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Sample records for pediatric acute leukemias

  1. The biology of pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Downing, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) comprises between 4% and 15% of newly diagnosed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients. AMKL in children with Down syndrome (DS) is characterized by a founding GATA1 mutation that cooperates with trisomy 21, followed by the acquisition of additional somatic mutations. In contrast, non–DS-AMKL is characterized by chimeric oncogenes consisting of genes known to play a role in normal hematopoiesis. CBFA2T3-GLIS2 is the most frequent chimeric oncogene identified to date in this subset of patients and confers a poor prognosis. PMID:26186939

  2. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D.E.; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C. Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-01-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1–0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1–4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7 PMID:26069293

  3. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  4. Neurodevelopmental Sequelae of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janzen, Laura A.; Spiegler, Brenda J.

    2008-01-01

    This review will describe the neurocognitive outcomes associated with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its treatment. The literature is reviewed with the aim of addressing methodological issues, treatment factors, risks and moderators, special populations, relationship to neuroimaging findings, and directions for future research.…

  5. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies. PMID:27870639

  6. Molecular pathway activation features of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) cells.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Ivan; Suntsova, Maria; Mutorova, Olga; Sorokin, Maxim; Garazha, Andrew; Ilnitskaya, Elena; Spirin, Pavel; Larin, Sergey; Kovalchuk, Olga; Prassolov, Vladimir; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Roumiantsev, Alexander; Buzdin, Anton

    2016-11-19

    Acute lymphoblast leukemia (ALL) is characterized by overproduction of immature white blood cells in the bone marrow. ALL is most common in the childhood and has high (>80%) cure rate. In contrast, acute myeloid leukemia (AML) has far greater mortality rate than the ALL and is most commonly affecting older adults. However, AML is a leading cause of childhood cancer mortality. In this study, we compare gene expression and molecular pathway activation patterns in three normal blood, seven pediatric ALL and seven pediatric AML bone marrow samples. We identified 172/94 and 148/31 characteristic gene expression/pathway activation signatures, clearly distinguishing pediatric ALL and AML cells, respectively, from the normal blood. The pediatric AML and ALL cells differed by 139/34 gene expression/pathway activation biomarkers. For the adult 30 AML and 17 normal blood samples, we found 132/33 gene expression/pathway AML-specific features, of which only 7/2 were common for the adult and pediatric AML and, therefore, age-independent. At the pathway level, we found more differences than similarities between the adult and pediatric forms. These findings suggest that the adult and pediatric AMLs may require different treatment strategies.

  7. Recurrent deletions of IKZF1 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Beuling, Eva; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Obulkasim, Askar; Baruchel, André; Trka, Jan; Reinhardt, Dirk; Sonneveld, Edwin; Gibson, Brenda E S; Pieters, Rob; Zimmermann, Martin; Zwaan, C Michel; Fornerod, Maarten

    2015-09-01

    IKAROS family zinc finger 1/IKZF1 is a transcription factor important in lymphoid differentiation, and a known tumor suppressor in acute lymphoid leukemia. Recent studies suggest that IKZF1 is also involved in myeloid differentiation. To investigate whether IKZF1 deletions also play a role in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia, we screened a panel of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia samples for deletions of the IKZF1 locus using multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and for mutations using direct sequencing. Three patients were identified with a single amino acid variant without change of IKZF1 length. No frame-shift mutations were found. Out of 11 patients with an IKZF1 deletion, 8 samples revealed a complete loss of chromosome 7, and 3 cases a focal deletion of 0.1-0.9Mb. These deletions included the complete IKZF1 gene (n=2) or exons 1-4 (n=1), all leading to a loss of IKZF1 function. Interestingly, differentially expressed genes in monosomy 7 cases (n=8) when compared to non-deleted samples (n=247) significantly correlated with gene expression changes in focal IKZF1-deleted cases (n=3). Genes with increased expression included genes involved in myeloid cell self-renewal and cell cycle, and a significant portion of GATA target genes and GATA factors. Together, these results suggest that loss of IKZF1 is recurrent in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and might be a determinant of oncogenesis in acute myeloid leukemia with monosomy 7. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  8. Acute pediatric leg compartment syndrome in chronic myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Eric; Truntzer, Jeremy; Trunzter, Jeremy; Klinge, Steve; Schwartz, Kevin; Schiller, Jonathan

    2014-11-01

    Acute compartment syndrome is an orthopedic surgical emergency and may result in devastating complications in the setting of delayed or missed diagnosis. Compartment syndrome has a variety of causes, including posttraumatic or postoperative swelling, external compression, burns, bleeding disorders, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Rare cases of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in the setting of acute myeloid leukemia and, even less commonly, chronic myeloid leukemia have been reported. The authors report the first known case of pediatric acute compartment syndrome in a patient without a previously known diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. On initial examination, an 11-year-old boy presented with a 2-week history of progressive left calf pain and swelling after playing soccer. Magnetic resonance imaging scan showed a hematoma in the left superficial posterior compartment. The patient had unrelenting pain, intermittent lateral foot parethesias, and inability to bear weight. Subsequently, he was diagnosed with acute compartment syndrome and underwent fasciotomy and evacuation of a hematoma. Laboratory results showed an abnormal white blood cell count of 440×10(9)/L (normal, 4.4-11×10(9)) and international normalized ratio of 1.3 (normal, 0.8-1.2). Further testing included the BCR-ABL1 fusion gene located on the Philadelphia chromosome, leading to a diagnosis of chronic myeloid leukemia. Monotherapy with imatinib mesylate (Gleevec) was initiated. This report adds another unique case to the growing literature on compartment syndrome in the pediatric population and reinforces the need to consider compartment syndrome, even in unlikely clinical scenarios. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  9. Renal Presentation in Pediatric Acute Leukemia: Report of 2 Cases.

    PubMed

    Sherief, Laila M; Azab, Seham F; Zakaria, Marwa M; Kamal, Naglaa M; Abd Elbasset Aly, Maha; Ali, Adel; Abd Alhady, Mohamed

    2015-09-01

    Renal enlargement at time of diagnosis of acute leukemia is very unusual. We here in report 2 pediatric cases of acute leukemia who had their renal affection as the first presenting symptom with no evidences of blast cells in blood smear and none of classical presentation of acute leukemia. The first case is a 4-year-old girl who presented with pallor and abdominal enlargement. Magnetic resonance imaging showed bilateral symmetrical homogenous enlarged kidneys suggestive of infiltration. Complete blood picture (CBC) revealed white blood count 11 × 10⁹/L, hemoglobin 8.7 g/dL and platelet count 197 × 10⁹/L. Bone marrow aspiration was performed, and diagnosed precursor B-cell ALL was made. The child had an excellent response to modified CCG 1991 standard risk protocol of chemotherapy with sustained remission, but unfortunately relapsed 11 month after the end of therapy. The second child was 13-month old, presented with pallor, vomiting, abdominal enlargement, and oliguria 2 days before admission. Initial CBC showed bicytopenia, elevated blood urea, creatinine, and serum uric acid, while abdominal ultrasonography revealed bilateral renal enlargement. Bone marrow examination was done and showed 92% blast of biphenotypic nature. So, biphynotypic leukemia with bilateral renal enlargement and acute renal failure was subsequently diagnosed. The patients admitted to ICU and received supportive care and prednisolone. Renal function normalized and chemotherapy was started. The child achieved complete remission with marked reduction of kidney size but, unfortunately she died from sepsis in consolidation phase of therapy. This case demonstrates an unusual early renal enlargement in childhood acute leukemia. Renal involvement of acute leukemia should be considered in child presenting with unexplained bilateral renal enlargement with or without renal function abnormalities and bone marrow examination should be included in the workup.

  10. Collaborative Efforts Driving Progress in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zwaan, C. Michel; Kolb, Edward A.; Reinhardt, Dirk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Adachi, Souichi; Aplenc, Richard; De Bont, Eveline S.J.M.; De Moerloose, Barbara; Dworzak, Michael; Gibson, Brenda E.S.; Hasle, Henrik; Leverger, Guy; Locatelli, Franco; Ragu, Christine; Ribeiro, Raul C.; Rizzari, Carmelo; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Smith, Owen P.; Sung, Lillian; Tomizawa, Daisuke; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.; Creutzig, Ursula; Kaspers, Gertjan J.L.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnosis, treatment, response monitoring, and outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) have made enormous progress during the past decades. Because AML is a rare type of childhood cancer, with an incidence of approximately seven occurrences per 1 million children annually, national and international collaborative efforts have evolved. This overview describes these efforts and includes a summary of the history and contributions of each of the main collaborative pediatric AML groups worldwide. The focus is on translational and clinical research, which includes past, current, and future clinical trials. Separate sections concern acute promyelocytic leukemia, myeloid leukemia of Down syndrome, and relapsed AML. A plethora of novel antileukemic agents that have emerged, including new classes of drugs, are summarized as well. Finally, an important aspect of the treatment of pediatric AML—supportive care—and late effects are discussed. The future is bright, with a wide range of emerging innovative therapies and with more and more international collaboration that ultimately aim to cure all children with AML, with fewer adverse effects and without late effects. PMID:26304895

  11. Acute Central Nervous System Complications in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Baytan, Birol; Evim, Melike Sezgin; Güler, Salih; Güneş, Adalet Meral; Okan, Mehmet

    2015-10-01

    The outcome of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia has improved because of intensive chemotherapy and supportive care. The frequency of adverse events has also increased, but the data related to acute central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment are sparse. The purpose of this study is to evaluate these complications and to determine their long term outcome. We retrospectively analyzed the hospital reports of 323 children with de novo acute lymphoblastic leukemia from a 13-year period for acute neurological complications. The central nervous system complications of leukemic involvement, peripheral neuropathy, and post-treatment late-onset encephalopathy, and neurocognitive defects were excluded. Twenty-three of 323 children (7.1%) suffered from central nervous system complications during acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. The majority of these complications (n = 13/23; 56.5%) developed during the induction period. The complications included posterior reversible encephalopathy (n = 6), fungal abscess (n = 5), cerebrovascular lesions (n = 5), syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (n = 4), and methotrexate encephalopathy (n = 3). Three of these 23 children (13%) died of central nervous system complications, one from an intracranial fungal abscess and the others from intracranial thrombosis. Seven of the survivors (n = 7/20; 35%) became epileptic and three of them had also developed mental and motor retardation. Acute central neurological complications are varied and require an urgent approach for proper diagnosis and treatment. Collaboration among the hematologist, radiologist, neurologist, microbiologist, and neurosurgeon is essential to prevent fatal outcome and serious morbidity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Beginning treatment for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: the family connection.

    PubMed

    McGrath, Pam; Paton, Mary Anne; Huff, Nicole

    2005-01-01

    There is a loud silence on psycho-oncology research in relation to pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML). This article is part of a series that begins to address the psycho-social hiatus. The present article documents the less obvious, often hidden, aspect of beginning treatment for pediatric AML--the "behind the scenes" experience of the home and family connection. The findings are from the first stage of a five year longitudinal study that examines through qualitative research the experience of childhood leukemia from the perspective of the child, siblings and parents. Open-ended interviews, audio-recorded and transcribed verbatim, were thematically analyzed with the assistance of the Non-numerical Unstructured Data by processes of Indexing Searching and Theory-building (NUD*IST) computer program. The findings emphasize the disruption to normalcy in relation to home life, school, and work, which is exacerbated for families who relocate for specialist treatment. The findings emphasise the need for support for families coping with childhood AML.

  13. Biomarkers in Bone Marrow Samples From Pediatric Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Molecular Therapeutic Approaches for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Tasian, Sarah K.; Pollard, Jessica A.; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Approximately two-thirds of children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are cured with intensive multi-agent chemotherapy. However, refractory and relapsed AML remains a significant source of childhood cancer mortality, highlighting the need for new therapies. Further therapy intensification with traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy in pediatric AML is not feasible given the risks of both short-term and long-term organ dysfunction. Substantial emphasis has been placed upon the development of molecularly targeted therapeutic approaches for adults and children with high-risk subtypes of AML with the goal of improving remission induction and minimizing relapse. Several promising agents are currently in clinical testing or late preclinical development for AML, including monoclonal antibodies against leukemia cell surface proteins, kinase inhibitors, proteasome inhibitors, epigenetic agents, and chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cell immunotherapies. Many of these therapies have been specifically tested in children with relapsed/refractory AML in Phase 1 and 2 trials with a smaller number of new agents under Phase 3 evaluation for children with de novo AML. Although successful identification and implementation of new drugs for children with AML remain a formidable challenge, enthusiasm for novel molecular therapeutic approaches is great given the potential for significant clinical benefit for children who do not have other curative options. PMID:24672775

  15. Elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Uemura, Takuya; Yagi, Hirohisa; Okada, Mitsuhiro; Yokoi, Takuya; Shintani, Kosuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Acute leukemia in children presents with various clinical manifestations that mimic orthopaedic conditions. The association of septic arthritis of the elbow with acute leukemia is very rare, and the correct diagnosis of acute leukemia is often established only after treatment of the septic arthritis. In this article, we present a three-year-old child patient with elbow septic arthritis related to acute leukemia, diagnosed promptly by bone marrow aspiration on the same day as emergency surgical debridement of the septic elbow joint due to the maintenance of a high index of suspicion, and treated with chemotherapy as soon as possible. The emergency physician and orthopaedist must recognize unusual patterns of presentation like this. Since delay in initiating treatment of septic arthritis may result in growth disturbance, elbow septic arthritis associated with pediatric acute leukemia must be treated promptly and appropriately. Early diagnosis is a good prognostic feature of childhood acute leukemia.

  16. Outcome of Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia Patients Receiving Intensive Care in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Fitzgerald, Julie C.; Fisher, Brian T.; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Torp, Kari; Seif, Alix E.; Kavcic, Marko; Walker, Dana M.; Leckerman, Kateri H.; Kilbaugh, Todd J.; Rheingold, Susan R.; Sung, Lillian; Zaoutis, Theoklis E.; Berg, Robert A.; Nadkarni, Vinay M.; Thomas, Neal J.; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Objective Children with acute myeloid leukemia are at risk for sepsis and organ failure. Outcomes associated with intensive care support have not been studied in a large pediatric acute myeloid leukemia population. Our objective was to determine hospital mortality of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients requiring intensive care. Design Retrospective cohort study of children hospitalized between 1999 and 2010. Use of intensive care was defined by utilization of specific procedures and resources. The primary endpoint was hospital mortality. Setting Forty-three children’s hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information System database. Patients Patients who are newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and who are 28 days through 18 years old (n = 1, 673) hospitalized any time from initial diagnosis through 9 months following diagnosis or until stem cell transplant. A reference cohort of all nononcology pediatric admissions using the same intensive care resources in the same time period (n = 242,192 admissions) was also studied. Interventions None. Measurements and Main Results One-third of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (553 of 1,673) required intensive care during a hospitalization within 9 months of diagnosis. Among intensive care admissions, mortality was higher in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort compared with the nononcology cohort (18.6% vs 6.5%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.64–3.94). However, when sepsis was present, mortality was not significantly different between cohorts (21.9% vs 19.5%; odds ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.89–1.53). Mortality was consistently higher for each type of organ failure in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort versus the nononcology cohort; however, mortality did not exceed 40% unless there were four or more organ failures in the admission. Mortality for admissions requiring intensive care decreased over time for both cohorts (23.7% in 1999–2003 vs 16.4% in 2004–2010 in the acute myeloid

  17. Outcome of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients receiving intensive care in the United States.

    PubMed

    Maude, Shannon L; Fitzgerald, Julie C; Fisher, Brian T; Li, Yimei; Huang, Yuan-Shung; Torp, Kari; Seif, Alix E; Kavcic, Marko; Walker, Dana M; Leckerman, Kateri H; Kilbaugh, Todd J; Rheingold, Susan R; Sung, Lillian; Zaoutis, Theoklis E; Berg, Robert A; Nadkarni, Vinay M; Thomas, Neal J; Aplenc, Richard

    2014-02-01

    Children with acute myeloid leukemia are at risk for sepsis and organ failure. Outcomes associated with intensive care support have not been studied in a large pediatric acute myeloid leukemia population. Our objective was to determine hospital mortality of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia patients requiring intensive care. Retrospective cohort study of children hospitalized between 1999 and 2010. Use of intensive care was defined by utilization of specific procedures and resources. The primary endpoint was hospital mortality. Forty-three children's hospitals contributing data to the Pediatric Health Information System database. Patients who are newly diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia and who are 28 days through 18 years old (n = 1,673) hospitalized any time from initial diagnosis through 9 months following diagnosis or until stem cell transplant. A reference cohort of all nononcology pediatric admissions using the same intensive care resources in the same time period (n = 242,192 admissions) was also studied. None. One-third of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (553 of 1,673) required intensive care during a hospitalization within 9 months of diagnosis. Among intensive care admissions, mortality was higher in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort compared with the nononcology cohort (18.6% vs 6.5%; odds ratio, 3.23; 95% CI, 2.64-3.94). However, when sepsis was present, mortality was not significantly different between cohorts (21.9% vs 19.5%; odds ratio, 1.17; 95% CI, 0.89-1.53). Mortality was consistently higher for each type of organ failure in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort versus the nononcology cohort; however, mortality did not exceed 40% unless there were four or more organ failures in the admission. Mortality for admissions requiring intensive care decreased over time for both cohorts (23.7% in 1999-2003 vs 16.4% in 2004-2010 in the acute myeloid leukemia cohort, p = 0.0367; and 7.5% in 1999-2003 vs 6.5% in 2004-2010 in the nononcology

  18. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and exposure to pesticides.

    PubMed

    Soldin, Offie P; Nsouli-Maktabi, Hala; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M; Loffredo, Christopher A; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B; Luban, Naomi L; Shad, Aziza T; Nelson, David

    2009-08-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case-control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child-mother pairs) recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography-high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association.

  19. Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia and Exposure to Pesticides

    PubMed Central

    Soldin, Offie P.; Nsouly-Maktabi, Hala; Genkinger, Jeanine M.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Ortega-Garcia, Juan Antonio; Colantino, Drew; Barr, Dana B.; Luban, Naomi L.; Shad, Aziza T.; Nelson, David

    2013-01-01

    Organophosphates are pesticides ubiquitous in the environment and have been hypothesized as one of the risk factors for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we evaluated the associations of pesticide exposure in a residential environment with the risk for pediatric ALL. This is a case–control study of children newly diagnosed with ALL, and their mothers (n = 41 child–mother pairs) were recruited from Georgetown University Medical Center and Children's National Medical Center in Washington, DC, between January 2005 and January 2008. Cases and controls were matched for age, sex, and county of residence. Environmental exposures were determined by questionnaire and by urinalysis of pesticide metabolites using isotope dilution gas chromatography–high-resolution mass spectrometry. We found that more case mothers (33%) than controls (14%) reported using insecticides in the home (P < 0.02). Other environmental exposures to toxic substances were not significantly associated with the risk of ALL. Pesticide levels were higher in cases than in controls (P < 0.05). Statistically significant differences were found between children with ALL and controls for the organophosphate metabolites diethylthiophosphate (P < 0.03) and diethyldithiophosphate (P < 0.05). The association of ALL risk with pesticide exposure merits further studies to confirm the association. PMID:19571777

  20. Intracerebral metastasis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A rare presentation

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Müge; Aytac, Selin; Altan, Ilhan; Unal, Sule; Tuncer, Murat; Gumruk, Fatma; Cetin, Mualla

    2012-01-01

    Central nervous system leukemia may present in different ways. However, intraparenchymal mass is extremely rare in childhood leukemia. Herein, we report a boy who presented with right hemiparesis and anisocoria 1 year after the cessation of the chemotherapy protocol for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Cranial imaging demonstrated an extensive mass located in the anterior white matter of left frontal lobe, and cerebrospinal fluid examination revealed concomitant lymphoblasts. Immunohistochemical staining of the biopsy material showed neoplastic cells with positive CD10 and TdT. Complete remission was achieved with chemotherapy alone for a duration of 2 years. PMID:23560011

  1. AIEOP-BFM consensus guidelines 2016 for flow cytometric immunophenotyping of Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dworzak, Michael N; Buldini, Barbara; Gaipa, Giuseppe; Ratei, Richard; Hrusak, Ondrej; Luria, Drorit; Rosenthal, Eti; Bourquin, Jean-Pierre; Sartor, Mary; Schumich, Angela; Karawajew, Leonid; Mejstrikova, Ester; Maglia, Oscar; Mann, Georg; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Biondi, Andrea; Schrappe, Martin; Basso, Giuseppe

    2017-02-10

    Immunophenotyping by flow cytometry (FCM) is a worldwide mainstay in leukemia diagnostics. For concordant multicentric application, however, a gap exists between available classification systems, technologic standardization, and clinical needs. The AIEOP-BFM consortium induced an extensive standardization and validation effort between its nine national reference laboratories collaborating in immunophenotyping of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We elaborated common guidelines which take advantage of the possibilities of multi-color FCM: marker panel requirements, immunological blast gating, in-sample controls, tri-partite antigen expression rating (negative vs. weak or strong positive) with capturing of blast cell heterogeneities and subclone formation, refined ALL subclassification, and a dominant lineage assignment algorithm able to distinguish "simple" from bilineal/"complex" mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) cases, which is essential for choice of treatment. These guidelines are a first step toward necessary inter-laboratory standardization of pediatric leukemia immunophenotyping for a concordant multicentric application. © 2017 International Clinical Cytometry Society.

  2. Pediatric acute leukemia: the effect of prognostic factors on clinical outcomes at Phramongkutklao Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Rujkijyanont, Piya; Kaewinsang, Suphathida; Monsereenusorn, Chalinee; Traivaree, Chanchai

    2014-02-01

    Leukemia is the most common malignancy in children. Multiple prognostic factors have been used in order to assist the clinician to decide appropriate risk-adjusted treatment for each patient; the current clinical outcomes of those patients have been significantly improved over the past decades. The purpose of this study was to examine survival outcome in children who were diagnosed with acute leukemia and treated in the Department of Pediatrics, Phramongkutklao Hospital during January 1, 2000 and July 31, 2013. The authors retrospectively reviewed the patients who were diagnosed with acute leukemia and treated at Phramongkutklao Hospital. Their clinical data were collected and analyzed based on clinicalfeatures inchluding age, initial WBC count at diagnosis, sex, immnunophenotype and cytogenetic abnormalities. Total 152 patients with acute leukemia, 123 patients were diagnosed with acute lymnphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 29 patients were diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The 5-year survival rates of ALL and AML patients were 72.63% and 30.30%, respectively. In addition, we found a correlation between the ALL patients' clinical outcomes and several prognostic factors including initial white blood cell count, CNS status at diagnosis and ploidy. However, there was no correlation between those factors and clinical outcomes in AML patients. Our treatment outcomes on patients with acute leukemia were similar to the reports from other countries. The several prognostic factors especially initial WBC at diagnosis can assist the clinician to select appropriate treatment option for each patient.

  3. Classification, subtype discovery, and prediction of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Eng-Juh; Ross, Mary E; Shurtleff, Sheila A; Williams, W Kent; Patel, Divyen; Mahfouz, Rami; Behm, Fred G; Raimondi, Susana C; Relling, Mary V; Patel, Anami; Cheng, Cheng; Campana, Dario; Wilkins, Dawn; Zhou, Xiaodong; Li, Jinyan; Liu, Huiqing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Naeve, Clayton; Wong, Limsoon; Downing, James R

    2002-03-01

    Treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is based on the concept of tailoring the intensity of therapy to a patient's risk of relapse. To determine whether gene expression profiling could enhance risk assignment, we used oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze the pattern of genes expressed in leukemic blasts from 360 pediatric ALL patients. Distinct expression profiles identified each of the prognostically important leukemia subtypes, including T-ALL, E2A-PBX1, BCR-ABL, TEL-AML1, MLL rearrangement, and hyperdiploid >50 chromosomes. In addition, another ALL subgroup was identified based on its unique expression profile. Examination of the genes comprising the expression signatures provided important insights into the biology of these leukemia subgroups. Further, within some genetic subgroups, expression profiles identified those patients that would eventually fail therapy. Thus, the single platform of expression profiling should enhance the accurate risk stratification of pediatric ALL patients.

  4. Recognition of adult and pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Torelli, Giovanni F; Peragine, Nadia; Raponi, Sara; Pagliara, Daria; De Propris, Maria S; Vitale, Antonella; Bertaina, Alice; Barberi, Walter; Moretta, Lorenzo; Basso, Giuseppe; Santoni, Angela; Guarini, Anna; Locatelli, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the pathways of recognition of acute lymphoblastic leukemia blasts by natural killer cells and to verify whether differences in natural killer cell activating receptor ligand expression among groups defined by age of patients, or presence of cytogenetic/molecular aberrations correlate with the susceptibility to recognition and killing. We analyzed 103 newly diagnosed acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: 46 adults and 57 children. Pediatric blasts showed a significantly higher expression of Nec-2 (P=0.03), ULBP-1 (P=0.01) and ULBP-3 (P=0.04) compared to adult cells. The differential expression of these ligands between adults and children was confined to B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia with no known molecular alterations. Within molecularly defined subgroups of patients, a high surface expression of NKG2D and DNAM1 ligands was found on BCR-ABL(+) blasts, regardless of patient age. Accordingly, BCR-ABL(+) blasts proved to be significantly more susceptible to natural killer-dependent lysis than B-lineage blasts without molecular aberrations (P=0.03). Cytotoxic tests performed in the presence of neutralizing antibodies indicated a pathway of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell recognition in the setting of the Nec-2/DNAM-1 interaction. These data provide a biological explanation of the different roles played by alloreactive natural killer cells in pediatric versus adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia and suggest that new natural killer-based strategies targeting specific subgroups of patients, particularly those BCR-ABL(+), are worth pursuing further.

  5. Acute Activation of Metabolic Syndrome Components in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients Treated with Dexamethasone

    PubMed Central

    Warris, Lidewij T.; van den Akker, Erica L. T.; Bierings, Marc B.; van den Bos, Cor; Zwaan, Christian M.; Sassen, Sebastiaan D. T.; Tissing, Wim J. E.; Veening, Margreet A.; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2016-01-01

    Although dexamethasone is highly effective in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), it can cause serious metabolic side effects. Because studies regarding the effects of dexamethasone are limited by their small scale, we prospectively studied the direct effects of treating pediatric ALL with dexamethasone administration with respect to activation of components of metabolic syndrome (MetS); in addition, we investigated whether these side effects were correlated with the level of dexamethasone. Fifty pediatric patients (3–16 years of age) with ALL were studied during a 5-day dexamethasone course during the maintenance phase of the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group ALL-10 and ALL-11 protocols. Fasting insulin, glucose, total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triglycerides levels were measured at baseline (before the start of dexamethasone; T1) and on the fifth day of treatment (T2). Dexamethasone trough levels were measured at T2. We found that dexamethasone treatment significantly increased the following fasting serum levels (P<0.05): HDL, LDL, total cholesterol, triglycerides, glucose, and insulin. In addition, dexamethasone increased insulin resistance (HOMA-IR>3.4) from 8% to 85% (P<0.01). Dexamethasone treatment also significantly increased the diastolic and systolic blood pressure. Lastly, dexamethasone trough levels (N = 24) were directly correlated with high glucose levels at T2, but not with other parameters. These results indicate that dexamethasone treatment acutely induces three components of the MetS. Together with the weight gain typically associated with dexamethasone treatment, these factors may contribute to the higher prevalence of MetS and cardiovascular risk among survivors of childhood leukemia who received dexamethasone treatment. PMID:27362350

  6. Bafilomycin A1 targets both autophagy and apoptosis pathways in pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Na; Song, Lin; Zhang, Suping; Lin, Weiwei; Cao, Yan; Xu, Fei; Fang, Yixuan; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Han; Li, Xin; Wang, Zhijian; Cai, Jinyang; Wang, Jian; Zhang, Yi; Mao, Xinliang; Zhao, Wenli; Hu, Shaoyan; Chen, Suning; Wang, Jianrong

    2015-01-01

    B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common type of pediatric leukemia. Despite improved remission rates, current treatment regimens for pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia are often associated with adverse effects and central nervous system relapse, necessitating more effective and safer agents. Bafilomycin A1 is an inhibitor of vacuolar H+-ATPase that is frequently used at high concentration to block late-phase autophagy. Here, we show that bafilomycin A1 at a low concentration (1 nM) effectively and specifically inhibited and killed pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. It targeted both early and late stages of the autophagy pathway by activating mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and by disassociating the Beclin 1-Vps34 complex, as well as by inhibiting the formation of autolysosomes, all of which attenuated functional autophagy. Bafilomycin A1 also targeted mitochondria and induced caspase-independent apoptosis by inducing the translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor from mitochondria to the nucleus. Moreover, bafilomycin A1 induced the binding of Beclin 1 to Bcl-2, which further inhibited autophagy and promoted apoptotic cell death. In primary cells from pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and a xenograft model, bafilomycin A1 specifically targeted leukemia cells while sparing normal cells. An in vivo mouse toxicity assay confirmed that bafilomycin A1 is safe. Our data thus suggest that bafilomycin A1 is a promising candidate drug for the treatment of pediatric B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:25512644

  7. Cognitive reserve and brain volumes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kesler, Shelli R.; Tanaka, Hiroko; Koovakkattu, Della

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is associated with long-term, progressive cognitive deficits and white matter injury. We measured global and regional white and gray matter as well as cognitive function and examined relationships between these variables and cognitive reserve, as indicated by maternal education level, in 28 young survivors of ALL and 31 healthy controls. Results indicated significantly reduced white matter volumes and cognitive testing scores in the ALL group compared to controls. Maternal education was inversely related to both global and regional white matter and directly related to gray matter in ALL and was directly related to both gray and white matter in controls, consistent with the cognitive reserve hypothesis. Cognitive performance was associated with different brain regions in ALL compared to controls. Maternal education was significantly positively correlated with working and verbal memory in ALL as well as processing speed and verbal memory in controls, improving models of cognitive outcome over medical and/or demographic predictors. Our findings suggest that cognitive reserve may be an important factor in brain injury and cognitive outcome in ALL. Additionally, children with ALL may experience some neural reorganization related to cognitive outcome. PMID:20814845

  8. Biology, Risk Stratification, and Therapy of Pediatric Acute Leukemias: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Carroll, William L.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Arceci, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We review recent advances in the biologic understanding and treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), identify therapeutically challenging subgroups, and suggest future directions of research. Methods A review of English literature on childhood acute leukemias from the past 5 years was performed. Results Contemporary treatments have resulted in 5-year event-free survival rates of approximately 80% for childhood ALL and almost 60% for pediatric AML. The advent of high-resolution genome-wide analyses has provided new insights into leukemogenesis and identified many novel subtypes of leukemia. Virtually all ALL and the vast majority of AML cases can be classified according to specific genetic abnormalities. Cooperative mutations involved in cell differentiation, cell cycle regulation, tumor suppression, drug responsiveness, and apoptosis have also been identified in many cases. The development of new formulations of existing drugs, molecularly targeted therapy, and immunotherapies promises to further advance the cure rates and improve quality of life of patients. Conclusion The application of new high-throughput sequencing techniques to define the complete DNA sequence of leukemia and host normal cells and the development of new agents targeted to leukemogenic pathways promise to further improve outcome in the coming decade. PMID:21220611

  9. Advances in treatment of de-novo pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Raul C

    2014-11-01

    To describe the current management of de-novo pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), excluding promyelocytic leukemia and myeloid neoplasms of patients with constitutional trisomy 21. The biology of pediatric AML, which differs from that of its adult counterpart, is briefly discussed. Although survival of childhood AML has improved substantially over the past 40 years, progress has reached a plateau. Pediatric AML comprises several subtypes with diverse prognosis. Currently, about 35% of patients die of the disease, and survivors have many debilitating late effects. Clinical trials reported over the past 5 years have revealed several therapeutic concepts. First, initial intensive myelosuppressive chemotherapy is necessary to sufficiently reduce minimal residual disease and is associated with improved disease-free survival. Second, postremission chemotherapy with or without hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is necessary to eradicate AML. Third, central nervous system leukemia can be adequately managed with intrathecal chemotherapy and rarely requires radiotherapy. Finally, small differences in survival among clinical trials are explained by patient selection and quality of supportive care. The most crucial steps for progress are greater understanding of the biology of pediatric AML and introduction of new agents targeting specific AML subtypes and age-specific factors.

  10. Genomic Profiling of Adult and Pediatric B-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-Fang; Wang, Bai-Yan; Zhang, Wei-Na; Huang, Jin-Yan; Li, Ben-Shang; Zhang, Ming; Jiang, Lu; Li, Jian-Feng; Wang, Ming-Jie; Dai, Yu-Jun; Zhang, Zi-Guan; Wang, Qiang; Kong, Jie; Chen, Bing; Zhu, Yong-Mei; Weng, Xiang-Qin; Shen, Zhi-Xiang; Li, Jun-Min; Wang, Jin; Yan, Xiao-Jing; Li, Yan; Liang, Ying-Min; Liu, Li; Chen, Xie-Qun; Zhang, Wang-Gang; Yan, Jin-Song; Hu, Jian-Da; Shen, Shu-Hong; Chen, Jing; Gu, Long-Jun; Pei, Deqing; Li, Yongjin; Wu, Gang; Zhou, Xin; Ren, Rui-Bao; Cheng, Cheng; Yang, Jun J; Wang, Kan-Kan; Wang, Sheng-Yue; Zhang, Jinghui; Mi, Jian-Qing; Pui, Ching-Hon; Tang, Jing-Yan; Chen, Zhu; Chen, Sai-Juan

    2016-06-01

    Genomic landscapes of 92 adult and 111 pediatric patients with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) were investigated using next-generation sequencing and copy number alteration analysis. Recurrent gene mutations and fusions were tested in an additional 87 adult and 93 pediatric patients. Among the 29 newly identified in-frame gene fusions, those involving MEF2D and ZNF384 were clinically relevant and were demonstrated to perturb B-cell differentiation, with EP300-ZNF384 inducing leukemia in mice. Eight gene expression subgroups associated with characteristic genetic abnormalities were identified, including leukemia with MEF2D and ZNF384 fusions in two distinct clusters. In subgroup G4 which was characterized by ERG deletion, DUX4-IGH fusion was detected in most cases. This comprehensive dataset allowed us to compare the features of molecular pathogenesis between adult and pediatric B-ALL and to identify signatures possibly related to the inferior outcome of adults to that of children. We found that, besides the known discrepancies in frequencies of prognostic markers, adult patients had more cooperative mutations and greater enrichment for alterations of epigenetic modifiers and genes linked to B-cell development, suggesting difference in the target cells of transformation between adult and pediatric patients and may explain in part the disparity in their responses to treatment.

  11. [Results of the treatment of nonlymphoblastic acute leukemia in a pediatric population].

    PubMed

    Rivera Luna, R; Ajuria Gottwald, E; Silva Sosa, M; González Chirinos, P

    1977-01-01

    On a prospective fashion during approximately two years, 22 pediatric patients with acute non lymphocytic leukemia were evaluated. Of this population the majority had acute mielocytic leukemia, followed by acute myelomonocytic leukemia. Absolutely all patients at the time of diagnosis and subsequently every 4 to 6 weeks had a bone marrow aspiration test. When the patients were first seen, 54% of them presented fever; lymph node enlargement was not a common finding. Only few of this patients presented splenomegaly and/or hepatomegaly. In regards to complete blood counts the most outstanding of its was the presence of leukocyte count above 20000/mm.3 in 8 of this patients. From the 22 patients studied only 21 are evaluable. All 21 patients were treated with a 4 drug combination (modified COAP). Sixteen patients (76%) achieved bone marrow remission, of which only 15 patients (71%) achieved complete remission. The median duration remission was of 9.2 months with a range of 2 to 26 months. At the present time only 7 patients (33%) are alive and on remission. Two more patients are alive but in full relapse. The mortality rate of this study is of 59%. The review of recent chemotherapy reports is presented and the need for further trials is emphasized especially in view of recent papers published in which it appears that better results are being obtained at last in children's acute non lymphocitic leukemia.

  12. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    AZIZI, ZAHRA; RAHGOZAR, SOHEILA; MOAFI, ALIREZA; DABAGHI, MOHAMMAD; NADIMI, MOTAHAREH

    2015-01-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the mRNA expression levels of BAALC and MRD1 were measured in bone marrow samples of 28 new diagnosed childhood ALL patients and 13 children without cancer. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured one year after the initiation of the chemotherapy using the RT-qPCR method. The high level expression of BAALC had a significant association with the pre-B-ALL subtype, leukocytosis and positive MRD after one year of treatment in leukemic patients. In addition, a positive correlation between BAALC and MDR1 mRNA expression was shown in this group. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the increase of BAALC expression as a poor prognostic factor for childhood ALL is shown for the first time. Additionally, the correlation between BAALC and MDR1 in mRNA expression levels can aid for an improved understanding of the mechanism through which BAALC may function in ALL and multidrug resistance. PMID:26137238

  13. mRNA overexpression of BAALC: A novel prognostic factor for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Zahra; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Dabaghi, Mohammad; Nadimi, Motahareh

    2015-05-01

    BAALC is a novel molecular marker in leukemia that is highly expressed in patients with acute leukemia. Increased expression levels of BAALC are known as poor prognostic factors in adult acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the prognostic significance of the BAALC gene expression levels in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and its association with MDR1. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR), the mRNA expression levels of BAALC and MRD1 were measured in bone marrow samples of 28 new diagnosed childhood ALL patients and 13 children without cancer. Minimal residual disease (MRD) was measured one year after the initiation of the chemotherapy using the RT-qPCR method. The high level expression of BAALC had a significant association with the pre-B-ALL subtype, leukocytosis and positive MRD after one year of treatment in leukemic patients. In addition, a positive correlation between BAALC and MDR1 mRNA expression was shown in this group. In conclusion, to the best of our knowledge, the increase of BAALC expression as a poor prognostic factor for childhood ALL is shown for the first time. Additionally, the correlation between BAALC and MDR1 in mRNA expression levels can aid for an improved understanding of the mechanism through which BAALC may function in ALL and multidrug resistance.

  14. The significance of PTEN and AKT aberrations in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zuurbier, Linda; Petricoin, Emanuel F.; Vuerhard, Maartje J.; Calvert, Valerie; Kooi, Clarissa; Buijs-Gladdines, Jessica G.C.A.M.; Smits, Willem K.; Sonneveld, Edwin; Veerman, Anjo J.P.; Kamps, Willem A.; Horstmann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P.P.

    2012-01-01

    Background PI3K/AKT pathway mutations are found in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, but their overall impact and associations with other genetic aberrations is unknown. PTEN mutations have been proposed as secondary mutations that follow NOTCH1-activating mutations and cause cellular resistance to γ-secretase inhibitors. Design and Methods The impact of PTEN, PI3K and AKT aberrations was studied in a genetically well-characterized pediatric T-cell leukemia patient cohort (n=146) treated on DCOG or COALL protocols. Results PTEN and AKT E17K aberrations were detected in 13% and 2% of patients, respectively. Defective PTEN-splicing was identified in incidental cases. Patients without PTEN protein but lacking exon-, splice-, promoter mutations or promoter hypermethylation were present. PTEN/AKT mutations were especially abundant in TAL- or LMO-rearranged leukemia but nearly absent in TLX3-rearranged patients (P=0.03), the opposite to that observed for NOTCH1-activating mutations. Most PTEN/AKT mutant patients either lacked NOTCH1-activating mutations (P=0.006) or had weak NOTCH1-activating mutations (P=0.011), and consequently expressed low intracellular NOTCH1, cMYC and MUSASHI levels. T-cell leukemia patients without PTEN/AKT and NOTCH1-activating mutations fared well, with a cumulative incidence of relapse of only 8% versus 35% for PTEN/AKT and/or NOTCH1-activated patients (P=0.005). Conclusions PI3K/AKT pathway aberrations are present in 18% of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Absence of strong NOTCH1-activating mutations in these cases may explain cellular insensitivity to γ-secretase inhibitors. PMID:22491738

  15. Myths and lessons from the adult/pediatric interface in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sallan, Stephen E

    2006-01-01

    The development of effective therapy for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is one of the great successes of clinical oncology, with long-term survival achieved in over 80% of patients. However, cure rates for adults with ALL remain relatively low, with only 40% of patients cured. With an age-unrestricted, biology-based approach, we anticipate a better understanding about why these outcome differences exist, and think that by extending successful pediatric clinical programs to include adult patients with ALL, we can directly compare uniformly treated adults and children in terms of response to therapy, toxicity and underlying biology.

  16. Pulmonary tuberculosis presenting as fever without source in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Christina; LaBeaud, A Desiree; Esper, Frank; Abughali, Nazha; Auletta, Jeffery

    2009-12-15

    Children who undergo treatment for malignancies are at high for infection with both typical and opportunistic pathogens. Fever in these children prompts extensive evaluation and empiric treatment with broad-spectrum antimicrobials. In the United States (US), tuberculosis is an infrequently reported cause of fever in the pediatric cancer patient and has not been well described. In this report we describe a case of primary pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) in a boy with precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and review the pertinent literature. (c) 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Use of gemtuzumab ozogamicin in the treatment of pediatric relapsed/ refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ünal, Elif; Sahdev, Indira

    2008-03-05

    Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO, MylotargTM) is an antibody-targeted chemotherapy agent that has been studied in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) at first relapse in adults. There is limited experience in pediatric patients. We report six patients with refractory/relapsed CD33+AML who were treated with GO on compassionate-use basis. One patient attained remission. One patient is still alive following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and one patient died in remission. Two patients were refractory and three patients had a response with <5% blasts in the bone marrow. Fever and chills, hypotension and hypoxia were observed as side effects. Three patients developed veno-occlusive disease (VOD) of the liver. Two of these three patients had persistence of VOD at the time of their deaths. One patient treated postSCT had bone marrow response without VOD. GO should be used cautiously in chemotherapy-refractory AML pediatric patients due to the high incidence of VOD.

  18. Executive function late effects in survivors of pediatric brain tumors and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Winter, Amanda L; Conklin, Heather M; Tyc, Vida L; Stancel, Heather; Hinds, Pamela S; Hudson, Melissa M; Kahalley, Lisa S

    2014-01-01

    Survivors of pediatric brain tumors (BT) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive late effects related to executive function. Survivors of BT (48) and ALL (50) completed neurocognitive assessment. Executive function was compared to estimated IQ and population norms by diagnostic group. Both BT and ALL demonstrated relative executive function weaknesses. As a group, BT survivors demonstrated weaker executive functioning than expected for age. Those BT survivors with deficits exhibited a profile suggestive of global executive dysfunction, while affected ALL survivors tended to demonstrate specific rapid naming deficits. Findings suggest that pediatric BT and ALL survivors may exhibit different profiles of executive function late effects, which may necessitate distinct intervention plans.

  19. Executive Function Late Effects in Survivors of Pediatric Brain Tumors and Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Amanda L.; Conklin, Heather M.; Tyc, Vida L.; Stancel, Heather; Hinds, Pamela S.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Kahalley, Lisa S.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Survivors of pediatric brain tumors (BT) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are at risk for neurocognitive late effects related to executive function. PROCEDURE Survivors of BT (48) and ALL (50) completed neurocognitive assessment. Executive function was compared to estimated IQ and population norms by diagnostic group. RESULTS Both BT and ALL demonstrated relative executive function weaknesses. As a group, BT survivors demonstrated weaker executive functioning than expected for age. Those BT survivors with deficits exhibited a profile suggestive of global executive dysfunction, while affected ALL survivors tended to demonstrate specific rapid naming deficits. CONCLUSION Findings suggest that pediatric BT and ALL survivors may exhibit different profiles of executive function late effects, which may necessitate distinct intervention plans. PMID:25126830

  20. Oral Microbiota Distinguishes Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Pediatric Hosts from Healthy Populations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xuedong; You, Meng; Du, Qin; Yang, Xue; He, Jingzhi; Zou, Jing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Zhu, Yiping; Li, Jiyao; Shi, Wenyuan; Xu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In leukemia, oral manifestations indicate aberrations in oral microbiota. Microbiota structure is determined by both host and environmental factors. In human hosts, how health status shapes the composition of oral microbiota is largely unknown. Taking advantage of advances in high-throughput sequencing, we compared the composition of supragingival plaque microbiota of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) pediatric patients with healthy controls. The oral microbiota of leukemia patients had lower richness and less diversity compared to healthy controls. Microbial samples clustered into two major groups, one of ALL patients and another of healthy children, with different structure and composition. Abundance changes of certain taxa including the Phylum Firmicutes, the Class Bacilli, the Order Lactobacillales, the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with leukemia status. ALL patients demonstrated a structural imbalance of the oral microbiota, characterized by reduced diversity and abundance alterations, possibly involved in systemic infections, indicating the importance of immune status in shaping the structure of oral microbiota. PMID:25025462

  1. Oral microbiota distinguishes acute lymphoblastic leukemia pediatric hosts from healthy populations.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Xue, Jing; Zhou, Xuedong; You, Meng; Du, Qin; Yang, Xue; He, Jinzhi; He, Jingzhi; Zou, Jing; Cheng, Lei; Li, Mingyun; Li, Yuqing; Zhu, Yiping; Li, Jiyao; Shi, Wenyuan; Xu, Xin

    2014-01-01

    In leukemia, oral manifestations indicate aberrations in oral microbiota. Microbiota structure is determined by both host and environmental factors. In human hosts, how health status shapes the composition of oral microbiota is largely unknown. Taking advantage of advances in high-throughput sequencing, we compared the composition of supragingival plaque microbiota of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) pediatric patients with healthy controls. The oral microbiota of leukemia patients had lower richness and less diversity compared to healthy controls. Microbial samples clustered into two major groups, one of ALL patients and another of healthy children, with different structure and composition. Abundance changes of certain taxa including the Phylum Firmicutes, the Class Bacilli, the Order Lactobacillales, the Family Aerococcaceae and Carnobacteriaceae, as well as the Genus Abiotrophia and Granulicatella were associated with leukemia status. ALL patients demonstrated a structural imbalance of the oral microbiota, characterized by reduced diversity and abundance alterations, possibly involved in systemic infections, indicating the importance of immune status in shaping the structure of oral microbiota.

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults Treated in Pediatric and Adult Departments in the Nordic Countries.

    PubMed

    Wennström, Lovisa; Edslev, Pernille Wendtland; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Nørgaard, Jan Maxwell; Fløisand, Yngvar; Forestier, Erik; Gustafsson, Göran; Heldrup, Jesper; Hovi, Liisa; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jonsson, Olafur Gisli; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Holmberg, Erik; Juliusson, Gunnar; Stockelberg, Dick; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Studies on adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia suggest better results when using pediatric protocols for adult patients, while corresponding data for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are limited. We investigated disease characteristics and outcome for de novo AML patients 10-30 years old treated in pediatric or adult departments. We included 166 patients 10-18 years of age with AML treated according to the pediatric NOPHO-protocols (1993-2009) compared with 253 patients aged 15-30 years treated in hematology departments (1996-2009) in the Nordic countries. The incidence of AML was 4.9/million/year for the age group 10-14 years, 6.5 for 15-18 years, and 6.9 for 19-30 years. Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) was more frequent in adults and in females of all ages. Pediatric patients with APL had similar overall survival as pediatric patients without APL. Overall survival at 5 years was 60% (52-68%) for pediatric patients compared to 65% (58-70%) for adult patients. Cytogenetics and presenting white blood cell count were the only independent prognostic factors for overall survival. Age was not an independent prognostic factor. No difference was found in outcome for AML patients age 10-30 years treated according to pediatric as compared to adult protocols. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Antibody Therapy for Pediatric Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Vedi, Aditi; Ziegler, David S.

