNA populations in a control line and in two transformed peanut lines that expressed an inverted repeat targeting five genes involved in the aflatoxin-biosynthesis pathway and that showed up to 100% less aflatoxin B1 than the controls. The objective was to determine the putative involvement of the small RNA populations in aflatoxin reduction. In total, 41 known microRNA (miRNA) families and many novel miRNAs were identified. Among those, 89 known and 10 novel miRNAs were differentially expressed in the transformed lines. We furthermore found two small interfering RNAs derived from the inverted repeat, and 39 sRNAs that mapped without mismatches to the genome of A. flavus and were present only in the transformed lines. This information will increase our understanding of the effectiveness of RNAi and enable the possible improvement of the RNAi technology for the control of aflatoxins.

  13. Reducing Length of Labor and Cesarean Surgery Rate Using a Peanut Ball for Women Laboring With an Epidural

    PubMed Central

    Tussey, Christina Marie; Botsios, Emily; Gerkin, Richard D.; Kelly, Lesly A.; Gamez, Juana; Mensik, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT One strategy for reducing the primary cesarean surgery rate and length of labor is using a peanut-shaped exercise ball for women laboring under epidural analgesia. A randomized, controlled study was conducted to determine whether use of a “peanut ball” decreased length of labor and increased the rate of vaginal birth. Women who used the peanut ball (n = 107) versus those who did not (n = 91) demonstrated shorter first stage labor by 29 min (p = .053) and second stage labor by 11 min (p < .001). The intervention was associated with a significantly lower incidence of cesarean surgery (OR = 0.41, p = .04). The peanut ball is potentially a successful nursing intervention to help progress labor and support vaginal birth for women laboring under epidural analgesia. PMID:26937158

  14. Making peanut allergens indigestible: a model system for reducing or preventing an allergic reaction

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergens are not totally resistant to digestion as previously known. Creating peanut allergen conjugates that are more resistant to digestion may prevent absorption of the allergens into the bloodstream, and thereby, an allergic reaction. Peanut allergen conjugates were prepared by covalen...

  15. The potential of papain and alcalase enzymes and process optimizations to reduce allergenic gliadins in wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Li, Ying; Yu, Jianmei; Goktepe, Ipek; Ahmedna, Mohamed

    2016-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to select effective enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of allergenic proteins, gliadins, in wheat flour and to optimize the enzymatic treatment conditions. Six proteases were tested. Hydrolyzed samples were tested for residual gliadin concentrations and in vitro allergenicity. The hydrolysis conditions of wheat protein by the effective enzymes were optimized by central composite design. Results showed that alcalase from Bacillus licheniformis, and papain from latex of papaya fruit had greater ability to reduce gliadin content of wheat flour than flavourzyme, pepsin, trypsin or α-chymotrypsin. The sequential-treatment of wheat flour by alcalase-papain was more effective in reducing gliadin content than single enzyme treatment. Under the optimal conditions of sequential enzymatic treatment, gliadin was almost completely removed, resulting in the flour extract showing lowest IgE-binding. Therefore, this could be a promising biotechnology for preparing low allergenic wheat products.

  16. Energy values of canola meal, cottonseed meal, bakery meal, and peanut flour meal for broiler chickens determined using the regression method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F; Adeola, O

    2017-02-01

    The energy values of canola meal (CM), cottonseed meal (CSM), bakery meal (BM), and peanut flour meal (PFM) for broiler chickens were determined in 2 experiments with Ross 708 broiler chickens from d 21 to 28 posthatch. The birds were fed a standard broiler starter diet from d 0 to 21 posthatch. In each experiment, 320 birds were grouped by weight into 8 blocks of 5 cages with 8 birds per cage and assigned to 5 diets. Each experiment used a corn-soybean meal reference diet and 4 test diets in which test ingredients partly replaced the energy sources in the reference diet. The test diets in Exp. 1 consisted of 125 g CM, 250 g CM, 100 g CSM, or 200 g CSM/kg. In Exp. 2, the test diets consisted of 200 g BM, 400 g BM, 100 g PFM, or 200 g PFM/kg. The ileal digestible energy (IDE), metabolizable energy (ME), and nitrogen-corrected metabolizable energy (MEn) of all the test ingredients were determined by the regression method. The DM of CM, CSM, BM and PFM were 883, 878, 878, and 964 g/kg, respectively and the respective gross energies (GE) were 4,143, 4,237, 4,060, and 5,783 kcal/kg DM. In Exp. 1, the IDE were 2,132 and 2,197 kcal/kg DM for CM and CSM, respectively. The ME were 2,286 and 2,568 kcal/kg DM for CM and CSM, respectively. The MEn were 1,931 kcal/kg DM for CM and 2,078 kcal/ kg DM for CSM. In Exp. 2, IDE values were 3,412 kcal/kg DM for BM and 4,801 kcal/kg DM for PFM; ME values were 3,176 and 4,601 kcal/kg DM for BM and PFM, respectively, and the MEn values were 3,093 kcal/kg DM for BM and 4,112 kcal/kg DM for PFM. In conclusion, the current study showed that chickens can utilize a considerable amount of energy from these 4 ingredients, and also provided the energy values of CM, CSM, BM and PFM for broiler chickens.

  17. Anaphylactic reaction to lupine flour.

    PubMed

    Brennecke, Sabine; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Lepp, Ute; Jappe, Uta

    2007-09-01

    Roasted lupine seeds have been used as snack food in Mediterranean countries for years. Since the 1990s, lupine flour has been used as a substitute for or additive to other flours in countries of the European Union; usually the amount is so low that no declaration is required. Since 1994, a number of cases of immediate-type allergy to lupine flour-containing products have been published. A 52-year-old woman developed facial and mucosal edema, followed by dizziness and shortness of breath a few minutes after ingestion of a nut croissant containing lupine flour; she required emergency care. Allergy diagnostic tests revealed a total IgE of 116 kU/l, a highly elevated concentration of IgE specific for lupine seed (42.9 kU/l) and birch pollen IgE of 2.57 kU/l. Skin prick test with native lupine flour was strongly positive. Allergy against lupine seeds may develop de novo or via cross-reactivity to legumes, particularly peanuts, the latter being detectable in up to 88% of cases, founded on a strong sequence similarity between lupine and peanut allergens. In our patient, no cross-reactivity could be detected via immunoblotting, indicating a rare monovalent sensitization to lupine flour. Treatment consists of avoidance of lupine flour-containing products. Patients with proven peanut allergy should also avoid lupine flour because of the major risk of cross-reaction.

  18. The addition of whole soy flour to cafeteria diet reduces metabolic risk markers in wistar rats

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Soybean is termed a functional food because it contains bioactive compounds. However, its effects are not well known under unbalanced diet conditions. This work is aimed at evaluating the effect of adding whole soy flour to a cafeteria diet on intestinal histomorphometry, metabolic risk and toxicity markers in rats. Methods In this study, 30 male adult Wistar rats were used, distributed among three groups (n = 10): AIN-93 M diet, cafeteria diet (CAF) and cafeteria diet with soy flour (CAFS), for 56 days. The following parameters were measured: food intake; weight gain; serum concentrations of triglycerides, total cholesterol, HDL-c, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), aspartate (AST) and alanine (ALT) aminotransferases and Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances (TBARS); humidity and lipid fecal content; weight and fat of the liver. The villous height, the crypt depth and the thickness of the duodenal and ileal circular and longitudinal muscle layers of the animals were also measured. Results There was a significant reduction in the food intake in the CAF group. The CAFS showed lower serum concentrations of triglycerides and serum TBARS and a lower percentage of hepatic fat, with a corresponding increase in thickness of the intestinal muscle layers. In the CAF group, an increase in the HbA1c, ALT, lipid excretion, liver TBARS and crypt depth, was observed associated with lower HDL-c and villous height. The addition of soy did not promote any change in these parameters. Conclusions The inclusion of whole soy flour in a high-fat diet may be helpful in reducing some markers of metabolic risk; however, more studies are required to clarify its effects on unbalanced diets. PMID:24119309

  19. Experimental study on treating agate dyeing wastewater with sulfate-reducing bacteria strengthening peanut shells and scrap iron.

    PubMed

    Di, Junzhen; Wang, Mingxin

    2017-08-01

    To solve the problems of high concentrations of Cr(6+), SO4(2-) and H(+) in agate dyeing industrial wastewater and heavy pollution and high treating cost, single-factor and orthogonal experiments were conducted to determine the optimum particle size, the ratio of adsorbents dosing and hydraulic retention time based on peanut shells and scrap iron. Experiments, using five dynamic columns filled with the peanut shells, scrap iron and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB), were also conducted to determine the effect and mechanism of treating the wastewater. The results show that the best treatment effect was obtained when the diameter of peanut shells was 3 mesh, scrap iron being 60 mesh size, scrap iron and peanut shells with a ratio of 1:2, and hydraulic retention time being 24 h. By the comprehensive comparison of five groups of columns, the treating effect of column 4 was best, in which the removal rate of SO4(2-) and Cr(6+) was 30.17% and 88.36% respectively before adding the microorganisms, and 25.34% and 99.31% respectively after adding the microorganisms. The average of chemical oxygen demand (COD) release quantity was 62.11 and 513.75 mg·L(-1), and the average effluent pH was 7.09 and 7.93 before and after addition of microorganisms respectively. In conclusion, peanut shells, scrap iron and SRB had a certain synergistic effect on treating agate dyeing wastewater.

  20. Treatment with oleic acid reduces IgE binding to peanut and cashew allergens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Oleic acid (OA) is known to bind and change the bioactivities of proteins, such as a-lactalbumin and ß-lactoglobulin in vitro. The objective of this study was to determine if OA binds to allergens from a peanut extract or cashew allergen and changes their allergenic properties. Peanut extract or c...

  1. Functional properties of peanut fractions on the growth of probiotics and foodborne bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Peng, Mengfei; Bitsko, Elizabeth; Biswas, Debabrata

    2015-03-01

    Various compounds found in peanut (Arachis hypogaea) have been shown to provide multiple benefits to human health and may influence the growth of a broad range of gut bacteria. In this study, we investigated the effects of peanut white kernel and peanut skin on 3 strains of Lactobacillus and 3 major foodborne enteric bacterial pathogens. Significant (P < 0.05) growth stimulation of Lactobacillus casei and Lactobacillus rhamnosus was observed in the presence of 0.5% peanut flour (PF) made from peanut white kernel, whereas 0.5% peanut skin extract (PSE) exerted the inhibitory effect on the growth of these beneficial microbes. We also found that within 72 h, PF inhibited growth of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EHEC), while PSE significantly (P < 0.05) inhibited Listeria monocytogenes but promoted the growth of both EHEC and Salmonella Typhimurium. The cell adhesion and invasion abilities of 3 pathogens to the host cells were also significantly (P < 0.05) reduced by 0.5% PF and 0.5% PSE. These results suggest that peanut white kernel might assist in improving human gut flora as well as reducing EHEC, whereas the beneficial effects of peanut skins require further research and investigation.

  2. Non-aflatoxigenic Aspergillus flavus as potential biocontrol agents to reduce aflatoxin contamination in peanuts harvested in Northern Argentina.

    PubMed

    Alaniz Zanon, María Silvina; Barros, Germán Gustavo; Chulze, Sofía Noemí

    2016-08-16

    Biological control is one of the most promising strategies for preventing aflatoxin contamination in peanuts at field stage. A population of 46 native Aspergillus flavus nonaflatoxin producers were analysed based on phenotypic, physiological and genetic characteristics. Thirty-three isolates were characterized as L strain morphotype, 3 isolates as S strain morphotype, and 10 isolates did not produce sclerotia. Only 11 of 46 non-aflatoxigenic isolates did not produce cyclopiazonic acid. The vegetative compatibility group (VCG) diversity index for the population was 0.37. For field trials we selected the non-aflatoxigenic A. flavus AR27, AR100G and AFCHG2 strains. The efficacy of single and mixed inocula as potential biocontrol agents in Northern Argentina was evaluated through a 2-year study (2014-2015). During the 2014 peanut growing season, most of the treatments reduced the incidence of aflatoxigenic strains in both soil and peanut kernel samples, and no aflatoxin was detected in kernels. During the 2015 growing season, there was a reduction of aflatoxigenic strains in kernel samples from the plots treated with the potential biocontrol agents. Reductions of aflatoxin contamination between 78.36% and 89.55% were observed in treated plots in comparison with the un-inoculated control plots. This study provides the first data on aflatoxin biocontrol based on competitive exclusion in the peanut growing region of Northern Argentina, and proposes bioproducts with potential use as biocontrol agents. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. Stability of transgene expression in reduced allergen peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) across multiple generations and at different soil sulfur levels.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Manju; Chu, Ye; Maleki, Soheila J; Ozias-Akins, Peggy

    2015-02-18

    Transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) containing a gene designed for RNA interference (RNAi) showed stable complete silencing of Ara h 2 and partial silencing of Ara h 6, two potent peanut allergens/proteins, along with minimal collateral changes to other allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 3, across three generations (T3, T4, and T5) under field conditions. Different soil sulfur levels (0.012, 0.3, and 3.0 mM) differentially impacted sulfur-rich (Ara h 2, Ara h 3, and Ara h 6) versus sulfur-poor (Ara h 1) proteins in non-transgenic versus transgenic peanut. The sulfur level had no effect on Ara h 1, whereas low sulfur led to a significant reduction of Ara h 3 in transgenic and non-transgenic seeds and Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 in non-transgenic but not in transgenic peanuts because these proteins already were reduced by gene silencing. These results demonstrate stability of transgene expression and the potential utility of RNAi in allergen manipulation.

  4. Peanut Oil

    MedlinePlus

    ... and baby care products. Sometimes the less expensive soya oil is added to peanut oil. ... are pregnant or breast-feeding. Allergy to peanuts, soybeans, and related plants: Peanut oil can cause serious ...

  5. Blueberry polyphenol-enriched soybean flour reduces hyperglycemia, body weight gain and serum cholesterol in mice.

    PubMed

    Roopchand, Diana E; Kuhn, Peter; Rojo, Leonel E; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-02-01

    Defatted soybean flour (DSF) can sorb and concentrate blueberry anthocyanins and other polyphenols, but not sugars. In this study blueberry polyphenol-enriched DSF (BB-DSF) or DSF were incorporated into very high fat diet (VHFD) formulations and provided ad libitum to obese and hyperglycemic C57BL/6 mice for 13 weeks to investigate anti-diabetic effects. Compared to the VHFD containing DSF, the diet supplemented with BB-DSF reduced weight gain by 5.6%, improved glucose tolerance, and lowered fasting blood glucose levels in mice within 7 weeks of intervention. Serum cholesterol of mice consuming the BB-DSF-supplemented diet was 13.2% lower than mice on the diet containing DSF. Compounds were eluted from DSF and BB-DSF for in vitro assays of glucose production and uptake. Compared to untreated control, doses of BB-DSF eluate containing 0.05-10μg/μL of blueberry anthocyanins significantly reduced glucose production by 24-74% in H4IIE rat hepatocytes, but did not increase glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. The results indicate that delivery of blueberry polyphenols stabilized in a high-protein food matrix may be useful for the dietary management of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Blueberry polyphenol-enriched soybean flour reduces hyperglycemia, body weight gain and serum cholesterol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Roopchand, Diana E.; Kuhn, Peter; Rojo, Leonel E.; Lila, Mary Ann; Raskin, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    Defatted soybean flour (DSF) can sorb and concentrate blueberry anthocyanins and other polyphenols, but not sugars. In this study blueberry polyphenol-enriched DSF (BB-DSF) or DSF were incorporated into very high fat diet (VHFD) formulations and provided ad libitum to obese and hyperglycemic C57BL/6 mice for 13 weeks to investigate anti-diabetic effects. Compared to the VHFD containing DSF, the diet supplemented with BB-DSF reduced weight gain by 5.6%, improved glucose tolerance, and lowered fasting blood glucose levels in mice within 7 weeks of intervention. Serum cholesterol of mice consuming the BB-DSF-supplemented diet was 13.2% lower than mice on the diet containing DSF. Compounds were eluted from DSF and BB-DSF for in vitro assays of glucose production and uptake. Compared to untreated control, doses of BB-DSF eluate containing 0.05 – 10 μg/μL of blueberry anthocyanins significantly reduced glucose production by 24% - 74% in H4IIE rat hepatocytes, but did not increase glucose uptake in L6 myotubes. The results indicate that delivery of blueberry polyphenols stabilized in a high-protein food matrix may be useful for the dietary management of pre-diabetes and/or diabetes. PMID:23220243

  7. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice.

    PubMed

    Gregory, James A; Shepley-McTaggart, Ariel; Umpierrez, Michelle; Hurlburt, Barry K; Maleki, Soheila J; Sampson, Hugh A; Mayfield, Stephen P; Berin, M Cecilia

    2016-07-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between preparations complicates immunotherapy studies. Moreover, peanut immunotherapy is associated with frequent negative side effects and patients are often at risk of allergic reactions once immunotherapy is discontinued. Allergen-specific approaches using recombinant proteins are an attractive alternative because they allow more precise dosing and the opportunity to engineer proteins with improved safety profiles. We tested whether Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, two major peanut allergens, could be produced using chloroplast of the unicellular eukaryotic alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. C. reinhardtii is novel host for producing allergens that is genetically tractable, inexpensive and easy to grow, and is able to produce more complex proteins than bacterial hosts. Compared to the native proteins, algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain and Ara h 2 have a reduced affinity for IgE from peanut-allergic patients. We further found that immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h 1 core domain confers protection from peanut-induced anaphylaxis in a murine model of peanut allergy.

  8. Peanut protein reduces body protein mass and alters skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Jacques, Hélène; Leblanc, Nadine; Papineau, Roxanne; Richard, Denis; Côté, Claude H

    2010-05-01

    It is well known that diets high in nuts or peanuts favourably affect plasma lipid concentrations. However, few studies have examined the effects of nut and peanut protein (PP) on body composition and skeletal muscle properties. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of dietary PP compared with two animal proteins, casein (C) and cod protein (CP) on body composition, skeletal muscle contractile properties and lipid metabolism in rats. Thirty-two male rats were assigned to one of the following four diets containing either C, CP, PP or C+peanut protein (CPP, 50:50) mixture. After 28 d of ad libitum feeding and after 12-h fast, blood, liver and muscle were collected for measurements of plasma and hepatic cholesterol and TAG, plasma glucose and insulin and contractile properties. Rats fed with the low-quality protein, PP, had lower body weight gain, body protein mass, soleus mass and liver weight than those fed with the high-quality dietary proteins, C and CP. PP also caused a deficit in contractile properties in soleus. Likewise, PP increased plasma cholesterol and body fat mass compared with CP. However, these elevations were accompanied with increased hepatic TAG concentrations and lowered intestinal fat excretion. These results show that PP intake alters body composition by reducing skeletal muscle mass and liver weight as well as muscle contractility and lipid metabolism. Adding a complete protein such as C might partially counteract these adverse effects.

  9. RNA interference reduces aflatoxin accumulation by Aspergillus flavus in peanut seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aflatoxins are among the most powerful carcinogens in nature. They are produced by the fungal pathogen Aspergillus flavus Link and other Aspergillus species. Aflatoxins accumulate in many crops, including rice, wheat, oats, pecans, pistachios, soybean, cassava, almonds, peanuts, beans, corn and cot...

  10. Biological control as a strategy to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in peanuts, grapes and cereals in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Chulze, S N; Palazzini, J M; Torres, A M; Barros, G; Ponsone, M L; Geisen, R; Schmidt-Heydt, M; Köhl, J

    2015-01-01

    Mycotoxins including aflatoxins, deoxynivalenol, fumonisins and ochratoxin A are among the main fungal secondary metabolites detected as natural contaminants in South America in different commodities such as peanuts (aflatoxins), cereals (deoxynivalenol and fumonisins) or grapes (ochratoxin A). Different strategies including crop rotation, tillage practices, fungicide application and planting less susceptible cultivars are used in order to reduce the impact of these mycotoxins in both food and feed chains. The development of fungicide resistance in many fungal pathogens as well as rising of public concern on the risks associated with pesticide use led to the search for alternative environmentally friendly methods. Biological control of plant pathogens and toxigenic fungi offers an alternative that can complement chemical control in the frame of an integrated pest management to reduce the impact of mycotoxins in the food and feed chains. The advances made in Argentina on reducing the impact of toxigenic fungi and mycotoxins in peanut, grapes and cereals using the biocontrol strategy are summarised. Native bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi have been selected to evaluate them as potential biocontrol agents. Field trials showed that Bacillus subtilis RC 218 and Brevibacillus sp. RC 263 were effective at reducing deoxynivalenol accumulation in wheat. The application of Clonostachys rosea isolates on wheat stubble reduced Fusarium colonisation on the stubble. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens and Microbacterium oleovorans showed good activity to control both Fusarium verticillioides growth and the accumulation of fumonisins at pre-harvest stage in maize. Control of toxigenic Aspergillus flavus and aflatoxin accumulation in peanuts was achieved using a native atoxigenic Aspergillus flavus strain based on competitive exclusion of the toxigenic strains. Kluyveromyces thermotolerans strains were used as biocontrol agents to reduce the impact of Aspergillus section Nigri and

  11. Whole and fractionated yellow pea flours reduce fasting insulin and insulin resistance in hypercholesterolaemic and overweight human subjects.

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Jones, Peter J H

    2011-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare whole pea flour (WPF) to fractionated pea flour (FPF; hulls only) for their ability to reduce risk factors associated with CVD and diabetes in overweight hypercholesterolaemic individuals. Using a cross-over design, twenty-three hypercholesterolaemic overweight men and women received two-treatment muffins/d containing WPF, FPF or white wheat flour (WF) for 28 d, followed by 28 d washout periods. Daily doses of WPF and FPF complied with the United States Department of Agriculture's recommended level of intake of half a cup of pulses/d (approximately 50 g/d). Dietary energy requirements were calculated for each study subject, and volunteers were only permitted to eat food supplied by the study personnel. Fasting insulin, body composition, urinary enterolactone levels, postprandial glucose response, as well as fasting lipid and glucose concentrations, were assessed at the beginning and at the end of each treatment. Insulin concentrations for WPF (37·8 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml, P = 0·021) and FPF (40·5 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml, P = 0·037) were lower compared with WF (50·7 (SEM 3·4) pmol/ml). Insulin homeostasis modelling assessment showed that consumption of WPF and FPF decreased (P < 0·05) estimates of insulin resistance (IR) compared with WF. Android:gynoid fat ratios in women participants were lower (P = 0·027) in the WPF (1·01 (sem 0·01) group compared with the WF group (1·06 (SEM 0·01). Urinary enterolactone levels tended to be higher (P = 0·087) in WPF compared with WF. Neither treatment altered circulating fasting lipids or glucose concentrations. In conclusion, under a controlled diet paradigm, a daily consumption of whole and fractionated yellow pea flours at doses equivalent to half a cup of yellow peas/d reduced IR, while WPF reduced android adiposity in women.

  12. A Collaborative Study: Determination of Mycotoxins in Corn, Peanut Butter, and Wheat Flour Using Stable Isotope Dilution Assay (SIDA) and Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Kai; Schaab, Matthew R; Southwood, Gavin; Tor, Elizabeth R; Aston, Linda S; Song, Wenlu; Eitzer, Brian; Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Lapainis, Theodore; Mai, Huy; Tran, Kevin; El-Demerdash, Aref; Vega, Victor; Cai, Yanxuan; Wong, Jon W; Krynitsky, Alexandra J; Begley, Timothy H

    2017-01-03

    A collaborative study was conducted to evaluate stable isotope dilution assay (SIDA) and LC-MS/MS for the simultaneous determination of aflatoxins B1, B2, G1, and G2; deoxynivalenol; fumonisins B1, B2, and B3; ochratoxin A; HT-2 toxin; T-2 toxin; and zearalenone in foods. Samples were fortified with 12 (13)C uniformly labeled mycotoxins ((13)C-IS) corresponding to the native mycotoxins and extracted with acetonitrile/water (50:50 v/v), followed by centrifugation, filtration, and LC-MS/MS analysis. In addition to certified reference materials, the six participating laboratories analyzed corn, peanut butter, and wheat flour fortified with the 12 mycotoxins at concentrations ranging from 1.0 to 1000 ng/g. Using their available LC-MS/MS platform, each laboratory developed in-house instrumental conditions for analysis. The majority of recoveries ranged from 80 to 120% with relative standard derivations (RSDs) <20%. Greater than 90% of the average recoveries of the participating laboratories were in the range of 90-110%, with repeatability RSDr (within laboratory) < 10% and reproducibility RSDR (among laboratory) < 15%. All Z scores of the results of certified reference materials were between -2 and 2. Using (13)C-IS eliminated the need for matrix-matched calibration standards for quantitation, simplified sample preparation, and achieved simultaneous identification and quantitation of multiple mycotoxins in a simple LC-MS/MS procedure.

  13. Peanut digestion and energy balance.

    PubMed

    Traoret, C J; Lokko, P; Cruz, A C R F; Oliveira, C G; Costa, N M B; Bressan, J; Alfenas, R C G; Mattes, R D

    2008-02-01

    To explore the effects of peanut consumption on fecal energy excretion with a balanced, non-vegetarian diet. Four arm parallel group design (that is, whole peanut (P), peanut butter (PB), peanut oil (PO) or peanut flour (PF) consumption) with one crossover (control and intervention). In total 63 healthy men and women from Ghana, Brazil and USA (N=15-16 per group) with an average body mass index of 21.8 kg m(-2). Percent fat of fecal wet weight daily energy excretion during the control and the treatment periods. Compared to control, the percentage of fat in the feces increased significantly for the P group (5.22+/-0.29%) relative to the other three groups ((PO=3.07+/-0.36%, PB=3.11+/-0.31% (P=0.001), and PF=3.75+/-0.40% (P=0.019)). The same findings held for kJ g(-1) of feces excreted. During the P supplementation period, the energy excretion was 21.4+/-1.0 kJ g(-1) versus 18.7+/-1.0 kJ g(-1) for PO (P=0.034), 18.8+/-0.7 kJ g(-1) for PB (P=0.042) and 18.5+/-0.8 kJ g(-1) for PF (P=0.028). Fecal fat and energy loss is greater with consumption of whole peanuts compared to peanut butter, oil or flour. This may contribute to the less than predicted change of body weight observed with peanut consumption. There were no cultural differences.

  14. Peanut Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Basics Facts and Statistics NIAID Resources Allergens Peanut Tree Nuts Milk Egg Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Sesame ... Basics Facts and Statistics NIAID Resources Allergens Peanut Tree Nuts Milk Egg Wheat Soy Fish Shellfish Sesame ...

  15. Effect of bread baking on the bioavailability of hydrogen-reduced iron powder added to unenriched refined wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Maekawa, Atsushi A; Glahn, Raymond P; Lei, Xin Gen; Miller, Dennis D

    2006-10-18

    Elemental iron powders are widely used to fortify flour and other cereal products. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that baking enhances the bioavailability of elemental iron powders by oxidizing Fe(0) to Fe(2+) or Fe(3+). An in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model and a piglet model were used to measure bioavailability. Bread flour, either unfortified or fortified with hydrogen-reduced (HR) iron powder or FeSO(4) (300 mg Fe/kg flour), was baked into bread. For the in vitro studies, bread samples were treated with pepsin at pH 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 and subsequently incubated with pancreatic enzymes at pH 7 in a chamber positioned above monolayers of cultured Caco-2 cells. Ferritin formation in the cells was used as an index of iron bioavailability. Ferritin formation in cells fed HR Fe bread was similar to cells fed FeSO(4) bread when the peptic digestion was conducted at a pH 2 but lower when the peptic phase was conducted at pH 3, 4, 5, 6, or 7 (P < 0.05). Pig diets containing 35% dried bread were prepared and fed to cross-bred (Hampshire x Landrace x Yorkshire) anemic pigs in two studies. The rate of increase in hemoglobin Fe over the feeding period was used to calculate relative biological value (RBV), an index of iron bioavailability. In the first pig study, RBV of HR Fe added to flour prior to baking was 47.9% when compared to FeSO(4) fortified flour (P < 0.05). In the second pig study, a third treatment consisting of unfortified bread with HR iron added during diet mixing (after bread baking) was included. RBVs of the HR Fe diet (Fe added after baking) and HR Fe diet (Fe added before baking) were 40.1% and 53.5%, respectively, compared to the FeSO(4) diet. Differences in RBV between the HR Fe (before and after baking) and FeSO(4) (before baking) treatment groups were significant, but the difference between the before and after HR treatment groups was not significant. We conclude that bread baking does not enhance the bioavailability of elemental

  16. Characteristics of the peanut chain in Europe - implications for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Prusak, Anna; Schlegel-Zawadzka, Małgorzata; Boulay, Annabelle; Rowe, Gene

    2014-01-01

    Peanuts are one of the main food allergens, occasionally responsible for life-threatening reactions. Thus, many studies have tried to fi nd a connection between peanut allergy prevalence and processes in the peanut chain that may contribute to the peanut allergenicity. To inform this discussion, this paper outlines experiences in peanut cultivation, trade and processing in Europe, focusing on four European countries with different peanut experiences (Poland, Bulgaria, Spain and the UK). Results here are based on documentary analysis and semi-structured, face-to-face interviews with 32 experts involved in various stages of the peanut chain, including peanut farmers, processors, traders, food technologists and manufacturers. A common peanut chain diagram has been drawn considering shelled and in-shell peanuts. The analysis of each stage of peanut processing has been made in accordance with this peanut chain schema. Thermal and mechanical processes are discussed alongside the resultant end peanut products available for European consumers. The paper also analyses the main trends of peanut trade in Europe. The results suggest that the majority of peanut products in Europe are roasted, implying enhanced exposure of the population to more allergenic peanuts. The presented schema and related discussion bring together diverse aspects of peanut production, trade and processing. The main factor associated with the increased allergenicity of peanuts appears to be high temperature roasting. Frying and boiling are also thermal processes, but fried and boiled peanuts have been associated with reduce peanut allergenicity. Neither country of origin nor cultivar type appear to be related to differential peanut allergenicity. More research is needed as regards the impact of various additives, such as chocolate (which is also considered an allergen) on the allergenicity of peanut products. The use of peanuts in non-food products also needs more investigation.

  17. Relevance of casual contact with peanut butter in children with peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Simonte, Steven J; Ma, Songhui; Mofidi, Shideh; Sicherer, Scott H

    2003-07-01

    Casual skin contact or inhalation of peanut butter fumes is reported and feared to cause allergic reactions in highly sensitive children with peanut allergy but has not been systematically studied. We sought to determine the clinical relevance of exposure to peanut butter by means of inhalation and skin contact in children with peanut allergy. Children with significant peanut allergy (recent peanut-specific IgE antibody concentration >50 kIU/L or evidence of peanut-specific IgE antibody and one of the following: clinical anaphylaxis, a reported inhalation-contact reaction, or positive double-blind, placebo-controlled oral challenge result to peanut) underwent double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized exposures to peanut butter by means of contact with intact skin (0.2 mL pressed flat for 1 minute) and inhalation (surface area of 6.3 square inches 12 inches from the face for 10 minutes). Placebo challenges were performed by using soy butter mixed with histamine (contact), and scent was masked with soy butter, tuna, and mint (inhalation). Thirty children underwent the challenges (median age, 7.7 years; median peanut IgE level, >100 kIU/L; 13 with prior history of contact and 11 with inhalation reactions). None experienced a systemic or respiratory reaction. Erythema (3 subjects), pruritus without erythema (5 subjects), and wheal-and-flare reactions (2 subjects) developed only at the site of skin contact with peanut butter. From this number of participants, it can be stated with 96% confidence that at least 90% of highly sensitive children with peanut allergy would not experience a systemic-respiratory reaction from casual exposure to peanut butter. Casual exposure to peanut butter is unlikely to elicit significant allergic reactions. The results cannot be generalized to larger exposures or to contact with peanut in other forms (flour and roasted peanuts).

  18. Isolation of glycinin (11S) from lipid-reduced soybean flour: effect of processing conditions on yields and purity.

    PubMed

    Deng, Kequan; Huang, Youru; Hua, Yufei

    2012-03-09

    Defatted soybean flour was treated with hexane and ethanol to reduce lipid content and heated to inactivate lipoxygenase (LOX, linoleate:oxygen reductase; EC 1.13.11.12) to obtain lipid-reduced soybean flour (LRSF). The effects of processing conditions such as pH, reducing agent and storage time on yields and purity of glycinin (11S) were evaluated in the fractionation of soybean glycinin isolated from LRSF. Adjusting the pH of protein extract from 6.2 to 6.6, the yield of glycinin decreased by 16.71%, while the purity of the protein increased by 4.60%. Sulfhydryl and disulfide content of proteins increased by degrees with increasing pH. Compared with dithiothreitol (DTT) or β-mercaptoethanol (ME) as reducing agent, the yield of glycinin was the highest when sodium bisulfite (SBS) was added to the protein extract at pH 6.4. The effect of DTT on yields of glycinin was the lowest of the three kinds of reducing agent. The purity of glycinin was similar when the three kinds of reducing agent were used. These results showed that SBS was the best choice for the isolation of 11S-rich fraction. Prolonging storage time in the precipitation stage, 10 h was the best for yields and purity of glycinin in the experiment, while there was no significant difference at P ≥ 0.05 for total sulfhydryl and disulfide content. The decreased free sulfhydryl content of glycinin indicated that the oxidation of free sulfhydryls and the formation of disulfide bonds occurred when the extraction time was prolonged.

  19. Grape seed flour is a viable ingredient to improve the nutritional profile and reduce lipid oxidation of frankfurters.

    PubMed

    Özvural, Emin Burçin; Vural, Halil

    2011-05-01

    In this study, grape seed flour (GSF) obtained from wine by-products was incorporated into frankfurters at seven concentrations (0, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5%) and the effects occurred on physical, nutritional and sensory characteristics of the products were investigated. The colour values (L*, a* and b*) of frankfurters generally decreased (p < 0.05) on account of the increasing amount of GSF. The utilization of this flour also led to a decline in the oxidation level of the products (p < 0.05), probably due to its antioxidant content. The increment of GSF in the frankfurters enhanced the protein, total dietary fibre and water holding capacity of the treatments (p < 0.05). Although the level of GSF above 0.5% reduced overall acceptability, the frankfurters containing the level up to 2% received scores above the average. The evaluation of wine by-products in the production of healthier and functional frankfurters has been achieved by the study, but further research is necessary to improve palatability of the products. Copyright © 2011 The American Meat Science Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Overuse of Phosphorus Fertilizer Reduces the Grain and Flour Protein Contents and Zinc Bioavailability of Winter Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Liu, Dunyi; Liu, Yumin; Chen, Xinping; Zou, Chunqin

    2017-03-01

    To supplement human dietary nutrition, it is necessary to evaluate the effects of phosphorus (P) fertilizer application on grain and flour protein contents and especially on the bioavailability of zinc (Zn). A field experiment of winter wheat with six P application rates (0, 25, 50, 100, 200, 400 kg/ha) was conducted from 2013 to 2015. The grain yield increased with P application but was not further enhanced when P rates exceeded 50 kg/ha. As P application increased, the protein concentration in grain and standard flour and the viscosity of standard flour decreased. Phosphorus and phytic acid (PA) concentrations in grain and flours increased and then plateaued, whereas Zn concentration decreased and then plateaued as P application increased from 0 to 100 kg/ha. Estimated Zn bioavailability in grain and flours decreased as P application increased from 0 to 100 kg/ha and then plateaued. Estimated Zn bioavailability was greater in standard flour, bread flour, and refined flour than in grain or coarse flour. Phosphorus supply in the intensive cropping of wheat can be optimized to simultaneously obtain high grain yields, high grain and flour protein contents, and high Zn bioavailability.

  1. Stability of transgene expression in reduced allergen peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) across multiple generations, and at different soil sulfur levels

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Transgenic peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) containing a gene designed for RNA interference (RNAi), showed stable complete silencing of Ara h 2 and partial silencing of Ara h 6, two potent peanut allergens/proteins, along with minimal collateral changes to other allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 3, across th...

  2. A new design concept for an automated peanut processing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ertas, A.; Tanju, B.T.; Fair, W.T.; Butts, C.

    1996-12-31

    Peanut quality is a major concern in all phases of the peanut industry from production to manufacturing. Postharvest processing of peanuts can have profound effects on the quality and safety of peanut food products. Curing is a key step in postharvest processing. Curing peanuts improperly can significantly reduce quality, and result in significant losses to both farmers and processors. The conventional drying system designed in the 1960`s is still being used in the processing of the peanuts today. The objectives of this paper is to design and develop a new automated peanut drying system for dry climates capable of handling approximately 20 million lbm of peanuts per harvest season.

  3. Stability and immunogenicity of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes during in vitro pepsin digestion.

    PubMed

    Plundrich, Nathalie J; White, Brittany L; Dean, Lisa L; Davis, Jack P; Foegeding, E Allen; Lila, Mary Ann

    2015-07-01

    Allergenic peanut proteins are relatively resistant to digestion, and if digested, metabolized peptides tend to remain large and immunoreactive, triggering allergic reactions in sensitive individuals. In this study, the stability of hypoallergenic peanut protein-polyphenol complexes was evaluated during simulated in vitro gastric digestion. When digested with pepsin, the basic subunit of the peanut allergen Ara h 3 was more rapidly hydrolyzed in peanut protein-cranberry or green tea polyphenol complexes compared to uncomplexed peanut flour. Ara h 2 was also hydrolyzed more quickly in the peanut protein-cranberry polyphenol complex than in uncomplexed peanut flour. Peptides from peanut protein-cranberry polyphenol complexes and peanut protein-green tea polyphenol complexes were substantially less immunoreactive (based on their capacity to bind to peanut-specific IgE from patient plasma) compared to peptides from uncomplexed peanut flour. These results suggest that peanut protein-polyphenol complexes may be less immunoreactive passing through the digestive tract in vivo, contributing to their attenuated allergenicity.

  4. Modeling Demonstrates That Folic Acid Fortification of Whole-Wheat Flour Could Reduce the Prevalence of Folate Inadequacy in Canadian Whole-Wheat Consumers.

    PubMed

    Chan, Yen-Ming; MacFarlane, Amanda J; O'Connor, Deborah L

    2015-11-01

    Mandatory folic acid fortification of white-wheat flour and selected other grain products has reduced the prevalence of neural tube defects in Canada; however, the fortification of whole-wheat flour is not permitted. The objective of this study was to model the impact of adding folic acid to whole-wheat flour on the folate intake distribution of Canadians. Twenty-four-hour dietary recall and supplement intake data (n = 35,107) collected in the 2004 Canadian Community Health Survey 2.2 were used to calculate the prevalence of folate inadequacy (POFI) and the proportion of folic acid intakes above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level (UL). In model 1, folic acid was added to whole-wheat flour-containing foods in amounts comparable to those that are mandatory for white-wheat flour-containing foods. In model 2, a 50% overage of folic acid fortification was considered. Models 3 and 4 included assessment of folate intake distributions in adult whole-wheat consumers with or without a fortification overage. SIDE (Software for Intake Distribution Estimation; Department of Statistics and Center for Agricultural and Rural Development, Iowa State University) was used to estimate usual folate intakes. Mean folate intakes increased by ∼ 5% in all sex and age groups when whole-wheat foods were fortified (models 1 and 2; P < 0.0001). Folic acid fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods did not change the POFI or percentage of intakes above the UL in the general population, whether in supplement users or nonusers. Among whole-wheat consumers, the POFI was reduced by 10 percentage points after fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods (95% CIs did not overlap). The percentage of whole-wheat consumers with intakes above the UL did not change. Although folic acid fortification of whole-wheat flour-containing foods is unlikely to change the POFI or proportion of folic acid intakes above the UL in the general Canadian population, this fortification strategy may reduce

  5. A close look at secular evolution: boxy/peanut bulges reduce gas inflow to the central kiloparsec

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragkoudi, F.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.

    2016-10-01

    In this Letter we investigate the effect of boxy/peanut (b/p) bulges on bar-induced gas inflow to the central kiloparsec, which plays a crucial role on the evolution of disc galaxies. We carry out hydrodynamic gas response simulations in realistic barred galaxy potentials, including or not the geometry of a b/p bulge, to investigate the amount of gas inflow induced in the different models. We find that b/p bulges can reduce the gas inflow rate to the central kiloparsec by more than an order of magnitude, which leads to a reduction in the amount of gas available in the central regions. We also investigate the effect of the dark matter halo concentration on these results, and find that for maximal discs, the effect of b/p bulges on gas inflow remains significant. The reduced amount of gas reaching the central regions due to the presence of b/p bulges could have significant repercussions on the formation of discy- (pseudo-) bulges, on the amount of nuclear star formation and feedback, on the fuel reservoir for AGN activity, and on the overall secular evolution of the galaxy.

  6. Performance of Equipment for In-field Peanut Shelling

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drying, cleaning, and shelling peanuts represents approximately one-third of the costs included in growing, harvesting, and processing peanuts for the edible market. These processes are cost-prohibitive when producing peanuts for biodiesel. Shelling peanuts during harvest would significantly reduc...

  7. A pilot study of omalizumab to facilitate rapid oral desensitization in high-risk peanut allergic patients

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Blood, Emily; Mittal, Mudita; Umetsu, Dale T.

    2015-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy is a major public health problem that affects 1% of the population and has no effective therapy. Objective To examine the safety and efficacy of oraldesensitization in peanut allergic children in combination with a brief course of anti-IgE monoclonal antibody (omalizumab, Xolair). Methods We performed oral peanut desensitization in peanut allergic children at high risk for developing significant peanut-induced allergic reactions. Omalizumab was administered prior to and during oral peanut desensitization. Results We enrolled 13 children (median age, 10 years), with a median peanut-specific IgE of 229 kUA/L and a median total serum IgE of 621 kU/L, who failed an initial double-blind placebo controlled food challenge at doses 100 mg peanut flour. After pre-treatment with omalizumab, all subjects tolerated the initial 11 desensitization doses given on the first day, including the maximum dose of 500 mg peanut flour (cumulative dose, 992 mg, equivalent to >2 peanuts), requiring minimal or no rescue therapy. 12 subjects then reached the maximum maintenance dose of 4,000 mg peanut flour/day in a median time of 8 weeks, at which point omalizumab was discontinued. All 12 subjects continued on 4,000 mg peanut flour/day and subsequently tolerated a challenge with 8,000 mg peanut flour (equivalent to about 20 peanuts), or 160 to 400 times the dose tolerated before desensitization. During the study, 6 of the 13 subjects experienced mild or no allergic reactions; 6 subjects had Grade 2, and 2 subjects Grade 3 reactions, all of which responded rapidly to treatment. Conclusions Among children with high-risk peanut allergy, treatment with omalizumab may facilitate rapid oral desensitization, and qualitativelyimprove the desensitization process. PMID:24176117

  8. A pilot study of omalizumab to facilitate rapid oral desensitization in high-risk peanut-allergic patients.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Lynda C; Rachid, Rima; LeBovidge, Jennifer; Blood, Emily; Mittal, Mudita; Umetsu, Dale T

    2013-12-01

    Peanut allergy is a major public health problem that affects 1% of the population and has no effective therapy. To examine the safety and efficacy of oral desensitization in peanut-allergic children in combination with a brief course of anti-IgE mAb (omalizumab [Xolair]). We performed oral peanut desensitization in peanut-allergic children at high risk for developing significant peanut-induced allergic reactions. Omalizumab was administered before and during oral peanut desensitization. We enrolled 13 children (median age, 10 years), with a median peanut-specific IgE level of 229 kU(A)/L and a median total serum IgE level of 621 kU/L, who failed an initial double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge at peanut flour doses of 100 mg or less. After pretreatment with omalizumab, all 13 subjects tolerated the initial 11 desensitization doses given on the first day, including the maximum dose of 500 mg peanut flour (cumulative dose, 992 mg, equivalent to >2 peanuts), requiring minimal or no rescue therapy. Twelve subjects then reached the maximum maintenance dose of 4000 mg peanut flour per day in a median time of 8 weeks, at which point omalizumab was discontinued. All 12 subjects continued on 4000 mg peanut flour per day and subsequently tolerated a challenge with 8000 mg peanut flour (equivalent to about 20 peanuts), or 160 to 400 times the dose tolerated before desensitization. During the study, 6 of the 13 subjects experienced mild or no allergic reactions, 5 subjects had grade 2 reactions, and 2 subjects had grade 3 reactions, all of which responded rapidly to treatment. Among children with high-risk peanut allergy, treatment with omalizumab may facilitate rapid oral desensitization and qualitatively improve the desensitization process. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Preparation of peanut butter suspension for determination of peanuts using enzyme-linked immunoassay kits.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, Mary W; Brewer, Vickery A; Williams, Kristina M; Westphal, Carmen D; Heeres, James T

    2004-01-01

    Peanuts are one of the 8 most common allergenic foods and a large proportion of peanut-allergic individuals have severe reactions, some to minimal exposure. Specific protein constituents in the peanuts are the cause of the allergic reactions in sensitized individuals who ingest the peanuts. To avoid accidental ingestion of peanut-contaminated food, methods of analysis for the determination of the allergenic proteins in foods are important tools. Such methods could help identify foods inadvertently contaminated with peanuts, thereby reducing the incidence of allergic reactions to peanuts. Commercial immunoassay kits are available but need study for method performance, which requires reference materials for within- and between-laboratory validations. In this study, National Institute of Standards and Technology Standard Reference Material 2387 peanut butter was used. A polytron homogenizer was used to prepare a homogenous aqueous Peanut Butter suspension for the evaluation of method performance of some commercially available immunoassay kits such as Veratox for Peanut Allergen Test (Neogen Corp.), Ridascreen Peanut (R-Biopharm GmbH), and Bio-Kit Peanut Protein Assay Kit (Tepnel). Each gram of the aqueous peanut butter suspension contained 20 mg carboxymethylcellulose sodium salt, 643 microg peanut, 0.5 mg thimerosal, and 2.5 mg bovine serum albumin. The suspension was homogenous, stable, reproducible, and applicable for adding to ice cream, cookies, breakfast cereals, and chocolate for recovery studies at spike levels ranging from 12 to 90 microg/g.

  10. Iron fortification of whole wheat flour reduces iron deficiency and iron deficiency anemia and increases body iron stores in Indian school-aged children.

    PubMed

    Muthayya, Sumithra; Thankachan, Prashanth; Hirve, Siddhivinayak; Amalrajan, Vani; Thomas, Tinku; Lubree, Himangi; Agarwal, Dhiraj; Srinivasan, Krishnamachari; Hurrell, Richard F; Yajnik, Chittaranjan S; Kurpad, Anura V

    2012-11-01

    Wheat is the primary staple food for nearly one-third of the world's population. NaFeEDTA is the only iron (Fe) compound suitable for fortifying high extraction flours. We tested the hypothesis that NaFeEDTA-fortified, whole wheat flour reduces Fe deficiency (ID) and improves body Fe stores (BIS) and cognitive performance in Indian children. In a randomized, double-blind, controlled, school feeding trial, 6- to 15-y-old, Fe-depleted children (n = 401) were randomly assigned to either a daily wheat-based lunch meal fortified with 6 mg of Fe as NaFeEDTA or an otherwise identical unfortified control meal. Hemoglobin (Hb) and Fe status were measured at baseline, 3.5 mo, and 7 mo. Cognitive performance was evaluated at baseline and 7 mo in children (n = 170) at one of the study sites. After 7 mo, the prevalence of ID and ID anemia in the treatment group significantly decreased from 62 to 21% and 18 to 9%, respectively. There was a time x treatment interaction for Hb, serum ferritin, transferrin receptor, zinc protoporphyrin, and BIS (all P < 0.0001). Changes in BIS differed between the groups; it increased in the treatment group (0.04 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) and decreased in the control group (-0.02 ± 0.04 mmol/kg body weight) (P < 0.0001). In sensory tests, NaFeEDTA-fortified flour could not be differentiated from unfortified flour. There were no significant differences in cognitive performance tests between the groups. NaFeEDTA-fortified wheat flour markedly improved BIS and reduced ID in Fe-depleted children. It may be recommended for wider use in national school feeding programs.