    2014-01-01

    Despite increasing cure rates for pediatric leukemia, relapsed disease still carries a poor prognosis with significant morbidity and mortality. Novel targeted therapies are currently being investigated in an attempt to reduce adverse events and improve survival outcomes. Antibody therapies represent a form of targeted therapy that offers a new treatment paradigm. Monoclonal antibodies are active in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and are currently in Phase III trials. Antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs) are the next generation of antibodies where a highly potent cytotoxic agent is bound to an antibody by a linker, resulting in selective targeting of leukemia cells. ADCs are currently being tested in clinical trials for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia and ALL. Bispecific T cell engager (BiTE) antibodies are a construct whereby each antibody contains two binding sites, with one designed to engage the patient’s own immune system and the other to target malignant cells. BiTE antibodies show great promise as a novel and effective therapy for childhood leukemia. This review will outline recent developments in targeted agents for pediatric leukemia including monoclonal antibodies, ADCs, and BiTE antibodies. PMID:24795859

  4. Upregulation of microRNA-375 is associated with poor prognosis in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhengyan; Hong, Ze; Gao, Feng; Feng, Weijing

    2013-11-01

    A genome-wide serum miRNA expression analysis previously showed the upregulation of microRNA-375 (miR-375) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients compared with healthy controls. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression patterns and the prognostic relevance of miR-375 in pediatric AML. Expression levels of miR-375 in bone marrow mononuclear cells were detected by real-time quantitative PCR in a cohort of 106 patients with newly diagnosed pediatric AML. Expression levels of miR-375 in the bone marrow of pediatric AML patients were significantly higher than those in normal controls (P < 0.001). Then, miR-375 upregulation occurred more frequently in French-American-British classification subtype M7 than in other subtypes (P < 0.001). Regarding to cytogenetic risk, the expression levels of miR-375 in pediatric AML patients with unfavorable karyotypes were dramatically higher than those in intermediate and favorable groups (P = 0.002). Moreover, high miR-375 expression was significantly associated with shorter relapse-free survival (P < 0.001) and overall survival (P < 0.001) in pediatric AML patients. Multivariate analysis further identified miR-375 expression and cytogenetics risk as independent prognostic factors for both relapse-free survival and overall survival. In particular, the prognostic relevance of miR-375 expression was more obvious in the subgroup of patients with intermediate-risk cytogenetics. Our findings suggest for the first time that the upregulation of miR-375 may be one of the molecular mechanisms involved in the development and progression of pediatric AML. Since its correlation with poor relapse-free survival and overall survival, miR-375 may be a novel biomarker to improve the management of pediatric AML patients.

  5. ReCAP: Gaps in Insurance Coverage for Pediatric Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Hersh, Aimee O; Fluchel, Mark N; Boucher, Kenneth M; Kirchhoff, Anne C; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Kaul, Sapna; Hersh, Aimee O; Fluchel, Mark N; Boucher, Kenneth M; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    Continuous insurance coverage is an important component of effective health care. Evaluation of insurance gaps in pediatric cancer care is an understudied area. We conducted a retrospective analysis of payer data from outpatient oncology encounters at Primary Children's Hospital (Salt Lake City, UT) over the first 2 years of therapy for pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia diagnosed from 1998 to 2010 (N = 380). Using logistic regression, we evaluated demographic and clinical predictors (age at diagnosis, sex, ethnicity, high/standard acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk, and rural/urban county of residence at diagnosis) of a gap in health insurance. The median age at diagnosis was 4 years (interquartile range, 3 to 8 years), and 172 patients (45%) were girls. In the first 2 years of treatment, 45 patients (12%) experienced a gap in health insurance. The odds of having a gap in insurance coverage decreased by 16% each year from 1998 to 2010 (odds ratio, 0.84; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.93; test for trend, P = .001). Public insurance at diagnosis was associated with a four-fold increased likelihood of experiencing an insurance gap (odds ratio, 4.09; 95% CI, 1.98 to 8.44; P < .001) compared with patients with private insurance at diagnosis. Gaps in insurance coverage during pediatric cancer treatment are not uncommon, which highlights the importance of discussing insurance status at diagnosis and throughout a patient's treatment course to help patients and their families prepare for any changes and avoid unnecessary financial burden. Future research should focus on examining the effect of insurance gaps on patient outcomes and evaluating likelihood of gaps in insurance after health care reform. Copyright © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Accuracy of Adverse Event Ascertainment in Clinical Trials for Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yimei; Kavcic, Marko; Troxel, Andrea B.; Huang, Yuan-Shun V.; Sung, Lillian; Alonzo, Todd A.; Gerbing, Robert; Hall, Matt; Daves, Marla H.; Horton, Terzah M.; Pulsipher, Michael A.; Pollard, Jessica A.; Bagatell, Rochelle; Seif, Alix E.; Fisher, Brian T.; Luger, Selina; Gamis, Alan S.; Adamson, Peter C.; Aplenc, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Reporting of adverse events (AEs) in clinical trials is critical to understanding treatment safety, but data on AE accuracy are limited. This study sought to determine the accuracy of AE reporting for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia clinical trials and to test whether an external electronic data source can improve reporting. Methods Reported AEs were evaluated on two trials, Children’s Oncology Group AAML03P1 and AAML0531 arm B, with identical chemotherapy regimens but with different toxicity reporting requirements. Chart review for 12 AEs for patients enrolled in AAML0531 at 14 hospitals was the gold standard. The sensitivity and positive predictive values (PPV) of the AAML0531 AE report and AEs detected by review of Pediatric Health Information System (PHIS) billing and microbiology data were compared with chart data. Results Select AE rates from AAML03P1 and AAML0531 arm B differed significantly and correlated with the targeted toxicities of each trial. Chart abstraction was performed on 204 patients (758 courses) on AAML0531. AE report sensitivity was < 50% for eight AEs, but PPV was > 75% for six AEs. AE reports for viridans group streptococcal bacteremia, a targeted toxicity on AAML0531, had a sensitivity of 78.3% and PPV of 98.1%. PHIS billing data had higher sensitivity (> 50% for nine AEs), but lower PPV (< 75% for 10 AEs). Viridans group streptococcal detection using PHIS microbiology data had high sensitivity (92.3%) and PPV (97.3%). Conclusion The current system of AE reporting for cooperative oncology group clinical trials in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia underestimates AE rates. The high sensitivity and PPV of PHIS microbiology data suggest that using external data sources may improve the accuracy of AE reporting. PMID:26884558

  7. The Association Between Motor Skills and Academic Achievement Among Pediatric Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Balsamo, Lyn M; Sint, Kyaw J; Neglia, Joseph P; Brouwers, Pim; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2016-04-01

    Assess the association between fine motor (FM) and visual-motor integration (VMI) skills and academic achievement in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. In this 28-site cross-sectional study of 256 children in first remission, a mean of 8.9 ± 2.2 years after treatment for standard-risk precursor-B ALL, validated measures of FM, VMI, reading, math, and intelligence were administered at mean follow-up age of 12.8 ± 2.5 years.   VMI was significantly associated with written math calculation ability (p < .0069) after adjusting for intelligence (p < .0001). VMI was more strongly associated with math in those with lower intelligence (p = .0141). Word decoding was also significantly associated with VMI but with no effect modification by intelligence. FM skills were not associated with either reading or math achievement. These findings suggest that VMI is associated with aspects of math and reading achievement in leukemia survivors. These skills may be amenable to intervention. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The promoter of miR-663 is hypermethylated in Chinese pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background There is growing evidence supporting a role for microRNAs (miRNA) as targets in aberrant mechanisms of DNA hypermethylation. Epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor miRNAs, including miR-663, which has recently been reported to be inactivated by hypermethylation in several cancers, may play important roles in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, expression of miR-663 and its promoter methylation remain status unclear in childhood leukemia. Methods Promoter methylation status of miR-663 was investigated by methylation specific PCR (MSP) and bisulfate genomic sequencing (BGS). Transcriptional expression of miR-663 was evaluated by semi-quantitative and real-time PCR, and the relationship between expression of miR-663 and promoter methylation was confirmed using 5-aza-2’-deoxycytidine (5-Aza) demethylation reagent. Results MiR-663 was aberrantly methylated in 45.5% (5/11) leukemia cell lines; BGS showed that the promoter was significantly methylated in three AML cell lines; methylation of miR-663 was significantly higher in Chinese pediatric AML patients [41.4% (29/70)] compared to normal bone marrow (NBM) control samples [10.0% (3/30)]. These results were confirmed by both BGS and 5-Aza demethylation analysis. In addition, miR-663 transcript expression was significantly lower in AML patients, both with and without miR-663 methylation, compared to controls; however, there were no significant differences in clinical features or French-American-British (FAB) classification between patients with and without miR-663 methylation. Conclusions Expression of miR-663 was significantly lower in pediatric AML cells compared to NBM controls; furthermore, a high frequency of miR-663 promoter hypermethylation was observed in both AML cell lines and pediatric AML samples. Inactivation of miR-663 by promoter hypermethylation could be affected by 5-Aza demethylation. These findings suggest that hypermethylation of the miR-663 promoter may be an early event in

  9. Methylation level of CpG islands in GGH gene promoter in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huihui; Mai, Huirong; Yuan, Xiuli; Li, Changgang; Wen, Feiqiu

    2017-01-01

    Background γ-Glutamyl hydrolase (GGH) regulates intracellular folates and antifolates such as methotrexate (MTX) for proper nucleotide biosynthesis and antifolate-induced cytotoxicity, respectively. In addition to genetic polymorphism and karyotypic abnormalities, methylation of CpG island 1 (CpG1) in the promoter region is found to modulate GGH activity by reducing GGH mRNA expression in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cells. We aim to investigate methylation status of two CpG islands (CpG1 and CpG2) in the GGH promoter region in pediatric patients with ALL and acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). Methods 70B-ALL, 29 AML, 10 ITP (idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura) and 40 healthy children are recruited in the present study. MS-HRM (methylation-sensitive high-resolution melting) and bisulfite sequencing PCR (BSP) are used to detect methylation change and its level in CpG1 and CpG2 in the GGH promoter region. GGH mRNA expression is quantified by real-time PCR. Correlation between CpG island methylation and GGH mRNA expression is assessed by statistical software. Results Methylations of CpG1 are detected in leukemia cells samples obtained from 30.9% (21/68) of patients with ALL and 20.7% (6/29) of patients with AML. These methylations are not detected in the controls. Methylations of CpG2 are detected in leukemia cell samples obtained from 44.1% (30/68) of the ALL patients and 37.9% (11/29) of the AML patients. These percentages are significantly higher than that observed in the control cell samples: 6.0% (3/50) (Fisher's exact test, P = 0.000). The abundance of CpG1 methylation in all leukemia cell samples is classified as Grade I (methylation level is less than 10%) and the abundance of CpG2 methylation in leukemia cell samples is classified in separate grades. Our results indicate that methylation of CpG1 or hypermethylation (the methylation level is greater than 10%) of CpG2 could significantly reduce GGH mRNA expression in leukemia cells from the ALL and AML

  10. Pediatric Medical Care System in China Has Significantly Reduced Abandonment of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qi; Hong, Dan; Lu, Jun; Zheng, Defei; Ashwani, Neetica

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have analyzed both administrative and clinical data from our hospital during 2002 to 2012 to evaluate the influence of government medical policies on reducing abandonment treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Two policies funding for the catastrophic diseases and the new rural cooperative medical care system (NRCMS) were initiated in 2005 and 2011, respectively. About 1151 children diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia were enrolled in our study during this period and 316 cases abandoned treatment. Statistical differences in sex, age, number of children in the family, and family financial status were observed. Of most importance, the medical insurance coverage was critical for reducing abandonment treatment. However, 92 cases abandoning treatment after relapse did not show significant difference either in medical insurance coverage or in duration from first complete remission. In conclusion, financial crisis was the main reason for abandoning treatment. Government-funded health care expenditure programs reduced families’ economic burden and thereby reduced the abandonment rate with resultant increased overall survival. PMID:25393454

  11. Pharmacogenetics of microRNAs and microRNAs biogenesis machinery in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    López-López, Elixabet; Gutiérrez-Camino, Ángela; Piñán, Maria Ángeles; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Uriz, Jose Javier; Ballesteros, Javier; García-Miguel, Purificación; Navajas, Aurora; García-Orad, África

    2014-01-01

    Despite the clinical success of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy, toxicity is frequent. Therefore, it would be useful to identify predictors of adverse effects. In the last years, several studies have investigated the relationship between genetic variation and treatment-related toxicity. However, most of these studies are focused in coding regions. Nowadays, it is known that regions that do not codify proteins, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), may have an important regulatory function. MiRNAs can regulate the expression of genes affecting drug response. In fact, the expression of some of those miRNAs has been associated with drug response. Genetic variations affecting miRNAs can modify their function, which may lead to drug sensitivity. The aim of this study was to detect new toxicity markers in pediatric B-ALL, studying miRNA-related polymorphisms, which can affect miRNA levels and function. We analyzed 118 SNPs in pre-miRNAs and miRNA processing genes in association with toxicity in 152 pediatric B-ALL patients all treated with the same protocol (LAL/SHOP). Among the results found, we detected for the first time an association between rs639174 in DROSHA and vomits that remained statistically significant after FDR correction. DROSHA had been associated with alterations in miRNAs expression, which could affect genes involved in drug transport. This suggests that miRNA-related SNPs could be a useful tool for toxicity prediction in pediatric B-ALL.

  12. Identification of mutant alleles of JAK3 in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Changhong; Sandoval, Claudio; Baeg, Gyeong-Hun

    2015-05-01

    Children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have an 80% chance of long-term survival. Despite the high rate of cure, children relapse, and recurrent ALL is difficult to cure with chemotherapeutic regimens. Therefore, improved biological understanding of ALL and the development of rationally designed therapeutics targeting molecules associated with the pathogenesis of ALL are essential. We identified missense and synonymous JAK3 mutations in 16 of 91 pediatric patients with ALL. The expression of JAK3(V722I) mutant caused the cytokine-independent activation of Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) signaling and conferred the factor-independent growth of murine interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent pro-B Ba/F3 cells. Importantly, inhibition of JAK3 by the known JAK3 inhibitor CP-690 550 converted the Ba/F3-JAK3(V722I) cells back to factor-dependent growth. These observations suggest that JAK3 may contribute to the pathogenesis of pediatric ALL and serve as an important therapeutic target which can be leveraged to improve outcomes for pediatric patients with ALL.

  13. Genomic characterization of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia reveals novel recurrent driver mutations

    PubMed Central

    Spinella, Jean-François; Cassart, Pauline; Richer, Chantal; Saillour, Virginie; Ouimet, Manon; Langlois, Sylvie; St-Onge, Pascal; Sontag, Thomas; Healy, Jasmine; Minden, Mark D.; Sinnett, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematologic malignancy with variable prognosis. It represents 15% of diagnosed pediatric ALL cases and has a threefold higher incidence among males. Many recurrent alterations have been identified and help define molecular subgroups of T-ALL, however the full range of events involved in driving transformation remain to be defined. Using an integrative approach combining genomic and transcriptomic data, we molecularly characterized 30 pediatric T-ALLs and identified common recurrent T-ALL targets such as FBXW7, JAK1, JAK3, PHF6, KDM6A and NOTCH1 as well as novel candidate T-ALL driver mutations including the p.R35L missense mutation in splicesome factor U2AF1 found in 3 patients and loss of function mutations in the X-linked tumor suppressor genes MED12 (frameshit mutation p.V167fs, splice site mutation g.chrX:70339329T>C, missense mutation p.R1989H) and USP9X (nonsense mutation p.Q117*). In vitro functional studies further supported the putative role of these novel T-ALL genes in driving transformation. U2AF1 p.R35L was shown to induce aberrant splicing of downstream target genes, and shRNA knockdown of MED12 and USP9X was shown to confer resistance to apoptosis following T-ALL relevant chemotherapy drug treatment in Jurkat leukemia cells. Interestingly, nearly 60% of novel candidate driver events were identified among immature T-ALL cases, highlighting the underlying genomic complexity of pediatric T-ALL, and the need for larger integrative studies to decipher the mechanisms that contribute to its various subtypes and provide opportunities to refine patient stratification and treatment. PMID:27602765

  14. Asparaginase Therapy in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Focus on the Mode of Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shih-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    Asparaginase is one of the most important chemotherapeutic agents against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common form of childhood cancer. The therapeutic efficacy (e.g., chemoresistance) and adverse effects of asparaginase (e.g., hypersensivity and pancreatitis) have been investigated over the past four decades. It was suggested early on that leukemic cells are resistant to asparaginase because of their increased asparagine synthetase activity. Afterward, other mechanisms associated with asparaginase resistance were reported. Not only leukemic cells but also patients themselves may play a role in causing asparaginase resistance, which has been associated with unfavorable outcome in children with ALL. This article will briefly review asparaginase therapy in children with ALL and comprehensively analyze recent reports on the potential mechanisms of asparaginase resistance.

  15. CXCR4 Overexpression is a Poor Prognostic Factor in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Low Risk: A Report From the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Hidemasa; Nakamura, Naomi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Saito, Akiko Moriya; Kiyokawa, Nobutaka; Horibe, Keizo; Nishinaka-Arai, Yoko; Tokumasu, Mayu; Itoh, Hiroshi; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko; Nakayama, Hideki; Kinoshita, Akitoshi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Taki, Tomohiko; Tanaka, Shiro; Adachi, Souichi

    2016-08-01

    Overexpression of CXC chemokine receptor 4 (CXCR4+) is a poor prognostic factor in adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, its prognostic significance in pediatric AML is unclear. This retrospective study examined the prognostic significance of CXCR4+ in pediatric AML patients enrolled in the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group AML-05 study. In the total cohort (n = 248), no significant differences were observed between CXCR4+ patients (n = 81) and CXCR4- patients (n = 167) in terms of 3-year overall survival (OS) (69.4% vs. 75.2%, P = 0.44). However, there was a significant difference in 3-year OS between CXCR4+ and CXCR4- patients in the low-risk (LR) group (n = 93; 79.2% vs. 98.3%, P = 0.007). CXCR4+ patients in the t(8;21) AML without KIT mutation group had a significantly worse 3-year OS than CXCR4- patients (n = 44; 76.1% vs. 100.0%, P = 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analysis identified CXCR4+ as a poor prognostic factor for OS in LR AML patients (hazard ratio, 11.47; P = 0.01). Consistent with the data for survival analysis, CXCR4+ patients in the t(8;21) AML group had a higher incidence of splenomegaly than CXCR4- patients (25.9% vs. 5.9%, P = 0.03). These results suggest that CXCR4+ is a poor prognostic factor for LR patients, particularly t(8;21) patients without KIT mutation. The poor outcome was only applicable to OS, not relapse-free survival (RFS); thus, CXCR4+ may be associated with a poor prognosis after recurrence. Intensive therapy, including administration of CXCR4 antagonists, may be promising for pediatric AML patients with LR. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia relapsing after first-line pediatric-inspired therapy: a retrospective GRAALL study

    PubMed Central

    Desjonquères, A; Chevallier, P; Thomas, X; Huguet, F; Leguay, T; Bernard, M; Bay, J-O; Tavernier, E; Charbonnier, A; Isnard, F; Hunault, M; Turlure, P; Renaud, M; Bastié, J-N; Himberlin, C; Lepretre, S; Lioure, B; Lhéritier, V; Asnafi, V; Beldjord, K; Lafage-Pochitaloff, M; Béné, M C; Ifrah, N; Dombret, H

    2016-01-01

    The outcome of adult patients with Philadelphia chromosome-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph− ALL) relapsing after pediatric-inspired front-line therapy is ill known. Here 229 relapsing Ph− ALL younger adults (18–63 years) treated within the Group for Research on Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (GRAALL)-2003/-2005 trials were considered. Salvage regimens consisted of potentially curative therapies in 194 cases, low-intensity therapies in 21, allogeneic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT) in 6 and best supportive care in 8. Overall, 77 patients received allo-SCT after relapse. The median follow-up was 3.1 years. A second complete remission (CR2) was achieved in 121 patients (53%). In multivariate analysis, only younger age <45 years (P=0.008) and CR1 duration ⩾18 months (P=0.009) predicted CR2. Overall survival (OS) at 2 and 5 years was 19.3% (14–24%) and 13.3% (8–18%), respectively. In CR2 patients, disease-free survival (DFS) at 2 and 5 years was 29.0% (21–38%) and 25% (17–33%). In multivariate analysis, CR1 duration ⩾18 months and allo-SCT after relapse were associated with longer DFS (P<0.009 and P=0.004, respectively) and longer OS (P=0.004 and P<0.0001, respectively). In conclusion, although younger adults relapsing after pediatric-inspired ALL therapies retain a poor outcome, some of them may be cured if CR1 duration ⩾18 months and if allo-SCT can be performed in CR2. New therapies are definitely needed for these patients. PMID:27935576

  17. Inhibiting Polo-like kinase 1 causes growth reduction and apoptosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Hartsink-Segers, Stefanie A; Exalto, Carla; Allen, Matthew; Williamson, Daniel; Clifford, Steven C; Horstmann, Martin; Caron, Huib N; Pieters, Rob; Den Boer, Monique L

    2013-10-01

    This study investigated Polo-like kinase 1, a mitotic regulator often over-expressed in solid tumors and adult hematopoietic malignancies, as a potential new target in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Polo-like kinase 1 protein and Thr210 phosphorylation levels were higher in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n=172) than in normal bone marrow mononuclear cells (n=10) (P<0.0001). High Polo-like kinase 1 protein phosphorylation, but not expression, was associated with a lower probability of event-free survival (P=0.042) and was a borderline significant prognostic factor (P=0.065) in a multivariate analysis including age and initial white blood cell count. Polo-like kinase 1 was necessary for leukemic cell survival, since short hairpin-mediated Polo-like kinase 1 knockdown in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines inhibited cell proliferation by G2/M cell cycle arrest and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. Primary patient cells with a high Polo-like kinase 1 protein expression were sensitive to the Polo-like kinase 1-specific inhibitor NMS-P937 in vitro, whereas cells with a low expression and normal bone marrow cells were resistant. This sensitivity was likely not caused by Polo-like kinase 1 mutations, since only one new mutation (Ser335Arg) was found by 454-sequencing of 38 pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases. This mutation did not affect Polo-like kinase 1 expression or NMS-P937 sensitivity. Together, these results indicate a pivotal role for Polo-like kinase 1 in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and show potential for Polo-like kinase 1-inhibiting drugs as an addition to current treatment strategies for cases expressing high Polo-like kinase 1 levels.

  18. Array comparative genomic hybridization and cytogenetic analysis in pediatric acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Dawson, A J; Yanofsky, R; Vallente, R; Bal, S; Schroedter, I; Liang, L; Mai, S

    2011-10-01

    Most patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (all) are reported to have acquired chromosomal abnormalities in their leukemic bone marrow cells. Many established chromosome rearrangements have been described, and their associations with specific clinical, biologic, and prognostic features are well defined. However, approximately 30% of pediatric and 50% of adult patients with all do not have cytogenetic abnormalities of clinical significance. Despite significant improvements in outcome for pediatric all, therapy fails in approximately 25% of patients, and these failures often occur unpredictably in patients with a favorable prognosis and "good" cytogenetics at diagnosis.It is well known that karyotype analysis in hematologic malignancies, although genome-wide, is limited because of altered cell kinetics (mitotic rate), a propensity of leukemic blasts to undergo apoptosis in culture, overgrowth by normal cells, and chromosomes of poor quality in the abnormal clone. Array comparative genomic hybridization (acgh-"microarray") has a greatly increased genomic resolution over classical cytogenetics. Cytogenetic microarray, which uses genomic dna, is a powerful tool in the analysis of unbalanced chromosome rearrangements, such as copy number gains and losses, and it is the method of choice when the mitotic index is low and the quality of metaphases is suboptimal. The copy number profile obtained by microarray is often called a "molecular karyotype."In the present study, microarray was applied to 9 retrospective cases of pediatric all either with initial high-risk features or with at least 1 relapse. The conventional karyotype was compared to the "molecular karyotype" to assess abnormalities as interpreted by classical cytogenetics. Not only were previously undetected chromosome losses and gains identified by microarray, but several karyotypes interpreted by classical cytogenetics were shown to be discordant with the microarray results. The complementary use of microarray

  19. The Association Between Motor Skills and Academic Achievement Among Pediatric Survivors of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sint, Kyaw J.; Neglia, Joseph P.; Brouwers, Pim; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Assess the association between fine motor (FM) and visual–motor integration (VMI) skills and academic achievement in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) survivors. Methods In this 28-site cross-sectional study of 256 children in first remission, a mean of 8.9 ± 2.2 years after treatment for standard-risk precursor-B ALL, validated measures of FM, VMI, reading, math, and intelligence were administered at mean follow-up age of 12.8 ± 2.5 years. Results VMI was significantly associated with written math calculation ability (p < .0069) after adjusting for intelligence (p < .0001). VMI was more strongly associated with math in those with lower intelligence (p = .0141). Word decoding was also significantly associated with VMI but with no effect modification by intelligence. FM skills were not associated with either reading or math achievement. Conclusion These findings suggest that VMI is associated with aspects of math and reading achievement in leukemia survivors. These skills may be amenable to intervention. PMID:26514641

  20. Osteonecrosis as a complication in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Riccio, Ilaria; Pota, Elvira; Marcarelli, Marco; Affinita, Maria Carmen; Di Pinto, Daniela; Indolfi, Cristiana; Del Regno, Nicola; Esposito, Marco

    2016-11-28

    Osteonecrosis is a significant adverse effect of treatment administered to children suffering from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that may have a negative effect on the quality of life. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the rate of secondary vascular osteonecrosis (ON) in a population of pediatric patients with ALL treated with corticosteroids and cytostatic agents. A retrospective analysis of prospectively collected data of the medical records of 328 patients with ALL identified 4 cases with ON, corresponding to 1.2% of all cases observed. Of the 4 patients identified in our study 3 were girls and 1 was a boy, aged from 10 to 16 years old (average age at diagnosis, 12 years). Median time between the diagnosis of ALL and ON was 12.5 months (range, 12 to 36 months). Regarding the lesion size of ON, in all cases the femoral head (monolateral in 1 case and bilateral in 3 cases) was involved and was associated with the scapula-humeral joint in one case. ON of the weight-bearing joints has been identified as a severe complication in children with leukemia that may be associated with the development of articular surface collapse, subsequent debilitating arthritis, sometimes needing arthroplasty. For this reason it is very important to implement prevention strategies, especially in adolescent girls treated with steroids and chemotherapy. An early diagnosis of ON and careful orthopedic follow-up are necessary in order to avoid bone deformations related to the late start or the wrong therapy.

  1. Oral manifestations in pediatric patients receiving chemotherapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ponce-Torres, Elena; Ruíz-Rodríguez, Ma del Socorro; Alejo-González, Francisco; Hernández-Sierra, Juan Francisco; Pozos-Guillén, Amaury de J

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the prevalence of oral manifestations in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) receiving chemotherapy, and to evaluate the significance of independent risk factors (oral health, gender, age, time and type of treatment, and phase of chemotherapy). A cross-sectional study was made in 49 children with ALL between 2 and 14 years of age. To describe oral manifestations, a clinical diagnosis was made and the following criteria were applied: the OHI-S index to describe oral health and the IMPA index to describe periodontal conditions and to differentiate gingivitis from periodontitis. The prevalence of oral manifestations was: gingivitis, 91.84%; caries, 81.63%; mucositis, 38.77%; periodontitis, 16.32%; cheilitis, 18.36%; recurrent herpes, 12.24%; and primary herpetic gingivostomatitis, 2.04%. Other oral manifestations were: dry lips, mucosal pallor, mucosal petechiae, ecchymoses, and induced ulcers. The prevalence of oral candidiasis was 6.12%. It was observed that high risk ALL and poor oral hygiene were important risk factors for the development of candidiasis and gingivitis. The type of leukemia, gender and phase of chemotherapy were apparently associated with the presence of candidiasis, gingivitis, and periodontitis, and they could be considered risk factors for the development of oral manifestations.

  2. Management of Invasive Fungal Infections in Pediatric Acute Leukemia and the Appropriate Time for Restarting Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Tüfekçi, Özlem; Yılmaz Bengoa, Şebnem; Demir Yenigürbüz, Fatma; Şimşek, Erdem; Karapınar, Tuba Hilkay; İrken, Gülersu; Ören, Hale

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Rapid and effective treatment of invasive fungal infection (IFI) in patients with leukemia is important for survival. In this study, we aimed to describe variations regarding clinical features, treatment modalities, time of restarting chemotherapy, and outcome in children with IFI and acute leukemia (AL). Materials and Methods: The charts of all pediatric AL patients in our clinic between the years of 2001 and 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. All patients received prophylactic fluconazole during the chemotherapy period. Results: IFI was identified in 25 (14%) of 174 AL patients. Most of them were in the consolidation phase of chemotherapy and the patients had severe neutropenia. The median time between leukemia diagnosis and definition of IFI was 122 days. Twenty-four patients had pulmonary IFI. The most frequent finding on computed tomography was typical parenchymal nodules. The episodes were defined as proven in 4 (16%) patients, probable in 7 (28%) patients, and possible in 14 (56%) patients. The median time for discontinuation of chemotherapy was 27 days. IFI was treated successfully in all patients with voriconazole, amphotericin B, caspofungin, or posaconazole alone or in combination. Chemotherapy was restarted in 50% of the patients safely within 4 weeks and none of those patients experienced reactivation of IFI. All of them were given secondary prophylaxis. The median time for antifungal treatment and for secondary prophylaxis was 26 and 90 days, respectively. None of the patients died due to IFI. Conclusion: Our data show that rapid and effective antifungal therapy with rational treatment modalities may decrease the incidence of death and that restarting chemotherapy within several weeks may be safe in children with AL and IFI. PMID:25913290

  3. Genetic and metabolic determinants of methotrexate-induced mucositis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    den Hoed, M A H; Lopez-Lopez, E; te Winkel, M L; Tissing, W; de Rooij, J D E; Gutierrez-Camino, A; Garcia-Orad, A; den Boer, E; Pieters, R; Pluijm, S M F; de Jonge, R; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2015-06-01

    Methotrexate (MTX) is an effective and toxic chemotherapeutic drug in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL). In this prospective study, we aimed to identify metabolic and genetic determinants of MTX toxicity. One hundred and thirty-four Dutch pediatric ALL patients were treated with four high infusions MTX (HD-MTX: 5 g m(-2)) every other week according to the DCOG-ALL-10 protocol. Mucositis (National Cancer Institute grade ⩾ 3) was the most frequent occurring toxicity during the HD-MTX phase (20%) and occurred especially after the first MTX course. Mucositis was not associated with plasma MTX, plasma folate or plasma homocysteine levels. Patients with mucositis had higher erythrocyte folate levels at the start of protocol M than patients without mucositis (median 1.4 vs 1.2 μmol l(-1), P<0.008), this could reflect an increased MTX uptake in mucosal cells of patients with mucositis. From 17 single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the MTX pathway, only patients with the wild-type variant of rs7317112 SNP in the ABCC4 gene had more mucositis (AA (39%) vs AG/GG (15%), P=0.016). We found no evidence that erythrocyte folate levels mediate in the association between the rs7317112 and mucositis.

  4. Global chromatin profiling reveals NSD2 mutations in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jaffe, Jacob D; Wang, Yan; Chan, Ho Man; Zhang, Jinghui; Huether, Robert; Kryukov, Gregory V; Bhang, Hyo-eun C; Taylor, Jordan E; Hu, Min; Englund, Nathan P; Yan, Feng; Wang, Zhaofu; McDonald, E Robert; Wei, Lei; Ma, Jing; Easton, John; Yu, Zhengtian; deBeaumount, Rosalie; Gibaja, Veronica; Venkatesan, Kavitha; Schlegel, Robert; Sellers, William R; Keen, Nicholas; Liu, Jun; Caponigro, Giordano; Barretina, Jordi; Cooke, Vesselina G; Mullighan, Charles; Carr, Steven A; Downing, James R; Garraway, Levi A; Stegmeier, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic dysregulation is an emerging hallmark of cancers. We developed a high-information-content mass spectrometry approach to profile global histone modifications in human cancers. When applied to 115 lines from the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia1, this approach identified distinct molecular chromatin signatures. One signature was characterized by increased histone 3 lysine 36 (H3K36) dimethylation, exhibited by several lines harboring translocations in NSD2, which encodes a methyltransferase. A previously unknown NSD2 p.Glu1099Lys (p.E1099K) variant was identified in nontranslocated acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines sharing this signature. Ectopic expression of the variant induced a chromatin signature characteristic of NSD2 hyperactivation and promoted transformation. NSD2 knockdown selectively inhibited the proliferation of NSD2-mutant lines and impaired the in vivo growth of an NSD2-mutant ALL xenograft. Sequencing analysis of >1,000 pediatric cancer genomes identified the NSD2 p.E1099K alteration in 14% of t(12;21) ETV6-RUNX1–containing ALLs. These findings identify NSD2 as a potential therapeutic target for pediatric ALL and provide a general framework for the functional annotation of cancer epigenomes. PMID:24076604

  5. Vincristine pharmacokinetics pathway and neurotoxicity during early phases of treatment in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Astigarraga, Itziar; Navajas, Aurora; Echebarria-Barona, Aizpea; Garcia-Miguel, Purificacion; Garcia de Andoin, Nagore; Lobo, Carmen; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-05-01

    Vincristine is an important component of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment protocols that can cause neurotoxicity. Patients treated with LAL/SHOP protocols often suffer from vincristine-related neurotoxicity in early phases of treatment. Recently, a genome-wide association study connected a SNP in CEP72, involved in vincristine pharmacodynamics, with neurotoxicity during later phases of therapy, which was not replicated during induction phase. These results, together with previous studies indicating that polymorphisms in pharmacokinetic genes are associated with drug toxicity, suggest that changes in the activity or levels of vincristine transporters or metabolizers could work as predictors of vincristine-related neurotoxicity in early phases of treatment in pediatric ALL. We analyzed 150 SNPs in eight key genes involved in vincristine pharmacokinetics and in 13 miRNAs that regulate them. We studied their correlation with neurotoxicity during induction phase in 152 ALL patients treated with LAL/SHOP protocols. The strongest associations with neurotoxicity were observed for two SNPs in ABCC2. The genotypes rs3740066 GG and rs12826 GG were associated with increased neurotoxicity. Polymorphisms in ABCC2 could be novel markers for vincristine-related neurotoxicity in pediatric ALL in early phases.

  6. Behavioral side effects of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment: the role of parenting strategies.

    PubMed

    Williams, Lauren K; Lamb, Karen E; McCarthy, Maria C

    2014-11-01

    Behavioral and emotional difficulties are a recognised side effect of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. Modifiable factors, such as parenting strategies, may be an appropriate target for interventions to assist families with managing their child's behavior, potentially leading to improved psychosocial and clinical outcomes. This study examined whether parenting strategies are associated with child behavioral and emotional problems in a pediatric oncology context, with the aim of establishing whether parenting is a potential modifiable target for psychosocial intervention. Participants included 73 parents of children aged 2-6 years who were either (i) in the maintenance phase of treatment for ALL at the Royal Children's Hospital Children's Cancer Centre, Melbourne (N = 43), or (ii) had no major medical history (healthy control group) (N = 30). Participants completed psychometrically validated questionnaires that assessed parenting strategies and child emotional and behavioral problems. Results revealed that the ALL group parents reported higher lax parenting and more spoiling and bribing of their child than the healthy control group. Results from regression models indicated that, after controlling for the significant contribution of illness status and child age on child emotional and behavioral difficulties, parental laxness and parental overprotection were significantly associated with child emotional and behavioral difficulties. Supporting parents to minimise sub-optimal parenting strategies, particularly lax parenting, may offer a fruitful avenue for future research directed toward modifiable factors associated with managing child emotional and behavioral problems in a pediatric oncology context. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Caregiver survey results related to handling of oral chemotherapy for pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Held, Kristin; Ryan, Robin; Champion, Judy M; August, Keith; Radhi, Mohamed A

    2013-08-01

    Oral chemotherapy is commonly administered in the home; however, there may be harmful effects on healthy individuals who handle these medications. Caregivers of pediatric patients were surveyed to establish educational needs for safe handling of oral chemotherapy agents. An 11-question self-report survey was developed to characterize handling practices for patients in maintenance therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia related to caregiver education, use of protective gear, preparation, and disposal of oral chemotherapy agents. Fifty questionnaires were collected. Seventy-two percent of responders reported receiving instruction on safe handling of oral chemotherapy. Ninety percent of responders reported that they did not utilize protective gear during preparation of oral chemotherapy. Although tablet crushers were designated for use with oral chemotherapy by 61% of responders, 22% used the same device to crush other nonchemotherapy medications. The majority of responders disposed of medication waste with regular garbage or poured the remainder down the sink. Caregiver survey responses demonstrated that personal safeguards were not routinely utilized by pediatric caregivers while handling oral chemotherapy. Future educational efforts should be directed to improve caregiver understanding related to the use of protective equipment, designation of supplies for use with chemotherapy agents, and safe disposal.

  8. Respiratory syncytial virus infection in infants with acute leukemia: a retrospective survey of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Michiki; Miyamura, Takako; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Taga, Takashi; Tawa, Akio; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Kajihara, Ryosuke; Adachi, Souichi; Ishii, Eiichi; Tomizawa, Daisuke

    2015-12-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) can cause life-threatening complications of lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) in young children with malignancies, but reports remain limited. We performed a retrospective nationwide survey to clarify the current status of RSV disease among infants with hematological malignancies. Clinical course, treatment, and outcome of patients with hematological malignancies who suffered from RSV infections at the age of <24 months during anti-tumor therapy from April 2006 to March 2009 were investigated by sending a questionnaire to all member institutions of the Japanese Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (JPLSG). Twelve patients with acute leukemia were identified as having experienced RSV disease. The primary diseases were acute myeloid leukemia (n = 8) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (n = 4). RSV infection occurred pre- or during induction therapy (n = 8) and during consolidation therapy (n = 4). Eight patients developed LRTI, four of whom had severe pneumonia or acute respiratory distress syndrome; these four patients died despite receiving intensive care. In our survey, the prognosis of RSV disease in pediatric hematological malignancies was poor, and progression of LRTI in particular was associated with high mortality. In the absence of RSV-specific therapy, effective prevention and treatment strategies for severe RSV disease must be investigated.

  9. FLT3 is implicated in cytarabine transport by human equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1 in pediatric acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Català, Albert; Pastor-Anglada, Marçal; Caviedes-Cárdenas, Liska; Malatesta, Roberta; Rives, Susana; Vega-García, Nerea

    2016-01-01

    FLT3 abnormalities are negative prognostic markers in acute leukemia. Infant leukemias are a subgroup with frequent MLL (KMT2A) rearrangements, FLT3 overexpression and high sensitivity to cytarabine, but dismal prognosis. Cytarabine is transported into cells by Human Equilibrative Nucleoside Transporter-1 (hENT1, SLC29A1), but the mechanisms that regulate hENT1 in acute leukemia have been scarcely studied. We explored the expression and functional link between FLT3 and main cytarabine transporters in 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and MLL rearrangement (ALL-MLL+) and other subtypes of leukemia, and in leukemia cell lines. A significant positive correlation was found between FLT3 and hENT1 expression in patients. Cytarabine uptake into cells was mediated mainly by hENT1, hENT2 and hCNT1. hENT1-mediated uptake of cytarabine was transiently abolished by the FLT3 inhibitor PKC412, and this effect was associated with decreased hENT1 mRNA and protein levels. Noticeably, the cytotoxicity of cytarabine was lower when cells were first exposed to FLT3 inhibitors (PKC412 or AC220), probably due to decreased hENT1 activity, but we observed a higher cytotoxic effect if FLT3 inhibitors were administered after cytarabine. FLT3 regulates hENT1 activity and thereby affects cytarabine cytotoxicity. The sequence of administration of cytarabine and FLT3 inhibitors is important to maintain their efficacy. PMID:27391351

  10. Trisomy 8 in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: A NOPHO-AML study.

    PubMed

    Laursen, Anne Cathrine Lund; Sandahl, Julie Damgaard; Kjeldsen, Eigil; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Asdahl, Peter; Ha, Shau-Yin; Heldrup, Jesper; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Jónsson, Ólafur G; Lausen, Birgitte; Palle, Josefine; Zeller, Bernward; Forestier, Erik; Hasle, Henrik

    2016-09-01

    Trisomy 8 (+8) is a common cytogenetic aberration in acute myeloid leukemia (AML); however, the impact of +8 in pediatric AML is largely unknown. We retrospectively investigated 609 patients from the NOPHO-AML database to determine the clinical and cytogenetic characteristics of +8 in pediatric AML and to investigate its prognostic impact. Complete cytogenetic data were available in 596 patients (98%) aged 0-18 years, diagnosed from 1993 to 2012, and treated according to the NOPHO-AML 1993 and 2004 protocols in the Nordic countries and Hong Kong. We identified 86 patients (14%) with +8. Trisomy 8 was combined with other cytogenetic aberrations in 68 patients (11%) (+8 other) and in 18 patients (3%), it was the sole abnormality (+8 alone). Trisomy 8 was associated with FAB M5 (36%) but otherwise clinically comparable with non-trisomy 8 patients. Trisomy 8 was favorable in patients of young age and with t(9;11). Trisomy 8 alone was associated with older age (median age 10.1 years), FAB M2 (33%), and FLT3-ITD mutations (58%). The 5-year event-free survival for patients with +8 alone was 50% and 5-year overall survival was 75%. In conclusion, +8 is one of the most common cytogenetic aberrations in pediatric AML. Trisomy 8 positive AML is a heterogeneous group and the majority of cases have additional cytogenetic aberrations. Patients with +8 alone differed from patients with +8 other and were associated with older age, FAB M2, and FLT3-ITD aberrations. There were no differences in survival despite the more frequent occurrence of FLT3-ITD in +8 alone. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. TSER polymorphism is not associated with risk of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Zhaohua; Lou, Dan; Ruan, Li

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Accumulating studies have explored the effect of thymidylate synthase enhancer region (TSER) variation on risk of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) with controversial results. Therefore, this quantitative meta-analysis was performed to assess synthetically the association of TSER variation with susceptibility to develop pediatric ALL. Methods: The PubMed, ScienceDirect, Google Scholar, Wanfang Database, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure were systematically retrieved to obtain the published case-control studies about the relationship between TSER variation and pediatric ALL risk. The quality assessment of the included studies was preformed and relevant information was collected. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were applied to evaluate the strength of association. Results: This meta-analysis finally included 2681 children with ALL and 3854 matched controls from 11 investigations. The quantitative synthesis results found no significant association between TSER variation and susceptibility to pediatric ALL in overall comparisons under 5 genetic models (2R/3R vs 3R/3R: OR = 0.95, 95% CI = 0.84–1.07, P = 0.41; 2R/2R vs 3R/3R: OR = 0.99, 95% CI = 0.84–1.16, P = 0.90; 2R2R vs 3R/3R+2R/3R: OR = 1.05, 95% CI = 0.92–1.21, P = 0.45; 2R/3R+2R/2R vs 3R/3R: OR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.87–1.09, P = 0.63; 2R vs 3R: OR = 1.03, 95% CI = 0.92–1.15, P = 0.61). Similarly, there was no significant association existed in the stratification analyses according to ethnicity, control source, and quality score. Conclusion: This meta-analysis shows that TSER variation is not related to the development risk of pediatric ALL. PMID:28207544

  12. Clinical Courses of Two Pediatric Patients with Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia Harboring the CBFA2T3-GLIS2 Fusion Gene

    PubMed Central

    Ishibashi, Mayu; Yokosuka, Tomoko; Yanagimachi, Masakatsu D.; Iwasaki, Fuminori; Tsujimoto, Shin-ichi; Sasaki, Koji; Takeuchi, Masanobu; Tanoshima, Reo; Kato, Hiromi; Kajiwara, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Fumiko; Goto, Hiroaki; Yokota, Shumpei

    2016-01-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) in children without Down syndrome (DS) has an extremely poor outcome with 3-year survival of less than 40%, whereas AMKL in children with DS has an excellent survival rate. Recently, a novel recurrent translocation involving CBFA2T3 and GLIS2 was identified in about 30% of children with non-DS AMKL, and the fusion gene was reported as a strong poor prognostic factor in pediatric AMKL. We report the difficult clinical courses of pediatric patients with AMKL harboring the CBFA2T3-GLIS2 fusion gene. PMID:27094503

  13. The role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in pediatric lymph-node acute lymphoblastic leukemia involvement.

    PubMed

    Cistaro, Angelina; Saglio, Francesco; Asaftei, Sebastian; Fania, Piercarlo; Berger, Massimo; Fagioli, Franca

    2011-01-01

    In pediatric oncology, positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is emerging as an essential diagnostic tool in characterizing suspicious neoplastic lesions and staging malignant diseases. Most studies regarding the possible role of FDG-PET/CT in the management of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients are limited to adults. Here we report a pediatric patient with recurrent ALL, in which FDG-PET/CT was used both to define more precisely the cause of lymphadenopathy and to assess the effect of the second-line therapy.

  14. Improved outcome of pediatric patients with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia in the AML-BFM 04 trial.

    PubMed

    Schweitzer, Jana; Zimmermann, Martin; Rasche, Mareike; von Neuhoff, Christine; Creutzig, Ursula; Dworzak, Michael; Reinhardt, Dirk; Klusmann, Jan-Henning

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the treatment of children with acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) using intensified treatment protocols, clear prognostic indicators, and treatment recommendations for this acute myeloid leukemia (AML) subgroup are yet to be defined. Here, we report the outcome of 97 pediatric patients with de novo AMKL (excluding Down syndrome [DS]) enrolled in the prospective multicenter studies AML-BFM 98 and AML-BFM 04 (1998-2014). AMKL occurred in 7.4 % of pediatric AML cases, at younger age (median 1.44 years) and with lower white blood cell count (mean 16.5 × 10(9)/L) as compared to other AML subgroups. With 60 ± 5 %, children with AMKL had a lower 5-year overall survival (5-year OS; vs. 68 ± 1 %, P log rank = 0.038). Yet, we achieved an improved 5-year OS in AML-BFM 04 compared to AML-BFM 98 (70 ± 6 % vs. 45 ± 8 %, P log rank = 0.041). Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission did not provide a significant survival benefit (5-year OS 70 ± 11 % vs. 63 ± 6 %; P Mantel-Byar = 0.85). Cytogenetic data were available for n = 78 patients. AMKL patients with gain of chromosome 21 had a superior 5-year OS (80 ± 9 %, P log rank = 0.034), whereas translocation t(1;22)(p13;q13) was associated with an inferior 5-year event-free survival (38 ± 17 %, P log rank = 0.04). However, multivariate analysis showed that treatment response (bone marrow morphology on day 15 and 28) was the only independent prognostic marker (RR = 4.39; 95 % CI, 1.97-9.78). Interestingly, GATA1-mutations were detected in six patients (11 %) without previously known trisomy 21. Thus, AMKL (excluding DS) remains an AML subgroup with inferior outcome. Nevertheless, with intensive therapy regimens, a steep increase in the survival rates was achieved.

  15. Current Concepts in Pediatric Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bernt, Kathrin M.; Hunger, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    The t(9;22)(q34;q11) or Philadelphia chromosome creates a BCR–ABL1 fusion gene encoding for a chimeric BCR–ABL1 protein. It is present in 3–4% of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL), and about 25% of adult ALL cases. Prior to the advent of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI), Ph+ ALL was associated with a very poor prognosis despite the use of intensive chemotherapy and frequently hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) in first remission. The development of TKIs revolutionized the therapy of Ph+ ALL. Addition of the first generation ABL1 class TKI imatinib to intensive chemotherapy dramatically increased the survival for children with Ph+ ALL and established that many patients can be cured without HSCT. In parallel, the mechanistic understanding of Ph+ ALL expanded exponentially through careful mapping of pathways downstream of BCR–ABL1, the discovery of mutations in master regulators of B-cell development such as IKZF1 (Ikaros), PAX5, and early B-cell factor (EBF), the recognition of the complex clonal architecture of Ph+ ALL, and the delineation of genomic, epigenetic, and signaling abnormalities contributing to relapse and resistance. Still, many important basic and clinical questions remain unanswered. Current clinical trials are testing second generation TKIs in patients with newly diagnosed Ph+ ALL. Neither the optimal duration of therapy nor the optimal chemotherapy backbone are currently defined. The role of HSCT in first remission and post-transplant TKI therapy also require further study. In addition, it will be crucial to continue to dig deeper into understanding Ph+ ALL at a mechanistic level, and translate findings into complementary targeted approaches. Expanding targeted therapies hold great promise to decrease toxicity and improve survival in this high-risk disease, which provides a paradigm for how targeted therapies can be incorporated into treatment of other high-risk leukemias. PMID:24724051

  16. Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) after Induction Treatment Predicts Survival of Pediatric Patients with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Tamas; Müller, Judit; Erdelyi, Daniel J; Csoka, Monika; Kovacs, Gabor T

    2017-01-30

    Absolute Lymphocyte Count (ALC) has been recently established as a prognostic factor of survival in pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL). A retrospective analysis of 132 patients treated according the BFM - ALLIC 2002 protocol was performed in a single institution. A possible association between ALC values and Overall Survival (OS) or Event-Free Survival (EFS) was evaluated at multiple time points during induction chemotherapy. ALC higher than 350 cells/μL measured on the 33th day of induction was associated with better Overall- and Event-Free Survival in both Kaplan-Meier (OS 88.6% vs. 40%; p < 0.001 / EFS 81.6% vs. 30%; p < 0.001) and Cox regression (OS HR 8.77 (3.31-23.28); p < 0.001) and EFS HR 6.61 (2.79-15.63); p < 0.001) analyses. There was no association between survival and measured ALC values from earlier time points (day of diagnosis, days 8 and 15) of induction therapy. Patients with low ALC values tend to have higher risk (MR or HR groups) and a higher age at diagnosis (>10 years). With help of day 33 ALC values of 350 cells/μL cutoff it was possible to refine day 33 flow cytometry (FC) Minimal Residual Disease (MRD) results within the negative cohort: higher ALC values were significantly associated with better survival. ALC on day 33 (350 cells/μL) remained prognostic for OS and EFS in multivariate analysis after adjusting it for age, cytogenetics, immunophenotype and FC MRD of induction day 33. According to these findings ALC on day 33 of induction is a strong predictor of survival in pediatric ALL.

  17. Treatment delay and the risk of relapse in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Amelia; Collins, Anna; Fox, Kahlia; Shields, Sarah; Ritchie, Petra; Kirby, Maria; Revesz, Tamas

    2017-03-13

    Delays or interruptions in chemotherapy due to toxicity such as neutropenia or severe infections are common in the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Based on the reports of worse outcomes in children with poorer compliance with therapy, there has been concern that toxicity-induced therapy interruptions could also compromise treatment outcome. In a retrospective study of treatment delays in our hospital between 2003 and 2013, the case notes of 141 patients were reviewed. The cumulative lengths of delays during the whole length of chemotherapy, during the intensive phase of treatment, and during maintenance treatment were analyzed. Within these categories, delays were split between less and more than the median value. The risk of relapse did not differ between patients with a longer or shorter delay during the total length of treatment or during the intensive phase. In addition, there was a trend when comparing patients above vs below the mean in length of treatment delays during maintenance, and there was a statistically significant difference in relapses when comparing patients in the lowest and highest quartiles of maintenance delays, with fewer relapses among those patients in the highest quartile for treatment delays.

  18. The mutational landscape in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia deciphered by whole genome sequencing.

    PubMed

    Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Nordlund, Jessica; Ekman, Diana; Johansson, Anna; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Raine, Amanda; Övernäs, Elin; Dahlberg, Johan; Wahlberg, Per; Henriksson, Niklas; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Frost, Britt-Marie; Grandér, Dan; Heyman, Mats; Larsson, Rolf; Palle, Josefine; Söderhäll, Stefan; Forestier, Erik; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Berglund, Eva C

    2015-01-01

    Genomic characterization of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has identified distinct patterns of genes and pathways altered in patients with well-defined genetic aberrations. To extend the spectrum of known somatic variants in ALL, we performed whole genome and transcriptome sequencing of three B-cell precursor patients, of which one carried the t(12;21)ETV6-RUNX1 translocation and two lacked a known primary genetic aberration, and one T-ALL patient. We found that each patient had a unique genome, with a combination of well-known and previously undetected genomic aberrations. By targeted sequencing in 168 patients, we identified KMT2D and KIF1B as novel putative driver genes. We also identified a putative regulatory non-coding variant that coincided with overexpression of the growth factor MDK. Our results contribute to an increased understanding of the biological mechanisms that lead to ALL and suggest that regulatory variants may be more important for cancer development than recognized to date. The heterogeneity of the genetic aberrations in ALL renders whole genome sequencing particularly well suited for analysis of somatic variants in both research and diagnostic applications.

  19. Banding cytogenetic analysis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a Brazilian population

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cytogenetic studies in Brazilian population about childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, are scarce. Moreover, Brazilian race is very heterogeneous and is made by the confluence of people of several different origins, from the original Native Brazilians, with the influx of Portuguese colonizers, Black African slaves, and recent European, Arab and Japanese immigration. The purpose of this prospective, multicentric study was to assess the sociodemographic, clinic and cytogenetic characteristics of the children treated for ALL in the Northeast region of Brazil. Results This study includes thirty patients between 4 months and 17 years old treated for ALL from January 1st, 2009 to November 30th, 2010. Cytogenetic analysis showed that in nineteen out of thirty patients (64%) presented some chromosome abnormalities, in which 53% corresponds to numerical abnormalities, 21% structural and numerical abnormalities, and 26% only structural changes. Moreover, seven patients presented complexes karyotype not yet described in the literature. Taken together these results show the importance of the cytogenetic analysis in ALL pediatric patients and illustrates that the studied population presented unexpected complexes karyotypes which were correlated to poor outcome. Conclusion The results demonstrate the importance of banding cytogenetics for ALL diagnosis despite the use of most modern techniques such as FISH and aCGH, and provide reliable insight into the ALL in Brazil. PMID:24025689

  20. MicroRNA biomarker identification for pediatric acute myeloid leukemia based on a novel bioinformatics model.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wenying; Xu, Lihua; Sun, Zhandong; Lin, Yuxin; Zhang, Wenyu; Chen, Jiajia; Hu, Shaoyan; Shen, Bairong

    2015-09-22

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in children is a complex and heterogeneous disease. The identification of reliable and stable molecular biomarkers for diagnosis, especially early diagnosis, remains a significant therapeutic challenge. Aberrant microRNA expression could be used for cancer diagnosis and treatment selection. Here, we describe a novel bioinformatics model for the prediction of microRNA biomarkers for the diagnosis of paediatric AML based on computational functional analysis of the microRNA regulatory network substructure. microRNA-196b, microRNA-155 and microRNA-25 were identified as putative diagnostic biomarkers for pediatric AML. Further systematic analysis confirmed the association of the predicted microRNAs with the leukemogenesis of AML. In vitro q-PCR experiments showed that microRNA-155 is significantly overexpressed in children with AML and microRNA-196b is significantly overexpressed in subgroups M4-M5 of the French-American-British classification system. These results suggest that microRNA-155 is a potential diagnostic biomarker for all subgroups of paediatric AML, whereas microRNA-196b is specific for subgroups M4-M5.

  1. Central nervous system complications during treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a single pediatric institution.

    PubMed

    Parasole, Rosanna; Petruzziello, Fara; Menna, Giuseppe; Mangione, Argia; Cianciulli, Emilio; Buffardi, Salvatore; Marchese, Luciano; Nastro, Anna; Misuraca, Aldo; Poggi, Vincenzo

    2010-06-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) complications during treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remain a challenging clinical problem. Outcome improvement with more intensive chemotherapy has significantly increased the incidence and severity of adverse events. This study analyzed the incidence of neurological complications during ALL treatment in a single pediatric institution, focusing on clinical, radiological, and electrophysiological findings. Exclusion criteria included CNS leukemic infiltration at diagnosis, therapy-related peripheral neuropathy, late-onset encephalopathy, or long-term neurocognitive defects. During a 9-year period, we retrospectively collected 27 neurological events (11%) in as many patients, from 253 children enrolled in the ALL front-line protocol. CNS complications included posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (n = 10), stroke (n = 5), temporal lobe epilepsy (n = 2), high-dose methotrexate toxicity (n = 2), syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion (n = 1), and other unclassified events (n = 7). In conclusion, CNS complications are frequent events during ALL therapy, and require rapid detection and prompt treatment to limit permanent damage.

  2. Transcriptome sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia identifies fusion genes associated with distinct DNA methylation profiles.

    PubMed

    Marincevic-Zuniga, Yanara; Dahlberg, Johan; Nilsson, Sara; Raine, Amanda; Nystedt, Sara; Lindqvist, Carl Mårten; Berglund, Eva C; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Cavelier, Lucia; Forestier, Erik; Heyman, Mats; Lönnerholm, Gudmar; Nordlund, Jessica; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2017-08-14

    Structural chromosomal rearrangements that lead to expressed fusion genes are a hallmark of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this study, we performed transcriptome sequencing of 134 primary ALL patient samples to comprehensively detect fusion transcripts. We combined fusion gene detection with genome-wide DNA methylation analysis, gene expression profiling, and targeted sequencing to determine molecular signatures of emerging ALL subtypes. We identified 64 unique fusion events distributed among 80 individual patients, of which over 50% have not previously been reported in ALL. Although the majority of the fusion genes were found only in a single patient, we identified several recurrent fusion gene families defined by promiscuous fusion gene partners, such as ETV6, RUNX1, PAX5, and ZNF384, or recurrent fusion genes, such as DUX4-IGH. Our data show that patients harboring these fusion genes displayed characteristic genome-wide DNA methylation and gene expression signatures in addition to distinct patterns in single nucleotide variants and recurrent copy number alterations. Our study delineates the fusion gene landscape in pediatric ALL, including both known and novel fusion genes, and highlights fusion gene families with shared molecular etiologies, which may provide additional information for prognosis and therapeutic options in the future.

  3. Impact of registration on clinical trials on infection risk in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dix, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bowes, Lynette; Cellot, Sonia; Ethier, Marie-Chantal; Feusner, Jim; Gillmeister, Biljana; Johnston, Donna L; Lewis, Victor; Michon, Bruno; Mitchell, David; Portwine, Carol; Price, Victoria; Silva, Mariana; Stobart, Kent; Yanofsky, Rochelle; Zelcer, Shayna; Beyene, Joseph; Sung, Lillian

    2016-04-01

    Little is known about the impact of enrollment on therapeutic clinical trials on adverse event rates. Primary objective was to describe the impact of clinical trial registration on sterile site microbiologically documented infection for children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted a multicenter cohort study that included children aged ≤18 years with de novo AML. Primary outcome was microbiologically documented sterile site infection. Infection rates were compared between those registered and not registered on clinical trials. Five hundred seventy-four children with AML were included of which 198 (34.5%) were registered on a therapeutic clinical trial. Overall, 400 (69.7%) had at least one sterile site microbiologically documented infection. In multiple regression, registration on clinical trials was independently associated with a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection [adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.53; p = 0.040] and viridans group streptococcal infection (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08-1.98; p = 0.015). Registration on trials was not associated with Gram-negative or invasive fungal infections. Children with newly diagnosed AML enrolled on clinical trials have a higher risk of microbiologically documented sterile site infection. This information may impact on supportive care practices in pediatric AML.

  4. Heterogeneity in mechanisms of emergent resistance in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sutton, Rosemary; Venn, Nicola C.; Bendak, Katerina; Anderson, Denise; Marshall, Glenn M.; Cole, Catherine H.

    2016-01-01

    Relapse in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) remains a significant clinical problem and is thought to be associated with clonal selection during treatment. In this study we used an established pre-clinical model of induction therapy to increase our understanding of the effect of engraftment and chemotherapy on clonal selection and acquisition of drug resistance in vivo. Immune-deficient mice were engrafted with patient diagnostic specimens and exposed to a repeated combination therapy consisting of vincristine, dexamethasone, L-asparaginase and daunorubicin. Any re-emergence of disease following therapy was shown to be associated with resistance to dexamethasone, no resistance was observed to the other three drugs. Immunoglobulin/T-cell receptor gene rearrangements closely matched those in respective diagnosis and relapse patient specimens, highlighting that these clonal markers do not fully reflect the biological changes associated with drug resistance. Gene expression profiling revealed the significant underlying heterogeneity of dexamethasone-resistant xenografts. Alterations were observed in a large number of biological pathways, yet no dominant signature was common to all lines. These findings indicate that the biological changes associated with T-ALL relapse and resistance are stochastic and highly individual, and underline the importance of using sophisticated molecular techniques or single cell analyses in developing personalized approaches to therapy. PMID:27623214

  5. ETO2-GLIS2 Hijacks Transcriptional Complexes to Drive Cellular Identity and Self-Renewal in Pediatric Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Thirant, Cécile; Ignacimouttou, Cathy; Lopez, Cécile K; Diop, M'Boyba; Le Mouël, Lou; Thiollier, Clarisse; Siret, Aurélie; Dessen, Phillipe; Aid, Zakia; Rivière, Julie; Rameau, Philippe; Lefebvre, Céline; Khaled, Mehdi; Leverger, Guy; Ballerini, Paola; Petit, Arnaud; Raslova, Hana; Carmichael, Catherine L; Kile, Benjamin T; Soler, Eric; Crispino, John D; Wichmann, Christian; Pflumio, Françoise; Schwaller, Jürg; Vainchenker, William; Lobry, Camille; Droin, Nathalie; Bernard, Olivier A; Malinge, Sébastien; Mercher, Thomas

    2017-03-13

    Chimeric transcription factors are a hallmark of human leukemia, but the molecular mechanisms by which they block differentiation and promote aberrant self-renewal remain unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the ETO2-GLIS2 fusion oncoprotein, which is found in aggressive acute megakaryoblastic leukemia, confers megakaryocytic identity via the GLIS2 moiety while both ETO2 and GLIS2 domains are required to drive increased self-renewal properties. ETO2-GLIS2 directly binds DNA to control transcription of associated genes by upregulation of expression and interaction with the ETS-related ERG protein at enhancer elements. Importantly, specific interference with ETO2-GLIS2 oligomerization reverses the transcriptional activation at enhancers and promotes megakaryocytic differentiation, providing a relevant interface to target in this poor-prognosis pediatric leukemia.

  6. The need for evidence based nutritional guidelines for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients: acute and long-term following treatment.

    PubMed

    Owens, Joyce L; Hanson, Sheila J; McArthur, Jennifer A; Mikhailov, Theresa A

    2013-10-31

    High survival rates for pediatric leukemia are very promising. With regard to treatment, children tend to be able to withstand a more aggressive treatment protocol than adults. The differences in both treatment modalities and outcomes between children and adults make extrapolation of adult studies to children inappropriate. The higher success is associated with a significant number of children experiencing nutrition-related adverse effects both in the short and long term after treatment. Specific treatment protocols have been shown to deplete nutrient levels, in particular antioxidants. The optimal nutrition prescription during, after and long-term following cancer treatment is unknown. This review article will provide an overview of the known physiologic processes of pediatric leukemia and how they contribute to the complexity of performing nutritional assessment in this population. It will also discuss known nutrition-related consequences, both short and long term in pediatric leukemia patients. Since specific antioxidants have been shown to be depleted as a consequence of therapy, the role of oxidative stress in the pediatric leukemia population will also be explored. More pediatric studies are needed to develop evidence based therapeutic interventions for nutritional complications of leukemia and its treatment.

  7. Utility of peripheral blood immunophenotyping by flow cytometry in the diagnosis of pediatric acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Metrock, Laura K; Summers, Ryan J; Park, Sunita; Gillespie, Scott; Castellino, Sharon; Lew, Glen; Keller, Frank G

    2017-10-01

    Childhood acute leukemia is traditionally diagnosed from a bone marrow aspirate (BMA). New-onset acute leukemia patients do not always have visible circulating blasts in the peripheral blood (PB) at diagnosis. While the role of bone marrow flow cytometry for the diagnosis of acute leukemia is well established, the utility of PB flow cytometry (PBFC) is unknown. We performed a single-institution retrospective analysis to compare PBFC versus BMA in establishing or excluding a diagnosis of childhood acute leukemia. We retrospectively identified 485 PBFC samples with concurrent BMA from 2008 to 2013. Results of four-color flow cytometry for immunophenotypic characterization of leukemic versus nonclonal disease were characterized. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated among patients without a known diagnosis or prior therapy. Among 485 samples eligible for analysis, 120 had negative PBFC and BMA, 359 had positive PBFC and BMA, 3 had negative PBFC and positive BMA, and 3 had positive PBFC and negative BMA. There were small but significant differences in sensitivity (100 vs. 93.8%; P = 0.002) and positive predictive value (100 vs. 93.8%; P = 0.002) favoring BMA over PBFC among those demonstrating absence of circulating morphologic blasts. PBFC has high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of childhood acute leukemia. The predictive value of PBFC remains high for patients without visible circulating blasts and may enhance the diagnostic process for determining the indications for marrow testing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. [Dentigerous cyst in a pediatric patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia type 1].

    PubMed

    Acosta-Rangel, Monica C; Barrera-Vera, Héctor; Franco-Ornelas, Sergio; Aldape-Barrios, Beatriz; Castro-García, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    To report medical and surgical treatment in a patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia type 1 who developed a dangerous cyst. A male of 8 years with acute lymphoblastic leukemia type 1, whose treatment was in induction. In one month, the patient presented a facial asymmetry due to mandibular growth and acute pain, hyperthermia and malaise. In the examination, we identified lip parestesia, a second temporal molar treated with chromium steel and expansion involving the cortical of the lateral permanent incisive until the first permanent molar was identified. Since we suspected of bone metastasis, we performed an orthopantomography. We established the diagnosis of dentigerous cyst. Enucleation, curettage, and extraction of decay teeth were done in order to avoid and prevent infectious sources. The most frequent clinical manifestations of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are anemia, leukopenia, and thrombocytopenia. This leukemia may be manifested also as infiltration of the jaw bone. In this case, the results showed no presence of bone metastasis. As a first step before to begin treatment, the physician ought to make sure that the patient is free of infectious processes anywhere that may influence the clinical development of leukemia. Due to the surgical intervention and to a successful bone marrow transplant, the patient is on remission.

  9. Decitabine in Treating Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with NPM1 mutations is characterized by a gene expression profile with dysregulated HOX gene expression distinct from MLL-rearranged leukemias.

    PubMed

    Mullighan, C G; Kennedy, A; Zhou, X; Radtke, I; Phillips, L A; Shurtleff, S A; Downing, J R

    2007-09-01

    Somatic mutations in nucleophosmin (NPM1) occur in approximately 35% of adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML). To assess the frequency of NPM1 mutations in pediatric AML, we sequenced NPM1 in the diagnostic blasts from 93 pediatric AML patients. Six cases harbored NPM1 mutations, with each case lacking common cytogenetic abnormalities. To explore the phenotype of the AMLs with NPM1 mutations, gene expression profiles were obtained using Affymetrix U133A microarrays. NPM1 mutations were associated with increased expression of multiple homeobox genes including HOXA9, A10, B2, B6 and MEIS1. As dysregulated homeobox gene expression is also a feature of MLL-rearranged leukemia, the gene expression signatures of NPM1-mutated and MLL-rearranged leukemias were compared. Significant differences were identified between these leukemia subtypes including the expression of different HOX genes, with NPM1-mutated AML showing higher levels of expression of HOXB2, B3, B6 and D4. These results confirm recent reports of perturbed HOX expression in NPM1-mutated adult AML, and provide the first evidence that the NPM1-mutated signature is distinct from MLL-rearranged AML. These findings suggest that mutated NPM1 leads to dysregulated HOX expression via a different mechanism than MLL rearrangement.

  11. Molecular Targeting of the Oncoprotein PLK1 in Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia: RO3280, a Novel PLK1 Inhibitor, Induces Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Na-Na; Li, Zhi-Heng; Zhao, He; Tao, Yan-Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Lu, Jun; Cao, Lan; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Fang, Fang; Su, Guang-Hao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Gang; Li, Yi-Ping; Xu, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Hui-Ting; Wu, Yi; Jin, Mei-Fang; Liu, Lin; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Hu, Shao-Yan; Zhu, Xue-Ming; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Polo-like kinase 1 (PLK1) is highly expressed in many cancers and therefore a biomarker of transformation and potential target for the development of cancer-specific small molecule drugs. RO3280 was recently identified as a novel PLK1 inhibitor; however its therapeutic effects in leukemia treatment are still unknown. We found that the PLK1 protein was highly expressed in leukemia cell lines as well as 73.3% (11/15) of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) samples. PLK1 mRNA expression was significantly higher in AML samples compared with control samples (82.95 ± 110.28 vs. 6.36 ± 6.35; p < 0.001). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis revealed that shorter survival time correlated with high tumor PLK1 expression (p = 0.002). The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of RO3280 for acute leukemia cells was between 74 and 797 nM. The IC50 of RO3280 in primary acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and AML cells was between 35.49 and 110.76 nM and 52.80 and 147.50 nM, respectively. RO3280 induced apoptosis and cell cycle disorder in leukemia cells. RO3280 treatment regulated several apoptosis-associated genes. The regulation of DCC, CDKN1A, BTK, and SOCS2 was verified by western blot. These results provide insights into the potential use of RO3280 for AML therapy; however, the underlying mechanisms remain to be determined. PMID:25574601

  12. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ... et al. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults. In: Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice. 6th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: ...

  13. Outpatient consolidation chemotherapy in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Bakhshi, Sameer; Singh, Preetpaul; Swaroop, Chetanya

    2009-10-01

    To assess the outcomes of outpatient high dose cytosine arabinoside consolidation cycles in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients in comparison to inpatient treatment. We retrospectively analyzed 90 cycles of AML consolidation given to 30 patients between July 2003 and July 2007. Median age was 8 years (range 1.5-15) and 22/30 (73.3%) were males. Sixty-nine of 90 (76.7%) cycles were given on an ambulatory basis; readmission occurred in 25/69 (36.2%) and there was one death. The outpatient cycles in comparison to the inpatient cycles required significantly fewer invasive blood investigations (p<0.001) but had comparable number of blood products administered as supportive therapy. There was no significant difference in the frequency of granulocyte colony stimulating factor usage and recovery time of absolute neutrophil count and platelet count. The incidence of febrile neutropenia though was comparable in the groups (72.5% outpatient versus 76.2% inpatient), but the duration (p=0.003) and subsequent therapeutic antifungal usage (p=0.001) was significantly more in inpatient administered cycles. Second line antibiotics were needed in 16/50 (32%) outpatient episodes of febrile neutropenia in contrast to 10/16 (72.5%) episodes of febrile neutropenia in inpatient courses (p=0.030). Outpatient AML consolidation therapy is safe and feasible in children. It appears to result in less frequent invasive blood studies; shorter duration of febrile neutropenia and consequently less antimicrobial and antifungal usage as compared to inpatient consolidation cycles. To our knowledge, this report is the first of its kind looking specifically at outpatient consolidation chemotherapy in AML.

  14. Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Faderl, Stefan; O’Brien, Susan; Pui, Ching-Hon; Stock, Wendy; Wetzler, Meir; Hoelzer, Dieter; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2016-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a clonal expansion of hematopoietic blasts, is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising many entities for which distinct treatment strategies are pursued. Although ALL is a success story in pediatric oncology, results in adults lag behind those in children. An expansion of new drugs, more reliable immunologic and molecular techniques for the assessment of minimal residual disease, and efforts at more precise risk stratification are generating new aspects of adult ALL therapy. For this review, the authors summarized pertinent and recent literature on ALL biology and therapy, and they discuss current strategies and potential implications of novel approaches to the management of adult ALL. PMID:20101737

  15. Pediatric non-Down syndrome acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is characterized by distinct genomic subsets with varying outcomes.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Jasmijn D E; Branstetter, Cristyn; Ma, Jing; Li, Yongjin; Walsh, Michael P; Cheng, Jinjun; Obulkasim, Askar; Dang, Jinjun; Easton, John; Verboon, Lonneke J; Mulder, Heather L; Zimmermann, Martin; Koss, Cary; Gupta, Pankaj; Edmonson, Michael; Rusch, Michael; Lim, Joshua Yew Suang; Reinhardt, Katarina; Pigazzi, Martina; Song, Guangchun; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Shih, Lee-Yung; Liang, Der-Cherng; Halene, Stephanie; Krause, Diane S; Zhang, Jinghui; Downing, James R; Locatelli, Franco; Reinhardt, Dirk; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M; Zwaan, C Michel; Fornerod, Maarten; Gruber, Tanja A

    2017-03-01

    Acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) is a subtype of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in which cells morphologically resemble abnormal megakaryoblasts. While rare in adults, AMKL accounts for 4-15% of newly diagnosed childhood AML cases. AMKL in individuals without Down syndrome (non-DS-AMKL) is frequently associated with poor clinical outcomes. Previous efforts have identified chimeric oncogenes in a substantial number of non-DS-AMKL cases, including RBM15-MKL1, CBFA2T3-GLIS2, KMT2A gene rearrangements, and NUP98-KDM5A. However, the etiology of 30-40% of cases remains unknown. To better understand the genomic landscape of non-DS-AMKL, we performed RNA and exome sequencing on specimens from 99 patients (75 pediatric and 24 adult). We demonstrate that pediatric non-DS-AMKL is a heterogeneous malignancy that can be divided into seven subgroups with varying outcomes. These subgroups are characterized by chimeric oncogenes with cooperating mutations in epigenetic and kinase signaling genes. Overall, these data shed light on the etiology of AMKL and provide useful information for the tailoring of treatment.

  16. Applying molecular epidemiology in pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Joshua D

    2016-02-01

    Molecular epidemiology is the study of genetic and environmental risk for disease, with much effort centered on cancer. Childhood leukemia occurs in nearly a third of all patients newly diagnosed with pediatric cancer. only a small percentage of these new cases of childhood leukemia are associated with high penetrant hereditary cancer syndromes. Childhood leukemia, especially acute lymphoblastic leukemia, has been associated with a dysregulated immune system due to delayed infectious exposure at a young age. Identical twins with childhood leukemia suggest that acute lymphoblastic leukemia begins in utero and that the concordant presentation is due to a shared preleukemia subclone via placental transfer. Investigation of single nucleotide polymorphisms within candidate genes find that leukemia risk may be attributed to population-based polymorphisms affecting folate metabolism, xenobiotic metabolism, DNA repair, immunity, and B-cell development. More recently, genome-wide association studies for leukemia risk has led investigators to genes associated with B-cell development. When describing leukemia predisposition due to hereditary cancer syndromes, the following 6 categories become apparent on the basis of biology and clinical presentation: (1) genetic instability/DNA repair syndromes, (2) cell cycle/differentiation syndromes, (3) bone marrow failure syndromes, (4) telomere maintenance syndromes, (5) immunodeficiency syndromes, and (6) transcription factor syndromes and pure familial leukemia. understanding the molecular epidemiology of childhood leukemia can affect the treatment and tumor surveillance strategies for these high risk patients and their family members.

  17. Use of Minimal Residual Disease Assessment to Redefine Induction Failure in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, David; Moorman, Anthony V; Wade, Rachel; Hancock, Jeremy; Tan, Ronald M R; Bartram, Jack; Moppett, John; Schwab, Claire; Patrick, Katharine; Harrison, Christine J; Hough, Rachael; Goulden, Nick; Vora, Ajay; Samarasinghe, Sujith

    2017-02-20

    Purpose Our aim was to determine the role of end-of-induction (EOI) minimal residual disease (MRD) assessment in the identification and stratification of induction failure in patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to identify genetic abnormalities that drive disease in these patients. Patients and Methods Analysis included 3,113 patients who were treated in the Medical Research Council UKALL2003 multicenter randomized trial (NCT00222612) between 2003 and 2011. MRD was measured by using standardized real-time quantitative PCR. Median follow-up was 5 years 9 months. Results Fifty-nine patients (1.9%) had morphologic induction failure with 5-year event-free survival (EFS) of 50.7% (95% CI, 37.4 to 64.0) and 5-year overall survival of 57.7% (95% CI, 44.2 to 71.2). Of these, a small proportion of patients with M2 marrow (6 of 44) and a low EOI MRD level (< 0.01%) had 5-year EFS of 100%. Conversely, among patients with morphologic remission 2.3% (61 of 2,633) had high MRD (≥ 5%) and 5-year EFS of 47.0% (95% CI, 32.9 to 61.1), which was similar to those with morphologic induction failure. Redefining induction failure to include morphologic induction failure and/or MRD ≥ 5% identified 3.9% (120 of 3,133 patients) of the trial cohort with 5-year EFS of 48.0% (95% CI, 39.3 to 58.6). Induction failure (morphologic or MRD ≥ 5%) occurred most frequently in T-ALL (10.1%; 39 of 386 T-ALL cases) and B-other ALL, that is, lacking established chromosomal abnormalities (5.6%; 43 of 772 B-other cases). Genetic testing within the B-other group revealed the presence of PDGFRB gene fusions, particularly EBF1-PDGFRB, in almost one third of B-other ALL cases. Conclusion Integration of EOI MRD level with morphology identifies induction failure more precisely than morphology alone. Prevalence of EBF1-PDGFRB fusions in this group highlights the importance of genetic screening to identify abnormalities that may be targets for novel agents.

  18. Population pharmacokinetics and pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics of bendamustine in pediatric patients with relapsed/refractory acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Darwish, Mona; Megason, Gail; Bond, Mary; Hellriegel, Edward; Robertson, Philmore; Grasela, Thaddeus; Phillips, Luann

    2014-11-01

    The pharmacokinetic (PK) profile of bendamustine has been characterized in adults with indolent non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), but remains to be elucidated in pediatric patients with hematologic malignancies. This analysis used data from a nonrandomized pediatric study in patients with relapsed/refractory acute lymphocytic leukemia or acute myeloid leukemia. Bendamustine 90 or 120 mg/m(2) (60-minute infusion) was administered on days 1 and 2 of 21 day cycles. The population PK base model was adjusted for body surface area (BSA), and the appropriateness of the final model was evaluated by visual predictive check. A covariate analysis explored PK variability. Bayesian PK parameter estimates and concentration-time profiles for each patient were generated. Bendamustine PK in pediatric patients was compared with that of adults with indolent NHL. PK/pharmacodynamic analyses were conducted for fatigue, nausea, vomiting, and infection. Thirty-eight patients (median age: 7 years; range: 1-19 years) receiving bendamustine 120 mg/m(2) and an additional five patients receiving bendamustine 90 mg/m(2) (median age: 12 years; range: 8-14 years) were included in the population PK analysis. Peak plasma concentrations of bendamustine (Cmax) occurred at the end of infusion (about 1 h). Decline from peak showed a rapid distribution phase (t½α = 0.308 h) and a slower elimination phase (t½β = 1.47 h). Model-predicted mean Cmax and area under the curve values from time 0-24 h were 6806 ng/mL and 8240 ng*h/mL, respectively. When dosed based upon BSA, it appeared that age, body weight, race, mild renal (n = 3) or hepatic (n = 2) dysfunction, cancer type, and cytochrome P450 1A2 inhibitors (n = 17) or inducers (n = 3) did not affect systemic exposure, which was comparable between pediatric and adult patients. Infection was the only adverse event associated with bendamustine Cmax. However, due to the small sample size for some subgroups, the

  19. [Clinical and hematologic features of pediatric leukemias].

    PubMed

    Hasanbegović, Edo

    2006-01-01

    to present main clinical and hematologic features of pediatric leukemias treated at Hematooncologic department of Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo during last 7 years. In retrospective study we followed up children with leukemia aged 0-15 who were treated during period of 01.01.1997-31.12.2003. at Hematooncologic department on Pediatric Clinic in Sarajevo. A total number of patient with leukemia was 130 of them 112 (83.2%) had acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 16 (12.3%) of them had acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and 2 (1.5%) patients had chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). There were 84 (64.6%) boys and 46 (35.4%) girls. Median age of newly diagnosed patients was 6 years and 4 months. Dominant clinical signs were: high temperature-72.9%, fatigue and paleness-74.8% and bone pain-87.9%. Most of the children had leucocitosis (51.5%), anemia (56.1%) and trombocitopenia (57.5%). Most frequent signs at the beginning of the illness are general symptoms like fatigue, unclear febrile state and accented bone pains. Those united signs with complete blood picture finding should be enough reason for suspicion under possible leukemia.

  20. Pharmacogenetics in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Cheok, Meyling H.; Pottier, Nicolas; Kager, Leo

    2009-01-01

    Progress in the treatment of acute leukemia in children has been remarkable, from a disease being lethal four decades ago to current cure rates exceeding 80%. This exemplary progress is largely due to the optimization of existing treatment modalities rather than the discovery of new antileukemic agents. However, despite these high cure rates, the annual number of children whose leukemia relapses after their initial therapy remains greater than that of new cases of most types of childhood cancers. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to develop strategies to personalize treatment and tailor therapy to individual patients, with the goal of optimizing efficacy and safety through better understanding of human genome variability and its influence on drug response. In this review, we summarize recent pharmacogenomic studies related to the treatment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia. These studies illustrate the promise of pharmacogenomics to further advance the treatment of human cancers, with childhood leukemia serving as a paradigm. PMID:19100367

  1. Asparaginase in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawedia, Jitesh D; Rytting, Michael E

    2014-09-01

    Cure rates in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia have significantly improved over the past decades. Now, almost 90% of children will survive the disease. The cure rates in adolescents, young adults, and adults have not kept pace with the improvements in younger patients, even though almost an equal proportion of adult patients achieve complete remission as their pediatric counterparts. Differences in treatment regimens might be important. Intensive use of asparaginase has been a key component of successful pediatric therapy. In this review, we focus on the use of asparaginase and the potential of optimizing asparaginase use via monitoring to minimize adverse drug events and improve efficacy of the drug.

  2. Letter regarding Zhao et al. entitled " DPYD gene polymorphisms are associated with risk and chemotherapy prognosis in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia".

    PubMed

    Deenen, Maarten J; Henricks, Linda M; Sonke, Gabe S; Schellens, Jan Hm; Meulendijks, Didier

    2017-06-01

    Zhao et al. investigated the association between germline genetic polymorphisms in DPYD, the gene encoding dihydropyrimidine dehydrogenase, and (1) the risk of developing pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and (2) outcome of acute lymphoblastic leukemia following the treatment with 5-fluorouracil plus oxaliplatin (FOLFOX). The authors found that the common DPYD variant c.85T>C (rs1801265, DPYD*9A) was significantly associated with (1) risk of developing pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia, (2) complete response rate, (3) event-free survival, and (4) treatment-related toxicity. The authors conclude that patients carrying the c.85T>C C allele have an increased risk of developing acute lymphoblastic leukemia and have inferior outcome, and that DPYD c.85T>C can be used as a guide for individualized treatment and the decision to utilize 5-fluorouracil in acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. In our view, the published article gives rise to multiple critical issues regarding the study's rationale and the methodology used, which strongly question the validity of the authors' conclusions.

  3. Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: where are we going and how do we get there?

    PubMed

    Pui, Ching-Hon; Mullighan, Charles G; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2012-08-09

    Improved supportive care, more precise risk stratification, and personalized chemotherapy based on the characteristics of leukemic cells and hosts (eg, pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics) have pushed the cure rate of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia to near 90%. Further increase in cure rate can be expected from the discovery of additional recurrent molecular lesions, coupled with the development of novel targeted treatment through high-throughput genomics and innovative drug-screening systems. We discuss specific areas of research that promise to further refine current treatment and to improve the cure rate and quality of life of the patients.

  4. Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Treating Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Targeted Therapy for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia In recent years, new drugs that target specific ... Typical Treatment of Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  5. What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL)?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia (ALL) What Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? Cancer starts when cells in the body begin ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  6. The synergism of MCL1 and glycolysis on pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival and prednisolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Ariës, Ingrid M; Hansen, Bo R; Koch, Troels; van den Dungen, Rosanna; Evans, William E; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L

    2013-12-01

    In vitro and in vivo resistance to prednisolone are predictive for an adverse prognosis in pediatric precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Causes of resistance are still poorly understood. In this study, we observed that prednisolone exposure of prednisolone-sensitive patients' leukemic cells decreased anti-apoptotic MCL1 protein levels by 2.9-fold, while MCL1 protein expression in prednisolone-resistant leukemic patients' cells was unaffected (P<0.01). Locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides directed against MCL1 reduced MCL1 protein levels by 82±16% (P<0.05) in leukemic cells, decreased proliferation by 9-fold and sensitized to prednisolone up to 80.8-fold, compared to a non-silencing-control locked nucleic acid (P<0.05). Remarkably, we discovered that MCL1-silencing up-regulated the glucose consumption of leukemic cells by 2.5-fold (P<0.05), suggesting a potential rescue mechanism mediated by glycolysis. Targeting glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose synergistically inhibited leukemic survival by 23.2-fold in MCL1-silenced cells (P<0.05). Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose and MCL1 locked nucleic acid concomitantly sensitized leukemic cells to prednisolone compared to MCL1 locked nucleic acid or 2-deoxyglucose alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate the need to target both MCL1 and glycolysis simultaneously to inhibit leukemic survival and sensitize acute leukemia patients towards prednisolone.

  7. The synergism of MCL1 and glycolysis on pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell survival and prednisolone resistance

    PubMed Central

    Ariës, Ingrid M.; Hansen, Bo R.; Koch, Troels; van den Dungen, Rosanna; Evans, William E.; Pieters, Rob; den Boer, Monique L.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro and in vivo resistance to prednisolone are predictive for an adverse prognosis in pediatric precursor B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Causes of resistance are still poorly understood. In this study, we observed that prednisolone exposure of prednisolone-sensitive patients’ leukemic cells decreased anti-apoptotic MCL1 protein levels by 2.9-fold, while MCL1 protein expression in prednisolone-resistant leukemic patients’ cells was unaffected (P<0.01). Locked nucleic acid oligonucleotides directed against MCL1 reduced MCL1 protein levels by 82±16% (P<0.05) in leukemic cells, decreased proliferation by 9-fold and sensitized to prednisolone up to 80.8-fold, compared to a non-silencing-control locked nucleic acid (P<0.05). Remarkably, we discovered that MCL1-silencing up-regulated the glucose consumption of leukemic cells by 2.5-fold (P<0.05), suggesting a potential rescue mechanism mediated by glycolysis. Targeting glycolysis by 2-deoxyglucose synergistically inhibited leukemic survival by 23.2-fold in MCL1-silenced cells (P<0.05). Moreover, 2-deoxyglucose and MCL1 locked nucleic acid concomitantly sensitized leukemic cells to prednisolone compared to MCL1 locked nucleic acid or 2-deoxyglucose alone (P<0.05). In conclusion, these results indicate the need to target both MCL1 and glycolysis simultaneously to inhibit leukemic survival and sensitize acute leukemia patients towards prednisolone. PMID:24142999

  8. An evaluation of diagnostic techniques utilized in the initial workup of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kuntz, D J; Leonard, J C; Nitschke, R M; Vanhoutte, J J; Wilson, D A; Basmadjian, G P

    1984-07-01

    The records of 32 pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) were reviewed to evaluate the role of various diagnostic techniques used to assess the extent of extramedullary disease. Our findings indicate that adequate screening for hepatosplenomegaly is obtained by clinical assessment and for bone and renal involvement by bone scintigraphy including concomitant renal imaging. We recommend that radiographs be restricted to scintigraphically abnormal areas and/or sites of bone pain. Liver-spleen scintigraphy, gallium studies, intravenous pyelography, and ultrasound studies of the abdomen and pelvis should be utilized only to answer specific clinical questions. Evaluation in this manner reduces both radiation exposure and patient expense, while it adequately defines the extent of disease in these organs.

  9. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-10-07

    Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Use of cytosar in pediatric acute myelocytic leukemia and leukemic meningitis.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, M P

    1982-01-01

    For children with acute myelocytic leukemia, 5-day courses of Cytosar in combination with cyclophosphamide (with or without vincristine sulfate and prednisone) has shown excellent, age related results in relapse patients. The regimen known as Mini-COAP has been incorporated into front-line studies. Cytosar given intrathecally in combination with methotrexate has produced superior results in treating meningeal disease in the African presentation of Burkitt disease. This "synchronizing" technique has been incorporated into a high Cytoxan-high methotrexate regimen with coordinated intrathecal therapy with good results. Triple (Cytosar, methotrexate, and hydrocortisone) intrathecal prophylaxis is now demonstrated to have equivalent effectiveness to conventional CNS prophylaxis employing radiotherapy 2400 R and 5 doses of intrathecal methotrexate.

  11. Institutional experience with clofarabine and cytarabine in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Lucas; Fernandez-Navarro, Jose Maria; Del Mar Andres, Maria; Bautista, Francisco; Tasso, Maria; Verdeguer, Amparo

    2012-01-01

    Cytarabine (1000 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) and clofarabine (40 mg/m/d intravenous for 5 d) were given every 28 days to 9 children with relapsed acute myeloid leukemia at our institution. Among 19 courses, there were 18 infectious episodes. Median hospitalization time was 13 days (7.7 to 30.5 d) per cycle. Hepatobiliary abnormalities included alanine aminotransferase/aspartate aminotransferase elevation and hyperbilirubinemia. Four patients achieved complete remission (one after an earlier allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant). Four patients are alive disease free. In summary, a proportion of children responded and was able to receive allogeneic Haematopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant. Side effects were tolerable, although hospitalization time was prolonged.

  12. Discovery of Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at subnanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design. PMID:22662287

  13. Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Mer Kinase Inhibitors for the Treatment of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Yang, Chao; Simpson, Catherine; Deryckere, Deborah; Van Deusen, Amy; Miley, Michael J; Kireev, Dmitri; Norris-Drouin, Jacqueline; Sather, Susan; Hunter, Debra; Korboukh, Victoria K; Patel, Hari S; Janzen, William P; Machius, Mischa; Johnson, Gary L; Earp, H Shelton; Graham, Douglas K; Frye, Stephen V; Wang, Xiaodong

    2012-02-09

    Ectopic Mer expression promotes pro-survival signaling and contributes to leukemogenesis and chemoresistance in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Consequently, Mer kinase inhibitors may promote leukemic cell death and further act as chemosensitizers increasing efficacy and reducing toxicities of current ALL regimens. We have applied a structure-based design approach to discover novel small molecule Mer kinase inhibitors. Several pyrazolopyrimidine derivatives effectively inhibit Mer kinase activity at sub-nanomolar concentrations. Furthermore, the lead compound shows a promising selectivity profile against a panel of 72 kinases and has excellent pharmacokinetic properties. We also describe the crystal structure of the complex between the lead compound and Mer, opening new opportunities for further optimization and new template design.

  14. Low expression of Toll-like receptors in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Cuaxospa, María; Contreras-Ramos, Alejandra; Pérez-Figueroa, Erandi; Medina-Sansón, Aurora; Jiménez-Hernández, Elva; Torres-Nava, José R; Rojas-Castillo, Emilio; Maldonado-Bernal, Carmen

    2016-08-01

    Cancer is the second most common cause of death among children aged 1-14 years. Leukemia accounts for one-third of all childhood cancers, 78% of which is acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The development of cancer has been associated with malignant cells that express low levels of immunogenic molecules, which facilitates their escape from the antineoplastic immune response. It is thought that it may be possible to rescue the antineoplastic immune response through the activation of recognition receptors, such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs), which activate the innate immune system. TLRs are type I membrane glycoproteins expressed mainly in immune system cells such as monocytes, neutrophils, macrophages, dendritic cells, T, B and natural killer cells. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the expression of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in patients with ALL and prior to any treatment. PBMCs were obtained from 50 pediatric patients diagnosed with ALL and from 20 children attending the ophthalmology and orthopedics services. The mean fluorescence intensity was obtained by analysis of immunofluorescence. We found lower expression levels of TLR1, TLR3, TLR4, TLR7 and TLR9 in PBMCs from patients with ALL compared with those from control patients. We also observed that the PBMCs from patients with Pre-B and B ALL had lower TLR4 expression than controls and patients with Pro-B, Pre-B, B and T ALL had lower TLR7 expression than controls. The present study is the first to demonstrate reduced expression of TLRs in PBMCs from pediatric patients with ALL. This finding is of great relevance and may partly explain the reduction in the antineoplastic immune response in patients with ALL.

  15. Effective VCR/DEX pulse maintenance therapy in the KYCCSG ALL-02 protocol for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yasuhiro; Koga, Yuki; Inagaki, Jiro; Ozono, Shuichi; Ueda, Koichiro; Shimoura, Maiko; Itonaga, Nobuyoshi; Shinkoda, Yuichi; Moritake, Hiroshi; Nomura, Yuko; Nakayama, Hideki; Hotta, Noriko; Hidaka, Yasufumi; Shimonodan, Hidemi; Suga, Naohiro; Tanabe, Takayuki; Nakashima, Kentaro; Fukano, Reiji; Kawano, Yoshifumi

    2016-02-01

    In a previous study of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) by the Kyushu-Yamaguchi Children's Cancer Study Group, ALL-96, we achieved a 72.1 % 5-year event-free survival (EFS) and an 84.8 % 5-year overall survival (OS). In a subsequent study, ALL-02, we adopted a vincristine dexamethasone (VCR/DEX) pulse regimen as maintenance therapy in the context of the ALL-96 study using the same risk classification and treatment schedule. A total of 156 pediatric cases of ALL were treated with ALL-02. All of the patients were classified as standard-risk or high-risk. Risk stratification was based on white cell counts, immunophenotype, the presence of central nervous system (CNS) disease at diagnosis, organomegaly, and early treatment response (day 14 bone marrow status). The 7-year EFS and OS rates were 77.7 % (95 % CI 70.6-84.8 %) and 89.5 % (95 % CI 84.6-94.4 %), respectively. CNS 3 status [hazard ratio (HR) = 5.0, p = 0.009] and high white blood cell count at diagnosis (HR = 2.6, p = 0.047) were risk factors for poor EFS in multivariate analysis. Our strategies to categorize patients into two risk groups, and to treat with a VCR/DEX pulse were feasible and reasonably effective treatments for pediatric ALL.

  16. [Heterogeneity and clonal evolution in pediatric ETV6-RUNX1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia by quantitative multigene fluorescence in situ hybridization].

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Hu, L P; Liu, X M; Guo, Y; Yang, W Y; Zhang, J Y; Liu, F; Liu, T F; Wang, S C; Chen, X J; Ruan, M; Qi, B Q; Chang, L X; Chen, Y M; Zou, Y; Zhu, X F

    2017-07-14

    Objective: To evaluate heterogeneity and clonal evolution in pediatric ETV6-RUNX1(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in China. Methods: Totally 48 children (<14 years) with newly diagnosed ETV6-RUNX1(+) ALL in Institute of Hematology and Blood Disease Hospital, CAMS and PUMC, from February 2006 to June 2011 were included. The copy number variations were analyzed by quantitative multigene fluorescence in situ hybridization (QM-FISH) in 48 patients. Non-normal distribution of measurement data were shown with Median (range) , count data were shown with percent (%) . Overall survival and event-free survival were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Forty-eight patients were tested by QM-FISH. Of 48 patients, 70.8% harbored one clone, 18.8% two subclones, and 10.4% three or more subclones. The clone heterogeneity was detected by two different models: the linear succession model and the branching evolution model. ETV6-RUNX1(+) ALL relapse evolved from an ancestral clone or a new clone. The patients relapsed from a new clone got the worse outcome. Conclusion: The clone evolution was detected in pediatric ETV6-RUNX1(+) ALL in China. QM-FISH might be helpful to evaluate the outcome of relapsed patients. A new clone was associated with a poorer outcome.