  11. Specific allergen profiles of peanut foods and diagnostic or therapeutic allergenic products.

    PubMed

    Filep, Stephanie; Block, Denise S; Smith, Bryan R E; King, Eva M; Commins, Scott; Kulis, Michael; Vickery, Brian P; Chapman, Martin D

    2017-07-12

    Generic immunoassays for peanut cannot discriminate between allergen levels in peanut-derived food products or therapeutics. Clinical trials of oral immunotherapy (OIT) are strengthened by using standardized peanut preparations with defined doses of major allergens. This article describes measurement of Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 in peanut foods and in peanut flour extracts used for allergy diagnosis and OIT. Monoclonal antibody-based enzyme immunoassays for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 were used to compare allergen levels in peanut (n = 16) and tree nut (n = 16) butter, peanut flour (n = 11), oils (n = 8), extracts used for diagnosis and OIT (n = 5), and the National Institute for Standards and Technology Peanut Butter Standard Reference Material 2387. Roasted peanut butters contained 991 to 21,406 μg/g Ara h 1 and exceeded Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 levels by 2- to 4-fold. Similarly, National Institute for Standards and Technology Peanut Butter Standard Reference Material 2387 contained 11,275 μg/g Ara h 1, 2,522 μg/g Ara h 2, and 2,036 μg/g Ara h 6. In contrast, peanut flours contained 787 to 14,631 μg/g Ara h 2 and exceeded Ara h 1 levels by 2- to 20-fold. Flour extracts used for OIT contained 394 to 505 μg/mL Ara h 1, 1,187 to 5,270 μg/mL Ara h 2, and 1,104 to 8,092 μg/mL Ara h 6. In most cases specific peanut allergens were not detected in tree nut butters or peanut oils. The results show marked differences in specific peanut allergen profiles in peanut butter and flour and peanut preparations for clinical use. Roasting can increase Ara h 1 levels in peanut butter. Variability in allergen levels could affect the outcome of clinical trials of peanut OIT, especially with respect to Ara h 1. Specific allergen measurements will improve standardization and provide accurate dosing of peanut preparations that are being used for OIT. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights

  12. Supplementation with a new trypsin inhibitor from peanut is associated with reduced fasting glucose, weight control, and increased plasma CCK secretion in an animal model.

    PubMed

    Serquiz, Alexandre C; Machado, Richele J A; Serquiz, Raphael P; Lima, Vanessa C O; de Carvalho, Fabiana Maria C; Carneiro, Marcella A A; Maciel, Bruna L L; Uchôa, Adriana F; Santos, Elizeu A; Morais, Ana H A

    2016-12-01

    Ingestion of peanuts may have a beneficial effect on weight control, possibly due to the satietogenic action of trypsin inhibitors. The aim of this study was to isolate a new trypsin inhibitor in a typical Brazilian peanut sweet (paçoca) and evaluate its effect in biochemical parameters, weight gain and food intake in male Wistar rats. The trypsin inhibitor in peanut paçoca (AHTI) was isolated. Experimental diets were prepared with AIN-93G supplemented with AHTI. Animals had their weight and food intake monitored. Animals were anesthetized, euthanized, and their bloods collected by cardiac puncture for dosage of cholecystokinin (CCK) and other biochemical parameters. Supplementation with AHTI significantly decreased fasting glucose, body weight gain, and food intake. These effects may be attributed to increased satiety, once supplemented animals showed no evidence of impaired nutritional status and also because AHTI increased CCK production. Thus, our results indicate that AHTI, besides reducing fasting glucose, can reduce weight gain via food intake reduction.

  13. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) contains polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and PPO substrates that can reduce post-harvest proteolysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies of perennial peanut (Arachis glaburata Benth.) suggest its hay and haylage have higher levels of rumen undegraded protein (RUP) than other legume forages such as alfalfa. Higher RUP can result in more efficient utilization of nitrogen by ruminant animals with positive economic and environmen...

  14. Immunotherapy using algal-produced Ara h1 core domain suppresses peanut allergy in mice

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated adverse reaction to a subset of proteins found in peanuts. Immunotherapy aims to desensitize allergic patients through repeated and escalating exposures for several months to years using extracts or flours. The complex mix of proteins and variability between prepara...

  15. Sensitization to lupine flour: is it clinically relevant?

    PubMed

    de Jong, N W; van Maaren, M S; Vlieg-Boersta, B J; Dubois, A E J; de Groot, H; Gerth van Wijk, R

    2010-10-01

    Lupinus angustifolius (blue lupine) is used for human and animal consumption. Currently, the lupine content in bread varies from 0% to 10% and from 0.5% to 3% in pastry. Although lupine flour is present in many products, anaphylaxis on lupine flour is rarely seen. The aim of our study was to determine the clinical relevance of sensitization to lupine flour. From October 2004 until October 2005, we performed skin prick tests (SPT) with lupine flour, peanut and soy extracts in consecutive patients attending our allergy clinic with a suspected food allergy. In patients sensitized to lupine flour, double-blind placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC) were performed and specific IgE was measured. We tested 372 patients. SPTs with peanut, soy and lupine flour were positive in 135, 58 and 22 patients, respectively. Nine patients with sensitization to lupine flour underwent DBPCFC, which was negative in eight cases. In contrast, one patient experienced significant symptoms. Four of these nine patients suspected lupine by history. Two other patients with a positive history to lupine declined from challenges. In these patients, a 3-day dietary record showed that they could consume lupine without symptoms. Specific IgE in the serum was positive for L. angustifolius, peanut and soy in all nine patients. These results demonstrate that clinical lupine allergy is very uncommon, even in the presence of sensitization to lupine flour. The estimated prevalence of lupine allergy, among patients with a suspected food allergy, referred to a tertiary allergy centre in the Netherlands is 0.27-0.81%. In most, although not all cases, sensitization is not clinically relevant and is most likely caused by cross-sensitization to peanut. In selected cases, eliciting doses are low, making significant reactions possible. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. Peanuts and their nutritional aspects

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut is a legume crop that belongs to the family of Fabaceae, genus Arachis, and botanically named as Arachis hypogaea. Peanuts are consumed in many forms such as boiled peanuts, peanut oil, peanut butter, roasted peanuts, and added peanut meal in snack food, energy bars and candies. Peanuts are c...

  17. Survival of Salmonella in peanut butter and peanut butter spread.

    PubMed

    Burnett, S L; Gehm, E R; Weissinger, W R; Beuchat, L R

    2000-09-01

    In 1996, the first documented outbreak of salmonellosis associated with the consumption of peanut butter was reported. This study was undertaken to determine survival characteristics of high (5.68 log10 cfu g(-1)) and low (1.51 log10 cfu g(-1)) inocula of a five-serotype mixture of Salmonella in five commercial peanut butters and two commercial peanut butter spreads. Populations in samples inoculated with 5.68 log10 cfu g(-1) and stored for 24 weeks at 21 or 5 degrees C decreased 4.14-4.50 log10 cfu g(-1) and 2.86-4.28 log10 cfu g(-1), respectively, depending on the formulation. The order of retention of viability was: peanut butter spreads > traditional (regular) and reduced sugar, low-sodium peanut butters > natural peanut butter. Differences in rates of inactivation are attributed to variation in product composition as well as size and stability of water droplets in the colloidal matrix, which may influence nutrient availability. With the exception of natural peanut butter, products initially inoculated with 1.51 log10 cfu of Salmonella g(-1) (32 cfu g(-1)) were positive for the pathogen after storage for 24 weeks at 5 degrees C. At 21 degrees C, however, with the exception of one peanut butter spread, all products were negative for Salmonella after storage for 24 weeks. Post-process contamination of peanut butter and spreads with Salmonella may to result in survival in these products for the duration of their shelf life at 5 degrees C and possibly 21 degrees C, depending on the formulation.

  18. Effects of pulsed UV-light on peanut allergens in extracts and liquid peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Chung, S-Y; Yang, W; Krishnamurthy, K

    2008-06-01

    Pulsed ultraviolet (PUV) light, a nonthermal technology, was used to treat both the peanut extracts and liquid peanut butter. The objective was to determine if such treatment would lead to a reduction in the allergenic properties of the peanut extract and butter. Peanut samples were PUV treated using a Xenon RS-3000C under the following conditions: 3 pulses/s, 14.6 cm from the central axis of the lamp, 4 min (extract) or 3 min (liquid peanut butter). After the treatment, the peanut samples were centrifuged and the supernatants analyzed by SDS-PAGE and competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA). For comparison, boiling treatments were also performed. SDS-PAGE showed that while boiling treatment had little effect on the peanut allergens, PUV-light-treated samples displayed a reduced solubility or level of peanut allergens (63 kDa). Solubility of another allergen (18 to 20 kDa) was unaffected. Insoluble aggregates formed were responsible for the reduced level of allergens in PUV-light-treated samples. ciELISA showed that untreated samples exhibited an IgE binding 7-fold higher than the PUV-treated samples. It was concluded that PUV light was effective in reducing IgE binding of peanut extracts and liquid peanut butter. The current study provides an approach to the development of a possibly less allergenic peanut product. However, the reduction in actual allergenicity needs to be confirmed by clinical studies.

  19. Nut and Peanut Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray Nut and Peanut Allergy KidsHealth > For Kids > Nut and Peanut Allergy Print ... previous continue How Is a Nut or Peanut Allergy Diagnosed? If your doctor thinks you might have ...

  20. Nut and Peanut Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... foods. Sauces. Many cooks use peanuts or peanut butter to thicken chili and other sauces. Always proceed ... knife another family member used to make peanut butter sandwiches is not used to butter your bread ...

  1. Nut and Peanut Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... What Happens in the Operating Room? Nut and Peanut Allergy KidsHealth > For Kids > Nut and Peanut Allergy ... worse. previous continue How Is a Nut or Peanut Allergy Diagnosed? If your doctor thinks you might ...

  2. Exposure to inhalable flour dust in Canadian flour mills.

    PubMed

    Karpinski, Eva A

    2003-12-01

    In 1999, the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH(R)) proposed a Threshold Limit Value (TLV(R)) of 0.5 mg/m(3) for flour dust with a sensitization notation. The Labour Program of the Department of Human Resources Development Canada (HRDC), following notice of the intention to set a TLV, conducted a study of the levels of exposure to flour dust in flour mills across Canada to verify existing conditions, as well as to decide whether to adopt the proposed TLV or reference some other value. As part of the study, a relationship between flour dust concentrations obtained by using Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) samplers and closed-face 37-mm cassettes was examined and the literature on the health effects of exposure to flour dust was reviewed. A total of 104 millers, packers, sweepers, bakery mix operators, and others (mixed tasks) from 14 flour mills were sampled over an 8-hour work shift using IOM samplers. The results indicate that 101 employees (97.1%) were exposed to levels exceeding 0.5 mg/m(3), 66 employees (67.3%) to levels exceeding 5 mg/m(3), and 44 employees (42.3%) to levels exceeding 10 mg/m(3). For comparison purposes, flour dust measurements were also taken in a highly automated flour mill using state-of-the-art technology. The results suggest that even with the most up-to-date technology and proper cleaning operations in place, the flour milling industry may not be able to reduce the flour dust levels to below the TLV of 0.5 mg/m(3). According to the measurements of inhalable and total dust concentrations, the IOM sampler appears to be a more efficient collector of inhalable airborne particles up to 100 microm than the closed-face 37-mm cassette.

  3. Bahiagrass for the Management of Meloidogyne arenaria in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Weaver, C. F.; Robertson, D. G.; Ivey, H.

    1988-01-01

    Bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) cultivars Argentine, Pensacola, and Tifton-9 were non-hosts for Meloidogyne arenaria, M. incognita, and Heterodera glycines in a greenhouse experiment using field soil infested with these nematodes. The effect of Pensacola bahiagrass in rotation with peanut (Arachis hypogaea) on M. arenaria was studied in 1986 and 1987 in a field at the Wiregrass substation near Headland, Alabama. Each year soil densities of second-stage juveniles of M. arenaria, determined near peanut harvest, were 96-98% lower under bahiagrass than under peanut. In 1987 peanut yields in plots following bahiagrass were 27% higher than in plots under peanut monoculture. Juvenile population densities in bahiagrass-peanut plots were 41% lower than in plots with continuous peanut. Using bahiagrass for reducing population densities of M. arenaria and increasing peanut yield was as effective as using aldicarb at the recommended rates for peanut. PMID:19290315

  4. Successful oral tolerance induction in severe peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Clark, A T; Islam, S; King, Y; Deighton, J; Anagnostou, K; Ewan, P W

    2009-08-01

    Peanut allergy is common, potentially severe and rarely resolves causing impaired quality of life. No disease-modifying treatment exists and there is therefore a need to develop a therapeutic intervention. The aim of this study was to investigate whether peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) can induce clinical tolerance to peanut protein. Four peanut-allergic children underwent OIT. Preintervention oral challenges were performed to confirm clinical allergy and define the amount of protein required to cause a reaction (dose thresholds). OIT was then administered as daily doses of peanut flour increasing from 5 to 800 mg of protein with 2-weekly dose increases. After 6 further weeks of treatment, the oral challenge was repeated to define change in dose threshold and subjects continued daily treatment. Preintervention challenges confirmed peanut allergy and revealed dose thresholds of 5-50 mg (1/40-1/4 of a whole peanut); one subject had anaphylaxis during challenge and required adrenaline injection. All subjects tolerated immunotherapy updosing to 800 mg protein and i.m. adrenaline was not required. Each subject tolerated at least 10 whole peanuts (approximately 2.38 g protein) in postintervention challenges, an increase in dose threshold of at least 48-, 49-, 55- and 478-fold for the four subjects. We demonstrated a substantial increase in dose threshold after OIT in all subjects, including the subject with proven anaphylaxis. OIT was well tolerated and conferred protection against at least 10 peanuts, more than is likely to be encountered during accidental ingestion.

  5. Nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes under different water regimes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a serious environmental stress limiting growth and productivity in peanut and other crops. Nutrient uptake of peanut is reduced under drought conditions, which reduces yield. The objectives of this study were to investigate nutrient uptake of peanut genotypes in response to drought and ...

  6. Strategies to mitigate peanut allergy: production, processing, utilization, and immunotherapy considerations.

    PubMed

    White, Brittany L; Shi, Xiaolei; Burk, Caitlin M; Kulis, Michael; Burks, A Wesley; Sanders, Timothy H; Davis, Jack P

    2014-01-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important crop grown worldwide for food and edible oil. The surge of peanut allergy in the past 25 years has profoundly impacted both affected individuals and the peanut and related food industries. In response, several strategies to mitigate peanut allergy have emerged to reduce/eliminate the allergenicity of peanuts or to better treat peanut-allergic individuals. In this review, we give an overview of peanut allergy, with a focus on peanut proteins, including the impact of thermal processing on peanut protein structure and detection in food matrices. We discuss several strategies currently being investigated to mitigate peanut allergy, including genetic engineering, novel processing strategies, and immunotherapy in terms of mechanisms, recent research, and limitations. All strategies are discussed with considerations for both peanut-allergic individuals and the numerous industries/government agencies involved throughout peanut production and utilization.

  7. The management of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Katherine; Clark, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Peanut allergy is common and can be a cause of severe, life-threatening reactions. It is rarely outgrown like other food allergies such as egg and milk. Measures aiming to reduce its prevalence via maternal avoidance during pregnancy and lactation, or delayed introduction into the diet, have failed to show any benefit. Peanut allergy has a significant effect on the quality of life of sufferers and their families due to dietary and social restrictions, but mainly stemming from fear of accidental peanut ingestion. The current management consists of strict avoidance, education and provision of emergency medication. Families find avoidance challenging as peanut is hidden in various food products. Despite the fact that food labelling has improved, with a legal obligation to declare certain food allergens (including nuts) in prepacked products, it still causes confusion and does not extend to cross-contamination. In an effort to address issues of safety at school, a lot of work has been undertaken to better care for peanut-allergic children in that environment. This includes training of school staff on how to recognise and treat allergic reactions promptly. Recent developments in the management of peanut allergy, such as immunotherapy, have shown some promise as an active form of treatment, but larger studies are required to further investigate safety and efficacy. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  8. Developing therapies for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Bublin, Merima; Breiteneder, Heimo

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated, persisting immune disorder that is of major concern worldwide. Currently, no routine immunotherapy is available to treat this often severe and sometimes fatal food allergy. Traditional subcutaneous allergen immunotherapy with crude peanut extracts has proven not feasible due to the high risk of severe systemic side effects. The allergen-specific approaches under preclinical and clinical investigation comprise subcutaneous, oral, sublingual and epicutaneous immunotherapy with whole-peanut extracts as well as applications of hypoallergenic peanut allergens or T cell epitope peptides. Allergen-nonspecific approaches include monoclonal anti-IgE antibodies, TCM herbal formulations and Toll-like receptor 9-based immunotherapy. The potential of genetically engineered plants with reduced allergen levels is being explored as well as the beneficial influence of lactic acid bacteria and soybean isoflavones on peanut allergen-induced symptoms. Although the underlying mechanisms still need to be elucidated, several of these strategies hold great promise. It can be estimated that individual strategies or a combination thereof will result in a successful immunotherapy regime for peanut-allergic individuals within the next decade. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. Optimization of ingredient levels for the development of peanut based fiber rich pasta.

    PubMed

    Badwaik, Laxmikant S; Prasad, Kamlesh; Seth, Dibyakant

    2014-10-01

    Defatted peanut flour is rich source of protein and popularly use for fortification of different food products. Pasta was prepared using semolina, whereas defatted peanut flour and carrot powder were added for fortification. Response surface methodology was used to analyze the effect of peanut flour, semolina and carrot fiber on overall acceptability, percent expansion, hardness, solid loss and bulk density of pasta product. A rotatable central composite design was used to develop models for the responses. It was found out that an increase in semolina to peanut flour and carrot powder ratio increased the percent solid loss and decreased the hardness of uncooked pasta. Individual contour plots of the different responses were superimposed and regions meeting the maximum overall acceptability (7.81) and hardness (26.984 kg) as well as minimum solid loss (11.47 %) and bulk density below 260 kg/m(3) however percent expansion was found below 190 %. The product was acceptable at ingredient composition of 205.59 g semolina, 16.70 g peanut flour and 10 g carrot powder.

  10. Lupine allergy: not simply cross-reactivity with peanut or soy.

    PubMed

    Peeters, Kim A B M; Nordlee, Julie A; Penninks, André H; Chen, Lingyun; Goodman, Richard E; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla A F M; Hefle, Sue L; Taylor, Steve L; Knulst, André C

    2007-09-01

    Reports of lupine allergy are increasing as its use in food products increases. Lupine allergy might be the consequence of cross-reactivity after sensitization to peanut or other legumes or de novo sensitization. Lupine allergens have not been completely characterized. We sought to identify allergens associated with lupine allergy, evaluate potential cross-reactivity with peanut, and determine eliciting doses (EDs) for lupine allergy by using double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges. Six patients with a history of allergic reactions to lupine flour were evaluated by using skin prick tests, CAP tests, and double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges. Three of these patients were also allergic to peanut. Lupine allergens were characterized by means of IgE immunoblotting and peptide sequencing. In all 6 patients the ED for lupine flour was 3 mg or less for subjective symptoms and 300 mg or more for objective symptoms. The low ED and moderate-to-severe historical symptoms indicate significant allergenicity of lupine flour. Two patients allergic to lupine but not to peanut displayed IgE binding predominantly to approximately 66-kd proteins and weak binding to 14- and 24-kd proteins, whereas patients with peanut allergy and lupine allergy showed weak binding to lupine proteins of about 14 to 21 or 66 kd. Inhibition of binding was primarily species specific. Lupine allergy can occur either separately or together with peanut allergy, as demonstrated by 3 patients who are cosensitized to peanut and lupine. Lupine flour is allergenic and potentially cross-reactive with peanut allergen, thus posing some risk if used as a replacement for soy flour.

  11. Understanding the feasibility and implications of implementing early peanut introduction for prevention of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Koplin, Jennifer J; Peters, Rachel L; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Gurrin, Lyle; Tang, Mimi L K; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Matheson, Melanie; Togias, Alkis; Lack, Gideon; Allen, Katrina J

    2016-10-01

    A recent randomized trial (the Learning Early About Peanut Allergy [LEAP] study) provided evidence that earlier dietary peanut introduction reduces peanut allergy prevalence in high-risk infants. However, questions remain as to how to identify and target the "at-risk" population to facilitate timely introduction of peanut. We sought to use population-based infant peanut allergy data to understand feasibility and implications of implementing the LEAP trial intervention. Using the HealthNuts study cohort (n = 5276) of 1-year-old infants, we explored the impact of using various criteria to identify infants at high risk of developing peanut allergy, and the implications of skin prick test (SPT) screening before peanut introduction. Screening all infants with early onset eczema and/or egg allergy could require testing 16% of the population and would still miss 23% of peanut allergy cases; 29% of screened infants would require clinical follow-up because of being SPT-positive. Around 11% of high-risk infants were excluded from the LEAP study because of an SPT wheal size of more than 4 mm to peanut at baseline; data from the HealthNuts study suggest that 80% of these would be peanut allergic on food challenge. There were no life-threatening events among either low- or high-risk infants whose parents chose to introduce peanut at home in the first year of life, or in 150 peanut-allergic infants during hospital-based challenges. Based on this large epidemiological study, a population program aiming to identify and screen all infants at risk of peanut allergy would pose major cost and logistic challenges that need to be carefully considered. Further research might be required to provide data for low-risk infants. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. Use of the wetting method on cassava flour in three konzo villages in Mozambique reduces cyanide intake and may prevent konzo in future droughts.

    PubMed

    Nhassico, Dulce; Bradbury, James Howard; Cliff, Julie; Majonda, Rita; Cuambe, Constantino; Denton, Ian C; Foster, Matthew P; Martins, Arlinda; Cumbane, Adelaide; Sitoe, Luis; Pedro, Joao; Muquingue, Humberto

    2016-07-01

    Konzo is an irreversible paralysis of the legs that occurs mainly in children and young women associated with large cyanide intake from bitter cassava coupled with malnutrition. In East Africa outbreaks occur during drought, when cassava plants produce much more cyanogens than normal. A wetting method that removes cyanogens from cassava flour was taught to the women of three konzo villages in Mozambique, to prevent sporadic konzo and konzo outbreaks in the next drought. The intervention was in three villages with 72 konzo cases and mean konzo prevalence of 1.2%. The percentage of children with high (>350 μmol/L) urinary thiocyanate content and at risk of contracting konzo in Cava, Acordos de Lusaka, and Mujocojo reduced from 52, 10, and 6 at baseline to 17, 0, and 4 at conclusion of the intervention. Cassava flour showed large reductions in total cyanide over the intervention. The percentage of households using the wetting method was 30-40% in Acordos de Lusaka and Mujocojo and less in Cava. If the wetting method is used extensively by households during drought it should prevent konzo outbreaks and chronic cyanide intoxication. We recommend that the wetting method be taught in all konzo areas in East Africa.

  13. Intake of partially defatted Brazil nut flour reduces serum cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic patients--a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Roberta F; Huguenin, Grazielle V B; Luiz, Ronir R; Moreira, Annie S B; Oliveira, Glaucia M M; Rosa, Glorimar

    2015-06-16

    Thyroid hormones can lower levels of atherogenic lipoproteins, and selenium is important in thyroid hormone homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the effects of a healthy diet associated with the Brazil nut (Bertholletia excelsa) in dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients. This study was a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Seventy-seven dyslipidemic and hypertensive patients already receiving lipid-lowering drugs received either a dietary treatment associated with partially defatted Brazil nut flour (13 g/day providing 227,5 μg of selenium/day),or with dyed cassava flour as a placebo. All patients received a personalized dietary guideline with nutritional recommendations for dyslipidemia and hypertension and were followed for 90 days. The Brazil nut group showed reductions in total cholesterol (-20.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02), non HDL-cholesterol (-19.5 ± 61.2 mg/dL, P = 0.02) and Apo A-1 (-10.2 ± 26.7 mg/dL, P = 0.03) without significant alterations in the Apo B/Apo A-1 ratio. The placebo group showed a reduction in FT3 levels (-0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.03) and increased Lp(a) levels (5.9 ± 18.0 mg/dL, P = 0.02). There were no statistical differences in blood pressure and serum lipids between Brazil nut and placebo group. Supplementation with Brazil nuts seems to favor the maintenance of FT3 levels and contributes to lipemia reduction in hypercholesterolemic and euthyroid patients. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier NCT01990391.

  14. Groundnut (Peanut) Oil

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut oil is valued worldwide, primarily as a cooking medium and food ingredient. This chapter provides timely summaries and discussions on the latest compositional, physical and nutritional data for peanut oil....

  15. Peanut allergy and anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    Finkelman, Fred D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Peanuts are a frequent cause of food allergy and the most common cause of fatal food-induced anaphylaxis in the U.S. Advances during the past two years have promoted our understanding of peanut allergens and peanut allergy prevalence, etiology, diagnosis and therapy. The advances highlighted in this review include evidence that the peanut allergens most important in disease differ in different parts of the world, that early oral exposure to peanuts may decrease the frequency of peanut allergy, while early non-oral exposure may have the opposite effect, that complement activation by peanut constituents appears to promote peanut-induced anaphylaxis and that oral immunotherapy, anti-IgE antibody and an herbal formulation are promising approaches for treatment of this disorder. PMID:21051210

  16. A randomized controlled study of peanut oral immunotherapy: clinical desensitization and modulation of the allergic response.

    PubMed

    Varshney, Pooja; Jones, Stacie M; Scurlock, Amy M; Perry, Tamara T; Kemper, Alex; Steele, Pamela; Hiegel, Anne; Kamilaris, Janet; Carlisle, Suzanne; Yue, Xiaohong; Kulis, Mike; Pons, Laurent; Vickery, Brian; Burks, A Wesley

    2011-03-01

    Open-label oral immunotherapy (OIT) protocols have been used to treat small numbers of patients with peanut allergy. Peanut OIT has not been evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. To investigate the safety and effectiveness of OIT for peanut allergy in a double-blind, placebo-controlled study. In this multicenter study, children ages 1 to 16 years with peanut allergy received OIT with peanut flour or placebo. Initial escalation, build-up, and maintenance phases were followed by an oral food challenge (OFC) at approximately 1 year. Titrated skin prick tests (SPTs) and laboratory studies were performed at regular intervals. Twenty-eight subjects were enrolled in the study. Three peanut OIT subjects withdrew early in the study because of allergic side effects. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, all remaining peanut OIT subjects (n = 16) ingested the maximum cumulative dose of 5000 mg (approximately 20 peanuts), whereas placebo subjects (n = 9) ingested a median cumulative dose of 280 mg (range, 0-1900 mg; P < .001). In contrast with the placebo group, the peanut OIT group showed reductions in SPT size (P < .001), IL-5 (P = .01), and IL-13 (P = .02) and increases in peanut-specific IgG(4) (P < .001). Peanut OIT subjects had initial increases in peanut-specific IgE (P < .01) but did not show significant change from baseline by the time of OFC. The ratio of forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3)(hi): FoxP3(intermediate) CD4+ CD25+ T cells increased at the time of OFC (P = .04) in peanut OIT subjects. These results conclusively demonstrate that peanut OIT induces desensitization and concurrent immune modulation. The current study continues and is evaluating the hypothesis that peanut OIT causes long-term immune tolerance. Copyright © 2011 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Impact of thermal processing on ELISA detection of peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Fu, Tong-Jen; Maks, Nicole

    2013-06-19

    This study examined the effect of heat treatment on the solubility of peanut proteins and compared the performances of two commercial ELISA kits (Veratox Quantitative Peanut Allergen Test and BioKits Peanut Assay Kit) for quantitation of peanut residues as affected by different heat treatments (moist and dry heat) and detection targets (mixture of proteins vs specific protein). Both laboratory-prepared and commercial peanut flour preparations were used for the evaluation. The two ELISA kits tended to underestimate the levels of protein in samples that were subjected to elevated heat, respectively, by more than 60- or 400-fold lower for the autoclaved samples and by as much as 70- or 2000-fold lower for the dark-roast commercial flour samples. The BioKits test, which employs antibodies specific to a heat labile protein (Ara h 1), in general exhibited a greater degree of underestimation. These results suggest that commercial ELISA kits may not be able to accurately determine the amount of proteins present in thermally processed foods due to changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of the target proteins. Users need to be aware of such limitations before applying ELISA kits for evaluation of food allergen control programs.

  18. Release of OLe peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OLe is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut that has excellent yield and enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to other high oleic Spanish cultivars. The purpose for releasing OLe is to provide peanut producers with a true Spanish peanut that is high oleic and has enhanced yi...

  19. Dietary supplementation of Chardonnay grape seed flour reduces plasma cholesterol concentration, hepatic steatosis, and abdominal fat content in high-fat diet-induced obese hamsters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The mechanisms for the hypocholesterolemic and anti-obesity effects of grape seed flours derived from white and red winemaking processing were investigated. Male Golden Syrian hamsters were fed high-fat (HF) diets supplemented with 10% partially defatted grape seed flours from Chardonnay (ChrSd), Ca...

  20. Airborne concentrations of peanut protein.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rodney M; Barnes, Charles S

    2013-01-01

    Food allergy to peanut is a significant health problem, and there are reported allergic reactions to peanuts despite not eating or having physical contact with peanuts. It is presumed that an allergic reaction may have occurred from inhalation of airborne peanut allergens. The purpose of this study was to detect the possible concentrations of airborne peanut proteins for various preparations and during specific activities. Separate Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 monoclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and a polyclonal sandwich enzyme immunoassay for peanuts were used to detect the amount of airborne peanut protein collected using a Spincon Omni 3000 air collector (Sceptor Industries, Inc., Kansas City, MO) under different peanut preparation methods and situations. Air samples were measured for multiple peanut preparations and scenarios. Detectable amounts of airborne peanut protein were measured using a whole peanut immunoassay when removing the shells of roasted peanut. No airborne peanut allergen (Ara h 1 or Ara h 2) or whole peanut protein above the LLD was measured in any of the other peanut preparation collections. Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and polyclonal peanut proteins were detected from water used to boil peanuts. Small amounts of airborne peanut protein were detected in the scenario of removing shells from roasted peanuts; however, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 proteins were unable to be consistently detected. Although airborne peanut proteins were detected, the concentration of airborne peanut protein that is necessary to elicit a clinical allergic reaction is unknown.

  1. Immunotherapy for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Lee, T H; Chan, June; Lau, Vivian W Y; Lee, W L; Lau, P C; Lo, M H

    2014-08-01

    Peanut allergy is one of the commonest food hypersensitivities causing fatal or near-fatal reactions. There is, currently, no preventive treatment and the incidence of severe allergic reactions during peanut desensitisation has limited its clinical use. Anti-immunoglobulin E therapy has been shown to be effective in preventing peanut-induced reactions but it does not result in long-term tolerance. Two important advances have recently been reported. One involves gradual oral introduction of peanut protein to desensitise, whereas the other approach uses a combination of anti-immunoglobulin E and oral peanut immunotherapy. Both approaches could offer a way to desensitise with a far greater margin of safety than has, hitherto, been reported. This article provides an overview of the literature on peanut immunotherapy and describes the experience in a small group of children in Hong Kong who were treated successfully using anti-immunoglobulin E combined with oral peanut desensitisation.

  2. False positive detection of peanut residue in liquid caramel coloring using commercial ELISA kits.

    PubMed

    Stelk, T; Niemann, L; Lambrecht, D M; Baumert, J L; Taylor, S L

    2013-07-01

    Initial food industry testing in our laboratory using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods indicated that the darkest caramel color (class IV) unexpectedly contained traces of peanut protein, a potential undeclared allergen issue. Caramel production centers on the heating of sugars, often glucose, under controlled heat and chemical processing conditions with other ingredients including ammonia, sulfite, and/or alkali salts. These ingredients should not contain any traces of peanut residue. We sought to determine the reliability of commercially available peanut allergen ELISA methods for detection of apparent peanut residue in caramel coloring. Caramel color samples of classes I, II, III, and IV were obtained from 2 commercial suppliers and tested using 6 commercially available quantitative and qualitative peanut ELISA kits. Five lots of class IV caramel color were spiked with a known concentration of peanut protein from light roasted peanut flour to assess recovery of peanut residue using a spike and recovery protocol with either 15 ppm or 100 ppm peanut protein on a kit-specific basis. A false positive detection of peanut protein was found in class IV caramel colors with a range of 1.2 to 17.6 parts per million recovered in both spiked and unspiked liquid caramel color samples. ELISA kit spike/recovery results indicate that false negative results might also be obtained if peanut contamination were ever to actually exist in class IV caramel color. Manufacturers of peanut-free products often test all ingredients for peanut allergen residues using commercial ELISA kits. ELISA methods are not reliable for the detection of peanut in class IV caramel ingredients and their use is not recommended with this matrix. © 2013 Institute of Food Technologists®

  3. Production and characterization of Xanthosoma sagittifolium and Colocasia esculenta flours.

    PubMed

    Pérez, E E; Gutiérrez, M E; De Delahaye, E Pacheco; Tovar, J; Lares, M

    2007-08-01

    The physical proximate composition and physicochemical characteristics, microbiological stability, and in vitro alpha-amylolysis rate of flours produced by conventional dehydration techniques of the edible portions of the aroids Xanthosoma sagittifolium and Colocasia esculenta were investigated. Flours from the edible portion of both tubers did not show significant statistical differences in moisture, Aw, crude protein, total sugars, amylose, and amylopectin contents. C. esculenta flour showed higher crude fat, total, soluble, and insoluble dietary fiber, and mineral (P, Ca, Fe, and Zn) contents, whereas X. sagittifolium flour showed higher starch, ash, and reducing sugar content than its counterpart. With regard to physical and physicochemical characteristics, X. sagittifolium flour showed higher titratable acidity and relative density values, being darker and more yellowish than its counterpart. On the other hand, X. sagittifolium flour showed higher gelatinization temperature than C. esculenta flour. Parameters such as viscosity during the holding time (95 degrees C for 30 min), viscosity at 50 degrees C, setback, and consistency were lower in C. esculenta flour than X. sagittifolium flour. The viscosity peak and breakdown indexes were higher in C. esculenta flour than in the X. sagittifolium sample. The colony forming units (CFU) of the microorganisms were much lower than those reported in the literature for similar products. Moreover, due to their moisture content and water activity, these flours could be classified as dry foods and they are shelf-stable foods. The results reflect that flours with good chemical, physicochemical, and nutritional quality and satisfactory microbiological stability may be produced from these aroids.

  4. Maternal and postnatal dietary probiotic supplementation enhances splenic regulatory T helper cell population and reduces peanut allergen-induced hypersensitivity responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Toomer, Ondulla T; Ferguson, Martine; Pereira, Marion; Do, Andrew; Bigley, Elmer; Gaines, Dennis; Williams, Kristina

    2014-09-01

    Neonatal to early childhood is the critical period for establishing a balance of T helper 1 (Th1) versus T helper 2 (Th2) cellular immunity within the gut, which is strongly influenced by the source and establishment of gut microflora. Probiotic administration has been shown to attenuate Th2-biased cellular immunity and predisposition to food allergies. To test this hypothesis we provided ad libitum a probiotic-supplemented (Primalac 454 Feed Grade Microbials) or control diet to lactating dams with suckling pups and weaned pups until 10 weeks of age. Weaned mice were sensitized/challenged with peanut extract, saline or adjuvant at 6, 8 and 10 weeks of age. At 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks, fecal samples were collected for microbial analysis, while blood samples were analyzed for total plasma IgE levels. At termination (10 weeks of age), splenic T lymphocyte population subtypes were determined using FACS analysis and Th1/Th2/Th17 gene expression by PCR array. Mice given the probiotic-supplemented diet had significantly enhanced probiotic fecal counts compared to controls at 3, 6, 8 and 10 weeks. Moreover, mice fed the probiotic-supplemented diet had enhanced splenic naturally occurring T regulatory cell populations, and reduced splenic gene expression of allergic mediator IL-13 compared to controls. These results provide evidence that early probiotic supplementation may provide host protection to hypersensitivity reactions to food allergens by attenuating food allergen inflammatory responses. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  5. IgE sensitization to lupine in bakers - cross-reactivity or co-sensitization to wheat flour?

    PubMed

    van Kampen, Vera; Sander, Ingrid; Quirce, Santiago; Brüning, Thomas; Merget, Rolf; Raulf, Monika

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy to lupine has frequently been reported in patients allergic to peanut or soy, and cross-reactivity between these legumes is known. Moreover, respiratory allergy to lupine has been described after inhalation, mostly at workplaces. Our aim was to study the frequency of lupine sensitization in European bakers with suspected bakers' allergy. Furthermore, associations between sensitizations to lupine and other plant allergens were investigated. One hundred and sixteen bakers with work-related allergic symptoms but without known food allergies were examined. Specific IgE (sIgE) antibodies to wheat flour, rye flour, lupine, peanut, soy and the recombinant single birch protein rBet v 1 were quantified. Selected sera were tested for cross-reactivity using ImmunoCAP inhibition and ISAC microarrays. Whereas 67% of bakers were sensitized to wheat and/or rye flour, 35% showed sIgE to peanut and 33% to lupine. All lupine-positive bakers also had sIgE to either wheat flour (89%) and/or peanut (92%), and lupine sIgE correlated significantly with sIgE to peanut, soy, wheat and rye flour. Used as an inhibitor, wheat flour inhibited IgE binding to lupine in 4 out of 8 sera, indicating cross-reactivity. In microarrays, these sera showed IgE binding to lipid transfer proteins, profilins and/or cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants. Further inhibition experiments suggest that these single allergens are involved in cross-reactivity. One third of 116 symptomatic bakers showed sIgE to lupine. At least some of these sensitizations were based on cross-reactivity between lupine and wheat flour. However, the considerable sensitization rate could also be a sign that the use of lupine flour in bakeries may be of occupational relevance. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  6. Oral immunotherapy for peanut allergy: multipractice experience with epinephrine-treated reactions.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Richard L; Factor, Jeffrey M; Baker, James W; Mansfield, Lyndon E; Katz, Yitzhak; Hague, Angela R; Paul, Marianne M; Sugerman, Robert W; Lee, Jason O; Lester, Mitchell R; Mendelson, Louis M; Nacshon, Liat; Levy, Michael B; Goldberg, Michael R; Elizur, Arnon

    2014-01-01

    Peanut allergy creates the risk of life-threatening anaphylaxis that can disrupt psychosocial development and family life. The avoidance management strategy often fails to prevent anaphylaxis and may contribute to social dysfunction. Peanut oral immunotherapy may address these problems, but there are safety concerns regarding implementation in clinical practice. The purpose of this report is to communicate observations about the frequency of epinephrine-treated reactions during peanut oral immunotherapy in 5 different allergy/immunology practices. Retrospective chart review of peanut oral immunotherapy performed in 5 clinical allergy practices. A total of 352 treated patients received 240,351 doses of peanut, peanut butter, or peanut flour, and experienced 95 reactions that were treated with epinephrine. Only 3 patients received 2 doses of epinephrine, and no patient required more intensive treatment. A total of 298 patients achieved the target maintenance dose for a success rate of 85%. Peanut oral immunotherapy carries a risk of systemic reactions. In the context of oral immunotherapy, those reactions were recognized and treated promptly. Peanut oral immunotherapy may be a suitable therapy for patients managed by qualified allergists/immunologists. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Research advances in cadmium pollution of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.)].

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai-rong; Zhang, Lei

    2008-12-01

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is a major oil-bearing crop in the world, and as well, an important resource of plant protein and a main raw material for food processing. With the increasing of its direct human consumption and food processing, the Cd concentration in peanut kernel has aroused great concern in recent years. China is a main country of the production and exportation of peanut, but the Cd enrichment in peanut kernel is the main obstacle for its peanut export trade. In this paper, the research advances in Cd pollution of peanut kernel were reviewed, based on the characteristics and mechanisms of Cd accumulation and distribution in peanut kernel, the intra-specific variation of kernel Cd content, and the measures in controlling kernel Cd content. Two strategies were put forward for controlling Cd pollution of peanut kernel, i.e., to reduce the Cd uptake by main root system of peanut plant, and to control the transference of Cd from root to fruit (kernel). In order to applying the strategies effectively, researches on the mechanisms of Cd accumulation in peanut kernel should be enhanced in three aspects, i.e., root vitality and its relationship with Cd accumulation in kernel, mechanism of fruit Cd absorption and its contribution to kernel Cd content, and mechanism of Cd transference in plants and its effects on kernel Cd content.

  8. Flavor and Antioxidant Capacity of Peanut Paste and Peanut Butter Supplemented with Peanut Skins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut skins (PS) are a good source of phenolic compounds. This study evaluated antioxidant properties and flavor of peanut paste and peanut butter enhanced with peanut skins. PS were added to peanut paste and peanut butter in concentrations of 0.0, 0.5, 1.0, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0 and 20.0 % (w/w). PS, ...

  9. Study of mechanical and thermal properties of soy flour elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Kendra Alicia

    Bio-based plastics are becoming viable alternatives to petroleum-based plastics because they decrease dependence on petroleum derivatives and are more environmentally friendly. Raw materials such as soy flour are widely available, low cost, lightweight, stiffness and have high strength characteristics, but weak interfacial adhesion between the soy flour and the polymer poses a challenge. In this study, soy flour was utilized as a filler in thermoplastic elastomer composites. A surface modification called acetylation was investigated at soy flour concentrations of 10 wt%, 15 wt% and 20 wt%. The mechanical properties of the composites were then compared to that of elastomers without a filler. Chemical characterization of the acetylated soy flour was attempted in order to understand what occurs during the reaction and after completion. In the range of tests, soy flour loadings were observed to be inversely proportional to tensile strength for both the untreated and treated soy flour. However, the acetylated soy flour at 10 wt% concentration performed comparable to that of the neat rubber and resulted in an increase in tensile strength. Unexpectedly, the acetylation reaction increased elongation, which reduced stress within the composite and is believed to increase the adhesion of the soy flour to that of the elastomer. In the nuclear magnetic resonance (SS-NMR), the intensity for the treated soy flour was larger than that of the untreated soy flour for the acetyl groups that were attached to the soy flour, particularly, the carbonyl function group next to the deprotonated oxygen and the methyl group next to the carbonyl. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) indicated that the acetylated soy flour is slightly more thermally stable than the untreated soy flour. The treated soy flour also increased the decomposition temperature of the composite.

  10. Energy conservation by partial recirculation of peanut drying air

    SciTech Connect

    Young, J.H.

    1983-06-01

    Conventional, recirculating, and intermittent type peanut dryers were compared in a three-year study. Comparisons indicate that partial recirculation of peanut drying air may reduce energy consumption per unit of water removed by approximately 25% while also reducing required drying time and maintaining high quality.

  11. A randomized controlled study of peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT): clinical desensitization and modulation of the allergic response

    PubMed Central

    Varshney, Pooja; Jones, Stacie M.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Perry, Tamara T.; Kemper, Alex; Steele, Pamela; Hiegel, Anne; Kamilaris, Janet; Carlisle, Suzanne; Yue, Xiaohong; Kulis, Mike; Pons, Laurent; Vickery, Brian; Burks, A. Wesley

    2011-01-01

    Background Open-label oral immunotherapy (OIT) protocols have been used to treat small numbers of patients with peanut allergy. Peanut OIT has not been evaluated in double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Objective To investigate the safety and effectiveness of OIT for peanut allergy in a double blind, placebo-controlled study. Methods In this multicenter study, peanut-allergic children ages 1-16 years received OIT with peanut flour or placebo. Initial escalation, build-up, and maintenance phases were followed by an oral food challenge at approximately one year. Titrated skin prick tests (SPT) and laboratory studies were performed at regular intervals. Results Twenty-eight subjects were enrolled in the study. Three peanut OIT subjects withdrew early in the study due to allergic side effects. During the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, all remaining peanut OIT subjects (N=16) ingested the maximum cumulative dose of 5000 mg (approximately 20 peanuts), while placebo subjects (N=9) ingested a median cumulative dose of 280 mg (range, 0-1900 mg) [p<0.001]. In contrast to the placebo group, the peanut OIT group showed reductions in SPT size (p<0.001), IL-5 (p=0.01), and IL-13 (p=0.02) and increases in peanut-specific IgG4 (p<0.001). Peanut OIT subjects had initial increases in peanut-specific IgE (p<0.01) but did not show significant change from baseline by the time of OFC. The ratio of FoxP3 hi: FoxP3 intermediate CD4+CD25+ T cells increased at the time of OFC (p=0.04) in peanut OIT subjects. Conclusion These results conclusively demonstrate that peanut OIT induces desensitization and concurrent immune modulation. The present study continues and is evaluating the hypothesis that peanut OIT causes long-term immune tolerance. PMID:21377034

  12. Boiling and frying peanuts decreases soluble peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 but does not generate hypoallergenic peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy continues to be a problem in most developed countries of the world. We sought a processing method that would alter allergenic peanut proteins, such that allergen recognition by IgE from allergic individuals would be significantly reduced or eliminated. Such a method would render accid...

  13. [Effect of addition of instant corn flour on rheological characteristics of wheat flour and breadmaking III].

    PubMed

    Martínez, F; el-Dahs, A A

    1993-12-01

    The instant corn flour prepared by the hydrothermal process using corn grits soaked in water at room temperature (28-30 degrees C) for 5 hours and steaming for 1 minute at 118 degrees C presented characteristics similar to that of flours prepared with grits soaked in water at temperature higher than room temperature and different steaming time (5 and 15 minutes). The addition of instant corn flour up of a 25% mixture with wheat flour reduced the peak of maximum viscosity during the heating cycle; however, the final viscosity during the cooling cycle was increased. The water absorption was increased with the increase of substitution in the level of wheat flour. Extensibility, maximum resistance and values of area were reduced with an increase in the level of instant corn flour in the mixture. However, extension resistance and proportional number were increased. Bread prepared from a mixture of instant corn flour and wheat flour showed higher weight with low loaf volume, color and texture of the crumb related to bread wheat.

  14. Registration of 'VENUS' peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    VENUS is a large-seeded high-oleic Virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) that has enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot resistance when compared to the cultivar Jupiter. VENUS is the first high-oleic Virginia peanut developed for optimal performance in the South...

  15. Nut and Peanut Allergy

    MedlinePlus

    ... like a restaurant or bar) where lots of peanuts are being cracked from their shells. The person inhales and then swallows the protein, and this can lead to a reaction when the protein gets digested. Although ... and wheat allergies), peanut and tree nut allergies are lifelong in many ...

  16. Peanut variety tests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managed peanut variety trials located in various state-wide regions are an essential part of peanut variety development and release. In this study, trials were conducted in Caddo, Beckham, and Custer counties of Oklahoma. Trial entries included 10 runner types, 4 Spanish types, and 6 Virginia type...

  17. Peanut Variety Tests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managed peanut variety trials located in various state-wide regions are an essential part of peanut variety development and release. In this study, trials were conducted in Caddo, Custer, and Tillman counties of Oklahoma. Trial entries included 8 runner types, 4 Spanish types, and 4 Virginia types...

  18. Peanut variety tests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managed peanut variety trials located in various state-wide regions are an essential part of peanut variety development and release. In this study, trials were conducted in Caddo, Custer, and Tillman counties of Oklahoma. Trial entries included 12 runner types, 4 Spanish types and 8 Virginia types...

  19. Peanut variety tests

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Managed peanut variety trials located in various state-wide regions are an essential part of peanut variety development and release. In this study, trials were conducted in Caddo, Beckham, and Custer counties of Oklahoma. Trial entries included 9 runner types, 4 Spanish types, and 7 Virginia types...

  20. Registration of 'OLé' peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    OLé peanut (experimental designation ARSOK-S140-1OL) is a high oleic Spanish-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. fastigiata var. vulgaris) that was cooperatively released by the USDA-ARS and the Oklahoma Agricultural Experiment Station in 2014. OLé is the product of a Tamspan 90 X F435, the ori...