  17. A meta-analysis of body mass index of adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nam, Gina E; Kaul, Sapna; Wu, Yelena P; Nelson, Richard E; Wright, Jennifer; Fluchel, Mark N; Hacking, Claire C; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2015-09-01

    We conducted a meta-analysis of existing studies to examine body mass index (BMI) of adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) compared to individuals without cancer. Studies were identified and reviewed using specific inclusion criteria. The effect size was odds ratio (OR) of the prevalence of overweight/obese BMI (≥ 25 kg/m(2)) in ALL survivors versus comparison groups. Study data were coded and validated. Fixed-effects (FE) and random-effects (RE) estimates of the effect size were estimated. A total of 9 studies met our inclusion criteria. Survivors were more likely to be overweight/obese compared to comparison groups (FE OR = 1.12, 95% CI 1.06-1.18 and RE OR = 1.28, 95% CI 1.07-1.53). When limited to studies from North American samples, female survivors were overweight/obese more often than the comparison groups (FE OR = 1.30, 95% CI 1.19-1.43). Adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric ALL, especially female survivors, may be at a higher risk of being overweight/obese compared to individuals without cancer. However, few studies provided detailed information on patient and treatment factors (e.g., cranial radiation) that can impact BMI. Standardized reporting of study content is vital for providing robust information on the risk of developing late effects among cancer survivors. Adolescent and adult survivors of pediatric ALL require additional weight management resources such as targeted counseling for physical activity and dietician support both early in treatment and after the end of their therapy. Female survivors may need additional guidance to develop healthy eating practices and to participate in exercise programs.

  18. Immunization practices in acute lymphocytic leukemia and post-hematopoietic stem cell transplant in Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers

    PubMed Central

    Top, Karina A.; Pham-Huy, Anne; Price, Victoria; Sung, Lillian; Tran, Dat; Vaudry, Wendy; Halperin, Scott A.; De Serres, Gaston

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT There are no Canadian immunization guidelines for children treated for malignancy. Guidelines do exist for patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), but they provide broad timeframes for initiating vaccination; there is no standard schedule. The optimal approach to immunization in these populations is unclear. We sought to describe immunization practices at Canadian Pediatric Hematology/Oncology centers. A 43-item online questionnaire was distributed to the 16 programs in the C17 research network of pediatric hematology/oncology centers to capture information on timing and criteria for immunization of patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and those who have undergone HSCT. At each center, 1–2 physicians or pharmacists completed the survey to reflect center-wide immunization practices. Responses were received from 11/16 (69%) programs; 11 respondents reported on practices for patients with ALL and 9 reported on practices for patients who are post-HSCT. In 5/11 ALL programs (45%) re-immunization is recommended routinely after chemotherapy, starting 3–6 months post-chemotherapy. In HSCT programs, timing of pneumococcal conjugate vaccination (PCV) varied from 3 months post-HSCT (4 programs) to 12 months post-HSCT (4 programs). Live vaccines were administered 24 months post-HSCT in 8/9 programs. All HSCT programs considered graft-versus-host-disease and 7 considered discontinuation of immunosuppression in immunization decisions. Pediatric hematology/oncology programs were divided in regards to re-immunization of patients with ALL post-chemotherapy. After HSCT, timing of PCV administration varied, with 4 programs initiating immunization later than Canadian guidelines recommend (3–9 months post-HSCT). These findings suggest a need to standardize immunization practices in these populations. PMID:26962702

  19. [Acute plasma cell leukemia].

    PubMed

    Monsalbe, V; Domíngues, C; Roa, I; Busel, D; González, S

    1989-01-01

    Plasma Cell Leukemia is a very rare form of plasmocytic dyscrasia, whose clinical and pathological characteristics warrant its recognition as a distinct subentity. We report the case of a 60 years old man who presented a rapidly fatal acute plasma cell leukemia, with multiple osteolytic lesions, hipercalcemia, renal and cardiac failure.

  20. [Cost-effectiveness of consolidation treatments for acute myeloid leukemia in high-risk pediatric patients within the Colombian healthcare system].

    PubMed

    García, Mario; Chicaíza, Liliana Alejandra; Quitián, Hoover; Linares, Adriana; Ramírez, Óscar

    2015-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia represents about 20% of leukemias in minors under 18 years old. At present, there are only two consolidation treatment alternatives: Chemotherapy and stem-cell transplantation. To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of unrelated and related hematopoietic stem cell transplantations, versus chemotherapy consolidation in pediatric patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia. A decision tree was constructed with life-years gained as the outcome. Costs and probabilities were extracted from the literature. Probabilistic sensitivity analyses and acceptability curves were computed. The cost-effectiveness threshold was three times the 2010 per capita gross domestic product. When compared to consolidation chemotherapy cycles, related and unrelated hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation had incremental cost-effectiveness ratios of COP$ 9,226,421 (USD$ 4,820) and COP$ 6,544,116 (USD$ 3,419) respectively, which are lower than the per capita gross domestic product (COP$ 12,047,418, USD$ 6,294). Transplant proved to be cost-effective in 70% of the simulations and had a higher probability of the willingness to pay being over than COP$ 7,200,000 (USD$ 3,762). In Colombia, related and unrelated hematopoietic stem-cell transplants are cost-effective alternatives to consolidation treatment for high-risk acute myeloid leukemia in pediatric patients.

  1. Emotion regulation, internalizing symptoms and somatic complaints in pediatric survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Katz, Lynn Fainsilber; Heleniak, Charlotte; Kawamura, Joy; Jakubiak, Jessica

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to examine whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA)-a physiological index of children's emotion regulation-moderates the relation between cancer diagnosis and internalizing problems in children. Participants were twenty-two 7-12-year survivors of acute lymphoblastic leukemia and 20 age-matched controls. RSA was calculated from cardiac interbeat interval using spectral time-series analysis. t-Scores on the Child Behavior Checklist Anxious/Depressed, Withdrawn/Depressed, and Somatic Complaints subscales were computed. Respiratory sinus arrhythmia moderated the relation between diagnostic status and both child somatic complaints and withdrawn/depressed symptoms. The positive association between diagnostic status and somatic complaints was significant for children with low RSA but not significant for children with high RSA. This association was also significant for withdrawn/depressed symptoms. Low RSA was associated with more somatic complaints and withdrawn/depressed symptoms for children with cancer but not for control participants. Children who have poor emotion regulation abilities may be more vulnerable to the range of stressors associated with the diagnosis, treatment, and survivorship of cancer. Behavioral interventions targeting emotion regulation skills may reduce internalizing symptoms in this population. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Long-term results in the treatment of acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: a Pediatric Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Krischer, J P; Steuber, C P; Vietti, T J; Culbert, S J; Ragab, A H; Morgan, S K; Berry, D H; Hvizdala, E; Thomas, P J; Land, V J

    1989-01-01

    Complete remission (CR), 5-year remission duration (RD), and overall 5-year survival rates are 74%, 28% and 25%, respectively, for previously untreated children with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia diagnosed between 1977 and 1981, following induction therapy with vincristine, doxorubicin and prednisone (VAP), consolidation therapy with 6-thioguanine, cytosine arabinoside (TA) and cyclophosphamide/vincristine/cytosine arabinoside/prednisone (COAP), and maintenance therapy of alternating TA and COAP with or without VAP pulses. Approximately 20% are free of their disease for more than 5 years. High white blood cell counts (WBC) at diagnosis and M3 and M6 morphology were associated with lower CR rates, while M5 morphology was associated with higher CR rates. Patients with M1 morphology had shorter remission duration as compared to those with M4 or M5 morphology. Low WBC and age between 2 and 10 years at diagnosis were associated with longer remission durations and survival. Patients with M4 morphology also survived longer. The observed CR rates are comparable to other studies initiated at the same time as this study but survival is less than those reported more recently. Low WBC at diagnosis and M4/M5 morphology may identify relatively favorable prognostic groups.

  3. Integrated methylome and transcriptome analysis reveals novel regulatory elements in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Almamun, Md; Levinson, Benjamin T; van Swaay, Annette C; Johnson, Nathan T; McKay, Stephanie D; Arthur, Gerald L; Davis, J Wade; Taylor, Kristen H

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common cancer diagnosed in children under the age of 15. In addition to genetic aberrations, epigenetic modifications such as DNA methylation are altered in cancer and impact gene expression. To identify epigenetic alterations in ALL, genome-wide methylation profiles were generated using the methylated CpG island recovery assay followed by next-generation sequencing. More than 25,000 differentially methylated regions (DMR) were observed in ALL patients with ∼90% present within intronic or intergenic regions. To determine the regulatory potential of the DMR, whole-transcriptome analysis was performed and integrated with methylation data. Aberrant promoter methylation was associated with the altered expression of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, apoptosis, and proliferation. Novel enhancer-like sequences were identified within intronic and intergenic DMR. Aberrant methylation in these regions was associated with the altered expression of neighboring genes involved in cell cycle processes, lymphocyte activation and apoptosis. These genes include potential epi-driver genes, such as SYNE1, PTPRS, PAWR, HDAC9, RGCC, MCOLN2, LYN, TRAF3, FLT1, and MELK, which may provide a selective advantage to leukemic cells. In addition, the differential expression of epigenetic modifier genes, pseudogenes, and non-coding RNAs was also observed accentuating the role of erroneous epigenetic gene regulation in ALL. PMID:26308964

  4. Multi-agent chemotherapy overcomes glucocorticoid resistance conferred by a BIM deletion polymorphism in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Soh, Sheila Xinxuan; Lim, Joshua Yew Suang; Huang, John W J; Jiang, Nan; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Ong, S Tiong

    2014-01-01

    A broad range of anti-cancer agents, including glucocorticoids (GCs) and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), kill cells by upregulating the pro-apoptotic BCL2 family member, BIM. A common germline deletion in the BIM gene was recently shown to favor the production of non-apoptotic BIM isoforms, and to predict inferior responses in TKI-treated chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) and EGFR-driven lung cancer patients. Given that both in vitro and in vivo GC resistance are predictive of adverse outcomes in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), we hypothesized that this polymorphism would mediate GC resistance, and serve as a biomarker of poor response in ALL. Accordingly, we used zinc finger nucleases to generate ALL cell lines with the BIM deletion, and confirmed the ability of the deletion to mediate GC resistance in vitro. In contrast to CML and lung cancer, the BIM deletion did not predict for poorer clinical outcome in a retrospective analysis of 411 pediatric ALL patients who were uniformly treated with GCs and chemotherapy. Underlying the lack of prognostic significance, we found that the chemotherapy agents used in our cohort (vincristine, L-asparaginase, and methotrexate) were each able to induce ALL cell death in a BIM-independent fashion, and resensitize BIM deletion-containing cells to GCs. Together, our work demonstrates how effective therapy can overcome intrinsic resistance in ALL patients, and suggests the potential of using combinations of drugs that work via divergent mechanisms of cell killing to surmount BIM deletion-mediated drug resistance in other cancers.

  5. Pharmacokinetic modeling of an induction regimen for in vivo combined testing of novel drugs against pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts.

    PubMed

    Szymanska, Barbara; Wilczynska-Kalak, Urszula; Kang, Min H; Liem, Natalia L M; Carol, Hernan; Boehm, Ingrid; Groepper, Daniel; Reynolds, C Patrick; Stewart, Clinton F; Lock, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Current regimens for induction therapy of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), or for re-induction post relapse, use a combination of vincristine (VCR), a glucocorticoid, and L-asparaginase (ASP) with or without an anthracycline. With cure rates now approximately 80%, robust pre-clinical models are necessary to prioritize active new drugs for clinical trials in relapsed/refractory patients, and the ability of these models to predict synergy/antagonism with established therapy is an essential attribute. In this study, we report optimization of an induction-type regimen by combining VCR, dexamethasone (DEX) and ASP (VXL) against ALL xenograft models established from patient biopsies in immune-deficient mice. We demonstrate that the VXL combination was synergistic in vitro against leukemia cell lines as well as in vivo against ALL xenografts. In vivo, VXL treatment caused delays in progression of individual xenografts ranging from 22 to >146 days. The median progression delay of xenografts derived from long-term surviving patients was 2-fold greater than that of xenografts derived from patients who died of their disease. Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that systemic DEX exposure in mice increased 2-fold when administered in combination with VCR and ASP, consistent with clinical findings, which may contribute to the observed synergy between the 3 drugs. Finally, as proof-of-principle we tested the in vivo efficacy of combining VXL with either the Bcl-2/Bcl-xL/Bcl-w inhibitor, ABT-737, or arsenic trioxide to provide evidence of a robust in vivo platform to prioritize new drugs for clinical trials in children with relapsed/refractory ALL.

  6. Genome-wide signatures of differential DNA methylation in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although aberrant DNA methylation has been observed previously in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the patterns of differential methylation have not been comprehensively determined in all subtypes of ALL on a genome-wide scale. The relationship between DNA methylation, cytogenetic background, drug resistance and relapse in ALL is poorly understood. Results We surveyed the DNA methylation levels of 435,941 CpG sites in samples from 764 children at diagnosis of ALL and from 27 children at relapse. This survey uncovered four characteristic methylation signatures. First, compared with control blood cells, the methylomes of ALL cells shared 9,406 predominantly hypermethylated CpG sites, independent of cytogenetic background. Second, each cytogenetic subtype of ALL displayed a unique set of hyper- and hypomethylated CpG sites. The CpG sites that constituted these two signatures differed in their functional genomic enrichment to regions with marks of active or repressed chromatin. Third, we identified subtype-specific differential methylation in promoter and enhancer regions that were strongly correlated with gene expression. Fourth, a set of 6,612 CpG sites was predominantly hypermethylated in ALL cells at relapse, compared with matched samples at diagnosis. Analysis of relapse-free survival identified CpG sites with subtype-specific differential methylation that divided the patients into different risk groups, depending on their methylation status. Conclusions Our results suggest an important biological role for DNA methylation in the differences between ALL subtypes and in their clinical outcome after treatment. PMID:24063430

  7. Second induction in pediatric patients with recurrent acute lymphoid leukemia using DFCI-ALL protocols.

    PubMed

    Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Moghrabi, Albert; Rousseau, Pierre; Leclerc, Jean-Marie; Barrette, Stephane; Bernstein, Mark L; Champagne, Josette; David, Michele; Demers, Jocelyn; Duval, Michel; Hume, Heather; Meyer, Patrick; Champagne, Martin A

    2005-02-01

    Between 15% and 30% of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) experience disease recurrence. With the possible exception of patients presenting with late isolated extramedullary relapse, induction of second complete remission (CR) is employed as a stepping stone to allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The authors report their institutional experience in the management of children with recurrent ALL using the Dana Farber Cancer Institute (DFCI) ALL protocol in patients treated initially with that same protocol. Successful reinduction was followed by allogeneic HSCT when possible. Between April 1986 and May 2003, 34 patients with recurrent ALL, treated at initial diagnosis with DFCI-ALL protocol therapy, were given the same protocol as repeat induction chemotherapy. The median age was 4.6 years at diagnosis and 7.1 years at recurrence. Median duration of CR1 was 30.3 months. Second CR was obtained in 29 (85%) patients. Twenty went on to allogeneic HSCT; 10 of them currently remain in CR. Two additional patients treated with chemotherapy without HSCT are also in continuous CR2. Overall, 13 (38%) of the 34 patients are alive with a median follow-up of 105 months. There were no toxic deaths due to the reinduction therapy. One child died of cardiac failure after autologous HSCT. The treatment of children with recurrent ALL using the DFCI-ALL protocol induction regimen after initial use of the same protocol is associated with a high rate of second CR with no excess toxicity. However, the overall prognosis in these patients remains unsatisfactory and needs to be improved.

  8. Outcome of refractory and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia in children treated during 2005–2011 – experience of the Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG)

    PubMed Central

    Wachowiak, Jacek; Skalska-Sadowska, Jolanta; Wachowiak, Jacek; Zając-Spychała, Olga; Niewiadomska-Wojnałowicz, Izabela; Januszkiewicz-Lewandowska, Danuta; Balwierz, Walentyna; Pawińska-Wąsikowska, Katarzyna; Goździk, Jolanta; Chybicka, Alicja; Potocka, Kinga; Krawczuk-Rybak, Maryna; Muszyńska-Rosłan, Katarzyna; Adamkiewicz-Drożyńska, Elżbieta; Maciejka-Kapuścińska, Lucyna; Karolczyk, Grażyna; Kowalczyk, Jerzy; Wójcik, Beata; Badowska, Wanda; Urasiński, Tomasz; Ociepa, Tomasz; Matysiak, Michał; Sikorska-Fic, Barbara; Szczepański, Tomasz; Tomaszewska, Renata; Sobol, Grażyna; Wieczorek, Maria; Karpińska-Derda, Irena

    2014-01-01

    Aim of the study Recent studies showed relatively better outcome for children with refractory (refAML) and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (relAML). Treatment of these patients has not been unified within Polish Pediatric Leukemia/Lymphoma Study Group (PPLLSG) so far. The goal of this study is to analyze the results of this therapy performed between 2005–2011. Material and methods The outcome data of 16 patients with refAML and 62 with relAML were analyzed retrospectively. Reinduction was usually based on idarubicine, fludarabine and cytarabine with allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (alloHSCT) in 5 refAML and 30 relAML children. Results Seventy seven percent relAML patients entered second complete remission (CR2). Five-year OS and disease-free survival (DFS) were estimated at 16% and 30%. The outcome for patients after alloHSCT in CR2 (63%) was better than that of those not transplanted (36%) with 5-year OS of 34% vs. 2-year of 7% and 5-year DFS of 40% vs. 12.5%. Second complete remission achievement and alloHSCT were the most significant predictors of better prognosis (p = 0.000 and p = 0.024). The outcome of refAML children was significantly worse than relAML with first remission (CR1) rate of 33%, OS and DFS of 25% at 3 years and 53% at 2 years, respectively. All survivors of refAML were treated with alloHSCT after CR1. Conclusions The uniform reinduction regimen of the documented efficacy and subsequent alloHSCT in remission is needed to improve the outcome for ref/relAML children treated within PPLLSG. The focus should be on the future risk-directed both front and second line AML therapy. PMID:24876821

  9. Variations in mRNA and protein levels of Ikaros family members in pediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Julie L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a highly heterogeneous disease in which the cells share phenotypic characteristics with normal human thymocytes. The Ikaros family of transcription factors includes five members that are required for normal T cell development and are implicated in leukemogenesis. The goal of this work was to correlate the pattern of expression of Ikaros family members with the phenotype of the T-ALL cells. Methods We obtained twenty-four samples from pediatric T-ALL patients and used multi-parameter flow cytometry to characterize each sample, comparing the phenotype of the leukemic cells with normal human thymocytes. Then, we defined the expression levels of each Ikaros family member to determine whether the mRNA levels or splicing or protein levels were similar to the normal patterns seen during human T cell development. Results Multi-parameter analysis of the phenotype of T-ALL cells revealed that each patient’s cells were unique and could not be readily correlated with stages of T cell development. Similarly, the pattern of Ikaros expression varied among patients. In most patients, Ikaros mRNA was the dominant family member expressed, but some patients’ cells contained mostly Helios, Aiolos, or Eos mRNA. Despite that most patients had elevated mRNA levels of Ikaros family members and unique patterns of mRNA splicing, most patients had significantly reduced protein levels of Ikaros and Aiolos. Conclusions Our analysis of the cell phenotype and Ikaros expression levels in T-ALL cells revealed the extent of heterogeneity among patients. While it is rarely possible to trace leukemic cells to their developmental origin, we found distinct patterns of Ikaros family mRNA levels in groups of patients. Further, mRNA and protein levels of Ikaros and Aiolos did not correlate, indicating that mRNA and protein levels are regulated via distinct mechanisms. PMID:27826566

  10. Comparison of multidimensional flow cytometry with standard morphology for evaluation of early marrow response in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Meshinchi, S; Thomson, B; Finn, L S; Leisenring, W; Green, C; Radich, J P; Loken, M; Hawkins, D

    2001-12-01

    We compared multidimensional flow cytometry (MDF) with morphology in evaluating early marrow response to induction chemotherapy in pediatric ALL. Chemotherapy response was determined by standard morphology or by MDF assessed by residual leukemic cell percentage remaining in the marrow on days 7, 14, and 28 of induction. Bone marrow response was classified as M3 (>25% leukemic blasts) or M1/M2 (< or = 25% leukemic blasts). Multidimensional flow cytometry evaluation was compared with that of standard morphology. Available day-7 and day-14 marrow slides were also reevaluated by a single pathologist without patients' clinical information. Of 46 day-7 specimens, eight (17%) had discordant MDF and morphologic results (P < 0.001), including six classified as M3 by morphology but were M1/M2 by MDF, and two were classified as M3 by MDF but were M1/M2 by morphology. Of 24 day-14 bone marrow specimens, five (20.5%) were discordant (P < 0.001), including two classified as M3 by morphology but were M1/M2 by MDF, and three were classified as M3 by MDF but were M1/M2 by morphology. Reevaluation of the blinded day-7 and day-14 marrow slides yielded discordance between repeated pathology readings of 11% (P < 0.001) and 6% (P = 0.04), respectively. Our data show significant discordance between the morphologic and MDF evaluation of early marrow response. Early response to therapy is a significant prognostic indicator in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and is used to alter subsequent treatment; thus, precise assessment of response is important. A larger comparison of MDF with morphology for the evaluation of early response, including correlation with clinical outcome, is warranted.

  11. Comparison of biochemical and immunological profile of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia in relation to healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Sanches, Fabiane L F Z; Nitsch, Taís M; Vilela, Maria Marluce S; Sgarbieri, Valdemiro C

    2015-01-01

    To compare the biochemical and immunological profiles of pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with healthy children and adolescents. This was a cross-sectional study in which 21 therapy-naïve patients with AML were compared with a group of 24 healthy individuals. The following data were analyzed: serum proteins, leucocytes and subgroups, erythrocytes, hematocrit, hemoglobin, platelets, cytokines in peripheral blood mononuclear cells cultures under spontaneous and BCG- or PHA-stimulated conditions, immunoglobulin A, and erythrocytic glutathione. Statistical analysis was performed using SPSS software, considering as significant p-values<0.05. Serum albumin levels were higher (p<0.0001) in the control group, as well as all the parameters related to red blood cells (p<0.0001). For leucocytes and subgroups, no statistical difference was found between the AML and the control groups. For cytokines, the concentrations were significantly higher under spontaneous and BCG-stimulated conditions for TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10, and IFN-γ in the control group. Under PHA-stimulated conditions, the concentration was higher (p=0.002) only for IL-6. No difference was found between the two groups for the other cytokines and for IgA in the saliva. Erythrocytic glutathione was higher (p<0.0001) in AML patients. It was possible to characterize the biochemical and immunological profile of pediatric patients with AML, as well as highlight some significant differences in these parameters when comparing with healthy children and adolescents. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. A meta-analysis of the neuropsychological sequelae of chemotherapy-only treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Catherine C; Johnson, Courtney E; Ramirez, Lisa Y; Huestis, Samantha; Pai, Ahna L H; Demaree, Heath A; Drotar, Dennis

    2008-07-01

    Mixed findings on the neuropsychological sequelae of chemotherapy-only treatment for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), without radiation, indicate the need for a comprehensive meta-analytic review. The purpose of the current study was to conduct a meta-analysis assessing neuropsychological and academic functioning differences between children with ALL treated solely with chemotherapy and comparison groups. Thirteen articles met inclusion criteria for the meta-analysis and were analyzed using a random effects model, weighted least squares methods. Mean effect sizes were significantly different from zero for multiple domains of intelligence and academic achievement; processing speed; verbal memory; and some aspects of executive functioning and fine motor skills, indicating worse functioning in ALL survivors. Effect sizes for visual-motor skills and visual memory were not significantly different from zero. Results support the presence of neuropsychological and academic sequelae for ALL survivors treated solely with chemotherapy and highlight the need for ongoing follow-up of children with ALL using a standardized neuropsychological test battery and research methodology. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Microdeletions are a general feature of adult and adolescent acute lymphoblastic leukemia: Unexpected similarities with pediatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Paulsson, Kajsa; Cazier, Jean-Baptiste; MacDougall, Finlay; Stevens, Jane; Stasevich, Irina; Vrcelj, Nikoletta; Chaplin, Tracy; Lillington, Debra M.; Lister, T. Andrew; Young, Bryan D.

    2008-01-01

    We present here a genome-wide map of abnormalities found in diagnostic samples from 45 adults and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A 500K SNP array analysis uncovered frequent genetic abnormalities, with cryptic deletions constituting half of the detected changes, implying that microdeletions are a characteristic feature of this malignancy. Importantly, the pattern of deletions resembled that recently reported in pediatric ALL, suggesting that adult, adolescent, and childhood cases may be more similar on the genetic level than previously thought. Thus, 70% of the cases displayed deletion of one or more of the CDKN2A, PAX5, IKZF1, ETV6, RB1, and EBF1 genes. Furthermore, several genes not previously implicated in the pathogenesis of ALL were identified as possible recurrent targets of deletion. In total, the SNP array analysis identified 367 genetic abnormalities not corresponding to known copy number polymorphisms, with all but two cases (96%) displaying at least one cryptic change. The resolution level of this SNP array study is the highest used to date to investigate a malignant hematologic disorder. Our findings provide insights into the leukemogenic process and may be clinically important in adult and adolescent ALL. Most importantly, we report that microdeletions of key genes appear to be a common, characteristic feature of ALL that is shared among different clinical, morphological, and cytogenetic subgroups. PMID:18458336

  14. Kinase activity profiling reveals active signal transduction pathways in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a new approach for target discovery.

    PubMed

    van der Sligte, Naomi E; Scherpen, Frank J G; Meeuwsen-de Boer, Tiny G J; Lourens, Harm Jan; Ter Elst, Arja; Diks, Sander H; Guryev, Victor; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van Leeuwen, Frank N; de Bont, Eveline S J M

    2015-04-01

    Still about 20% of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) struggle with relapse, despite intensive chemotherapy. We and others have shown that kinase activity profiling is able to give more insights in active signal transduction pathways and point out interesting signaling hubs as well as new potential druggable targets. With this technique the gap between newly designed drugs and ALL may be bridged. The aim of this study was to perform kinome profiling on 20 pediatric ALL samples (14 BCP-ALL and six T-ALL) to identify signaling proteins relevant to ALL. We defined 250 peptides commonly activated in both BCP-ALL and T-ALL representing major signal transduction pathways including MAPK, PI3K/Akt, and regulators of the cell cycle/p53 pathway. For 27 peptides, differentially phosphorylation between BCP-ALL and T-ALL was observed. Among these, ten peptides were more highly phosphorylated in BCP-ALL while 17 peptides showed increased phosphorylation in T-ALL. Furthermore we selected one lead of the list of commonly activated peptides (HGFR_Y1235) in order to test its efficacy as a potential target and provide proof of principle for this approach. In conclusion kinome profiling is an elegant approach to study active signaling and identify interesting potential druggable targets. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. [Prognostic value of dynamic monitoring of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Gao, H T; Zhang, Y; Sun, K; Guo, J M; Chen, Y Q; Chen, X L; Shi, J; Niu, X N; Wang, F; Huo, L

    2017-03-14

    Objective: To investigate the prognostic value of dynamic monitoring of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript in pediatric patients with t (8;21) acute myeloid leukemia (AML) . Methods: The clinical features and RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels of 55 pediatric t (8;21) AML patients, newly diagnosed from Jan. 2010 to Apr. 2016, were analyzed retrospectively. The relationship between the minimal residual disease (MRD) and prognosis was analysed by dynamic monitoring of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels using real-time quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) technology. Results: The RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels in bone marrow cells at diagnosis was not related to relapse. After one course of induction therapy, patients with a more than 2 Log reduction of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels (>2 Log) had lower 5 years cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) [ (24.3±8.4) % vs (52.6±9.7) %, χ(2)=9.046, P=0.003], relapse-free survival (RFS) [ (71.6±12.7) % vs (48.1±13.2) %, χ(2)=5.814, P=0.016], and better overall survival (OS) [ (76.9±12.5) % vs (48.9±14.7) %, χ(2)=6.346, P=0.012], compared to patients with a less than 2 Log reduction (a<2 Log) . Multivariate Cox survival analysis suggested that a>2 Log reduction in RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels after a course of induction therapy was an independent prognostic factor for RFS (HR=0.263, 95%CI 0.081-0.851, P=0.026) and OS (HR=0.214, 95% CI 0.057-0.808, P=0.023) . During consolidation therapy and follow-up period, molecular relapse of 16 cases and hematologic relapse of 13 cases were identified by continuous dynamic monitoring of RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels, with a median interval of 4.0 (1.5-5.8) months from the molecular relapse to hematologic relapse. 2 cases of molecular relapse who received timely allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation did not experience hematologic relapse. Conclusion: Dynamic monitoring RUNX1-RUNX1T1 transcript levels by RQ-PCR technique can subdivide patients into relatively low and high risk group, early

  16. Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention Can Acute Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? It’s not clear what causes most ... Myeloid Leukemia Be Prevented? More In Acute Myeloid Leukemia About Acute Myeloid Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  17. Cost-effective screening of DNMT3A coding sequence identifies somatic mutation in pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Szarzyńska-Zawadzka, Bronisława; Kosmalska, Maria; Sędek, Łukasz; Sonsala, Alicja; Twardoch, Magdalena; Kowalczyk, Jerzy R; Szczepański, Tomasz; Witt, Michał; Dawidowska, Małgorzata

    2017-09-14

    In pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) risk assignment schemes preclude reliable prediction of outcome and thus new prognostic factors are needed. Mutations in DNMT3A are candidate prognostic and classification markers in adults with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and T-ALL and thus were considered as candidates prognostic markers in pediatric T-ALL. DNMT3A mutational status was investigated in 74 pediatric T-ALL samples collected at diagnosis. We applied high resolution melt (HRM) analysis and Sanger sequencing to study the hotspot position (R882) within catalytic MTase domain and exons coding for other functional domains of the protein, known to be mutated in the wide spectrum of hematological malignancies. We demonstrate a low frequency of mutations in DNMT3A coding sequence in pediatric T-ALL (1.4%, n=1/74). We identified missense mutation, p.Ala644Thr, which has not been described previously in pediatric T-ALL, but is recurrent in adults with T-ALL and AML. Low frequency of DNMT3A mutations in pediatric T-ALL is in striking contrast to adult T-ALL and renders the necessity for the search of other candidate prognostic markers. Combined Sanger sequencing-HRM approach offers a cost-effective option for genotyping DNMT3A coding sequence, with potential clinical application in other hematological malignancies. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  18. Flavopiridol in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  19. Both mature KIR+ and immature KIR- NK cells control pediatric acute B-cell precursor leukemia in NOD.Cg-Prkdcscid IL2rgtmWjl/Sz mice.

    PubMed

    Kübler, Ayline; Woiterski, Jeanette; Witte, Kai-Erik; Bühring, Hans-Jörg; Hartwig, Udo F; Ebinger, Martin; Oevermann, Lena; Mezger, Markus; Herr, Wolfgang; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Münz, Christian; André, Maya C

    2014-12-18

    Therapeutic natural killer (NK)-cell-mediated alloreactivity toward acute myeloid leukemia has largely been attributed to mismatches between killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their ligands, HLA class I molecules, on target cells. While adult acute B-cell precursor leukemia (BCP-ALL) appears to be resistant to NK-cell-mediated lysis, recent data indicate that pediatric BCP-ALL might yet be a target of NK cells. In this study, we demonstrate in a donor-patient-specific NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) IL2rg(tmWjl)/Sz (NSG) xenotransplantation model that NK cells mediate considerable alloreactivity toward pediatric BCP-ALL in vivo. Notably, both adoptively transferred mature KIR(+) NK cells and immature KIR(-) NK cells arising early posttransplantation in humanized NSG mice exerted substantial antileukemic activity. Low-dose and long-term treatment of humanized NSG mice with the DNA-demethylating agent 5-aza-cytidine distinctly enhanced the antitumor response, interestingly without inducing common inhibitory KIR expression but rather by promoting the differentiation of various NK-cell precursor subsets. Collectively, these data indicate that the future design of innovative therapy protocols should consider further exploitation of NK-cell-mediated immune responses for poor prognosis pediatric BCP-ALL patients. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  20. FLT3-internal tandem duplication in a pediatric patient with t(8;21) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kawamura, Machiko; Kaku, Hidefumi; Ito, Tateki; Funata, Nobuaki; Taki, Tomohiko; Shimada, Akira; Hayashi, Yasuhide

    2010-12-01

    Patients diagnosed with t(8;21)-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are currently considered to have good prognoses, but about half of these patients relapse. FLT3-internal tandem duplication (ITD) is generally thought to be strongly associated with poor prognosis in AML, but is rarely reported in patients with t(8;21)-AML. Expression of the neural cell-adhesion molecule (CD56) is also associated with a significantly shorter complete remission duration and survival in patients with t(8;21)-AML. Patients with t(8;21)-AML expressing CD56 have been reported to exhibit a higher incidence of granulocytic sarcoma (GS), and t(8;21)-AML with GS results in a less favorable prognosis than AML with this translocation alone. Here, we report on a 15-year-old girl with t(8;21)-AML having both CD56 expression and FLT3-ITD. This patient underwent unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation and achieved complete remission, but thereafter presented with obstructive jaundice caused by GS compression of the common bile duct without bone marrow invasion at relapse. Autopsy revealed multiple nodules of the stomach membrane and invasion into the head of the pancreas. For earlier detection of relapse, we suggest that it would be useful to examine existence of GS in CD56-positive t(8;21)-AML patients at diagnosis and hematologic remission. Even though t(8;21)-AML is less likely to co-occur with FLT3-ITD in pediatric patients, this report suggests that prognostic factors, including FLT3 and KIT genes and the surface marker CD56, should be analyzed in these patients. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Vaccination to improve the persistence of CD19CAR gene-modified T cells in relapsed pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Rossig, C; Pule, M; Altvater, B; Saiagh, S; Wright, G; Ghorashian, S; Clifton-Hadley, L; Champion, K; Sattar, Z; Popova, B; Hackshaw, A; Smith, P; Roberts, T; Biagi, E; Dreno, B; Rousseau, R; Kailayangiri, S; Ahlmann, M; Hough, R; Kremens, B; Sauer, M G; Veys, P; Goulden, N; Cummins, M; Amrolia, P J

    2017-03-10

    Trials with second generation CD19 chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) T-cells report unprecedented responses but are associated with risk of cytokine release syndrome (CRS). Instead, we studied the use of donor Epstein-Barr virus-specific T-cells (EBV CTL) transduced with a first generation CD19CAR, relying on the endogenous T-cell receptor for proliferation. We conducted a multi-center phase I/II study of donor CD19CAR transduced EBV CTL in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). Patients were eligible pre-emptively if they developed molecular relapse (>5 × 10(-4)) post first stem cell transplant (SCT), or prophylactically post second SCT. An initial cohort showed poor expansion/persistence. We therefore investigated EBV-directed vaccination to enhance expansion/persistence. Eleven patients were treated. No CRS, neurotoxicity or graft versus host disease (GVHD) was observed. At 1 month, 5 patients were in CR (4 continuing, 1 de novo), 1 PR, 3 had stable disease and 3 no response. At a median follow-up of 12 months, 10 of 11 have relapsed, 2 are alive with disease and 1 alive in CR 3 years. Although CD19CAR CTL expansion was poor, persistence was enhanced by vaccination. Median persistence was 0 (range: 0-28) days without vaccination compared to 56 (range: 0-221) days with vaccination (P=0.06). This study demonstrates the feasibility of multi-center studies of CAR T cell therapy and the potential for enhancing persistence with vaccination.Leukemia advance online publication, 10 March 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.39.

  2. The Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) to Identify Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) Survivors At Risk for Neurocognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Viola, Adrienne; Balsamo, Lyn; Neglia, Joseph P; Brouwers, Pim; Ma, Xiaomei; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2017-04-01

    Neurocognitive problems, including executive dysfunction, are potential late effects of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment. Surveillance for neurocognitive impairment in a timely and efficient manner is imperative to ongoing clinical care. We sought to determine if the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function (BRIEF) Parent Form identified leukemia survivors with cognitive impairment. In this 28-site cross-sectional study, parents of 256 children, a mean of 8.9±2.2 years after treatment for standard-risk precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia and in first remission, completed the BRIEF. We used a multivariate logistic regression to calculate the association between elevated scores on 3 composite BRIEF indices (Behavioral Regulation Index, Metacognition Index, Global Executive Composite [GEC]) and special education and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) outcomes. All BRIEF index scores were significantly associated with receipt of special education services or ADHD. The BRI was most strongly associated with ADHD (odds ratios=4.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.72-10.9). The GEC was most strongly associated with ADHD (odds ratios=4.46; 95% confidence interval, 1.77-11.22). Elevated scores on the BRIEF GEC were associated with low sensitivity (24.1 to 39.1) for detecting the outcomes but better specificity (range, 87.7 to 89.3). These results suggest that the parent-completed BRIEF is associated with clinical outcomes but is not a sensitive tool to identify leukemia survivors that require a comprehensive neuropsychological assessment.

  3. Protein biomarkers distinguish between high- and low-risk pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia in a tissue specific manner

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The current study evaluated the differential expression detected in the proteomic profiles of low risk- and high risk- ALL pediatric patients to characterize candidate biomarkers related to diagnosis, prognosis and patient targeted therapy. Bone marrow and peripheral blood plasma and cell lysates samples were obtained from pediatric patients with low- (LR) and high-risk (HR) ALL at diagnosis. As controls, non-leukemic pediatric patients were studied. Cytogenetic analysis was carried out by G- banding and interphase fluorescent in situ hybridization. Differential proteomic analysis was performed using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The differential expression of certain proteins was confirmed by Western blot analysis. The obtained data revealed that CLUS, CERU, APOE, APOA4, APOA1, GELS, S10A9, AMBP, ACTB, CATA and AFAM proteins play a significant role in leukemia prognosis, potentially serving as distinctive biomarkers for leukemia aggressiveness, or as suppressor proteins in HR-ALL cases. In addition, vitronectin and plasminogen probably contributed to leukemogenesis, whilst bicaudal D-related protein 1 could afford a significant biomarker for pediatric ALL therapeutics. PMID:23849470

  4. A Healthcare System Perspective on Implementing Genomic Medicine: Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia as a Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Evans, William E.; Crews, Kristine R.; Pui, Ching-Hon

    2013-01-01

    The promise of genomic medicine has received great attention over the past decade, projecting how genomics will soon guide the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. However, this evolution has been slower than forecast, even where evidence is often strong (e.g., pharmacogenomics). Reasons include the requirement for institutional resources and the need for the will to push beyond barriers impeding health-care changes. Here, we illustrate how genomics has been deployed to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia. PMID:23462885

  5. Adoption of pediatric-inspired acute lymphoblastic leukemia regimens by adult oncologists treating adolescents and young adults: A population-based study.

    PubMed

    Muffly, Lori; Lichtensztajn, Daphne; Shiraz, Parveen; Abrahão, Renata; McNeer, Jennifer; Stock, Wendy; Keegan, Theresa; Gomez, Scarlett Lin

    2017-01-01

    Studies have demonstrated superior outcomes for adolescent and young adult (AYA) patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who are treated using pediatric versus adult therapeutic regimens. To the best of our knowledge, whether adult oncologists in the United States have adopted this approach to ALL in AYA patients is currently unknown. The objective of the current study was to provide a population-based description of ALL treatment patterns in AYA individuals over the past decade. Data regarding AYA patients aged 15 to 39 years and diagnosed with ALL between 2004 and 2014 while living in the Greater Bay Area were obtained from the Greater Bay Area Cancer Registry (GBACR). Treating facilities were designated as pediatric or adult centers; induction treatment regimens were abstracted from registry text data fields. Of 304 patients diagnosed in the GBACR catchment region, complete treatment data were available for 229 (75%). The location of care was identified for 296 patients (97%) treated at 31 unique centers. Approximately 70% of AYA patients received induction therapy at an adult treatment center. All AYA patients who were treated at pediatric centers received pediatric ALL regimens. Among AYA patients treated by adult oncologists with complete treatment data, none received a pediatric regimen before 2008. Between 2008 and 2012, while the US Adult Intergroup C10403 pediatric-inspired ALL protocol was open to accrual, 31% of AYA patients treated by adult oncologists received pediatric regimens. This rate fell to 21% from 2013 through 2014. Adult facilities treating ≥ 2 AYA patients with ALL per year captured in the GBACR were more likely to administer pediatric regimens than lower volume centers (P = .03). As of 2014, only a minority of AYA patients with ALL received pediatric ALL regimens at adult cancer centers. Cancer 2017;122-130. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  6. Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia mieloide aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  7. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Associations between genetic variants in folate and drug metabolizing pathways and relapse risk in pediatric acute lymphoid leukemia on CCG-1952

    PubMed Central

    Vujkovic, Marijana; Kershenbaum, Aaron; Wray, Lisa; McWilliams, Thomas; Cannon, Shannon; Devidas, Meenakshi; Stork, Linda; Aplenc, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variation in drug detoxification pathways may influence outcomes in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We evaluated relapse risk and 24 variants in 17 genes in 714 patients in CCG-1961. Three TPMT and 1 MTR variant were associated with increased risks of relapse (rs4712327, OR 3.3, 95%CI 1.2–8.6; rs2842947, OR 2.7, 95%CI 1.1–6.8; rs2842935, OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.1–5.0; rs10925235, OR 4.9, 95%CI 1.1–25.1). One variant in SLC19A1 showed a protective effect (rs4819128, OR 0.5, 95%CI 0.3–0.9). Our study provides data that relapse risk in pediatric ALL is associated with germline variations in TPMT, MTR and SLC19A1. PMID:26605150

  9. The use of central laboratories and remote electronic data capture to risk-adjust therapy for pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Devidas, Meenakshi; London, Wendy B; Anderson, James R

    2010-02-01

    The Children's Oncology Group (COG) is a National Cancer Institute (NIH)-sponsored cooperative clinical trials group with the primary mission of conducting pediatric cancer clinical trials. COG has complex risk classification systems that are used to deliver risk-stratified therapy for many pediatric cancers, including clinical trials for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and neuroblastoma (NB). Classification of patients is based on biological, clinical, and genomic data obtained at initial diagnosis and during the initial phases of therapy. The COG Web-based remote data entry (RDE) system enables submission of data in real time from central laboratories and treating institutions. The data are then used in an automated fashion to determine the risk group and corresponding treatment assignment for individual patients enrolled in COG clinical trials. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent abnormality in pediatric acute megakaryoblastic leukemia with a distinct HOX gene expression pattern.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, J D E; Hollink, I H I M; Arentsen-Peters, S T C J M; van Galen, J F; Berna Beverloo, H; Baruchel, A; Trka, J; Reinhardt, D; Sonneveld, E; Zimmermann, M; Alonzo, T A; Pieters, R; Meshinchi, S; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Zwaan, C Michel

    2013-12-01

    Cytogenetic abnormalities and early response to treatment are the main prognostic factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Recently, NUP98/NSD1 (t(5; 11)(q35; p15)), a cytogenetically cryptic fusion, was described as recurrent event in AML, characterized by dismal prognosis and HOXA/B gene overexpression. Using split-signal fluorescence in situ hybridization, other NUP98-rearranged pediatric AML cases were identified, including several acute megakaryoblastic leukemia (AMKL) cases with a cytogenetically cryptic fusion of NUP98 to JARID1A (t(11;15)(p15;q35)). In this study we screened 105 pediatric AMKL cases to analyze the frequency of NUP98/JARID1A and other recurrent genetic abnormalities. NUP98/JARID1A was identified in 11/105 patients (10.5%). Other abnormalities consisted of RBM15/MKL1 (n=16), CBFA2T3/GLIS2 (n=13) and MLL-rearrangements (n=13). Comparing NUP98/JARID1A-positive patients with other pediatric AMKL patients, no significant differences in sex, age and white blood cell count were found. NUP98/JARID1A was not an independent prognostic factor for 5-year overall (probability of overall survival (pOS)) or event-free survival (probability of event-free survival (pEFS)), although the 5-year pOS for the entire AMKL cohort was poor (42 ± 6%). Cases with RBM15/MLK1 fared significantly better in terms of pOS and pEFS, although this was not independent from other risk factors in multivariate analysis. NUP98/JARID1A cases were characterized by HOXA/B gene overexpression, which is a potential druggable pathway. In conclusion, NUP98/JARID1A is a novel recurrent genetic abnormality in pediatric AMKL.

  11. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01.

    PubMed

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L

    2014-09-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6-10%, 11-20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  12. The prognostic significance of early treatment response in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia: results of the international study Relapsed AML 2001/01

    PubMed Central

    Creutzig, Ursula; Zimmermann, Martin; Dworzak, Michael N.; Gibson, Brenda; Tamminga, Rienk; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Ha, Shau-Yin; Hasle, Henrik; Maschan, Alexey; Bertrand, Yves; Leverger, Guy; von Neuhoff, Christine; Razzouk, Bassem; Rizzari, Carmelo; Smisek, Petr; Smith, Owen P.; Stark, Batia; Reinhardt, Dirk; Kaspers, Gertjan L.

    2014-01-01

    The prognostic significance of early response to treatment has not been reported in relapsed pediatric acute myeloid leukemia. In order to identify an early and easily applicable prognostic factor allowing subsequent treatment modifications, we assessed leukemic blast counts in the bone marrow by morphology on days 15 and 28 after first reinduction in 338 patients of the international Relapsed-AML2001/01 trial. Both day 15 and day 28 status was classified as good (≤20% leukemic blasts) in 77% of patients. The correlation between day 15 and 28 blast percentages was significant, but not strong (Spearman correlation coefficient = 0.49, P<0.001). Survival probability decreased in a stepwise fashion along with rising blast counts at day 28. Patients with bone marrow blast counts at this time-point of ≤5%, 6–10%, 11–20% and >20% had 4-year probabilities of survival of 52%±3% versus 36%±10% versus 21%±9% versus 14%±4%, respectively, P<0.0001; this trend was not seen for day 15 results. Multivariate analysis showed that early treatment response at day 28 had the strongest prognostic significance, superseding even time to relapse (< or ≥12 months). In conclusion, an early response to treatment, measured on day 28, is a strong and independent prognostic factor potentially useful for treatment stratification in pediatric relapsed acute myeloid leukemia. This study was registered with ISRCTN code: 94206677. PMID:24763401

  13. Protracted Administration of L-Asparaginase in Maintenance Phase Is the Risk Factor for Hyperglycemia in Older Patients with Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Hideki; Imamura, Toshihiko; Saito, Akiko M; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Suenobu, So-ichi; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Deguchi, Takao; Hashii, Yoshiko; Kawasaki, Hirohide; Endo, Mikiya; Hori, Hiroki; Suzuki, Nobuhiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Kato, Koji; Yumura-Yagi, Keiko; Hara, Junichi; Oda, Megumi; Sato, Atsushi; Horibe, Keizo

    2015-01-01

    Although L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia is well known adverse event, it is not studied whether the profile of this adverse event is affected by intensification of L-asparaginase administration. Here, we analyzed the profile of L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia in a 1,176 patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the Japan Association of Childhood Leukemia Study ALL-02 protocol using protracted L-asparaginase administration in maintenance phase. We determined that a total of 75 L-asparaginase related hyperglycemia events occurred in 69 patients. Although 17 events (17/1176, 1.4%) developed in induction phase, which was lower incidence than those (10-15%) in previous reports, 45 events developed during the maintenance phase with protracted L-asparaginase administration. Multivariate analysis showed that older age at onset (≥ 10 years) was a sole independent risk factor for L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia (P<0.01), especially in maintenance phase. Contrary to the previous reports, obesity was not associated with L-asparaginase-related hyperglycemia. These findings suggest that protracted administration of L-asparaginase is the risk factor for hyperglycemia when treating adolescent and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

  14. IMMUNOTHERAPY IN ACUTE LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Wing

    2010-01-01

    Recent advances in immunotherapy of cancer may represent a successful example in translational research, in which progress in knowledge and technology in immunology has lead to new strategies of immunotherapy, and even past failure in many clinical trials have led to a better understanding of basic cancer immunobiology. This article reviews the latest concepts in antitumor immunology and its application in the treatment of cancer, with particular focus on acute leukemia. PMID:19100371

  15. A retrospective analysis of treatment-related hospitalization costs of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Kaul, Sapna; Korgenski, Ernest Kent; Ying, Jian; Ng, Christi F; Smits-Seemann, Rochelle R; Nelson, Richard E; Andrews, Seth; Raetz, Elizabeth; Fluchel, Mark; Lemons, Richard; Kirchhoff, Anne C

    2016-02-01

    This retrospective study examined the longitudinal hospital outcomes (costs adjusted for inflation, hospital days, and admissions) associated with the treatment of pediatric, adolescent, and young adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Patients between one and 26 years of age with newly diagnosed ALL, who were treated at Primary Children's Hospital (PCH) in Salt Lake City, Utah were included. Treatment and hospitalization data were retrieved from system-wide cancer registry and enterprise data warehouse. PCH is a member of the Children's Oncology Group (COG) and patients were treated on, or according to, active COG protocols. Treatment-related hospital costs of ALL were examined by computing the average annual growth rates (AAGR). Longitudinal regressions identified patient characteristics associated with costs. A total of 505 patients (46.9% female) were included. The majority of patients had B-cell lineage ALL, 6.7% had T-ALL, and the median age at diagnosis was 4 years. Per-patient, first-year ALL hospitalization costs at PCH rose from $24,197 in 1998 to $37,924 in 2012. The AAGRs were 6.1, 13.0, and 7.6% for total, pharmacy, and room and care costs, respectively. Average days (AAGR = 5.2%) and admissions (AAGR = 3.8%) also demonstrated an increasing trend. High-risk patients had 47% higher costs per 6-month period in the first 5 years from diagnosis than standard-risk patients (P < 0.001). Similarly, relapsed ALL and stem cell transplantations were associated with significantly higher costs than nonrelapsed and no transplantations, respectively (P < 0.001). Increasing treatment-related costs of ALL demonstrate an area for further investigation. Value-based interventions such as identifying low-risk fever and neutropenia patients and managing them in outpatient settings should be evaluated for reducing the hospital burden of ALL. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Risk–Benefit Analysis of Pediatric-Inspired Versus Hyperfractionated Cyclophosphamide, Vincristine, Doxorubicin, and Dexamethasone Protocols for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adolescents and Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Guzauskas, Gregory F.; Villa, Kathleen F.; Vanhove, Geertrui F.; Fisher, Vicki L.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the risk–benefit trade-off of a pediatric-inspired regimen versus hyperfractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) for first-line treatment of adolescents/young adult (AYA; ages 16–39 years) patients with Philadelphia-negative acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Methods: Patient outcomes were simulated using a 6-state Markov model, including complete response (CR), no CR, first relapse, second CR, second relapse, and death. A Weibull distribution was fit to the progression-free survival curve of hyper-CVAD–treated AYA patients from a single-center study, and comparable patient data from a retrospective study of pediatric regimen–treated AYA patients were utilized to estimate a relative progression difference (hazard ratio = 0.51) and model survival differences. Health-state utilities were estimated based on treatment stage, with an assumption that the pediatric protocol had 0.10 disutility compared with hyper-CVAD before the maintenance phase of treatment. Total life-years and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) were compared between treatment protocols at 1, 5, and 10 years, with additional probabilistic sensitivity analyses. Results: Treatment with the pediatric-inspired protocol was associated with a 0.04 increase in life-years, but a 0.01 decrease in QALYs at 1 year. By years 5 and 10, the pediatric-inspired protocol resulted in 0.18 and 0.24 increase in life-years and 0.25 and 0.32 increase in QALYs, respectively, relative to hyper-CVAD. The lower quality of life associated with the induction and intensification phases of pediatric treatment was offset by more favorable progression-free survival and overall survival relative to hyper-CVAD. Conclusions: Our exploratory analysis suggests that, compared with hyper-CVAD, pediatric-inspired protocols may increase life-years throughout treatment stages and QALYs in the long term. PMID:27779442

  17. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-20

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (ALL) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s estimates for acute lymphocytic ... Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Research and Treatment? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  19. The role of matched sibling donor allogeneic stem cell transplantation in pediatric high-risk acute myeloid leukemia: results from the AML-BFM 98 study

    PubMed Central

    Klusmann, Jan-Henning; Reinhardt, Dirk; Zimmermann, Martin; Kremens, Bernhard; Vormoor, Josef; Dworzak, Michael; Creutzig, Ursula; Klingebiel, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    the remainder of the pediatric high-risk acute myeloid leukemia patients the prognosis was not improved by allogeneic stem cell transplantation, which was, however, associated with a higher rate of late sequelae. PMID:21933851

  20. Twenty years of unrelated donor bone marrow transplantation for pediatric acute leukemia facilitated by the National Marrow Donor Program.

    PubMed

    MacMillan, Margaret L; Davies, Stella M; Nelson, Gene O; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Confer, Dennis L; King, Roberta J; Kernan, Nancy A

    2008-09-01

    The National Marrow Donor Program (NMDP) has facilitated unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplants for more than 20 years. In this time period, there have been many changes in clinical practice, including improvements in HLA typing and supportive care, and changes in the source of stem cells. Availability of banked unrelated donor cord blood (incorporated into the NMDP registry in 2000) as a source of stem cells has become an important option for children with leukemia, offering the advantages of immediate availability for children with high-risk disease, the need for a lesser degree of HLA match, and expanding access for those with infrequent HLA haplotypes. Overall survival (OS) in children with acute leukemia transplanted with unrelated donor bone marrow (BM) is markedly better in more recent years, largely attributable to less treatment-related mortality (TRM). Within this cohort, 2-year survival was markedly better for patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in first complete response (CR1) (74%) versus second complete response (CR2) (62%) or more advanced disease (33%). Similar findings are observed with patients with AML, suggesting earlier referral to bone marrow transplant (BMT) is optimal for survival. Notably, this improvement over time was not observed in unmodified peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) recipients, suggesting unmodified PBSC may not be the optimal stem cell source for children.

  1. Prevalence and Predictors of Overweight and Obesity Among a Multiethnic Population of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Survivors: A Cross-Sectional Assessment.

    PubMed

    Brown, Austin L; Lupo, Philip J; Danysh, Heather E; Okcu, Mehmet F; Scheurer, Michael E; Kamdar, Kala Y

    2016-08-01

    As previous studies of obesity in survivors of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) have primarily been conducted among non-Hispanic white survivors or children treated on older protocols, our objective was to describe the prevalence and correlates of overweight status among an ethnically diverse population of pediatric ALL survivors, largely treated with more contemporary therapies. We evaluated the overweight/obesity status of pediatric ALL survivors (n=406) followed in the Texas Children's Cancer Center between 2004 and 2014. Survivors were classified as underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese on the basis of their body mass index at their most current follow-up visit. Our results showed that Hispanic ethnicity (39% of the subjects) was associated with being overweight (adjusted odds ratio=1.88; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-3.14) or obese (adjusted odds ratio=2.84; 95% confidence interval, 1.59-5.06) at follow-up, even after adjusting for cranial radiotherapy (CRT) exposure. Body mass index z-score at diagnosis was also associated with overweight/obesity at follow-up. In addition, there was a statistically significant interaction between younger age at diagnosis and CRT, indicating that younger age at diagnosis was associated with obesity among patients who received CRT. These findings may help identify pediatric ALL patients that are at increased risk of being overweight or obese after treatment.

  2. Apoptotic resistance to ionizing radiation in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia frequently involves increased NF-kappaB survival pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Weston, Victoria J; Austen, Belinda; Wei, Wenbin; Marston, Eliot; Alvi, Azra; Lawson, Sarah; Darbyshire, Philip J; Griffiths, Mike; Hill, Frank; Mann, Jill R; Moss, Paul A H; Taylor, A Malcolm R; Stankovic, Tatjana

    2004-09-01

    To investigate possible causes of the variable response to treatment in pediatric B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to establish potential novel therapeutic targets, we used ionizing radiation (IR) exposure as a model of DNA damage formation to identify tumors with resistance to p53-dependent apoptosis. Twenty-one of 40 ALL tumors responded normally to IR, exhibiting accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins and cleavage of caspases 3, 7, and 9 and of PARP1. Nineteen tumors exhibited apoptotic resistance and lacked PARP1 and caspase cleavage; although 15 of these tumors had normal accumulation of p53 and p21 proteins, examples exhibited abnormal expression of TRAF5, TRAF6, and cIAP1 after IR, suggesting increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling as the mechanism of apoptotic resistance. The presence of a hyperactive PARP1 mutation in one tumor was consistent with such increased NF-kappaB activity. PARP1 inhibition restored p53-dependent apoptosis after IR in these leukemias by reducing NF-kappaB DNA binding and transcriptional activity. In the remaining 4 ALL tumors, apoptotic resistance was associated with a TP53 mutation or with defective activation of p53. We conclude that increased NF-kappaB prosurvival signaling is a frequent mechanism by which B-precursor ALL tumors develop apoptotic resistance to IR and that PARP1 inhibition may improve the DNA damage response of these leukemias.

  3. Blood Spotlight on iAMP21 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a high-risk pediatric disease.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Christine J

    2015-02-26

    Intrachromosomal amplification of chromosome 21 (iAMP21) defines a distinct cytogenetic subgroup of childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Breakage-fusion-bridge cycles followed by chromothripsis and other complex structural rearrangements of chromosome 21 underlie the mechanism giving rise to iAMP21. Patients with iAMP21 are older (median age 9 years), with a low white cell count. They have a high relapse rate when treated as standard risk. Recent studies have shown improved outcome on intensive therapy. Molecular targets for therapy are being sought.

  4. The genomic landscape of pediatric and young adult T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    Genetic alterations that activate NOTCH1 signaling and T cell transcription factors, coupled with inactivation of the INK4/ARF tumor suppressors, are hallmarks of T-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL), but detailed genome-wide sequencing of large T-ALL cohorts has not been carried out. Using integrated genomic analysis of 264 T-ALL cases, we identified 106 putative driver genes, half of which had not previously been described in childhood T-ALL (for example, CCND3, CTCF, MYB, SMARCA4, ZFP36L2 and MYCN).

  5. Acute Appendicitis in Patients with Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki Up; Kim, Jin Kyeung; Won, Jong Ho; Hong, Dae Sik; Park, Hee Sook; Park, Kyeung Kyu

    1993-01-01

    The decision to operate for abdominal pain in patients with leukopenia can be exceedingly difficult. Surgical exploration may be the only effective way to differentiate acute appendicitis from other causes, but it involves considerable risk of infectious complications due to immunesuppression. Leukemic patients, who presented significant RLQ pain, had been indicated for operation, despite having advanced disease or having had received chemotherapy or steroids. Four adult leukemia patients, complicated by acute appendictis, were reviewed. Two patients were in induction chemotherapy, one receiving salvage chemotheapy due to relapse and the other was in conservative treatment. Two patients were acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), one had acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and the other had aleukemic leukemia. All patients underwent appendectomy and recovered without complication. Our experience supports the theory that the surgical management of appendicitis in acute leukemia is the most effective way, in spite of leukopenia. PMID:8268146

  6. Successful acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type therapy in two children with mixed-phenotype acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Otsubo, Keisuke; Yabe, Miharu; Yabe, Hiromasa; Fukumura, Akiko; Morimoto, Tsuyoshi; Kato, Masahiko; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    Mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) is a rare type of leukemia expressing both myeloid and lymphoid markers. There is limited information, especially on pediatric cases. Therefore, the optimal therapeutic approach to pediatric MPAL has not been defined. Here, we report two pediatric cases of MPAL. According to the 2008 World Health Organization (WHO) classification and European Group for the Immunological Characterization of Leukemias (EGIL) criteria, patient 1 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for the myeloid marker myeloperoxidase (MPO), and B-lymphoid markers. Patient 2 was diagnosed with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) using EGIL criteria. According to the 2008 WHO classification, however, patient 2 was diagnosed with overt MPAL positive for CD3, T-lymphoid markers and MPO. We chose an ALL-type therapy consisting of both lymphoid- and myeloid-directed agents; these patients have maintained complete remission following treatment. Further information on pediatric MPAL is needed to establish an appropriate therapeutic strategy including stem cell transplantation for this rare condition. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  7. Treatment of children with early pre-B and pre-B acute lymphocytic leukemia with antimetabolite-based intensification regimens: a Pediatric Oncology Group Study.

    PubMed

    Harris, M B; Shuster, J J; Pullen, J; Borowitz, M J; Carroll, A J; Behm, F G; Camitta, B; Land, V J

    2000-09-01

    Between May 1987 and January 1991, 1354 patients, 1-21 years old, with standard or poor prognosis B-lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia were treated on the Pediatric Oncology Group Study 8602. One thousand three hundred and twenty-three patients entered remission and 1051 patients were randomized on day 43 to an intensification regimen containing L-asparaginase and intermediate-dose methotrexate (regimen B) or cytarabine and intermediate dose methotrexate (regimen C). After completion of intensification at week 25, all patients received the same maintenance therapy until 3 years from diagnosis. Overall 5-year continuous complete remission (CCR) for regimen B was 72+/-2% (s.e.) and for regimen C, 73+/-2% (P = 0.72 by log-rank analysis). Significant differences between treatments for CCR, testicular, CNS relapses overall or with regard to phenotype (pre-B vs early pre-B), gender, or race were not detected. During intensification, regimen C had significantly more bacterial infections (P = 0.05) and days spent in the hospital (P < 0.001) compared with regimen B, while regimen B had significantly more allergic reactions (P < 0.0001). No significant differences in CCR were noted between patients with pre-B and early pre-B ALL (P = 0.22 stratified by risk group and treatment). This study was unable to detect statistical difference between asparaginase (regimen B) and cytarabine (regimen C) during the intensification phase of therapy in children with B-lineage acute lymphocytic leukemia.

  8. IKZF1 deletion is an independent predictor of outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated according to the ALL-BFM 2000 protocol.

    PubMed

    Dörge, Petra; Meissner, Barbara; Zimmermann, Martin; Möricke, Anja; Schrauder, André; Bouquin, Jean-Pierre; Schewe, Denis; Harbott, Jochen; Teigler-Schlegel, Andrea; Ratei, Richard; Ludwig, Wolf-Dieter; Koehler, Rolf; Bartram, Claus R; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Cario, Gunnar

    2013-03-01

    IKZF1 gene deletions have been associated with a poor outcome in pediatric precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. To assess the prognostic relevance of IKZF1 deletions for patients treated on Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster Study Group trial ALL-BFM 2000, we screened 694 diagnostic acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples by Multiplex Ligation-dependent Probe Amplification. Patients whose leukemic cells bore IKZF1 deletions had a lower 5-year event-free survival (0.69±0.05 vs. 0.85±0.01; P<0.0001) compared to those without, mainly due to a higher cumulative incidence of relapses (0.21±0.04 vs. 0.10±0.01; P=0.001). Although IKZF1 deletions were significantly associated with the P2RY8-CRLF2 rearrangement, their prognostic value was found to be independent from this association. Thus, IKZF1 deletion is an independent predictor of treatment outcome and a strong candidate marker for integration in future treatment stratification strategies on ALL-BFM protocols. Clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT00430118.

  9. The Role of Histone Protein Modifications and Mutations in Histone Modifiers in Pediatric B-Cell Progenitor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Janczar, Szymon; Janczar, Karolina; Pastorczak, Agata; Harb, Hani; Paige, Adam J. W.; Zalewska-Szewczyk, Beata; Danilewicz, Marian; Mlynarski, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    While cancer has been long recognized as a disease of the genome, the importance of epigenetic mechanisms in neoplasia was acknowledged more recently. The most active epigenetic marks are DNA methylation and histone protein modifications and they are involved in basic biological phenomena in every cell. Their role in tumorigenesis is stressed by recent unbiased large-scale studies providing evidence that several epigenetic modifiers are recurrently mutated or frequently dysregulated in multiple cancers. The interest in epigenetic marks is especially due to the fact that they are potentially reversible and thus druggable. In B-cell progenitor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL) there is a relative paucity of reports on the role of histone protein modifications (acetylation, methylation, phosphorylation) as compared to acute myeloid leukemia, T-cell ALL, or other hematologic cancers, and in this setting chromatin modifications are relatively less well studied and reviewed than DNA methylation. In this paper, we discuss the biomarker associations and evidence for a driver role of dysregulated global and loci-specific histone marks, as well as mutations in epigenetic modifiers in BCP-ALL. Examples of chromatin modifiers recurrently mutated/disrupted in BCP-ALL and associated with disease outcomes include MLL1, CREBBP, NSD2, and SETD2. Altered histone marks and histone modifiers and readers may play a particular role in disease chemoresistance and relapse. We also suggest that epigenetic regulation of B-cell differentiation may have parallel roles in leukemogenesis. PMID:28054944

  10. GATA3 rs3824662 gene polymorphism as possible risk factor in a cohort of Egyptian patients with pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and its prognostic impact.

    PubMed

    Mosaad, Youssef M; Elashery, Rasha; Darwish, Ahmad; Sharaf Eldein, Omar A; Barakat, Tarek; Marouf, Samy; Abou El-Khier, Noha T; Youssef, Laila F; Fawzy, Iman M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the possible role of GATA3 rs3824662 polymorphism as risk factor for the development of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in a cohort of Egyptian children and to evaluate its prognostic role. Typing of GATA3 rs3824662 polymorphism was done using real-time PCR for 116 patients with ALL and 273 healthy controls. The A allele and AA genotype were significantly higher in ALL patients (p = .015 and .016, respectively) especially B-ALL (p = .014 and .01, respectively). The AA genotype was associated with shorter disease free survival (DFS) in univariate (p = .017) and multivariate cox regression analysis (p = .028), increased incidence of relapse (p = .008) and poor prognosis (p = .028) in pediatric ALL. The GATA3 rs3824662 A allele and AA genotype may be risk factors for the development of pediatric ALL especially B-ALL in the studied cohort of Egyptian patients. The AA genotype is associated with shorter DSF, increased incidence of relapse and poor prognosis in pediatric ALL.

  11. miR-181a promotes G1/S transition and cell proliferation in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia by targeting ATM.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaodan; Liao, Wang; Peng, Hongxia; Luo, Xuequn; Luo, Ziyan; Jiang, Hua; Xu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal expression of miRNAs is intimately related to a variety of human cancers. The purpose of this study is to confirm the expression of miR-181a and elucidate its physiological function and mechanism in pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Pediatric AML patients and healthy controls were enrolled, and the expression of miR-181a and ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) in tissues were examined using quantitative PCR. Moreover, cell proliferation and cell cycle were evaluated in several cell lines (HL60, NB4 and K562) by using flow cytometry after transfected with miR-181a mimics and inhibitors, or ATM siRNA and control siRNA. Finally, ATM as the potential target protein of miR-181a was examined. We found that miR-181a was significantly increased in pediatric AML, which showed an inverse association with ATM expression. Overexpressed miR-181a in cell lines significantly enhanced cell proliferation, as well as increased the ratio of S-phase cells by miR-181a mimics transfection in vitro. Luciferase activity of the reporter construct identified ATM as the direct molecular target of miR-181a. ATM siRNA transfection significantly enhanced cell proliferation and increased the ratio of S-phase cells in vitro. The results revealed novel mechanism through which miR-181a regulates G1/S transition and cell proliferation in pediatric AML by regulating the tumor suppressor ATM, providing insights into the molecular mechanism in pediatric AML.

  12. Tipifarnib and Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blast Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adults

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent neoplastic disease in children, being a rare disease in adults. Many of the advances in pediatric ALL have been through modifications in the doses and schedules of available agents as opposed to the introduction of new compounds. In recent years some improvements in the outcome of ALL in adults have occurred. Application of pediatric regimens to young and middle-aged adults shows promise to improve outcome. Advances in the supportive care of patients undergoing allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT), the use of alternative sources of hematopoietic stem cells and the use of reduced-intensity conditioning regimens will expand the number of patients who can benefit from this therapeutic modality. The evaluation of minimal residual disease will further stratify risk classification and redefine the role of therapeutic modalities such as SCT or biologic agents. New drugs such as thyrosin kinase inhibitors or monoclonal antibodies have led to incremental improvements in outcome. Advances in the genetic and epigenetic mechanisms of the disease provide hope that targeted therapies can more effectively treat the disease with less toxicity. PMID:22053271

  14. IL-7 Receptor Mutations and Steroid Resistance in Pediatric T cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Genome Sequencing Study

    PubMed Central

    Stubbs, Andrew P.; Vroegindeweij, Eric M.; Smits, Willem K.; van Marion, Ronald; Dinjens, Winand N. M.; Horstmann, Martin; Kuiper, Roland P.; Zaman, Guido J. R.; van der Spek, Peter J.; Pieters, Rob; Meijerink, Jules P. P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common childhood cancer and the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in children. T cell ALL (T-ALL) represents about 15% of pediatric ALL cases and is considered a high-risk disease. T-ALL is often associated with resistance to treatment, including steroids, which are currently the cornerstone for treating ALL; moreover, initial steroid response strongly predicts survival and cure. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in T-ALL patients are poorly understood. In this study, we combined various genomic datasets in order to identify candidate genetic mechanisms underlying steroid resistance in children undergoing T-ALL treatment. Methods and Findings We performed whole genome sequencing on paired pre-treatment (diagnostic) and post-treatment (remission) samples from 13 patients, and targeted exome sequencing of pre-treatment samples from 69 additional T-ALL patients. We then integrated mutation data with copy number data for 151 mutated genes, and this integrated dataset was tested for associations of mutations with clinical outcomes and in vitro drug response. Our analysis revealed that mutations in JAK1 and KRAS, two genes encoding components of the interleukin 7 receptor (IL7R) signaling pathway, were associated with steroid resistance and poor outcome. We then sequenced JAK1, KRAS, and other genes in this pathway, including IL7R, JAK3, NF1, NRAS, and AKT, in these 69 T-ALL patients and a further 77 T-ALL patients. We identified mutations in 32% (47/146) of patients, the majority of whom had a specific T-ALL subtype (early thymic progenitor ALL or TLX). Based on the outcomes of these patients and their prednisolone responsiveness measured in vitro, we then confirmed that these mutations were associated with both steroid resistance and poor outcome. To explore how these mutations in IL7R signaling pathway genes cause steroid resistance and subsequent poor outcome, we

  15. Treatment of Children with APL (Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Childhood Leukemia Treatment of Children With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (APL) Treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), the ... With Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) More In Childhood Leukemia About Childhood Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and Prevention ...

  16. Pediatric precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia: are T helper cells the missing link in the infectious etiology theory?

    PubMed

    Bürgler, Simone; Nadal, David

    2017-12-01

    Precursor B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL), the most common childhood malignancy, arises from an expansion of malignant B cell precursors in the bone marrow. Epidemiological studies suggest that infections or immune responses to infections may promote such an expansion and thus BCP-ALL development. Nevertheless, a specific pathogen responsible for this process has not been identified. BCP-ALL cells critically depend on interactions with the bone marrow microenvironment. The bone marrow is also home to memory T helper (Th) cells that have previously expanded during an immune response in the periphery. In secondary lymphoid organs, Th cells can interact with malignant cells of mature B cell origin, while such interactions between Th cells and malignant immature B cell in the bone marrow have not been described yet. Nevertheless, literature supports a model where Th cells-expanded during an infection in early childhood-migrate to the bone marrow and support BCP-ALL cells as they support normal B cells. Further research is required to mechanistically confirm this model and to elucidate the interaction pathways between leukemia cells and cells of the tumor microenvironment. As benefit, targeting these interactions could be included in current treatment regimens to increase therapeutic efficiency and to reduce relapses.

  17. [Successful treatment of a persistent rhino-cerebral mucormycosis in a pediatric patient with a debut of acute lymphoblastic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Cofré, Fernanda; Villarroel, Milena; Castellón, Loreto; Santolaya, María E

    2015-08-01

    The fungi of the order Mucorales cause mucormycosis, which usually presents as an invasive fungal disease with rapid angioinvasion in immunocompromised patients. Rhinocerebral is the most common presentation. The lipid formulations of amphotericin B are used as primary treatment in invasive mucormycosis; the combined use of posaconazole could allow a reduction in the dose of amphotericin B improving tolerance and adherence to treatment. Caspofungin and amphotericin B association has been shown to be synergistic in vitro and effective in murine models. We present the case of a preschool patient that during the debut of acute lymphoblastic leukemia developed a rhinocerebral mucormycosis successfully responding to antifungal treatment with the combination of liposomal amphotericin and caspofungin.

  18. Role of peripheral blood minimum residual disease at day 8 of induction therapy in high-risk pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Salina, Thais Ditolvo da Costa; Ferreira, Yvelise Antunes; Alves, Eliana Brasil; Ferreira, Cristina Motta; De Paula, Erich Vinícius; Mira, Marcelo Távora; Passos, Leny da Mota

    2016-01-01

    Risk stratification and treatment intensification, based on minimal residual disease (MRD) mensurement, changed the prognosis of pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL). The main aim of this study was to investigate whether peripheral blood (PB) MRD measurement at day 8 (D8) could predict the risk stratification category determined by bone marrow (BM) MRD at day 15 (D15). The study was performed prospectively, in a cohort of 40 children with B-lineage ALL, adopting the protocol of the Brazilian Cooperative Group of the Treatment Childhood Leukemia (GBTLI-2009). MRD was detected by flow cytometry (FC) using a simplifed panel that can reliably identify MRD at early phases of induction therapy. Upon diagnosis, the proportion of low and high-risk patients, was 24:16 (60%:40%). The main result of our study demonstrated the potential of D8 MRD in anticipating of week the risk stratification of high-risk patients as determined by D15 BM MRD. In these patients D8 MRD level of 1% was able to segregate high risk fast responders from high risk slow responders (p = 0.0097). This result could represent an opportunity for early treatment intensification, as already performed in some protocols. PMID:27526794

  19. High Throughput Drug Sensitivity Assay and Genomics- Guided Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-14

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  1. Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, however, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood ...

  2. Markedly improved outcomes and acceptable toxicity in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia following treatment with a pediatric protocol: a phase II study by the Japan Adult Leukemia Study Group.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, F; Sakura, T; Yujiri, T; Kondo, E; Fujimaki, K; Sasaki, O; Miyatake, J; Handa, H; Ueda, Y; Aoyama, Y; Takada, S; Tanaka, Y; Usui, N; Miyawaki, S; Suenobu, S; Horibe, K; Kiyoi, H; Ohnishi, K; Miyazaki, Y; Ohtake, S; Kobayashi, Y; Matsuo, K; Naoe, T

    2014-10-17

    The superiority of the pediatric protocol for adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has already been demonstrated, however, its efficacy in young adults remains unclear. The ALL202-U protocol was conducted to examine the efficacy and feasibility of a pediatric protocol in adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with BCR-ABL-negative ALL. Patients aged 15-24 years (n=139) were treated with the same protocol used for pediatric B-ALL. The primary objective of this study was to assess the disease-free survival (DFS) rate and its secondary aims were to assess toxicity, the complete remission (CR) rate and the overall survival (OS) rate. The CR rate was 94%. The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 67% (95% confidence interval (CI) 58-75%) and 73% (95% CI 64-80%), respectively. Severe adverse events were observed at a frequency that was similar to or lower than that in children treated with the same protocol. Only insufficient maintenance therapy significantly worsened the DFS (hazard ratio 5.60, P<0.001). These results indicate that this protocol may be a feasible and highly effective treatment for AYA with BCR-ABL-negative ALL.

  3. Toxicity profile of repeated doses of PEG-asparaginase incorporated into a pediatric-type regimen for adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Aldoss, Ibrahim; Douer, Dan; Behrendt, Carolyn E; Chaudhary, Preeti; Mohrbacher, Ann; Vrona, Janice; Pullarkat, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Despite having been long regarded as too toxic for adult patients, pediatric-like regimens containing L-asparaginase have resulted in improved outcomes for adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To characterize the spectrum of toxicity of repeated doses of polyethylene glycolated-asparaginase (PEG-asp) in adults, we reviewed all doses (2000 IU/m(2) ) administered as part of a pediatric-inspired regimen in adult ALL at our center. Subjects aged 18-60 yr with ALL (n = 152, 69.1% male) contributed 522 dose cycles to the study. Hepatotoxicity was the most common adverse event: grades 3-4 transaminitis and hyperbilirubinemia occurred in 53.9% and 23.7% of subjects, respectively. Hepatotoxicity was reversible; no cases of fulminate hepatic failure were observed. Other toxicities affecting at least 5% of subjects were grades 3-4 triglyceridemia in 50.9%, hypofibrinogenemia (<100 mg/dL) in 47.9%, clinical pancreatitis in 12.6%, venous thromboembolism in 11.2%, allergic reaction in 7.2%, and any grade bleeding in 5.3%. PEG-asp was always discontinued after grades 3-4 pancreatitis or allergic reaction. Otherwise, toxicities did not preclude administration of additional cycles of the drug. Our results suggest that repeated PEG-asp dosing is safe in adults aged 18-60 yr, even after occurrence of a drug-related toxicity.

  4. MicroRNA profiling can classify acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either acute myeloid leukemia or acute lymphoid leukemia.

    PubMed

    de Leeuw, David C; van den Ancker, Willemijn; Denkers, Fedor; de Menezes, Renée X; Westers, Theresia M; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A; Smit, Linda

    2013-04-15

    Classification of acute leukemia is based on the commitment of leukemic cells to the myeloid or the lymphoid lineage. However, a small percentage of acute leukemia cases lack straightforward immunophenotypical lineage commitment. These leukemias of ambiguous lineage represent a heterogeneous category of acute leukemia that cannot be classified as either acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The lack of clear classification of acute leukemias of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL is a hurdle in treatment choice for these patients. Here, we compared the microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles of 17 cases with acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage and 16 cases of AML, B-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (B-ALL), and T-cell acute lymphoid leukemia (T-ALL). We show that leukemias of ambiguous lineage do not segregate as a separate entity but exhibit miRNA expression profiles similar to AML, B-ALL, or T-ALL. We show that by using only 5 of the most lineage-discriminative miRNAs, we are able to define acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage as either AML or ALL. Our results indicate the presence of a myeloid or lymphoid lineage-specific genotype, as reflected by miRNA expression, in these acute leukemias despite their ambiguous immunophenotype. miRNA-based classification of acute leukemia of ambiguous lineage might be of additional value in therapeutic decision making.

  5. BMS-214662 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  6. Biological, Functional and Genetic Characterization of Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stromal Cells from Pediatric Patients Affected by Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Conforti, Antonella; Biagini, Simone; Del Bufalo, Francesca; Sirleto, Pietro; Angioni, Adriano; Starc, Nadia; Li Pira, Giuseppina; Moretta, Francesca; Proia, Alessandra; Contoli, Benedetta; Genovese, Silvia; Ciardi, Claudia; Avanzini, Maria Antonietta; Rosti, Vittorio; Lo-Coco, Francesco; Locatelli, Franco; Bernardo, Maria Ester

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in hematopoietic microenvironment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have been claimed to occur, but little is known about the components of marrow stroma in these patients. In this study, we characterized mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) isolated from bone marrow (BM) of 45 pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL-MSCs) at diagnosis (day+0) and during chemotherapy treatment (days: +15; +33; +78), the time points being chosen according to the schedule of BM aspirates required by the AIEOP-BFM ALL 2009 treatment protocol. Morphology, proliferative capacity, immunophenotype, differentiation potential, immunomodulatory properties and ability to support long-term hematopoiesis of ALL-MSCs were analysed and compared with those from 41 healthy donors (HD-MSCs). ALL-MSCs were also genetically characterized through array-CGH, conventional karyotyping and FISH analysis. Moreover, we compared ALL-MSCs generated at day+0 with those isolated during chemotherapy. Morphology, immunophenotype, differentiation potential and in vitro life-span did not differ between ALL-MSCs and HD-MSCs. ALL-MSCs showed significantly lower proliferative capacity (p<0.001) and ability to support in vitro hematopoiesis (p = 0.04) as compared with HD-MSCs, while they had similar capacity to inhibit in vitro mitogen-induced T-cell proliferation (p = N.S.). ALL-MSCs showed neither the typical translocations carried by the leukemic clone (when present), nor other genetic abnormalities acquired during ex vivo culture. Our findings indicate that ALL-MSCs display reduced ability to proliferate and to support long-term hematopoiesis in vitro. ALL-MSCs isolated at diagnosis do not differ from those obtained during treatment. PMID:24244271

  7. What Should You Ask Your Doctor about Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Types What Should You Ask Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? It is important to have frank, honest discussions ... Your Doctor About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? More In Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia About Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  8. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin on alternate days reduces rate of viridans sepsis and febrile neutropenia in pediatric patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Boztug, Heidrun; Mühlegger, Nora; Pötschger, Ulrike; Attarbaschi, Andishe; Peters, Christina; Mann, Georg; Dworzak, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Intensive chemotherapy directed against acute myeloid leukemia of childhood is followed by profound neutropenia and high risk for bacterial and fungal infections, including viridans group streptococci as a common cause for gram-positive septicemia. Few retrospective studies have shown the efficacy of various antibiotic prophylactic regimens in children. We retrospectively studied 50 pediatric patients treated on the AML-BFM 2004 protocol between 2005 and 2015 at St. Anna Children's Hospital and assessed the effect of antibiotic prophylaxis on the frequency of febrile neutropenia and bacterial sepsis. Fifty pediatric patients underwent 199 evaluable chemotherapy cycles. Viridans sepsis occurred after none of 98 cycles with prophylactic administration of teicoplanin/vancomycin in comparison to 12 cases of viridans sepsis among 79 cycles without systemic antibacterial prophylaxis (0 vs. 15 %, p < 0.0001). In addition, there were significantly fewer episodes of febrile neutropenia in the teicoplanin/vancomycin group (44 % vs. no prophylaxis 82 %, p < 0.0001). Severity of infection seemed to be worse when no antibiotic prophylaxis had been administered with a higher rate of intensive care unit treatment (0/98, 0 %, vs. 4/79, 5 %, p = 0.038). So far, no increase of vancomycin-resistant enterococcus isolates in surveillance cultures was noticed. Antibiotic prophylaxis with teicoplanin (or vancomycin) appears safe and feasible and resulted in eradication of viridans sepsis and decreased incidence of febrile neutropenia in pediatric AML patients. The possibility to administer teicoplanin on alternate days on an outpatient basis or at home could contribute to patient's quality of life and decrease health care costs.

  9. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults in Finland.

    PubMed

    Usvasalo, Anu; Räty, Riikka; Knuutila, Sakari; Vettenranta, Kim; Harila-Saari, Arja; Jantunen, Esa; Kauppila, Marjut; Koistinen, Pirjo; Parto, Katriina; Riikonen, Pekka; Salmi, Toivo T; Silvennoinen, Raija; Elonen, Erkki; Saarinen-Pihkala, Ulla M

    2008-08-01

    Interest has recently been paid to adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, particularly because all reports so far published indicate that these patients have a better outcome when treated with pediatric rather than adult therapeutic protocols. There are different biological subtypes of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with distinct features and prognoses; the distribution of these subtypes is not well known among adolescents. We, therefore, studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults aged 10 to 25 years in Finland. This population-based study included 225 consecutive patients aged 10-25 years diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia during 1990-2004. One hundred and twenty-eight patients (10-16 years) were treated with pediatric Nordic (NOPHO) protocols, and 97 patients (17-25 years) with Finnish Leukemia Group National protocols. We characterized the biological subtypes, clinical features and outcome of these patients. For the whole cohort, the remission rate was 96%, 5-year event-free survival 62% and overall survival 72%. The 5-year event-free survival was 67% for the pediatric treatment group and 60% for the adult treatment group (p=n.s.). Patients with inferior outcome were those with a white blood cell count >or= 100 x 10(9)/L, the Philadelphia chromosome and MLL. Good prognostic features were TEL-AML1, hyperdiploidy, and pediatric intermediate risk stratification. Unlike all previous studies, we found that the outcome of adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with pediatric or adult therapeutic protocols was comparable. The success of the adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy emphasizes the benefit of central referral of patients to academic centers and adherence to research protocols.

  10. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-18

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-25

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Liver transplantation in an adolescent with acute liver failure from acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Reddi, D M; Barbas, A S; Castleberry, A W; Rege, A S; Vikraman, D S; Brennan, T V; Ravindra, K V; Collins, B H; Sudan, D L; Lagoo, A S; Martin, A E

    2014-03-01

    The most common identifiable causes of acute liver failure in pediatric patients are infection, drug toxicity, metabolic disease, and autoimmune processes. In many cases, the etiology of acute liver failure cannot be determined. Acute leukemia is an extremely rare cause of acute liver failure, and liver transplantation has traditionally been contraindicated in this setting. We report a case of acute liver failure in a previously healthy 15-yr-old male from pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He underwent liver transplantation before the diagnosis was established, and has subsequently received chemotherapy for pre-B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia. He is currently alive 31 months post-transplantation. The published literature describing acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a cause of acute liver failure is reviewed. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Pharmacogenetics of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Bilbao-Aldaiturriaga, Nerea; Pombar-Gomez, Maria; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2014-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. Although treatment outcome has improved owing to advances in chemotherapy, there is still a group of patients for which therapy fails while some patients experience severe toxicity. In the last few years, several pharmacogenetic studies have been performed to search for markers of outcome and toxicity in pediatric ALL. However, to date, TPMT is the only pharmacogenetic marker in ALL with clinical guidelines for drug dosing. In this article, we will provide an overview of the most important findings carried out in pharmacogenetics for pediatric ALL, such as the interest drawn by methotrexate transporters in the context of methotrexate treatment. Even if most of the studies are centered on coding genes, we will also point to new approaches focusing on noncoding regions and epigenetic variation that could be interesting for consideration in the near future.

  14. Newly Diagnosed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Avvisati, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) represents a medical emergency with a high rate of early mortality. As a consequence, as soon as the diagnosis is suspected based upon cytologic criteria, it is necessary to start all- trans retinoic acid (ATRA) treatment without delay. For patients with newly diagnosed APL, induction therapy with ATRA plus anthracycline based chemotherapy is recommended. At present the combination of arsenic trioxide plus ATRA should be considered for patients who are not candidates for anthracycline-based therapy. For pediatric and adult patients with APL aged < 60 years who achieve a CR with induction, I recommend 3 intensive courses of consolidation chemotherapy associated to ATRA, targeted on the basis of the risk group at diagnosis. In patients treated with a very intensive consolidation chemotherapy maintenance treatment can be omitted. However If a maintenance treatment has to be adopted I suggest the use of intermittent ATRA for 15 days every 3 months for a period of 2 years, rather than ATRA associated to chemotherapy. Moreover, taking into account the medical literature, a reduced dosage of ATRA ( 25 mg/m2) in pediatric patients and a consolidation chemotherapy of reduced intensity in elderly patients is recommended. Furthermore, in order to maximize survival, careful attention should be reserved to the coagulopathy and to the appearance of the differentiation syndrome. Finally, PCR for the PML/RARA fusion gene on a bone marrow specimen every three months for two years, and then every six months for additional three years are needed during the follow-up. PMID:22220261

  15. Flavopiridol and Vorinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or Refractory Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-04-01

    Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... TV, Video Games, and the Internet Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) ... Treatment Coping en español Leucemia linfoblástica aguda About Leukemia Leukemia is a type of cancer that affects ...

  17. Cilengitide in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b)

  18. Acute leukemias of ambiguous origin.

    PubMed

    Porwit, Anna; Béné, Marie C

    2015-09-01

    This session of the Society for Hematopathology/European Association for Haematopathology Workshop focused on acute leukemias of ambiguous origin. We provide an overview of mixed-phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) as recognized in the current World Health Organization classification and summarize diagnostic criteria for major categories of MPAL: B/myeloid, T/myeloid, B/T, and B/T/myeloid. Most MPAL cases submitted were B/myeloid and T/myeloid MPAL, the most frequent types, but three cases of B/T MPAL were also submitted, and examples of all categories are illustrated. We emphasize that a comprehensive approach to immunophenotyping is required to accurately establish the diagnosis of MPAL. Flow cytometry immunophenotyping using a large panel of antibodies is needed as well as confirmatory immunohistochemical analysis and cytochemistry studies for myeloperoxidase and nonspecific esterase. We discuss technical issues in determining blast lineage and possible pitfalls in MPAL diagnosis. In particular, rare cases of B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) can express myeloperoxidase but are otherwise consistent with B-ALL and should be treated as such. Last, we review the differential diagnosis between acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia with minimal differentiation. There was an agreement that diagnosis of MPAL can be challenging, especially if applied flow cytometry panels are not comprehensive enough. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  19. PROGRESS IN ACUTE MYELOID LEUKEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Kadia, Tapan M.; Ravandi, Farhad; O’Brien, Susan; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop M.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady gains in clinical research and a renaissance of genomics in leukemia have led to improved outcomes. The recognition of tremendous heterogeneity in AML has allowed individualized treatments of specific disease entities within the context of patient age, cytogenetics, and mutational analysis. The following is a comprehensive review of the current state of AML therapy and a roadmap of our approach to these distinct disease entities. PMID:25441110

  20. Risk-Based Classification System of Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-13

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  1. Tanespimycin and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-19

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... 1- to 2-Year-Old Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) KidsHealth > For Parents > Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) A A A What's in this article? About ... child will develop acute lymphoblastic, or lymphoid, leukemia (ALL). This is the most common type of childhood ...

  4. Immunophenotyping pediatric leukemias in Kelantan, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Menon, B S; Dasgupta, A; Jackson, N

    1998-01-01

    This study reviewed the immunophenotyping results of children with acute leukemia in Kelantan, Malaysia. In the 3.5-year period (January 1994 to June 1997), 45 cases were identified. All children were under the age of 12 years and the predominant ethnic group was Malay. Thirty-six cases (80%) were acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 9 cases (20%) were acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). Of the ALL cases, 3% were of B-cell and 22% of T-cell origin, and 96% of the B-lineage ALL were CD10 positive. All the AML cases expressed CD33 and 78% were positive for CD13. The incidence of mixed-lineage leukemias was 13.8% for My+ ALL and 11.1% for Ly+ AML.

  5. Potentially life-threatening coagulopathy associated with simultaneous reduction in coagulation and fibrinolytic function in pediatric acute leukemia after hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Takashi; Nogami, Keiji; Matsumoto, Tomoko; Nomura, Akitaka; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Ochi, Satoshi; Shima, Midori

    2017-03-16

    The pathogenesis of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS) and thrombotic microangiopathy (TMA) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is poorly understood, and limited information is available on global hemostatic function in HSCT. We assessed changes in coagulation and fibrinolysis using a simultaneous thrombin and plasmin generation assay (T/P-GA) during HSCT. Measurements of endogenous thrombin potential (T-EP) and plasmin peak height (P-Peak) using T/P-GA in six pediatric acute leukemia patients treated with HSCT were compared to normal plasma. In the SOS case, the ratios of T-EP and P-Peak to normal were simultaneously decreased at four weeks post-HSCT (Pre; ~1.1/1.1-1.4, Week+4; 0.14/0.0084, respectively). Similarly, in the TMA patient, both ratios were decreased at 3 weeks and recovered after 8 weeks (Pre; 1.2/~0.95, Week+3; 0.59/0.22, Week+8; 1.2/0.64-0.85). In the other patients, when SOS/TMA was not evident, the T/P-GA data remained within normal limits. These findings suggest that the simultaneous reduction of coagulation and fibrinolytic function in patients developing SOS/TMA can lead to a life-threatening coagulopathy. Further research is warranted to clarify global hemostatic function after HSCT to establish optimal supportive therapy for these critical clinical disorders of hemostasis.

  6. Plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate treatment in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia or Burkitt lymphoma: association with hepatotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Masaru; Nakata, Rieko; Adachi, Souichi; Watanabe, Ken-Ichiro; Heike, Toshio; Takeshita, Yasufumi; Shima, Midori

    2014-07-01

    This study aimed to investigate: (i) changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine levels following high-dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) treatment and (ii) the correlation of these sulfur-containing amino acids with MTX-induced hepatotoxicity. Fifteen pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and one patient with Burkitt lymphoma, with a total of 26 treatment courses of HD-MTX, were enrolled. Homocysteine levels increased at 24 h after HD-MTX treatment, and showed marginal decreases at 48 and 72 h. Methionine levels showed a biphasic pattern, i.e. an initial decrease at 24 h followed by increases at 48 and 72 h. S-adenosylhomocysteine exhibited a marginal decrease at 24 h. Changes of homocysteine exhibited significant correlation only with a maximum increase of alanine aminotransferase or total bilirubin from baseline. This study has demonstrated, for the first time, simultaneous changes of plasma homocysteine, methionine and S-adenosylhomocysteine following HD-MTX. The potential of homocysteine as a marker of hepatotoxicity is also presented.

  7. Vincristine-induced neuropathy in pediatric patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in Oman: Frequent autonomic and more severe cranial nerve involvement.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Hanan F; AlFutaisi, Amna; Zacharia, Mathew; Elshinawy, Mohamed; Mevada, Surekha T; Alrawas, Abdulhakim; Khater, Doaa; Jaju, Deepali; Wali, Yasser

    2017-06-17

    Vincristine (VCR) induced peripheral neuropathy is a common complication in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). A retrospective data analysis over an interval of 10 years (2006-2016) of all children with ALL seen at Sultan Qaboos University Hospital was carried out. Electronic medical records of eligible patients were reviewed. Patients with clinical evidence of neuropathy and abnormal nerve conduction studies (NCSs) were included in the study. Nineteen (nine females and 10 males) out of 103 pediatric patients developed VCR-related neuropathy, and their age ranged between 2.5 and 14 years. Symptoms started after 2-11 doses of VCR. All 19 patients had documented peripheral neuropathy on NCSs. The autonomic nervous system and cranial nerves affection was relatively common in our patients; two presented with bradycardia, two patients with unexplained tachycardia, and five had abdominal pain and constipation, complicated by typhlitis in two patients. One patient developed unilateral hearing loss. Two patients developed severe life-threatening cranial nerve involvement with bilateral ptosis and recurrent laryngeal nerve involvement presented as vocal cord paralysis, hoarseness of voice, frequent chocking, and aspiration episodes. Peripheral neuropathy was the commonest form of VCR-related neuropathy. Autonomic neuropathy was relatively common in our patients. Cranial neuropathy is a serious side effect of VCR that can be severe, involving multiple cranial nerves and needs prompt recognition and management. Concomitant administration of pyridoxine and pyridostigmine does not seem to protect against further neurological damage in some patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Poor outcome in a pediatric patient with acute myeloid leukemia associated with a variant t(8;21) and trisomy 6.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michael J; Meloni-Ehrig, Aurelia M; Manley, Peter E; Altura, Rachel A

    2009-02-01

    RUNX1T1/RUNX1 (formerly ETO/AML1) is a molecular marker that is usually associated with a favorable outcome in both pediatric and adult patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We describe a 10-year-old girl with AML associated with an RUNX1T1/RUNX1 fusion. The patient's karyotype at the time of diagnosis was 46,X,-X,t(4;21;8)(q25;q22;q22),+6. She had an early relapse while being treated on a standard protocol and had significant difficulty in attaining a second remission. She subsequently underwent a matched related donor bone marrow transplant, but a second bone marrow relapse with extensive extramedullary disease followed on day +199. Cytogenetic analysis at second relapse showed evidence of clonal evolution in the form of a highly complex karyotype with numeric and structural abnormalities in addition to the t(4;21;8) and trisomy 6 detected in the diagnostic sample. Trisomy 6 is an uncommon cytogenetic abnormality in myeloid diseases. As a sole abnormality, it has been associated mainly with myelodysplastic syndrome and AML. The presence of this novel variant of t(8;21)(q22;q22) associated with trisomy 6 may have abrogated the usual favorable prognosis associated with RUNX1T1/RUNX1 in AML.