  1. International peanut yield gains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut is grown in more than 100 countries, with China, India, the U.S., Nigeria, and Indonesia being the largest producers. Peanut production systems range from very primitive with only hand labor and few inputs of fertilizer or chemical controls for weeds or diseases to other systems that are h...

  2. Iron bioavailability and utilization in rats are lower from lime-treated corn flour than from wheat flour when they are fortified with different sources of iron.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Miguel; Sousa, Virginia; Moreno, Ambar; Villapando, Salvador; López-Alarcón, Mardya

    2003-01-01

    Although iron bioavailability from wheat flour fortified with iron has been widely studied, the bioavailability of lime-treated corn flour has not been evaluated sufficiently. We compared iron bioavailability and utilization of lime-treated corn flour and wheat flour supplemented with various iron sources. Bioavailability and utilization were determined in Sprague-Dawley rats using the iron balance and hemoglobin depletion-repletion methods. Rats were iron depleted by feeding them a low iron, casein diet for 10 d. During the repletion period, the rats were fed diets based on lime-treated corn flour or wheat flour, both supplemented with ferrous fumarate, ferrous sulfate, ferric citrate and reduced iron for 14 d. Hemoglobin was determined at the end of depletion and repletion periods. The phytate concentration was lower in wheat flour (114 mg/100g) than in lime-treated corn flour (501 mg/100g). Iron bioavailability and utilization by rats were higher from fortified and unfortified wheat flour than from the lime-treated corn flour counterparts. Iron utilization was greater in rats fed wheat flour supplemented with ferrous sulfate, followed by fumarate and citrate than in rats fed reduced iron. In lime-treated corn flour, iron utilization by rats fed unfortified flour and flour fortified with reduced iron did not differ, but utilization was higher in rats fed corn flour fortified with iron sulfate, fumarate and citrate than with reduced iron. We conclude that fortification of lime-treated corn flour with reduced iron has no effect on iron bioavailability or utilization, probably due to the high phytate content. Other iron compounds must be selected to fortify lime-treated corn flour when intended for public nutrition programs.

  3. Basophil activation test discriminates between allergy and tolerance in peanut-sensitized children.

    PubMed

    Santos, Alexandra F; Douiri, Abdel; Bécares, Natalia; Wu, Shih-Ying; Stephens, Alick; Radulovic, Suzana; Chan, Susan M H; Fox, Adam T; Du Toit, George; Turcanu, Victor; Lack, Gideon

    2014-09-01

    Most of the peanut-sensitized children do not have clinical peanut allergy. In equivocal cases, oral food challenges (OFCs) are required. However, OFCs are laborious and not without risk; thus, a test that could accurately diagnose peanut allergy and reduce the need for OFCs is desirable. To assess the performance of basophil activation test (BAT) as a diagnostic marker for peanut allergy. Peanut-allergic (n = 43), peanut-sensitized but tolerant (n = 36) and non-peanut-sensitized nonallergic (n = 25) children underwent skin prick test (SPT) and specific IgE (sIgE) to peanut and its components. BAT was performed using flow cytometry, and its diagnostic performance was evaluated in relation to allergy versus tolerance to peanut and validated in an independent population (n = 65). BAT in peanut-allergic children showed a peanut dose-dependent upregulation of CD63 and CD203c while there was no significant response to peanut in peanut-sensitized but tolerant (P < .001) and non-peanut-sensitized nonallergic children (P < .001). BAT optimal diagnostic cutoffs showed 97% accuracy, 95% positive predictive value, and 98% negative predictive value. BAT allowed reducing the number of required OFCs by two-thirds. BAT proved particularly useful in cases in which specialists could not accurately diagnose peanut allergy with SPT and sIgE to peanut and to Arah2. Using a 2-step diagnostic approach in which BAT was performed only after equivocal SPT or Arah2-sIgE, BAT had a major effect (97% reduction) on the number of OFCs required. BAT proved to be superior to other diagnostic tests in discriminating between peanut allergy and tolerance, particularly in difficult cases, and reduced the need for OFCs. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Flour sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-extractable protein level as a cookie flour quality indicator.

    PubMed

    Pareyt, Bram; Bruneel, Charlotte; Brijs, Kristof; Goesaert, Hans; Delcour, Jan A

    2010-01-13

    Flour characteristics of laboratory-milled flour fractions of two wheat cultivars were related to their cookie-baking performance. Cultivar (cv.) Albatros wheat milling yielded fractions with lower damaged starch (DS) and arabinoxylan levels and higher sodium dodecyl sulfate-extractable protein (SDSEP) levels than did cv. Meunier wheat milling. During baking, cv. Albatros flour doughs spread faster and set later than their cv. Meunier counterparts and, hence, resulted in larger cookie diameters. DS levels negatively affected spread rate during both cv. Albatros (R2=0.68) and cv. Meunier (R2=0.51) cookie baking. SDSEP levels also influenced cookie quality. The use of flour heat-treated to reduce its SDSEP levels to different degrees led to reduction of the set time (R2=0.90). It was deduced that larger gluten polymer sizes limit dough spread time during baking and that, apart from DS level, the SDSEP level is an indicator for cookie flour quality.

  5. Increasing the accuracy of peanut allergy diagnosis by using Ara h 2.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thanh D; Tang, Mimi; Choo, Sharon; Licciardi, Paul V; Koplin, Jennifer J; Martin, Pamela E; Tan, Tina; Gurrin, Lyle C; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Tey, Dean; Robinson, Marnie; Dharmage, Shyamali C; Allen, Katrina J

    2012-04-01

    Measurement of whole peanut-specific IgE (sIgE) is often used to confirm sensitization but does not reliably predict allergy. Ara h 2 is the dominant peanut allergen detected in 90% to 100% of patients with peanut allergy and could help improve diagnosis. We sought to determine whether Ara h 2 testing might improve the accuracy of diagnosing peanut allergy and therefore circumvent the need for an oral food challenge (OFC). Infants from the population-based HealthNuts study underwent skin prick tests to determine peanut sensitization and subsequently underwent a peanut OFC to confirm allergy status. In a stratified random sample of 200 infants (100 with peanut allergy and 100 with peanut tolerance), whole peanut sIgE and Ara h 2 sIgE levels were quantified by using fluorescence enzyme immunoassay. By using the previously published 95% positive predictive value of 15 kU(A)/L for whole peanut sIgE, a corresponding specificity of 98% (95% CI, 93% to 100%) was found in this study cohort. At the equivalent specificity of 98%, the sensitivity of Ara h 2 sIgE is 60% (95% CI, 50% to 70%), correctly identifying 60% of subjects with true peanut allergy compared with only 26% correctly identified by using whole peanut sIgE. We report that when using a combined approach of plasma sIgE testing for whole peanut followed by Ara h 2 for the diagnosis of peanut allergy, the number of OFCs required is reduced by almost two thirds. Ara h 2 plasma sIgE test levels provide higher diagnostic accuracy than whole peanut plasma sIgE levels and could be considered a new diagnostic tool to distinguish peanut allergy from peanut tolerance, which might reduce the need for an OFC. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Evaluation of tillage, cover crop, & herbicide effects on weed control, yield and grade in peanut?

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut production continues to play a large role in agriculture in the Southeastern United States and weed challenges persist. Therefore, it is important to reduce weed competition in peanut to protect yield and grade. With traditional use of herbicides for weed control in peanut and rotational crop...

  7. Particle size and particle-particle interactions on tensile properties and reinforcement of corn flour particles in natural rubber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Renewable corn flour has a significant reinforcement effect in natural rubber. The corn flour was hydrolyzed and microfluidized to reduce its particle size. Greater than 90% of the hydrolyzed corn flour had an average size of ~300 nm, a reduction of 33 times compared to unhydrolyzed corn flour. Comp...

  8. Peanut consumption in adolescents is associated with improved weight status.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Jennette Palcic; Johnston, Craig A; El-Mubasher, Abeer A; Papaioannou, Maria A; Tyler, Chermaine; Gee, Molly; Foreyt, John P

    2013-07-01

    Studies have shown an association between nut consumption and health benefits in adults such as lower lipid levels, lower body mass indices, and reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Few studies have demonstrated these health benefits in children. To determine the association between peanut consumption and weight, intake of nutrients of concern, high-density lipoprotein, low-density lipoprotein, and cholesterol in Mexican American children, baseline data from 262 sixth-grade students (48% female) in a school-based weight management program were analyzed to compare differences between peanut and non-peanut eaters. It was hypothesized that Mexican American children who consume peanuts will be less overweight and have a better nutrient and lipid profile when compared to those who do not eat peanuts. Participants completed a food frequency questionnaire as a baseline dietary assessment before beginning the program. Children were identified as either a peanut consumer (n = 100) or non-peanut consumer (n = 162). Body mass index measurements were taken on all participants. A smaller sample of participants submitted blood for lipid analysis. Analyses revealed that children in the peanut consumer group were less likely to be overweight or obese than children in the non-peanut consumer group (χ(2) = 13.9, P = .001), had significantly higher intakes of several vitamins and micronutrients (i.e., magnesium, vitamin E), and had lower low-density lipoprotein and total cholesterol levels. These results illustrate that consumption of peanuts and/or peanut butter is associated with lower weight status, improved diet, and lipid levels among Mexican American children. Future research is needed to clarify the role of peanut consumption in children's overall health.

  9. Natural occurrence of aflatoxins in peanuts and peanut butter from Bulawayo, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Mupunga, I; Lebelo, S L; Mngqawa, P; Rheeder, J P; Katerere, D R

    2014-10-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic secondary metabolites produced by filamentous fungi that may contaminate food and pose a health risk, especially in developing countries, where there is a lack of food security and quality is subsumed by food insufficiency. Aflatoxins are the most toxic known mycotoxins and are a significant risk factor for liver and kidney cancer, teratogenicity, undernutrition, and micronutrient malabsorption in both humans and animals. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent of fungal and aflatoxin contamination in peanuts and peanut butter being sold in both the formal and informal markets in Bulawayo, Zimbabwe. Eighteen peanut samples and 11 peanut butter samples were purchased from retail shops and the informal market. Fungal contamination was determined using standard mycology culture methods, while aflatoxin contamination was determined using high-performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection. Four of the six peanut samples tested for fungal contamination were infected with Aspergillus flavus/parasiticus, ranging from 3 to 20% of the kernels examined, while 27% (3 of 11) of the peanut butter samples were infected with A. flavus/parasiticus. Ninety-one percent (10 of 11) of the peanut butter samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (mean, 75.66 ng/g, and range, 6.1 to 247 ng/g), and aflatoxin B1 was the most prevalent (mean, 51.0 ng/g, and range, 3.7 to 191 ng/g). Three of the 18 peanut samples were contaminated with aflatoxins (range, 6.6 to 622 ng/g). The commercial peanut butter samples had very high aflatoxin levels, and manufacturers should be sensitized to the detrimental effects of aflatoxins and measures to reduce contamination.

  10. Runner Peanut Growth, Maturity, and Flavor Response to Prohexadione Calcium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    One major challenge to producing runner market type peanuts in west Texas is the potential for early frost and poor crop maturity that could result in flavor problems. Prohexadione calcium is a plant growth regulator that inhibits the synthesis of gibberellic acid in peanut resulting in reduced vin...

  11. Lessons Learned While Breeding Peanut for Improved Drought Tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts become contaminated with aflatoxins when subjected to prolong periods of heat and drought stress. We have documented that improved drought tolerance can result in reduced aflatoxin contamination, and we are using drought-tolerance as an indirect selection technique to develop peanut cultiva...

  12. Effect of Avoidance on Peanut Allergy after Early Peanut Consumption.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, George; Sayre, Peter H; Roberts, Graham; Sever, Michelle L; Lawson, Kaitie; Bahnson, Henry T; Brough, Helen A; Santos, Alexandra F; Harris, Kristina M; Radulovic, Suzana; Basting, Monica; Turcanu, Victor; Plaut, Marshall; Lack, Gideon

    2016-04-14

    In a randomized trial, the early introduction of peanuts in infants at high risk for allergy was shown to prevent peanut allergy. In this follow-up study, we investigated whether the rate of peanut allergy remained low after 12 months of peanut avoidance among participants who had consumed peanuts during the primary trial (peanut-consumption group), as compared with those who had avoided peanuts (peanut-avoidance group). At the end of the primary trial, we instructed all the participants to avoid peanuts for 12 months. The primary outcome was the percentage of participants with peanut allergy at the end of the 12-month period, when the participants were 72 months of age. We enrolled 556 of 628 eligible participants (88.5%) from the primary trial; 550 participants (98.9%) had complete primary-outcome data. The rate of adherence to avoidance in the follow-up study was high (90.4% in the peanut-avoidance group and 69.3% in the peanut-consumption group). Peanut allergy at 72 months was significantly more prevalent among participants in the peanut-avoidance group than among those in the peanut-consumption group (18.6% [52 of 280 participants] vs. 4.8% [13 of 270], P<0.001). Three new cases of allergy developed in each group, but after 12 months of avoidance there was no significant increase in the prevalence of allergy among participants in the consumption group (3.6% [10 of 274 participants] at 60 months and 4.8% [13 of 270] at 72 months, P=0.25). Fewer participants in the peanut-consumption group than in the peanut-avoidance group had high levels of Ara h2 (a component of peanut protein)-specific IgE and peanut-specific IgE; in addition, participants in the peanut-consumption group continued to have a higher level of peanut-specific IgG4 and a higher peanut-specific IgG4:IgE ratio. Among children at high risk for allergy in whom peanuts had been introduced in the first year of life and continued until 5 years of age, a 12-month period of peanut avoidance was not

  13. Navy Bean Flour Particle Size and Protein Content Affect Cake Baking and Batter Quality(1).

    PubMed

    Singh, Mukti; Byars, Jeffrey A; Liu, Sean X

    2015-06-01

    Whole navy bean flour and its fine and coarse particle size fractions were used to completely replace wheat flour in cakes. Replacement of wheat flour with whole bean flour significantly increased the protein content. The protein content was adjusted to 3 levels with navy bean starch. The effect of navy bean flour and its fractions at 3 levels of protein on cake batter rheology and cake quality was studied and compared with wheat flour samples. Batters prepared from navy bean flour and its fractions had higher viscosity than the cake flour. Reducing the protein content by addition of starch significantly lowered the viscosity of cake batters. The whole navy bean flour and coarse bean fraction cakes were softer than cakes made with wheat flour but had reduced springiness. Principal component analysis showed a clear discrimination of cakes according to protein. It also showed that low protein navy bean flour cakes were similar to wheat flour cakes. Navy bean flour with protein content adjusted to the level of cake (wheat) flour has potential as a healthy alternative in gluten-free cakes.

  14. Peanut shell colitis.

    PubMed

    Keeffe, E B; Girard, D E

    1985-07-01

    A 40-year-old physician experienced abdominal pain, loose stools, hematochezia, and anal discomfort with defecation associated with the daily consumption of 15 to 30 whole peanuts, including the shells. Thorough evaluation revealed only nonspecific colitis of the distal portion of the sigmoid colon and inflamed hemorrhoids. Discontinuation of whole peanut ingestion was associated with symptomatic, endoscopic, and histological resolution. In this patient, undigested peanut shells seem to have caused a nonspecific colitis, perhaps as the result of mechanical abrasion of the colonic mucosa.

  15. The Development of an Edible Peanut Protein Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, N.; Jones, G.; Aglan, H.; Lu, J.

    1998-01-01

    The peanut is one of the crops chosen for use in NASA's Advanced Life Support Program (ALS). The peanut is a source of both oil and protein. After oil is extracted from the peanut, a protein rich flour remains. An edible peanut protein film is one use for this flour. Two types of film are developed for this study, one set of film contains 10% fat while the other set contains no fat. For film without fat the defatting of the peanut by the Soxhlet method is the first step in the manufacturing process of the film. Secondly, the protein is precipitated at its isoelectric point (pH 4.5) and centrifuged to separate the protein from the non-protein. After freeze-drying the protein it is milled in a ceramic ball mill to decrease particle size and sifted through a series of sieves to determine particle size distribution. Those particles retained on the 100 mesh sieves are utilized for film formation. Larger particles are re-ground and sifted. Five grams of protein is mixed with 50 mL of distilled water, 70 mL of 80% ethanol, 15 mL of 6N ammonium hydroxide and a plasticizer. This mixture is heated for 30 minutes until the temperature reaches 70 C. The mixture is then poured onto a level Teflon coated glass surface. After allowing the film to form overnight under a ventilation hood, it is manually removed from the plate. The processes and methods adopted have created flexible films of uniform thickness that are free of air bubbles. Thickness of films made from defatted peanut protein and partially defatted peanut protein were 0.10 Lm and 0.13 Lm respectively. Films with natural peanut fat are approximately three times as flexible and almost four times as strong as the films made without fat. Further research will be performed to evaluate its mechanical properties. This paper will greatly contribute to food preservation and waste management. Potential applications of this film are edible/biodegradable containers, wrapping for food preservation (against water, oxygen and oil

  16. The Development of an Edible Peanut Protein Film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patrick, N.; Jones, G.; Aglan, H.; Lu, J.

    1998-01-01

    The peanut is one of the crops chosen for use in NASA's Advanced Life Support Program (ALS). The peanut is a source of both oil and protein. After oil is extracted from the peanut, a protein rich flour remains. An edible peanut protein film is one use for this flour. Two types of film are developed for this study, one set of film contains 10% fat while the other set contains no fat. For film without fat the defatting of the peanut by the Soxhlet method is the first step in the manufacturing process of the film. Secondly, the protein is precipitated at its isoelectric point (pH 4.5) and centrifuged to separate the protein from the non-protein. After freeze-drying the protein it is milled in a ceramic ball mill to decrease particle size and sifted through a series of sieves to determine particle size distribution. Those particles retained on the 100 mesh sieves are utilized for film formation. Larger particles are re-ground and sifted. Five grams of protein is mixed with 50 mL of distilled water, 70 mL of 80% ethanol, 15 mL of 6N ammonium hydroxide and a plasticizer. This mixture is heated for 30 minutes until the temperature reaches 70 C. The mixture is then poured onto a level Teflon coated glass surface. After allowing the film to form overnight under a ventilation hood, it is manually removed from the plate. The processes and methods adopted have created flexible films of uniform thickness that are free of air bubbles. Thickness of films made from defatted peanut protein and partially defatted peanut protein were 0.10 Lm and 0.13 Lm respectively. Films with natural peanut fat are approximately three times as flexible and almost four times as strong as the films made without fat. Further research will be performed to evaluate its mechanical properties. This paper will greatly contribute to food preservation and waste management. Potential applications of this film are edible/biodegradable containers, wrapping for food preservation (against water, oxygen and oil

  17. Proteomics of wheat flour

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Wheat is a major food crop grown on more than 215 million hectares of land throughout the world. Wheat flour provides an important source of protein for human nutrition and is used as a principal ingredient in a wide range of food products, largely because wheat flour, when mixed with water, has un...

  18. Flour Flame Thrower: The "Flaming Potential" of Plain Flour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Plain flour has a lot of chemical energy packed into it. When the flour is in a clump or pile it does not ignite although it may blacken. This is because there is not enough flour exposed to the oxygen in the air. Aerosolising the flour exposes it to much more oxygen allowing a self sustaining combustion reaction to occur when an ignition source…

  19. Flour Flame Thrower: The "Flaming Potential" of Plain Flour

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandoval, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Plain flour has a lot of chemical energy packed into it. When the flour is in a clump or pile it does not ignite although it may blacken. This is because there is not enough flour exposed to the oxygen in the air. Aerosolising the flour exposes it to much more oxygen allowing a self sustaining combustion reaction to occur when an ignition source…

  20. Allergen-specific oral immunotherapy for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Nurmatov, Ulugbek; Venderbosch, Iris; Devereux, Graham; Simons, F Estelle R; Sheikh, Aziz

    2012-09-12

    history of severe peanut anaphylaxis. Randomisation was in a 2:1 ratio resulting in 19 children being randomised to the intervention arm and nine to the placebo arm. Intervention arm children received OIT with peanut flour and control arm participants received placebo comprising of oat flour. The primary outcome was assessed using a double-blind, placebo controlled oral food challenge (OFC) at approximately one year. No data were available on longer term outcomes beyond the OFC conducted at the end of the study.Because of adverse events, three patients withdrew from the intervention arm before the completion of the study. Therefore, only 16 participants received the full course of peanut OIT, whereas all nine patients receiving placebo completed the trial. The per-protocol analysis found a significant increase in the threshold dose of peanut allergen required to trigger a reaction in those in the intervention arm with all 16 participants able to ingest the maximum cumulative dose of 5000 mg of peanut protein (which the authors equate as being equivalent to approximately 20 peanuts) without developing symptoms, whereas in the placebo group they were able to ingest a median cumulative dose of 280 mg (range: 0 to 1900 mg, P < 0.001) before experiencing symptoms.  Per-protocol analyses also demonstrated that peanut OIT resulted in reductions in skin prick test size (P < 0.001), interleukin-5 (P = 0.01), interleukin-13 (P = 0.02) and an increase in peanut-specific immunoglobulin G(4) (IgG(4)) (P < 0.01).Children in the intervention arm experienced more adverse events during treatment than those in the placebo arm. In the initial day escalation phase, nine (47%) of the 19 participants initially enrolled in the OIT arm experienced clinically-relevant adverse events which required treatment with H(1)-antihistamines, two of which required additional treatment with epinephrine (adrenaline). The one small RCT we found showed that allergen-specific peanut OIT can result in

  1. Survival of Salmonella during baking of peanut butter cookies.

    PubMed

    Lathrop, Amanda A; Taylor, Tiffany; Schnepf, James

    2014-04-01

    Peanuts and peanut-based products have been the source of recent Salmonella outbreaks worldwide. Because peanut butter is commonly used as an ingredient in baked goods, such as cookies, the potential risk of Salmonella remaining in these products after baking needs to be assessed. This research examines the potential hazard of Salmonella in peanut butter cookies when it is introduced via the peanut-derived ingredient. The survival of Salmonella during the baking of peanut butter cookies was determined. Commercial, creamy-style peanut butter was artificially inoculated with a five-strain Salmonella cocktail at a target concentration of 10(8) CFU/g. The inoculated peanut butter was then used to prepare peanut butter cookie dough following a standard recipe. Cookies were baked at 350 °F (177 °C) and were sampled after 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 min. Temperature profiles of the oven and cookies were monitored during baking. The water activity and pH of the inoculated and uninoculated peanut butter, raw dough, and baked cookies were measured. Immediately after baking, cookies were cooled, and the survival of Salmonella was determined by direct plating or enrichment. After baking cookies for 10 min, the minimum reduction of Salmonella observed was 4.8 log. In cookies baked for 13 and 14 min, Salmonella was only detectable by enrichment reflecting a Salmonella reduction in the range of 5.2 to 6.2 log. Cookies baked for 15 min had no detectable Salmonella. Results of this study showed that proper baking will reduce Salmonella in peanut butter cookies by 5 log or more.

  2. Thermal inactivation of Salmonella in peanut butter.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Guodong; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Mantripragada, Vijaya; Ezeoke, Ifeoma; Doyle, Michael P

    2009-08-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the rates of thermal inactivation of three Salmonella Tennessee strains in peanut butter associated with an outbreak and to compare them to the rates of inactivation of Salmonella strains of other serotypes (Enteritidis, Typhimurium, and Heidelberg) (SSOS) and of clinical isolates of Salmonella Tennessee from sporadic cases (STSC). Commercial peanut butter was inoculated with Salmonella isolates and heated at 71, 77, 83, and 90 degrees C. The thermal inactivation curves were upwardly concave, indicating rapid death at the beginning (20 min) of heating followed by lower death rates thereafter. The first-order kinetics approach and nonlinear Weibull model were used to fit the inactivation curves and describe the rates of thermal inactivation of Salmonella in peanut butter. The calculated minimum times needed to obtain a 7-log reduction at 90 degrees C for the composited three outbreak-associated strains were significantly greater (P < 0.05) than those of SSOS and STSC. Approximately 120 min were needed to reduce the outbreak strains of Salmonella Tennessee by 7 log, whereas 86 and 55 min were needed for SSOS and STSC, respectively. These results indicate that the outbreak-associated Salmonella strains were more thermotolerant than the other Salmonella strains tested, and this greater thermal resistance was not serotype specific. Thermal treatments of peanut butter at 90 degrees C for less than 30 min are not sufficient to kill large populations (5 log CFU/g) of Salmonella in highly contaminated peanut butter.

  3. Removing peanut allergens by tannic acid.

    PubMed

    Chung, Si-Yin; Reed, Shawndrika

    2012-10-01

    Tannic acid (TA) forms insoluble complexes with proteins. The aims here were to remove major peanut allergens as insoluble TA complexes and determine if they would dissociate and release the allergens at pH 2 and 8 (gut pH). Release of the allergens in the gut could lead to absorption and consequently an allergic reaction. TA (0.25, 0.5, 1, and 2 mg/ml) was added to a peanut butter extract (5 mg/ml; pH 7.2), stirred, and centrifuged. The precipitates were then suspended in buffer at pH 2, centrifuged, re-suspended at pH 8, and centrifuged. Supernatants from each step were analysed by SDS-PAGE, ELISA, and Western blots. The effect of NaCl (1M) on complexes was also determined. Results showed that complexes formed at a TA concentration >0.5 mg/ml did not release major peanut allergens at pH 2 and 8, regardless of 1M NaCl being present or not. IgE binding of the extracts was reduced substantially, especially at a TA concentration of 1-2 mg/ml. Animal or clinical studies are still needed before TA can find an application in the development of low-allergen peanut products/beverages or the removal of peanut allergens due to accidental ingestion. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Fortification of flour with folic acid.

    PubMed

    Berry, Robert J; Bailey, Lynn; Mulinare, Joe; Bower, Carol

    2010-03-01

    After randomized, controlled trials established that consumption of folic acid before pregnancy and during the early weeks of gestation reduces the risk of a neural tube defect (NTD)-affected pregnancy, the United States Public Health Service recommended in 1992 that all women capable of becoming pregnant consume 400 microg folic acid daily. In 1998, folic acid fortification of all enriched cereal grain product flour was fully implemented in the United States and Canada. To provide guidance on national fortification of wheat and maize flours to prevent 50 to 70% of the estimated 300,000 NTD-affected pregnancies worldwide. An expert workgroup reviewed the latest evidence of effectiveness of folic acid flour fortification and the safety of folic acid. Recent estimates show that in the United States and Canada, the additional intake of about 100 to 150 microg/day of folic acid through food fortification has been effective in reducing the prevalence of NTDs at birth and increasing blood folate concentrations in both countries. Most potential adverse effects associated with folic acid are associated with extra supplement use not mandatory fortification. Fortification of wheat flour has a proven record of prevention in other developed countries. In 2009, 51 countries had regulations written for mandatory wheat flour fortification programs that included folic acid. NTDs remain an important cause of perinatal mortality and infantile paralysis worldwide. Mandatory fortification of flour with folic acid has proved to be one of the most successful public health interventions in reducing the prevalence of NTD-affected pregnancies. Most developing countries have few, if any, common sources of folic acid, unlike many developed countries, which have folic acid available from ready-to-eat cereals and supplements. Expanding the number of developed and developing countries with folic acid flour fortification has tremendous potential to safely eliminate most folic acid

  5. Dietary supplementation of chardonnay grape seed flour reduces plasma cholesterol concentration, hepatic steatosis, and abdominal fat content in high-fat diet-induced obese hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Bartley, Glenn E; Arvik, Torey; Lipson, Rebecca; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Seo, Kunho; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2014-02-26

    The mechanisms for the hypocholesterolemic and antiobesity effects of grape seed flours derived from white and red winemaking processing were investigated using male Golden Syrian hamsters fed high-fat (HF) diets supplemented with 10% partially defatted grape seed flours from Chardonnay (ChrSd), Cabernet Sauvignon (CabSd), or Syrah (SyrSd) pomace as compared to a HF control diet for 3 weeks. Hamsters fed the ChrSd diet had significantly lowered plasma total-, VLDL-, and LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared to the CabSd, SyrSd, and control diets. The improved plasma cholesterol after ChrSd was correlated with the up-regulation of hepatic genes related to cholesterol (CYP51) and bile acid (CYP7A1) synthesis as well as LDL-cholesterol uptake (LDLR). A reduction of hepatic lipid content was associated with altered expression of the genes related to lipid metabolism. However, fecal total lipid content was not changed. Expression of ileal apical sodium bile acid transporter (ASBT) was not affected by ChrSd, indicating unchanged ileal bile acid reabsorption. The antiobesity effect of the ChrSd diet appears to be related to expression of adipogenesis- and inflammation-related genes in adipose tissue. These findings suggest that flavonoid-rich Chardonnay grape seed flour induced cholesterol-lowering, antiobesity, and anti-inflammatory health benefits and attenuation of hepatic steatosis via regulation of gene expression related to cholesterol, bile acid, and lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue.

  6. Prevalence of peanut allergy in children of peanut farmers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High levels of environmental exposure to peanut during infancy appear to promote sensitization by the epicutaneous route. Children of peanut farmers are likely exposed to relatively high levels of peanut protein in their environment, increasing their risk of cutaneous sensitization. The purpose of...

  7. TEXTURE PROFILES OF PEANUT PASTES ENHANCED WITH PEANUT SEED COATS

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut paste is commonly used by food manufacturers because it provides a unique flavor, good nutrient content and a smooth, creamy texture. Nutritional properties of peanut paste can be improved by the addition of peanut seed coats which are currently of little value. The objective of this research...

  8. Structural biology of peanut allergens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts are a cause of one of the most common food allergies. Allergy to peanuts not only affects a significant fraction of the population, but it is relatively often associated with strong reactions in sensitized individuals. Peanut and tree nut allergies, which start in childhood, are often persi...

  9. Uniform peanut performance test 2013

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, 2 controls and 13 entries were evaluated at 9 locations....

  10. Uniform peanut performance test 2015

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, 2 controls and 13 entries were evaluated at 9 locations....

  11. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2009

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, there were 2 controls, 3 Florida lines, 6 Georgia lines,...

  12. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2007

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, there were 2 controls, 3 Florida lines, 7 Georgia lines,...

  13. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2010

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, there were 2 controls, 3 Florida lines, 4 Georgia lines,...

  14. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2011

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, there were 2 controls, 3 Florida lines, 3 Georgia lines,...

  15. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2008

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) are designed to evaluate the commercial potential of advanced breeding peanut lines not formally released. The tests are performed in ten locations across the peanut production belt. In this study, there were 2 controls, 3 Florida lines, 6 Georgia lines,...

  16. Flavor and antioxidant capacity of peanut paste and peanut butter supplemented with peanut skins.

    PubMed

    Hathorn, Chellani S; Sanders, Timothy H

    2012-11-01

    Peanut skins (PS) are a good source of phenolic compounds. This study evaluated antioxidant properties and flavor of peanut paste and peanut butter enhanced with peanut skins. PS were added to both materials in concentrations of 0.0%, 0.5%, 1.0%, 5.0%, 10.0%, 15.0%, and 20.0% (w/w). PS, peanut paste, and peanut butter used in the study had initial total phenolics contents of 158, 12.9, and 14.1 mg GAE/g, respectively. Hydrophilic oxygen radical absorbance capacity (H-ORAC) of peanut skins was 189453 μMol Trolox/100 g and addition of 5% PS increased H-ORAC of peanut paste and peanut butter by 52% to 63%. Descriptive sensory analysis indicated that the addition of 1% PS did not change intensity of descriptors in the sensory profile of either peanut paste or peanut butter. Addition of 5% PS resulted in significant differences in woody, hulls, skins; bitter; and astringent descriptors and 10% PS addition resulted in significant differences in most attributes toward more negative flavor. Peanut skins are a low-value residue material from peanut processing which contain naturally occurring phenolic compounds. The use of this material to improve antioxidant capacity and shelf-life of foods can add value to the material and improve the nutritional value of foods. The improved nutritional qualities and unchanged flavor profile occurring with low levels of peanuts skins in peanut paste and peanut butter suggest potential application of this technology in various food industries. Journal of Food Science © 2012 Institute of Food Technologists® No claim to original US government works.

  17. Impact of fortification of flours with iron to reduce the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency among schoolchildren in Caracas, Venezuela: a follow-up.

    PubMed

    Layrisse, Miguel; García-Casal, María Nieves; Méndez-Castellano, Hernán; Jiménez, Maritza; Henry, Olavarría; Chávez, José E; González, Eglis

    2002-12-01

    In Venezuela, a severe economic crisis starting in 1983 provoked a progressive reduction in the quantity and quality of food consumed by people from the low socioeconomic strata of the population. This situation resulted in a continuous increase in the prevalence of iron deficiency in the 1980s and 1990s. In 1993, an iron-fortification program was started, in which precooked corn and white wheat flours were enriched with iron, vitamin A, thiamine, niacin, and riboflavin. White wheat flour was enriched with the same nutrients, except for vitamin A. In 1996 we published the results of the impact of fortification of precooked corn and white wheat flours on the prevalence of anemia and iron deficiency in the population. A survey carried out in Caracas in 307 children aged 7, 11, and 15 years showed that the prevalence of iron deficiency measured by serum ferritin concentration dropped from 37% in 1992 to 16% in 1994, only one year after the iron-fortification program began. The prevalence of anemia, as measured by the hemoglobin concentration, diminished from 19% to 10% during the same period. This article reports the results of three other surveys carried out in 1997, 1998, and 1999 on children of the same age and socioeconomic groups that were evaluated in 1990, 1992, and 1994. There were no significant differences in anemia or iron deficiency among the last three surveys. The prevalence results from the last seven years seem to indicate that, after a dramatic reduction in 1994, iron deficiency tended to stabilize, while the prevalence of anemia increased to the same level found in 1992, before the fortification program started.

  18. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.175 Phosphated flour. Phosphated flour, phosphated white flour, and...

  19. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.175 Phosphated flour. Phosphated flour, phosphated white flour, and...

  20. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.175 Phosphated flour. Phosphated flour, phosphated white flour, and...

  1. 21 CFR 137.105 - Flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Flour. 137.105 Section 137.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.105 Flour. (a) Flour, white flour, wheat flour, plain flour, is the food prepared...

  2. 21 CFR 137.105 - Flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Flour. 137.105 Section 137.105 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... Related Products § 137.105 Flour. (a) Flour, white flour, wheat flour, plain flour, is the food prepared...

  3. Development of a Drinkable, Peanut-Based Dietary Supplement and Comparison of Its Nutritional and Microbiological Qualities with Commercial Products.

    PubMed

    Klu, Yaa Asantewaa Kafui; Phillips, Robert D; Chen, Jinru

    2016-05-01

    This study was undertaken to formulate, using peanuts as a major ingredient, a beverage which will benefit older adults who are at a high risk of protein-energy malnutrition and other health complications, and to compare its nutritional and microbiological qualities to commercial products. Peanuts, rice flour, and flaxseed meal in a ratio of 48.0:49.8:2.2 were mixed with water (20% solids) and cooked into gruel which was sequentially treated with BAN(®) , (480 KNU-B/g, 75 °C 1 h), Alcalase(®) (2.4 AU-A/g, 60 °C 1 h), and Flavourzyme(®) (1000 LAPU/g, 55 °C 1 h) to predigest starch and protein, respectively. The degree of hydrolysis and product viscosity during hydrolysis was measured. The nutritional and microbiological qualities of the product were compared to 10 commercial products. Results indicate that 60% of starch was hydrolyzed while a total of 1.62% protein hydrolysis was observed. Product viscosity reduced from 228.55 to 3.60 cP at the end of hydrolysis. The formulation had no cholesterol and low sodium which was a functional property that was absent in the commercial products. Results of this study suggest that the formulation can be further optimized into a unique product that could cater for the protein needs and other nutritional requirements of older adults. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  4. Germination and extrusion as combined processes for reducing phytates and increasing phenolics content and antioxidant capacity of Oryza sativa L. whole grain flours.

    PubMed

    Albarracín, M; De Greef, D M; González, R J; Drago, S R

    2015-01-01

    Whole rice (WR) products with low phytic acid (PA) content and enhanced bio-functional components were obtained by the combination of germination and extrusion processes. Germination conditions (24 h - 35 °C), with a previous soaking process (24 h - 20 °C), were chosen according to the remnant PA content and germination rate. Specific mechanical energy consumption, expansion, sensorial and mechanical hardness, specific volume, solubility, water absorption, free phenolic content (FPC) and antioxidant capacity were evaluated. Results indicated that 175 °C and 14 g 100 g(-1) of moisture were the most appropriate conditions to obtain expanded products and precooked flours based on germinated WR. Selected extruded product presented less PA content (821.6 9 ± 10.3 versus 695.2 0 ± 1.6 mg 100 g(-1)) and higher Fe bio-accessibility, FPC (45.2 9 ± 1.61 versus 66.3 5 ± 3.35 mg GAE g(-1)) and antioxidant capacity compared with WR (34.9 5 ± 0.8 versus 54.6 3 ± 1.6 µmol trolox g(-1)). Combining germination-extrusion processes could be a strategy to obtain expanded products or precooked flours based on WR with enhanced health benefits.

  5. Simulation model of the red flour beetle in flour mills

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Red flour beetle (Tribolium castaneum) is one of the most common insect pests infesting wheat flour mills. Structural treatments such as methyl bromide, sulfuryl fluoride and heat, are used to control the red flour beetle. The structural treatments do not provide any residual action and, thus, any s...

  6. Effects of Switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) Rotations with Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) on Nematode Populations and Soil Microflora

    PubMed Central

    Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Mahaffee, W. F.; Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Kloepper, J. W.; BOWEN, K. L.

    2002-01-01

    A 3-year field rotation study was conducted to assess the potential of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) to suppress root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne arenaria), southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii), and aflatoxigenic fungi (Aspergillus sp.) in peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) and to assess shifts in microbial populations following crop rotation. Switchgrass did not support populations of root-knot nematodes but supported high populations of nonparasitic nematodes. Peanut with no nematicide applied and following 2 years of switchgrass had the same nematode populations as continuous peanut plus nematicide. Neither previous crop nor nematicide significantly reduced the incidence of pods infected with Aspergillus. However, pod invasion by A. flavus was highest in plots previously planted with peanut and not treated with nematicide. Peanut with nematicide applied at planting following 2 years of switchgrass had significantly less incidence of southern blight than either continuous peanut without nematicide application or peanut without nematicide following 2 years of cotton. Peanut yield did not differ among rotations in either sample year. Effects of crop rotation on the microbial community structure associated with peanut were examined using indices for diversity, richness, and similarity derived from culture-based analyses. Continuous peanut supported a distinctly different rhizosphere bacterial microflora compared to peanut following 1 year of switchgrass, or continuous switchgrass. Richness and diversity indices for continuous peanut rhizosphere and geocarposphere were not consistently different from peanut following switchgrass, but always differed in the specific genera present. These shifts in community structure were associated with changes in parasitic nematode populations. PMID:19265915

  7. Production of high fructose syrup from cassava and sweet potato flours and their blends with cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Regy; Moorthy, S N; Padmaja, G

    2010-06-01

    Despite being a rich source of starch, root crops such as cassava and sweet potato have not been widely exploited for the production of high fructose syrup (HFS), which is a highly valued sweetener for the food and beverage industries. The major factors contributing to the cost of production of HFS are the cost and labor-intensive steps in the production of starch, different processing temperatures and pH for the enzyme reactions, poor extractability of starch, etc. With the objective of overcoming the cost associated with the preparation of starch, the feasibility of using native cassava/sweet potato flours and their blends with rice flour and wheat flour, as the raw material for HFS production was investigated. The saccharified slurry from cassava--rice flour blends contained 70-72 g reducing sugars/100 g, which was higher than that released from native cassava flour (~69%). Blends of sweet potato with rice or wheat yielded saccharified mash with lower content of reducing sugars (60-66%). Although the percentage conversion to fructose after isomerization was similar for cassava/sweet potato or their blends with cereal flours (42-43%), fructose yield was higher in native cassava flour and cassava-rice blends (28-29 g/100 g) than the other flour blends.

  8. 7 CFR 996.9 - Inshell peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.9 Inshell peanuts. Inshell peanuts means peanuts, the kernels or edible portions of which are contained in the shell. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Inshell peanuts. 996.9 Section 996.9 Agriculture...

  9. 7 CFR 996.9 - Inshell peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.9 Inshell peanuts. Inshell peanuts means peanuts, the kernels or edible portions of which are contained in the shell. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Inshell peanuts. 996.9 Section 996.9 Agriculture...

  10. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture...

  11. 7 CFR 996.9 - Inshell peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.9 Inshell peanuts. Inshell peanuts means peanuts, the kernels or edible portions of which are contained in the shell. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Inshell peanuts. 996.9 Section 996.9 Agriculture...

  12. 7 CFR 996.9 - Inshell peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.9 Inshell peanuts. Inshell peanuts means peanuts, the kernels or edible portions of which are contained in the shell. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Inshell peanuts. 996.9 Section 996.9 Agriculture...

  13. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture...

  14. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture...

  15. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture...

  16. 7 CFR 996.19 - Shelled peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.19 Shelled peanuts. Shelled peanuts means the kernels or portions of kernels of peanuts after the shells are removed. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Shelled peanuts. 996.19 Section 996.19 Agriculture...

  17. 7 CFR 996.9 - Inshell peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.9 Inshell peanuts. Inshell peanuts means peanuts, the kernels or edible portions of which are contained in the shell. ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Inshell peanuts. 996.9 Section 996.9 Agriculture...

  18. 7 CFR 996.13 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peanuts. 996.13 Section 996.13 Agriculture Regulations... DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Definitions § 996.13 Peanuts. Peanuts means the seeds of the legume Arachis hypogaea and includes both inshell and shelled peanuts produced in...

  19. In vitro protein digestibility and physicochemical properties of dry red bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) flour: effect of processing and incorporation of soybean and cowpea flour.

    PubMed

    Njintang, N Y; Mbofung, C M; Waldron, K W

    2001-05-01

    A study was carried out to determine the effect of germination and drying temperature on the in vitro protein digestibility and physicochemical properties of dry red bean flours. A 2 x 3 factorial experiment with two treatments (germination and nongermination) and three drying temperatures was used for this purpose. The effect of particle size on water absorption capacity of bean flour was investigated. In addition, the effect of incorporating soybean and cowpea into the red bean flour on functional properties was equally investigated. Results reveal that protein digestibility increased with germination and also with drying temperature. Drying at 60 degrees C produced flours of optimum functional characteristics, although the hydrophilic/lipophilic index was high and the solubility index reduced. Germination and particle size as well as drying temperature all affected the water uptake properties of bean flours. Incorporation of soybean and cowpea flour into germinated bean flour at levels of 10 and 30%, respectively, produced a composite with higher functional properties.

  20. Registration of "Sugg" Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ‘Sugg’ (Reg. no. CV- , PI ) is a large-seeded virginia-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) with partial resistance to four diseases that occur commonly in the Virginia-Carolina production area: early leafspot caused by Cercospora arachidicola Hori, Cylindroc...

  1. Release of Lariat Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Lariat is a high-oleic runner-type peanut (Arachis hypogaea L. subsp. hypogaea var. hypogaea) that has enhanced Sclerotinia blight and pod rot tolerance when compared to the cultivar Red River Runner. Lariat (experimental designation ARSOK-R35) is the result of a cross between cultivar Red River Ru...

  2. Yield Advances in Peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Average yields of peanut in the U.S. set an all time record of 4,695 kg ha-1 in 2012. This far exceeded the previous record yield of 3,837 kg ha-1 in 2008. Favorable weather conditions undoubtedly contributed to the record yields in 2012; however, these record yields would not have been achievable...

  3. Peanut tolerance to pyroxasulfone

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Due to limited hectares and production in comparison to field corn, soybean, and wheat, commercial research and development efforts by major manufacturers for potential new peanut herbicides are minimal. Field trials were conducted in Ty Ty and Plains Georgia in 2007 and 2008 to evaluate the tolera...

  4. Influence of grain activation conditions on functional characteristics of brown rice flour.

    PubMed

    Singh, Arashdeep; Sharma, Savita; Singh, Baljit

    2017-09-01

    Grain activation is a natural processing technique that can be used to produce modified flours without chemical modification. Functional characteristics of brown rice flour as influenced by grain activation time and temperatures were investigated. Germination temperatures at 25 ℃, 30 ℃ and 35 ℃ and time for 12, 24, 36 and 48 h significantly influenced the functional properties of flour with modification of starch, protein and high enzymatic activity. Significant decrease in the bulk density, water absorption and swelling power of brown rice flour was observed in comparison to non-germinated flour. Gel consistency and oil absorption capacity of brown rice flour increased as the grain activation time and temperature were increased. Native flour had lowest emulsion and foaming properties, while increase in grain activation time and temperature enhanced the emulsifying and foaming properties of flour. Paste clarity of native flour was 54% which was reduced to 25.17%; however, increase in germination time and temperature increased the % synersis values of germinated flour. Native flour had least gelation concentration of 12% which increased to 25% after 48 h of germination at 35 ℃. Overall, germination can be used as a natural way to modify the functional properties of brown rice flours for their utilization in variety food products.

  5. The Learning Early About Peanut Allergy Study: The Benefits of Early Peanut Introduction, and a New Horizon in Fighting the Food Allergy Epidemic.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew

    2015-12-01

    Observational studies have explored associations between timing of peanut, egg, and milk introduction and food allergy development, noting significant associations with reduced respective rates of milk, egg, and peanut allergy associated with earlier timing of introduction. Interventional studies developed to more definitively explore these outcomes have been published for egg and peanut, and are ongoing for multiple other allergens. This review focuses on the recent publication regarding the LEAP (Learning Early About Peanut Allergy) study, its highly favorable results, the policy implications of its findings, and the horizon for primary prevention as a realistic strategy to prevent food allergy.

  6. Rotations with Coastal Bermudagrass, Cotton, and Bahiagrass for Management of Meloidogyne arenaria and Southern Blight in Peanut.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R; Kokalis-Burelle, N; Robertson, D G; King, P S; Wells, L W

    1994-12-01

    The efficacy of coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) as a rotation crop for controt of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) in 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogoea) was evaluated in a 3-year field trial. Coastal bermudagrass-peanut rotation (CBP) was compared with peanut monoculture without nematicide (P - ) and peanut monoculture with aldicarb (P + ). The performance of CBP was also compared with 'Pensacola' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum)-peanut (BP), and 'Deltapine 90' cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-peanut (CP) rotations. Each rotation crop was grown for 2 years (1991, 1992) and peanut was planted without nematicide the third year (1993). In contrast with peanut, the alternate crops of bahiagrass, bermudagrass, and cotton did not support M. arenaria populations. In 1993, the lowest numbers of M. arenaria second-stage juveniles (J2) in soil were in plots with CP and BP; these rotations resulted in the highest peanut yields. CBP failed to increase peanut yield and resulted in the highest population densities of M. arenaria J2. In 1993, aldicarb reduced J2 densities in the soil but did not increase peanut yields. Rotations of BP and CP reduced incidence of southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) in peanut, but neither CBP nor aldicarb affected the disease.

  7. Rotations with Coastal Bermudagrass, Cotton, and Bahiagrass for Management of Meloidogyne arenaria and Southern Blight in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Kokalis-Burelle, N.; Robertson, D. G.; King, P. S.; Wells, L. W.