  9. Prognostic impact of RUNX1 and ETV6 gene copy number on pediatric B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia with or without hyperdiploidy.

    PubMed

    Kutlay, Nuket Yurur; Pekpak, Esra; Altıner, Sule; Ileri, Talia; Vicdan, Arzu Nedime; Dinçaslan, Handan; Ince, Elif Unal; Tukun, Fatma Ajlan

    2016-09-01

    The ETV6/RUNX1 fusion gene is a valuable prognostic marker that is frequently observed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-cell ALL). However, the clinical significance of copy number aberrations in these genes remains unclear. In this study, the effects of various aberrations inETV6 and RUNX1 gene copy number on disease prognosis were evaluated in 21 pediatric patients diagnosed with B-cell ALL with/without t(12;21). The prognostic significance of changes in gene copy number of ETV6 or RUNX1 in the presence or absence of hyperdiploidy, trisomy 21, and t(12;21) translocation were also evaluated. RUNX1 gene copy number amplifications were detected in 83 % of the patients who lacked t(12;21) and in all of the patients with hyperdiploidy. Trisomy 21 was detected in 78 % of the patients with hyperdiploidy. Changes in ETV6 gene copy number were detected in patients who lacked both the t(12;21) translocation and RUNX1 gene copy number amplifications. However, RUNX1 gene copy number amplification and ETV6 deletion were observed in all of the patients with t(12;21). RUNX1 gene copy number amplification was associated with hyperdiploidy, but not with t(12;21). Thus, the evaluation of distinct FISH and cytogenetic patterns in patients with B-cell ALL may strengthen the prognostic significance of changes in gene copy number.

  10. Deep targeted sequencing in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia unveils distinct mutational patterns between genetic subtypes and novel relapse-associated genes

    PubMed Central

    Lindqvist, C. Mårten; Lundmark, Anders; Nordlund, Jessica; Freyhult, Eva; Ekman, Diana; Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Raine, Amanda; Övernäs, Elin; Abrahamsson, Jonas; Frost, Britt-Marie; Grandér, Dan; Heyman, Mats; Palle, Josefine; Forestier, Erik; Lönnerholm, Gudmar

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the mutational patterns of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we performed deep next generation sequencing of 872 cancer genes in 172 diagnostic and 24 relapse samples from 172 pediatric ALL patients. We found an overall greater mutational burden and more driver mutations in T-cell ALL (T-ALL) patients compared to B-cell precursor ALL (BCP-ALL) patients. In addition, the majority of the mutations in T-ALL had occurred in the original leukemic clone, while most of the mutations in BCP-ALL were subclonal. BCP-ALL patients carrying any of the recurrent translocations ETV6-RUNX1, BCR-ABL or TCF3-PBX1 harbored few mutations in driver genes compared to other BCP-ALL patients. Specifically in BCP-ALL, we identified ATRX as a novel putative driver gene and uncovered an association between somatic mutations in the Notch signaling pathway at ALL diagnosis and increased risk of relapse. Furthermore, we identified EP300, ARID1A and SH2B3 as relapse-associated genes. The genes highlighted in our study were frequently involved in epigenetic regulation, associated with germline susceptibility to ALL, and present in minor subclones at diagnosis that became dominant at relapse. We observed a high degree of clonal heterogeneity and evolution between diagnosis and relapse in both BCP-ALL and T-ALL, which could have implications for the treatment efficiency. PMID:27590521

  11. Outcome and Prognostic Factors for ETV6/RUNX1 Positive Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Treated at a Single Institution in Korea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Wook; Kim, Seong-Koo; Jang, Pil-Sang; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Jeong, Dae-Chul; Kim, Myungshin; Cho, Bin; Kim, Hack-Ki

    2017-04-01

    ETV6/RUNX1 (+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), which is the most common genetic subtype of pediatric ALL, has a favorable prognosis. In this study, we analyzed the outcome of ETV6/RUNX1 (+) ALL patients treated at our institution with the aim of identifying significant prognostic variables. Sixty-three patients were diagnosed with ETV6/RUNX1 (+) ALL from 2005 to 2011. Prognostic variables studied included minimal residual disease (MRD) as detected by ETV6/RUNX1 (+) fusion, and the presence of additional cytogenetic abnormalities. The 5-year event-free survival was 84.1±4.6%, with 10 patients relapsing at a median of 28.3 months from diagnosis for a 5-year cumulative incidence of relapse of 15.9±4.6%. Multivariate analysis revealed that the presence MRD, as detected by real-time quantitative-polymerase chain reaction or fluorescence in situ hybridization for ETV6/RUNX1 fusion at end of remission induction, and the presence of additional structural abnormalities of 12p (translocations or inversions) negatively affected outcome. Despite treatment such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, eight of the 10 relapsed patients died from disease progression for overall survival of 82.5±6.9%. ETV6/RUNX1 (+) ALL may be heterogeneous in terms of prognosis, and variables such as MRD at end ofremission induction or additional structural abnormalities of 12p could define a subset of patients who are likely to have poor outcome.

  12. Effect of the Polymorphism of Folylpolyglutamate Synthetase on Treatment of High-Dose Methotrexate in Pediatric Patients with Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhen; Tong, Hong-Fei; Li, Yuan; Qian, Jiang-Chao; Wang, Ju-Xiang; Wang, Zhe; Ruan, Ji-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the association of the polymorphism of folylpolyglutamate synthetase (FPGS) with the dynamic plasma concentration of methotrexate (MTX) in pediatric patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), as well as the prognosis. Material/Methods 57 ALL patients and 31 age and sex-matched children (control) were included in this study. Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism was performed for the analysis of the genotype of FPGS rs1544105 and high-performance liquid chromatography for measurement of MTX plasma concentration after 24-h and 44-h treatment. Overall survival was analyzed by Kaplan-Meier method. Results No differences were observed between patients and controls regarding the distribution frequency of genotype and alleles of rs1544105. Patients carrying AA genotype had a significantly higher plasma concentration of MTX after 24 h than those carrying GG or GA (P<0.05) and no differences were found after 44 h. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed a longer median survival time in patients with AA than other genotypes with significant difference in overall survival. Conclusions Polymorphism of FPGS rs1544105 might be used as an effective approach for prediction of the treatment outcome of MTX. PMID:27987364

  13. The contributions of the European Medicines Agency and its pediatric committee to the fight against childhood leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Klaus; Walson, Philip D

    2015-01-01

    Background Although the diagnosis of childhood leukemia is no longer a death sentence, too many patients still die, more with acute myeloid leukemia than with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The European Union pediatric legislation was introduced to improve pharmaceutical treatment of children, but some question whether the European Medicines Agency (EMA) approach is helping children with leukemia. Some have even suggested that the decisions of EMA pediatric committee (PDCO) are counterproductive. This study was designed to investigate the impact of PDCO-issued pediatric investigation plans (PIPs) for leukemia drugs. Methods All PIPs listed under “oncology” were downloaded from the EMA website. Non-leukemia decisions including misclassifications, waivers (no PIP), and solid tumors were discarded. The leukemia decisions were analyzed, compared to pediatric leukemia trials in the database http://www.clinicaltrials.gov, and discussed in the light of current literature. Results The PDCO leukemia decisions demand clinical trials in pediatric leukemia for all new adult drugs without prioritization. However, because leukemia in children is different and much rarer than in adults, these decisions have resulted in proposed studies that are scientifically and ethically questionable. They are also unnecessary, since once promising new compounds are approved for adults, more appropriate, prioritized pediatric leukemia trials are initiated worldwide without PDCO involvement. Conclusion EMA/PDCO leukemia PIPs do little to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia. The unintended negative effects of the flawed EMA/PDCO’s standardized requesting of non-prioritized testing of every new adult leukemia drug in children with relapsed or refractory disease expose these children to questionable trials, and could undermine public trust in pediatric clinical research. Institutions, investigators, and ethics committees/institutional review boards need to be skeptical of trials

  14. 8-Chloro-Adenosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-08

    Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsed Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myeloproliferative Disorder

  15. [Transformation of myelodysplastic syndrome to acute lymphoblastic leukemia: 2 new cases].

    PubMed

    Guillén, M; Madero, L; Parra, L; Hernández, C; Herrero, B; Carceller, F; Lassaletta, A; Sevilla, J

    2013-06-01

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) are clonal disorders of hematopoietic stem cells, with a variable risk of transformation to acute myeloid leukemia. Progression into acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is an extremely rare event, with very few cases published in children. In this report, we describe two cases of myelodysplastic syndromes that progressed to ALL. Moreover, we review previously reported cases of MDS transformation to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in the pediatric population whose prognosis seems to be similar to that for adults.

  16. Phase I Dose-Escalation Trial of Clofarabine Followed by Escalating Doses of Fractionated Cyclophosphamide in Children With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemias

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2010-09-21

    Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Myeloproliferative Disorders; Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia; Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia; Acute Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelofibrosis; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

  17. New insights to the MLL recombinome of acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Kowarz, E; Hofmann, J; Renneville, A; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ben Abdelali, R; Macintyre, E; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Delabesse, E; de Oliveira, M P; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; van Dongen, J J M; Balgobind, B V; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Beverloo, H B; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Harbott, J; Kjeldsen, E; Schnittger, S; Koehl, U; Gruhn, B; Heidenreich, O; Chan, L C; Yip, S F; Krzywinski, M; Eckert, C; Möricke, A; Schrappe, M; Alonso, C N; Schäfer, B W; Krauter, J; Lee, D A; Zur Stadt, U; Te Kronnie, G; Sutton, R; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Lo Nigro, L; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Szczepanski, T; Strehl, S; Ilencikova, D; Molkentin, M; Burmeister, T; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2009-08-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL gene are associated with high-risk pediatric, adult and therapy-associated acute leukemias. These patients need to be identified, treated appropriately and minimal residual disease was monitored by quantitative PCR techniques. Genomic DNA was isolated from individual acute leukemia patients to identify and characterize chromosomal rearrangements involving the human MLL gene. A total of 760 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from 384 pediatric and 376 adult leukemia patients were characterized at the molecular level. The distribution of MLL breakpoints for clinical subtypes (acute lymphoblastic leukemia, acute myeloid leukemia, pediatric and adult) and fused translocation partner genes (TPGs) will be presented, including novel MLL fusion genes. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed 104 different MLL rearrangements of which 64 TPGs are now characterized on the molecular level. Nine TPGs seem to be predominantly involved in genetic recombinations of MLL: AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, MLLT4/AF6, ELL, EPS15/AF1P, MLLT6/AF17 and SEPT6, respectively. Moreover, we describe for the first time the genetic network of reciprocal MLL gene fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  18. E2A-PBX1 exhibited a promising prognosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treated with the CCLG-ALL2008 protocol

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yixin; He, Hailong; Lu, Jun; Wang, Yi; Xiao, Peifang; Li, Jianqin; Li, Jie; Sun, Yina; Lv, Hui; Fan, Junjie; Yao, Yanhua; Chai, Yihuan; Hu, Shaoyan

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to observe the prognosis of pediatric patients with E2A-PBX1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) from the treatment with the CCLG-ALL2008 protocol. Design and methods Three hundred and forty-nine Chinese pediatric patients with pre-B-cell ALL were enrolled in this study from December 2008 to September 2013. Of these, 20 patients with E2A-PBX1 expression and 223 without the gene expression were stratified into two cohorts. Clinical and biological characteristics and 5-year event-free survival (EFS), relapse-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS) were analyzed and compared between these two groups. Results The E2A-PBX1 fusion transcript was detected in 20 of 349 (5.7%) patients. Compared with the gene-negative subgroup, patients with E2A-PBX1 were younger in age but did not show significant differences in white blood cell (WBC) count or gender distribution at primary diagnosis. Moreover, there were more inferior karyotypes detected in the E2A-PBX1 subgroup (P=0.035). With the CCLG-ALL2008 treatment protocol, patients with E2A-PBX1 showed a favorable treatment response with lower minimal residual disease (MRD) levels (<10−4) at time point 1 (TP1, P=0.039) but no superior steroid response or histological remission. We also observed a promising survival outcome, with a 5-year EFS reaching 95.0%±4.9% versus 66.3%±3.9% in the gene-negative group (P=0.039). However, we did not find significant differences in RFS (P=0.061) and OS (P=0.113). Conclusion Our data provided clinical observation of Chinese pediatric patients. Patients with E2A-PBX1-positive ALL benefited well from the CCLG-ALL2008 protocol, a risk-based intensified treatment trial, with lower levels of MRD and longer RFS duration though they had no favorable characteristics at primary diagnosis. PMID:27920559

  19. Donor Umbilical Cord Blood Transplant With or Without Ex-vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitor Cells in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Blasts Under 10 Percent of Bone Marrow Nucleated Cells; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Mixed Phenotype Acute Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Pancytopenia; Refractory Anemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Idarubicin and Cytarabine With or Without Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  1. A health-care system perspective on implementing genomic medicine: pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia as a paradigm.

    PubMed

    Evans, W E; Crews, K R; Pui, C-H

    2013-08-01

    The promise of genomic medicine has received great attention over the past decade, projecting how genomics will soon guide the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of human diseases. However, this evolution has been slower than forecast, even where evidence is often strong (e.g., pharmacogenomics). Reasons include the requirement for institutional resources and the need for the will to push beyond barriers impeding health-care changes. Here, we illustrate how genomics has been deployed to advance the treatment of childhood leukemia.

  2. Rebeccamycin Analog in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  3. Decitabine, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Diagnosed? Certain signs and symptoms can suggest that ... described below. Tests used to diagnose and classify ALL If your doctor thinks you have leukemia, he ...

  5. SB-715992 in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-10

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Recurrent, Refractory, or Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-13

    Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Germline variation in the MTHFR and MTRR genes determines the nadir of bone density in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    te Winkel, M L; de Muinck Keizer-Schrama, S M P F; de Jonge, R; van Beek, R D; van der Sluis, I M; Hop, W C J; Pieters, R; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M

    2011-03-01

    This study aims to identify folate-metabolism-related genetic risk factors for low bone mineral density (BMD) during/after pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment. We investigated the influence of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR 677C > T and 1298A > C) and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR 66A > G) single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on total body BMD (BMD(TB)) and lumbar spine BMD (BMD(LS)) in 83 patients. Homocysteine, folate and vitamin B12 were determined. BMD was measured repeatedly using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry in patients ≥ 4 years (n = 68). Carriers of the MTHFR 677 T-allele showed a lower baseline BMD(TB) than non-carriers (-0.38 SDS vs. +0.55 SDS, p = 0.01) and BMD(TB) remained lower during/after treatment. MTHFR 677C>T did not influence treatment-related loss of BMD(TB) (p = 0.39). The MTRR 66 G-allele carriers showed a trend towards a lower BMD(TB) compared with non-carriers. Combining these two SNPs, patients carrying ≥ 2 risk alleles had a significantly lower BMD(TB) (-1.40 SDS) than patients with one (-0.80 SDS) or no risk alleles (-0.31 SDS). Although carriers of the MTHFR 1298A > C had higher homocysteine levels, this SNP was not related to BMD(TB). BMD(LS) of carriers was similar to non-carriers of the investigated SNPs. The MTHFR 677C>T SNP and the MTRR 66A >G SNP were identified as determinants of impaired BMD(TB) in childhood ALL patients. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Decitabine With or Without Bortezomib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-30

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Treosulfan, Fludarabine Phosphate, and Total-Body Irradiation Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Entinostat and Clofarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Relapsed, or Refractory Poor-Risk Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Bilineage/Biphenotypic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-07-16

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  11. Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Cellular Diagnosis, Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. MS-275 and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Redefining transplant in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sellar, Rob; Goldstone, Anthony H; Lazarus, Hillard M

    2011-12-01

    Assigning the correct treatment to those with acute leukemia is challenging and requires careful assessment of both the disease and the patient. Our ability to assign relapse risk to disease is evolving and incorporates cytogenetics, molecular lesions, and assessment of minimal residual disease after initial treatment. Allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (alloHCPT) is one of the most efficacious treatments available to the physician. In adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) despite the treatment risk, patients with a matched sibling who achieve CR should be referred for transplant. Prospective trials investigating the role of unrelated donors are in progress. There is little prospective evidence, but nonetheless encouraging data, to support referring older patients for alloHPCT using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) regimens. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), all high-risk patients and the majority of intermediate-risk patients with a matched sibling should be offered alloHPCT in CR1. In addition there is evidence that some patients previously assigned as good-risk would benefit from sibling transplant. Use of unrelated donors will expand the numbers eligible for transplant and should be considered when a matched-sibling is not available particularly in high-risk patients. Similarly to ALL, the use of RIC is allowing transplantation to be offered to those deemed too old or unfit for myeloablative conditioning. The importance of enrolling patients into suitable prospective clinical trials cannot be overstated.

  14. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-09

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult L1 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult L2 Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  15. Genetics Home Reference: core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... acute myeloid leukemia core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... collapse boxes. Description Core binding factor acute myeloid leukemia (CBF-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  16. Genetics Home Reference: cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... normal acute myeloid leukemia cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... expand/collapse boxes. Description Cytogenetically normal acute myeloid leukemia (CN-AML) is one form of a cancer ...

  17. Alemtuzumab and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-20

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L1 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; L2 Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Negative Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Childhood Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  18. Nivolumab and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  19. Studying Biomarkers in Samples From Younger Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-17

    Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia/Other Myeloid Malignancies; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4)

  20. Vosaroxin and Infusional Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Myeloid Sarcoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  1. CCI-779 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia in Blastic Phase

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  2. T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for relapsed/refractory pediatric Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia without posttransplant tyrosine kinase inhibitor therapy.

    PubMed

    Sano, Hideki; Mochizuki, Kazuhiro; Akaihata, Mitsuko; Kobayashi, Shogo; Ohto, Hitoshi; Kikuta, Atsushi

    2017-03-01

    Intensive chemotherapy with tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) improves the prognosis of patients with Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph-ALL). However, the prognosis of cases of relapsed or refractory Ph-ALL remains poor. Here, we aimed to assess the efficacy of T-cell-rich HLA-haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (TCR-haplo-HSCT) in eight patients with relapsed or refractory pediatric Ph-ALL. Transplant-related mortality was observed in two patients. All patients discontinued TKI after receiving TCR-haplo-HSCT. The 3-year probability of overall survival and event-free survival was 75.0 and 62.5%, respectively. These results indicate the efficacy of TCR-haplo-HSCT for relapsed/refractory pediatric Ph-ALL.

  3. Epidemiology of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergrass, T.W.

    1985-06-01

    Although the etiology of acute leukemia is largely unknown, some facets of the puzzle are becoming clarified. Recognition of important patterns in age-specific mortality rates has suggested that events early in life, perhaps even prenatally, may have an influence on developing leukemia in childhood. The racial differences evident in mortality, incidence, and immunologic subtype of ALL suggest either differences in exposures to certain factors or differences in responses to those factors by white children. Hereditary factors appear to play a role. Familial and hereditary conditions exist that have high incidences of acute leukemia. Chromosomal anomalies are common in these conditions. Viral infections may play a role by contributing to alteration in genetic material through incorporation of the viral genome. How that virus is dealt with after primary infection seems important. The presence of immunodeficiency may allow wider dissemination or enhanced replication of such viruses, thereby increasing the likelihood of cellular transformation to an abnormal cell. Proliferation of that malignant cell to a clone may depend on other cofactors. Perhaps prolonged exposure to substances like benzene or alkylating agents may enhance these interactions between virus and genetic material. Does this change DNA repair mechanisms. Are viral infections handled differently. Is viral genomic information more easily integrated into host cells. Ionizing radiation has multiple effects. Alteration in genetic material occurs both at the molecular and chromosomal levels. DNA may be altered, lost, or added in the cell's attempt to recover from the injury.

  4. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (∼90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements. PMID:23628958

  5. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2013.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Hofmann, J; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Park, T S; Emerenciano, M; Pombo de Oliveira, M; Renneville, A; Villarese, P; Macintyre, E; Cavé, H; Clappier, E; Mass-Malo, K; Zuna, J; Trka, J; De Braekeleer, E; De Braekeleer, M; Oh, S H; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; van der Velden, V H J; van Dongen, J J M; Delabesse, E; Binato, R; Silva, M L M; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Harris, M H; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Choi, W W L; Jarosova, M; Kolenova, A; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Wehner, S; Eckert, C; Talmant, P; Tondeur, S; Lippert, E; Launay, E; Henry, C; Ballerini, P; Lapillone, H; Callanan, M B; Cayuela, J M; Herbaux, C; Cazzaniga, G; Kakadiya, P M; Bohlander, S; Ahlmann, M; Choi, J R; Gameiro, P; Lee, D S; Krauter, J; Cornillet-Lefebvre, P; Te Kronnie, G; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Alonso, C N; zur Stadt, U; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Madsen, H O; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Cerveira, N; Teixeira, M R; Lo Nigro, L; Möricke, A; Stanulla, M; Schrappe, M; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Zwaan, C M; Coenen, E A; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Strehl, S; Dworzak, M; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Dingermann, T; Klingebiel, T; Marschalek, R

    2013-11-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL (mixed lineage leukemia) gene are associated with high-risk infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. We used long-distance inverse-polymerase chain reaction to characterize the chromosomal rearrangement of individual acute leukemia patients. We present data of the molecular characterization of 1590 MLL-rearranged biopsy samples obtained from acute leukemia patients. The precise localization of genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and novel TPGs identified. All patients were classified according to their gender (852 females and 745 males), age at diagnosis (558 infant, 416 pediatric and 616 adult leukemia patients) and other clinical criteria. Combined data of our study and recently published data revealed a total of 121 different MLL rearrangements, of which 79 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. However, only seven rearrangements seem to be predominantly associated with illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene (≈ 90%): AFF1/AF4, MLLT3/AF9, MLLT1/ENL, MLLT10/AF10, ELL, partial tandem duplications (MLL PTDs) and MLLT4/AF6, respectively. The MLL breakpoint distributions for all clinical relevant subtypes (gender, disease type, age at diagnosis, reciprocal, complex and therapy-induced translocations) are presented. Finally, we present the extending network of reciprocal MLL fusions deriving from complex rearrangements.

  6. Azacitidine, Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride, and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Poor-Prognosis Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-18

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Balance in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Varedi, Mitra; McKenna, Raymond; Lamberg, Eric M

    2017-03-01

    Treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) can affect balance via different mechanisms, including sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy, cognitive impairment, and reduced muscle strength and flexibility. To provide an overview of what is currently known about the effects of cancer treatment on balance in pediatric ALL patients and survivors, and of the predictors of poor balance, a review of the literature was conducted. Five databases were searched for English-language original research articles on balance during or after treatment for pediatric ALL. From a total of nine studies, six identified significant balance problems in children with ALL during or after treatment. The percentage of patients or survivors with impaired balance varied between 27% and 69% during treatment, 7% and 65% a few years after completion of treatment, and 14% and 17% many years after the completion of treatment. Factors associated with impaired balance were higher body mass index; higher intrathecal methotrexate dose; cranial radiation; knee extensor weakness; and impaired cognition. Although heterogeneity between the studies regarding patient age; age at diagnosis; time since completion of treatment; and methods of quantifying balance make it difficult to reach a single conclusion, the evidence suggests that survivors may experience short- and/or long-term balance difficulties. While there is a need for additional studies to better understand the effects of impaired balance in survivors, clinicians treating both child and adult survivors of ALL need to be aware of these potential risks. © 2016 Japan Pediatric Society.

  8. Mutational profiling of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with testicular relapse.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ling-Wen; Sun, Qiao-Yang; Mayakonda, Anand; Tan, Kar-Tong; Chien, Wenwen; Lin, De-Chen; Jiang, Yan-Yi; Xu, Liang; Garg, Manoj; Lao, Zhen-Tang; Lill, Michael; Yang, Henry; Yeoh, Allen Eng Juh; Koeffler, H Phillip

    2017-03-02

    Relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the leading cause of deaths of childhood cancer. Although relapse usually happens in the bone marrow, extramedullary relapse occasionally occurs including either the central nervous system or testis (<1-2%). We selected two pediatric ALL patients who experienced testicular relapse and interrogated their leukemic cells with exome sequencing. The sequencing results and clonality analyses suggest that relapse of patient D483 directly evolved from the leukemic clone at diagnosis which survived chemotherapy. In contrast, relapse leukemia cells (both bone marrow and testis) of patient D727 were likely derived from a common ancestral clone, and testicular relapse likely arose independently from the bone marrow relapsed leukemia. Our findings decipher the mutational spectra and shed light on the clonal evolution of two cases of pediatric ALL with testicular relapse. Presence of CREBBP/NT5C2 mutations suggests that a personalized therapeutic approach should be applied to these two patients.

  9. Pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with t(8;16)(p11;p13), a distinct clinical and biological entity: a collaborative study by the International-Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster AML-study group

    PubMed Central

    Coenen, Eva A.; Zwaan, C. Michel; Reinhardt, Dirk; Harrison, Christine J.; Haas, Oskar A.; de Haas, Valerie; Mihál, Vladimir; De Moerloose, Barbara; Jeison, Marta; Rubnitz, Jeffrey E.; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Johnston, Donna; Alonzo, Todd A.; Hasle, Henrik; Auvrignon, Anne; Dworzak, Michael; Pession, Andrea; van der Velden, Vincent H. J.; Swansbury, John; Wong, Kit-fai; Terui, Kiminori; Savasan, Sureyya; Winstanley, Mark; Vaitkeviciene, Goda; Zimmermann, Martin; Pieters, Rob; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2013-01-01

    In pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cytogenetic abnormalities are strong indicators of prognosis. Some recurrent cytogenetic abnormalities, such as t(8;16)(p11;p13), are so rare that collaborative studies are required to define their prognostic impact. We collected the clinical characteristics, morphology, and immunophenotypes of 62 pediatric AML patients with t(8;16)(p11;p13) from 18 countries participating in the International Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (I-BFM) AML study group. We used the AML-BFM cohort diagnosed from 1995-2005 (n = 543) as a reference cohort. Median age of the pediatric t(8;16)(p11;p13) AML patients was significantly lower (1.2 years). The majority (97%) had M4-M5 French-American-British type, significantly different from the reference cohort. Erythrophagocytosis (70%), leukemia cutis (58%), and disseminated intravascular coagulation (39%) occurred frequently. Strikingly, spontaneous remissions occurred in 7 neonates with t(8;16)(p11;p13), of whom 3 remain in continuous remission. The 5-year overall survival of patients diagnosed after 1993 was 59%, similar to the reference cohort (P = .14). Gene expression profiles of t(8;16)(p11;p13) pediatric AML cases clustered close to, but distinct from, MLL-rearranged AML. Highly expressed genes included HOXA11, HOXA10, RET, PERP, and GGA2. In conclusion, pediatric t(8;16)(p11;p13) AML is a rare entity defined by a unique gene expression signature and distinct clinical features in whom spontaneous remissions occur in a subset of neonatal cases. PMID:23974201

  10. [Treatment of acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Gross, R; Gerecke, D

    1982-11-12

    The effective treatment of acute (myeloblastic and lymphoblastic) leukaemias depends on the induction of remissions as well as on the maintenance of these remissions. Whereas the use of anthracyclines and of cytosine arabinoside in different combinations notably increased the rate of induction of remissions, their maintenance was less successful until now. We present a scheme using, beside MTX and 6-MP, modified COAP regimes periodically every 3 months. The follow-up of 26 patients treated in this way is encouraging since nearly one third remained in full haematological remission after 3 years of observation.

  11. Drug interactions may be important risk factors for methotrexate neurotoxicity, particularly in pediatric leukemia patients.

    PubMed

    Forster, Victoria J; van Delft, Frederik W; Baird, Susan F; Mair, Shona; Skinner, Roderick; Halsey, Christina

    2016-11-01

    Methotrexate administration is associated with frequent adverse neurological events during treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Here, we present evidence to support the role of common drug interactions and low vitamin B12 levels in potentiating methotrexate neurotoxicity. We review the published evidence and highlight key potential drug interactions as well as present clinical evidence of severe methotrexate neurotoxicity in conjunction with nitrous oxide anesthesia and measurements of vitamin B12 levels among pediatric leukemia patients during therapy. We describe a very plausible mechanism for methotrexate neurotoxicity in pediatric leukemia patients involving reduction in methionine and consequential disruption of myelin production. We provide evidence that a number of commonly prescribed drugs in pediatric leukemia management interact with the same folate biosynthetic pathways and/or reduce functional vitamin B12 levels and hence are likely to increase the toxicity of methotrexate in these patients. We also present a brief case study supporting out hypothesis that nitrous oxide contributes to methotrexate neurotoxicity and a nutritional study, showing that vitamin B12 deficiency is common in pediatric leukemia patients. Use of nitrous oxide in pediatric leukemia patients at the same time as methotrexate use should be avoided especially as many suitable alternative anesthetic agents exist. Clinicians should consider monitoring levels of vitamin B12 in patients suspected of having methotrexate-induced neurotoxic effects.

  12. Advances in acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Randolph, Tim R

    2004-01-01

    Current literature. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a stem cell disorder characterized by an overproduction of lymphoblasts in the bone marrow that eventually spill into circulation, producing lymphocytosis. As with the other acute leukemias, the most common symptoms experienced by patients include fatigue, bleeding, and recurrent infections resulting from the suppression of normal hematopoiesis in the bone marrow by the accumulating blasts. ALL primarily affects children and exhibits the best response to standard chemotherapy as compared to acute myeloblastic leukemias (AML). Further, remission rates are highest among ALL patients, many of whom are experiencing sustained remissions suggesting cure. In light of early treatment successes, researchers began to investigate modifications of standard treatment regimens to accommodate variability in weight, age, and response to therapy among children with ALL. Individualized treatment plans were implemented where some patients received a reduced intensity course of therapy to minimize drug toxicity while others received drug intensification to maximize response. More recently, research efforts have been directed at the elucidation of leukemogenic mechanisms implicated in ALL to identify specific protein mutants that can be used to design drugs tailored to interfere with the activity of these mutant protein targets. Identification of chimeric proteins produced from chromosomal translocations and gene expression profiles from microarray analyses are the primary techniques used to identify the potential therapeutic targets. Several reliable prognostic indicators have been identified and are being used to improve therapeutic planning and outcome prediction in ALL patients. Individualized treatment regimens have been developed based on the specific characteristics of each patient to minimize treatment related adverse events and maximize response. Through the use of cytogenetic, molecular, and microarray testing, ALL

  13. Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-02-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Sherborne, Amy L; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Agnes F; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L; Leal, Valeria P; Espinoza, Juan P M; Kamel, Azza M; Ebid, Gamal T A; Radwan, Eman R; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S

    2011-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  15. Rationale for an international consortium to study inherited genetic susceptibility to childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Sherborne, Amy L.; Hemminki, Kari; Kumar, Rajiv; Bartram, Claus R.; Stanulla, Martin; Schrappe, Martin; Petridou, Eleni; Semsei, Ágnes F.; Szalai, Csaba; Sinnett, Daniel; Krajinovic, Maja; Healy, Jasmine; Lanciotti, Marina; Dufour, Carlo; Indaco, Stefania; El-Ghouroury, Eman A; Sawangpanich, Ruchchadol; Hongeng, Suradej; Pakakasama, Samart; Gonzalez-Neira, Anna; Ugarte, Evelia L.; Leal, Valeria P.; Espinoza, Juan P.M.; Kamel, Azza M.; Ebid, Gamal T.A.; Radwan, Eman R.; Yalin, Serap; Yalin, Erdinc; Berkoz, Mehmet; Simpson, Jill; Roman, Eve; Lightfoot, Tracy; Hosking, Fay J.; Vijayakrishnan, Jayaram; Greaves, Mel; Houlston, Richard S.

    2011-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the major pediatric cancer in developed countries. To date most association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia have been based on the candidate gene approach and have evaluated a restricted number of polymorphisms. Such studies have served to highlight difficulties in conducting statistically and methodologically rigorous investigations into acute lymphoblastic leukemia risk. Recent genome-wide association studies of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia have provided robust evidence that common variation at four genetic loci confers a modest increase in risk. The accumulated experience to date and relative lack of success of initial efforts to identify novel acute lymphoblastic leukemia predisposition loci emphasize the need for alternative study designs and methods. The International Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia Genetics Consortium includes 12 research groups in Europe, Asia, the Middle East and the Americas engaged in studying the genetics of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. The initial goal of this consortium is to identify and characterize low-penetrance susceptibility variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia through association-based analyses. Efforts to develop genome-wide association studies of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in terms of both sample size and single nucleotide polymorphism coverage, and to increase the number of single nucleotide polymorphisms taken forward to large-scale replication should lead to the identification of additional novel risk variants for acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Ethnic differences in the risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia are well recognized and thus in assessing the interplay between inherited and non-genetic risk factors, analyses using different population cohorts with different incidence rates are likely to be highly informative. Given that the frequency of many acute lymphoblastic leukemia subgroups is small, identifying differential effects will realistically only be

  16. Integrative computational in-depth analysis of dysregulated miRNA-mRNA interactions in drug-resistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells: an attempt to obtain new potential gene-miRNA pathways involved in response to treatment.

    PubMed

    Mesrian Tanha, Hamzeh; Mojtabavi Naeini, Marjan; Rahgozar, Soheila; Moafi, Alireza; Honardoost, Mohammad Amin

    2016-06-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the major neoplasia type among children. Despite the tremendous success of current treatment strategies, drug resistance still remains a major cause of chemotherapy failure and relapse in pediatric patients. Overwhelming evidence illustrates that microRNAs (miRNAs) act as post-transcriptional regulators of drug-resistance-related genes. The current study was aimed at how dysregulated miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks mediate resistance to four commonly used chemotherapy agents in pediatric ALL, including asparaginase, daunorubicin, prednisolone, and vincristine. Using public expression microarray datasets, a holistic in silico approach was utilized to investigate candidate drug resistance miRNA-mRNA-signaling pathway interaction networks in pediatric ALL. Our systems biology approach nominated significant drug resistance and cross-resistance miRNAs, mRNAs, and cell signaling pathways based on anti-correlative relationship between miRNA and mRNA expression pattern. To sum up, our systemic analysis disclosed either a new potential role of miRNAs, or a possible mechanism of cellular drug resistance, in chemotherapy resistance of pediatric ALL. The current study may shed light on predicting drug response and overcoming drug resistance in childhood ALL for subsequent generations of chemotherapies.

  17. What's New in Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Leukemia (AML) About Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What’s New in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Research and Treatment? Researchers ... benefit from current treatments. Researchers are studying many new chemo drugs for use in AML, including: Sapacitabine, ...

  18. What Are the Key Statistics about Acute Myeloid Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) What Are the Key Statistics About Acute Myeloid Leukemia? The American Cancer Society’s ... myeloid leukemia . Visit the American Cancer Society’s Cancer Statistics Center for more key statistics. Written by References ...

  19. The MLL recombinome of acute leukemias in 2017.

    PubMed

    Meyer, C; Burmeister, T; Gröger, D; Tsaur, G; Fechina, L; Renneville, A; Sutton, R; Venn, N C; Emerenciano, M; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Barbieri Blunck, C; Almeida Lopes, B; Zuna, J; Trka, J; Ballerini, P; Lapillonne, H; De Braekeleer, M; Cazzaniga, G; Corral Abascal, L; van der Velden, V H J; Delabesse, E; Park, T S; Oh, S H; Silva, M L M; Lund-Aho, T; Juvonen, V; Moore, A S; Heidenreich, O; Vormoor, J; Zerkalenkova, E; Olshanskaya, Y; Bueno, C; Menendez, P; Teigler-Schlegel, A; Zur Stadt, U; Lentes, J; Göhring, G; Kustanovich, A; Aleinikova, O; Schäfer, B W; Kubetzko, S; Madsen, H O; Gruhn, B; Duarte, X; Gameiro, P; Lippert, E; Bidet, A; Cayuela, J M; Clappier, E; Alonso, C N; Zwaan, C M; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, M M; Izraeli, S; Trakhtenbrot, L; Archer, P; Hancock, J; Möricke, A; Alten, J; Schrappe, M; Stanulla, M; Strehl, S; Attarbaschi, A; Dworzak, M; Haas, O A; Panzer-Grümayer, R; Sedék, L; Szczepański, T; Caye, A; Suarez, L; Cavé, H; Marschalek, R

    2017-07-13

    Chromosomal rearrangements of the human MLL/KMT2A gene are associated with infant, pediatric, adult and therapy-induced acute leukemias. Here we present the data obtained from 2345 acute leukemia patients. Genomic breakpoints within the MLL gene and the involved translocation partner genes (TPGs) were determined and 11 novel TPGs were identified. Thus, a total of 135 different MLL rearrangements have been identified so far, of which 94 TPGs are now characterized at the molecular level. In all, 35 out of these 94 TPGs occur recurrently, but only 9 specific gene fusions account for more than 90% of all illegitimate recombinations of the MLL gene. We observed an age-dependent breakpoint shift with breakpoints localizing within MLL intron 11 associated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia and younger patients, while breakpoints in MLL intron 9 predominate in AML or older patients. The molecular characterization of MLL breakpoints suggests different etiologies in the different age groups and allows the correlation of functional domains of the MLL gene with clinical outcome. This study provides a comprehensive analysis of the MLL recombinome in acute leukemia and demonstrates that the establishment of patient-specific chromosomal fusion sites allows the design of specific PCR primers for minimal residual disease analyses for all patients.Leukemia advance online publication, 8 August 2017; doi:10.1038/leu.2017.213.

  20. Novel agents for the treatment of childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Annesley, Colleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Together, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) make up approximately one-third of all pediatric cancer diagnoses. Despite remarkable improvement in the treatment outcomes of these diseases over the past several decades, the prognosis for certain high-risk groups of leukemia and for relapsed disease remains poor. However, recent insights into different types of ‘driver’ lesions of leukemogenesis, such as the aberrant activation of signaling pathways and various epigenetic modifications, have led to the discovery of novel agents that specifically target the mechanism of transformation. In parallel, emerging approaches in cancer immunotherapy have led to newer therapies that can exploit and harness cytotoxic immunity directed against malignant cells. This review details the rationale and implementation of recent and specifically targeted therapies in acute pediatric leukemia. Topics covered include the inhibition of critical cell signaling pathways [BCR-ABL, FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3), mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), and Janus-associated kinase (JAK)], proteasome inhibition, inhibition of epigenetic regulators of gene expression [DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) inhibitors, histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors, and disruptor of telomeric signaling-1 (DOT1L) inhibitors], monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugated toxins, bispecific T-cell engaging (BiTE) antibodies, and chimeric antigen receptor-modified (CAR) T cells. PMID:25830014

  1. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Veliparib and Temozolomide in Treating Patients With Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Accelerated Phase of Disease; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With PML-RARA; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Adult T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Disease; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Eltrombopag Olamine in Improving Platelet Recovery in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-26

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ramsey, Laura B.; Janke, Laura J.; Payton, Monique A.; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W.; Karol, Seth E.; Kamdem, Landry Kamdem; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T.; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E.; Relling, Mary V.

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. PMID:26252865

  5. Antileukemic Efficacy of Continuous vs Discontinuous Dexamethasone in Murine Models of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Laura B; Janke, Laura J; Payton, Monique A; Cai, Xiangjun; Paugh, Steven W; Karol, Seth E; Kamdem Kamdem, Landry; Cheng, Cheng; Williams, Richard T; Jeha, Sima; Pui, Ching-Hon; Evans, William E; Relling, Mary V

    2015-01-01

    Osteonecrosis is one of the most common, serious, toxicities resulting from the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In recent years, pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia clinical trials have used discontinuous rather than continuous dosing of dexamethasone in an effort to reduce the incidence of osteonecrosis. However, it is not known whether discontinuous dosing would compromise antileukemic efficacy of glucocorticoids. Therefore, we tested the efficacy of discontinuous dexamethasone against continuous dexamethasone in murine models bearing human acute lymphoblastic leukemia xenografts (n = 8 patient samples) or murine BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Plasma dexamethasone concentrations (7.9 to 212 nM) were similar to those achieved in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia using conventional dosages. The median leukemia-free survival ranged from 16 to 59 days; dexamethasone prolonged survival from a median of 4 to 129 days in all seven dexamethasone-sensitive acute lymphoblastic leukemias. In the majority of cases (7 of 8 xenografts and the murine BCR-ABL model) we demonstrated equal efficacy of the two dexamethasone dosing regimens; whereas for one acute lymphoblastic leukemia sample, the discontinuous regimen yielded inferior antileukemic efficacy (log-rank p = 0.002). Our results support the clinical practice of using discontinuous rather than continuous dexamethasone dosing in patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  6. PS-341 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Blast Phase, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-22

    Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  7. [MLL rearrangements in acute leukemias].

    PubMed

    Urioste, M; Arranz, E; Martínez-Delgado, B; Soto, C; Román, A; Pérez, I; Mayayo, M; Pérez-Pons, C; Barroso, A; Benítez, J

    1999-12-01

    In present study we have studied MLL rearrangements in a serie of acute myeloid, lymphoblastic and biphenotypic leukaemias. We analyzed a total of 11 cases: 9 acute myeloid leukaemias (M4 and M5 subtypes in FAB classification), 1 lymphoid leukaemia, and 1 acute biphenotypic leukaemia. We studied bone marrow samples from all patients by using conventional cytogenetic techniques and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with an MLL probe. We also analyzed the correlation between clinical features and genetic results. Cells from 6 patients showed to contain MLL rearrangements and these arose in all types of leukaemias included in this study. Some MLL rearrangements were detected by FISH in kariotypically normal cases or without cytogenetic evidence of 11q23 aberration. MLL gene duplication has been observed in two cases with M4 and biphenotypic leukaemia, respectively. The presence of MLL gene rearrangements does not shape a group of patients with a common clinical pattern. MLL rearrangements occurs in a wide variety of leukemias. These rearrangements should be screened by FISH techniques, taking into account that gene duplications could arise in cases with normal karyotype. MLL rearrangements appear to have a considerable clinicopathologic heterogeneity.

  8. SJG-136 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  9. Comparison of the results of the treatment of adolescents and young adults with standard-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia with the Programa Español de Tratamiento en Hematología pediatric-based protocol ALL-96.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep-María; Oriol, Albert; Sanz, Miguel-Angel; Tormo, Mar; Fernández-Abellán, Pascual; del Potro, Eloy; Abella, Eugenia; Bueno, Javier; Parody, Ricardo; Bastida, Pilar; Grande, Carlos; Heras, Inmaculada; Bethencourt, Concepción; Feliu, Evarist; Ortega, Juan-José

    2008-04-10

    Retrospective studies have shown that adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with pediatric protocols have better outcomes than similarly aged patients treated with adult protocols, but prospective studies comparing adolescents and young adults using pediatric schedules are scarce. The ALL-96 protocol was addressed to compare the toxicity and results of a pediatric-based protocol in adolescents (age 15-18 years) and young adults (age 19-30 years) with standard-risk (SR) ALL. Adolescents (n = 35) and young adults (n = 46) received a standard five-drug/5-week induction course followed by two cycles of early consolidation, maintenance with monthly reinforcement cycles up to 1 year in continuous complete remission (CR) and 1 year with standard maintenance chemotherapy up to 2 years in CR. Adolescents and young adults were comparable in the main pretreatment ALL characteristics. The CR rate was 98% and. after a median follow-up of 4.2 years, 6-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) were 61% (95% CI, 51% to 72%) and 69% (95% CI, 59% to 79%), respectively, with no differences between adolescents and young adults. The hematologic toxicity in consolidation and reinforcement cycles was higher in young adults than in adolescents. Slow response to induction therapy was the only parameter associated with poor EFS (34% v 67%) and OS (40% v 76%). The response to the pediatric ALL-96 protocol was identical in adolescents and young adults despite a slight increase in hematologic toxicity observed in adults. This justifies the age-unrestricted use of pediatric regimens to treat patients with SR ALL.

  10. Engraftment of low numbers of pediatric acute lymphoid and myeloid leukemias into NOD/SCID/IL2Rcγnull mice reflects individual leukemogenecity and highly correlates with clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Woiterski, Jeanette; Ebinger, Martin; Witte, Kai E; Goecke, Barbara; Heininger, Vanessa; Philippek, Martin; Bonin, Michael; Schrauder, Andre; Röttgers, Silja; Herr, Wolfgang; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hartwig, Udo F; André, Maya C

    2013-10-01

    Although immortalized cell lines have been extensively used to optimize treatment strategies in cancer, the usefulness of such in vitro systems to recapitulate primary disease is limited. Therefore, the design of in vivo models ideally utilizing patient-derived material is of critical importance. In this regard, NOD.Cg-Prkdc(scid) IL2rg(tmWjl) /Sz (NSG) mice have been reported to provide superior engraftment rates. However, limited data exist on the validity of such a model to constitute a surrogate marker for clinical parameters. We studied primary and serial engraftment on more than 200 NSG mice with 54 primary pediatric B cell precursor acute lymphatic leukemia (B-ALL), myeloid leukemia (AML) and T cell leukemia (T-ALL) samples, characterized the leukemogenic profile and correlated engraftment kinetics with clinical outcome. Median time to engraftment was 7-10 weeks and 90% of the mice engrafted. Male recipients conferred significantly higher engraftment levels than female recipients (p ≤ 0.004). PCR-based minimal residual disease marker expression and fluorescence in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of patient-specific genetic aberrations in mice. Transcriptome cluster analysis of genes known to be important in the leukemogenesis of all three diseases revealed that well-known tumor-regulating genes were expressed to a comparable extent in mice and men. The extent of engraftment and overall survival of NSG mice highly correlated with the individual prognosis of B-ALL, AML and T-ALL patients. Thus, we propose an in vivo model that provides a valuable preclinical tool to explore the heterogeneity of leukemic disease and exploit patient-tailored leukemia-targeting strategies within multivariate analyses. © 2013 UICC.

  11. New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_167596.html New Treatment Approved for Acute Myeloid Leukemia Vyxeos combines ... projections from the U.S. National Cancer Institute. The new therapy is sanctioned for high-risk forms of ...

  12. How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Adults Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Types How Is Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia Classified? Most types of cancers are assigned numbered ... ALL are now named as follows: B-cell ALL Early pre-B ALL (also called pro-B ...

  13. Stages of Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  14. Risk Groups for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  15. Treatment Option Overview (Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia)

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  17. Treatment Options for Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  18. Treatment Options for Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... genetic conditions affect the risk of having childhood ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  19. General Information about Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... recovery) and treatment options. Adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a type of cancer in which the ... to radiation may increase the risk of developing ALL. Anything that increases your risk of getting a ...