    1994-01-01

    The efficacy of coastal bermudagrass (Cynodon dactylon) as a rotation crop for controt of root-knot nematode (Meloidogyne arenaria) in 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogoea) was evaluated in a 3-year field trial. Coastal bermudagrass-peanut rotation (CBP) was compared with peanut monoculture without nematicide (P - ) and peanut monoculture with aldicarb (P + ). The performance of CBP was also compared with 'Pensacola' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum)-peanut (BP), and 'Deltapine 90' cotton (Gossypium hirsutum)-peanut (CP) rotations. Each rotation crop was grown for 2 years (1991, 1992) and peanut was planted without nematicide the third year (1993). In contrast with peanut, the alternate crops of bahiagrass, bermudagrass, and cotton did not support M. arenaria populations. In 1993, the lowest numbers of M. arenaria second-stage juveniles (J2) in soil were in plots with CP and BP; these rotations resulted in the highest peanut yields. CBP failed to increase peanut yield and resulted in the highest population densities of M. arenaria J2. In 1993, aldicarb reduced J2 densities in the soil but did not increase peanut yields. Rotations of BP and CP reduced incidence of southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) in peanut, but neither CBP nor aldicarb affected the disease. PMID:19279945

  8. Peanut allergen (Ara h 1) detection in foods containing chocolate.

    PubMed

    Pomés, A; Vinton, R; Chapman, M D

    2004-04-01

    Inadvertent exposure to peanut in foods poses health risks for peanut-allergic individuals that can be reduced by improving detection systems for allergen contaminants in food products and manufacturing processes. Detection of peanut in chocolate has been especially difficult. We report the optimization of conditions for measuring a major peanut allergen, Ara h 1, in chocolate with the use of a two-site monoclonal antibody sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Ara h 1 was extracted from peanut in the presence or absence of chocolate with phosphate buffer, salt, and three dried milks (goat, soy, or nonfat) (0 to 25% wt/vol) for 15 min at 60 degrees C or for 2.5 h at room temperature. The best conditions for Ara h 1 extraction in the presence of chocolate were 5% nonfat dry milk for 2.5 h at room temperature. Spiking experiments of chocolate with peanut confirmed improvement of the extraction: Ara h 1 was detected in extractions of 0.16 to 0.33% peanut in chocolate. Interestingly, the best conditions for Ara h 1 extraction were different for peanut alone than with chocolate, regarding time, temperature, and percentage of nonfat dry milk in the extraction buffer. In chocolate with peanut foods, the total Ara h 1 values were 10-fold higher than when products were extracted with phosphate buffer alone and could be up to 400-fold higher for individual foods. The dramatic improvement of Ara h 1 extraction should allow specific allergen monitoring in chocolate-containing food products and assessment of Ara h 1 exposure.

  9. Use of indigenous technology for the production of high quality cassava flour with similar food qualities as wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Eleazu, Ogbonnaya Chinedum; Eleazu, Kate Chinedum; Kolawole, Segun

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the paper was to compare the food qualities of 2 varieties (SME 1 and 2) of high quality cassava flour (HQCF) produced from indigenous technology and that of some commercially sold wheat/HQCF samples. The pH, proximate, phytochemical, antioxidant, functional properties and starch yield of the flours were carried out using standard techniques. The wheat flours had higher bulk densities and lipids than the HQCF samples while the oil absorption capacity of the HQCF (SME 2) was higher than other fl our samples investigated. The antioxidant assays of the flours showed that they contained considerable levels of antioxidants with the HQCF sample from DAT having higher antioxidants than other flour samples studied. The HQCF (SME 1) had significantly higher (P < 0.05) starch content among the flour samples. The bacteria counts of the HQCF samples ranged from 0 to 1.4 × 10(4) cfu/ml while the fungal count ranged from 0 to 2 × 10(-3) with the unbranded wheat fl our having the highest microbial load compared with other flour samples studied. The use of this indigenous technology produces HQCF with lower lipids, microbial contamination but higher flavour retaining ability, flavonoids and starch contents than wheat flour. The significant positive correlation (R2 = 0.872) between reducing power of the samples and their DPPH antioxidant activity indicate that either could be used to assay for the total antioxidant activity of cassava and wheat flour. The study underscores the need to buy flour from branded companies to reduce the risks of microbial contamination.

  10. Fermented Brown Rice Flour as Functional Food Ingredient.

    PubMed

    Ilowefah, Muna; Chinma, Chiemela; Bakar, Jamilah; Ghazali, Hasanah M; Muhammad, Kharidah; Makeri, Mohammad

    2014-02-12

    As fermentation could reduce the negative effects of bran on final cereal products, the utilization of whole-cereal flour is recommended, such as brown rice flour as a functional food ingredient. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of fermented brown rice flour on white rice flour, white rice batter and its steamed bread qualities. Brown rice batter was fermented using commercial baker's yeast (Eagle brand) according to the optimum conditions for moderate acidity (pH 5.5) to obtain fermented brown rice flour (FBRF). The FBRF was added to white rice flour at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% levels to prepare steamed rice bread. Based on the sensory evaluation test, steamed rice bread containing 40% FBRF had the highest overall acceptability score. Thus, pasting properties of the composite rice flour, rheological properties of its batter, volume and texture properties of its steamed bread were determined. The results showed that peak viscosity of the rice flour containing 40% FBRF was significantly increased, whereas its breakdown, final viscosity and setback significantly decreased. Viscous, elastic and complex moduli of the batter having 40% FBRF were also significantly reduced. However, volume, specific volume, chewiness, resilience and cohesiveness of its steamed bread were significantly increased, while hardness and springiness significantly reduced in comparison to the control. These results established the effectiveness of yeast fermentation in reducing the detrimental effects of bran on the sensory properties of steamed white rice bread and encourage the usage of brown rice flour to enhance the quality of rice products.

  11. Fermented Brown Rice Flour as Functional Food Ingredient

    PubMed Central

    Ilowefah, Muna; Chinma, Chiemela; Bakar, Jamilah; Ghazali, Hasanah M.; Muhammad, Kharidah; Makeri, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As fermentation could reduce the negative effects of bran on final cereal products, the utilization of whole-cereal flour is recommended, such as brown rice flour as a functional food ingredient. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of fermented brown rice flour on white rice flour, white rice batter and its steamed bread qualities. Brown rice batter was fermented using commercial baker’s yeast (Eagle brand) according to the optimum conditions for moderate acidity (pH 5.5) to obtain fermented brown rice flour (FBRF). The FBRF was added to white rice flour at 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% levels to prepare steamed rice bread. Based on the sensory evaluation test, steamed rice bread containing 40% FBRF had the highest overall acceptability score. Thus, pasting properties of the composite rice flour, rheological properties of its batter, volume and texture properties of its steamed bread were determined. The results showed that peak viscosity of the rice flour containing 40% FBRF was significantly increased, whereas its breakdown, final viscosity and setback significantly decreased. Viscous, elastic and complex moduli of the batter having 40% FBRF were also significantly reduced. However, volume, specific volume, chewiness, resilience and cohesiveness of its steamed bread were significantly increased, while hardness and springiness significantly reduced in comparison to the control. These results established the effectiveness of yeast fermentation in reducing the detrimental effects of bran on the sensory properties of steamed white rice bread and encourage the usage of brown rice flour to enhance the quality of rice products. PMID:28234309

  12. Boiling and Frying Peanuts Decreases Soluble Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) Allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 But Does Not Generate Hypoallergenic Peanuts

    PubMed Central

    Comstock, Sarah S.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Teuber, Suzanne S.

    2016-01-01

    Peanut allergy continues to be a problem in most developed countries of the world. We sought a processing method that would alter allergenic peanut proteins, such that allergen recognition by IgE from allergic individuals would be significantly reduced or eliminated. Such a method would render accidental exposures to trace amounts of peanuts safer. A combination of boiling and frying decreased recovery of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 at their expected MWs. In contrast, treatment with high pressures under varying temperatures had no effect on protein extraction profiles. Antibodies specific for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 bound proteins extracted from raw samples but not in boiled/fried samples. However, pre-incubation of serum with boiled/fried extract removed most raw peanut-reactive IgE from solution, including IgE directed to Ara h 1 and 2. Thus, this method of processing is unlikely to generate a peanut product tolerated by peanut allergic patients. Importantly, variability in individual patients’ IgE repertoires may mean that some patients’ IgE would bind fewer polypeptides in the sequentially processed seed. PMID:27310538

  13. Boiling and Frying Peanuts Decreases Soluble Peanut (Arachis Hypogaea) Allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 But Does Not Generate Hypoallergenic Peanuts.

    PubMed

    Comstock, Sarah S; Maleki, Soheila J; Teuber, Suzanne S

    2016-01-01

    Peanut allergy continues to be a problem in most developed countries of the world. We sought a processing method that would alter allergenic peanut proteins, such that allergen recognition by IgE from allergic individuals would be significantly reduced or eliminated. Such a method would render accidental exposures to trace amounts of peanuts safer. A combination of boiling and frying decreased recovery of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 at their expected MWs. In contrast, treatment with high pressures under varying temperatures had no effect on protein extraction profiles. Antibodies specific for Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 6 bound proteins extracted from raw samples but not in boiled/fried samples. However, pre-incubation of serum with boiled/fried extract removed most raw peanut-reactive IgE from solution, including IgE directed to Ara h 1 and 2. Thus, this method of processing is unlikely to generate a peanut product tolerated by peanut allergic patients. Importantly, variability in individual patients' IgE repertoires may mean that some patients' IgE would bind fewer polypeptides in the sequentially processed seed.

  14. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts

    PubMed Central

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-01-01

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ∼3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal–ligand coordination bonds and aromatic–aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures. PMID:28656977

  15. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-06-01

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ~3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal-ligand coordination bonds and aromatic-aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures.

  16. Polyaromatic molecular peanuts.

    PubMed

    Yazaki, Kohei; Akita, Munetaka; Prusty, Soumyakanta; Chand, Dillip Kumar; Kikuchi, Takashi; Sato, Hiroyasu; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2017-06-28

    Mimicking biological structures such as fruits and seeds using molecules and molecular assemblies is a great synthetic challenge. Here we report peanut-shaped nanostructures comprising two fullerene molecules fully surrounded by a dumbbell-like polyaromatic shell. The shell derives from a molecular double capsule composed of four W-shaped polyaromatic ligands and three metal ions. Mixing the double capsule with various fullerenes (that is, C60, C70 and Sc3N@C80) gives rise to the artificial peanuts with lengths of ∼3 nm in quantitative yields through the release of the single metal ion. The rational use of both metal-ligand coordination bonds and aromatic-aromatic π-stacking interactions as orthogonal chemical glue is essential for the facile preparation of the multicomponent, biomimetic nanoarchitectures.

  17. Use of whole grain and refined flour from tannin and non-tannin sorghum (Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench) varieties in frybread.

    PubMed

    Rose, Devin J; Williams, Emily; Mkandawire, Nyambe L; Weller, Curtis L; Jackson, David S

    2014-07-01

    Frybreads were prepared using wheat flour and wheat-sorghum composite flours (refined and whole grain; white, tannin-free and red, tannin-containing) at 0, 25, 50, and 75% sorghum flour. Hardness, volume, specific volume, color, and oil uptake were determined. Frybreads made with refined white, tannin-free sorghum were also evaluated in a sensory panel. Substitution of sorghum flour for wheat flour reduced the volume and increased the darkness of the fried dough pieces compared with wheat flour controls. Oil absorption was unaffected when using white, tannin-free sorghum. When using red, tannin-containing sorghum, oil absorption increased for refined flour and decreased for whole grain flour, suggesting that a component only present in the whole grain tannin-containing Sorghum--perhaps tannins themselves--may decrease oil uptake. Panelists rated frybreads containing up to 50% white, tannin-free sorghum flour as not significantly different from control frybreads made with refined wheat flour.

  18. Rooting traits of peanut genotypes with different yield responses to terminal drought

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought at pod filling can severely reduce yield of peanut. Better root systems can reduce yield loss from drought. However, the relationship of root characters with yield under terminal drought is not well understood. The objective of this study was to investigate the responses of peanut genotyp...

  19. Rooting traits of peanut genotypes with different yield response to terminal drought

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought at pod filling and maturity stages can severely reduce yield of peanut. Better root systems can reduce yield loss from drought. The goal of this study was to investigate the responses to terminal drought of peanut genotypes for root dry weight and root length density. A field experiment was ...

  20. Influence of Application Variables on Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) Response to Prohexadione Calcium

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Excessive vegetative growth of peanut reduces row visibility during the digging and inversion process. Prohexadione calcium retards vegetative growth, improves row visibility, and in some instances reduces pod shed and increases pod yield compared with non-treated peanut. However, prohexadione cal...

  1. 21 CFR 137.170 - Instantized flours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Instantized flours. 137.170 Section 137.170 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.170 Instantized flours. (a) Instantized flours, instant blending...

  2. 21 CFR 137.155 - Bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bromated flour. 137.155 Section 137.155 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.155 Bromated flour. Bromated flour conforms to the definition and standard...

  3. 21 CFR 137.170 - Instantized flours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Instantized flours. 137.170 Section 137.170 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.170 Instantized flours. (a) Instantized flours, instant blending...

  4. 21 CFR 137.220 - Durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Durum flour. 137.220 Section 137.220 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.220 Durum flour. (a) Durum flour is the food prepared by grinding and...

  5. 21 CFR 137.220 - Durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Durum flour. 137.220 Section 137.220 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.220 Durum flour. (a) Durum flour is the food prepared by grinding and...

  6. 21 CFR 137.220 - Durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Durum flour. 137.220 Section 137.220 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.220 Durum flour. (a) Durum flour is the food prepared by grinding and...

  7. 21 CFR 137.155 - Bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bromated flour. 137.155 Section 137.155 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.155 Bromated flour. Bromated flour conforms to the definition and standard...

  8. 21 CFR 137.155 - Bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bromated flour. 137.155 Section 137.155 Food and... CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.155 Bromated flour. Bromated flour conforms to the definition and standard...

  9. 21 CFR 137.170 - Instantized flours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Instantized flours. 137.170 Section 137.170 Food... HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.170 Instantized flours. (a) Instantized flours, instant blending...

  10. PeanutBase and other bioinformatic resources for peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Large-scale genomic data for peanut have only become available in the last few years, with the advent of low-cost sequencing technologies. To make the data accessible to researchers and to integrate across diverse types of data, the International Peanut Genomics Consortium funded the development of ...

  11. Improving properties of sweet potato composite flour: Influence of lactic fermentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuliana, Neti; Nurdjanah, Siti; Setyani, Sri; Novianti, Dini

    2017-06-01

    The use of locally grown crops such as sweet potato as raw material for composite flour is considered advantageous as it reduces the importation of wheat flour. However the use of native sweetpotato flour has drawback properties when applied in the food. This study was aimed to modify sweet potato flour through six methods of lactic fermentation (spontaneous, pickle brine, Lb plantarum, Lc mesentereoides, a mixed of Lb plantarum and Lc mesentereoides, and mixed of Lb plantarum, Lc mesentereoides and yeast) to increase its properties in composite flour. Composite flours were obtained after fermentation of sweet potato slices for 48h in the proportion of 50% sweet potatoes flour and 50% wheat flour. pH, moisture content, swelling power, solubility, and pasting properties were determined for the fermented and unfermented composite flours. The results indicated that the composite fermented flours had better properties than those of non fermented flour. Fermentation increased swelling power, moisture content, meanwhile, solubility, and pH, deacresed. Amylose leaching, however, was not significantly affected by the fermentation process.

  12. Storing Peanuts in Grain Bags

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A study was executed to determine the potential of storing farmers stock peanuts and shelled peanuts for crushing in hermetically sealed grain bags. The objectives of the study were to evaluate equipment for loading and unloading the grain bags, the capacity of the grain bags, and the changes in qu...

  13. Characterization of Folate in Peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The folate levels in a group of raw and roasted samples selected from the 2007 and the 2008 Uniform Peanut Performance Trials (UPPT) and from a set of raw samples from the Core of the Core of the Peanut Germplasm collection grown in 2006 and 2008 were determined. The samples were digested in protea...

  14. Annual and perennial peanut forage

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut hay can be a valuable feed for livestock in the Southeast. Perennial peanut (Arachis glabrata Benth.) cultivars have been developed and are grown on limited acres in Georgia and Florida. The cost and time for establishment of this vegetatively propagated crop can be prohibitive to some grow...

  15. Uniform Peanut Performance Tests 2012

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Uniform Peanut Performance Tests (UPPT) were established in 1973 through an informal arrangement among cooperating scientists involving seven major peanut-producing states. In 1995, plant material transfer agreements were also accepted among all cooperators in the UPPT. The year 2012 completed...

  16. 2-D DIGE analysis of the proteome of extracts from peanut variants reveals striking differences in major allergen contents.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Hendrik; Gelhaus, Christoph; Latendorf, Ties; Nebendahl, Melanie; Petersen, Arnd; Krause, Susanne; Leippe, Matthias; Becker, Wolf-Meinhard; Janssen, Ottmar

    2009-07-01

    Over the last decade, an increasing prevalence of peanut allergies was observed worldwide. Peanuts are meanwhile categorized among the most dangerous food allergens. This is particularly relevant since peanut-derived ingredients are widely used in industrial food production. To minimize the problem of hidden food allergens causing severe anaphylactic reactions, pre-packaged food containing peanut components needs to be classified according to European ruling since 2005. Food companies search for strategies to reduce the allergenicity of peanut-derived food additives either by genetically altering the allergen content or by identifying peanut varieties with low levels of major allergens. In our study, we focused on peanut extracts from Indonesia that apparently contain lower levels of the major Arachis hypogaea allergen 1 (Ara h 1). Basic extracts of Virginia-type and Indonesian peanuts were compared by 1- and 2-DE. We identified more than hundred individual components in these extracts by MS and provide a high-resolution allergen map that also includes so far unknown fragments of major peanut allergens. The reduced level of Ara h 1 associated with a significantly lower abundance of the most potent peanut allergen Ara h 2 in various Indonesian peanuts was also confirmed by Western blotting with monoclonal antibodies and sera of allergic patients.

  17. Molecular diagnosis of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Chan, Susan M H; Dumitru, Catalina; Turcanu, Victor

    2012-11-01

    Peanut allergy prevalence has increased in developed countries over the last few decades in the frame of the allergy epidemics, currently affecting 1-2% of children. While less frequent in developing countries, its prevalence is rising as these countries adopt a more westernized lifestyle. There is no curative treatment for peanut allergy at present so patient management relies on peanut avoidance, which requires an accurate diagnosis. Recent progress in peanut allergy diagnosis was made with the introduction of component resolved diagnosis that allows the assessment of IgE specific to individual peanut allergens. Component-resolved diagnosis needs to be interpreted in the context of clinical data but overall increases the diagnostic accuracy, as described in the typical cases that we present. Novel diagnostic tools have been proposed recently, such as the basophil activation test, mRNA expression and resonance magnetic evaluation of biomarkers.

  18. Oral peanut immunotherapy in children with peanut anaphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Blumchen, Katharina; Ulbricht, Helen; Staden, Ute; Dobberstein, Kerstin; Beschorner, John; de Oliveira, Lucila Camargo Lopes; Shreffler, Wayne G; Sampson, Hugh A; Niggemann, Bodo; Wahn, Ulrich; Beyer, Kirsten

    2010-07-01

    The only treatment option for peanut allergy is strict avoidance. To investigate efficacy and safety of oral immunotherapy (OIT) in peanut allergy. Twenty-three children (age, 3.2-14.3 years) with IgE-mediated peanut allergy confirmed by positive double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC) received OIT following a rush protocol with roasted peanut for 7 days. If a protective dose of at least 0.5 g peanut was not achieved, patients continued with a long-term buildup protocol using biweekly dose increases up to at least 0.5 g peanut. A maintenance phase for 8 weeks was followed by 2 weeks of peanut avoidance and a final DBPCFC. Immunologic parameters were determined. After OIT using the rush protocol, patients tolerated a median dose of only 0.15 g peanut. Twenty-two of 23 patients continued with the long-term protocol. After a median of 7 months, 14 patients reached the protective dose. At the final DBPCFC, patients tolerated a median of 1 g (range, 0.25-4 g) in comparison with 0.19 g peanut at the DBPCFC before OIT (range, 0.02-1 g). In 2.6% of 6137 total daily doses, mild to moderate side effects were observed; in 1.3%, symptoms of pulmonary obstruction were detected. OIT was discontinued in 4 of 22 patients because of adverse events. There was a significant increase in peanut-specific serum IgG(4) and a decrease in peanut-specific IL-5, IL-4, and IL-2 production by PBMCs after OIT. Long-term OIT appears to be safe and of some benefit in many patients with peanut allergy. With an increase in threshold levels and a reduction of peanut-specific T(H)2 cytokine production, the induction of tolerance may be feasible in some patients. Copyright 2010 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Reduction of major peanut allergens Ara h 1 and Ara h 2, in roasted peanuts by ultrasound assisted enzymatic treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Yu, Jianmei; Ahmedna, Mohamed; Goktepe, Ipek

    2013-11-15

    This study investigated the effects of ultrasound, enzyme concentration and enzyme treatment time on soluble protein and major allergenic proteins (Ara h 1 and Ara h 2) of roasted peanut kernels. A 3-factor, five-level orthogonal experimental design was implemented with various ultrasonication times, concentrations of trypsin or α-chymotrypsin and treatment times. The total soluble proteins were determined by the Bicinchoninic acid (BCA) method, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2 were evaluated by SDS-PAGE and sandwich ELISA. The IgE-binding of peanut extracts was analysed by a competitive inhibition ELISA. Results indicate that ultrasound treatment, followed by protease digestion of peanuts, significantly increased the solubility of peanut protein and decreased the concentrations of Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. The sequential treatment of peanuts by ultrasonication-trypsin-alpha chymotrypsin, resulted in maximum reductions of Ara h 1/Ara h 2, and lowest IgE-binding. This study provides an approach to significantly reduce allergenic proteins in peanut product. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Peanut component Ara h 8 sensitization and tolerance to peanut.

    PubMed

    Asarnoj, Anna; Nilsson, Caroline; Lidholm, Jonas; Glaumann, Susanne; Östblom, Eva; Hedlin, Gunilla; van Hage, Marianne; Lilja, Gunnar; Wickman, Magnus

    2012-08-01

    Isolated Ara h 8 sensitization is suggested to be associated with no or mild symptoms among peanut-sensitized subjects. We sought to investigate the occurrence of systemic reactions in children with isolated sensitization to Ara h 8. Participants were 144 children sensitized to Ara h 8 (≥ 0.35 kU(A)/L) but not to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, or Ara h 3 (<0.35 kU(A)/L). An open oral challenge with peanut was performed in those subjects who did not consume peanut regularly, and an extended IgE reactivity profile was obtained. If the child had a documented history of systemic reactions up to grade I anaphylaxis, double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges were performed. One hundred twenty-nine (89.5%) children were either peanut consumers or did not react to peanut challenge. Another 14 (9.7%) children experienced oral cavity symptoms at the first 2 but not subsequent challenge doses. At the time of the double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenge, 1 boy with a previous mild systemic reaction to peanut experienced lip swelling, stomach cramping, and objective tiredness. Reanalysis of IgE levels showed an increase in peanut IgE levels from 1.5 to 8.8 kU(A)/L, but IgE levels to Ara h 8 remained stable and IgE levels to Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 were all still less than 0.35 kU(A)/L. The IgE level to Ara h 6 was 0.45 kU(A)/L. Isolated Ara h 8 sensitization indicates tolerance to peanuts in almost all cases. However, sensitization against thus far unidentified determinants in peanut might cause symptoms in rare cases. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. 21 CFR 102.23 - Peanut spreads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peanut spreads. 102.23 Section 102.23 Food and... § 102.23 Peanut spreads. (a) The common or usual name of a spreadable peanut product that does not..., shall consist of the term “peanut spread” and a statement of the percentage by weight of peanuts in...

  2. Analysis of Azodicarbonamide in Wheat Flour and Prepared Flour Mixes.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Akiko; Oishi, Mitsuo; Hayafuji, Chieko; Kobayashi, Chigusa; Shindo, Tetsuya; Ozawa, Hideki; Nakazato, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Azodicarbonamide (ADA) is used in some countries as a flour bleaching agent and a dough conditioner. However, ADA is prohibited for use as a food additive in Japan. Therefore, it is necessary to establish an efficient and sensitive method to determine ADA in wheat flour. A simple and practical procedure to analyze ADA in wheat flour and prepared flour mixes was developed. ADA was extracted from samples by ultrasonication with acetone. ADA in the solution was derivatized with triphenylphosphine (TPP). The ADA-TPP derivative was concentrated and cleaned up using a reversed-phase solid-phase extraction cartridge, and the ADA-TPP derivative was analyzed using HPLC for determination and LC-MS/MS for identification. Good linearity was achieved over the concentration range of 0.25-100 ppm ADA in wheat flour and prepared flour mixes. The mean recoveries from wheat flour and prepared flour mixes fortified at the levels of 1 and 10 ppm ranged from 86.9 to 101.0%, and the coefficients of variation ranged from 1.9 to 3.4%.

  3. Dust and flour aeroallergen exposure in flour mills and bakeries.

    PubMed Central

    Nieuwenhuijsen, M J; Sandiford, C P; Lowson, D; Tee, R D; Venables, K M; McDonald, J C; Newman Taylor, A J

    1994-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological study among workers exposed to flour total dust and flour aeroallergen concentrations were measured with personal samplers over a workshift in three large bakeries and four flour mills and packing stations. In the bakeries geometric means for total dust concentrations ranged from 0.4 mg/m3 in the bread wrapping area up to 6.4 mg/m3 at the dough brake. The flour aeroallergen concentrations ranged from 45.5 micrograms/m3 in the bread wrapping area up to 252.0 micrograms/m3 in the confectionary area. In the flour mills and packing stations the concentrations were higher with geometric means for total dust ranging from 0.5 mg/m3 in the office up to 16.9 mg/m3 for hygiene workers in an old mill. The flour aeroallergen concentrations ranged from 101.5 micrograms/m3 for transport workers up to 1728.2 micrograms/m3 for hygiene workers. The relation between total dust and flour aeroallergen concentrations varied for different areas and depended on the use of products other than flour. PMID:7951788

  4. Rotations of Bahiagrass and Castorbean with Peanut for the Management of Meloidogyne arenaria

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Kábana, R.; Robertson, D. G.; Weaver, C. F.; Wells, L.

    1991-01-01

    The relative value of 'Hale' castorbean (Ricinus communis) and 'Pensacola' bahiagrass (Paspalum notatum) as rotational crops for the management of Meloidogyne arenaria and southern blight (Sclerotium rolfsii) in 'Florunner' peanut (Arachis hypogaea) production was studied for 3 years in a field experiment in southeast Alabama. Peanut following 2 years of castorbean (C-C-P) yielded 43% higher than monocultured peanut without nematicide. At-plant application of aldicarb (30.5 g a.i./100 m row in a 20-cm-wide band) to monocultured peanut resulted in an average 38.9% increase in yield over the 3 years of the experiment. Peanut yield following 2 years of bahiagrass (B-B-P) was 36% higher than monocultured peanut without nematicide. Aldicarb application had no effect on southern blight, but both C-C-P and B-B-P rotations reduced the incidence of the disease in peanut. Juvenile populations of M. arenaria in soil at peanut harvest time were lower in plots with C-C-P than in those with the B-B-P rotation, and both rotations resulted in lower numbers of juveniles in soil than in the untreated monocultured peanut. PMID:19283180

  5. Effect of high pressure on peanut allergens in the presence of polyphenol oxidase and caffeic acid

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    High pressure (HP) enhances enzymatic reactions. Because polyphenol oxidase (PPO) is an enzyme, and reduces IgE binding of peanut allergens in presence of caffeic acid (CA), we postulated that a further reduction in IgE binding can be achieved, using HP together with PPO and CA. Peanut extracts cont...

  6. Hypoallergenic Edible Peanut Protein Matrix to Enable Novel Functional Food & Immunotherapy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergies can present life-threatening consequences; therefore, there is an intense interest in developing therapeutic strategies that could reduce the danger and severity of the allergic reaction in peanut sensitive patients. We have developed a unique technology to modify or mask allergenic...

  7. Inhibiting Peanut Allergen Digestion with p-Aminobenzamidine Attached to the Allergens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergens can be digested into peptide fragments despite being known as resistant proteins. Once absorbed, the peptide fragments from digested allergens could bind to immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies and cause an allergic reaction in allergic individuals. To reduce peanut allergy, one approa...

  8. Heritability and genetic relationships for drought-related traits in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a major factor in reduced productivity in peanut. Cultivars that have high water-use efficiency have the potential to enhance crop yield. Water-use efficiency (WUE) is often correlated with specific leaf area (SLA) and leaf carbon isotopic composition (d13C) in peanut. A good knowledge...

  9. Reduction of IgE immunoreactivity of whole peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) after pulsed light illumination

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pulsed light (PL), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown in literature to reduce allergen levels on peanut, soybean, almond, and shrimp protein extracts. This study investigated how PL affected the immunoreactivity of whole peanut kernels at two sample-to-lamp distance...

  10. Effect of processing parameters on the temperature and moisture content of microwave-blanched peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut blanching consists of heat application followed by abrasive removal of the seed coat. The use of a continuous microwave system for the blanching of peanuts has been proposed as a means of reducing processing time and energy costs compared to the traditional hot-air, multizone oven. The purpos...

  11. Population structure and genetic diversity of Sclerotinia minor from peanut research plots in Oklahoma

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Sclerotinia minor is the causal agent of Sclerotinia blight, a disease that significantly reduces peanut (Arachis hypogea) productivity. This study analyzed the diversity and population structure of 164 S. minor isolates from Oklahoma. Isolates were obtained from infected stems of peanut plants fr...

  12. Effects of fertilization, tillage, and phorate on thrips and TSWV incidence in early planted peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Thrips feeding is usually more prevalent in early planted peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.), which often directly results in higher incidence of tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV). Several management tools are available to reduce thrips feeding and/or the threat of TSWV in early planted peanuts, includin...

  13. [Chemical characteristics and uses of instant corn flour II].

    PubMed

    Martínez, F; el-Dahs, A A

    1993-12-01

    The hydrothermal process using corn grits soaked in water at room temperature (28-30 degrees C) for 5 hours and steaming for 1 minute at 118 degrees C did not affect the proximal composition of the corn flour. However, the amino acid content was reduced approximately 18% (specially lysine and tryptophan). Vitamin and pigment contents were few affected. The characteristics of color and shelf life of corn flour were improved with the hydrothermal process. Tortillas prepared with instant corn flour showed better color and texture in comparison to the tortillas prepared by the conventional process. Polentas prepared with instant corn flour with 30 seconds of mixing showed better characteristics of flavor, odor, texture and required less preparation time than commercial polentas.

  14. Rigid polyvinyl chloride/wood-flour composites and their foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mengeloglu, Fatih

    The effects of impact modifier types (crosslinked vs. uncrosslinked) and addition levels on the mechanical properties of rigid PVC/wood-fiber composites were examined. With the proper choice of modifier type and concentration, the impact strength of rigid PVC/wood-fiber composites can be significantly improved without degrading the tensile properties. Foaming is an effective method for reducing the density and brittleness of polymers. The experimental results indicated that impact modification (crosslinked and uncrosslinked modifiers) accelerated the rate of gas loss during foaming process, which impeded the growth of nucleated cells. Consequently, impact modifiers are an unnecessary ingredient in the formulation of foamed neat rigid PVC and rigid PVC/wood-flour composites. Since the batch foaming process used to generate cellular foamed structures in the composites is not likely to be implemented in the industrial production of foams because it is not cost-effective, the manufacture of PVC/wood-flour composite foams in an extrusion process needs to be investigated. The foamability of rigid PVC/wood-flour composites using moisture present in the wood flour as the foaming agent was investigated using a central composite design (CCD) experiment. It was determined that wood flour moisture could be used effectively as the foaming agent in the production of rigid PVC/wood-flour composite foams. Finally, mechanical property characterizations of extrusion-foamed rigid PVC/wood-flour composites were done. Extrusion foaming reduced the density and the brittleness of the composites, but also caused a reduction in the tensile strength and modulus of the rigid PVC/wood-flour composites. This study suggested that depending on the application, the problems associated with the rigid PVC/wood-flour composite products; high density, brittleness and low impact resistance can be overcome by adopting impact modification and/or extrusion foaming. Since impact modification improves the

  15. Effects of incorporating germinated brown rice on the antioxidant properties of wheat flour chapatti.

    PubMed

    Gujral, H Singh; Sharma, P; Bajaj, R; Solah, V

    2012-02-01

    Brown rice after germinating for 24 and 48 h was milled into flour and incorporated in whole wheat flour at a level of 10% to prepare chapattis. The objective was to use chapatti as a delivery vehicle for germinated brown rice. The flour blends and chapattis made from the flour blends were evaluated for their antioxidant properties. Incorporating germinated brown rice flour increased the total phenolic content of the flour blend from 1897 to 2144 µg FAE/g. The total flavonoids content increased significantly from 632.3 to1770.9 µg CAE/g and metal chelating activity significantly increased by 71.62%. Antioxidant activity increased significantly by the addition of brown rice flour and addition of 24- and 48-h germinated brown rice flour further increased the antioxidant activity significantly. The total phenolic content and total flavonoids content decrease significantly in all the blends after baking the flour into chapatti. A decrease of 3% to 29% was observed in the total phenolic content and a decrease of 25% to 42% was observed in the total flavonoids content. However, baking of the flour blends into chapatti increased the reducing power, metal chelating activity by three folds and antioxidant activity from 64% to 104%.

  16. Jet milling effect on wheat flour characteristics and starch hydrolysis.

    PubMed

    Angelidis, Georgios; Protonotariou, Styliani; Mandala, Ioanna; Rosell, Cristina M

    2016-01-01

    The interest for producing wheat flour with health promoting effect and improved functionality has led to investigate new milling techniques that can provide finer flours. In this study, jet milling treatment was used to understand the effect of ultrafine size reduction onto microstructure and physicochemical properties of wheat flour. Three different conditions of jet milling, regarding air pressure (4 or 8 bars) feed rate and recirculation, were applied to obtain wheat flours with different particle size (control, F1, F2 and F3 with d50 127.45, 62.30, 22.94 and 11.4 μm, respectively). Large aggregates were gradually reduced in size, depending on the intensity of the process, and starch granules were separated from the protein matrix. Damaged starch increased while moisture content decreased because of milling intensity. Notable changes were observed in starch hydrolysis kinetics, which shifted to higher values with milling. Viscosity of all micronized samples was reduced and gelatinization temperatures (To, Tp, Tc) for F2 and F3 flours increased. Controlling jet milling conditions allow obtaining flours with different functionality, with greater changes at higher treatment severity that induces large particle reduction.

  17. The Classroom Animal: Flour Beetles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the flour beetle, "Tribolium confusum," and its life cycle, habitat, culturing requirements, and some possible uses of this beetle as a classroom animal. Discusses what children could learn from flour beetles. Explains how to get rid of beetles found in foods at home. (CW)

  18. The Classroom Animal: Flour Beetles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kramer, David C.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the flour beetle, "Tribolium confusum," and its life cycle, habitat, culturing requirements, and some possible uses of this beetle as a classroom animal. Discusses what children could learn from flour beetles. Explains how to get rid of beetles found in foods at home. (CW)

  19. Testing of gastric contents for peanut proteins in a 13-year old anaphylaxis victim.

    PubMed

    Beavers, Charles; Stauble, M Elaine; Jortani, Saeed A

    2014-02-15

    We report the case of a 13-y female who went into anaphylactic shock following the ingestion of a meal suspected to be contaminated by peanuts. The teenager had a known sensitivity to peanuts, however, the restaurant claimed that no peanut products were used in the preparation of her meal. The gastric contents of the decedent were retained and tested for peanut proteins due to the possible legal liability of the proprietor. Using antibodies against peanut proteins (roasted and unroasted), we optimized a method to detect total soluble peanut proteins by Western-blot analysis in gastric contents. In addition, we validated two commercially available tests which were originally intended for detection of peanut proteins in food matrices to examine the same gastric sample. One was an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) that utilized polyclonal antibodies against Ara h 1 (Tepnel Life Sciences). The other was a laminar-flow assay directed against Ara h 1, Ara h 2 and Ara h 3 (R-Biopharm). A positive food-based control was created by reducing bread and peanuts (1:1, w/w) with water (1:1, w/v) using a mortar and pestle. A food-based negative food control was created similar to the positive control, except the peanuts were omitted and the amount of bread was doubled. The Western-blot assay was sensitive down to 2.5ng/ml of total peanut protein. The laminar flow was the most rapid and least complex. The ELISA was the most analytically sensitive with a cut-off of 1ng/ml of Ara h 1 protein compared to the laminar flow which had a cut-off of 4ng/ml Ara h 1 equivalent. Both ELISA and laminar flow assays were able to detect peanut proteins in the food matrices and positive controls, and not in negative controls. No peanut related proteins were detected in the decedent's gastric sample. The gastric sample spiked with peanuts was reliably detectable. The anaphylaxis patient had no peanut allergens detected in her gastric contents by any of the three methods employed. Both

  20. Characteristics and oil absorption in deep-fat fried batter prepared from ball-milled wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Thanatuksorn, Pariya; Kajiwara, Kazuhito; Suzuki, Toru

    2010-01-15

    The porous structure generated during frying influences oil absorption and textural qualities. The alteration in physical properties of wheat flour is suspected to affect the structure formation. The present study investigated the effect of physicochemical changes in wheat flour by the ball-milling process on structure formation and consequently oil absorption of a fried wheat flour batter model. Batter models containing 600 g kg(-1) moisture were made of 0-10 h ball-milled wheat flour and then fried in frying oil at 150 degrees C for 1-7 min. The samples made of milled flour possess larger pores and exhibit lower oil absorption than sample made of 0 h milled flour. The fracture force of a fried sample prepared from 5 and 10 h milled flour is lower than that of a sample prepared from 0 h milled flour. The decrease in glass transition temperature (T(g)) and melting temperature (T(m)) of milled flour affect the microstructure formation in the fried wheat flour batter. The microstructure is responsible for oil absorption and fracturability in fried food. The samples made of flour of longer ball-milling time have lower oil absorption and higher crispness. Ball-milling may be a tool to produce mechanically modified wheat flour which can reduce oil absorption for fried batter. Copyright (c) 2009 Society of Chemical Industry.

  1. Flour from Prosopis alba cotyledons: A natural source of nutrient and bioactive phytochemicals.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, F; Costamagna, M S; Zampini, I C; Sayago, J; Alberto, M R; Chamorro, V; Pazos, A; Thomas-Valdés, S; Schmeda-Hirschmann, G; Isla, M I

    2016-10-01

    The Prosopis alba seed is a waste material in the process to produce pod flour. To suggest a potential use of these seeds it is necessary to determine the nutritional, phytochemical and functional quality of cotyledon flour from Prosopis alba. This flour showed high level of proteins (62%), low content of total carbohydrate and fat. Free polyphenol (1150±20mg GAE/100g flour) and carotenoids (10.55±0.05mg β-CE/100g flour) compounds were the dominant compounds. The main identified constituents in the polyphenolic extracts were C- glycosyl flavones, including schaftoside, isoschaftoside, vicenin II, vitexin and isovitexin. The extract enriched in polyphenolic compounds exhibited ABTS(+) reducing capacity and scavenging activity of H2O2; and was able to inhibit phospholipase, lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase, three pro-inflammatory enzymes. According to our results, the P. alba cotyledon flour could be considered as a new alternative in the formulation of functional foods or food supplements.

  2. Maize flour fortification in Africa: markets, feasibility, coverage, and costs.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, John L; Afidra, Ronald; Mugambi, Gladys; Tehinse, John; Kabaghe, Gladys; Zulu, Rodah; Lividini, Keith; Smitz, Marc-Francois; Jallier, Vincent; Guyondet, Christophe; Bermudez, Odilia

    2014-04-01

    The economic feasibility of maize flour and maize meal fortification in Kenya, Uganda, and Zambia is assessed using information about the maize milling industry, households' purchases and consumption levels of maize flour, and the incremental cost and estimated price impacts of fortification. Premix costs comprise the overwhelming share of incremental fortification costs and vary by 50% in Kenya and by more than 100% across the three countries. The estimated incremental cost of maize flour fortification per metric ton varies from $3.19 in Zambia to $4.41 in Uganda. Assuming all incremental costs are passed onto the consumer, fortification in Zambia would result in at most a 0.9% increase in the price of maize flour, and would increase annual outlays of the average maize flour-consuming household by 0.2%. The increases for Kenyans and Ugandans would be even less. Although the coverage of maize flour fortification is not likely to be as high as some advocates have predicted, fortification is economically feasible, and would reduce deficiencies of multiple micronutrients, which are significant public health problems in each of these countries. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  3. Catering Gluten-Free When Simultaneously Using Wheat Flour.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kathryn; McGough, Norma; Urwin, Heidi

    2016-02-01

    A European law on gluten-free (GF) labeling came into force in 2012, covering foods sold prepacked and in food service establishments, and a similar U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulation covers GF labeling from August 2014. Gluten is found in the grains wheat, rye, and barley. A common source of gluten in the kitchen is wheat flour. This research aimed to determine variables that have a significant effect on gluten contamination in commercial kitchens when wheat flour is in use and to establish controls necessary to assure GF production. A pilot study was used to test the following hypotheses: (i) increasing duration of exposure to wheat flour would increase gluten contamination, (ii) increasing distance between the site of preparation and the site of wheat flour would reduce gluten contamination, (iii) the use of a ventilation hood would decrease gluten contamination, and (iv) the use of a barrier segregating the site of preparation of a GF meal and the use of wheat flour would decrease gluten contamination. Petri dishes containing GF rice pudding were placed in three directions at increasing distances (0.5 to 2 m) from a site of wheat flour use. A barrier was in place between a third of samples and the site of wheat flour. After wheat flour was handled for 0.5 and 4.0 h, petri dishes were sealed and the contents were analyzed for gluten. The experiment was duplicated with the ventilation hood on and off. The pilot study revealed that a distance of 2 m from the use of wheat flour was required to control gluten contamination at ≤20 ppm if wheat flour had been in use for 4.0 h. The identified control of distance was tested in five different study sites. In each of the study sites, a test meal was prepared a minimum of 2 m away from the site of wheat flour use. Although kitchens vary and must be considered individually, the established control of a minimum 2 m distance, along with good hygiene practices, was found to be effective in preparing GF meals

  4. Degree of roasting of carob flour affecting the properties of gluten-free cakes and cookies.

    PubMed

    Román, Laura; González, Ana; Espina, Teresa; Gómez, Manuel

    2017-06-01

    Carob flour is a product rich in fibre obtained from by-products of the locust bean gum extraction processing. The flour is commercialised with different degrees of roasting in order to improve its organoleptic characteristics. In this study, carob flour with three different roasting degrees was used to replace rice flour (15%) in gluten-free cakes and cookies. The influence of this replacement was studied on the psychochemical characteristics and acceptability of the final products. The incorporation of carob flour increased the viscosity of cake batters and increased the solid elastic-like behaviour of the cookie doughs, indicating a stronger interaction among the formula ingredients. The inclusion of carob flour, with a low time of roasting, did not lead to any significant differences in the specific volume and hardness of the cakes, but reduced cake staling and the thickness and width of the cookies. Darker colours were obtained when carob flour was incorporated into the product. The acceptability of cakes was only reduced with the addition of highly roasted carob flour, while in the case of cookies there was a decline in the acceptability of all carob flour cookies, which was mostly perceived with the highest roasting degree, something mainly attributed to the bitter taste of the products.

  5. Changes in the solubility of corn proteins through interaction with the arabinoxylans in extruded nixtamalized corn flour treated with xylanase.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Rivas, Silvia Carolina; Medina-Rodríguez, Concepción Lorenia; Torres-Chávez, Patricia Isabel; Ramírez-Wong, Benjamín; Platt-Lucero, Luis Carlos

    2014-06-01

    The extrusion process allows the production of nixtamalized corn flour rich in arabinoxylans, which help to prevent cardiovascular and intestinal diseases. During extrusion, physiochemical properties of nixtamalized corn flour are negatively modified. The use of enzymes such as xylanase in order to obtain nixtamalized corn flour using extrusion has been studied as an alternative to reduce these changes in corn flour tortilla. The aim of this research was to evaluate changes in protein solubility of extruded nixtamalized corn flour with and without different concentrations of xylanase enzyme (0.05, 0.075, and 0.1%, w/w). Soluble proteins of each corn flour were extracted and analyzed by SE-HPLC, while insoluble proteins were determined by the combustion method. In addition, each corn flour was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results showed that the extruded nixtamalized corn flour, with and without xylanase, increased the protein solubility, and this effect was lower in extruded nixtamalized corn flour with xylanase. Insoluble protein diminished in corn flours either with or without xylanase enzyme. The addition of xylanase reduces the effect that the extrusion process has on the solubility proteins of extruded nixtamalized corn flour.

  6. Evidence of pathway-specific basophil anergy induced by peanut oral immunotherapy in peanut-allergic children.

    PubMed

    Thyagarajan, A; Jones, S M; Calatroni, A; Pons, L; Kulis, M; Woo, C S; Kamalakannan, M; Vickery, B P; Scurlock, A M; Wesley Burks, A; Shreffler, W G

    2012-08-01

    In Westernized countries, over 1% of the population is allergic to peanuts or tree nuts, which carries a risk of severe allergic reactions. Several studies support the efficacy of peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) for reducing the clinical sensitivity of affected individuals; however, the mechanisms of this effect are still being characterized. One mechanism that may contribute is the suppression of effector cells, such as basophils. Basophil anergy has been characterized in vitro as a pathway-specific hyporesponsiveness; however, this has not been demonstrated to occur in vivo. To evaluate the hypothesis that basophil anergy occurs in vivo due to chronic allergen exposure in the setting of a clinical oral immunotherapy trial. Samples of peripheral blood were obtained from subjects during a placebo-controlled clinical trial of peanut OIT. Basophil reactivity to in vitro stimulation with peanut allergen and controls was assessed by the upregulation of activation markers, CD63 and CD203c, measured by flow cytometry. The upregulation of CD63 following stimulation of the IgE receptor, either specifically with peanut allergen or non-specifically with anti-IgE antibody, was strongly suppressed by active OIT. However, OIT did not significantly suppress this response in basophils stimulated by the distinct fMLP receptor pathway. In the subset of subjects with egg sensitization, active peanut OIT also suppressed CD63 upregulation in response to stimulation with egg allergen. Allergen OIT also suppressed the upregulation of CD203c including in response to stimulation with IL-3 alone. Peanut OIT induces a hyporesponsive state in basophils that is consistent with pathway-specific anergy previously described in vitro. This suggests the hypothesis that effector cell anergy could contribute to clinical desensitization. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Effect of incorporation of soy flour to wheat flour on nutritional and sensory quality of biscuits fortified with mushroom

    PubMed Central

    Farzana, Tasnim; Mohajan, Suman

    2015-01-01

    The research study was conducted to evaluate the quality characteristics of soy-mushroom-enriched biscuits which could be used as a protein supplemented cereal snack food. In this study, wheat flour was replaced with soy flour at different levels that is 20% (T3), 15% (T2), and 10% (T1) and without soy flour was kept as control (To). Mushroom was added in both biscuits. Biscuits were analyzed for chemical and sensory parameters. Protein content of soy flour-supplemented biscuits increased from 11.07% to 17.86% as compared to control along with a significant increased in fat (17.36–20.89%), fiber (0.48–0.92%), iron (1.56–1.99 mg/100 g), and energy value (463–485 Kcal/g). Ash content also increased but not significantly. Results from chemical analyses and organoleptic evaluation indicate that good quality biscuits can be prepared by substituting wheat flour with 15% soy flour and addition of mushroom powders may affect the backing quality. Protein Energy Malnutrition (PEM) of the Bangladeshi population can be reduced through the development of biscuits in this way. PMID:26405522

  8. Effect of Different Flours on the Formation of Hydroxymethylfurfural, Furfural, and Dicarbonyl Compounds in Heated Glucose/Flour Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mesías, Marta; Morales, Francisco J.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cereal-based foods usually include wheat flour in their formulations; however, the search for new products with new ingredients providing different properties to foods is widely pursued by food companies. Replacement of wheat by other flours can modify both nutritional properties and organoleptic characteristics of the final baked food, but can also impact the formation of potentially harmful compounds. The effect of the type of flour on the formation of furfurals and dicarbonyl compounds was studied in a dough model system during baking that contains water or glucose in order to promote the Maillard reaction and caramelization. The formation of methylglyoxal and glyoxal was significantly reduced in spelt and teff formulations compared to wheat flour formulations, respectively. In contrast, samples formulated with oat, teff, and rye showed a significant increase in the levels of 3-deoxyglucosone. Similarly, spelt and teff formulations presented significantly higher concentrations of hydroxymethylfurfural, and spelt, teff, and rye presented higher concentrations of furfural. Therefore, the formation of process contaminants and undesirable compounds in new food products formulated with different flours replacing the traditional wheat flour should be considered carefully in terms of food safety. PMID:28231092

  9. Peanut avoidance and peanut allergy diagnosis in siblings of peanut allergic children.

    PubMed

    Lavine, E; Clarke, A; Joseph, L; Shand, G; Alizadehfar, R; Asai, Y; Chan, E S; Harada, L; Allen, M; Ben-Shoshan, M

    2015-01-01

    Studies suggest that siblings of children with peanut allergy (PNA) have a higher prevalence of PNA than the general population. The Canadian Peanut Allergy Registry was used to assess the percentage of siblings of registered index PNA children who were 1) never exposed to peanut or 2) reportedly diagnosed with PNA by a physician without either a history of allergic reaction or a confirmatory testing. Sociodemographic and clinical factors that may be associated with either outcome were evaluated. Parents completed a questionnaire on siblings' sociodemographic characteristics, exposure and reaction to peanut, confirmatory tests performed and whether PNA had been diagnosed. Of 932 Registry families, 748 families responded, representing 922 siblings. 13.6% of siblings had never been exposed to peanut, 70.4% (n = 88) of which were born after the index child. Almost 9% of siblings (80) were reported as PNA, but almost half of this group had no history of an allergic reaction to peanut, including five children who also had no testing to confirm PNA. Of these 5, 4 were born after PNA diagnosis in the index child. In a multivariate regression analysis for siblings at least 3 years old, those born after PNA diagnosis in the index child were more likely to have never been exposed to peanut. In a univariate analysis, siblings born after the diagnosis of PNA in the index child were more likely to be diagnosed with PNA without supportive history or confirmatory testing. These data estimate that more than 10% of siblings of PNA patients will avoid peanut and that siblings born after the diagnosis of PNA in an index child are more likely to have never been exposed. Educational programs and guidelines that caution against unnecessary avoidance are required. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Peanut protein in household dust is related to household peanut consumption and is biologically active.