  20. Acute myeloid leukemia presenting as galactorrhea

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, K. Rakul; Devi, R. Nandini

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) presents with symptoms related to pancytopenia (weakness, infections, bleeding diathesis) and organ infiltration with leukemic cells. Galactorrhea is an uncommon manifestation of AML. We report a case of AML presenting with galactorrhea. PMID:27695173

  1. Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Version 2.2013

    PubMed Central

    O'Donnell, Margaret R.; Tallman, Martin S.; Abboud, Camille N.; Altman, Jessica K.; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Arber, Daniel A.; Attar, Eyal; Borate, Uma; Coutre, Steven E.; Damon, Lloyd E.; Lancet, Jeffrey; Maness, Lori J.; Marcucci, Guido; Martin, Michael G.; Millenson, Michael M.; Moore, Joseph O.; Ravandi, Farhad; Shami, Paul J.; Smith, B. Douglas; Stone, Richard M.; Strickland, Stephen A.; Wang, Eunice S.; Gregory, Kristina M.; Naganuma, Maoko

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights summarize several key updates to the NCCN Guidelines for Acute Myeloid Leukemia and discuss the clinical evidence that support the recommendations. The updates described in this article focus on the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) section, featuring recommendations for additional induction/consolidation regimens in patients with low- or intermediate-risk APL, and providing guidance on maintenance strategies for APL. PMID:24029121

  2. 211^At-BC8-B10 Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-13

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; CD45-Positive Neoplastic Cells Present; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  3. Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Down Syndrome and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-10

    Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  4. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Tipifarnib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-05-09

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. 5-Fluoro-2'-Deoxycytidine and Tetrahydrouridine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  7. S1312, Inotuzumab Ozogamicin and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-23

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma

  8. Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-06

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Acute Appendicitis Secondary to Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez, Eduardo A.; Lopez, Marvin A.; Valluri, Kartik; Wang, Danlu; Fischer, Andrew; Perdomo, Tatiana

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 43 Final Diagnosis: Myeloid sarcoma appendicitis Symptoms: Abdominal pain • chills • fever Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laparoscopic appendectomy, bone marrow biopsy Specialty: Gastroenterology and Hepatology Objective: Rare disease Background: The gastrointestinal tract is a rare site for extramedullary involvement in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). Case Report: A 43-year-old female with no past medical history presented complaining of mild abdominal pain, fever, and chills for the past day. On examination, she was tachycardic and febrile, with mild tenderness of her right lower quadrant and without signs of peritoneal irritation. Laboratory examination revealed pancytopenia and DIC, with a fibrinogen level of 290 mg/dL. CT of the abdomen showed a thickened and hyperemic appendix without perforation or abscess, compatible with acute appendicitis. The patient was given IV broad-spectrum antibiotics and was transfused with packed red blood cells and platelets. She underwent uncomplicated laparoscopic appendectomy and bone marrow biopsy, which revealed neo-plastic cells of 90% of the total bone marrow cellularity. Flow cytometry indicated presence of 92.4% of immature myeloid cells with t (15: 17) and q (22: 12) mutations, and FISH analysis for PML-RARA demonstrated a long-form fusion transcript, positive for APL. Appendix pathology described leukemic infiltration with co-expression of myeloperoxidase and CD68, consistent with myeloid sarcoma of the appendix. The patient completed a course of daunorubicin, cytarabine, and all trans-retinoic acid. Repeat bone marrow biopsy demonstrated complete remission. She will follow up with her primary care physician and hematologist/oncologist. Conclusions: Myeloid sarcoma of the appendix in the setting of APL is very rare and it might play a role in the development of acute appendicitis. Urgent management, including bone marrow biopsy for definitive diagnosis and urgent surgical intervention

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy in Treating Patients With Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia, Lymphocytic Lymphoma, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Noncontiguous Stage II Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage IV Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

  11. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and G-CSF in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Selinexor and Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-11

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Choline Magnesium Trisalicylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-01

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Eltrombopag Olamine in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-04

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Azacitidine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-14

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed, Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-10-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Omacetaxine Mepesuccinate, Cytarabine, and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-05

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. S0432 Tipifarnib in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Lenalidomide in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-02

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. GTI-2040 in Treating Patients With Relapsed, Refractory, or High-Risk Acute Leukemia, High-Grade Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Refractory or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  4. Levofloxacin in Preventing Infection in Young Patients With Acute Leukemia Receiving Chemotherapy or Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-05

    Acute Leukemias of Ambiguous Lineage; Bacterial Infection; Diarrhea; Fungal Infection; Musculoskeletal Complications; Neutropenia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  5. T-cell responses against CD19+ pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia mediated by bispecific T-cell engager (BiTE) are regulated contrarily by PD-L1 and CD80/CD86 on leukemic blasts

    PubMed Central

    Feucht, Judith; Kayser, Simone; Gorodezki, David; Hamieh, Mohamad; Döring, Michaela; Blaeschke, Franziska; Schlegel, Patrick; Bösmüller, Hans; Quintanilla-Fend, Leticia; Ebinger, Martin; Lang, Peter; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T-cell immunotherapies are promising options in relapsed/refractory B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We investigated the effect of co-signaling molecules on T-cell attack against leukemia mediated by CD19/CD3-bispecific T-cell engager. Primary CD19+ ALL blasts (n≥10) and physiologic CD19+CD10+ bone marrow precursors were screened for 20 co-signaling molecules. PD-L1, PD-1, LAG-3, CD40, CD86, CD27, CD70 and HVEM revealed different stimulatory and inhibitory profiles of pediatric ALL compared to physiologic cells, with PD-L1 and CD86 as most prominent inhibitory and stimulatory markers. PD-L1 was increased in relapsed ALL patients (n=11) and in ALLs refractory to Blinatumomab (n=5). Exhaustion markers (PD-1, TIM-3) were significantly higher on patients' T cells compared to physiologic controls. T-cell proliferation and effector function was target-cell dependent and correlated to expression of co-signaling molecules. Blockade of inhibitory PD-1-PD-L and CTLA-4-CD80/86 pathways enhanced T-cell function whereas blockade of co-stimulatory CD28-CD80/86 interaction significantly reduced T-cell function. Combination of Blinatumomab and anti-PD-1 antibody was feasible and induced an anti-leukemic in vivo response in a 12-year-old patient with refractory ALL. In conclusion, ALL cells actively regulate T-cell function by expression of co-signaling molecules and modify efficacy of therapeutic T-cell attack against ALL. Inhibitory interactions of leukemia-induced checkpoint molecules can guide future T-cell therapies. PMID:27708227

  6. Bortezomib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Relapsed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-30

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  7. Bioelectrical Impedance Measurement for Predicting Treatment Outcome in Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-14

    Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Mast Cell Leukemia; Myeloid/NK-cell Acute Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  8. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-17

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Final results of a single institution experience with a pediatric-based regimen, the augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster, in adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and comparison to the hyper-CVAD regimen.

    PubMed

    Rytting, Michael E; Jabbour, Elias J; Jorgensen, Jeffrey L; Ravandi, Farhad; Franklin, Anna R; Kadia, Tapan M; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Daver, Naval G; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Konopleva, Marina Y; Borthakur, Gautam; Garris, Rebecca; Wang, Sa; Pierce, Sherry; Schroeder, Kurt; Kornblau, Steven M; Thomas, Deborah A; Cortes, Jorge E; O'Brien, Susan M; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2016-08-01

    Several studies reported improved outcomes of adolescents and young adults (AYA) with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treated with pediatric-based ALL regimens. This prompted the prospective investigation of a pediatric Augmented Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster (ABFM) regimen, and its comparison with hyper-fractionated cyclophosphamide, vincristine, Adriamycin, and dexamethasone (hyper-CVAD) in AYA patients. One hundred and six AYA patients (median age 22 years) with Philadelphia chromosome- (Ph) negative ALL received ABFM from October 2006 through March 2014. Their outcome was compared to 102 AYA patients (median age 27 years), treated with hyper-CVAD at our institution. The complete remission (CR) rate was 93% with ABFM and 98% with hyper-CVAD. The 5-year complete remission duration (CRD) were 53 and 55%, respectively (P = 0.98). The 5-year overall survival (OS) rates were 60 and 60%, respectively. The MRD status on Day 29 and Day 84 of therapy was predictive of long-term outcomes on both ABFM and hyper-CVAD. Severe regimen toxicities with ABFM included hepatotoxicity in 41%, pancreatitis in 11%, osteonecrosis in 9%, and thrombosis in 19%. Myelosuppression-associated complications were most significant with hyper-CVAD. In summary, ABFM and hyper-CVAD resulted in similar efficacy outcomes, but were associated with different toxicity profiles, asparaginase-related with ABFM and myelosuppression-related with hyper-CVAD. Am. J. Hematol. 91:819-823, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Impact of Conditioning Regimen on Outcomes for Children with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Transplantation in First Complete Remission. An Analysis on Behalf of the Pediatric Disease Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lucchini, Giovanna; Labopin, Myriam; Beohou, Eric; Dalissier, Arnauld; Dalle, Jean Hughes; Cornish, Jacqueline; Zecca, Marco; Samarasinghe, Sujith; Gibson, Brenda; Locatelli, Franco; Bertrand, Yves; Abdel-Rahman, Fawzi; Socie, Gerald; Sundin, Mikael; Lankester, Arjan; Sedlacek, Peter; Hamladji, Rose Marie; Heilmann, Carsten; Afanasyev, Boris; Hough, Rachel; Peters, Cristina; Bader, Peter; Veys, Paul

    2017-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the cornerstone of treatment in pediatric high-risk and relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The aim of the present study was to compare outcomes of pediatric patients with AML undergoing HSCT using 3 different conditioning regimens: total body irradiation (TBI) and cyclophosphamide (Cy); busulfan (Bu) and Cy; or Bu, Cy, and melphalan (Mel). In this retrospective study, registry data for patients > 2 and <18 years age undergoing matched allogeneic HSCT for AML in first complete remission (CR1) in 204 European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation centers between 2000 and 2010 were analyzed. Data were available for 631 patients; 458 patients received stem cells from a matched sibling donor and 173 from a matched unrelated donor. For 440 patients, bone marrow was used as stem cell source, and 191 patients received peripheral blood stem cells. One hundred nine patients received TBICy, 389 received BuCy, and 133 received BuCyMel as their preparatory regimen. Median follow-up was 55 months. Patients receiving BuCyMel showed a lower incidence of relapse at 5 years (14.7% versus 31.5% in BuCy versus 30% in TBICy, P < .01) and higher overall survival (OS) (76.6% versus 64% versus 64.5%, P = .04) and leukemia-free survival (LFS) (74.5% versus 58% versus 61.9%, P < .01), with a comparable nonrelapse mortality (NRM) (10.8% versus 10.5% versus 8.1%, P = .79). Acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) grades III and IV but not chronic GVHD, was higher in patients receiving BuCyMel. Older age at HSCT had an adverse impact on NRM and the use of peripheral blood as stem cell source was associated with increased chronic GVHD and NRM as well as lower LFS and OS. Among pediatric patients receiving HSCT for AML in CR1, the use of BuCyMel conditioning proved superior to TBICy and BuCy in reducing relapse and improving LFS.

  11. Childhood acute leukemia and intestinal parasitosis.

    PubMed

    Rivera-Luna, R; Cárdenas-Cardos, R; Martínez-Guerra, G; Ayón, A; Leal, C; Rivera-Ortegón, F

    1989-11-01

    Infectious complications are the leading cause of mortality in children with acute leukemia. Despite the fact that intestinal parasitosis is a rather frequent finding and a health problem in underdeveloped countries, in our experience the incidence of helminthic and protozoan infections among children with leukemia is uncommon. We analyzed 54 consecutive patients with leukemia in a period of 5 years, and only seven (12.9%) had intestinal parasites, four of whom died because of the infection or complication by the parasites. One hundred children without any malignancy were the control group, 26 (26%) of whom had intestinal parasitosis. When we compared the frequency of parasitosis in the control group with the children with leukemia and parasitosis, we found a statistical difference (p less than 0.05). We speculate that parasitic infections may reduce the risk of childhood leukemia.

  12. Benzene and childhood acute leukemia in Oklahoma.

    PubMed

    Janitz, Amanda E; Campbell, Janis E; Magzamen, Sheryl; Pate, Anne; Stoner, Julie A; Peck, Jennifer D

    2017-10-01

    Although childhood cancer is a leading cause of childhood mortality in the US, evidence regarding the etiology is lacking. The goal of this study was to evaluate the association between benzene, a known carcinogen, and childhood acute leukemia. We conducted a case-control study including cases diagnosed with acute leukemia between 1997 and 2012 (n = 307) from the Oklahoma Central Cancer Registry and controls matched on week of birth from birth certificates (n = 1013). We used conditional logistic regression to evaluate the association between benzene, measured with the 2005 National-Scale Air Toxics Assessment (NATA) at census tract of the birth residence, and childhood acute leukemia. We observed no differences in benzene exposure overall between cases and controls. However, when stratified by year of birth, cases born from 2005 to 2010 had a three-fold increased unadjusted odds of elevated exposure compared to controls born in this same time period (4th Quartile OR: 3.53, 95% CI: 1.35, 9.27). Furthermore, the estimates for children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were stronger than those with acute lymphoid leukemia, though not statistically significant. While we did not observe an association between benzene and childhood leukemia overall, our results suggest that acute leukemia is associated with increased benzene exposure among more recent births, and children with AML may have increased benzene exposure at birth. Using the NATA estimates allowed us to assess a specific pollutant at the census tract level, providing an advantage over monitor or point source data. Our study, however, cannot rule out the possibility that benzene may be a marker of other traffic-related exposures and temporal misclassification may explain the lack of an association among earlier births. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advanced vertebral fracture among newly diagnosed children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia: results of the Canadian Steroid-Associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) research program.

    PubMed

    Halton, Jacqueline; Gaboury, Isabelle; Grant, Ronald; Alos, Nathalie; Cummings, Elizabeth A; Matzinger, Maryann; Shenouda, Nazih; Lentle, Brian; Abish, Sharon; Atkinson, Stephanie; Cairney, Elizabeth; Dix, David; Israels, Sara; Stephure, David; Wilson, Beverly; Hay, John; Moher, David; Rauch, Frank; Siminoski, Kerry; Ward, Leanne M

    2009-07-01

    Vertebral compression is a serious complication of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prevalence and pattern of vertebral fractures, as well as their relationship to BMD and other clinical indices, have not been systematically studied. We evaluated spine health in 186 newly diagnosed children (median age, 5.3 yr; 108 boys) with ALL (precursor B cell: N = 167; T cell: N = 19) who were enrolled in a national bone health research program. Patients were assessed within 30 days of diagnosis by lateral thoraco-lumbar spine radiograph, bone age (also used for metacarpal morphometry), and BMD. Vertebral morphometry was carried out by the Genant semiquantitative method. Twenty-nine patients (16%) had a total of 75 grade 1 or higher prevalent vertebral compression fractures (53 thoracic, 71%; 22 lumbar). Grade 1 fractures as the worst grade were present in 14 children (48%), 9 patients (31%) had grade 2 fractures, and 6 children (21%) had grade 3 fractures. The distribution of spine fracture was bimodal, with most occurring in the midthoracic and thoraco-lumbar regions. Children with grade 1 or higher vertebral compression had reduced lumbar spine (LS) areal BMD Z-scores compared with those without (mean +/- SD, -2.1 +/- 1.5 versus -1.1 +/- 1.2; p < 0.001). LS BMD Z-score, second metacarpal percent cortical area Z-score, and back pain were associated with increased odds for fracture. For every 1 SD reduction in LS BMD Z-score, the odds for fracture increased by 80% (95% CI: 10-193%); the presence of back pain had an OR of 4.7 (95% CI: 1.5-14.5). These results show that vertebral compression is an under-recognized complication of newly diagnosed ALL. Whether the fractures will resolve through bone growth during or after leukemia chemotherapy remains to be determined.

  14. Idhifa Approved for Some with Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Idhifa Approved for Some With Acute Myeloid Leukemia For adults with specific genetic mutation To use ... that leads to relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The mutation in the IDH2 gene can ...

  15. Nilotinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-29

    B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Adult Precursor Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  16. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Rytting, Michael E; Jabbour, Elias J; O'Brien, Susan M; Kantarjian, Hagop M

    2017-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in the adolescent and young adult (AYA) population is a difficult clinical problem. The AYA population, generally regarded as patients aged 15 to 39 years, currently draws a good deal of attention, particularly in the area of therapy selection. The current trend is to treat this group of patients with leukemia regimens based on pediatric protocols, and results comparing pediatric approaches versus adult approaches to treatment are maturing. Results are pending from a large US trial in which pediatric-based treatment is given to AYA patients with ALL. In tandem with these new clinical trials, researchers have reported disease features in the AYA group that may explain some of the differences in response to treatment observed in the AYA population compared with the pediatric population. In addition, unique social factors in this age group add to the complexity of ALL therapy in the AYA population. AYA patients are developing independence and separating from their parents. They tend to be noncompliant. Young adults suffer from a lack of health care insurance and poor access to clinical trials, and have specific concerns regarding toxicities, in particular fertility. Cancer 2017;123:2398-403. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  17. Sorafenib in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Leukemia, Myelodysplastic Syndromes, or Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Phase; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  18. Laboratory-Treated Donor Cord Blood Cell Infusion Following Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Younger Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-29

    Acute Leukemia of Ambiguous Lineage; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Trebananib With or Without Low-Dose Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-14

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Yttrium Y 90 Anti-CD45 Monoclonal Antibody BC8 Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With High-Risk Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. A Randomized Phase IV Control Trial of Single High Dose Oral Vitamin D3 in Pediatric Patients Undergoing HSCT

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-01

    Vitamin D Deficiency; Stem Cell Transplant Complications; Pediatric Cancer; Blood Disorder; Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Pediatric Acute Lymphoid Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Sickle Cell Anemia in Children; Aplastic Anemia; Thalassemia in Children

  2. Azacitidine With or Without Entinostat in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-08

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Micronucleus expression and acute leukemia prognosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Run-Chao; Yang, Lei; Tang, Yang; Bai, Ou

    2013-01-01

    The micronucleus frequency (MNF) in peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) is a biomarker of chromosomal damage and genome instability in human populations.The relationship of micronucleus frequency with prognosis of patients with acute leukemia is not clear. We therefore investigated MNF in mitogen-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from patients with hematologic diseases and solid tumours. Patients included 50 with acute leukemia, 49 diagnosed with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), 54 with benign blood diseases, and 45 with solid tumours, examined with 50 healthy controls. The mean MNF was significantly higher in cases of hematologic diseases and solid tumor patients than in healthy controls (P<0.001). There was no evident difference between MNF in the acute leukemia (7.15 ± 2.18) and solid tumor groups (7.11 ± 1.47), but both were higher than in the MDS group (5.12 ± 1.29) and benign blood diseases group (3.08 ± 1.08). Taking 7.15%, the average MNF of the acute leukemia group as standard, and dividing 50 cases of acute leukemia patients into high MNF group (MNF ≥ 7.15%) and low MNF group (MNF<7.15%). The overall response (complete remission + partial remission) rates of the low MNF group were significantly higher than in the high MNF group (P=0.001). The high MNF group further showed lower overall survival rates than the low MNF group. MNF expression and progression-free survival seemed to have a opposite relationship, with a correlation coefficient of -0.702. These data indicate that MNF in peripheral blood lymphocytes is important for evaluation of prognosis of acute leukemia patients, and it can reflect progression of disease to a certain degree.

  4. Phase I Combination of Midostaurin, Bortezomib, and Chemo in Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. AR-42 and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  6. Idarubicin, Cytarabine, and Pravastatin Sodium in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Palomero, Teresa; Khiabanian, Hossein; Van der Meulen, Joni; Castillo, Mireia; Van Roy, Nadine; De Moerloose, Barbara; Philippé, Jan; González-García, Sara; Toribio, María L; Taghon, Tom; Zuurbier, Linda; Cauwelier, Barbara; Harrison, Christine J; Schwab, Claire; Pisecker, Markus; Strehl, Sabine; Langerak, Anton W; Gecz, Jozef; Sonneveld, Edwin; Pieters, Rob; Paietta, Elisabeth; Rowe, Jacob M; Wiernik, Peter H; Benoit, Yves; Soulier, Jean; Poppe, Bruce; Yao, Xiaopan; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Meijerink, Jules; Rabadan, Raul; Speleman, Frank; Ferrando, Adolfo

    2010-04-01

    Tumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating mutations and deletions in the X-linked plant homeodomain finger 6 (PHF6) gene in 16% of pediatric and 38% of adult primary T-ALL samples. Notably, PHF6 mutations are almost exclusively found in T-ALL samples from male subjects. Mutational loss of PHF6 is importantly associated with leukemias driven by aberrant expression of the homeobox transcription factor oncogenes TLX1 and TLX3. Overall, these results identify PHF6 as a new X-linked tumor suppressor in T-ALL and point to a strong genetic interaction between PHF6 loss and aberrant expression of TLX transcription factors in the pathogenesis of this disease.

  8. Advanced Vertebral Fracture among Newly Diagnosed Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Results of the Canadian STeroid-associated Osteoporosis in the Pediatric Population (STOPP) Research Program

    PubMed Central

    Halton, J.; Gaboury, I.; Grant, R.; Alos, N.; Cummings, E. A.; Matzinger, M.; Shenouda, N.; Lentle, B.; Abish, S.; Atkinson, S.; Cairney, E.; Dix, D.; Israels, S.; Stephure, D.; Wilson, B.; Hay, J.; Moher, D.; Rauch, F.; Siminoski, K.; Ward, L.M.

    2013-01-01

    Vertebral compression is a serious complication of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). The prevalence and pattern of vertebral fractures, as well as their relationship to bone mineral density (BMD) and other clinical indices, have not been systematically studied. We evaluated spine health in 186 newly diagnosed children (median age 5.3 years, 108 boys) with ALL (precursor B cell: N=167; T-cell: N=19), who were enrolled in a national bone health research program. Patients were assessed within 30 days of diagnosis by lateral thoraco-lumbar spine radiograph, bone age (also used for metacarpal morphometry) and BMD. Vertebral morphometry was carried out by the Genant semi-quantitative method. Twenty-nine patients (16%) had a total of 75 grade 1 or higher prevalent vertebral compression fractures (53 thoracic, 71%; 22 lumbar). Grade 1 fractures as the worst grade were present in 14 children (48%), 9 patients (31%) had grade 2 fractures, and 6 children (21%) had grade 3 fractures. The distribution of spine fracture was bi-modal, with most occurring in the mid-thoracic and thoraco-lumbar regions. Children with grade 1 or higher vertebral compression had reduced lumbar spine (LS) areal BMD Z-scores compared to those without (mean±SD, −2.1±1.5 vs. −1.1±1.2; P < 0.001). LS BMD Z-score, second metacarpal percent cortical area Z-score, and back pain were associated with increased odds for fracture. For every 1 SD reduction in LS BMD Z-score, the odds for fracture increased by 80% (95% CI 10% to 193%); the presence of back pain had an odds ratio of 4.7 (95% CI, 1.5 to 14.5). These results show that vertebral compression is an under-recognized complication of newly diagnosed ALL. Whether the fractures will resolve through bone growth during or after leukemia chemotherapy remains to be determined. PMID:19210218

  9. CD19/CD22 Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells and Chemotherapy in Treating Children or Young Adults With Recurrent or Refractory CD19 Positive B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-03

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; CD19 Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  10. Filgrastim, Cladribine, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed or Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-27

    Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Treatment of acute pediatric pain.

    PubMed

    Kraemer, F Wickham

    2010-12-01

    Pediatric neurologists frequently treat acute pain in children. A broad range of medication options is available including nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, opioids, and other analgesic adjuvants, such as antidepressants and antiepileptics. This article reviews the physiology underlying the experience of pain and compares the pharmacologic mechanisms and properties of these medications, providing a framework for developing effective multimodal medical treatment approaches to pain in children. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. CPX-351 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-25

    Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  13. Leukemia cutis with lymphoglandular bodies: a clue to acute lymphoblastic leukemia cutis.

    PubMed

    Obiozor, Cynthia; Ganguly, Siddhartha; Fraga, Garth R

    2015-08-15

    Leukemia cutis describes cutaneous lesions produced by infiltrates of leukemic cells. It usually manifests contemporaneously with the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia, but may also precede or follow systemic leukemia. Most cases are associated with acute myeloid leukemia. Adult B-cell lymphoblastic leukemia cutis is very rare. We report a 59-year-old woman with a history of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia who relapsed with aleukemic lymphoblastic leukemia cutis. Lymphoglandular bodies were conspicuous on biopsy and may serve as a morphologic clue to lymphocytic differentiation while molecular and immunophenotypic studies are pending. The patient was successfully treated with local radiation therapy and oral ponatinib.

  14. Acute myelocytic leukemia after exposure to asbestos

    SciTech Connect

    Kishimoto, T.; Ono, T.; Okada, K.

    1988-08-15

    While the carcinogenicity of asbestos has been established in malignant mesotheliomas and lung cancers, and has recently been suspected in several other types of cancer, asbestos has not been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute leukemias. This article includes two cases of acute myelocytic leukemia in individuals with a long history of exposure to asbestos. Significant numbers of asbestos bodies were detected in specimens of their lungs and bone marrow. In addition, the kind of asbestos in both organs was crocidolite, which is implicated in carcinogenesis. No asbestos bodies were detected in the bone marrow specimens from a control group consisting of ten patients with lung cancer with similar occupational histories. The role of asbestos exposure in the development of leukemia requires further study.

  15. Vaccine Therapy Plus Immune Adjuvant in Treating Patients With Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-04

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Chronic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

  16. Total Marrow and Lymphoid Irradiation and Chemotherapy Before Donor Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-17

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Complete Remission

  17. Vaccine Therapy and Basiliximab in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Complete Remission

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22)

  18. CPI-613, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-23

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Lenalidomide and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Clofarabine and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Residual Disease

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  1. The Expression and Prognostic Impact of CD95 Death Receptor and CD20, CD34 and CD44 Differentiation Markers in Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    M. Kamazani, Fatemeh; Bahoush-Mehdiabadi, Gholamreza; Aghaeipour, Mahnaz; Vaeli, Shahram; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study investigated the expression and prognostic significance of the CD95 death receptor and CD20, a B cell-lineage associated marker, along with CD34 and CD44 non-lineage associated molecules in Iranian children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Methods: We performed immunophenotyping for expressions of the molecules in blood samples from children diagnosed with ALL by using a panel of monoclonal antibodies for flow cytometry analysis. The expression of markers was evaluated in relation to clinical and paraclinical features as well as response to treatment in the patients. Findings : CD95 showed a higher expression in T-ALL compared to B-ALL (P<0.001). Analysis of the clinical and laboratory findings at diagnosis in the group of B-ALL patients revealed an association between CD95 expression with lower white blood cell (WBC) numbers and bone marrow blasts (P<0.05). We detected a positive correlation between the expressions of CD95 and CD44 (r=0.445, P<0.01) in B-ALL patients. There was an association between CD20 expression and several poor prognostic factors that included increased extramedullary involvement (EMI) and decreased platelet numbers (P<0.008). The mean expression of CD34 in B-ALL was higher than T-ALL (P=0.004). At follow-up, complete remission duration (CRD) and survival duration did not significantly differ between patients who were positive or negative for each marker. Conclusion: Association of the studied molecules with several prognostic factors implies the significance of CD95 molecule as favorable and CD20 as unfavorable prognostic markers for childhood ALL. PMID:25755857

  2. The costs and cost-effectiveness of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation versus bone marrow transplantation in pediatric patients with acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yu-Feng; Lairson, David R; Chan, Wenyaw; Du, Xianglin L; Leung, Kathryn S; Kennedy-Nasser, Alana A; Martinez, Caridad A; Gottschalk, Stephen M; Bollard, Catherine M; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Krance, Robert A

    2010-09-01

    In a retrospective study, we evaluated the cost and cost-effectiveness of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) (n = 30) compared with bone marrow transplantation (BMT) (n = 110) in children with acute leukemia after 1 year of follow-up. Treatment success was defined as disease-free survival at 1 year posttransplantation. For patients at standard risk for disease, the treatment success rate was 57.1% for PBSCT recipients and 80.3% for BMT recipients (P = not significant [NS]). The average total cost per treatment success at 1 year in the standard-risk disease group was $512,294 for PBSCT recipients and $352,885 for BMT recipients (P = NS). For patients with high-risk disease, the treatment success rate was 18.8% for PBSCT recipients and 23.5% for BMT recipients (P = NS). The cumulative average cost was $457,078 in BMT recipients and $377,316 in PBSCT recipients (P = NS). Point estimates of the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) indicate that in patients with standard-risk disease, allogeneic BMT had lower costs and greater effectiveness than PBSCT (ICER, -$687,108; 95% confidence interval [CI], $2.4 million to dominated). For patients with high-risk disease, BMT was more effective and more costly, and it had an ICER of $1.69 million (95% CI, $29.7 million to dominated) per additional treatment success. The comparative economic evaluation provides support for BMT in standard-risk patients, but much uncertainty precludes a clear advantage of either treatment option in patients with high-risk disease. More studies using larger and randomized controlled trials are needed to confirm the long-term cost-effectiveness of each procedure.

  3. Intensification with intermediate-dose intravenous methotrexate is effective therapy for children with lower-risk B-precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A Pediatric Oncology Group study.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, D H; Shuster, J J; Nitschke, R; Lauer, S; Steuber, C P; Camitta, B

    2000-03-01

    To determine whether early intensification with 12 courses of intravenous (IV) methotrexate (MTX) and IV mercaptopurine (MP) is superior to 12 courses of IV MTX alone for prevention of relapse in children with lower-risk B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Six hundred fifty-one eligible patients were entered onto the study. Vincristine, prednisone, and asparaginase were used for remission induction therapy. Patients were randomized to receive intensification with IV MTX 1,000 mg/m(2) plus IV MP 1,000 mg/m(2) (regimen A) or IV MTX 1,000 mg/m(2) alone (regimen C). Twelve courses were administered at 2-week intervals. Triple intrathecal therapy was used for CNS prophylaxis. Continuation therapy included standard oral MP, weekly MTX, and triple intrathecal therapy every 12 weeks for 2 years. Six hundred forty-five patients (99.1%) achieved remission. Three hundred twenty-five were assigned to regimen A and 320 to regimen C. The estimated 4-year overall continuous complete remission for patients treated with regimen A is 82.1% (SE = 2.4%) and for regimen C is 82.2% (SE = 2.6%; P =.5). No significant difference in overall outcome was shown by sex or race. Serious grade 3/4 neurotoxicity, principally characterized by seizures, was observed in 7.6% of patients treated with either regimen. Intensification with 12 courses of IV MTX is an effective therapy for prevention of relapse in children with B-precursor ALL who are at lower risk for relapse but may be associated with an increased risk for neurotoxicity. Prolonged infusions of MP combined with IV MTX did not provide apparent advantage.

  4. An Initial Reintegration Treatment of Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Michelle; Kaufman, Nadeen

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the cognitive, psychological, and social adjustment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and assessed how their needs could best be met through reintegration programs focusing on learning/ educational needs. Findings from three case studies highlight the need for ALL patients to be provided with comprehensive programs…

  5. An Initial Reintegration Treatment of Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lurie, Michelle; Kaufman, Nadeen

    2001-01-01

    Evaluated the cognitive, psychological, and social adjustment of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients and assessed how their needs could best be met through reintegration programs focusing on learning/ educational needs. Findings from three case studies highlight the need for ALL patients to be provided with comprehensive programs…

  6. Important milestones in acute leukemia in 2013.

    PubMed

    Rowe, Jacob M

    2013-09-01

    This year marked the occurrence of several important milestones in the treatment of acute leukemias. First, the standard 7 + 3 protocol for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was developed 40 years ago, and with some adaptations, has stood the test of time. Second, the 1 millionth hematopoietic cell transplant was recorded this year. Stem cell transplant, the first reported by Dr E. Donnall Thomas in 1957, had been considered a rare procedure until about a decade ago. Today, it has become a proven and often life-saving therapy for patients with acute leukemia. Advances in the treatment of patients with AML continue to take place, many of which relate to an increased understanding of the clinical heterogeneity of known subtypes. Forty years ago, the regimen that has come to be known as 7+3 for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was born [1,2]. Cytosine arabinoside, or arabinosylcytosine as it was then called, was given as a continuous intravenous infusion of 100 mg/m(2) for 7 days, and the anthracycline, daunorubicin, was administered at 45 mg/m(2) intravenously for 3 days. Sixteen patients were originally treated on this protocol, and 5 of 8 previously untreated and 2 of 8 previously treated patients achieved a complete response (CR). This regimen has withstood the test of time. Attempts to add or substitute other agents have not yielded superior results. The only major contemporary change is that a higher dose of daunorubicin is safe and has become the standard of care [3].

  7. Myelomalacia as clinical presentation of acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Avilés, A; Gómez, G; Rubio, M E

    1989-01-01

    The case of a 27-year-old man is reported in whom neurological symptoms of obstruction of spinal arteries (myelomalacia) was the initial picture of acute leukemia. A review is given of the literature. There are no other reported cases of this very rare association.

  8. 47,XYY karyotype in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palanduz, S; Aktan, M; Ozturk, S; Tutkan, G; Cefle, K; Pekcelen, Y

    1998-10-01

    A case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMoL; M4) with a 47,XYY karyotype is reported. This chromosome aneuploidy was found in both bone marrow cells and mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes. The contribution of XYY chromosomal constitution in the pathogenesis of AMMoL is controversial.

  9. Arsenic Trioxide in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-04

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Ixazomib (MLN9708) in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. AKT Inhibitor MK-2206 in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Valspodar in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Lenalidomide and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Bortezomib, Daunorubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Bortezomib, Mitoxantrone, Etoposide, and Cytarabine in Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-12

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Vorinostat and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Flavopiridol, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Malignant Neoplasm; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Tipifarnib and Etoposide in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-08

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  19. Cytarabine With or Without SCH 900776 in Treating Adult Patients With Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-20

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Minimal Differentiation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. A Case of T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Relapsed As Myeloid Acute Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Paganin, Maddalena; Buldini, Barbara; Germano, Giuseppe; Seganfreddo, Elena; Meglio, Annamaria di; Magrin, Elisa; Grillo, Francesca; Pigazzi, Martina; Rizzari, Carmelo; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Khiabanian, Hossein; Palomero, Teresa; Rabadan, Raul; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Basso, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    A 4-year-old male with the diagnosis of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) relapsed after 19 months with an acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor gene rearrangements analyses reveal that both leukemias were rearranged with a clonal relationship between them. Comparative genomic hybridization (Array-CGH) and whole-exome sequencing analyses of both samples suggest that this leukemia may have originated from a common T/myeloid progenitor. The presence of homozygous deletion of p16/INK4A, p14/ARF, p15/INK4B, and heterozygous deletion of WT1 locus remained stable in the leukemia throughout phenotypic switch, revealing that this AML can be genetically associated to T-ALL.

  1. Acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) -- children

    MedlinePlus

    ... LE, Heslop HE, Weitz JI, Anastasi J, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ... Updated by: Adam S. Levy, MD, Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, The Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, NY. ...

  2. MS-275 and GM-CSF in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome and/or Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-20

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. [Oncogenes and the origin of leukemia. Acute avian leukemia viruses].

    PubMed

    Graf, T

    1988-03-01

    Oncogenes have been intimately associated with the genesis of human neoplasms. A particularly useful system to study the mechanism of tumorigenesis is a small group of avian retroviruses that carry two oncogenes. These viruses causes acute leukemias and can transform hematopoietic cells in vitro. The mechanisms by which viral oncogenes affect the growth control and differentiation of their target cells is now understood in fair detail for two of these virus strains. In the avian erythroblastosis virus AEV, the v-erbB oncogene deregulates the growth control of erythroid precursors, while verbA blocks their terminal differentiation into erythrocytes. Based on the findings that v-erbB oncogene corresponds to a mutated growth factor receptor gene and that v-erbA corresponds to a mutated hormone receptor gene, models have been developed that explain the function of these two oncogenes on a molecular basis. The myelomonocytic leukemia virus MH2 acts by a completely different mechanism. In this case, the v-myc oncogene stimulates the proliferation of macrophage-like cells, while the v-mil gene stimulates them to produce their own growth factor, thus leading to autocrine growth. It will be interesting to determine whether the type of mechanisms of oncogene cooperativity elucidated for acute leukemia viruses are also operative during leukemogenesis in humans.

  4. Lack of association of the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype with vincristine-related peripheral neuropathy during the early phase of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment in a Spanish population.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez-Camino, Angela; Martin-Guerrero, Idoia; Lopez-Lopez, Elixabet; Echebarria-Barona, Aizpea; Zabalza, Iñaki; Ruiz, Irune; Guerra-Merino, Isabel; Garcia-Orad, Africa

    2016-02-01

    Vincristine is a component of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) treatment with the potential to induce peripheral neuropathy. Recently, the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype was found to be associated with vincristine-induced toxicity during the continuation phase in pediatric ALL patients treated on the Total XIIIB and COG AALL0433 protocols at St Jude Children's Research Hospital and Children's Oncology Group. This finding could provide a base for safer dosing of vincristine. Nevertheless, there are variations in vincristine regimens among ALL treatment protocols and phases in different populations. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine whether the CEP72 rs924607 TT genotype is a useful marker of vincristine neuropathy during induction therapy among Spanish children with B-ALL treated on the LAL-SHOP protocols. No association was found between neurotoxicity during the induction phase and the rs924607 TT genotype. This lack of association could be because of population differences and/or differences in neurotoxicity etiology between induction and continuation phases of treatment.

  5. Caspofungin Acetate or Fluconazole in Preventing Invasive Fungal Infections in Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Fungal Infection; Neutropenia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  6. Acute kidney injury after pediatric cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sarvesh Pal

    2016-01-01

    Acute kidney injury is a common complication after pediatric cardiac surgery. The definition, staging, risk factors, biomarkers and management of acute kidney injury in children is detailed in the following review article. PMID:27052074

  7. Identification of de Novo Fanconi Anemia in Younger Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-13

    Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Fanconi Anemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Refractory Anemia With Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  8. [Presence of B cell clones in acute myelomonocytic leukemia].

    PubMed

    Novoa, Viviana; Nuñez, Neri; Cervellini, Mirta; Starosta, Aida; Carballo, Orlando G

    2010-01-01

    The coexistence of acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia in the same patient is rare. The majority of the cases correspond to patients that developed acute leukemia during the evolutionary course of a chronic lymphatic leukemia following treatment with chemotherapy drugs. We report a case of acute myelomonocytic leukemia concurrent with untreated B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia in which the use of flow cytometry analysis with a large panel of monoclonal antibodies, allowed the demonstration of different pathological populations and determine immunophenotyping patterns. Published cases of simultaneous chronic lymphocytic leukemia and acute leukemia are reviewed. The use of multiparametric flow cytometry to differentiate the populations demonstrates the utility of this technology in the diagnosis of these hematological malignancies.

  9. Acute myeloid leukemia targets for bispecific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, S S; Cheung, N K

    2017-01-01

    Despite substantial gains in our understanding of the genomics of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), patient survival remains unsatisfactory especially among the older age group. T cell-based therapy of lymphoblastic leukemia is rapidly advancing; however, its application in AML is still lagging behind. Bispecific antibodies can redirect polyclonal effector cells to engage chosen targets on leukemia blasts. When the effector cells are natural-killer cells, both antibody-dependent and antibody-independent mechanisms could be exploited. When the effectors are T cells, direct tumor cytotoxicity can be engaged followed by a potential vaccination effect. In this review, we summarize the AML-associated tumor targets and the bispecific antibodies that have been studied. The potentials and limitations of each of these systems will be discussed. PMID:28157217

  10. Targeting MTHFD2 in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Pikman, Yana; Puissant, Alexandre; Alexe, Gabriela; Furman, Andrew; Chen, Liying M.; Frumm, Stacey M.; Ross, Linda; Fenouille, Nina; Bassil, Christopher F.; Lewis, Caroline A.; Ramos, Azucena; Gould, Joshua; Stone, Richard M.; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Galinsky, Ilene; Clish, Clary B.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hemann, Michael T.; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Banerji, Versha

    2016-01-01

    Drugs targeting metabolism have formed the backbone of therapy for some cancers. We sought to identify new such targets in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The one-carbon folate pathway, specifically methylenetetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase-cyclohydrolase 2 (MTHFD2), emerged as a top candidate in our analyses. MTHFD2 is the most differentially expressed metabolic enzyme in cancer versus normal cells. Knockdown of MTHFD2 in AML cells decreased growth, induced differentiation, and impaired colony formation in primary AML blasts. In human xenograft and MLL-AF9 mouse leukemia models, MTHFD2 suppression decreased leukemia burden and prolonged survival. Based upon primary patient AML data and functional genomic screening, we determined that FLT3-ITD is a biomarker of response to MTHFD2 suppression. Mechanistically, MYC regulates the expression of MTHFD2, and MTHFD2 knockdown suppresses the TCA cycle. This study supports the therapeutic targeting of MTHFD2 in AML. PMID:27325891

  11. Clofarabine and Melphalan Before Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelodysplasia, Acute Leukemia in Remission, or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-13

    Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Remission; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Therapy-Related Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  12. Guidelines for the management of bacterial and fungal infections during chemotherapy for pediatric acute leukemia or solid tumors: what is available in 2010?

    PubMed Central

    Castagnola, Elio; Caviglia, Ilaria; Haupt, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    Febrile episodes and infections represent important complications during antineoplastic chemotherapy for pediatric neoplastic diseases. In the last years many international association published guidelines for the management of these complications in adults, but no document of this type was prepared for children. One of the major causes of this situation is probably the very low number of pediatric clinical trials with adequate power and design. The paper summarizes guidelines provided for the management of infectious complications in adults with cancer by different international and will comment on how much they may be translated in the management of pediatric patients. PMID:21647280

  13. Azacitidine and Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin in Treating Older Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia; Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Maturation; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia Without Maturation; Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Adult Erythroleukemia; Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  14. Lithium Carbonate and Tretinoin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-25

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Cholecalciferol in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Intensive Induction Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-18

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  16. Comparing Three Different Combination Chemotherapy Regimens in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-02

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  17. Sirolimus, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-10

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  18. Acute lymphoid leukemia following polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Camós, M; Cervantes, F; Montoto, S; Hernández-Boluda, J C; Villamor, N; Montserrat, E

    1999-01-01

    The tendency to evolve into acute leukemia is a well-known characteristic of polycythemia vera (PV), which is shared with the remaining chronic myeloproliferative disorders and increases after the administration of cytotoxic agents. Acute transformation is usually of myeloid phenotype, whereas acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL) following PV is seldom observed. A 63-year-old woman is described who developed ALL at 6 years from the initial diagnosis of PV, for which she had received radioactive phosphorus and hydroxyurea. The ALL was of B-cell type, corresponding to the L-3 subtype of the FAB classification. Despite the administration of combination chemotherapy the patient died shortly after the diagnosis of acute leukemia. The present case adds to seven previously described patients with the above association, all of whom had received cytotoxic therapy for PV. Median interval from PV to ALL diagnosis was 10 years, and there was a predominance of the B-cell phenotype. The prognosis was poor since all but one of the patients had a short survival after ALL diagnosis. The possible etiological and pathogenetic link between PV and the subsequent ALL is discussed.

  19. Treatment of Adolescent and Young Adults with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Ribera, Jordi; Genescà, Eulàlia

    2014-01-01

    The primary objective of this review was to update and discuss the current concepts and the results of the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) in adolescents and young adults (AYA). After a brief consideration of the epidemiologic and clinicobiologic characteristics of ALL in the AYA population, the main retrospective comparative studies stating the superiority of pediatric over adult-based protocols were reviewed. The most important prospective studies in young adults using pediatric inspired or pediatric unmodified protocols were also reviewed emphasizing their feasibility at least up to the age of 40 yr and their promising results, with event-free survival rates of 60–65% or greater. Results of trials from pediatric groups have shown that the unfavourable prognosis of adolescents is no more adequate. The majority of the older adolescents with ALL can be cured with risk-adjusted and minimal residual disease-guided intensive chemotherapy, without stem cell transplantation. However, some specific subgroups, which are more frequent in adolescents than in children (e.g., early pre-T, iAMP21, and BCR-ABL-like), deserve particular attention. In summary, the advances in treatment of ALL in adolescents have been translated to young adults, and that explains the significant improvement in survival of these patients in recent years. PMID:25045460

  20. Acute coagulopathy in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Choi, Pamela M; Vogel, Adam M

    2014-06-01

    To summarize our current understanding of the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of acute traumatic coagulopathy in children. Traumatic coagulopathy is a complex process that leads to global dysfunction of the endogenous coagulation system and results in worse outcomes and increased mortality. Although the cause is multifactorial, it is common in severely injured patients and is driven by significant tissue injury and hypoperfusion. Viscoelastic coagulation tests have been established as a rapid and reliable method to assess traumatic coagulopathy. Additionally, massive transfusion protocols have improved outcomes in adults, but limited studies in pediatrics have not shown any difference in mortality. Prospective studies are needed to determine how to best diagnose and manage acute traumatic coagulopathy in children.

  1. Tyrosine kinome sequencing of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia: a report from the Children's Oncology Group TARGET Project | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    TARGET researchers sequenced the tyrosine kinome and downstream signaling genes in 45 high-risk pediatric ALL cases with activated kinase signaling, including Ph-like ALL, to establish the incidence of tyrosine kinase mutations in this cohort. The study confirmed previously identified somatic mutations in JAK and FLT3, but did not find novel alterations in any additional tyrosine kinases or downstream genes. The mechanism of kinase signaling activation in this high-risk subgroup of pediatric ALL remains largely unknown.

  2. Decitabine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation

    PubMed Central

    Kunz, Joachim B.; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R.; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M.; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O.; Muckenthaler, Martina U.; Kulozik, Andreas E.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, ‘type 1’ relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas ‘type 2’ relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition. PMID:26294725

  4. Pediatric T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia evolves into relapse by clonal selection, acquisition of mutations and promoter hypomethylation.

    PubMed

    Kunz, Joachim B; Rausch, Tobias; Bandapalli, Obul R; Eilers, Juliane; Pechanska, Paulina; Schuessele, Stephanie; Assenov, Yassen; Stütz, Adrian M; Kirschner-Schwabe, Renate; Hof, Jana; Eckert, Cornelia; von Stackelberg, Arend; Schrappe, Martin; Stanulla, Martin; Koehler, Rolf; Avigad, Smadar; Elitzur, Sarah; Handgretinger, Rupert; Benes, Vladimir; Weischenfeldt, Joachim; Korbel, Jan O; Muckenthaler, Martina U; Kulozik, Andreas E

    2015-11-01

    Relapsed precursor T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia is characterized by resistance against chemotherapy and is frequently fatal. We aimed at understanding the molecular mechanisms resulting in relapse of T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and analyzed 13 patients at first diagnosis, remission and relapse by whole exome sequencing, targeted ultra-deep sequencing, multiplex ligation dependent probe amplification and DNA methylation array. Compared to primary T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, in relapse the number of single nucleotide variants and small insertions and deletions approximately doubled from 11.5 to 26. Targeted ultra-deep sequencing sensitively detected subclones that were selected for in relapse. The mutational pattern defined two types of relapses. While both are characterized by selection of subclones and acquisition of novel mutations, 'type 1' relapse derives from the primary leukemia whereas 'type 2' relapse originates from a common pre-leukemic ancestor. Relapse-specific changes included activation of the nucleotidase NT5C2 resulting in resistance to chemotherapy and mutations of epigenetic modulators, exemplified by SUZ12, WHSC1 and SMARCA4. While mutations present in primary leukemia and in relapse were enriched for known drivers of leukemia, relapse-specific changes revealed an association with general cancer-promoting mechanisms. This study thus identifies mechanisms that drive progression of pediatric T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia to relapse and may explain the characteristic treatment resistance of this condition.

  5. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P.; Griffiths, Elizabeth A.; Thompson, James E.; Wang, Eunice S.; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-01-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30 years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20–40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including L-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopruine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapy. PMID:25614322

  6. Pharmacogenetics predictive of response and toxicity in acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lin; Ontiveros, Evelena P; Griffiths, Elizabeth A; Thompson, James E; Wang, Eunice S; Wetzler, Meir

    2015-07-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a relatively rare disease in adults accounting for no more than 20% of all cases of acute leukemia. By contrast with the pediatric population, in whom significant improvements in long term survival and even cure have been achieved over the last 30years, adult ALL remains a significant challenge. Overall survival in this group remains a relatively poor 20-40%. Modern research has focused on improved pharmacokinetics, novel pharmacogenetics and personalized principles to optimize the efficacy of the treatment while reducing toxicity. Here we review the pharmacogenetics of medications used in the management of patients with ALL, including l-asparaginase, glucocorticoids, 6-mercaptopurine, methotrexate, vincristine and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Incorporating recent pharmacogenetic data, mainly from pediatric ALL, will provide novel perspective of predicting response and toxicity in both pediatric and adult ALL therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Management and treatment of osteonecrosis in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    te Winkel, Mariël L.; Pieters, Rob; Wind, Ernst-Jan D.; Bessems, J.H.J.M. (Gert); van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M.