    PubMed

    Brough, Helen A; Santos, Alexandra F; Makinson, Kerry; Penagos, Martin; Stephens, Alick C; Douiri, Abdel; Fox, Adam T; Du Toit, George; Turcanu, Victor; Lack, Gideon

    2013-09-01

    Peanut allergy is an important public health concern. To understand the pathogenesis of peanut allergy, we need to determine the route by which children become sensitized. A dose-response between household peanut consumption (HPC; used as an indirect marker of environmental peanut exposure) and the development of peanut allergy has been observed; however, environmental peanut exposure was not directly quantified. We sought to explore the relationship between reported HPC and peanut protein levels in an infant's home environment and to determine the biological activity of environmental peanut. Peanut protein was quantified in wipe and dust samples collected from 45 homes with infants by using a polyclonal peanut ELISA. Environmental peanut protein levels were compared with peanut consumption assessed by using a validated peanut food frequency questionnaire and other clinical and household factors. Biological activity of peanut protein in dust was assessed with a basophil activation assay. There was a positive correlation between peanut protein levels in the infant's bed, crib rail, and play area and reported HPC over 1 and 6 months. On multivariate regression analysis, HPC was the most important variable associated with peanut protein levels in the infant's bed sheet and play area. Dust samples containing high peanut protein levels induced dose-dependent activation of basophils in children with peanut allergy. We have shown that an infant's environmental exposure to peanut is most likely to be due to HPC. Peanut protein in dust is biologically active and should be assessed as a route of possible early peanut sensitization in infants. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Proteomic analysis of peanut seed storage proteins and genetic variation in a potential peanut allergen

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy is one of the most severe food allergies. One effort to alleviate this problem is to identify peanut germplasm with lower levels of allergens which could be used in conventional breeding to produce a less allergenic peanut cultivar. In this study, we identified one peanut line, GT-C9,...

  12. Effects of pulsed UV-light on peanut allergens in extracts and liquid peanut butter.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Pulsed ultraviolet (PUV)-light, a non-thermal technology, was used to treat both peanut extracts and liquid peanut butter. The objective was to determine if such treatment would lead to a reduction in the allergenic potency of the peanut extract and butter. Peanut samples were PUV treated, using a X...

  13. Removing Peanut Allergen Ara h 1 from Peanut Extracts Using p-Aminobenzamidine

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Rationale: Ara h 1 is one of 3 major allergens in peanut. Removing Ara h 1 from a peanut extract may produce a hypoallergenic peanut extract for immunotherapy and other purposes. Methods: Peanut extracts were treated overnight with and without 10 mM p-aminobenzamidine (pABA, a protease inhibitor) i...

  14. Effect of delayed harvesting and pre-treatment methods on the antinutritional contents of trifoliate yam flour.

    PubMed

    Abiodun, Olufunmilola Adunni; Akinoso, Rahman

    2014-03-01

    Effects of delayed harvesting and pre-treatment methods on the anti-nutritional contents of trifoliate yam flour were examined. Trifoliate yam tubers were washed, peeled, sliced and subjected to pre-treatment methods, such as soaking, pre-cooking and blanching/soaking. The phenols, phytate, oxalate, tannin and alkaloid profiles of the flours were evaluated and the values of phenols, tannin, oxalate and phytate contents were 0.02-0.32, 0.04-0.53, 0.11-4.32 and 0.20-1.05mg/100g, respectively. The predominant alkaloids in trifoliate yam flour were dioscorine and dihydrodioscorine. The white trifoliate yam flour had higher levels of anti-nutrients than the yellow trifoliate yam flour. Alkaloid contents of trifoliate yam flour increased slightly with delayed harvesting periods. Blanching/soaking method drastically reduced the anti-nutrient contents of trifoliate yam flour than other methods.

  15. Effect of incorporating hydrothermal, kilned and defatted oats on antioxidant and chapatti making properties of wheat flour.

    PubMed

    Gujral, Hardeep Singh; Sharma, Paras; Gill, Balmeet Singh; Kaur, Sumandeep

    2013-06-01

    Oats were subjected to treatments like defatting, hydrothermal cooking and kilning, milled into flour and then the control and treated flours were incorporated into wheat flour at 25% and 50% levels and chapatti making behaviour and antioxidant properties were studied. The treatments significantly affected the antioxidant properties of oats. Incorporating oat flours to wheat increased total phenolic content but lowered the antioxidant activity however both were decreased significantly upon baking. The reducing power of the oat blended flour was higher than the wheat flours and ranged from 8.0 to 15.5 μmol AAE/g and was further increased upon baking. The metal chelating activity of flour blends varied from 62.0% to 73.8% and further increased upon baking. After baking the total flavonoid content was lowered and ranged from 308 to 389 μg CE/g. The non-enzymatic browning index significantly increased up to 27.6% upon baking.

  16. Randomised, double blind, crossover challenge study of allergenicity of peanut oils in subjects allergic to peanuts.

    PubMed Central

    Hourihane, J. O.; Bedwani, S. J.; Dean, T. P.; Warner, J. O.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the in vivo allergenicity of two grades of peanut oil for a large group of subjects with proved allergy to peanuts. DESIGN: Double blind, crossover food challenge with crude peanut oil and refined peanut oil. SETTING: Dedicated clinical investigation unit in a university hospital. SUBJECTS: 60 subjects allergic to peanuts; allergy was confirmed by challenge tests. OUTCOME MEASURES: Allergic reaction to the tested peanut oils. RESULTS: None of the 60 subjects reacted to the refined oil; six (10%) reacted to the crude oil. Supervised peanut challenge caused considerably less severe reactions than subjects had reported previously. CONCLUSIONS: Crude peanut oil caused allergic reactions in 10% of allergic subjects studied and should continue to be avoided. Refined peanut oil did not pose a risk to any of the subjects. It would be reasonable to recommend a change in labelling to distinguish refined from crude peanut oil. PMID:9133891

  17. Enhanced approaches for identifying Amadori products: application to peanut allergens

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Katina L.; Williams, Jason G.; Maleki, Soheila J.; Hurlburt, Barry K.; London, Robert E.; Mueller, Geoffrey A.

    2016-01-01

    The dry roasting of peanuts is suggested to influence allergenic sensitization due to formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) on peanut proteins. Identifying AGEs is technically challenging. The AGEs of a peanut allergen were probed with nanoLC-ESI-MS and MS/MS analyses. Amadori product ions matched to expected peptides and yielded fragments that included a loss of 3 waters and HCHO. Due to the paucity of b- and y-ions in the MS/MS spectrum, standard search algorithms do not perform well. Reactions with isotopically labeled sugars confirmed that the peptides contained Amadori products. An algorithm was developed based upon information content (Shannon entropy) and the loss of water and HCHO. Results with test data show that the algorithm finds the correct spectra with high precision, reducing the time needed to manually inspect data. Computational and technical improvements allowed better identification of the chemical differences between modified and unmodified proteins. PMID:26811263

  18. Molecular techniques for detection of confused flour beetle infestations in stored products

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Tribolium confusum (confused flour beetle) is a stored-product pest which contaminates a wide range of food products, from flour and cereals to spices. The insect reduces food quality and is responsible for large economic losses every year. Although a number of methods for detection of stored-produc...

  19. Peanut by-products fed to cattle.

    PubMed

    Hill, Gary M

    2002-07-01

    Peanut by-products supply substantial quantities of feedstuffs to beef cattle grown in the same region where peanuts are produced. Included in the list of products fed to cattle are peanuts and peanut meal, peanut skins, peanut hulls, peanut hay, and silages. Residual peanut hay is by far the most widely used peanut by-product fed to beef cattle, and if it is properly harvested with minimal leaf shatter, it is comparable to good-quality grass hays in nutrient content. Peanut skins are often included in small quantities in cattle and pet foods, supplying both protein and energy. High tannin content of peanut skins can cause severe performance depressions in beef cattle if peanut skins are included at levels higher than 10% of the diet, unless diets contain relatively high CP (above 15% CP), or additional N sources are added such as ammonia or urea. Because dairy cattle diets are often above 16% CP in the total dietary DM, peanut skins may increase milk production when added at levels up to 16% of the dry matter. Peanut hulls are effectively used as a roughage source at levels up to 20% of beef finishing diets, for bedding in dairy cattle loafing sheds (if tested and found to contain low aflatoxin levels), and in a variety of manufactured products. Peanut hulls are economically priced because of their quantity, their inherent high fiber, and low CP content, and they should not be fed as a primary feedstuffs for beef cattle. Peanut by-products are generally priced below other by-products, and they can be incorporated into a variety of supplements and diets for cow herds, growing-finishing cattle, and dairy cattle.

  20. Peanut allergy: an evolving clinical challenge.

    PubMed

    Otsu, Kanao; Dreskin, Stephen C

    2011-10-01

    Peanut allergy is an IgE-mediated food allergy responsible for causing severe and occasionally fatal reactions in those sensitized to peanuts. The prevalence of peanut allergy appears to be on the rise worldwide, yet there are no therapeutics currently available that can alter the course of this condition. This article will review the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and clinical features of peanut allergy and discuss future possibilities in diagnostic and therapeutic modalities.

  1. Physicochemical and sensory properties of soy bread made with germinated, steamed, and roasted soy flour.

    PubMed

    Shin, Doo-Jee; Kim, Wook; Kim, Yookyung

    2013-11-01

    For the development of healthful gluten-free soy bread acceptable to consumers, we evaluated the effects of various processing procedures for soy flour on bread quality, in terms of beany flavour and texture. We pretreated soy flour by both non-heating (raw:NS and germinated:GS) and heating (steamed:SS and roasted:RS) methods. In addition, to improve the loaf volume, we added 1% hydroxypropyl-methylcellulose (HPMC) to RS flour. Lipoxygenase activity was retained in the non-heat-treated flours (279 U/g for NS and 255 U/g for GS), but was significantly reduced in the heat-treated flours (106U/g for SS and 69 U/g for RS). Moreover, heat-treated flour had higher isoflavone and ferric reducing antioxidant power than had non-heat-treated flour. However, RS flour had the lowest moisture content and lowest L value. The GS bread had the highest specific loaf volume (3.53 cm(3)/g), followed by NS (2.96 cm(3)/g), RS (2.25c m(3)/g), and SS (1.81 cm(3)/g) bread. GS bread had the lowest hardness (1.53N), followed by NS (1.65 N), RS (2.00 N), and SS (3.75 N) bread. The addition of 1% HPMC to RS increased the loaf volume (2.44 cm(3)/g), but decreased the bread's hardness (1.80N). As to the sensory properties, the bread with heat-treated flour was perceived to have a less beany odour and taste than was the bread with non-heat-treated flour. However, the latter had a better appearance than the former. These results indicated that soy flour pretreatment could enhance the loaf volume and reduce the beany flavour of whole soy bread.

  2. Effect of ambient storage on the quality characteristics of aerobically packaged fish curls incorporated with different flours.

    PubMed

    Raja, Waseem Hussain; Kumar, Sunil; Bhat, Zuhaib Fayaz; Kumar, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of ambient storage on the quality attributes of aerobically packaged fish curls incorporated with optimum levels of different flours. The curls were developed by extrusion technology using fish meat (Catla catla). The fish curls containing optimum levels of different flours viz. 20 percent corn flour, 10 percent black gram flour and 10 percent peanut flour were compared with the control snacks containing 30 percent rice flour and assessed for storage quality and shelf life at ambient temperature. The curls were aerobically packaged in LDPE (low density polyethylene) pouches and evaluated for various physicochemical, microbiological and sensory parameters. Mean values of pH of all the curls showed significantly (p < 0.05) decreasing trend with increasing days of storage (6.34 ± 0.01 on day 0 and 5.90 ± 0.005 on day 28 for control samples, 6.41 ± 0.009 on day 0 and 6.11 ± 0.02 on day 28 for corn flour incorporated samples, 6.36 ± 0.01 on day 0 and 6.14 ± 0.01 on day 28 for black gram flour incorporated samples, 6.57 ± 0.007 on day 0 and 6.34 ± 0.01 on day 28 for peanut flour incorporated samples). TBARS (mg malonaldehyde/kg), total plate count (log cfu/g) and yeast and mould count (log cfu/g) for the control as well as treatment samples showed significantly (p < 0.05) increasing trend with storage. Coliform counts (log cfu/g) were not detected until day 28 in all the products. The mean scores of sensory parameters i.e. appearance and colour, flavor, crispiness, texture and overall acceptability for control as well as treatment samples showed significantly (p < 0.05) decreasing trend with storage period. The decrease was significantly (p < 0.05) highest on 21(st) and 28(th) day of storage. The mean values for all the quality and storage parameters up to the day 21 of the storage were within the acceptable limits. Thus, based on various physicochemical and

  3. Assessment of the tolerance to lupine-enriched pasta in peanut-allergic children.

    PubMed

    Fiocchi, A; Sarratud, P; Terracciano, L; Vacca, E; Bernardini, R; Fuggetta, D; Ballabio, C; Duranti, M; Magni, C; Restani, P

    2009-07-01

    Reports of allergy to lupine derivatives (as de novo sensitization or cross-reactivity in subjects allergic to peanut) are increasing as their use in food products increases. The aim of this study was to assess: (1) lupine tolerance in a group of children allergic to peanut, using lupine enriched-pasta instead of raw flour as has been done in previous clinical studies; (2) whether technological treatments of lupine modify its cross-reactivity or co-sensitization with peanut; (3) the role of lupine seed proteins in sensitization, and (4) to identify the eliciting doses (EDs) by using double-blind, placebo-controlled food challenges (DBPCFC). Twelve patients with a history of clinical allergic reactions to peanut were evaluated by skin prick tests (SPTs), the ImmunoCAP test, immunoblotting, and DBPCFC. The 12 selected subjects were included in a trial where lupine-enriched pasta and placebo pasta were administered in a DBPCFC protocol. Positive clinical reactions were observed in two children, the EDs being 0.2 and 6.4 g of pasta, corresponding to 50 mg and 1.6 g of lupine proteins, respectively. Beta-conglutin was the protein most involved in SPT positivity. Lupine-enriched pasta can be tolerated by most subjects suffering from peanut allergy, but a sizeable minority (2/12 of them in this case) can develop potentially dangerous clinical reactions. Information about possible reactions to lupine derivatives by those allergic to peanuts must be included in the labelling of lupine-enriched products to protect consumers at risk.

  4. Effects of Peanut Butter on Ruminating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Katherine S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Effects of supplementary peanut butter on rumination behavior among five institutionalized mentally retarded adults were studied, by independently manipulating caloric density versus consistency of the peanut butter. Results showed an inverse relationship between rates of rumination and amount of peanut butter consumed, an effect primarily…

  5. 21 CFR 164.150 - Peanut butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Peanut butter. 164.150 Section 164.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION TREE NUT AND PEANUT PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Tree Nut and Peanut...

  6. 7 CFR 1216.18 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... means the seeds of the legume arachis hypogaea and includes both in-shell and shelled peanuts other than... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peanuts. 1216.18 Section 1216.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  7. 7 CFR 1216.18 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... means the seeds of the legume arachis hypogaea and includes both in-shell and shelled peanuts other than... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peanuts. 1216.18 Section 1216.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  8. 7 CFR 1216.18 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... means the seeds of the legume arachis hypogaea and includes both in-shell and shelled peanuts other than... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peanuts. 1216.18 Section 1216.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  9. 7 CFR 1216.18 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... means the seeds of the legume arachis hypogaea and includes both in-shell and shelled peanuts other than... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Peanuts. 1216.18 Section 1216.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  10. 7 CFR 1216.18 - Peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... means the seeds of the legume arachis hypogaea and includes both in-shell and shelled peanuts other than... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peanuts. 1216.18 Section 1216.18 Agriculture... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND...

  11. Storing Peanuts in Flexible Hermetically Sealed Containers

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In-shell peanuts stored in large bulk warehouses lose approximately 1.5-2% of their value. However, peanuts stored as long as nine months may lose as much as 5% of their value due to excessive moisture loss, a reduction of peanut kernel size and damage due to insects or microbial growth. Research h...

  12. Breeding versus bioengineering of hypoallergenic peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Major allergen proteins in the peanut seed are storage proteins Ara h1, Ara h2, and Ara h3. While these proteins serve a vital function of nutrient reservoir activity in the peanut seed, it may be possible to eliminate some or to alter others to mitigate peanut allergic responses, but with little c...

  13. Alternative Storage Environments for Shelled Peanuts.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Alternative Storage Environments for Shelled Peanuts. C. L. BUTTS1, K. HORM2, S. POWELL3, B. ANTHONY2, J. BENNETT2, D. COWART3, and M.C. LAMB1. 1USDA, ARS, National Peanut Research Laboratory, Dawson, GA, 2Mars Chocolate NA, Elizabethtown, PA,3 Birdsong Peanuts, Blakely, GA Small chamber studies w...

  14. Effects of Peanut Butter on Ruminating.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Katherine S.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Effects of supplementary peanut butter on rumination behavior among five institutionalized mentally retarded adults were studied, by independently manipulating caloric density versus consistency of the peanut butter. Results showed an inverse relationship between rates of rumination and amount of peanut butter consumed, an effect primarily…

  15. 21 CFR 164.150 - Peanut butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Peanut butter. 164.150 Section 164.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 164.150 Peanut butter. (a) Peanut butter is the food prepared by grinding one of the shelled and...

  16. 21 CFR 164.150 - Peanut butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Peanut butter. 164.150 Section 164.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 164.150 Peanut butter. (a) Peanut butter is the food prepared by grinding one of the shelled and...

  17. 21 CFR 164.150 - Peanut butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Peanut butter. 164.150 Section 164.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 164.150 Peanut butter. (a) Peanut butter is the food prepared by grinding one of the shelled and...

  18. 21 CFR 164.150 - Peanut butter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Peanut butter. 164.150 Section 164.150 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN... § 164.150 Peanut butter. (a) Peanut butter is the food prepared by grinding one of the shelled and...

  19. Transcript profiling of developing peanut seeds

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To investigate regulatory processes and mechanisms underlying the development of peanut seeds, 8 x 15k microarrays were used to monitor changes in the transcriptome of a runner peanut genotype. Developing peanut pods from six development stages corresponding R2 through R8 stages were profiled. Sever...

  20. Survival, growth, and thermal resistance of Listeria monocytogenes in products containing peanut and chocolate.

    PubMed

    Kenney, Stephen J; Beuchat, Larry R

    2004-10-01

    Outbreaks of listeriosis associated with the consumption of ready-to-eat foods have raised interest in determining growth, survival, and inactivation characteristics of Listeria monocytogenes in a wide range of products. A study was undertaken to determine the thermal tolerance of L. monocytogenes in a peanut-based beverage (3.1% fat), whole-fat (3.5%) milk, wholefat (4.0%) and reduced-fat (1.0%) chocolate milk, a chocolate-peanut spread (39% fat), and peanut butter (53% fat). The D60 degrees C value (decimal reduction time at 60 degrees C) in peanut beverage (3.2 min) was not significantly different (P > 0.05) than the D60 degrees C value in whole-fat milk (3.3 min) or whole-fat chocolate milk (4.5 min) but significantly lower (P < or = 0.05) than the D60 degrees C value in reduced-fat chocolate milk (5.9 min). The pathogen was significantly more resistant to heat when enmeshed in chocolate-peanut spread (water activity [aw] of 0.46; D60 degrees C = 37.5 min) and peanut butter (aw of 0.32; D60 degrees C = 26.0 min) than in liquid products. At 10 degrees C, the pathogen grew most rapidly in whole-fat chocolate milk and slowest in peanut beverage. At 22 degrees C, populations increased significantly within 12 and 16 h in whole-fat milk and reduced-fat chocolate milk, respectively, and within 8 h in whole-fat chocolate milk and peanut beverage. Initial populations (3.37 to 4.42 log CFU/g) of L. monocytogenes in chocolate-peanut spread and peanut butter adjusted to an aw of 0.33 and 0.65 declined, but the pathogen was not eliminated during a 24-week period at 20 degrees C. Survival was enhanced at reduced aw. Results indicate that a pasteurization process similar to that used for full-fat milk would be adequate to ensure the destruction of L. monocytogenes in peanut beverage. The pathogen survives for at least 24 weeks in chocolate-peanut spread and peanut butter at an aw range that encompasses that found in these products.

  1. A novel fortified blended flour, corn-soy blend "plus-plus," is not inferior to lipid-based ready-to-use supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Malawian children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) are often treated with fortified blended flours, most commonly a corn-soy blend (CSB). However, recovery rates remain <75%, lower than the rate achieved with peanut-paste-based ready-to-use supplementary foods (RUSFs). To bridge this gap, a novel CSB r...

  2. Molecular markers and strategies to control aflatoxin in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Methods of isolation of molecular markers and software developed in ARS for finding the most informative markers will be presented. Also, two different approaches being used at the NPRL to reduce aflatoxin in peanut will be discussed. One is the development of phytoalexin-detoxification enzyme inh...

  3. Characterization of Aroma-Active Compounds in Microwave Blanced Peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Microwave blanching of peanuts has been explored as an alternative to conventional oven methods based on its speed of operation, energy savings, and efficiency of process control. Although processing times can be greatly reduced,the occurrence of stale/floral and ashy off-flavors has been reported a...

  4. Peanut consumption in adolescents is associated with improved weight status

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies have shown an association between nut consumption and health benefits in adults, such as lower lipid levels, lower body mass indices, and reduced risk of coronary artery disease. Few studies have demonstrated these health benefits in children. To determine the association between peanut cons...

  5. Flavor of roasted peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) - Part I: Effect of raw material and processing technology on flavor, color and fatty acid composition of peanuts.

    PubMed

    Lykomitros, Dimitrios; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Capuano, Edoardo

    2016-11-01

    Flavor and color of roasted peanuts have a strong impact on consumer acceptability. They can be influenced by raw material and processing technology. Raw peanuts of various market types, origins and grades were processed by different technologies to produce 134 unique samples, which were profiled by a sensory panel and analyzed for color and fatty acid composition. Principal Component Analysis, Canonical Variate Analysis and General Linear Model regression were used to identify differences in flavor, color and fatty acid profiles, and to relate them to raw materials or process conditions. Data showed that raw material selection is key for flavor, but processing is also significant. Specifically, maceration significantly increased "roasted peanut" and "dark roast" aromas, reducing "sweet", "raw bean" aromas, and sweetness. It also influenced color and the fatty acid profile. Baking reduced "roasted peanut" and "dark roast" and increased "raw bean" aromas compared to frying, and impacted color development. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Physico-chemical properties and acceptability of yam flour substituted with soy flour.

    PubMed

    Akingbala, J O; Oguntimein, G B; Sobande, A O

    1995-07-01

    Yam flour was substituted 10, 20 and 40% with defatted and full fat soy flour. The effect of the substitution on the proximate composition, swelling power, solubility, water binding capacity and Brabender visco amylograph cooking properties of the yam flour and acceptability of the cooked paste (amala), were evaluated. Protein contents of the mixtures were 23.0 and 25.5% on substituting 40% full-and defatted soy flours for yam flour, ash and crude fibre contents increased while carbohydrate content, swelling power, Brabender paste viscosities decreased with increase in soy flour substitution of yam flour. Colour, texture, taste and overall acceptability of pastes (amala) from the mixed flours were rated lower than that of yam flour. Up to 10% defatted and 20% full fat soy flour substitution for yam flour was acceptable for amala.

  7. Evaluation of functional properties of composite flours and sensorial attributes of composite flour biscuits.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Suresh; Singh, Samsher; Kumari, Durvesh

    2015-06-01

    The present study was undertaken to develop biscuits from the composite flours. Composite flours were prepared by blending wheat flour with rice flour, green gram flour and potato flour in ratios of 100:0:0:0 (W100), 85:5:5:5 (W85), 70:10:10:10 (W70) and 55:15:15:15 (W55), respectively. The functional properties of composite flours such as swelling capacity, water absorption capacity, oil absorption capacity, emulsion activity, emulsion stability, foam capacity, foam stability, gelatinization temperature, least gelation concentration and bulk density were increased with increase in the incorporation of other flours with wheat flour. Overall acceptability for composite flour biscuits was awarded highest score for W55 followed by W70 and W85 as compared to control biscuits. All biscuits coincided in the range of 'like moderately' to 'like very much' for composite flours biscuits while 'like slightly' to like moderately' for control biscuits.

  8. Evaluation the quality characteristics of wheat flour and shelf-life of fresh noodles as affected by ozone treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Man; Zhu, Ke-Xue; Wang, Bi-Wen; Guo, Xiao-Na; Peng, Wei; Zhou, Hui-Ming

    2012-12-15

    In this study, the effects of ozone treatment on the microorganism mortality in wheat flour and shelf-life of fresh noodles were investigated, as well as the physicochemical properties of wheat flour and textural qualities of cooked noodles. Results showed that the total plate count (TPC) can be largely reduced in wheat flour exposed to ozone gas for 30 min and 60 min. Whiteness of flour and noodle sheet, dough stability, and peak viscosity of wheat starch were all increased by ozone treatment. Free cysteine content in wheat flour was shown to decrease significantly (P<0.05) as the treatment time increased and remarkable protein aggregates were observed in both reduced and non-reduced SDS-PAGE patterns. In addition, ozone treated noodles were generally higher in firmness, springiness, and chewiness, while lower in adhesiveness. Microbial growth and darkening rate of fresh noodles made from ozone treated flour were delayed significantly.

  9. Strain-Specific Survival of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Oil, Peanut Shell, and Chia Seeds.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen; Wang, Siyun

    2016-03-01

    In North America, outbreaks of Salmonella have been linked to low-water activity (aw) foods, such as nuts and seeds. These outbreaks have implicated an assortment of Salmonella serotypes. Some Salmonella serotypes (e.g., Enteritidis and Typhimurium) cause high proportions of salmonellosis. Nevertheless, there has recently been an emergence of uncommon Salmonella serotypes and strains (e.g., Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson) in low-aw foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival characteristics of Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson in three low-aw food ingredients with varying aw: peanut oil (aw = 0.521 ± 0.003), peanut shell (aw = 0.321 ± 0.20), and chia seeds (aw = 0.585 ± 0.003). The survival of individual Salmonella strains on each food matrix was monitored for a maximum of 150 days by spreading the bacterial cells onto Luria-Bertani and/or xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Overall, Salmonella survived for the longest periods of time in peanut oil (96 ± 8 days), followed by chia seeds (94 ± 46 days). The survival period was substantially reduced on the surface of peanut shell (42 ± 49 h), although PCR after 70 days of incubation revealed the presence of Salmonella cells. In addition, Salmonella exhibited a strain-specific response in the three low-aw foods tested. Salmonella Hartford was identified as highly persistent in all low-aw food matrices, whereas Salmonella Typhimurium was the least persistent. The current research emphasizes the adaptable nature of Salmonella to low-aw food ingredients. This may pose additional problems owing to the downstream production of various end products. Additionally, unique survival characteristics among Salmonella strains highlight the need for tailored mitigation strategies regarding high-risk Salmonella strains in the food industry.

  10. Effect of ketotifen premedication on adverse reactions during peanut oral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jagdis, Amanda; Berlin, Noam; Barron, Carly; Giruparajah, Mohana; Leader, Nathan; Maclachlan, Sean; Sussman, Gordon L

    2014-01-01

    Oral immunotherapy (OIT) has shown promise in inducing desensitization for food allergy. However, there are safety concerns regarding the frequency and severity of adverse events during food OIT. To evaluate the effect of Ketotifen premedication on adverse reactions during peanut OIT. A randomized single blind placebo controlled pilot study was performed. Peanut OIT was performed using a previously published protocol. Ketotifen was up-titrated to 2 mg twice daily over two weeks (week -2 to 0), followed by a peanut OIT initial escalation day (day 1). Ketotifen was administered from week 0-4 of peanut OIT; reactions to peanut OIT doses were recorded by clinic staff and subject diary. Six subjects (median age 10 years, peanut IgE >100kUA/L) were enrolled, 4 randomized to Ketotifen, 2 to placebo. The most common side effect of Ketotifen was fatigue (9% during up-titration). The rate of reaction per peanut OIT dose was lower for subjects on ketotifen (K) compared to placebo (P) during initial escalation on day 1 (K: 22% (8/36) vs. P: 67% (12/18)); week 0-4 build-up doses (K: 75% (3/4) vs. P: 100% (2/2)); and week 0-4 home doses (K: 50% (54/108) vs. P: 82% (27/33)). The rate of gastrointestinal symptoms per peanut OIT dose was also lower for subjects on ketotifen during initial escalation on day 1 (K: 17% (6/36) vs. P: 61% (11/18)); week 0-4 build-up doses (K: 75% (3/4) vs P: 100% (2/2)); and week 0-4 home doses (K: 46% (50/108) vs. P: 82% (27/33)). Ketotifen premedication is well tolerated and reduces the rate of gastrointestinal symptoms during peanut OIT. These findings require confirmation in a larger study of Ketotifen premedication used throughout peanut OIT. NCT0162515.

  11. Investigation of peanut oral immunotherapy with CpG/peanut nanoparticles in a murine model of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Kamal D; Siefert, Alyssa; Fahmy, Tarek M; Caplan, Michael J; Li, Xiu-Min; Sampson, Hugh A

    2016-08-01

    Treatments to reverse peanut allergy remain elusive. Current clinical approaches using peanut oral/sublingual immunotherapy are promising, but concerns about safety and long-term benefit remain a barrier to wide use. Improved methods of delivering peanut-specific immunotherapy are needed. We sought to investigate the efficacy and safety of peanut oral immunotherapy using CpG-coated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) nanoparticles containing peanut extract (CpG/PN-NPs) in a murine model of peanut allergy. C3H/HeJ mice were rendered peanut allergic by means of oral sensitization with peanut and cholera toxin. Mice were then subjected to 4 weekly gavages with CpG/PN-NPs, vehicle (PBS), nanoparticles alone, peanut alone, CpG nanoparticles, or peanut nanoparticles. Untreated mice served as naive controls. After completing therapy, mice underwent 5 monthly oral peanut challenges. Anaphylaxis was evaluated by means of visual assessment of symptom scores and measurement of body temperature and plasma histamine levels. Peanut-specific serum IgE, IgG1, and IgG2a levels were measured by using ELISA, as were cytokine recall responses in splenocyte cultures. Mice with peanut allergy treated with CpG/PN-NPs but not vehicle or other treatment components were significantly protected from anaphylaxis to all 5 oral peanut challenges, as indicated by lower symptom scores, less change in body temperature, and a lower increase of plasma histamine levels. Importantly, CpG/PN-NP treatment did not cause anaphylactic reactions. Treatment was associated with a sustained and significant decrease in peanut-specific IgE/IgG1 levels and an increase in peanut-specific IgG2a levels. Compared with vehicle control animals, peanut recall responses in splenocyte cultures from nanoparticle-treated mice showed significantly decreased levels of TH2 cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13) but increased IFN-γ levels in cell supernatants. Preclinical findings indicate that peanut oral immunotherapy with Cp

  12. Effects of barley β-glucan-enriched flour fractions on the glycaemic index of bread.

    PubMed

    Finocchiaro, Franca; Ferrari, Barbara; Gianinetti, Alberto; Scazzina, Francesca; Pellegrini, Nicoletta; Caramanico, Rosita; Salati, Claudia; Shirvanian, Vigen; Stanca, Antonio Michele

    2012-02-01

    The aim of this research was to evaluate β-glucan-enriched flours, obtained from barleys with either normal or waxy starch, for their effects on the glycaemic index (GI) and the quality of bread. Rheological results confirmed that when barley flour was included in the dough the overall quality of bread slightly worsened. However, positive consequences on glycaemia were obtained with the normal starch barley: the GI of all-wheat bread (82.8 ± 7.2) was significantly reduced (57.2 ± 7.9) when 40% of wheat flour was substituted with β-glucan-enriched barley flour (6.0% ± 0.1 β-glucan in the final flour blend). In contrast, this positive effect was significantly reduced (GI: 70.1 ± 9.1) when 40% of wheat flour was substituted with the β-glucan-enriched flour of a waxy barley (CDC Alamo; 6.6 ± 0.2 β-glucan in the final flour blend), suggesting that the ability of β-glucans to lower the GI was affected by the barley starch-type.

  13. Greenhouse Screening of Peanut for Resistance to Peanut Rust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Accessions of Arachis hypogaea, A. glabrata , A. monticola, and several other legumes were tested to Puccinia arachidis cultures PR-1-66 (from Puerto...accessions of A. glabrata were immune, six non-peanut legume species were also immune, and one accession of A. monticola produced only small, weakly sporulating pustules when tested to PR-1-66.

  14. Variation of analytical results for peanuts in energy bars and milk chocolate.

    PubMed

    Trucksess, Mary W; Whitaker, Thomas B; Slate, Andrew B; Williams, Kristina M; Brewer, Vickery A; Whittaker, Paul; Heeres, James T

    2004-01-01

    Peanuts contain proteins that can cause severe allergic reactions in some sensitized individuals. Studies were conducted to determine the percentage of recovery by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method in the analysis for peanuts in energy bars and milk chocolate and to determine the sampling, subsampling, and analytical variances associated with testing energy bars and milk chocolate for peanuts. Food products containing chocolate were selected because their composition makes sample preparation for subsampling difficult. Peanut-contaminated energy bars, noncontaminated energy bars, incurred milk chocolate containing known levels of peanuts, and peanut-free milk chocolate were used. A commercially available ELISA kit was used for analysis. The sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variances associated with each step of the test procedure to measure peanut protein were determined for energy bars. The sample preparation and analytical variances were determined for milk chocolate. Variances were found to be functions of peanut concentration. Sampling and subsampling variability associated with energy bars accounted for 96.6% of the total testing variability. Subsampling variability associated with powdered milk chocolate accounted for >60% of the total testing variability. The variability among peanut test results can be reduced by increasing sample size, subsample size, and number of analyses. For energy bars the effect of increasing sample size from 1 to 4 bars, subsample size from 5 to 20 g, and number of aliquots quantified from 1 to 2 on reducing the sampling, sample preparation, and analytical variance was demonstrated. For powdered milk chocolate, the effects of increasing subsample size from 5 to 20 g and number of aliquots quantified from 1 to 2 on reducing sample preparation and analytical variances were demonstrated. This study serves as a template for application to other foods, and for extrapolation to different sizes of samples and

  15. Removal of peanut allergen Ara h 1 from common hospital surfaces, toys and books using standard cleaning methods.

    PubMed

    Watson, Wade Ta; Woodrow, AnnMarie; Stadnyk, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    In children, a diagnosis of peanut allergy causes concern about accidental exposure because even small amounts of peanut protein could trigger an allergic reaction. Contamination of toys, books or other items by peanut butter in areas where individuals have eaten may occur in hospital waiting rooms and cafeterias. It is not known if hospital cleaning wipes are effective in removing peanut allergen. The purpose of this study was to determine whether cleaning peanut contaminated items with common household and hospital cleaning wipes would remove peanut allergen. 5 mL of peanut butter was evenly smeared on a 12 inch by 12 inch (30.5 by 30.5 cm) square on a nonporous (laminated plastic) table surface, a plastic doll, and a textured plastic ball, and 2.5 mL was applied to smooth and textured book covers. Samples for measurement of Ara h 1 were collected prior to the application of the peanut butter (baseline), and after cleaning with a common household wipe and two commercial hospital wipes. A monoclonal-based ELISA for arachis hypogaea allergen 1 (Ara h 1), range of detection 1.95-2000 ng/mL, was used to assess peanut allergen on each item. The samples were diluted 1:50 for testing. At baseline, there was no detectable Ara h 1 allergen on any item at baseline. Detectable Ara h 1 was detected on all products after applying peanut butter (range 1.2-19.0 micrograms/mL). After cleaning with any product, no Ara h 1 was detected on any item. Table surfaces, book covers and plastic toys can be cleaned to remove peanut allergen Ara h 1 using common household and hospital cleaning wipes. Regular cleaning of these products or cleaning prior to their use should be promoted to reduce the risk of accidental peanut exposure, especially in areas where they have been used by many children.

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome of the confused flour beetle Tribolium confusum (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae).

    PubMed

    Ou, Jing; Yao, Fu-Jiao; Li, Ya-Xiao; Yang, Yan; Jin, Cheng; Wei, Zhao-Ming

    2016-09-01

    Flour beetles of the genus Tribolium are economically important as destructive cosmopolitan pests of stored flour, corn, peanuts, and other dried agricultural products. The confused flour beetle Tribolium confusum Jacquelin du Val (1868) is one of the most important pest species of flour beetle. Here we sequenced and characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of T. confusum, the entire sequence is 15,813 bp in size with 72.8% AT content. It consists of 13 protein-coding genes (PCGs), 22 transfer RNA (tRNA), 2 ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes and one major non-coding AT-rich region. The mitogenome of T. confusum exhibits a gene arrangement and content identical to the most common type in insects. All PCGs are start with a typical ATN initiation codon, except for the cox1, which use AAC as its start codon instead of ATN. Ten genes use standard complete termination codon (six TAA, three TAG), whereas the cox2, cox3, nad4 and nad5 genes end with single T. Except for trnS1 ((AGN)), all tRNA genes display typical secondary cloverleaf structures as those of other insects. The sizes of the large and small ribosomal RNA genes are 1277 and 773 bp, respectively. The AT content of the AT-rich region is 79.5%. The 5 bp conserved motif TACTA was found in the intergenic region between trnS2 ((UCN)) and nad1.

  17. Properties of duck meat sausages supplemented with cereal flours.

    PubMed

    Yang, H S; Ali, M S; Jeong, J Y; Moon, S H; Hwang, Y H; Park, G B; Joo, S T

    2009-07-01

    Duck meat sausages were prepared using 10% beef fat (FDS) and 10% hydrated cereal flours including rice (RDS), wheat, corn, millet, and barley to replace fat. Control duck sausages (DS) were also prepared only with duck meat and duck meat plus 10% beef fat. Results showed that protein and fat contents significantly decreased and total expressible fluid reduced with the addition of cereal flours in duck sausage batters. The FDS had higher fat content and lower pH compared with others. Duck sausages with 10% supplemented wheat flour showed the lowest cooking loss among sausages and had similar redness and chroma values to FDS and DS. Texture analysis indicated that hardness of duck sausage significantly decreased when cereal flours and beef fat were added. In particular, RDS showed the lowest values for all texture measurements compared with others. Result of moisture absorption capacity suggested that the decrease in hardness in RDS was due to higher moisture retention for rice flour treatment. Sensory evaluation indicated that DS had significantly lower overall acceptability than RDS, due to its off-flavor, whereas RDS had higher overall acceptability than DS.

  18. Effect of mid season drought on phenolic compounds in peanut genotypes with different levels of resistance to drought

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought is a major constraint in peanut production. Drought not only reduces pod yield but also may affect phenolic compounds in peanut. This experiment was conducted for two years under field conditions. Soil moisture levels (field capacity and mid season drought stress) were assigned as main pl...

  19. Distribution of peanut protein in the home environment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In order to halt the rise in peanut allergy, we must determine how children become sensitized to peanut. High household peanut consumption used as an indirect marker of environmental peanut exposure is associated with the development of peanut allergy. We want to validate a method to quantify enviro...

  20. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts. Farmers stock peanuts means picked or threshed peanuts produced in the United States which have not...

  1. Will peanut hulls replace oil

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-12-01

    A low-cost, fast-curing wood adhesive has been recently developed by the University of Georgia, in which up to 80% of the petroleum ingredients can be replaced with a substance extracted from peanut hulls. An outline of the process is given.

  2. Peanut composition, flavor, and nutrition

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts are an important source of nutrition worldwide. They are used as food, as an ingredient and as an important source of cooking oil. They are usually roasted before consumption which results in changes in nutrition, texture and flavor. The flavor is important for repeat purchases. This cha...

  3. A survey of aflatoxin B1 and total aflatoxin contamination in baby food, peanut and corn products sold at retail in Indonesia analysed by ELISA and HPLC.

    PubMed

    Razzazi-Fazeli, E; Noviandi, C T; Porasuphatana, S; Agus, A; Böhm, J

    2004-06-01

    Aflatoxin contamination has been well known as a world-wide health-threatening problem in tropical countries including Indonesia. This research was undertaken to determine the degree of aflatoxin contamination in different Indonesian foodstuffs. A preliminary survey was carried out to evaluate the level of total aflatoxin (AfT) and aflatoxin B1 (AfB1) contamination of baby foods, peanut products, and corn products, which were purchased from traditional markets and supermarkets in Indonesia during the year 2001-2002. Eighty two peanut products, 12 baby foods products, and 11 corn products from different brands were analysed for AfT and AfB1 using the Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) method. The results indicate that, of the brands analysed, 35% of the peanut products were contaminated with aflatoxins at various levels (range 5 to 870 μg/kg). Peanut-chilli sauces had the highest percentage of AfT contamination 9/12 (75%), which was followed by traditional snacks 5/11 (45%), peanut butter 4/11 (40%), flour egg coated peanut 6/16 (37%), and peanut cake 3/10 (30%). Fried peanuts and roasted peanut were found to contain aflatoxin at relatively lower percentages of 9% and 8%, respectively. From the 12 analysed baby food samples, on the other hand, no sample was found to be contaminated with aflatoxins. Two of 11 samples (18%) of corn based products were contaminated with AfT, ranging between 5.8 and 12.4 μg/kg. Additionally, 30 selected samples in different concentration ranges were further analysed to verify the correlation between ELISA and HPLC techniques and results were compared.

  4. Cold plasma: A new technology to modify wheat flour functionality.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, Niloufar; Bayliss, Danny; Chope, Gemma; Penson, Simon; Perehinec, Tania; Fisk, Ian D

    2016-07-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma has the potential to modify biological chemistry and modulate physical surface properties. Wheat flour was treated by low levels of cold plasma (air, 15V and 20V) for 60 or 120s. There was no change in the total aerobic bacterial count or total mould count as a result of treatment. Treatment did not impact the concentration of total non-starch lipids, or non-polar and glycolipids. However, treatment did reduce total free fatty acids and phospholipids and was dose dependent. Oxidation markers (hydroperoxide value and head space n-hexanal) increased with treatment time and voltage, which confirmed the acceleration of lipid oxidation. Total proteins were not significantly influenced by treatment although there was a trend towards higher molecular weight fractions which indicated protein oxidation and treated flour did produce a stronger dough. This study confirms the potential of cold plasma as a tool to modify flour functionality.

  5. Administration of a probiotic with peanut oral immunotherapy: A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mimi L K; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Orsini, Francesca; Tey, Dean; Robinson, Marnie; Su, Ee Lyn; Licciardi, Paul; Burks, Wesley; Donath, Susan

    2015-03-01

    Coadministration of a bacterial adjuvant with oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been suggested as a potential treatment for food allergy. To evaluate a combined therapy comprising a probiotic together with peanut OIT. We performed a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized trial of the probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus CGMCC 1.3724 and peanut OIT (probiotic and peanut oral immunotherapy [PPOIT]) in children (1-10 years) with peanut allergy. The primary outcome was induction of sustained unresponsiveness 2 to 5 weeks after discontinuation of treatment (referred to as possible sustained unresponsiveness). Secondary outcomes were desensitization, peanut skin prick test, and specific IgE and specific IgG4 measurements. Sixty-two children were randomized and stratified by age (≤5 and >5 years) and peanut skin test wheal size (≤10 and >10 mm); 56 reached the trial's end. Baseline demographics were similar across groups. Possible sustained unresponsiveness was achieved in 82.1% receiving PPOIT and 3.6% receiving placebo (P < .001). Nine children need to be treated for 7 to achieve sustained unresponsiveness (number needed to treat, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.06-1.59). Of the subjects, 89.7% receiving PPOIT and 7.1% receiving placebo were desensitized (P < .001). PPOIT was associated with reduced peanut skin prick test responses and peanut-specific IgE levels and increased peanut-specific IgG4 levels (all P < .001). PPOIT-treated participants reported a greater number of adverse events, mostly with maintenance home dosing. This is the first randomized placebo-controlled trial evaluating the novel coadministration of a probiotic and peanut OIT and assessing sustained unresponsiveness in children with peanut allergy. PPOIT was effective in inducing possible sustained unresponsiveness and immune changes that suggest modulation of the peanut-specific immune response. Further work is required to confirm sustained unresponsiveness after a longer period of secondary peanut elimination and

  6. 21 CFR 137.155 - Bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bromated flour. 137.155 Section 137.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  7. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  8. 21 CFR 137.220 - Durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Durum flour. 137.220 Section 137.220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  9. 21 CFR 137.175 - Phosphated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Phosphated flour. 137.175 Section 137.175 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  10. 21 CFR 137.220 - Durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Durum flour. 137.220 Section 137.220 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  11. 21 CFR 137.155 - Bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bromated flour. 137.155 Section 137.155 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours...

  12. Household peanut consumption as a risk factor for the development of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Fox, Adam T; Sasieni, Peter; du Toit, George; Syed, Huma; Lack, Gideon

    2009-02-01

    Most children with peanut allergy (PA) react on first known oral exposure to peanut. Recent data suggest cutaneous exposure as a route of sensitization. This study aimed to establish the relevant route of peanut exposure in the development of allergy. Questionnaires were administered to children with PA and to high-risk controls (with egg allergy) and controls without allergy. Questionnaires were completed before subjects were aware of their PA status, avoiding recall bias. Questionnaires recorded maternal peanut consumption during pregnancy, breast-feeding, and the first year of life. Peanut consumption was determined among all household members, allowing quantification of environmental household exposure (household peanut). Median weekly household peanut in the 133 PA cases was significantly elevated (18.8 g) compared with 150 controls without allergy (6.9 g) and 160 high-risk controls (1.9 g). There were no differences in infant peanut consumption between groups. Differences in maternal peanut consumption during pregnancy (and lactation) were significant but become nonsignificant after adjusting for household peanut. A dose-response relationship was observed between environmental (nonoral) peanut exposure and the development of PA, which was strongest for peanut butter. Early oral exposure to peanut in infants with high environmental peanut exposure may have had a protective effect against the development of PA. High levels of environmental exposure to peanut during infancy appear to promote sensitization, whereas low levels may be protective in atopic children. No effect of maternal peanut consumption during pregnancy or lactation is observed, supporting the hypothesis that peanut sensitization occurs as a result of environmental exposure.

  13. Influence of pectinase treatment on the physicochemical properties of potato flours.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun-Jung; Kim, Hyun-Seok

    2015-01-15

    Untreated and pectinase-treated potato flours from Atlantic and Superior cultivars were characterised to identify the effects of pectinase treatment on their physicochemical properties. Steam-cooked potato whole-tissues were treated with and without pectinase to prepare the dehydrated potato flours. Untreated and pectinase-treated potato flours were investigated with respect to morphology, chemical composition, starch leaching, swelling power, gelatinization, and pasting viscosity. Upon viewing with scanning electron microscopy and light microscopy, the pectinase-treated (relative to untreated) potato flours revealed that the retrograded starch materials were present in intact parenchyma cells, apparently exhibiting granular structures. Their protein and ash contents were reduced through pectinase treatment. While starch leachate contents were lower for the pectinase-treated potato flours, the opposite trend in swelling powers was observed. Pectinase-treated potato flours exhibited higher melting temperatures and pasting viscosities than untreated counterparts. Overall, the modification of potato flour morphology by pectinase treatment may result in alteration of physicochemical properties of potato flours. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Grain-size effect on the structure and antiobesity activity of konjac flour.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Xia, Jun; Wang, Yang; Xie, Bijun

    2005-09-21

    The effect of high-frequency oscillatory type ball-mill treatment on the structure and antiobesity activity of konjac flour was investigated. The grain size of konjac flour changed from 657.3 microm (d(50)) to 23.7 microm (d(50)) after 4 h of treatment. The structural change of the konjac flour with different grain size was characterized by using X-ray diffraction (XRD) differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results indicated that the crystallinity decreased and the diffraction peak drifted not only by when the crystallization region was reduced but also when the crystalline structure was changed. With the decrease of the grain size and crystallinity, the konjac flour grain, especially the 4 h milled konjac flour, swelled more rapidly and led to the improvement of the antiobesity effect. Compared with the native konjac flour, the 4 h milled konjac flour could significantly decrease the body weight and total wet weight of fat of nutritional obese rats (P < 0.05) and also decreased the contents of triglyceride, glucose, and high-density lipoprotein in blood of nutritional obese rat significantly (P < 0.05), which meant the grain-size effect of konjac flour improved its antiobesity activity notably.

  15. Gamma irradiation of peanut kernel to control mold growth and to diminish aflatoxin contamination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y.-Y. Chiou, R.

    1996-09-01

    Peanut kernel inoculated with Aspergillus parasiticus conidia were gamma irradiated with 0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy using Co60. Levels higher than 2.5 kGy were effective in retarding the outgrowth of A. parasiticus and reducing the population of natural mold contaminants. However, complete elimination of these molds was not achieved even at the dose of 10 kGy. After 4 wk incubation of the inoculated kernels in a humidified condition, aflatoxins produced by the surviving A. parasiticus were 69.12, 2.42, 57.36 and 22.28 μ/g, corresponding to the original irradiation levels. Peroxide content of peanut oils prepared from the irradiated peanuts increased with increased irradiation dosage. After storage, at each irradiation level, peroxide content in peanuts stored at -14°C was lower than that in peanuts stored at an ambient temperature. TBA values and CDHP contents of the oil increased with increased irradiation dosage and changed slightly after storage. However, fatty acid contents of the peanut oil varied in a limited range as affected by the irradiation dosage and storage temperature. The SDS-PAGE protein pattern of peanuts revealed no noticeable variation of protein subunits resulting from irradiation and storage.

  16. Chinese herbal extracts of Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus suppress IgE production and prevent peanut-induced anaphylaxis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Peanut allergy is characterized by increased levels of peanut-specific IgE in the serum of most patients. Thus, the most logical therapy would be to inhibit the IgE production by committed B-cells. This study aims to investigate the unreported anti-IgE effects of Chinese herbal extracts of Rubia cordifolia (Qiancao) and Dianthus superbus (Qumai). Methods Seventy herbal extracts were tested for their ability to reduce IgE secretion by a human B-cell line. Those with the lowest inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values were tested in a mouse model of peanut-anaphylaxis. Anaphylactic scores, body temperature, plasma histamine and peanut-specific-immunoglobulins were determined. Results Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus inhibited the in vitro IgE production by a human B-cell line in a dose-dependent manner and the in vivo IgE production in a murine model of peanut allergy without affecting peanut-specific-IgG1 levels. After challenge, all mice in the sham groups developed anaphylactic reactions and increased plasma histamine levels. The extract-treated mice demonstrated significantly reduced peanut-triggered anaphylactic reactions and plasma histamine levels. Conclusion The extracts of Rubia cordifolia and Dianthus superbus inhibited the IgE production in vivo and in vitro as well as reduced anaphylactic reactions in peanut-allergic mice, suggesting potentials for allergy treatments. PMID:21961957

  17. Revised recommendations for iron fortification of wheat flour and an evaluation of the expected impact of current national wheat flour fortification programs.

    PubMed

    Hurrell, Richard; Ranum, Peter; de Pee, Saskia; Biebinger, Ralf; Hulthen, Lena; Johnson, Quentin; Lynch, Sean

    2010-03-01

    Iron fortification of wheat flour is widely used as a strategy to combat iron deficiency. To review recent efficacy studies and update the guidelines for the iron fortification of wheat flour. Efficacy studies with a variety of iron-fortified foods were reviewed to determine the minimum daily amounts of additional iron that have been shown to meaningfully improve iron status in children, adolescents, and women of reproductive age. Recommendations were computed by determining the fortification levels needed to provide these additional quantities of iron each day in three different wheat flour consumption patterns. Current wheat flour iron fortification programs in 78 countries were evaluated. When average daily consumption of low-extraction (< or = 0.8% ash) wheat flour is 150 to 300 g, it is recommended to add 20 ppm iron as NaFeEDTA, or 30 ppm as dried ferrous sulfate or ferrous fumarate. If sensory changes or cost limits the use of these compounds, electrolytic iron at 60 ppm is the second choice. Corresponding fortification levels were calculated for wheat flour intakes of < 150 g/day and > 300 g/day. Electrolytic iron is not recommended for flour intakes of < 150 g/day. Encapsulated ferrous sulfate or fumarate can be added at the same concentrations as the non-encapsulated compounds. For high-extraction wheat flour (> 0.8% ash), NaFeEDTA is the only iron compound recommended. Only nine national programs (Argentina, Chile, Egypt, Iran, Jordan, Lebanon, Syria, Turkmenistan, and Uruguay) were judged likely to have a significant positive impact on iron status if coverage is optimized. Most countries use non-recommended, low-bioavailability, atomized, reduced or hydrogen-reduced iron powders. Most current iron fortification programs are likely to be ineffective. Legislation needs updating in many countries so that flour is fortified with adequate levels of the recommended iron compounds.

  18. The Potential Use of Fermented Chickpea and Faba Bean Flour as Food Ingredients.

    PubMed

    Chandra-Hioe, Maria V; Wong, Christina H M; Arcot, Jayashree

    2016-03-01

    Apart from being a rich and inexpensive protein source, legumes provide essential vitamins, minerals and dietary fibre. Considering the nutritional benefits, legumes flour can potentially be incorporated in the development of new products. The aim of this study was to investigate whether fermentation affects the protein content, in vitro protein digestibility, trypsin inhibitor activity and the functionality of proteins in faba bean, desi and kabuli chickpea. Australian grown chickpea and faba bean were selected and initially soaked, de-hulled, dried and milled into flour. This was fermented with lyophilised yoghurt cultures in a 30 °C orbital shaker for 16 h. While protein contents in fermented desi and kabuli flour were lower than their raw counterparts (p > 0.05), it was significantly higher in fermented faba bean. A significant increase (9.5%) in in vitro protein digestibility was found in fermented desi. Trypsin inhibitor activity in fermented desi, kabuli and faba bean reduced by 2.7, 1.1 and 4.7%, respectively (p > 0.05). Overall, the in vitro protein digestibility in flour samples increased, while simultaneously reducing the trypsin inhibitor activity. The water absorption capacity of the fermented kabuli flour significantly increased by 11.3%. All fermented flour samples had significantly higher oil absorption capacity than their corresponding raw flour that was likely due to increased insoluble hydrophobic protein. Although, the foaming capacity in all fermented flour samples was significantly lower than their respective raw samples, only fermented desi and faba bean flour showed lower foaming stability (p > 0.05). The present study suggests that fermented legume flour could fulfill the demand for innovative products of higher nutritional value.

  19. [Supplementation of wheat flour with chickpea (Cicer arietinum) flour. I. Preparation of flours and their properties for bread making].

    PubMed

    Figuerola, F E; Estévez, A M; Castillo, E

    1987-06-01

    The feasibility of adding chick-pea flour substituting part of wheat flour in yeast-leavened bread-making in order to increase the protein value, was studied. A 70% extraction chick-pea flour of commercial granulometry (150 mu) was prepared. Wheat flours of 74% and 78% extraction were then blended with 5%, 10% and 15% of chick-pea flour. Every flour and blend were subsequently analyzed to determine protein, ash, fiber, fat and maltose content, as well as sedimentation, farinogram and bread-making. Addition of chick-pea flour increased protein, fiber, ash and fat content in the blends, not causing a severe effect on quality, even at the 15% level of substitution. Blends showed an increase in maltose content, W value and bread specific volume. Furthermore, breads prepared were of good quality even without the use of maturing agents.

  20. Peanut lectin-binding sites in large bowel carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cooper, H S

    1982-10-01

    Peanut lectin is known to bind to B-D-Gal-(1 leads to 3)-D-GalNac which provides antigenic determination for the T (TAg) blood group antigen. We examined 33 rectosigmoid carcinomas and 15 corresponding controls for their ability to express peanut lectin-binding sites. In controls one could localize TAg to the supranuclear portion of the cell, however, in cancers one noticed a cytostructural relocalization of TAg with the following two major patterns: localization to the region of the glycocalyx and localization intracytoplasmically in the apical portion of the cell. These two patterns were associated with glandular differentiation. Less frequently noted or in association with the above was a mucin glob-like pattern and/or a fine diffuse intracytoplasmic pattern associated with solid, nonglandular areas. The more poorly differentiated cancers less frequently expressed peanut lectin-binding sites. Benign (nontransitional zone) epithelium in those patients whose tumor expressed TAg was negative for peanut lectin-binding sites in 66 per cent of the cases. Reduced tumoral glycosyltransferases may explain this increased synthesis of TAg in cancers as compared with controls, if one considers TAg to be an incomplete glycoprotein of the MN blood group system.

  1. Influence of jet milling and particle size on the composition, physicochemical and mechanical properties of barley and rye flours.

    PubMed

    Drakos, Antonios; Kyriakakis, Georgios; Evageliou, Vasiliki; Protonotariou, Styliani; Mandala, Ioanna; Ritzoulis, Christos

    2017-01-15

    Finer barley and rye flours were produced by jet milling at two feed rates. The effect of reduced particle size on composition and several physicochemical and mechanical properties of all flours were evaluated. Moisture content decreased as the size of the granules decreased. Differences on ash and protein contents were observed. Jet milling increased the amount of damaged starch in both rye and barley flours. True density increased with decreased particle size whereas porosity and bulk density increased. The solvent retention capacity profile was also affected by jet milling. Barley was richer in phenolics and had greater antioxidant activity than rye. Regarding colour, both rye and barley flours when subjected to jet milling became brighter, whereas their yellowness was not altered significantly. The minimum gelation concentration for all flours was 16%w/v. Barley flour gels were stronger, firmer and more elastic than the rye ones.

  2. Effect of germination on the physicochemical and antioxidant characteristics of rice flour from three rice varieties from Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chinma, Chiemela Enyinnaya; Anuonye, Julian Chukwuemeka; Simon, Omotade Comfort; Ohiare, Raliat Ozavize; Danbaba, Nahemiah

    2015-10-15

    This study determined the effect of germination (48 h) on the physicochemical and antioxidant characteristics of rice flour from three rice varieties from Nigeria. Local rice varieties (Jamila, Jeep and Kwandala) were evaluated and compared to an improved variety (MR 219). Physicochemical and antioxidant properties of flours were determined using standard methods. Protein, magnesium, phosphorus, potassium and antioxidant properties of rice flours increased after germination while phytic acid and total starch contents decreased. Foaming capacity and stability of rice flours increased after germination. Germination resulted to changes in pasting and thermal characteristics of rice flours. Germinated rice flours had better physicochemical and antioxidant properties with reduced phytic acid and starch contents compared to MR 219, which can be utilized as functional ingredients in the preparation of rice-based products.

  3. Peanut allergy: Effect of environmental peanut exposure in children with filaggrin loss-of-function mutations

    PubMed Central

    Brough, Helen A.; Simpson, Angela; Makinson, Kerry; Hankinson, Jenny; Brown, Sara; Douiri, Abdel; Belgrave, Danielle C.M.; Penagos, Martin; Stephens, Alick C.; McLean, W.H. Irwin; Turcanu, Victor; Nicolaou, Nicolaos; Custovic, Adnan; Lack, Gideon

    2014-01-01

    Background Filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations lead to an impaired skin barrier associated with peanut allergy. Household peanut consumption is associated with peanut allergy, and peanut allergen in household dust correlates with household peanut consumption. Objective We sought to determine whether environmental peanut exposure increases the odds of peanut allergy and whether FLG mutations modulate these odds. Methods Exposure to peanut antigen in dust within the first year of life was measured in a population-based birth cohort. Peanut sensitization and peanut allergy (defined by using oral food challenges or component-resolved diagnostics [CRD]) were assessed at 8 and 11 years. Genotyping was performed for 6 FLG mutations. Results After adjustment for infantile atopic dermatitis and preceding egg skin prick test (SPT) sensitization, we found a strong and significant interaction between natural log (ln [loge]) peanut dust levels and FLG mutations on peanut sensitization and peanut allergy. Among children with FLG mutations, for each ln unit increase in the house dust peanut protein level, there was a more than 6-fold increased odds of peanut SPT sensitization, CRD sensitization, or both in children at ages 8 years, 11 years, or both and a greater than 3-fold increased odds of peanut allergy compared with odds seen in children with wild-type FLG. There was no significant effect of exposure in children without FLG mutations. In children carrying an FLG mutation, the threshold level for peanut SPT sensitization was 0.92 μg of peanut protein per gram (95% CI, 0.70-1.22 μg/g), that for CRD sensitization was 1.03 μg/g (95% CI, 0.90-1.82 μg/g), and that for peanut allergy was 1.17 μg/g (95% CI, 0.01-163.83 μg/g). Conclusion Early-life environmental peanut exposure is associated with an increased risk of peanut sensitization and allergy in children who carry an FLG mutation. These data support the hypothesis that peanut allergy develops through

  4. Peanut allergy: effect of environmental peanut exposure in children with filaggrin loss-of-function mutations.

    PubMed

    Brough, Helen A; Simpson, Angela; Makinson, Kerry; Hankinson, Jenny; Brown, Sara; Douiri, Abdel; Belgrave, Danielle C M; Penagos, Martin; Stephens, Alick C; McLean, W H Irwin; Turcanu, Victor; Nicolaou, Nicolaos; Custovic, Adnan; Lack, Gideon

    2014-10-01

    Filaggrin (FLG) loss-of-function mutations lead to an impaired skin barrier associated with peanut allergy. Household peanut consumption is associated with peanut allergy, and peanut allergen in household dust correlates with household peanut consumption. We sought to determine whether environmental peanut exposure increases the odds of peanut allergy and whether FLG mutations modulate these odds. Exposure to peanut antigen in dust within the first year of life was measured in a population-based birth cohort. Peanut sensitization and peanut allergy (defined by using oral food challenges or component-resolved diagnostics [CRD]) were assessed at 8 and 11 years. Genotyping was performed for 6 FLG mutations. After adjustment for infantile atopic dermatitis and preceding egg skin prick test (SPT) sensitization, we found a strong and significant interaction between natural log (ln [loge]) peanut dust levels and FLG mutations on peanut sensitization and peanut allergy. Among children with FLG mutations, for each ln unit increase in the house dust peanut protein level, there was a more than 6-fold increased odds of peanut SPT sensitization, CRD sensitization, or both in children at ages 8 years, 11 years, or both and a greater than 3-fold increased odds of peanut allergy compared with odds seen in children with wild-type FLG. There was no significant effect of exposure in children without FLG mutations. In children carrying an FLG mutation, the threshold level for peanut SPT sensitization was 0.92 μg of peanut protein per gram (95% CI, 0.70-1.22 μg/g), that for CRD sensitization was 1.03 μg/g (95% CI, 0.90-1.82 μg/g), and that for peanut allergy was 1.17 μg/g (95% CI, 0.01-163.83 μg/g). Early-life environmental peanut exposure is associated with an increased risk of peanut sensitization and allergy in children who carry an FLG mutation. These data support the hypothesis that peanut allergy develops through transcutaneous sensitization in children with an impaired

  5. Determination of protein levels in soy and peanut oils by colorimetric assay and ELISA.

    PubMed

    Jablonski, Joseph E; Fu, Tong-Jen; Jackson, Lauren S; Gendel, Steven M

    2010-01-01

    Analytical methods are needed for measuring the levels of protein from allergenic food transferred into cooking oil. A simple method for determination of total protein in cooking oils was developed. Oil was extracted with phosphate-buffered saline with 0.05% Tween (PBST) and the extracts were partitioned with hexane to remove residual oil. Total protein in the PBST extracts was assayed with bicinchoninic acid (BCA), micro-BCA, reducing-agent compatible BCA and CB-XT kits. These methods were used to measure recovery of protein from peanut butter spikes of soy and peanut oil in the range of 50-1000 ppm. Recoveries were generally above 70%. However, the BCA and micro-BCA assays were subject to interference and enhanced color formation which were probably due to co-extracted antioxidants present in oil. The reducing agent-compatible BCA and CB-X protein assays reduced interference and gave lower protein values in crude, cold-pressed, and refined peanut oils. Heating oil to 180 degrees C before extraction also reduced interference-induced color enhancement. A commercial ELISA test kit was also used to measure peanut protein in oil spiked with peanut butter. Recovery of peanut residues measured by ELISA was significantly decreased when the peanut butter-spiked oil was heated to 180 degrees C compared to unheated oil. Recovery of spiked peanut butter protein measured by the buffer extraction-colorimetric method was not decreased in heated oil. The method developed here could be used to determine protein levels in crude and refined oil, and to assess the potential for allergen cross-contact from reused cooking oil.

  6. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Self-rising flour. 137.180 Section 137.180 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.180 Self-rising flour. (a) Self-rising flour, self-rising white flour, self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of...

  7. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Self-rising flour. 137.180 Section 137.180 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.180 Self-rising flour. (a) Self-rising flour, self-rising white flour, self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of...

  8. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Self-rising flour. 137.180 Section 137.180 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.180 Self-rising flour. (a) Self-rising flour, self-rising white flour, self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of...

  9. 21 CFR 137.180 - Self-rising flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Self-rising flour. 137.180 Section 137.180 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.180 Self-rising flour. (a) Self-rising flour, self-rising white flour, self-rising wheat flour, is an intimate mixture of flour, sodium bicarbonate, and one or more of...

  10. Atopic dermatitis increases the effect of exposure to peanut antigen in dust on peanut sensitization and likely peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Brough, Helen A; Liu, Andrew H; Sicherer, Scott; Makinson, Kerry; Douiri, Abdel; Brown, Sara J; Stephens, Alick C; Irwin McLean, W H; Turcanu, Victor; Wood, Robert A; Jones, Stacie M; Burks, Wesley; Dawson, Peter; Stablein, Donald; Sampson, Hugh; Lack, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    History and severity of atopic dermatitis (AD) are risk factors for peanut allergy. Recent evidence suggests that children can become sensitized to food allergens through an impaired skin barrier. Household peanut consumption, which correlates strongly with peanut protein levels in household dust, is a risk factor for peanut allergy. We sought to assess whether environmental peanut exposure (EPE) is a risk for peanut sensitization and allergy and whether markers of an impaired skin barrier modify this risk. Peanut protein in household dust (in micrograms per gram) was assessed in highly atopic children (age, 3-15 months) recruited to the Consortium of Food Allergy Research Observational Study. History and severity of AD, peanut sensitization, and likely allergy (peanut-specific IgE, ≥5 kUA/mL) were assessed at recruitment into the Consortium of Food Allergy Research study. There was an exposure-response relationship between peanut protein levels in household dust and peanut skin prick test (SPT) sensitization and likely allergy. In the final multivariate model an increase in 4 log2 EPE units increased the odds of peanut SPT sensitization (1.71-fold; 95% CI, 1.13- to 2.59-fold; P = .01) and likely peanut allergy (PA; 2.10-fold; 95% CI, 1.20- to 3.67-fold; P < .01). The effect of EPE on peanut SPT sensitization was augmented in children with a history of AD (OR, 1.97; 95% CI, 1.26-3.09; P < .01) and augmented even further in children with a history of severe AD (OR, 2.41; 95% CI, 1.30-4.47; P < .01); the effect of EPE on PA was also augmented in children with a history of AD (OR, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.31-4.18; P < .01). Exposure to peanut antigen in dust through an impaired skin barrier in atopically inflamed skin is a plausible route for peanut SPT sensitization and PA. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Prick by Prick Induced Anaphylaxis in a Patient with Peanuts and Lupine Allergy: Awareness of Risks and Role of Component Resolved Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Ciccarelli, Anna; Calabrò, Claudia; Imperatore, Clara; Scala, Guglielmo

    2014-01-01

    A case of anaphylaxis is reported in the course of a prick by prick with Lupinus albus and roasted peanut in a 20-year-old woman. We focused on some main topics. First of all it seems important to underscore the potential risks connected to the practice of the prick-by-prick with fresh foods in allergic patients, especially when testing cross-reactive substances, such as White Lupine, peanuts, or soy. It is important that clinicians who perform prick tests be aware of the risk related with in vivo tests in allergic patients. Second, we discuss the problem of the hidden allergens, such as White Lupine flour, or soy flour which are utilized to improve wheat flour because of their lower cost. Patients with a demonstrated allergy to peanuts should be assessed for lupine allergy and informed about the “hidden allergens” issue. Finally, we believe that component resolved diagnosis, the serum specific IgE against molecular components, that is normally considered a second-level diagnostic step has an important role even as a first line approach at least in some selected cases. PMID:25477973

  12. Redefining the major peanut allergens

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Yonghua

    2015-01-01

    Food allergy has become a major public health concern in westernized countries, and allergic reactions to peanuts are particularly common and severe. Allergens are defined as antigens that elicit an IgE response, and most allergenic materials (e.g., pollens, danders, and foods) contain multiple allergenic proteins. This has led to the concept that there are “major” allergens and allergens of less importance. “Major allergens” have been defined as allergens that bind a large amount of IgE from the majority of patients and have biologic activity. However, the ability of an allergen to cross-link complexes of IgE and its high-affinity receptor FcεRI (IgE/FcεRI), which we have termed its allergic effector activity, does not correlate well with assays of IgE binding. To identify the proteins that are the most active allergens in peanuts, we and others have employed in vitro model assays of allergen-mediated cross-linking of IgE/FcεRI complexes and have demonstrated that the most potent allergens are not necessarily those that bind the most IgE. The importance of a specific allergen can be determined by measuring the allergic effector activity of that allergen following purification under non-denaturing conditions and by specifically removing the allergen from a complex allergenic extract either by chromatography or by specific immunodepletion. In our studies of peanut allergens, our laboratory has found that two related allergens, Ara h 2 and Ara h 6, together account for the majority of the effector activity in a crude peanut extract. Furthermore, murine studies demonstrated that Ara h 2 and Ara h 6 are not only the major elicitors of anaphylaxis in this system, but also can effectively desensitize peanut-allergic mice. As a result of these observations, we propose that the definition of a major allergen should be based on the potency of that allergen in assays of allergic effector activity and demonstration that removal of that allergen from an extract

  13. The Peanut Plant and Light: Spermidines from Peanut Flowers and Studies of their Photoisomerization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early history and significance of the peanut crop is discussed. Annual world production of peanuts at 30 million tons makes this crop one of the most important agricultural commodities. Unusual physiology, inflorescence, and infructescence of the peanut plant make it an attractive object for scienti...

  14. Early consumption of peanuts in infancy is associated with a low prevalence of peanut allergy.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Despite guidelines recommending avoidance of peanuts during infancy in the U.K. and North America, peanut allergy (PA) continues to rise in these countries. PA is reported to be a rare occurrence in countries where peanuts are introduced early in infancy. To determine the prevalence of PA among Isr...

  15. Proteomic analysis of differential protein expression and processing induced modifications in peanuts and peanut skins

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is grown extensively worldwide for its edible seed and oil. Proteomics has become a powerful tool in plant research; however, studies involving legumes, and especially peanuts, are in their infancy. Furthermore, protein expression in the peanut seed coat (skin), which is...

  16. 78 FR 77368 - Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Amendment to Primary Peanut-Producing States...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-23

    ... Agricultural Marketing Service 7 CFR Part 1216 Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order; Amendment to Primary Peanut-Producing States and Adjustment of Membership AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA...-coordinated program of promotion, research, and information designed to strengthen the position of peanuts in...

  17. Distribution of peanut allergen in the environment.

    PubMed

    Perry, Tamara T; Conover-Walker, Mary Kay; Pomés, Anna; Chapman, Martin D; Wood, Robert A

    2004-05-01

    Patients with peanut allergy can have serious reactions to very small quantities of peanut allergen and often go to extreme measures to avoid potential contact with this allergen. The purpose of this study was to detect peanut allergen under various environmental conditions and examine the effectiveness of cleaning agents for allergen removal. A monoclonal-based ELISA for Arachis hypogaea allergen 1 (Ara h 1; range of detection, 30-2000 ng/mL) was used to assess peanut contamination on cafeteria tables and other surfaces in schools, the presence of residual peanut protein after using various cleaning products on hands and tabletops, and airborne peanut allergen during the consumption of several forms of peanut. After hand washing with liquid soap, bar soap, or commercial wipes, Ara h 1 was undetectable. Plain water and antibacterial hand sanitizer left detectable Ara h 1 on 3 of 12 and 6 of 12 hands, respectively. Common household cleaning agents removed peanut allergen from tabletops, except dishwashing liquid, which left Ara h 1 on 4 of 12 tables. Of the 6 area preschools and schools evaluated, Ara h 1 was found on 1 of 13 water fountains, 0 of 22 desks, and 0 of 36 cafeteria tables. Airborne Ara h 1 was undetectable in simulated real-life situations when participants consumed peanut butter, shelled peanuts, and unshelled peanuts. The major peanut allergen, Ara h 1, is relatively easily cleaned from hands and tabletops with common cleaning agents and does not appear to be widely distributed in preschools and schools. We were not able to detect airborne allergen in many simulated environments.

  18. Comparison of the chemical composition and nutritional value of Amaranthus cruentus flour and its protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Escudero, N L; de Arellano, M L; Luco, J M; Giménez, M S; Mucciarelli, S I

    2004-01-01

    Plants constitute an alternative source of proteins in the human diet, with advantages over animal proteins because of their low content of saturated fats and absence of cholesterol. Within the framework of a wider research project on the role of Amaranthus cruentus (Ac) in lipid metabolism, in this work the chemical composition and biological value of the Ac flour and its protein concentrate were compared. Proximate chemical composition, amino acid and fatty acid profiles, some antinutrient factors, and biological values were determined for Ac seed flour and its protein concentrate obtained by extraction at pH 11 and precipitation at pH 4.5. The flour protein content was 16.6 g% while that of the concentrate was 52.56 g%. The content of the soluble dietary fiber with a hypolipemic function was notably higher in the protein concentrate (12.90 g%) than in the seed flour (4.29 g%). The protein concentrate also exhibited a higher content of insoluble dietary fiber. The Ac flour and the concentrate contain 75.44 and 56.95% unsaturated fatty acids, respectively. Squalene, which affects the biosynthesis of cholesterol, was detected both in the flour and the concentrate oils, with a higher content in the concentrate (9.53%) as compared to the flour (6.23%). Comparison of the amino acid composition with the FAO pattern protein indicated that the concentrate does not have limiting amino acids, while the flour has leucine, threonine, and valine. The content of lysine was high in both the flour and the concentrate, making these products particularly useful as a complement for cereal flour, which is deficient in this amino acid. The biological quality analysis demonstrated an improvement in the quality of the concentrate. The presence of saponins, phytic acid, and trypsin inhibitors in the concentrate, which favor the metabolism of lipids, suggests that consumption of the concentrate might reduce the risk of heart disease.

  19. Microbiological, Nutritional, and Sensory Quality of Bread Produced from Wheat and Potato Flour Blends

    PubMed Central

    Ijah, Udeme Joshua Josiah; Aduloju, Mercy Oluwayemisi; Aransiola, Sesan Abiodun

    2014-01-01

    Dehydrated uncooked potato (Irish and sweet) flour was blended by weight with commercial wheat flour at 0 to 10% levels of substitution to make bread. Comparative study of the microbial and nutritional qualities of the bread was undertaken. The total aerobic bacterial counts ranged from 3.0 × 105 cfu/g to 1.09 × 106 cfu/g while the fungal counts ranged from 8.0 × 101 cfu/g to 1.20 × 103 cfu/g of the sample. Coliforms were not detected in the bread. Bacteria isolated were species of Bacillus, Staphylococcus, and Micrococcus while fungi isolates were species of Aspergillus, Penicillium, Rhizopus, and Mucor. The mean sensory scores (color, aroma, taste, texture, and general acceptability) were evaluated. The color of the bread baked from WF/IPF2 (wheat/Irish potato flour, 95 : 5%) blend was preferred to WF (wheat flour, 100%) while WF/SPF1 (wheat/sweet potato flour, 100%) and WF/IPF1 (wheat/Irish potato flour, 90 : 10%) aroma were preferred to WF. However, the bread baked from WF, WF/IPF2 (wheat flour/Irish potato flour, 95 : 5%), and WF/SPF2 (wheat/sweet potato flour, 95 : 5%) was more acceptable than other blends. The use of hydrated potato flour in bread making is advantageous due to increased nutritional value, higher bread yield, and reduced rate of staling. PMID:26904642

  20. Maize flour-induced rhinitis.

    PubMed

    Borghesan, Franco; Borghesan, Nestore

    2005-09-01

    Food allergy rarely causes allergic rhinitis. We report the case of a patient who developed non-occupational persistent rhinitis in adult age, evoked by the ingestion of maize (corn) flour. The symptoms and typical reactions of food allergy occurred only 15 years after the onset of the rhinitis signs.

  1. Manual sorting to eliminate aflatoxin from peanuts.

    PubMed

    Galvez, F C F; Francisco, M L D L; Villarino, B J; Lustre, A O; Resurreccion, A V A

    2003-10-01

    A manual sorting procedure was developed to eliminate aflatoxin contamination from peanuts. The efficiency of the sorting process in eliminating aflatoxin-contaminated kernels from lots of raw peanuts was verified. The blanching of 20 kg of peanuts at 140 degrees C for 25 min in preheated roasters facilitated the manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated kernels after deskinning. The manual sorting of raw materials with initially high aflatoxin contents (300 ppb) resulted in aflatoxin-free peanuts (i.e., peanuts in which no aflatoxin was detected). Verification procedures showed that the sorted sound peanuts contained no aflatoxin or contained low levels (<15 ppb) of aflatoxin. The results obtained confirmed that the sorting process was effective in separating contaminated peanuts whether or nor contamination was extensive. At the commercial level, when roasters were not preheated, the dry blanching of 50 kg of peanuts for 45 to 55 min facilitated the proper deskinning and subsequent manual sorting of aflatoxin-contaminated peanut kernels from sound kernels.

  2. Quantitation of key peanut aroma compounds in raw peanuts and pan-roasted peanut meal. Aroma reconstitution and comparison with commercial peanut products.

    PubMed

    Chetschik, Irene; Granvogl, Michael; Schieberle, Peter

    2010-10-27

    By means of stable isotope dilution assays (SIDA), 26 odor-active compounds, previously characterized by GC-olfactometry (GC-O), were quantitated in raw peanuts, and the concentrations of 38 odorants were determined in pan-roasted peanut meal. On the basis of the quantitative data and odor thresholds determined in vegetable oil, the odor activity values (OAVs) of the most important aroma compounds in raw as well as in pan-roasted peanut meal were calculated. 3-Isopropyl-2-methoxypyrazine, acetic acid, and 3-(methylthio)propanal showed the highest OAVs in raw peanuts, whereas methanethiol, 2,3-pentanedione, 3-(methylthio)propanal, and 2- and 3-methylbutanal as well as the intensely popcorn-like smelling 2-acetyl-1-pyrroline revealed the highest OAV in the pan-roasted peanut meal. Aroma recombination studies confirmed the importance, in particular, of methanethiol and of lipid degradation products in the characteristic aroma of the freshly roasted peanut material. To evaluate additive effects on the overall aroma, the concentrations of eight pyrazines, previously not detected by GC-O among the odor-active volatiles, were additionally quantitated in the pan-roasted peanut meal. A sensory experiment in which the eight pyrazines were added to the recombinate clearly revealed that these volatiles did not show an impact on the overall aroma. Finally, selected odorants were quantitated in commercial peanut products to confirm their important role in peanut aroma.

  3. Meloidogyne javanica on Peanut in Florida

    PubMed Central

    Cetintas, R.; Lima, R. D.; Mendes, M. L.; Brito, J. A.; Dickson, D. W.

    2003-01-01

    A mixed population of Meloidogyne arenaria race 1 and M. javanica race 3 is reported on peanut from a field in Levy County, Florida. Confirmation of M. javanica on peanut is based on esterase and malate dehydrogenase isozyme patterns resolved on polyacrylamide slab gels following electrophoresis, and perineal patterns. Up to 29% of 290 individual females collected from peanut roots in the field in autumn 2002 showed a typical esterase J3 phenotype for M. javanica. This is the third report of M. javanica infecting peanut in the United States. PMID:19262776

  4. Epicutaneous immunotherapy for the treatment of peanut allergy in children and young adults.

    PubMed

    Jones, Stacie M; Sicherer, Scott H; Burks, A Wesley; Leung, Donald Y M; Lindblad, Robert W; Dawson, Peter; Henning, Alice K; Berin, M Cecilia; Chiang, David; Vickery, Brian P; Pesek, Robbie D; Cho, Christine B; Davidson, Wendy F; Plaut, Marshall; Sampson, Hugh A; Wood, Robert A

    2017-04-01

    Peanut allergy is common, life-threatening, and without therapeutic options. We evaluated peanut epicutaneous immunotherapy (EPIT) by using Viaskin Peanut for peanut allergy treatment. We sought to evaluate the clinical, safety, and immunologic effects of EPIT for the treatment of peanut allergy. In this multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled study, 74 participants with peanut allergy (ages 4-25 years) were treated with placebo (n = 25), Viaskin Peanut 100 μg (VP100; n = 24) or Viaskin Peanut 250 μg (VP250; n = 25; DBV Technologies, Montrouge, France). The primary outcome was treatment success after 52 weeks, which was defined as passing a 5044-mg protein oral food challenge or achieving a 10-fold or greater increase in successfully consumed dose from baseline to week 52. Adverse reactions and mechanistic changes were assessed. At week 52, treatment success was achieved in 3 (12%) placebo-treated participants, 11 (46%) VP100 participants, and 12 (48%) VP250 participants (P = .005 and P = .003, respectively, compared with placebo; VP100 vs VP250, P = .48). Median change in successfully consumed doses were 0, 43, and 130 mg of protein in the placebo, VP100, and VP250 groups, respectively (placebo vs VP100, P = .014; placebo vs VP250, P = .003). Treatment success was higher among younger children (P = .03; age, 4-11 vs >11 years). Overall, 14.4% of placebo doses and 79.8% of VP100 and VP250 doses resulted in reactions, predominantly local patch-site and mild reactions (P = .003). Increases in peanut-specific IgG4 levels and IgG4/IgE ratios were observed in peanut EPIT-treated participants, along with trends toward reduced basophil activation and peanut-specific TH2 cytokines. Peanut EPIT administration was safe and associated with a modest treatment response after 52 weeks, with the highest responses among younger children. This, when coupled with a high adherence and retention rate and significant changes in immune

  5. Effect of end of season water deficit on phenolic compounds in peanut genotypes with different levels of resistance to drought.

    PubMed

    Aninbon, C; Jogloy, S; Vorasoot, N; Patanothai, A; Nuchadomrong, S; Senawong, T

    2016-04-01

    Terminal drought reduces pod yield and affected the phenolic content of leaves, stems and seed of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.). The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of end of season water deficit on phenolic content in drought tolerant and sensitive genotypes of peanuts. Five peanut genotypes were planted under two water regimes, field capacity and 1/3 available water. Phenolic content was analyzed in seeds, leaves, and stems. The results revealed that terminal drought decreased phenolic content in seeds of both tolerant and sensitive genotypes. Phenolic content in leaves and stems increased under terminal drought stress in both years. This study provides basic information on changes in phenolic content in several parts of peanut plants when subjected to drought stress. Future studies to define the effect of terminal drought stress on specific phenolic compounds and antioxidant properties in peanut are warranted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. 21 CFR 137.160 - Enriched bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Enriched bromated flour. 137.160 Section 137.160... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.160 Enriched bromated flour. Enriched bromated flour conforms to...

  7. 21 CFR 137.160 - Enriched bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Enriched bromated flour. 137.160 Section 137.160... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.160 Enriched bromated flour. Enriched bromated flour conforms to...

  8. 21 CFR 137.160 - Enriched bromated flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Enriched bromated flour. 137.160 Section 137.160... FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.160 Enriched bromated flour. Enriched bromated flour conforms to...

  9. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  10. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  11. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  12. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  13. 21 CFR 137.215 - Yellow corn flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Yellow corn flour. 137.215 Section 137.215 Food... Flours and Related Products § 137.215 Yellow corn flour. Yellow corn flour conforms to the definition and standard of identity prescribed by § 137.211 for white corn flour except that cleaned yellow corn is used...

  14. 21 CFR 137.205 - Bromated whole wheat flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bromated whole wheat flour. 137.205 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.205 Bromated whole wheat flour. Bromated whole wheat flour... of ingredients, prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that potassium bromate is added...

  15. 21 CFR 137.205 - Bromated whole wheat flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bromated whole wheat flour. 137.205 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.205 Bromated whole wheat flour. Bromated whole wheat flour... of ingredients, prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that potassium bromate is added...

  16. 21 CFR 137.205 - Bromated whole wheat flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bromated whole wheat flour. 137.205 Section 137... Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.205 Bromated whole wheat flour. Bromated whole wheat flour... of ingredients, prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that potassium bromate is added...

  17. Heritability of N2 fixation traits, and phenotypic and genotypic correlations between N2 fixation traits with drought resistance traits and yield in peanut under different water regimes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought stress reduces growth and yield in peanut and also reduces nitrogen fixation (NF). Peanut production in drought prone areas should be enhanced by the development of cultivars that can fix more N under drought conditions. The aims of this study were to estimate heritability for NF and to est...

  18. Beneficial Influence of Short-Term Germination on Decreasing Allergenicity of Peanut Proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Yingchao; Sun, Xiulan; Ma, Zhezhe; Cui, Yan; Du, Chao; Xia, Xiuhua; Qian, He

    2016-01-01

    Most allergenic storage proteins in peanuts are degraded during seed germination. By altering this natural physiological process, it might be possible to reduce peanut protein allergenicity. However, little is known about the change in allergenic proteins and their corresponding immunocreactivity, and the effects of major environmental conditions on their allergenicity during germination. In this study, the influence of different germination conditions (temperature and light) on the degradation of Ara h1 and allergenicity changes of peanut seeds was evaluated by ELISA and Western blotting. The results showed that the 40- and 65-kDa proteins in peanut seeds degraded rapidly during the time course, beginning at 60 (at 25 °C) and 108 h (at 20 °C), and the corresponding immunocreactivity of Ara h1 decreased approximately one-third after 5 to 7 d of germination. Compared with the cotyledons, the embryonic axes had a higher proportion of Ara h1, which was then degraded relatively faster during germination, resulting in a significant reduction in its allergenicity. Although a higher temperature improved the seed germination rate, it affected sprout quality (as did light); therefore, 25 °C and dark surroundings were suitable conditions under which peanut sprouts were processed; neither factor significantly affected the allergenicity of Ara h1. These results provided a theoretical basis for studies using biological methods to reduce peanut allergenicity.

  19. Functional characterization of steam jet-cooked buckwheat flour as a fat replacer in cake-baking

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Fancy buckwheat flour was thermo-mechanically modified by steam jet-cooking and the resulting product was evaluated as a fat replacer for the use in cakes with reduced-fat content. Steam jet-cooking caused the integrity of buckwheat flour components to be disrupted, significantly changing the physi...

  20. Characterization of physiochemical and microbiological properties, and bioactive compounds, of flour made from the skin and bagasse of kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa).

    PubMed

    Soquetta, Marcela Bromberger; Stefanello, Flávia Santi; Huerta, Katira da Mota; Monteiro, Sabrina Sauthier; da Rosa, Claudia Severo; Terra, Nelcindo Nascimento

    2016-05-15

    The objective of this study was to analyze the physicochemical and microbiological properties, as well as the bioactive compounds, of flour made from the skin and bagasse of two varieties (Bruno and Monty) of kiwi fruit (Actinidia deliciosa) at two stages of maturation. The flour made with kiwi fruit peel from both varieties showed higher levels of bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity that the flour made with bagasse from both varieties. The flour made with green kiwi fruit skin from the Bruno variety had higher DPPH values and levels of phenolic compounds (1262.34 mg GAE/100g flour), while the Monty variety showed higher FRAP values, vitamin C (189.06 mg/100g flour), flavonoids (486.47 mg/100g flour), chlorophylls (12.13 mg/100g flour) and carotenoids (246.91 μg/100g flour). Flour made from kiwi fruit bagasse can be used to reduce agro-industrial waste. This flour is a promising ingredient which can be used to enrich products providing dietary fiber and bioactive compounds, as well as antioxidant action.

  1. The role of environmental exposure to peanut in the development of clinical allergy to peanut.

    PubMed

    Foong, R X; Brough, H

    2017-10-01

    The prevalence of peanut allergy has increased over the years and still remains one of the most common causes of food-related anaphylaxis. The way in which peanut sensitization occurs has been explored, such as via maternal consumption in pregnancy, via breastmilk and through a disrupted skin barrier. It has previously been shown that environmental exposure to aeroallergens in household dust can be a risk factor for the development of allergic asthma. There is an increasing body of evidence that the combination of cutaneous sensitization via a disrupted skin barrier (ie children with eczema or with filaggrin mutations) and environmental peanut exposure influences the development of peanut allergy. This review aims to explore routes of peanut sensitization and the current evidence on how environmental exposure to peanut affects the development of peanut allergy. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Solar drying of yam-flour pellets

    SciTech Connect

    Oladiran, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the heat/mass transfer characteristics of a turbulent impinging jet in cross flow in a model of a chamber used for solar drying of yam flour pellets is presented. The variables studied were the nozzle inclination, ..cap alpha.. and the jet-to-cross flow velocity ratio, M. These parameters were varied from 30/sup 0/ to 135/sup 0/ and from 5.0 to 20.9 respectively. Superimposing a cross flow onto the jet reduced the heat transfer coefficients. At low cross flows, inclining the nozzle further reduced the heat transfer coefficients. However, at higher cross flows, inclining the nozzle could be beneficial. The thin film napthalene sublimation technique was employed for the mass transfer measurements.

  3. Impact of γ-irradiation on physicochemical properties of freeze dried Amorphophallus paeoniifolius flour.

    PubMed

    Suriya, M; Rethina, C; Bashir, Mudasir; Koteswara Reddy, Chagam; Harsha, N; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy

    2017-11-01

    Freeze dried raw (FDR) and freeze dried blanched (FDB) Amorphophallus paeoniifolius flours were irradiated at doses of 3, 6 and 12kGy. The irradiated flours were investigated for physicochemical, pasting, textural, thermal and morphological properties. Reduction in amylose content was observed with increasing irradiation dose. Carboxyl content of the flours increased significantly at higher doses. Decline in lightness (L(∗)) and increase in redness (a(∗)) were found to increase with the elevation of dosage. Irradiation caused reduction in the values of pasting parameters of freeze dried raw as well as freeze dried blanched samples. Hardness of the flour gels exhibited increase at all the doses except at 3kGy. Decrease in onset gelatinization temperature of both FDR and FDB flours was observed with increasing irradiation dose. FDR as well as FDB flours exhibited increasing trend in their enthalpy (ΔHgel) values following irradiation treatment. Raman spectroscopy revealed that no new functional groups were introduced by irradiation treatment. However, band intensity of functional groups in irradiated FDR flours was reduced with increment of dose. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The molecular basis of peanut allergy

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures, and discusses how modif...

  5. Recent advances in peanut breeding and genetics

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Most previous advances in peanut cultivar development have been made using conventional breeding methods for self-pollinated crops. Peanut has lagged behind many other crops on use of molecular genetic technology for cultivar development in part due to lack of investment, but also because of low le...

  6. Alternative Storage Environments for Shelled Peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Studies were conducted in small chambers and commercial storage facilities to evaluate the effect of storing shelled peanuts at 3, 13, and 21 C (38, 55, 70 F) for one year. Shelled medium runner peanuts from the 2014 crop were placed in the three different environments in Feb 2015, sampled at 60-d ...

  7. Dome Storage of Farmer Stock Peanuts

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The small-scale farmer stock storage research facility at the National Peanut Research Laboratory in Dawson, GA consisting of four warehouses and four monolithic domes was used to conduct a 3-yr study looking at the effects of storing peanuts through the summer months following harvest. The study wa...

  8. SIMULATION OF PEANUT GROWTH IN OKLAHOMA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grosz, Gerald D.; Elliott, Ronald L.; Young, James H.

    1986-01-01

    Two peanut growth models of varying complexity were calibrated for Oklahoma varieties and growing conditions. Both models predicted pod growth quite well. The models were then used to simulate the effects of various soil moisture levels on peanut growth. The more complex model has potential as a management tool.

  9. Phenotyping peanut genotypes for drought tolerance

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Drought and heat stress can result in aflatoxin contamination of peanuts especially when this occurs during the last three to six weeks of the growing season. Identifying drought-tolerant genotypes may aid in development of peanuts that are less susceptible to aflatoxin contamination. This study w...

  10. Peanut Roaster Temperatures Relative to Salmonella Kill

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    ARS, Market Quality and Handling Research Unit, Raleigh NC 27695 In response to the limited peanut butter contamination incident of 2006/7, studies were initiated to examine the effect of various time and temperature protocols on log kill levels for Salmonella on peanuts. The objective of the work ...

  11. Nutritional chemistry of the peanut (Arachis hypogaea)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts, Arachis hypogaea, are one of the most widely consumed legume globally due to its nutrition, taste and affordability. Peanuts are protein and energy-rich and has been utilized worldwide to address the nutritional needs in developing countries. Currently, its role in a heart-healthy diet ha...

  12. Functional and physicochemical characteristics of cookies prepared from Amorphophallus paeoniifolius flour.

    PubMed

    Suriya, M; Rajput, Reshu; Reddy, Chagam Koteswara; Haripriya, Sundaramoorthy; Bashir, Mudasir

    2017-06-01

    This study was undertaken to prepare novelly formulated cookies from elephant foot yam flour (EFYF) with refined wheat flour (RWF) and evaluate their proximate composition, quality characteristics, texture, pasting and organoleptic properties. The formulated cookies prepared from EFYF, substituting RWF up to 70% had sensory properties similar to that of refined flour cookies (control). EFYF and RWF blend revealed reduced water and oil absorption capacity with increased peak and final viscosities when compared with RWF. Reduced lightness, increased redness and hardness were observed for formulated cookies with increase in storage time. Irrespective of the decreasing trend in their texture, overall acceptance of the EFYF cookies by the consumers was increased. Sensory scores revealed the preference of consumers towards formulated cookies. Overall analysis disclosed that the cookies prepared from A. paeoniifolius flour proved acceptable not only in quality characteristics but also fulfil the demand of functional foods in preparation of cookies.

  13. Sourdough fermentation and chestnut flour in gluten-free bread: A shelf-life evaluation.

    PubMed

    Rinaldi, Massimiliano; Paciulli, Maria; Caligiani, Augusta; Scazzina, Francesca; Chiavaro, Emma

    2017-06-01

    The effect of sourdough fermentation combined with chestnut flour was investigated for improving technological and nutritional quality of gluten-free bread during 5day shelf life by means of chemico-physical and nutritional properties. Sourdough fermentation by itself and with chestnut flour reduced volume of loaves and heterogeneity in crumb grain. Sourdough technology allowed increasing crumb moisture content with no significant variations during shelf-life. Chestnut flour darkened crumb and crust while no effects on colour were observed for sourdough. Sourdough and/or chestnut flour addition caused a significant increase in crumb hardness at time 0 while a significant reduction of staling was observed only at 5days, even if a decrease in amylopectin fusion enthalpy was observed. The percentage of hydrolysed starch during in vitro digestion was significantly reduced by sourdough fermentation with a presumable lower glycaemic index.

  14. A phase 1 study of heat/phenol-killed, E. coli-encapsulated, recombinant modified peanut proteins Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3 (EMP-123) for the treatment of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Wood, R A; Sicherer, S H; Burks, A W; Grishin, A; Henning, A K; Lindblad, R; Stablein, D; Sampson, H A

    2013-06-01

    Immunotherapy for peanut allergy may be limited by the risk of adverse reactions. To investigate the safety and immunologic effects of a vaccine containing modified peanut proteins. This was a phase 1 trial of EMP-123, a rectally administered suspension of recombinant Ara h 1, Ara h 2, and Ara h 3, modified by amino acid substitutions at major IgE-binding epitopes, encapsulated in heat/phenol-killed E. coli. Five healthy adults were treated with 4 weekly escalating doses after which 10 peanut-allergic adults received weekly dose escalations over 10 weeks from 10 mcg to 3063 mcg, followed by three biweekly doses of 3063 mcg. There were no significant adverse effects in the healthy volunteers. Of the 10 peanut-allergic subjects [4 with intermittent asthma, median peanut IgE 33.3 kUA /l (7.2-120.2), and median peanut skin prick test wheal 11.3 mm (6.5-18)]; four experienced no symptoms; one had mild rectal symptoms; and the remaining five experienced adverse reactions preventing completion of dosing. Two were categorized as mild, but the remaining three were more severe, including one moderate reaction and two anaphylactic reactions. Baseline peanut IgE was significantly higher in the five reactive subjects (median 82.4 vs 17.2 kUA /l, P = 0.032), as was baseline anti-Ara h 2 IgE (43.3 versus 8.3, P = 0.036). Peanut skin test titration and basophil activation (at a single dilution) were significantly reduced after treatment, but no significant changes were detected for total IgE, peanut IgE, or peanut IgG4. Rectal administration of EMP-123 resulted in frequent adverse reactions, including severe allergic reactions in 20%. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. 21 CFR 137.205 - Bromated whole wheat flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.205 Bromated whole wheat flour. Bromated whole wheat...

  16. 21 CFR 137.205 - Bromated whole wheat flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized Cereal Flours and Related Products § 137.205 Bromated whole wheat flour. Bromated whole wheat...

  17. Release of soluble protein from peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) and its adsorption by activated charcoal.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Randall; Van, Trang; Kim, Ara; Helm, Ricki

    2011-01-12

    Peanut (Arachis hypogaea, Leguminosae) allergy is a major cause of food-induced anaphylaxis. The potential use of activated charcoal (AC) to adsorb and reduce the bioavailability of peanut protein allergens for use in the moderation of hypersensitivity reactions was investigated. The rate and extent of protein release from peanut and the adsorption of the solubilized protein by AC was determined under physiological pH values and confirmed in vivo using a porcine animal model system. Peanut proteins were adsorbed with equal efficiency at pH 2 and 7 and are completely removed from solution by an AC/protein ratio of approximately 80:1. This suggests that AC can bind protein under gastric (pH 2) or intestinal (pH 7) conditions. The rapid adsorption of soluble peanut allergens and the continuous binding of allergens released from peanut particulate material suggest the potential efficacy of using AC for gastric decontamination and possible elimination of a biphasic allergic reaction.

  18. Coating of peanuts with edible whey protein film containing alpha-tocopherol and ascorbyl palmitate.

    PubMed

    Han, J H; Hwang, H-M; Min, S; Krochta, J M

    2008-10-01

    Physical properties of whey protein isolate (WPI) coating solution incorporating ascorbic palmitate (AP) and alpha-tocopherol (tocopherol) were characterized, and the antioxidant activity of dried WPI coatings against lipid oxidation in roasted peanuts were investigated. The AP and tocopherol were mixed into a 10% (w/w) WPI solution containing 6.7% glycerol. Process 1 (P1) blended an AP and tocopherol mixture directly into the WPI solution using a high-speed homogenizer. Process 2 (P2) used ethanol as a solvent for dissolving AP and tocopherol into the WPI solution. The viscosity and turbidity of the WPI coating solution showed the Newtonian fluid behavior, and 0.25% of critical concentration of AP in WPI solution rheology. After peanuts were coated with WPI solutions, color changes of peanuts were measured during 16 wk of storage at 25 degrees C, and the oxidation of peanuts was determined by hexanal analysis using solid-phase micro-extraction samplers and GC-MS. Regardless of the presence of antioxidants in the coating layer, the formation of hexanal from the oxidation of peanut lipids was reduced by WPI coatings, which indicates WPI coatings protected the peanuts from oxygen permeation and oxidation. However, the incorporation of antioxidants in the WPI coating layer did not show a significant difference in hexanal production from that of WPI coating treatment without incorporation of antioxidants.

  19. [Amaranth flour: characteristics, comparative analysis, application possibilities].

    PubMed

    Zharkov, I M; Miroshnichenko, L A; Zviagin, A A; Bavykina, I A

    2014-01-01

    Amaranth flour--a product of amaranth seeds processing--is a valuable industrial raw material that has an unique chemical composition and may be used for nutrition of people suffering from intolerance to traditional cereals protein, including celiac disease patients. The research aim was to study the composition of amaranth flour of two types compared with semolina which is traditionally used for nutrition by Russian population, as well as to compare the composition of milk amaranth flour porridge with milk semolina porridge. The composition of amaranth whole-ground flour and amaranth flour of premium grade processed from amaranth seeds grown in Voronezh region has been researched. It is to be noted that protein content in amaranth flour was 10.8-24.3% higher than in semolina, and its biological value and NPU-coefficient were higher by 22.65 and 46.51% respectively; lysine score in amaranth flour protein of premium grade came up to 107.54%, and in semolina protein only 40.95%. The level of digestible carbohydrates, including starch, was lower in amaranth flour than in semolina by 2.79-12.85 and 4.76-15.85% respectively, while fiber content was 15.5-30 fold higher. Fat content in amaranth flour of premium grade was 2,4 fold lower than in whole-ground amaranth flour but it was 45% higher than in semolina. The main advantage of amaranth flour protein compared to wheat protein is the predominance of albumins and globulins and a minimal content of prolamines and alpha-gliadin complete absence. The specifics of chemical composition allow the amaranth flour to be recommended for being included into nutrition of both healthy children and adults and also celiac disease patients.

  20. Radiation disinfestation of wheat flour leaving the mill: Flour quality and economic aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedláčková, J.; Zuska, J.; Příhoda, J.

    Wheat flour irradiated by 0.25 or 0.5 kGy of gamma rays retained its sensoric quality. Its baking properties improved after the doses of 0.25 to 1.5 kGy. Flour irradiation in a flour mill is less expensive if an electron accelerator is used instead of a 60Co source.

  1. Characterization of cookies made from wheat flour blended with buckwheat flour and effect on antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Jan, Ulfat; Gani, Adil; Ahmad, Mudasir; Shah, Umar; Baba, Waqas N; Masoodi, F A; Maqsood, Sajid; Gani, Asir; Wani, Idress Ahmed; Wani, S M

    2015-10-01

    Buckwheat flour was incorporated into wheat flour at different levels (0, 20, 40, 60, 80, and 100 %) and the physicochemical, functional and antioxidant properties of the blended flour were studied. This study also investigated the effect of buckwheat on the retention of antioxidant properties of cookies during baking. The results showed significant variation in physicochemical and functional properties of the blended flour. The addition of buckwheat flour into wheat flour also increased the antioxidant properties of blended flour proportionally, but metal chelating properties decreased. The incorporation of buckwheat in wheat flour helped in better retention of antioxidant potential of cookies during baking process as buckwheat cookies (100 % buckwheat) showed greater percentage increase in antioxidant properties than control (100 % wheat). Quality characteristics of cookies such as hardness and spread ratio decreased, while as non-enzymatic browning (NEB) increased significantly with increase in the proportion of buckwheat flour in wheat flour. The Overall acceptability of cookies by sensory analysis was highest at 40 % level of blending. This study concluded that addition of buckwheat in wheat flour, may not only improve the physico-chemical and functional properties of the blended flour but may also enhance the nutraceutical potential of the product prepared from it.

  2. Chemistry and Biochemstry of Peanut Skins. Implications of Utilization

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut shelling plants in the US produce thousands of tons of peanut skins each year. Currently, this material is considered a waste product with limited end uses and no real monetary value. Peanut skins were obtained from a regional peanut processor and subjected to a several types of solvent ext...

  3. Evaluation of a small-scale peanut sheller

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Commercial peanut shelling equipment is designed to shell peanuts at a rate of 20 metric tons/hr. Smaller shelling equipment intended for evaluating samples has a throughput ranging from 6 to 50 kg/h. There is a need for intermediately sized peanut shelling equipment for small peanut processors, p...

  4. Analysis of phenolic compounds extracted from peanut seed testa

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) contain numerous phenolic compounds with antimicrobial and antioxidant properties. These secondary metabolites may be isolated as co-products from peanut skins or testae during peanut processing and have potential use in functional food or feed formulations. Peanut skins w...

  5. 7 CFR 1421.14 - Obtaining peanut loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Obtaining peanut loans. 1421.14 Section 1421.14... peanut loans. (a) Peanuts loans to individual producers may be obtained through: (1) County offices; or... presented for disbursement unless the peanuts pledged as collateral for the marketing assistance loan is...

  6. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts...

  7. 7 CFR 1421.14 - Obtaining peanut loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Obtaining peanut loans. 1421.14 Section 1421.14... peanut loans. (a) Peanuts loans to individual producers may be obtained through: (1) County offices; or... presented for disbursement unless the peanuts pledged as collateral for the marketing assistance loan is...

  8. 7 CFR 1216.19 - Peanut producer organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Peanut producer organization. 1216.19 Section 1216.19... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.19 Peanut producer...

  9. 7 CFR 1421.14 - Obtaining peanut loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Obtaining peanut loans. 1421.14 Section 1421.14... peanut loans. (a) Peanuts loans to individual producers may be obtained through: (1) County offices; or... presented for disbursement unless the peanuts pledged as collateral for the marketing assistance loan is...

  10. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts...

  11. 7 CFR 1216.19 - Peanut producer organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Peanut producer organization. 1216.19 Section 1216.19... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.19 Peanut producer...

  12. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts...

  13. 7 CFR 1421.14 - Obtaining peanut loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Obtaining peanut loans. 1421.14 Section 1421.14... peanut loans. (a) Peanuts loans to individual producers may be obtained through: (1) County offices; or... presented for disbursement unless the peanuts pledged as collateral for the marketing assistance loan is...

  14. 7 CFR 1421.14 - Obtaining peanut loans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Obtaining peanut loans. 1421.14 Section 1421.14... peanut loans. (a) Peanuts loans to individual producers may be obtained through: (1) County offices; or... presented for disbursement unless the peanuts pledged as collateral for the marketing assistance loan is...

  15. 7 CFR 1216.19 - Peanut producer organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Peanut producer organization. 1216.19 Section 1216.19... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.19 Peanut producer...

  16. 7 CFR 1216.19 - Peanut producer organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Peanut producer organization. 1216.19 Section 1216.19... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.19 Peanut producer...

  17. 7 CFR 1216.19 - Peanut producer organization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Peanut producer organization. 1216.19 Section 1216.19... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.19 Peanut producer...

  18. 7 CFR 1216.9 - Farmers stock peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Farmers stock peanuts. 1216.9 Section 1216.9... AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.9 Farmers stock peanuts...

  19. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  20. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  1. 7 CFR 996.50 - Reconditioning failing quality peanuts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. 996.50 Section... QUALITY AND HANDLING STANDARDS FOR DOMESTIC AND IMPORTED PEANUTS MARKETED IN THE UNITED STATES Quality and Handling Standards § 996.50 Reconditioning failing quality peanuts. (a) Lots of peanuts which have not...

  2. Effect of peanut oil and randomized peanut oil on cholesterol and oleic acid absorption, transport, and distribution in the lymph of the rat.

    PubMed

    Satchithanandam, S; Flynn, T J; Calvert, R J; Kritchevsky, D

    1999-12-01

    Peanut oil was shown to be atherogenic in cholesterol-fed rats, rabbits, and monkeys. However, after randomization, a process in which the fatty acids in peanut oil are randomly rearranged, its atherogenicity was significantly reduced in cholesterol-fed rabbits and monkeys. The mechanism for this effect remains unknown. This study was designed to investigate whether the absorption, transport and distribution of dietary cholesterol and oleic acid in the lymph were altered in the presence of peanut oil or randomized peanut oil. Previous investigators collected lymph through the mesenteric duct for 6 h and analyzed lymph for cholesterol. In the present study, lymph fluids were collected at timed intervals for up to 8 h and then at 24 h via the thoracic duct. Cholesterol and oleic acid (fatty acid) were estimated not only in the whole lymph but also in lymph lipoprotein fractions and in major lipid fractions. A 24-h lymph collection will enhance accuracy as short-term fluctuations in lipid absorption will not affect the results. Thoracic duct lymph collection is quantitative compared to mesenteric duct lymph collection, which provides only a fraction of the total lymph. Rats were given a lipid emulsion containing either peanut oil or randomized peanut oil. The emulsion also contained cholesterol, oleic acid, and sodium taurocholate in saline and was given through a duodenal catheter. Results show that absorption, transport, and distribution of cholesterol and oleic acid in the lymph fluids were similar in both dietary groups. These results suggest that the atherogenicity of peanut oil may be due to other events taking place subsequent to the release of cholesterol-containing chylomicrons and very low density lipoprotein by the small intestinal epithelial cells into the blood or may be due to the triglyceride structure itself.

  3. Salmonella typhimurium infections associated with peanut products.

    PubMed

    Cavallaro, Elizabeth; Date, Kashmira; Medus, Carlota; Meyer, Stephanie; Miller, Benjamin; Kim, Clara; Nowicki, Scott; Cosgrove, Shaun; Sweat, David; Phan, Quyen; Flint, James; Daly, Elizabeth R; Adams, Jennifer; Hyytia-Trees, Eija; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Hoekstra, Robert M; Schwensohn, Colin; Langer, Adam; Sodha, Samir V; Rogers, Michael C; Angulo, Frederick J; Tauxe, Robert V; Williams, Ian T; Behravesh, Casey Barton

    2011-08-18

    Contaminated food ingredients can affect multiple products, each distributed through various channels and consumed in multiple settings. Beginning in November 2008, we investigated a nationwide outbreak of salmonella infections. A case was defined as laboratory-confirmed infection with the outbreak strain of Salmonella Typhimurium occurring between September 1, 2008, and April 20, 2009. We conducted two case-control studies, product "trace-back," and environmental investigations. Among 714 case patients identified in 46 states, 166 (23%) were hospitalized and 9 (1%) died. In study 1, illness was associated with eating any peanut butter (matched odds ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3 to 5.3), peanut butter-containing products (matched odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.7), and frozen chicken products (matched odds ratio, 4.6; 95% CI, 1.7 to 14.7). Investigations of focal clusters and single cases associated with nine institutions identified a single institutional brand of peanut butter (here called brand X) distributed to all facilities. In study 2, illness was associated with eating peanut butter outside the home (matched odds ratio, 3.9; 95% CI, 1.6 to 10.0) and two brands of peanut butter crackers (brand A: matched odds ratio, 17.2; 95% CI, 6.9 to 51.5; brand B: matched odds ratio, 3.6; 95% CI, 1.3 to 9.8). Both cracker brands were made from brand X peanut paste. The outbreak strain was isolated from brand X peanut butter, brand A crackers, and 15 other products. A total of 3918 peanut butter-containing products were recalled between January 10 and April 29, 2009. Contaminated peanut butter and peanut products caused a nationwide salmonellosis outbreak. Ingredient-driven outbreaks are challenging to detect and may lead to widespread contamination of numerous food products.

  4. Making bread with sourdough improves mineral bioavailability from reconstituted whole wheat flour in rats.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Hubert W; Duclos, Virgile; Coudray, Charles; Krespine, Virginie; Feillet-Coudray, Christine; Messager, Arnaud; Demigné, Christian; Rémésy, Christian

    2003-06-01

    We compared the effects of different kinds of bread fermentation on mineral bioavailability. Wistar rats were fed one of the following experimental diets for 21 d: control, reconstituted whole wheat flour (white flour plus bran), yeast bread, and sourdough bread. The apparent mineral absorption and intestinal fermentation were measured in each animal. Phytate contents in yeast and sourdough bread were lower than in reconstituted whole wheat flour (-52% and -71%, respectively). Total cecal pool of short-chain fatty acids, in particular the butyrate pool, was significantly increased by the ingestion of unrefined products. Calcium homeostasis was not modified by these nutritional conditions, whereas magnesium absorption was significantly greater in rats fed the control and sourdough diets than in those consuming whole wheat flour and yeast bread. Magnesium kidney excretion was slightly stimulated by sourdough bread. Compared with the control diet, iron balance was significantly reduced by reconstituted whole wheat flour diet. Yeast bread making counteracted the deleterious effects of whole wheat on iron absorption, whereas sourdough bread making enhanced iron absorption. Further, liver and plasma iron and transferrin saturation levels were lower in rats adapted to the flour diet than in other groups. Zinc absorption was strongly depressed in the presence of unprocessed reconstituted whole wheat flour in the diet, but yeast fermentation afforded a zinc assimilation comparable to the control diet, whereas the sourdough bread led to maximal zinc absorption. Copper absorption increased significantly when rats were fed the sourdough bread, whereas unprocessed whole flour depressed copper absorption (-41% versus control diet). Mineral bioavailability from reconstituted whole wheat flour can be improved by bread making. Although yeast fermentation minimizes the unfavorable effects of phytic acid, sourdough bread is a better source of available minerals, especially magnesium

  5. Effects of the kefir and banana pulp and skin flours on hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Angelis-Pereira, Michel Cardoso de; Barcelos, Maria de Fátima Píccolo; Sousa, Mariana Séfora Bezerra; Pereira, Juciane de Abreu Ribeiro

    2013-07-01

    To investigate the effect of kefir and banana pulp and skin flours on the serum levels of total cholesterol, HDL-c, LDL-c and triacylglycerols in rats fed cholesterol-rich diet. Thirty Male Wistar rats were used. In the first 21 days, the animals were fed purified hypercholesterolemic diets, except the standard group. In the next 21 days, the animals were given modified diets: Group GC: standard diet AIN-93G; Group HIP: hypercholesterolemic diet; Group F: hypercholesterolemic diet added of 1% of banana skin flour and 7% of banana pulp flour; Group Q: hypercholesterolemic diet plus kefir suspension by oral infusion (1.5 ml/animal); Group FQ: hypercholesterolemic diet added of 1% banana skin flour and 7% of banana pulp flour plus kefir suspension (1.5 ml/animal). In spite of the high fiber content, the addition of banana pulp (7%) and skin (1%) flour did not alter the plasma levels of total cholesterol, HDL-c and LDL-c. However, they reduced the TG levels in 22%. Already fermented kefir reduced significantly the levels of VLDL, LDL-c and triacylglycerols, in addition to having increased HDL-c. However, it was not possible to verify the symbiotic effect between both. The results reinforce the beneficial effects of kefir in reducing the risks of cardiovascular diseases.

  6. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... shells have been used as feed for meat and dairy animals. While many growers now harvest peanuts with... of curing peanuts on the vines in a stack and save the hay for animal feed. Peanut shells or hulls... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut...

  7. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... shells have been used as feed for meat and dairy animals. While many growers now harvest peanuts with... of curing peanuts on the vines in a stack and save the hay for animal feed. Peanut shells or hulls... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut...

  8. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... shells have been used as feed for meat and dairy animals. While many growers now harvest peanuts with... of curing peanuts on the vines in a stack and save the hay for animal feed. Peanut shells or hulls... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut...

  9. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shells have been used as feed for meat and dairy animals. While many growers now harvest peanuts with... of curing peanuts on the vines in a stack and save the hay for animal feed. Peanut shells or hulls... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut...

  10. 40 CFR 180.123a - Inorganic bromide residues in peanut hay and peanut hulls; statement of policy.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... shells have been used as feed for meat and dairy animals. While many growers now harvest peanuts with... of curing peanuts on the vines in a stack and save the hay for animal feed. Peanut shells or hulls... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inorganic bromide residues in peanut...

  11. Comparison of the digestibility of the major peanut allergens in thermally processed peanuts and in pure form

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    It has been suggested that boiling or frying of peanuts lead to less allergenic products than roasting. Here, we have compared the digestibility of the major peanut allergens in the context of peanuts subjected to boiling, frying, or roasting, and in purified form. The soluble peanut extracts and ...

  12. Halotolerant Rhizobacteria Promote Growth and Enhance Salinity Tolerance in Peanut.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Jayant; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Use of Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is a promising strategy to improve the crop production under optimal or sub-optimal conditions. In the present study, five diazotrophic salt tolerant bacteria were isolated from the roots of a halophyte, Arthrocnemum indicum. The isolates were partially characterized in vitro for plant growth promoting traits and evaluated for their potential to promote growth and enhanced salt tolerance in peanut. The 16S rRNA gene sequence homology indicated that these bacterial isolates belong to the genera, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ochrobactrum. All isolates were nifH positive and able to produce indole -3-acetic acid (ranging from 11.5 to 19.1 μg ml(-1)). The isolates showed phosphate solubilisation activity (ranging from 1.4 to 55.6 μg phosphate /mg dry weight), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (0.1 to 0.31 μmol α-kB/μg protein/h) and were capable of reducing acetylene in acetylene reduction assay (ranging from 0.95 to 1.8 μmol C2H4 mg protein/h). These isolates successfully colonized the peanut roots and were capable of promoting the growth under non-stress condition. A significant increase in total nitrogen (N) content (up to 76%) was observed over the non-inoculated control. All isolates showed tolerance to NaCl ranging from 4 to 8% in nutrient broth medium. Under salt stress, inoculated peanut seedlings maintained ion homeostasis, accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and showed enhanced growth compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Overall, the present study has characterized several potential bacterial strains that showed an enhanced growth promotion effect on peanut under control as well as saline conditions. The results show the possibility to reduce chemical fertilizer inputs and may promote the use of bio-inoculants.

  13. Halotolerant Rhizobacteria Promote Growth and Enhance Salinity Tolerance in Peanut

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Sandeep; Kulkarni, Jayant; Jha, Bhavanath

    2016-01-01

    Use of Plant growth promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) is a promising strategy to improve the crop production under optimal or sub-optimal conditions. In the present study, five diazotrophic salt tolerant bacteria were isolated from the roots of a halophyte, Arthrocnemum indicum. The isolates were partially characterized in vitro for plant growth promoting traits and evaluated for their potential to promote growth and enhanced salt tolerance in peanut. The 16S rRNA gene sequence homology indicated that these bacterial isolates belong to the genera, Klebsiella, Pseudomonas, Agrobacterium, and Ochrobactrum. All isolates were nifH positive and able to produce indole -3-acetic acid (ranging from 11.5 to 19.1 μg ml−1). The isolates showed phosphate solubilisation activity (ranging from 1.4 to 55.6 μg phosphate /mg dry weight), 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate deaminase activity (0.1 to 0.31 μmol α-kB/μg protein/h) and were capable of reducing acetylene in acetylene reduction assay (ranging from 0.95 to 1.8 μmol C2H4 mg protein/h). These isolates successfully colonized the peanut roots and were capable of promoting the growth under non-stress condition. A significant increase in total nitrogen (N) content (up to 76%) was observed over the non-inoculated control. All isolates showed tolerance to NaCl ranging from 4 to 8% in nutrient broth medium. Under salt stress, inoculated peanut seedlings maintained ion homeostasis, accumulated less reactive oxygen species (ROS) and showed enhanced growth compared to non-inoculated seedlings. Overall, the present study has characterized several potential bacterial strains that showed an enhanced growth promotion effect on peanut under control as well as saline conditions. The results show the possibility to reduce chemical fertilizer inputs and may promote the use of bio-inoculants. PMID:27790198

  14. Protein-bound Vaccinium fruit polyphenols decrease IgE binding to peanut allergens and RBL-2H3 mast cell degranulation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Plundrich, Nathalie J; Bansode, Rishipal R; Foegeding, E Allen; Williams, Leonard L; Lila, Mary Ann

    2017-04-19

    Peanut allergy is a worldwide health concern. In this study, the natural binding properties of plant-derived polyphenols to proteins was leveraged to produce stable protein-polyphenol complexes comprised of peanut proteins and cranberry (Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait.) or lowbush blueberry (Vaccinium angustifolium Ait.) pomace polyphenols. Protein-bound and free polyphenols were characterized and quantified by multistep extraction of polyphenols from protein-polyphenol complexes. Immunoblotting was performed with peanut-allergic plasma to determine peanut protein-specific IgE binding to unmodified peanut protein, or to peanut protein-polyphenol complexes. In an allergen model system, RBL-2H3 mast cells were exposed to peanut protein-polyphenol complexes and evaluated for their inhibitory activity on ionomycin-induced degranulation (β-hexosaminidase and histamine). Among the evaluated polyphenolic compounds from protein-polyphenol complex eluates, quercetin, - in aglycone or glycosidic form - was the main phytochemical identified to be covalently bound to peanut proteins. Peanut protein-bound cranberry and blueberry polyphenols significantly decreased IgE binding to peanut proteins at p < 0.05 (38% and 31% decrease, respectively). Sensitized RBL-2H3 cells challenged with antigen and ionomycin in the presence of protein-cranberry and blueberry polyphenol complexes showed a significant (p < 0.05) reduction in histamine and β-hexosaminidase release (histamine: 65.5% and 65.8% decrease; β-hexosaminidase: 60.7% and 45.4% decrease, respectively). The modification of peanut proteins with cranberry or blueberry polyphenols led to the formation of peanut protein-polyphenol complexes with significantly reduced allergenic potential. Future trials are warranted to investigate the immunomodulatory mechanisms of these protein-polyphenol complexes and the role of quercetin in their hypoallergenic potential.

  15. Gamma radiation effects on peanut skin antioxidants.

    PubMed

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D'Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts' antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil.

  16. Gamma Radiation Effects on Peanut Skin Antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    de Camargo, Adriano Costa; de Souza Vieira, Thais Maria Ferreira; Regitano-D’Arce, Marisa Aparecida Bismara; Calori-Domingues, Maria Antonia; Canniatti-Brazaca, Solange Guidolin

    2012-01-01

    Peanut skin, which is removed in the peanut blanching process, is rich in bioactive compounds with antioxidant properties. The aims of this study were to measure bioactive compounds in peanut skins and evaluate the effect of gamma radiation on their antioxidant activity. Peanut skin samples were treated with 0.0, 5.0, 7.5, or 10.0 kGy gamma rays. Total phenolics, condensed tannins, total flavonoids, and antioxidant activity were evaluated. Extracts obtained from the peanut skins were added to refined-bleached-deodorized (RBD) soybean oil. The oxidative stability of the oil samples was determined using the Oil Stability Index method and compared to a control and synthetic antioxidants (100 mg/kg BHT and 200 mg/kg TBHQ). Gamma radiation changed total phenolic content, total condensed tannins, total flavonoid content, and the antioxidant activity. All extracts, gamma irradiated or not, presented increasing induction period (h), measured by the Oil Stability Index method, when compared with the control. Antioxidant activity of the peanut skins was higher than BHT. The present study confirmed that gamma radiation did not affect the peanut skin extracts’ antioxidative properties when added to soybean oil. PMID:22489142

  17. Oxidation of corn oil during frying of soy-flour-added flour dough.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Y; Choe, E

    2007-08-01

    Oxidation of corn oil during frying of soy-flour-added dough was studied. Flour dough containing soy flour at 0%, 10%, 20%, and 30% was fried in corn oil at 180 degrees C for 2.5 min, and a total of 60 fryings were performed every 30 min. The oxidation of oil was determined by contents of free fatty acids (FFA), conjugated dienoic acids (CDA), polar compounds, and p-anisidine values (PAV). Tocopherols and phospholipids (PLs) in the oil were determined by HPLC. Tocopherols were present in corn oil at 1000 ppm before frying and increased after the first frying of dough containing soy flour due to tocopherol transfer from soy-flour-added dough to the oil during frying. However, as the oil repeated frying, tocopherol contents decreased and its degradation rate was higher in the oil that fried soy-flour-added dough than in the oil that fried the dough without soy flour. PL was not detected in corn oil before and after frying. As the oil repeated frying, FFA, CDA, and polar compounds contents, and PAV of frying oil increased due to the oil oxidation. The values were higher in the oil which fried soy-flour-added dough than in the oil fried the dough without soy flour, indicating the acceleration of oil oxidation by soy flour added to dough. Increase in the oil oxidation by soy flour added to the dough was highly correlated with fast decomposition of tocopherol in the oil.

  18. Nutritional and functional evaluation of wheat flour cookies supplemented with gram flour.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Ali A; Ahmed, Anwaar; Ahmad, Asif; Hameed, Tabassum; Randhawa, Muhammad Atif; Hayat, Imran; Khalid, Nauman

    2013-02-01

    Protein-enriched cookies were prepared by supplementing gram flour into wheat flour at levels of 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50% and analysed for physicochemical properties. The protein quality of the cookies was assessed by feeding gram flour-supplemented cookies to albino rats for 10 days. The supplementation resulted in a significant increase in protein, fat, crude fibre and ash contents of the cookies. The thickness and spread factor of cookies differ significantly while non-significant effect was observed in the width of the cookies. The protein efficiency ratio, net protein utilization, biological value and true digestibility differed significantly among diets containing cookies with gram flour fed to rats. Cookies with 30% substitution of straight grade flour and gram flour produced acceptable cookies as compared to control. The cookies containing 40-50% gram flour were best regarded as protein bioavailability for rats.

  19. Optimization of mold wheat bread fortified with soy flour, pea flour and whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Erben, Melina; Osella, Carlos A

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of replacing a selected wheat flour for defatted soy flour, pea flour and whey protein concentrate on both dough rheological characteristics and the performance and nutritional quality of bread. A mixture design was used to analyze the combination of the ingredients. The optimization process suggested that a mixture containing 88.8% of wheat flour, 8.2% of defatted soy flour, 0.0% of pea flour and 3.0% of whey protein concentrate could be a good combination to achieve the best fortified-bread nutritional quality. The fortified bread resulted in high protein concentration, with an increase in dietary fiber content and higher calcium levels compared with those of control (wheat flour 100%). Regarding protein quality, available lysine content was significantly higher, thus contributing with the essential amino acid requirement.

  20. Natural clinical tolerance to peanut in African patients is caused by poor allergenic activity of peanut IgE.

    PubMed

    Wollmann, E; Hamsten, C; Sibanda, E; Ochome, M; Focke-Tejkl, M; Asarnoj, A; Önell, A; Lilja, G; Gallerano, D; Lupinek, C; Thalhamer, T; Weiss, R; Thalhamer, J; Wickman, M; Valenta, R; van Hage, M

    2015-06-01

    In Africa, peanuts are frequently consumed, but severe allergic reactions are rare. We investigated immunological patterns of clinical tolerance to peanut in peanut-sensitized but asymptomatic patients from central Africa compared to peanut-allergic and peanut-sensitized but asymptomatic patients from Sweden. Sera from allergic patients (n = 54) from Zimbabwe sensitized to peanut but without allergic symptoms to peanut, and sera from peanut-allergic (n = 25) and peanut-sensitized but asymptomatic (n = 25) patients from Sweden were analyzed toward peanut allergen components (Ara h 1-3, 6, 8-9) and other allergen molecules from important allergen sources using microarray. IgE to Ara h 2 peptide epitopes was analyzed, and allergenic activity was assessed by basophil activation assay. Forty-six percent of the African and all peanut-allergic Swedish patients showed IgE toward one of the highly allergenic peanut allergens (Ara h 1-3, 6, 9). However, 48% of the African patients had IgE to cross-reactive carbohydrate determinants (CCDs) with low allergenic activity and 60% of the Swedish asymptomatic patients had IgE against the PR protein Ara h 8. IgG and IgG4 specificities and levels could not discriminate between the African asymptomatic and Swedish peanut-allergic patients. Asymptomatic patients almost lacked IgE to Ara h 2 peptides, which were recognized by peanut-allergic patients. Peanut IgE from peanut asymptomatic patients showed poor allergenic activity compared with IgE from peanut-allergic patients. Natural clinical tolerance to peanut in the African patients can be caused by IgE to low allergenic peanut components and by poor allergenic activity of peanut-specific IgE. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Enrichment of Bread with Nutraceutical-Rich Mushrooms: Impact of Auricularia auricula (Mushroom) Flour Upon Quality Attributes of Wheat Dough and Bread.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Biao; Zhao, Liyan; Yang, Wenjian; McClements, David Julian; Hu, Qiuhui

    2017-09-01

    Edible mushrooms contain a variety of bioactive molecules that may enhance human health and wellbeing. Consequently, there is increasing interest in fortifying functional foods with these nutraceutical-rich substances. However, incorporation of mushroom-based ingredients into foods should not adversely affect the quality attributes of the final product. In this study, the impact of incorporating powdered Auricularia auricula, a widely consumed edible mushroom, into bread products was examined. The rheological and structural properties of wheat dough and bread supplemented with 0% to 10% (w/w) A. auricula flour were measured. Supplementation of wheat doughs with A. auricula flour increased the peak viscosity and enhanced their water holding capacity. Rapid viscosity analysis showed that peak and final viscosities of the blended flour (wheat flour with A. auricula flour) were higher than wheat flour alone. However, dough stability and elastic modulus were reduced by blending wheat flour with A. auricula flour. SEM observation showed that doughs with up to 5% (w/w) A. auricula flour had acceptable gluten network microstructure. Characterization of the quality attributes of bread indicated that incorporation of A. auricula flour at levels >5% negatively impacted bread volume, height, texture, and appearance. © 2017 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  2. Development and analysis of composite flour bread.

    PubMed

    Menon, Lakshmi; Majumdar, Swarnali Dutta; Ravi, Usha

    2015-07-01

    The study elucidates the effect of utilizing cereal-pulse-fruit seed composite flour in the development and quality analysis of leavened bread. The composite flour was prepared using refined wheat flour (WF), high protein soy flour (SF), sprouted mung bean flour (MF) and mango kernel flour (MKF). Three variations were formulated such as V-I (WF: SF: MF: MKF = 85:5:5:5), V-II (WF: SF: MF: MKF = 70:10:10:10), and V-III (WF: SF: MF: MKF = 60:14:13:13). Pertinent functional, physico-chemical and organoleptic attributes were studied in composite flour variations and their bread preparations. Physical characteristics of the bread variations revealed a percentage decrease in loaf height (14 %) and volume (25 %) and 20 % increase in loaf weight with increased substitution of composite flour. The sensory evaluation of experimental breads on a nine-point hedonic scale revealed that V-I score was 5 % higher than the standard bread. Hence, the present study highlighted the nutrient enrichment of bread on incorporation of a potential waste material mango kernel, soy and sprouted legume. Relevant statistical tests were done to analyze the significance of means for all tested parameters.

  3. 21 CFR 137.170 - Instantized flours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Instantized flours. 137.170 Section 137.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  4. 21 CFR 137.170 - Instantized flours.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Instantized flours. 137.170 Section 137.170 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) FOOD FOR HUMAN CONSUMPTION CEREAL FLOURS AND RELATED PRODUCTS Requirements for Specific Standardized...

  5. Randomized Trial of Peanut Consumption in Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Toit, George Du; Roberts, Graham; Sayre, Peter H.; Bahnson, Henry T.; Radulovic, Suzana; Santos, Alexandra F.; Brough, Helen A.; Phippard, Deborah; Basting, Monica; Feeney, Mary; Turcanu, Victor; Sever, Michelle L.; Lorenzo, Margarita Gomez; Plaut, Marshall; Lack, Gideon

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevalence of peanut allergy among children in Western countries has doubled in the past 10 years, and peanut allergy is becoming apparent in Africa and Asia. We evaluated strategies of peanut consumption and avoidance to determine which strategy is most effective in preventing the development of peanut allergy in infants at high risk for the allergy. Methods We randomly assigned 640 infants with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both to consume or avoid peanuts until 60 months of age. Participants, who were at least 4 months but younger than 11 months of age at randomization, were assigned to separate study cohorts on the basis of preexisting sensitivity to peanut extract, which was determined with the use of a skin-prick test — one consisting of participants with no measurable wheal after testing and the other consisting of those with a wheal measuring 1 to 4 mm in diameter. The primary outcome, which was assessed independently in each cohort, was the proportion of participants with peanut allergy at 60 months of age. Results Among the 530 infants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had negative results on the skin-prick test, the prevalence of peanut allergy at 60 months of age was 13.7% in the avoidance group and 1.9% in the consumption group (P<0.001). Among the 98 participants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had positive test results, the prevalence of peanut allergy was 35.3% in the avoidance group and 10.6% in the consumption group (P = 0.004). There was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of serious adverse events. Increases in levels of peanut-specific IgG4 antibody occurred predominantly in the consumption group; a greater percentage of participants in the avoidance group had elevated titers of peanut-specific IgE antibody. A larger wheal on the skin-prick test and a lower ratio of peanut-specific IgG4:IgE were associated with peanut allergy. Conclusions The early introduction of

  6. Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Du Toit, George; Roberts, Graham; Sayre, Peter H; Bahnson, Henry T; Radulovic, Suzana; Santos, Alexandra F; Brough, Helen A; Phippard, Deborah; Basting, Monica; Feeney, Mary; Turcanu, Victor; Sever, Michelle L; Gomez Lorenzo, Margarita; Plaut, Marshall; Lack, Gideon

    2015-02-26

    The prevalence of peanut allergy among children in Western countries has doubled in the past 10 years, and peanut allergy is becoming apparent in Africa and Asia. We evaluated strategies of peanut consumption and avoidance to determine which strategy is most effective in preventing the development of peanut allergy in infants at high risk for the allergy. We randomly assigned 640 infants with severe eczema, egg allergy, or both to consume or avoid peanuts until 60 months of age. Participants, who were at least 4 months but younger than 11 months of age at randomization, were assigned to separate study cohorts on the basis of preexisting sensitivity to peanut extract, which was determined with the use of a skin-prick test--one consisting of participants with no measurable wheal after testing and the other consisting of those with a wheal measuring 1 to 4 mm in diameter. The primary outcome, which was assessed independently in each cohort, was the proportion of participants with peanut allergy at 60 months of age. Among the 530 infants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had negative results on the skin-prick test, the prevalence of peanut allergy at 60 months of age was 13.7% in the avoidance group and 1.9% in the consumption group (P<0.001). Among the 98 participants in the intention-to-treat population who initially had positive test results, the prevalence of peanut allergy was 35.3% in the avoidance group and 10.6% in the consumption group (P=0.004). There was no significant between-group difference in the incidence of serious adverse events. Increases in levels of peanut-specific IgG4 antibody occurred predominantly in the consumption group; a greater percentage of participants in the avoidance group had elevated titers of peanut-specific IgE antibody. A larger wheal on the skin-prick test and a lower ratio of peanut-specific IgG4:IgE were associated with peanut allergy. The early introduction of peanuts significantly decreased the frequency of

  7. Effect of flour extraction rate and baking on thiamine and riboflavin content and antioxidant capacity of traditional rye bread.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Villaluenga, C; Michalska, A; Frias, J; Piskula, M K; Vidal-Valverde, C; Zieliński, H

    2009-01-01

    The effect of rye flour extraction rates and baking on thiamine and riboflavin content, and antioxidant capacity of traditional rye bread were studied and compared with white wheat flour. The content of thiamine was higher (10.9%) in rye dough formulated with dark rye flour (F-100%; extraction rate of 100%) than in rye dough formulated with brown rye flour (F-92%; extraction rate of 92%) that was similar to dough made with wheat flour. The riboflavin content in rye dough made from flour F-100% was also higher (16%) than in dough formulated with flour F-92%, and both provided larger riboflavin content than wheat dough. Baking led to reductions in thiamine of 56% for wheat bread and of 20% for both rye breads; however, this process caused only a 10% decrease in riboflavin for wheat bread and a 30% decrease for rye breads. Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, peroxyl radical scavenging capacity, DPPH radical scavenging activity, and Folin-Ciocalteu reducing capacity were higher in rye than in wheat dough and bread. Baking process produced slight changes in antioxidant activity, except for Superoxide Dismutase-like activity where a sharp decrease was observed. Our findings showed that rye breads are an important source of B vitamins and rye breads formulated with dark and brown flours showed better antioxidant properties than wheat bread. Therefore, rye breads should be more widely recommended in human nutrition.

  8. Immunologic Suppression To Peanut During Immunotherapy Is Often Transient

    PubMed Central

    Gorelik, M.; Narisety, S.D.; Guerrerio, A.L.; Chichester, K.; Keet, C.A.; Bieneman, A.P.; Hamilton, R. G.; Wood, R.A; Schroeder, J.T.; Frischmeyer-Guerrerio, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Studies suggest that oral (OIT) and sublingual (SLIT) immunotherapy for food allergy hold promise; however, the immunologic mechanisms underlying these therapies are not well understood. Objective To generate insights into the mechanisms and duration of immunologic suppression to peanut during immunotherapy (IT). Methods Blood was obtained from subjects at baseline and at multiple timepoints during a placebo-controlled trial of peanut OIT and SLIT. Immunologic outcomes included spontaneous and stimulated basophil activity by automated fluorometry (histamine) and flow cytometry (activation markers, IL-4), allergen-induced cytokine expression in dendritic cell (DC)-T cell co-cultures by multiplexing technology, and expression of MHC II and costimulatory molecules on DCs by flow cytometry. Results Spontaneous and allergen-induced basophil reactivity (histamine release, CD63 expression, and IL-4 production) were suppressed during dose escalation and after 6 months of maintenance dosing. Peanut- and dust mite-induced expression of TH2 cytokines was reduced in DC-T cell co-cultures during IT. This was associated with decreased levels of CD40, HLA-DR, and CD86 expression on DCs, and increased expression of CD80. These effects were most striking in myeloid DC-T cell co-cultures from subjects receiving OIT. Many markers of immunologic suppression reversed following withdrawal from IT, and in some cases during ongoing maintenance therapy. Conclusion OIT and SLIT for peanut allergy induce rapid suppression of basophil effector functions, dendritic cell activation, and Th2 cytokine responses during the initial phases of IT in an antigen non-specific manner. While there was some inter-individual variation, in many patients, suppression appeared to be temporary. PMID:25542883

  9. Reduction of Aspergillus spp. and aflatoxins in peanut sauce processing by oil-less frying of chilli powder and retort processing.

    PubMed

    Farawahida, A H; Jinap, S; Nor-Khaizura, M A R; Samsudin, N I P

    2017-09-05

    Among the many roles played by Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) in the food industry is the production of heritage foods such as peanut sauce. Regretfully, the safety of peanut sauce is not always assured as the processing line is not controlled. Peanut sauce is usually made of peanuts and chilli, and these commodities are normally contaminated with Aspergillus spp. and aflatoxins (AFs). Hence, the objective of this study was to evaluate the practices related to reduction of AF hazard and the effect of interventions in peanut sauce processing. Peanut samples were collected from each step of peanut sauce processing from a small peanut sauce company according to four designs (1, 2, 3, and 4). The designs were (1) control (2) oil-less frying of chilli powder (3) addition of retort processing (4) combination of oil-less frying of chilli powder and retort processing. Oil-less frying of chilli powder (design 2) reduced total AFs by 33-41%, retort processing (design 3) reduced total AFs by 49%, while combination of these two thermal processing (design 4) significantly reduced total AFs by 57%. The present work demonstrated that design 4 yielded the highest reduction of total AFs and is therefore recommended to be employed by SME companies.

  10. Defatted Soy Flour Supplementation of Wheat Bread ameliorates Blood Chemistry and Oxidative Stress in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Ebuehi, O A T; Okafor, H K

    2015-01-01

    Bread is a convenience food made from wheat flour, which is derived from wheat and whose technology of which dates back to the ancient Egyptians. It is therefore of economic advantage if wheat importation to Nigeria can be reduced by substitution with other suitable materials. This led to the whole idea of composite flour, which is a mixture of wheat with other materials to form suitable flour for baking'purposes. The study is to ascertain the effect of supplementation of bread with defatted soy flour on blood chemistry and oxidative stress in Wistar rats. Wheat flour mixed with high quality defatted Soy flour at several ratios: 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40. The 90:10, 80:20, 70:30, and 60:40 flour mixtures were used to prepare 10%, 20%, 30%, and 40% Soya bread, respectively. The control bread (100%) was prepared with 100% wheat flour. Bread produced with these blends compared with regular 100% wheat bread and was tested for chemical and. organoleptic characteristics. Sixteen rats were randomly given codes and allocated to 2 different groups via tables with random numbers to feed on the 100% wheat blend and soy supplemented bread (90% wheat flour/10% soy flour) for 28 days. The weights and feedintake of the rats were computed on dailybasis. Blood was taken for biochemical assays and liver was used for antioxidant assay, that is activities of catalase, super oxider dismutase (SOD) and reduced glutathine level. The activities of serum SOD and catalase were significantly increase (p<0.05) in rats fed the composite bread as compared to the control, (wheat bread) and a significant decrease (p<0.05) in lipid peroxidation marker (malondialdehyde level) relative to control group. The activities of the liver enzymes (alanine amino transferase, aspartase amino transferase and alkaline phosphatase) and markers (low density lipoprotein, cholesterol and triacyl glycerol levels) showed significant decrease (p<0.05) in rats fed supplemented soy flour bread as compared to the

  11. Effect of ketotifen premedication on adverse reactions during peanut oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Oral immunotherapy (OIT) has shown promise in inducing desensitization for food allergy. However, there are safety concerns regarding the frequency and severity of adverse events during food OIT. Objective To evaluate the effect of Ketotifen premedication on adverse reactions during peanut OIT. Methods A randomized single blind placebo controlled pilot study was performed. Peanut OIT was performed using a previously published protocol. Ketotifen was up-titrated to 2 mg twice daily over two weeks (week -2 to 0), followed by a peanut OIT initial escalation day (day 1). Ketotifen was administered from week 0–4 of peanut OIT; reactions to peanut OIT doses were recorded by clinic staff and subject diary. Results Six subjects (median age 10 years, peanut IgE >100kUA/L) were enrolled, 4 randomized to Ketotifen, 2 to placebo. The most common side effect of Ketotifen was fatigue (9% during up-titration). The rate of reaction per peanut OIT dose was lower for subjects on ketotifen (K) compared to placebo (P) during initial escalation on day 1 (K: 22% (8/36) vs. P: 67% (12/18)); week 0–4 build-up doses (K: 75% (3/4) vs. P: 100% (2/2)); and week 0–4 home doses (K: 50% (54/108) vs. P: 82% (27/33)). The rate of gastrointestinal symptoms per peanut OIT dose was also lower for subjects on ketotifen during initial escalation on day 1 (K: 17% (6/36) vs. P: 61% (11/18)); week 0–4 build-up doses (K: 75% (3/4) vs P: 100% (2/2)); and week 0–4 home doses (K: 46% (50/108) vs. P: 82% (27/33)). Conclusions Ketotifen premedication is well tolerated and reduces the rate of gastrointestinal symptoms during peanut OIT. These findings require confirmation in a larger study of Ketotifen premedication used throughout peanut OIT. Trial registration Clinical Trials number: NCT0162515 PMID:25031584

  12. Atoxigenic strains of Aspergillus flavus isolated from peanuts collected from northern Philippines as potential biocon agents against pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of peanut and corn

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aflatoxin contamination of food products causes liver cancer and weakened immunity in humans, and stunted growth and reduced productivity in animals (CAST, 2003). Effective control of pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination of peanut and corn due to AflaGuard and Aflasafe in the United States and Africa...

  13. Assessing the efficacy of oral immunotherapy for the desensitisation of peanut allergy in children (STOP II): a phase 2 randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Anagnostou, Katherine; Islam, Sabita; King, Yvonne; Foley, Loraine; Pasea, Laura; Bond, Simon; Palmer, Chris; Deighton, John; Ewan, Pamela; Clark, Andrew

    2014-04-12

    Small studies suggest peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) might be effective in the treatment of peanut allergy. We aimed to establish the efficacy of OIT for the desensitisation of children with allergy to peanuts. We did a randomised controlled crossover trial to compare the efficacy of active OIT (using characterised peanut flour; protein doses of 2-800 mg/day) with control (peanut avoidance, the present standard of care) at the NIHR/Wellcome Trust Cambridge Clinical Research Facility (Cambridge, UK). Randomisation (1:1) was by use of an audited online system; group allocation was not masked. Eligible participants were aged 7-16 years with an immediate hypersensitivity reaction after peanut ingestion, positive skin prick test to peanuts, and positive by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). We excluded participants if they had a major chronic illness, if the care provider or a present household member had suspected or diagnosed allergy to peanuts, or if there was an unwillingness or inability to comply with study procedures. Our primary outcome was desensitisation, defined as negative peanut challenge (1400 mg protein in DBPCFC) at 6 months (first phase). Control participants underwent OIT during the second phase, with subsequent DBPCFC. Immunological parameters and disease-specific quality-of-life scores were measured. Analysis was by intention to treat. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the proportion of those with desensitisation to peanut after 6 months between the active and control group at the end of the first phase. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN62416244. The primary outcome, desensitisation, was recorded for 62% (24 of 39 participants; 95% CI 45-78) in the active group and none of the control group after the first phase (0 of 46; 95% CI 0-9; p<0·001). 84% (95% CI 70-93) of the active group tolerated daily ingestion of 800 mg protein (equivalent to roughly five peanuts). Median increase in

  14. Assessing the efficacy of oral immunotherapy for the desensitisation of peanut allergy in children (STOP II): a phase 2 randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Anagnostou, Katherine; Islam, Sabita; King, Yvonne; Foley, Loraine; Pasea, Laura; Bond, Simon; Palmer, Chris; Deighton, John; Ewan, Pamela; Clark, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Small studies suggest peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) might be effective in the treatment of peanut allergy. We aimed to establish the efficacy of OIT for the desensitisation of children with allergy to peanuts. Methods We did a randomised controlled crossover trial to compare the efficacy of active OIT (using characterised peanut flour; protein doses of 2–800 mg/day) with control (peanut avoidance, the present standard of care) at the NIHR/Wellcome Trust Cambridge Clinical Research Facility (Cambridge, UK). Randomisation (1:1) was by use of an audited online system; group allocation was not masked. Eligible participants were aged 7–16 years with an immediate hypersensitivity reaction after peanut ingestion, positive skin prick test to peanuts, and positive by double-blind placebo-controlled food challenge (DBPCFC). We excluded participants if they had a major chronic illness, if the care provider or a present household member had suspected or diagnosed allergy to peanuts, or if there was an unwillingness or inability to comply with study procedures. Our primary outcome was desensitisation, defined as negative peanut challenge (1400 mg protein in DBPCFC) at 6 months (first phase). Control participants underwent OIT during the second phase, with subsequent DBPCFC. Immunological parameters and disease-specific quality-of-life scores were measured. Analysis was by intention to treat. Fisher's exact test was used to compare the proportion of those with desensitisation to peanut after 6 months between the active and control group at the end of the first phase. This trial is registered with Current Controlled Trials, number ISRCTN62416244. Findings The primary outcome, desensitisation, was recorded for 62% (24 of 39 participants; 95% CI 45–78) in the active group and none of the control group after the first phase (0 of 46; 95% CI 0–9; p<0·001). 84% (95% CI 70–93) of the active group tolerated daily ingestion of 800 mg protein (equivalent to

  15. Effects of drought on characters related to nitrogen fixation in peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Twelve peanut genotypes were tested under three water regimes in two greenhouses to investigate the effects of drought on biomass production and N2 fixation. Drought reduced biomass production from 36.5 to 56.0% and reduced nitrogen fixation from 26.8 to 68.8%. Most genotypes with high biomass produ...

  16. The Case of the Disappearing "Peanuts."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Glenda; Jones, M. Gail

    1994-01-01

    Presents a series of investigations focusing on the biodegradable packing materials ("peanuts"), which provide a method for exploring science through experimentation. These activities can help fourth through sixth graders sharpen their critical thinking and science process skills. (PR)

  17. The Case of the Disappearing "Peanuts."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Glenda; Jones, M. Gail

    1994-01-01

    Presents a series of investigations focusing on the biodegradable packing materials ("peanuts"), which provide a method for exploring science through experimentation. These activities can help fourth through sixth graders sharpen their critical thinking and science process skills. (PR)

  18. The molecular basis of peanut allergy.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Geoffrey A; Maleki, Soheila J; Pedersen, Lars C

    2014-05-01

    Peanut allergens can trigger a potent and sometimes dangerous immune response in an increasing number of people. The molecular structures of these allergens form the basis for understanding this response. This review describes the currently known peanut allergen structures and discusses how modifications both enzymatic and non-enzymatic affect digestion, innate immune recognition, and IgE interactions. The allergen structures help explain cross-reactivity among allergens from different sources, which is useful in improving patient diagnostics. Surprisingly, it was recently noted that similar short peptide sequences among unrelated peanut allergens could also be a source of cross-reactivity. The molecular features of peanut allergens continue to inform predictions and provide new research directions in the study of allergic disease.

  19. [Proportion of aflatoxin B1 contaminated kernels and its concentration in imported peanut samples].

    PubMed

    Hirano, S; Shima, T; Shimada, T

    2001-08-01

    Moldy and split peanut kernels were separated from peanuts exported from Brazil, Sudan, India and Taiwan by visual inspection. The remaining peanuts from Brazil, Sudan and India were roasted lightly and the skins were removed. Stained peanuts were separated from the others. Aflatoxin was detected in moldy and stained peanuts. There was a positive correlation between % of aflatoxin-contaminated peanut kernels and aflatoxin B1 concentration in whole samples. Aflatoxin concentration of moldy peanuts was higher than that of stained peanut kernels.

  20. 21 CFR 137.225 - Whole durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Flours and Related Products § 137.225 Whole durum flour. Whole durum wheat flour conforms to the..., prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that cleaned durum wheat, instead of cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat, is used in its preparation. ...

  1. 21 CFR 137.225 - Whole durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Flours and Related Products § 137.225 Whole durum flour. Whole durum wheat flour conforms to the..., prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that cleaned durum wheat, instead of cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat, is used in its preparation. ...

  2. 21 CFR 137.225 - Whole durum flour.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Flours and Related Products § 137.225 Whole durum flour. Whole durum wheat flour conforms to the..., prescribed for whole wheat flour by § 137.200, except that cleaned durum wheat, instead of cleaned wheat other than durum wheat and red durum wheat, is used in its preparation. ...

  3. Sustained unresponsiveness to peanut in subjects who have completed peanut oral immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Vickery, Brian P; Scurlock, Amy M; Kulis, Michael; Steele, Pamela H; Kamilaris, Janet; Berglund, Jelena P; Burk, Caitlin; Hiegel, Anne; Carlisle, Suzanna; Christie, Lynn; Perry, Tamara T; Pesek, Robbie D; Sheikh, Saira; Virkud, Yamini; Smith, P Brian; Shamji, Mohamed H; Durham, Stephen R; Jones, Stacie M; Burks, A Wesley

    2014-02-01

    Although peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been conclusively shown to cause desensitization, it is currently unknown whether clinical protection persists after stopping therapy. Our primary objective was to determine whether peanut OIT can induce sustained unresponsiveness after withdrawal of OIT. We conducted a pilot clinical trial of peanut OIT at 2 US centers. Subjects age 1 to 16 years were recruited and treated for up to 5 years with peanut OIT. The protocol was modified over time to permit dose increases to a maximum of 4000 mg/d peanut protein. Blood was collected at multiple time points. Clinical end points were measured with 5000-mg double-blinded, placebo-controlled food challenges once specific criteria were met. Of the 39 subjects originally enrolled, 24 completed the protocol and had evaluable outcomes. Twelve (50%) of 24 successfully passed a challenge 1 month after stopping OIT and achieved sustained unresponsiveness. Peanut was added to the diet. At baseline and the time of challenge, such subjects had smaller skin test results, as well as lower IgE levels specific for peanut, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2 and lower ratios of peanut-specific IgE/total IgE compared with subjects not passing. There were no differences in peanut IgG₄ levels or functional activity at the end of the study. This is the first demonstration of sustained unresponsiveness after peanut OIT, occurring in half of subjects treated for up to 5 years. OIT favorably modified the peanut-specific immune response in all subjects completing the protocol. Smaller skin test results and lower allergen-specific IgE levels were predictive of successful outcome. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Sustained unresponsiveness to peanut in subjects who have completed peanut oral immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Brian P.; Scurlock, Amy M.; Kulis, Michael; Steele, Pamela H.; Kamilaris, Janet; Berglund, Jelena P.; Burk, Caitlin; Hiegel, Anne; Carlisle, Suzanna; Christie, Lynn; Perry, Tamara T.; Pesek, Robbie D.; Sheikh, Saira; Virkud, Yamini; Smith, P. Brian; Shamji, Mohamed H.; Durham, Stephen R.; Jones, Stacie M.; Burks, A. Wesley

    2013-01-01

    Background Although peanut oral immunotherapy (OIT) has been conclusively shown to cause desensitization, it is currently unknown whether clinical protection persists after stopping therapy. Objective Our primary objective was to determine whether peanut OIT can induce sustained unresponsiveness following withdrawal of OIT. Methods We conducted a pilot clinical trial of peanut OIT at two U.S. centers. Subjects aged 1–16 were recruited and treated for up to five years with peanut OIT. The protocol was modified over time to permit dose increases to a maximum of 4000 mg peanut protein/day. Blood was collected at multiple time points. Clinical endpoints were measured with 5000 mg double-blinded, placebo-controlled food challenges once specific criteria were met. Results Of the 39 subjects originally enrolled, 24 completed the protocol and had evaluable outcomes. 12/24 (50%) successfully passed a challenge one month after stopping OIT and achieved sustained unresponsiveness. Peanut was added to the diet. At baseline and the time of challenge, such subjects had smaller skin tests as well as lower IgE levels specific for peanut, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2, and lower ratios of peanut-specific:total IgE, compared to subjects not passing. There were no differences in peanut IgG4 levels or functional activity at end-of-study. Conclusions This is the first demonstration of sustained unresponsiveness after peanut OIT, occurring in half of subjects treated up to five years. OIT favorably modified the peanut-specific immune response in all subjects completing the protocol. Smaller skin tests and lower allergen-specific IgE levels were predictive of successful outcome. PMID:24361082

  5. Frequency and significance of immediate contact reactions to peanut in peanut-sensitive children.

    PubMed

    Wainstein, B K; Kashef, S; Ziegler, M; Jelley, D; Ziegler, J B

    2007-06-01

    Parents of atopic children frequently report, and are alarmed by, contact reactions to foods. Some schools restrict foods due to concerns regarding possible systemic reactions following contact in allergic children. We aimed to determine the frequency with which peanut-sensitive children exhibited contact sensitivity to peanut butter and to assess the significance of such reactions. One gram of peanut butter was applied directly to the skin of 281 children who were skin prick test (SPT) positive to peanut (immediate skin application food test; I-SAFT). The test was considered positive if one or more weals were present when the patch was removed after 15 min. A subset of children then underwent an open-label oral challenge with graded amounts of peanut protein. During 3515 clinic visits, 330 I-SAFT tests for peanut contact sensitivity were performed; 136 (41%) were positive. The mean SPT diameter was 10 mm in the I-SAFT-positive children and 8.5 mm in the I-SAFT-negative children (t-test, P<0.0001). No child had a systemic reaction following topical application of peanut butter. Eighty-four children had 85 oral challenges after blinded, placebo-controlled I-SAFT testing. Challenge was positive in 26/32 of those with a positive I-SAFT and negative in only 6/32. Challenge was also positive in 26/53 but negative in 27/53 of those with a negative I-SAFT (sensitivity 50%, specificity 82%, chi2, P=0.003). A minority of children sensitized to peanut (positive SPT) develop localized urticaria from prolonged skin contact with peanut butter. No tested subjects, including ones with systemic reactions upon oral challenge, developed a systemic reaction to prolonged skin exposure to peanut. Therefore, systemic reactions resulting from this mode of contact with peanut butter appear highly unlikely.

  6. Oral and sublingual peanut immunotherapy is not ready for general use.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew J

    2013-01-01

    Food oral immunotherapy (OIT) is an investigational peanut allergy treatment aimed to achieve specific oral tolerance induction. Allergic children are given titrated oral (or sublingual) doses of their allergen on a daily basis, unlike in subcutaneous immunotherapy (SCIT). OIT is theorized to cause a shift from a Th2 to a Th1 regulatory environment, reflected by increases in food-specific IgG4/IgE, and the production of FoxP3. Peanut OIT holds special promise because peanut allergy has an unfavorable natural history and is rarely outgrown. A high percentage of the participants experience symptoms during peanut OIT, including anaphylaxis, warranting epinephrine and/or discontinuation of therapy. This is a concerning fact given that the studies have mostly targeted only older children, with less historical reactivity for enrollment. The handful of peanut OIT studies have shown that some participants can be desensitized to peanut, but none have shown that long-term tolerance can be reestablished. Factors predictive of which patients are most likely to succeed and become desensitized through OIT are unknown. Some private practices have begun offering peanut OIT as a therapy. Such practice is potentially dangerous given the safety and efficacy of OIT in randomized controlled clinical trials is still not well established. Therefore, until further investigation emerges that conclusively demonstrates OIT is safe, intermediate and long-term outcomes are better established, the number of participants that experience symptoms is reduced, and proof of concept established in patients of all ages, (irrespective of past reaction severity), OIT is not ready for use in the general allergy practice.

  7. Effects of peanut processing on body weight and fasting plasma lipids.

    PubMed

    McKiernan, Fiona; Lokko, Phoebe; Kuevi, Anna; Sales, Regiane L; Costa, Neuza M B; Bressan, Josefina; Alfenas, Rita C G; Mattes, Richard D

    2010-08-01

    Peanuts and peanut butter are commonly consumed as a snack, meal component and ingredient in various commercial products. Their consumption is associated with reduced CVD risk and they pose little threat to positive energy balance. However, questions have arisen as to whether product form (e.g. whole nut v. butter) and processing properties (e.g. roasting and adding flavours) may compromise their positive health effects. The present study investigated the effects of peanut form and processing on two CVD risk factors: fasting plasma lipids and body weight. One hundred and eighteen adults (forty-seven males and seventy-one females; age 29.2 (sd 8.4) years; BMI 30.0 (sd 4.5) kg/m2) from Brazil, Ghana and the United States were randomised to consume 56 g of raw unsalted (n 23), roasted unsalted (n 24), roasted salted (n 23) or honey roasted (n 24) peanuts, or peanut butter (n 24) daily for 4 weeks. Peanut form and processing did not differentially affect body weight or fasting plasma lipid responses in the total sample. However, HDL-cholesterol increased significantly at the group level, and total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and TAG concentrations decreased significantly in individuals classified as having elevated fasting plasma lipids compared with those with normal fasting plasma lipids. These observations suggest that the processing attributes assessed in this trial do not compromise the lipid-lowering effects of peanuts, and do not negatively impact body weight. Further studies are warranted to determine the effects of form and processing on other health risk factors.

  8. Thermal inactivation of eight Salmonella serotypes on dry corn flour.

    PubMed

    VanCauwenberge, J E; Bothast, R J; Kwolek, W F

    1981-10-01

    Dry heat was used to inactivate Salmonella newington, Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella anatum, Salmonella kentucky, Salmonella cubana, Salmonella seftenberg, Salmonella thompson, and Salmonella tennessee in corn flour at 10 and 15% moisture. The flour was spray inoculated at 10(5) Salmonella cells per g and then stored at 49 degrees C (120 degrees F); viable Salmonella cells were counted on Trypticase (BBL Microbiology Systems) soy agar plates every 30 min for the first 4 h and then at 4-h intervals for 20 additional h of storage. After 24 h, 99.9% of all Salmonella cells were killed. S. thompson and S. tennessee were more resistant to heat inactivation than the other serotypes. Naturally occurring contamination by Salmonella spp. in dry food products could be significantly reduced with this treatment.

  9. Flour fortification in South Africa: post-implementation survey of micronutrient levels at point of retail.

    PubMed

    Yusufali, Rizwan; Sunley, Nigel; de Hoop, Maude; Panagides, Dora

    2012-12-01

    Fortification of staple foods is an effective strategy to deliver and increase the intake of micronutrients in the diet and can reduce micronutrient deficiencies. It is important to ensure that the food vehicle consistently contains adequate amounts of nutrients at the point of consumption for effective impact. This survey aimed to gauge the level of fortification of maize and wheat flour at the retail level compared with staple food fortification regulations in South Africa to better understand the current obstacles to effective delivery of micronutrients through flour fortification and consider approaches to strengthening the program. White bread flour and maize meal samples were collected from retail points across all provinces and analyzed for vitamin A, iron, and nicotinamide, and a database capturing the origins of the sample was populated. Nicotinamide and vitamin A results were compared against each other and evaluated against food regulations. The level of compliance with statutory fortification requirements was low, both for bread flour and for maize meal. There is evidence of insufficient addition of premix as opposed to losses due to vitamin A stability as seen from the strong correlation between vitamin A and nicotinamide in maize meal. The current levels of micronutrients added to maize meal and bread flour are unsatisfactory. This is likely to be because of insufficient addition of premix at the mills. This affects the availability and intake by consumers of fortified product and potentially prevents the desired reduction in vitamin and mineral deficiencies expected from the flour fortification program.

  10. Circuits and signal conditioning for a peanut-drying monitoring system

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Post-harvest processes at peanut buying points and other peanut grading facilities have a direct impact on the quality of the product. Peanut drying is an essential task for safe peanut storage. The rate at which peanuts are dried can also affect the flavor and milling qualities. Current peanut dryi...

  11. Effect of extruded wheat flour as a fat replacer on batter characteristics and cake quality.

    PubMed

    Román, Laura; Santos, Isabel; Martínez, Mario M; Gómez, Manuel

    2015-12-01

    The effects of three levels of fat replacement (1/3, 2/3, and 3/3) by extruded flour paste and the effects of the presence of emulsifier on layer cake batter characteristics and final cake quality were studied. Replacement of oil by extruded flour paste modified the batter density and microscopy, reducing the number of air bubbles and increasing their size, while emulsifier incorporation facilitated air entrapment in batter. Emulsifier addition also increased the elastic and viscous moduli of the batter, while oil reduction resulted in a less structured batter. Emulsifier incorporation leads to good quality cakes, minimizing the negative effect of oil reduction, maintaining the volume and reducing the hardness of cakes. Furthermore, consumer acceptability of the reduced fat cakes was improved by the addition of emulsifier. Thus, the results confirmed the positive effect of partial oil substitution (up to 2/3) by extruded flour paste on the quality of reduced fat cakes when emulsifier was incorporated.

  12. Combination of near infrared spectroscopy and chemometrics for authentication of taro flour from wheat and sago flour

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rachmawati; Rohaeti, E.; Rafi, M.

    2017-05-01

    Taro flour on the market is usually sold at higher price than wheat and sago flour. This situation could be a cause for adulteration of taro flour from wheat and sago flour. For this reason, we will need an identification and authentication. Combination of near infrared (NIR) spectrum with multivariate analysis was used in this study to identify and authenticate taro flour from wheat and sago flour. The authentication model of taro flour was developed by using a mixture of 5%, 25%, and 50% of adulterated taro flour from wheat and sago flour. Before subjected to multivariate analysis, an initial preprocessing signal was used namely normalization and standard normal variate to the NIR spectrum. We used principal component analysis followed by discriminant analysis to make an identification and authentication model of taro flour. From the result obtained, about 90.48% of the taro flour mixed with wheat flour and 85% of taro flour mixed with sago flour were successfully classified into their groups. So the combination of NIR spectrum with chemometrics could be used for identification and authentication of taro flour from wheat and sago flour.

  13. Comparative study of thermal inactivation kinetics of Salmonella spp. in peanut butter and peanut butter spread

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut butter has been implicated in multi-state outbreaks of salmonellosis in recent years. Studies have shown that Salmonella exhibited increased thermal resistance in peanut butter. However, little is known about the effect of product formulation on the kinetics of survival of Salmonella during...

  14. The peanut genome consortium and peanut genome sequence: Creating a better future through global food security

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The competitiveness of peanuts in domestic and global markets has been threatened by losses in productivity and quality that are attributed to diseases, pests, environmental stresses and allergy or food safety issues. The U.S. Peanut Genome Initiative (PGI) was launched in 2004, and expanded to a gl...

  15. Attempt to remove peanut allergens from peanut extracts, using IgE-attached magnetic beads.

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Immunoglobulin E (IgE) antibodies from sera of peanut-allergic individuals are known to bind specifically to major peanut allergens, Ara h 1 and Ara h 2. The objective of this study was to determine the efficiency of magnetic beads (Dynabeads) attached with IgE antibodies in the removal of major pea...

  16. Association mapping of SSR markers to sweet, bitter and roasted peanut sensory attributes in cultivated peanut

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Certain roasted peanut quality sensory attributes are very important breeding objectives for peanut manufactory and consumers. Currently the only means of measuring these traits is the use of a trained sensory panel. This is a costly and time-consuming process. It is desirable, from a cost, time an...

  17. Screening natural antioxidants in peanut shell using DPPH-HPLC-DAD-TOF/MS methods.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jiying; Chen, Leilei; Zhu, Qingjun; Wang, Daijie; Wang, Wenliang; Sun, Xin; Liu, Xiaoyong; Du, Fangling

    2012-12-15

    Peanut shell, a byproduct in oil production, is rich in natural antioxidants. Here, a rapid and efficient method using DPPH-HPLC-DAD-TOF/MS was used for the first time to screen antioxidants in peanut shell. The method is based on the hypothesis that upon reaction with 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH), the peak areas of compounds with potential antioxidant activities in the HPLC chromatogram will be significantly reduced or disappeared, and the identity confirmation could be achieved by HPLC-DAD-TOF/MS technique. With this method, three compounds possessing potential antioxidant activities were found abundantly in the methanolic extract of peanut shell. They were identified as 5,7-dihydroxychromone, eriodictyol, and luteolin. The contents of these compounds were 0.59, 0.92, and 2.36 mg/g, respectively, and luteolin possessed the strongest radical scavenging capacity. DPPH-HPLC-DAD-TOF/MS assay facilitated rapid identification and determination of natural antioxidants in peanut shell, which may be helpful for value-added utilization of peanut processing byproducts. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Regulated expression of an isopentenyltransferase gene (IPT) in peanut significantly improves drought tolerance and increases yield under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua; Gu, Qiang; Zhang, Junling; Sun, Li; Kuppu, Sundaram; Zhang, Yizheng; Burow, Mark; Payton, Paxton; Blumwald, Eduardo; Zhang, Hong

    2011-11-01

    Isopentenyltransferase (IPT) is a critical enzyme in the cytokinin biosynthetic pathway. The expression of IPT under the control of a maturation- and stress-induced promoter was shown to delay stress-induced plant senescence that resulted in an enhanced drought tolerance in both monocot and dicot plants. This report extends the earlier findings in tobacco and rice to peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), an important oil crop and protein source. Regulated expression of IPT in peanut significantly improved drought tolerance in both laboratory and field conditions. Transgenic peanut plants maintained higher photosynthetic rates, higher stomatal conductance and higher transpiration than wild-type control plants under reduced irrigation conditions. More importantly, transgenic peanut plants produced significantly higher yields than wild-type control plants in the field, indicating a great potential for the development of crops with improved performance and yield in water-limited areas of the world.

  19. Influence of partial replacement of butter fat with peanut oil (in infant formula) on erythrocyte fatty acids in infants.

    PubMed

    Hariharan, K; Rao, S V

    1997-09-01

    Erythrocyte fatty acid composition was studied in infants fed with three different formulae: formula I containing 20% butter fat; formula II containing 10% butter fat and 10% peanut oil; and formula III containing 10% butter fat and 5% peanut oil with a fat content itself reduced to 15%. The linoleic acid levels were 2.5, 18 and 13% in formula I-III, respectively. Analysis of fatty acids at the time of birth, and 3 and 6 months thereafter, indicated that linoleic acid levels could be improved by supplementation with peanut oil. Arachidonic acid levels (20:4, n-6) did not show a proportional relationship with respect to linoleic acid intake. The other ratio such as triene/tetraene, oleic/linoleic, linoleic/arachidonic and arachidonic/linoleic were all within the normal range, indicating normal desaturase and elongase activity. Thus, our present study suggests that peanut oils could be used for enhancing the linoleic acid levels in infants.

  20. Peanut and hazelnut traces in cookies and chocolates: relationship between analytical results and declaration of food allergens on product labels.

    PubMed

    Pele, Maria; Brohée, Marcel; Anklam, Elke; Van Hengel, Arjon J

    2007-12-01

    Accidental exposure to hazelnut or peanut constitutes a real threat to the health of allergic consumers. Correct information regarding food product ingredients is of paramount importance for the consumer, thereby reducing exposure to food allergens. In this study, 569 cookies and chocolates on the European market were purchased. All products were analysed to determine peanut and hazelnut content, allowing a comparison of the analytical results with information provided on the product label. Compared to cookies, chocolates are more likely to contain undeclared allergens, while, in both food categories, hazelnut traces were detected at higher frequencies than peanut. The presence of a precautionary label was found to be related to a higher frequency of positive test results. The majority of chocolates carrying a precautionary label tested positive for hazelnut, whereas peanut traces were not be detected in 75% of the cookies carrying a precautionary label.

  1. Incorporation of carrot pomace powder in wheat flour: effect on flour, dough and cookie characteristics.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Mukhtar; Wani, Touseef Ahmed; Wani, S M; Masoodi, F A; Gani, Adil

    2016-10-01

    Carrot pomace powder (CPP) of 72 and 120 mesh sizes was incorporated in wheat flour at 10, 15 and 20 % level and its impact on flour, dough and cookie characteristics was evaluated. Protein content of the flour blends (8.84-7.88 %) decreased and fibre content (4.63-6.68 %) increased upon blending of CPP in wheat flour. Wheat flour containing 120 mesh CPP showed better functional properties [water absorption (1.16-1.47 %), oil absorption (1.11-1.39 %), solubility index (41-50 %) and swelling power (1.34-1.39)] than those containing 72 mesh. Water solvent retention capacity and sucrose solvent retention capacity increased while lactic acid solvent retention capacity and sodium carbonate solvent retention capacity decreased with blending of CPP. Water absorption, dough development time and degree of softening increased whereas, dough stability and mixing tolerance decreased with increasing CPP. The highest decrease in pasting was observed flour containing 72 mesh CPP. Rheology of dough containing 120 mesh CPP closely resembled the control. Color of flour and cookies increased with blending of CPP irrespective of mesh size. Antioxidant activity of cookies was higher than the flour blends. The cookies containing CPP of 72 mesh showed the lowest hardness. However, cookies containing CPP of 120 mesh showed the best sensory properties. Incorporation of 120 mesh CPP produced low gluten cookies with manageable flour and dough characteristics and better antioxidant and sensory properties.

  2. [Possibility of using flour of pigeon pea in products prepared with rice or wheat flour].

    PubMed

    Mueses, C; de León, L; Bressani, R

    1993-03-01

    The present study reports on the development of foods containing processed pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan) flour. The pigeon pea flours described in a previous publication were prepared from dehulled pigeon peas by cooking in autoclave, by extrusion-cooking and by cooking/dehydration by drum-drying. Mixtures of cooked pigeon peas and rice were first evaluated biological through a protein complementation design using NPR. The results of this study showed that the two products had high protein quality and were similar when mixed in ratios of 80:20 to 40:60. For the evaluation of the processed pigeon pea flour, mixtures with rice (80:20) were used. All pigeon pea flours gave similar protein quality values. On the basis of these results three products were developed and tested. One was a gruel ("atole"), a second a fruit-flavored thick drink with and without 15% milk. Cookies were also prepared with a series of blends of pigeon pea flour (extrusion-cooked) and wheat. The gruel and the fruit flavored products had high acceptability based on a sensory evaluation test. Cookies with 100% pigeon pea flour were unacceptable, however, mixtures of 75% wheat flour and 25% pigeon pea flour gave cookies of attractive appearance and good taste. The study showed the possibility of preparing and utilizing tropical grain legume flours for food products of relatively high acceptability and nutritive value.

  3. The effect of monoculture peanut and cassava/peanut intercropping on physical and chemical properties in peanut rhizosphere soil under the biochar application and straw mulching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, X.; Tian, Y.; Guo, X. F.; Chen, G. K.; He, H. Z.; Li, H. S.

    2017-03-01

    Cassava/peanut intercropping is a popular cultivation method in the south China, with the advantage of apparent yield increase. In order to analyze the effect of cassava/peanut intercropping on physical and chemical properties in peanut rhizosphere soil, the physical and chemical properties were investigated under the biochar application and straw mulching. The result showed that the Ph, organic materials content, available phosphorus content, available potassium content in peanut rhizosphere under the biochar application increased by 7.06%, 94.52%, 17.53%, 25.08% (monoculture peanut) and 8.47%, 89.94%, 17.93%, 22.87% (cassava/peanut intercropping) compared with Ck in the same planting patterns. In addition, the available nitrogen content, organic materials content, available phosphorus content, and available potassium content in peanut rhizosphere under the straw mulching increased by 89.80%, 60.92%, 5.95%, 9.98% (monoculture peanut) and 67.09%, 52.34%, 6.96%, 11.94% (cassava/peanut intercropping) compared with Ck in the same planting patterns. In the same treatment conditions, bulk density in peanut rhizosphere soil decreased and porosity and saturated permeability coefficient increased slightly. But there was no significant difference between the two. At the same time, cassava/peanut intercropping could increase soil nutrients. Therefore, it is beneficial to apply biochar and straw mulching, and the suitable intercropping row spacing is more beneficial to increase soil nutrient contents.

  4. Effect of storage on chemical and sensory profiles of peanut pastes prepared with high-oleic and normal peanuts.

    PubMed

    Riveros, Cecilia G; Mestrallet, Marta G; Gayol, Maria F; Quiroga, Patricia R; Nepote, Valeria; Grosso, Nelson R

    2010-12-01

    Peanut paste and peanut butter have high oil contents and are thus susceptible to developing rancidity and off-flavours through lipid oxidation. Preservation of the chemical and sensory quality of these products is one of the main problems in the peanut industry. The purpose of this study was to compare the chemical and sensory stability of peanut paste prepared with high-oleic peanuts (cv. Granoleico, GO-P) with that of peanut paste prepared with normal peanuts (cv. Tegua, T-P) from Argentina. Chemical (peroxide and p-anisidine values and conjugated dienes) and sensory (roasted peanutty, oxidised and cardboard flavours) indicators of lipid oxidation were measured in peanut pastes stored at 4, 23 and 40 °C. Chemical indicator values and oxidised and cardboard flavours showed lower increments in GO-P than in T-P during storage. T-P had significantly higher peroxide value than GO-P. Roasted peanutty flavour showed a lower decrease in GO-P. Peanut paste prepared with high-oleic peanuts had four (at 4 °C), two (at 23 °C) and three (at 40 °C) times longer shelf-life than peanut paste prepared with normal peanuts. These results indicate that high-oleic Granoleico kernels provide peanut paste with higher protection against lipid oxidation. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  5. Cold plasma: A new technology to modify wheat flour functionality

    PubMed Central

    Bahrami, Niloufar; Bayliss, Danny; Chope, Gemma; Penson, Simon; Perehinec, Tania; Fisk, Ian D.

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric pressure cold plasma has the potential to modify biological chemistry and modulate physical surface properties. Wheat flour was treated by low levels of cold plasma (air, 15 V and 20 V) for 60 or 120 s. There was no change in the total aerobic bacterial count or total mould count as a result of treatment. Treatment did not impact the concentration of total non-starch lipids, or non-polar and glycolipids. However, treatment did reduce total free fatty acids and phospholipids and was dose dependent. Oxidation markers (hydroperoxide value and head space n-hexanal) increased with treatment time and voltage, which confirmed the acceleration of lipid oxidation. Total proteins were not significantly influenced by treatment although there was a trend towards higher molecular weight fractions which indicated protein oxidation and treated flour did produce a stronger dough. This study confirms the potential of cold plasma as a tool to modify flour functionality. PMID:26920291

  6. Influence of adipic acid on tensile and morphology properties of linear low density polyethylene/rambutan peels flour blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadhirah, A. A.; Sam, S. T.; Noriman, N. Z.; Ragunathan, S.; Ismail, H.

    2015-07-01

    This study investigate about the tensile and morphological properties of degradable polymer produced from linear low density polyethylene/rambutan peel flour (LLDPE/RPF) blends and adipic acid (AA) was used as a compatibilizer by varying the rambutan peel flour (RPF) amount from 0-25wt%. The samples were subjected to tensile and morphological tests. AA compatibilized showed higher strength compared to uncompatibilized blends. The Young's modulus for LLDPE/RPF blends increased with increasing flour content. However, the addition of adipic acid had reduced the Young's Modulus.

  7. Yield and Economic Responses of Peanut to Crop Rotation Sequence

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    National Peanut Research Laboratory, Dawson, GA 39842. Proper crop rotation is essential to maintaining high peanut yield and quality. However, the economic considerations of maintaining or altering crop rotation sequences must incorporate the commodity prices, production costs, and yield responses...

  8. Specific immunoglobulin E antibodies to peanut over time in relation to peanut intake, symptoms and age.

    PubMed

    van Odijk, J; Bengtsson, U; Borres, M P; Hulthén, L; Ahlstedt, S

    2004-10-01

    The clinical outcome of peanut allergy and some factors associated with development of peanut allergy remain unsolved. It has not been clarified to what extent peanut intake affects immunoglobulin (IgE) antibody formation in peanut sensitized individuals. The aim of the study was to investigate the development of peanut hypersensitivity in children and adolescents with specific IgE antibodies to peanut, using questionnaires and current serum tests and comparing it to information obtained 5-6 yr earlier, to investigate how peanut intake during this period related to subject age, IgE antibody levels and symptoms and to investigate what information this patient group was given at the time of diagnosis regarding avoidance of peanut related food. All patients with detectable peanut-specific IgE antibodies investigated during 1994-1996 deriving from two allergy laboratories in the western region of Sweden were traced and reinvestigated (n=132). A total of 111 subjects (63 with peanut allergy and 48 peanut sensitized) participated in the questionnaire. Eighty-six of them consented to be enrolled in a further interview and renewed testing of specific IgE antibody to peanut 5 yr later. All tests were done using the Pharmacia CAP system. Increased IgE antibody levels during follow-up was related to age; subjects 0-6 yr at initial test occasion were more likely to have higher IgE antibody class than the older individuals (p=0.018). Exposure to peanut during the study, i.e. 5-6 yr since diagnosis, did not seem to affect the result. During the follow-up period, 29 out of 86 (34%) increased their IgE antibody class. At the second test occasion the remaining subjects had similar (28%) or lowered (38%) levels of IgE antibodies. Exposure to peanut during follow-up was more common in subjects with IgE antibody class 1-3 compared to subjects with high value (> 3) at the initial test (p=0.003). Reported symptoms during follow-up were also more common in subjects with initially high Ig

  9. Comparative leaf proteomics of drought-tolerant and -susceptible peanut in response to water stress.

    PubMed

    Katam, Ramesh; Sakata, Katsumi; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Pechan, Tibor; Kambiranda, Devaiah M; Naik, Karamthot Sivasankar; Guo, Baozhu; Basha, Sheikh M

    2016-06-30

    Water stress (WS) predisposes peanut plants to fungal infection resulting in pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination. Major changes during water stress including oxidative stress, lead to destruction of photosynthetic apparatus and other macromolecules within cells. Two peanut cultivars with diverse drought tolerance characteristics were subjected to WS, and their leaf proteome was compared using two-dimensional electrophoresis complemented with MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry. Ninety-six protein spots were differentially abundant to water stress in both cultivars that corresponded to 60 non-redundant proteins. Protein interaction prediction analysis suggests that 42 unique proteins showed interactions in tolerant cultivar while 20 showed interactions in the susceptible cultivar, activating other proteins in directed system response networks. Four proteins: glutamine ammonia ligase, chitin class II, actin isoform B, and beta tubulin, involved in metabolism, defense and cellular biogenesis, are unique in tolerant cultivar and showed positive interactions with other proteins. In addition, four proteins: serine/threonine protein phosphate PP1, choline monooxygenase, peroxidase 43, and SNF1-related protein kinase regulatory subunit beta-2, that play a role as cryoprotectants through signal transduction, were induced in drought tolerant cultivar following WS. Eleven interologs of these proteins were found in Arabidopsis interacting with several proteins and it is believed that similar mechanisms/pathways exist in peanut. Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea L.) are a major source of plant protein grown in subtropical and tropical regions of the world. Pre-harvest aflatoxin contamination is a major problem that affects peanut crop yield and food safety. Poor understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms associated with aflatoxin resistance is largely responsible for the lack of progress in elucidating a process/methodology for reducing aflatoxin contamination in peanuts. Drought

  10. [Effects of light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut seedling leaves].

    PubMed

    Yan, Meng-Meng; Wang, Ming-Lun; Wang, Hong-Bo; Wang, Yue-Fu; Zhao, Chang-Xing

    2014-02-01

    This study explored the effects of different light quality on photosynthetic pigment contents and photosynthetic characteristics of peanut (Qinhua 6) seedling leaves. The results showed that, compared with natural light, blue light (445-470 nm) could significantly improve the specific leaf area (SLA), chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content of peanut seedlings. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate, stomatal conductance, and transpiration rate were higher, the intercellular CO2 content was lower, and the photosynthetic efficiency was improved significantly under blue light. Red light (610-660 nm) could improve the chlorophyll content significantly, and reduce SLA, chlorophyll a/b value and carotenoid content, with a lower photosynthetic efficiency than natural light. Green light (515-520 nm) and yellow light (590-595 nm) were not conducive to photosynthetic pigment accumulation of leaves, and significantly inhibited leaf photosynthesis of peanut seedlings.

  11. Effects of gamma irradiation for inactivating Salmonella Typhimurium in peanut butter product during storage.

    PubMed

    Ban, Ga-Hee; Kang, Dong-Hyun

    2014-02-03

    Three types (A, B, and C) of peanut butter product with different water activities (0.18, 0.39, and 0.65 aw) inoculated with a 3-strain mixture of Salmonella Typhimurium were subjected to gamma irradiation (⁶⁰Co) treatment, with doses ranging from 0 to 3 kGy. The inactivation of S. Typhimurium in the 3 types of treated peanut butter product over a 14 day storage period and the influence of storage temperature at 4 (refrigerated) and 25 °C (ambient), and peanut butter product formulation were investigated. Three types of peanut butter product inoculated with S. Typhimurium to a level of ca. 6.6 log CFU/g and subjected to gamma irradiation experienced significant (p<0.05) reductions of 1.3 to 1.9, 2.6 to 2.8, and 3.5 to 4.0 log CFU/g at doses of 1, 2, and 3 kGy, respectively. The time required to reduce S. Typhimurium in peanut butter product to undetectable levels was 14, 5, and 5 days at 25°C after exposure to 3 kGy for products A, B, and C, respectively, and 7 days at 25 °C following exposure to 2 kGy for product C. During storage at 4 and 25 °C, survival of S. Typhimurium was lowest in product C compared to products A and B. Water activity (a(w)) of peanut butter product was likely the most critical factor affecting pathogen survival. When a(w) is reduced, radiolysis of water is reduced, thereby decreasing antimicrobial action. Overall, death was more rapid at 25 °C versus 4 °C for all peanut butter products during 14 day storage. Following gamma irradiation, acid values of peanut butter product were not significantly different from the control, and general observations failed to detect changes in color and aroma, even though lightness observed using a colorimeter was slightly reduced on day 0. The use of gamma irradiation has potential in preventing spoilage of post-packaged food by destroying microorganisms and improving the safety and quality of foods without compromising sensory quality.

  12. Ultrasonic study of wheat flour properties.

    PubMed

    García-Álvarez, J; Salazar, J; Rosell, C M

    2011-02-01

    In this work, the wheat flour properties are investigated using ultrasound techniques. Moreover, the flour samples were also characterized by means of well established techniques such as protein content, Alveograph and Mixolab®. A set of 35 dough samples, made of wheat flours with diverse physical and quality properties, were studied. The obtained results shown that ultrasound measurements can detect changes in the dough consistency induced by proteins and also by gelatinization of the starch. Furthermore, ultrasound measurements can be related to parameters indicative of the proteolytic degradation or softening of the dough due to protease activity. Thus, ultrasound can be considered a low cost and rapid tool, complementary to conventional test, for wheat flour characterization.

  13. Sequential extractions: A new way for protein quantification-data from peanut allergens.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ningling; Li, Wenying; Wu, Zhihua; Li, Xin; Yang, Anshu; Tong, Ping; Chen, Hongbing

    2015-09-01

    Quantification of certain protein contents in the matrix is essential in protein analyses. The amount of total protein in the matrix can be determined by the Kjeldahl method. However, few methods can quantify certain protein contents in the matrix without extracting all of them in solution. Extracting all of the contents is difficult for proteins, especially relatively insoluble ones. A five-step sequential extraction method was developed for the quantification of certain proteins in defatted peanut flour based on the relationship between the extracted protein contents and the extraction times. The extracted proteins (i.e., total protein, Ara h 1, and Ara h 2) were quantitatively analyzed in each extraction of the same condition. An exponential equation was obtained between the extraction times and the respective amount of extracted protein as well as both the total protein and a particular protein. In particular, the amount of protein extracted each time can be a geometric sequence. If all proteins can be extracted with sufficient extraction times, the protein contents in the peanut matrix can be calculated using a mathematical summation formula. This sum should be all proteins in the matrix. The five-step sequential extraction method can provide a means to quantify certain proteins in the matrix.

  14. Influence of added bean flour (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) on some physical and nutritional properties of wheat flour tortillas.

    PubMed

    Anton, Alex A; Ross, Kelly A; Lukow, Odean M; Fulcher, R Gary; Arntfield, Susan D

    2008-07-01

    Composite flours containing 15%, 25%, or 35% of small red, black, pinto, or navy bean flours (BF) and wheat were made into tortillas. Dough rheology, firmness, cohesiveness, rollability, and some physical properties of tortillas were negatively affected as BF concentration increased regardless of bean cultivar. Nutritionally, all bean tortillas had significantly higher levels of crude protein, total phenols, 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulphonic acid) (ABTS(+)) in vitro antioxidant activity (AA) and antinutritional compounds such as phytic acid (PA) and trypsin inhibitors (TI) than the wheat control. Tortillas to which 35% of small red, pinto and black BF was added had the highest levels of phenols, which were significantly correlated with both DPPH (r=0.99) and ABTS(+) (r=0.99) AA. Compared to raw flours, PA and TI were reduced from 37.37% to 43.78% and from 50% to 66%, respectively, in the tortillas. Overall analysis indicated that tortillas with acceptable texture and improved nutritional profile were produced at 25% substitution.

  15. Microbiological contamination in peanut confectionery processing plants.

    PubMed

    Carminati, J de A; Amorim Neto, D P; Morishita, K N; Takano, L V; Olivier Bernardi, A; Copetti, M V; do Nascimento, M da S

    2016-10-01

    In order to investigate Enterobacteriaceae, coliforms, Escherichia coli and Salmonella contamination, a survey was conducted at three peanut confectionery processing companies (A, B and C) in Brazil. Samples of different peanut confectionery products (n = 59), peanut raw material (n = 30), manufacturing environment (n = 116) and workers' hand surfaces (n = 12) were analysed. Salmonella and E. coli were not detected in any final product or raw material analysed. Enterobacteriaceae was isolated from 15% of final products. Coliforms were detected in only one sample. Referring to the raw material, six samples showed contamination by Enterobacteriaceae and three samples by coliforms. For the process environment, 19% and 11% of samples presented Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms. Escherichia coli was detected in 5% of samples, and one of these samples tested positive for Salmonella; this strain was serotyping as S. Heidelberg. All food handlers surveyed in Company C showed Enterobacteriaceae and coliforms on their hands. Escherichia coli was isolated from one food worker's hand. The results showed that the manufacturing environment, including food handlers were considered the main sources for possible contamination of peanut confectionery products. This has been the first study to investigate the occurrence of Salmonella and other Enterobacteriaceae throughout peanut confectionery processing lines. The results might be used to assist risk assessment studies and to establish more effective control measures. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  16. Desensitization for Peanut Allergies in Children

    PubMed Central

    Jhamnani, Rekha D.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion Statement Immunotherapy for peanut allergy has been an exploding topic of study within the last few years. Sublingual, epicutaneous, and oral immunotherapy are being investigated and show promise in the treatment of peanut allergy. Oral immunotherapy has shown the most clinical benefit; however, sublingual and epicutaneous immunotherapy appear to have the most favorable safety profiles. Most studies to date suggest that only a minority of subjects achieve sustained unresponsiveness to peanut after discontinuation of immunotherapy. Recent efforts have been focused on identifying adjunct therapies, such as omalizumab, that may assist patients in achieving peanut desensitization more quickly and with greater success. Several underlying immunologic mechanisms, including a switch from IgE to IgG4 production and induction of T regulatory cells, have been studied although more research is needed to identify reliable biomarkers. This article will describe the immunotherapy approaches that are being investigated to induce peanut desensitization, and highlight the benefits and risks of these therapies that need to be considered before they are ready for routine clinical practice. PMID:28042528

  17. Dielectric Properties of Peanut-hull Pellets at Microwave Frequencies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut-hull pellets are obtained from a waste product, peanut-hulls, which after pelleting can have several uses, namely as a renewable fuel. Rapid and nondestructive characterization of peanut-hull pellets is important for industrial utilization of this resource. Properties such as water content an...

  18. Heat and pressure treatments effects on peanut allergenicity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Peanut allergy is recognized as one of the most severe food allergies. The aim of this study was to investigate the changes in IgE binding capacity of peanut proteins produced by thermal-processing methods, including autoclaving. Immunoreactivity to raw and thermally processed peanut extracts was ev...

  19. Unloading Farmers’ Stock Warehouses with a Peanut Vac

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A peanut vacuum has been developed by a company specializing in pneumatic conveying equipment by redesigning their existing grain vacuum (vac) specifically to handle farmers’ stock peanuts accounting for the desire to maintain the integrity of the peanut pod throughout the conveyance process. The pe...

  20. Enhanced approaches for identifying Amadori products: application to peanut allergens

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The dry roasting of peanuts is suggested to influence allergenic sensitization due to formation of advanced glycation end products (AGE) on peanut proteins. Identifying AGEs is technically challenging. The AGE composition of peanut proteins was probed with nanoLC-ESI-MS and MS/MS analyses. Amadori ...