    2014-01-01

    There is no consensus regarding how to manage osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Therefore, we performed a quality assessment of the literature with the result of a search strategy using the MESH terms osteonecrosis, children, childhood cancer, surgery, bisphosphonates, 6 hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, anticoagulants and hyperbaric oxygen, and terms related to these MESH terms. A randomized controlled trial showed that osteonecrosis can be prevented by intermittent, instead of continuous, corticosteroid administration. The studies on interventions after onset of osteonecrosis were of low-quality evidence. Seven pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies described non-surgical interventions; bisphosphonates (n=5), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=1), or prostacyclin analogs (n=1). Safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Five studies focused on surgical interventions; none was of sufficient quality to draw definite conclusions. In conclusion, preventing osteonecrosis is feasible in a proportion of the pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients by discontinuous, instead of continuous, steroid scheduling. The questions as to how to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with osteonecrosis cannot be answered as good-quality studies are lacking. PMID:24598854

  8. Management and treatment of osteonecrosis in children and adolescents with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Te Winkel, Mariël L; Pieters, Rob; Wind, Ernst-Jan D; Bessems, J H J M Gert; van den Heuvel-Eibrink, Marry M

    2014-03-01

    There is no consensus regarding how to manage osteonecrosis in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients. Therefore, we performed a quality assessment of the literature with the result of a search strategy using the MESH terms osteonecrosis, children, childhood cancer, surgery, bisphosphonates, 6 hydroxymethyl-glutaryl CoA reductase inhibitors, anticoagulants and hyperbaric oxygen, and terms related to these MESH terms. A randomized controlled trial showed that osteonecrosis can be prevented by intermittent, instead of continuous, corticosteroid administration. The studies on interventions after onset of osteonecrosis were of low-quality evidence. Seven pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia studies described non-surgical interventions; bisphosphonates (n=5), hyperbaric oxygen therapy (n=1), or prostacyclin analogs (n=1). Safety and efficacy studies are lacking. Five studies focused on surgical interventions; none was of sufficient quality to draw definite conclusions. In conclusion, preventing osteonecrosis is feasible in a proportion of the pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients by discontinuous, instead of continuous, steroid scheduling. The questions as to how to treat childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients with osteonecrosis cannot be answered as good-quality studies are lacking.

  9. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients. To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p < 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation. In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences

  10. High-resolution Antibody Array Analysis of Childhood Acute Leukemia Cells.

    PubMed

    Kanderova, Veronika; Kuzilkova, Daniela; Stuchly, Jan; Vaskova, Martina; Brdicka, Tomas; Fiser, Karel; Hrusak, Ondrej; Lund-Johansen, Fridtjof; Kalina, Tomas

    2016-04-01

    Acute leukemia is a disease pathologically manifested at both genomic and proteomic levels. Molecular genetic technologies are currently widely used in clinical research. In contrast, sensitive and high-throughput proteomic techniques for performing protein analyses in patient samples are still lacking. Here, we used a technology based on size exclusion chromatography followed by immunoprecipitation of target proteins with an antibody bead array (Size Exclusion Chromatography-Microsphere-based Affinity Proteomics, SEC-MAP) to detect hundreds of proteins from a single sample. In addition, we developed semi-automatic bioinformatics tools to adapt this technology for high-content proteomic screening of pediatric acute leukemia patients.To confirm the utility of SEC-MAP in leukemia immunophenotyping, we tested 31 leukemia diagnostic markers in parallel by SEC-MAP and flow cytometry. We identified 28 antibodies suitable for both techniques. Eighteen of them provided excellent quantitative correlation between SEC-MAP and flow cytometry (p< 0.05). Next, SEC-MAP was applied to examine 57 diagnostic samples from patients with acute leukemia. In this assay, we used 632 different antibodies and detected 501 targets. Of those, 47 targets were differentially expressed between at least two of the three acute leukemia subgroups. The CD markers correlated with immunophenotypic categories as expected. From non-CD markers, we found DBN1, PAX5, or PTK2 overexpressed in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemias, LAT, SH2D1A, or STAT5A overexpressed in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and HCK, GLUD1, or SYK overexpressed in acute myeloid leukemias. In addition, OPAL1 overexpression corresponded to ETV6-RUNX1 chromosomal translocation.In summary, we demonstrated that SEC-MAP technology is a powerful tool for detecting hundreds of proteins in clinical samples obtained from pediatric acute leukemia patients. It provides information about protein size and reveals differences in

  11. Pediatric Priapism: A Rare First Manifestation of Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Shankar Prasad; Gogoi, Debojit; Sharma, Pramod Kumar; Pal, Dilip Kumar; Chakraborty, Sudip C

    2013-01-01

    Priapism is a rare disease. It is an emergency condition with a poor prognosis, and the risk of impotence is 50% despite appropriate management. Though about 20% cases of all priapism are related to hematological disorders, the incidence of priapism in adult leukemic patients is only about 1-5 percent. The incidence in pediatric leukemia patient is even rarer. Here we present a case of priapism in a 14-year-old apparently healthy boy who found to have chronic myeloid leukemia on subsequent investigations. PMID:24381835

  12. Entinostat and Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Solid Tumors or Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-18

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. Global characteristics of childhood acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, M S; Scelo, G; Smith, M T; Feusner, J; Wiemels, J L; Metayer, C

    2015-03-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5-10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent-de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Global Characteristics of Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Samad, A; Pombo-de-Oliveira, MS; Scelo, G; Smith, MT; Feusner, J; Wiemels, JL; Metayer, C

    2014-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) comprises approximately 5–10% of childhood acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases in the US. While variation in this percentage among other populations was noted previously, global patterns of childhood APL have not been thoroughly characterized. In this comprehensive review of childhood APL, we examined its geographic pattern and the potential contribution of environmental factors to observed variation. In 142 studies (spanning >60 countries) identified, variation was apparent—de novo APL represented from 2% (Switzerland) to >50% (Nicaragua) of childhood AML in different geographic regions. Because a limited number of previous studies addressed specific environmental exposures that potentially underlie childhood APL development, we gathered 28 childhood cases of therapy-related APL, which exemplified associations between prior exposures to chemotherapeutic drugs/radiation and APL diagnosis. Future population-based studies examining childhood APL patterns and the potential association with specific environmental exposures and other risk factors are needed. PMID:25445717

  15. Acute myeloid leukemia: update in diagnosis and treatment in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Helman, Ricardo; Santos, Fabio Pires de Souza; Simões, Belinda; Atta, Elias Hallack; Callera, Fernando; Dobbin, Jane de Almeida; Mattos, Éderson Roberto; Atalla, Angelo; Maiolino, Angelo; Zanichelli, Maria Aparecida; Diefenbach, Cristiane Fração; Delamain, Marcia Torresan; Hamerschlak, Nelson

    2011-06-01

    To identify how the Brazilian hematology centers treated and diagnosed cases of acute myeloid leukemia in 2009. An epidemiological observational multicenter study of 11 listed Brazilian centers that treat acute myeloid leukemia and perform bone marrow transplantation. Data were collected from clinical charts of patients with acute myeloid leukemia treated at the said centers between 2005 and 2009. The availability for immunophenotyping and cytogenetic tests was assessed. During 2009, a total of 345 new cases of acute myeloid leukemia were diagnosed. Differences were noted in the tests performed between patients who initiated treatment at the center and those referred for treatment. Of the participating centers, 72% conducted some type of molecular study in acute myeloid leukemia upon diagnosis. Treatment for acute myeloid leukemia in Brazil shows significantly inferior results when compared to other centers worldwide.

  16. Molecularly targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stein, Eytan M

    2015-01-01

    The past 15 years have seen major leaps in our understanding of the molecular genetic mutations that act as drivers of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Clinical trials of agents against specific mutant proteins, such as FLT3-internal tandem duplications (ITDs) and isocitrate dehydrogenase mutations (IDHs) are ongoing. This review discusses agents in clinical trials that target specific gene mutations and/or epigenetic targets. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular biomarkers in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Prada-Arismendy, Jeanette; Arroyave, Johanna C; Röthlisberger, Sarah

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is the most common acute leukemia in adults. The pathophysiology of this disease is just beginning to be understood at the cellular and molecular level, and currently cytogenetic markers are the most important for risk stratification and treatment of AML patients. However, with the advent of new technologies, the detection of other molecular markers such as point mutations and characterization of epigenetic and proteomic profiles, have begun to play an important role in how the disease is approached. Recent evidence shows that the identification of new AML biomarkers contributes to a better understanding of the molecular basis of the disease, is significantly useful in screening, diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of AML, as well as the possibility of predicting each individual's response to treatment. This review summarizes the most relevant molecular (genetic, epigenetic, and protein) biomarkers associated with acute myeloid leukemia and discusses their clinical importance in terms of risk prediction, diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Expression of CD133 in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Tolba, Fetnat M; Foda, Mona E; Kamal, Howyda M; Elshabrawy, Deena A

    2013-06-01

    There have been conflicting results regarding a correlation between CD133 expression and disease outcome. To assess CD133 expression in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and to evaluate its correlation with the different clinical and laboratory data as well as its relation to disease outcome, the present study included 60 newly diagnosed acute leukemic patients; 30 ALL patients with a male to female ratio of 1.5:1 and their ages ranged from 9 months to 48 years, and 30 AML patients with a male to female ratio of 1:1 and their ages ranged from 17 to 66 years. Flow cytometric assessment of CD133 expression was performed on blast cells. In ALL, no correlations were elicited between CD133 expression and some monoclonal antibodies, but in AML group, there was a significant positive correlation between CD133 and HLA-DR, CD3, CD7 and TDT, CD13 and CD34. In ALL group, patients with negative CD133 expression achieved complete remission more than patients with positive CD133 expression. In AML group, there was no statistically significant association found between positive CD133 expression and treatment outcome. The Kaplan-Meier curve illustrated a high significant negative correlation between CD133 expression and the overall survival of the AML patients. CD133 expression is an independent prognostic factor in acute leukemia, especially ALL patients and its expression could characterize a group of acute leukemic patients with higher resistance to standard chemotherapy and relapse. CD133 expression was highly associated with poor prognosis in acute leukemic patients.

  19. Midostaurin and Decitabine in Treating Older Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia and FLT3 Mutation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With FLT3/ITD Mutation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Gene Mutations; FLT3 Tyrosine Kinase Domain Point Mutation; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Factors associated with improved outcomes after second allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for relapsed pediatric leukemia.

    PubMed

    Menon, Neethu N; Jenkins, Lydia M; Cui, Haiyan; Jenkins, Craig; Anwer, Faiz; Yeager, Andrew M; Katsanis, Emmanuel

    2016-03-01

    A second allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is an important therapeutic consideration for patients relapsing after their first. We conducted a retrospective review of 41 pediatric patients with leukemia that underwent a second allo-HCT at our institution. Overall, 53.7 and 43.9 % of patients were alive and disease-free at 1 and 5 years, respectively, after the second allo-HCT. The factors affecting outcome by both univariate and multivariate analysis were interval between transplants and the use of a myeloablative conditioning (MAC) regimen prior to second transplant. Outcomes were inferior in patients who received their second transplant <6 months from their first HCT when compared to patients in whom the interval between HCTs was 6-12 or more than 12 months. Interval between HCTs was also significant when each type of leukemia (acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) n = 21, acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) n = 11, and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) n = 7) was analyzed separately. In univariate analysis, use of the same donor and use of a matched sibling donor resulted in significant improved outcome. There was not a significant association between disease-free survival (DFS) and age, remission status, use of total body irradiation (TBI) before second HCT, or type of leukemia. Second allogeneic HCT can be a curative therapeutic option for leukemia patients relapsing after their first transplant. As more targeted therapies have become available, patients that relapse after first HCT are more likely to achieve remission. Therefore, it is anticipated that there will be more candidates for second HCT with improved performance and remission status, ultimately leading to a better outcome with the second HCT.

  1. 7-Hydroxystaurosporine and Perifosine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia, Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia or High Risk Myelodysplastic Syndromes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Accelerated Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Ipilimumab and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-06

    Chimerism; Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Recipient; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-1; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts-2; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  3. Brain Function in Young Patients Receiving Methotrexate for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-08

    Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Long-Term Effects Secondary to Cancer Therapy in Children; Neurotoxicity Syndrome; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  4. Phase I Trial of AZD1775 and Belinostat in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Myeloid Malignancies or Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blast Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Positive; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  5. Vorinostat and Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndromes or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    Acute Erythroid Leukemia; Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Excess Blasts; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Ring Sideroblasts; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation

  6. Decitabine, Donor Natural Killer Cells, and Aldesleukin in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  7. Diagnosis of Large Granular Lymphocytic Leukemia in a Patient Previously Treated for Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bozdag, Sinem Civriz; Namdaroglu, Sinem; Kayikci, Omur; Kaygusuz, Gülsah; Demiriz, Itir; Cinarsoy, Murat; Tekgunduz, Emre; Altuntas, Fevzi

    2013-01-01

    Large granular lymphocytic (LGL) leukemia is a lymphoproliferative disease characterized by the clonal expansion of cytotoxic T or natural killer cells. We report on a patient diagnosed with T-cell LGL leukemia two years after the achievement of hematologic remission for acute myeloblastic leukemia. PMID:24416499

  8. Combination Chemotherapy and Dasatinib in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Tretinoin, Cytarabine, and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride With or Without Arsenic Trioxide Followed by Tretinoin With or Without Mercaptopurine and Methotrexate in Treating Patients With Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Childhood Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  10. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-14

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Donor; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

  11. Topotecan Hydrochloride and Carboplatin With or Without Veliparib in Treating Advanced Myeloproliferative Disorders and Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-21

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Atypical Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, BCR-ABL1 Negative; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Myelofibrosis; Polycythemia Vera; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Combination Chemotherapy With or Without PSC 833, Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation, and/or Interleukin-2 in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Adult Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Adult Acute Erythroid Leukemia (M6); Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Childhood Acute Basophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Eosinophilic Leukemia; Childhood Acute Erythroleukemia (M6); Childhood Acute Megakaryocytic Leukemia (M7); Childhood Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Childhood Acute Monoblastic Leukemia and Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5); Childhood Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Childhood Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Childhood Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  13. Blinatumomab and Combination Chemotherapy or Dasatinib, Prednisone, and Blinatumomab in Treating Older Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-10

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, Philadelphia Chromosome Negative; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  14. Minimal Residual Disease in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Hourigan, Christopher S.; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances in the laboratory have lead to substantial improvements in clinical decision-making by the use of pre-treatment prognostic risk stratification factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Unfortunately similar progress has not been made in treatment response criteria, with the definition of “complete remission” in AML largely unchanged for over half a century. Several recent clinical trials have demonstrated that higher sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden during or after treatment can be performed, that results are predictive for clinical outcome and can be used to improve outcomes by guiding additional therapeutic intervention to patients in clinical complete remission but at increased relapse risk. We review here these recent trials, the characteristics and challenges of the modalities currently used to detect minimal residual disease (MRD), and outline opportunities to both refine detection and better clinically utilize MRD measurements. MRD measurement is already the standard of care in other myeloid malignancies such as chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) and acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). It is our belief that response criteria for non-APL AML should be updated to include assessment for molecular complete remission (mCR) and that recommendations for post-consolidation surveillance should include regular monitoring for molecular relapse as a standard of care. PMID:23799371

  15. Invasive Fungal Infections in Acute Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Bhatt, Vijaya R.; Viola, George M.; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-01-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed. PMID:23556092

  16. Invasive fungal infections in acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya R; Viola, George M; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2011-08-01

    Invasive fungal infection (IFI) is among the leading causes for morbidity, mortality, and economic burden for patients with acute leukemia. In the past few decades, the incidence of IFI has increased dramatically. The certainty of diagnosis of IFI is based on host factors, clinical evidence, and microbiological examination. Advancement in molecular diagnostic modalities (e.g. non-culture-based serum biomarkers such as β-glucan or galactomannan assays) and high-resolution radiological imaging has improved our diagnostic approach. The early use of these diagnostic tests assists in the early initiation of preemptive therapy. Nonetheless, the complexity of IFI in patients with leukemia and the limitations of these diagnostic tools still mandate astute clinical acumen. Its management has been further complicated by the increasing frequency of infection by non-Aspergillus molds (e.g. zygomycosis) and the emergence of drug-resistant fungal pathogens. In addition, even though the antifungal armamentarium has expanded rapidly in the past few decades, the associated mortality remains high. The decision to initiate antifungal treatment and the choice of anti-fungal therapy requires careful consideration of several factors (e.g. risk stratification, local fungal epidemiologic patterns, concomitant comorbidities, drug-drug interactions, prior history of antifungal use, overall cost, and the pharmacologic profile of the antifungal agents). In order to optimize our diagnostic and therapeutic management of IFI in patients with acute leukemia, further basic research and clinical trials are desperately needed.

  17. Skin infiltration in acute promyelocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Nagao, K; Kikuchi, A; Kawai, Y; Kizaki, M; Ikeda, Y; Nishikawa, T

    1997-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is a type of acute leukemia showing unique clinical, morphological and cytogenetic features. A skin infiltration by APL cells is an extremely rare occasion, but there have been several case reports of leukemia cutis in APL, in which all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) may have induced the skin infiltration. However, no immunohistochemical analyses of the APL cells in the skin have been done to date. A 30-year-old woman with APL developed multiple reddish purple nodules on the extremities in her second complete remission. Histological findings revealed a dense infiltration of medium to large atypical cells, which were positive for myeloperoxidase, throughout the dermis. Despite the conventional chemotherapy and ATRA therapy she died from disseminated intravascular coagulation during her third relapse. Leukemic cells in the peripheral blood before the treatment with ATRA revealed CD3-/CD4-/CD5-/CD7-/CD8-/CD10-/CD13++/CD14-/CD19 -/ CD20-/CD33++/CD38++/CD41-/Ia-, but they expressed CD3-/CD4-/CD5-/CD7++/ CD8-/CD10-/CD13++/CD14-/CD19-/CD20-/CD33++ /CD38++/CD41+/Ia+ after the treatment. We suggest that the alternation of the surface molecules on the tumor cells is closely associated with the skin infiltration of APL cells.

  18. Open Label, Phase II Study to Evaluate Efficacy and Safety of Oral Nilotinib in Philadelphia Positive (Ph+) Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia (CML) Pediatric Patients.

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-20

    Leukemia; Leukemia,Pediatric; Leukemia, Myleiod; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Chronic; Leukemia, Mylegenous, Accelerated; BCR-ABL Positive; Myeloproliferative Disorder; Bone Marrow Disease; Hematologic Diseases; Neoplastic Processes; Imatinib; Dasatinib; Enzyme Inhibitor; Protein Kinase Inhibitor

  19. Decitabine, Vorinostat, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory High-Risk Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-09

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome

  1. WEE1 Inhibitor AZD1775 With or Without Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-12

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  2. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: Advancements in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Meng-Ge; Zheng, Hu-Yong

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Leukemia is the most common pediatric malignancy and a major cause of morbidity and mortality in children. Among all subtypes, a lack of consensus exists regarding the diagnosis and treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Patient survival rates have remained modest for the past three decades in AML. Recently, targeted therapy has emerged as a promising treatment. Data Sources: We searched the PubMed database for recently published research papers on diagnostic development, target therapy, and other novel therapies of AML. Clinical trial information was obtained from ClinicalTrials.gov. For the major purpose of this review that is to outline the latest therapeutic development of AML, we only listed the ongoing clinical trials for reference. However, the published results of complete clinical trials were also mentioned. Study Selection: This article reviewed the latest developments related to the diagnosis and treatment of AML. In the first portion, we provided some novel insights on the molecular basis of AML, as well as provided an update on the classification of AML. In the second portion, we summarized the results of research on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. We will also highlight ongoing research and clinical trials in pediatric AML. Results: We described clonal evolution and how it changes our view on leukemogenesis, treatment responses, and disease relapse. Pediatric-specific genomic mapping was discussed with a novel diagnostic method highlighted. In the later portion of this review, we summarized the researches on potential molecular therapeutic agents including monoclonal antibodies, tyrosine kinase/FLT3 inhibitors, epigenetic/demethylating agents, and cellular therapeutic agents. Conclusion: Gene sequencing techniques should set the basis for next-generation diagnostic

  3. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia in adolescents and young adults.

    PubMed

    Ribera, Josep-Maria; Oriol, Albert

    2009-10-01

    Today, long-term survival is achieved in more than 80% of children 1 to 10 years old with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). However, cure rates for adults and adolescents and young adults (AYA) with ALL remain relatively low, at only 40% to 50%. Age is a continuous prognostic variable in ALL, with no single age at which prognosis deteriorates markedly. Within childhood ALL populations, older children have shown inferior outcomes, whereas younger adults have shown superior outcomes among adult ALL patients. The type of treatment (pediatric-based versus adult-based) for AYA has recently been a matter of debate. In this article the biology and treatment of ALL in AYA is reviewed.

  4. Gemtuzumab ozogamicin in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Godwin, C D; Gale, R P; Walter, R B

    2017-09-01

    CD33 is variably expressed on leukemia blasts in almost all patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and possibly leukemia stem cells in some. Efforts to target CD33 therapeutically have focused on gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO; Mylotarg), an antibody-drug conjugate delivering a DNA-damaging calicheamicin derivative. GO is most effective in acute promyelocytic leukemia but induces remissions in other AML types and received accelerated approval in the US in 2000. However, because a large follow-up study showed no survival improvement and increased early deaths the drug manufacturer voluntarily withdrew the US New Drug Application in 2010. More recently, a meta-analysis of data from several trials reported better survival in adults with favorable- and intermediate-risk cytogenetics but not adverse-risk AML randomized to receive GO along with intensive induction chemotherapy. As a result, GO is being re-evaluated by regulatory agencies. Responses to GO are diverse and predictive biological response markers are needed. Besides cytogenetic risk, ATP-binding cassette transporter activity and possibly CD33 display on AML blasts may predict response, but established clinical assays and prospective validation are lacking. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms in CD33 may also be predictive, most notably rs12459419 where the minor T-allele leads to decreased display of full-length CD33 and preferential translation of a splice variant not recognized by GO. Data from retrospective analyses suggest only patients with the rs12459419 CC genotype may benefit from GO therapy but confirmation is needed. Most important may be markers for AML cell sensitivity to calicheamicin, which varies over 100 000-fold, but useful assays are unavailable. Novel CD33-targeted drugs may overcome some of GO's limitations but it is currently unknown whether such drugs will be more effective in patients benefitting from GO and/or improve outcomes in patients not benefitting from GO, and what the supportive

  5. Outcomes in patients with mixed phenotype acute leukemia in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Bachir, Fatima; Zerrouk, Jihane; Howard, Scott C; Graoui, Omar; Lahjouji, Ali; Hessissen, Leila; Bennani, Sanae; Quessar, Assmae; El Aouad, Rajae

    2014-08-01

    Mixed phenotype acute leukemia (MPAL) includes biphenotypic and bilineal types of leukemia, which constitute rare subtypes that require individualized therapy. Outcomes in Moroccan patients with MPAL are unknown. Among 1264 patients with acute leukemia, 20 were classified as having MPAL, including 17 with biphenotypic acute leukemia (1.3%) and 3 with bilineal leukemia (0.2%). There were 8 adults and 12 children. In 12 cases (60%), leukemic blasts expressed myeloid and T-lymphoid antigens, and, in 5 cases (25%), leukemic blasts expressed B lymphoid antigens plus myeloid antigens. Patients were initially treated on protocols for acute myeloid leukemia (n=4), acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL, n=14), or with palliative care (n=2). The probability of survival at 2 years in MPAL cases was 52%± 14%. Six of the 12 patients younger than 15 years remain alive versus 1 of 8 adult patients. Patients treated with ALL-directed therapy had significantly higher overall survival than those treated with acute myeloid leukemia-directed therapy (P=0.003). There was no association between the phenotypic characteristics and the clinical outcome (P=0.83). In conclusion, MPAL represents 1.5% of acute leukemia in Morocco. The prognosis is poor, but initial treatment with therapy directed toward ALL, improved supportive care, and the prevention of abandonment of therapy may improve outcomes in this subgroup of patients.

  6. [Acute leukemia in Jehovah's Witnesses].

    PubMed

    Bueno, J; Zuazu, J; Villalba, T; Julià, A

    1999-10-01

    Two cases of young patients, Jehova Witnesses (JW), diagnosed as having acute lymphoblastic leukaemia are presented. In one case a complete remission (CR) was obtained, lasting until now, 20 months after diagnosis; the other one died 11 months after diagnosis without achieving a CR. Three important questions can be raised in JW: 1) the absolute respect to patients' wishes; 2) to treat or not to treat; and 3) the pertinent therapy. The answer is yes to 1) and 2), and a slight myelotoxic therapy for the last one.

  7. Genomic profiling of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia reveals a changing mutational landscape from disease diagnosis to relapse | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Cancer.gov

    The genomic and clinical information used to develop and implement therapeutic approaches for AML originated primarily from adult patients and has been generalized to patients with pediatric AML. However, age-specific molecular alterations are becoming more evident and may signify the need to age-stratify treatment regimens. The NCI/COG TARGET-AML initiative employed whole exome capture sequencing (WXS) to interrogate the genomic landscape of matched trios representing specimens collected upon diagnosis, remission, and relapse from 20 cases of de novo childhood AML.

  8. Donor Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant and Pretargeted Radioimmunotherapy in Treating Patients With High-Risk Advanced Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-27

    Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia; Refractory Cytopenia With Multilineage Dysplasia and Ringed Sideroblasts; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Alvocidib, Cytarabine, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride or Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Multilineage Dysplasia Following Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Early Discharge and Outpatients Care in Patients With Myelodysplastic Syndrome or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Previously Treated With Intensive Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-02-05

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. Acute nonlymphocytic leukemia: the first 48 hours.

    PubMed

    Ringenberg, Q S; Doll, D C

    1990-08-01

    The initial care of patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia can be lifesaving. Such patients are most often treated at tertiary care centers where resident physicians, working under the supervision of a subspecialist, are responsible for the diagnosis and initial treatment. During the first 48 hours, the house officer must recognize and understand the management of perilous complications such as hyperleukocytosis, hemorrhage, and infection. Specific lifesaving measures will grant the patient and his physicians sufficient time to reach a decision regarding the initiation of curative induction chemotherapy.

  12. Blood group change in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prakash, N. P.; Vijayalakshmi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Blood group antigens are either sugars or proteins found attached to the red blood cell membrane. ABO blood group antigens are the most clinically important antigens because they are the most immunogenic. As red blood cell antigens are inherited traits, they are usually not altered throughout the life of an individual. There have been occasional case reports of ABO blood group antigen change in malignant conditions. We report two such cases of ABO antigen alteration associated with acute myeloid leukemia. These patients had suppression of their blood group antigens during their leukemic phase, and the antigens were reexpressed when the patients attained remission. PMID:28127141

  13. Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Concise Review

    PubMed Central

    Saultz, Jennifer N.; Garzon, Ramiro

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous clonal disorder characterized by immature myeloid cell proliferation and bone marrow failure. Cytogenetics and mutation testing remain a critical prognostic tool for post induction treatment. Despite rapid advances in the field including new drug targets and increased understanding of the biology, AML treatment remains unchanged for the past three decades with the majority of patients eventually relapsing and dying of the disease. Allogenic transplant remains the best chance for cure for patients with intermediate or high risk disease. In this review, we discuss the landmark genetic studies that have improved outcome prediction and novel therapies. PMID:26959069

  14. Molecular diagnosis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Watt, Christopher D; Bagg, Adam

    2010-11-01

    The diagnosis and classification of acute myeloid leukemia is multifaceted, requiring the integration of a variety of laboratory findings, with genetic approaches now firmly established as a central component. Molecular genetic technologies continue to evolve and provide additional tiers of both clarity and complexity. Many have rapidly moved into clinical laboratories; others remain as relevant discovery tools, while some are poised to take their place in diagnostic testing menus. Here, we attempt to synthesize the role of various testing modalities and exciting nascent fundamental discoveries, with a view as to how these might be integrated into the contemporary and future evaluation of this group of aggressive hematologic malignancies.

  15. Acute promyelocytic leukemia, arsenic, and PML bodies

    PubMed Central

    Le Bras, Morgane; Lallemand-Breitenbach, Valérie

    2012-01-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is driven by a chromosomal translocation whose product, the PML/retinoic acid (RA) receptor α (RARA) fusion protein, affects both nuclear receptor signaling and PML body assembly. Dissection of APL pathogenesis has led to the rediscovery of PML bodies and revealed their role in cell senescence, disease pathogenesis, and responsiveness to treatment. APL is remarkable because of the fortuitous identification of two clinically effective therapies, RA and arsenic, both of which degrade PML/RARA oncoprotein and, together, cure APL. Analysis of arsenic-induced PML or PML/RARA degradation has implicated oxidative stress in the biogenesis of nuclear bodies and SUMO in their degradation. PMID:22778276

  16. Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride With Asparaginase in Treating Patients With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-24

    B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent T Lymphoblastic Leukemia/Lymphoma; Refractory B Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Refractory T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T Lymphoblastic Lymphoma

  17. Challenges identifying genetic determinants of pediatric cancers--the childhood leukemia experience.

    PubMed

    Sinnett, Daniel; Labuda, Damian; Krajinovic, Maja

    2006-01-01

    Pediatric cancers affect approximately 1 in every 500 children before the age of 15. Little is known about the etiology of this heterogeneous group of diseases despite the fact they constitute the major cause of death by disease among this population. Because of its relatively high prevalence, most of the work done in pediatric oncogenetics has been focused on leukemias, particularly acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Although it is now well accepted that genetic variation plays a significant role in determining individual's cancer susceptibility, few studies have explored genetic susceptibility to childhood leukemia with respect to common polymorphisms. The biochemical and genetic mechanisms contributing to cancer susceptibility are numerous and can be grouped into broad categories: (1) cellular growth and differentiation, (2) DNA replication and repair, (3) metabolism of carcinogens (4) apoptosis, (5) oxidative stress response and (6) cell cycle. To evaluate whether candidate genes in these pathways are involved in childhood leukemogenesis, we conducted case-control studies. We showed that leukemogenesis in children may be associated with DNA variants in some of these genes and that the combination of genotypes seems to be more predictive of risk than either of them independently. We also observed that, at least at some loci, the parental genetics might be important in predicting the risk of cancer in this pediatric model of a complex disease. Taken together, these results indicate that the investigation of a single enzyme and/or a single genotype might not be sufficient to explain the etiology of childhood leukemia because of the complexity of the environment and that of the inter-individual variability in cancer susceptibility.

  18. Cutaneous presentation preceding acute monocytic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xianhua; Li, Fuqiu; Li, Xue; Zhu, Wenjing; Mou, Yan; Huang, Yang; Zhao, Huanyu; Gao, Wei; Xia, Jianxin

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Cutaneous presentation preceding acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is rare, and the prognosis is poor. Patient concerns: We report 4 cases of AML cutis, where skin infiltration precedes any blood or bone marrow evidence of leukemia. We also reviewed 13 cases reported in English and Chinese literature. The 4 cases all presented typical cutaneous lesions without any systemic evidence of leukemia. Histopathological examination found that dense monomorphous cell infiltration involved the dermis. Some cells surrounded blood vessels and skin appendages in a concentric manner or showed single-row arrangement in the collagen fiber bundles. Uninvolved papillary dermis was found to separate normal epidermis from dermal infiltration. Minor cells had a large kidney-shaped or oval nucleus with nucleoli and slightly eosinophilic cytoplasm. Immunohistochemical analysis was positive for CD4, CD56, while CD123 was negative in all cases. Diagnoses: AML-M5. Interventions: 2 patients received chemotherapy ,but others rejected treatment. Outcomes: Most patients died within 1 year after the onset of skin lesions. Lessons: These findings suggest that skin infiltration of AML may precede any systemic evidence, and typical cutaneous lesions in elderly individuals may be indicative for AML. PMID:28272239

  19. Decitabine and Valproic Acid in Treating Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Acute Myeloid Leukemia or Previously Treated Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia or Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-09-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Relapsed Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia, or Acute Myeloid Leukemia Who Have Undergone Stem Cell Transplant

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-17

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes

  1. Immune reconstitution complicated by CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent haploidentical CD34+-selected hematopoietic stem cell transplant for acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Cesaro, Simone; Boaro, Maria Paola; Pillon, Marta; Calore, Elisabetta; Cermakova, Ivete; Perruccio, Katia; Mengoli, Carlo; Messina, Chiara

    2008-09-01

    We describe two episodes of CMV retinitis in a pediatric patient who underwent a CD34+ selected graft from his haploidentical father. Both recipient and donor were cytomegalovirus (CMV) seropositive. Both episodes occurred late post-grafting during a phase of complete immunological recovery with sufficient numbers of circulating CMV-specific clones. Antiviral treatment with foscarnet and ganciclovir was successful but prolonged treatment was required to prevent relapses. We hypothesize that this complication was more related to an immune reconstitution process than to an immune-deficient state post-grafting. We conclude that CMV retinitis is a late complication of HSCT that can occur despite satisfactory immune reconstitution. Usually, it is responsive to antiviral therapy. Dilated fundoscopic examination is essential both for examining patients with reduced visual acuity and for screening asymptomatic patients.

  2. [Leukemia research in Germany: the Competence Network Acute and Chronic Leukemias].

    PubMed

    Kossak-Roth, Ute; Saußele, Susanne; Aul, Carlo; Büchner, Thomas; Döhner, Hartmut; Dugas, Martin; Ehninger, Gerhard; Ganser, Arnold; Giagounidis, Aristoteles; Gökbuget, Nicola; Griesshammer, Martin; Hasford, Jörg; Heuser, Michael; Hiddemann, Wolfgang; Hochhaus, Andreas; Hoelzer, Dieter; Niederwieser, Dietger; Reiter, Andreas; Röllig, Christoph; Hehlmann, Rüdiger

    2016-04-01

    The Competence Network "Acute and Chronic Leukemias" was founded in 1997 by the consolidation of the leading leukemia study groups in Germany. Key results are the development of new trials and cooperative studies, the setup of patient registries and biobanking facilities, as well as the improvement of study infrastructure. In 2003, the concept of the competence network contributed to the foundation of the European LeukemiaNet (ELN). Synergy with the ELN resulted in cooperation on a European and international level, standardization of diagnostics and treatment, and recommendations for each leukemia and interdisciplinary specialty. The ultimate goal of the network is the cure of leukemia through cooperative research.

  3. Vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus bacteremia in a child with acute myeloid leukemia: successful treatment with daptomycin.

    PubMed

    Büyükcam, Ayşe; Karadağ Öncel, Eda; Özsürekçi, Yasemin; Cengiz, Ali B; Kuşkonmaz, Barış; Sancak, Banu

    2016-12-01

    Multiple-drug-resistant enterococcal infections canbe a serious problem in pediatric patients particularly concomitance with severe underlying diseases and lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The treatment options in children are limited compared with adults. We report a 3-year old-boy with acute myeloid leukemia (AML)-M7 and vancomycin-resistant enterococcus bacteremia successfully treated with daptomycin. Daptomycin may be an alternative therapy for VRE infections in children; more studies are needed for extended usage.

  4. Chromosome abnormalities in acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    SciTech Connect

    Rowley, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Less information is available on the cytogenetic abnormalities in marrow cells of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) than on abnormalities in acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL); nonetheless, some patterns of karyotypic change in ALL are evident. Even with banding, about 50% of patients appear to have a normal karyotype. The modal chromosome number tends to be higher in ALL than in ANLL. Every patient with B-cell ALL has had an abnormality of one chromosome No. 14 that involved the translocation of material to the end of the long arm. Among seven reported cases, the translocation was from 8q in three patients and 11q in one. Cells with a haploid or near-haploid (24 to 35) chromosome number have been reported in five patients with ALL and in four patients in a lymphoid blast crisis of chronic myelogeneous leukemia. The karyotype in the four ALL patients whose cells were analyzed with banding was remarkably consistent. All patients had the haploid number, usually with both sex chromosomes, plus an additional No. 10, 18, and 21. Evolution of the karyotype, which occurs in the leukemic cells of about 50% of patients, involves cells of patients who had an initially normal or an initially abnormal karyotype. The evidence regarding a correlation between the presence of an abnormal clone prior to treatment and response to treatment is contradictory at present. Some chromosome abnormalities, such as the presence of a Philadelphia (Ph/sup 1/) chromosome, a 14q+chromosome, or a haploid clone, are associated with a relatively short survival.

  5. Generation of Pediatric Leukemia Xenograft Models in NSG-B2m Mice: Comparison with NOD/SCID Mice.

    PubMed

    Gopalakrishnapillai, Anilkumar; Kolb, E Anders; Dhanan, Priyanka; Bojja, Aruna Sri; Mason, Robert W; Corao, Diana; Barwe, Sonali P

    2016-01-01

    Generation of orthotopic xenograft mouse models of leukemia is important to understand the mechanisms of leukemogenesis, cancer progression, its cross talk with the bone marrow microenvironment, and for preclinical evaluation of drugs. In these models, following intravenous injection, leukemic cells home to the bone marrow and proliferate there before infiltrating other organs, such as spleen, liver, and the central nervous system. Moreover, such models have been shown to accurately recapitulate the human disease and correlate with patient response to therapy and prognosis. Thus, various immune-deficient mice strains have been used with or without recipient preconditioning to increase engraftment efficiency. Mice homozygous for the severe combined immune deficiency (SCID) mutation and with non-obese diabetic background (NOD/SCID) have been used in the majority of leukemia xenograft studies. Later, NOD/SCID mice deficient for interleukin 2 receptor gamma chain (IL2Rγ) gene called NSG mice became the model of choice for leukemia xenografts. However, engraftment of leukemia cells without irradiation preconditioning still remained a challenge. In this study, we used NSG mice with null alleles for major histocompatibility complex class I beta2-microglobulin (β2m) called NSG-B2m. This is a first report describing the 100% engraftment efficiency of pediatric leukemia cell lines and primary samples in NSG-B2m mice in the absence of host preconditioning by sublethal irradiation. We also show direct comparison of the engraftment efficiency and growth rate of pediatric acute leukemia cells in NSG-B2m and NOD/SCID mice, which showed 80-90% engraftment efficiency. Secondary and tertiary xenografts in NSG-B2m mice generated by injection of cells isolated from the spleens of leukemia-bearing mice also behaved similar to the primary patient sample. We have successfully engrafted 25 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 5 acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples with

  6. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient.

  7. Dasatinib and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Young Patients With Newly Diagnosed Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-08

    Adult B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Childhood B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  8. Neurocognitive and neuroradiologic central nervous system late effects in children treated on Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) P9605 (standard risk) and P9201 (lesser risk) acute lymphoblastic leukemia protocols (ACCL0131): a methotrexate consequence? A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    PubMed

    Duffner, Patricia K; Armstrong, Floyd Daniel; Chen, Lu; Helton, Kathleen J; Brecher, Martin L; Bell, Beverly; Chauvenet, Allen R

    2014-01-01

    Concerns about long-term methotrexate (MTX) neurotoxicity in the 1990s led to modifications in intrathecal (IT) therapy, leucovorin rescue, and frequency of systemic MTX administration in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. In this study, neurocognitive outcomes and neuroradiologic evidence of leukoencephalopathy were compared in children treated with intense central nervous system (CNS)-directed therapy (P9605) versus those receiving fewer CNS-directed treatment days during intensive consolidation (P9201). A total of 66 children from 16 Pediatric Oncology Group institutions with "standard-risk" acute lymphoblastic leukemia, 1.00 to 9.99 years at diagnosis, without evidence of CNS leukemia at diagnosis were enrolled on ACCL0131: 28 from P9201 and 38 from P9605. Magnetic resonance imaging scans and standard neuropsychological tests were performed ≥2.6 years after the end of treatment. Significantly more P9605 patients developed leukoencephalopathy compared with P9201 patients (68%, 95% confidence interval 49%-83% vs. 22%, 95% confidence interval 5%-44%; P=0.001) identified as late as 7.7 years after the end of treatment. Overall, 40% of patients scored <85 on either Verbal or Performance IQ. Children on both studies had significant attention problems, but P9605 children scored below average on more neurocognitive measures than those treated on P9201 (82%, 14/17 measures vs. 24%, 4/17 measures). This supports ongoing concerns about intensive MTX exposure as a major contributor to CNS late effects.

  9. Sorafenib Tosylate and Chemotherapy in Treating Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (Megakaryoblastic) With t(1;22)(p13;q13); RBM15-MKL1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With a Variant RARA Translocation; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(3)(q21q26.2) or t(3;3)(q21;q26.2); RPN1-EVI1; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(6;9)(p23;q34); DEK-NUP214; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Variant MLL Translocations; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  10. Decitabine as Maintenance Therapy After Standard Therapy in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-04

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Myelodysplasia-Related Changes; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21); (q22; q22.1); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22.3;q23.3); MLLT3-KMT2A; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  11. MEK Inhibitor MEK162, Idarubicin, and Cytarabine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-26

    Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  12. Cyclosporine, Pravastatin Sodium, Etoposide, and Mitoxantrone Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-27

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  13. Adolescents and young adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Stock, Wendy

    2010-01-01

    During the last decade, increasing attention has been paid to a unique group of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) who lie at the crossroad of therapeutic care by pediatric and adult hematologists/oncologists. ALL is a disease that affects infants, children, adolescents, and adult patients. With current therapies, the vast majority of children with ALL are now long-term survivors; unfortunately, the same good results have not yet been obtained for adults with ALL. This review will describe current controversies surrounding the treatment of adolescents and young adults with ALL--a group who finds themselves in the transition from "pediatric" to "adult" treatment approaches. The review focuses on recent insights into disease biology, prognostic factors, and treatment outcomes that have led to a series of prospective clinical trials specifically designed for adolescents and younger adults (AYAs) with ALL. These trials have been designed to provide important new clinical, psychosocial, and biological insights, and to further improve the survival of this challenging and unique group of patients.

  14. Lenalidomide, Cytarabine, and Idarubicin in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-22

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia Arising From Previous Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13.1q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13.1;q22); CBFB-MYH11; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); RUNX1-RUNX1T1; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(9;11)(p22;q23); MLLT3-MLL; Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); PML-RARA; Alkylating Agent-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndrome; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. Intravenous Sodium Valproate for Acute Pediatric Headache.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, David; Sun, Benjamin; O'Brien, Patricia; Hansen, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    Headaches are common in the pediatric population, and increase in prevalence with age. The abortive medications currently used have a number of potential side effects. Sodium valproate (VPA) has been shown to be effective for acute treatment in the adult population, but no data exist in the pediatric population. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of VPA for acute pediatric headache in the emergency department. This was a retrospective case series of all patients <19 years of age treated in the pediatric emergency department (PED) at two tertiary care pediatric hospitals and with a final diagnosis of migraine or headache who received parenteral VPA. Data collected included patient demographics, pain reduction, length of stay, and final disposition. From July 2010 to February 2014, there were 16 patients who received VPA for acute headache in the PED; 4 were excluded. Eighty-three percent were discharged home. Mean length of stay in the PED before VPA was 395 min, and 120 min after VPA administration. Patients achieved a 17% mean pain score reduction before VPA and approximately an additional 40% mean pain reduction after VPA infusion. VPA appears to be an effective agent for acute pediatric headache in this small series. Patients responded well to VPA in a relatively short amount of time. Further studies are needed to evaluate its effectiveness in combination with other first-line medications or as a single agent. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Vorinostat and Decitabine in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors or Relapsed or Refractory Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia, or Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-26

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Blastic Phase Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Extranodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma of Mucosa-associated Lymphoid Tissue; Nodal Marginal Zone B-cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Recurrent Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Recurrent Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Recurrent Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Splenic Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage III Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage III Marginal Zone Lymphoma; Stage III Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Burkitt Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Mixed Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Diffuse Small Cleaved Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Immunoblastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Adult Lymphoblastic Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 1 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 2 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Grade 3 Follicular Lymphoma; Stage IV Mantle Cell Lymphoma; Stage IV Marginal Zone Lymphoma

  17. Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy as presenting symptoms of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Gold, Heidi L; Grynspan, David; Kanigsberg, Nordau

    2014-01-01

    Leukemia cutis and facial nerve palsy are rare presenting symptoms of leukemia. This report describes a case of acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) presenting with only these two symptoms, a presentation of ALL that, to our knowledge, has not been previously described. It serves to alert physicians to look for underlying malignancy in the setting of cutaneous findings associated with facial nerve palsy. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. New Strategies in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia: Leukemogenesis and Personalized Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Gojo, Ivana; Karp, Judith E.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular technology have unraveled the complexity of leukemogenesis and provided the opportunity to design more personalized and pathophysiology-targeted therapeutic strategies. Despite the use of intensive chemotherapy, relapse remains the most common cause for therapeutic failure in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML). The interactions between leukemia stem cells (LSC) and marrow microenvironment appear to be critical in promoting therapeutic resistance through progressive acquisition of genetic and epigenetic changes within leukemia cells and immune evasion, resulting in leukemia cell survival. With advances in genomic sequencing efforts, epigenetic and phenotypic characterization, personalized therapeutic strategies aimed at critical leukemia survival mechanisms may be feasible in the near future. Here, we review select novel approaches to therapy of AML such as targeting LSC, altering leukemia/marrow microenvironment interactions, inhibiting DNA repair or cell cycle checkpoints, and augmenting immune-based anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25324141

  19. [Infections in the child with acute leukemia].

    PubMed

    Carrillo, J M; Jiménez, E; Jiménez, R

    1981-01-01

    One hundred and twenty-five febrile episodes in 82 children with acute leukemia were studied; 46% of the patients were from urban and 54% from rural areas. The origin of the fever was identified in 91% of the episodes, prevailing pneumonia, septicemia, chickenpox and herpes zoster. The etiological agent was identified in 46% of the cases. A viral predominance was evident, and among them varicela-zoster, following in importance gram-negative bacteria. Histoplasma capsulatum and Pneumocystis carinii were isolated in two occassions each. Sepsis was found more frequently in children with active leukemia than in those in remission (p less than 0.001). Forty-four febrile episodes occurred in patients with less than 1,000 neutrophils/ul. The daily-risk rate of infection was higher in children fom rural than in those from urban areas (p less than 0.001). After clinical and laboratory studies, methicillin and gentamicin were used, in addition to carbenicillin or trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole is selected cases. This treatment was effective in 86% of the cases. Twelve (15%) children died, 6 of whom were in remission at that moment.

  20. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Antonio F.; Menéndez, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs) and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides) include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations) may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation). Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events. PMID:27043530

  1. Linking Pesticide Exposure with Pediatric Leukemia: Potential Underlying Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hernández, Antonio F; Menéndez, Pablo

    2016-03-29

    Leukemia is the most common cancer in children, representing 30% of all childhood cancers. The disease arises from recurrent genetic insults that block differentiation of hematopoietic stem and/or progenitor cells (HSPCs) and drives uncontrolled proliferation and survival of the differentiation-blocked clone. Pediatric leukemia is phenotypically and genetically heterogeneous with an obscure etiology. The interaction between genetic factors and environmental agents represents a potential etiological driver. Although information is limited, the principal toxic mechanisms of potential leukemogenic agents (e.g., etoposide, benzene metabolites, bioflavonoids and some pesticides) include topoisomerase II inhibition and/or excessive generation of free radicals, which may induce DNA single- and double-strand breaks (DNA-DSBs) in early HSPCs. Chromosomal rearrangements (duplications, deletions and translocations) may occur if these lesions are not properly repaired. The initiating hit usually occurs in utero and commonly leads to the expression of oncogenic fusion proteins. Subsequent cooperating hits define the disease latency and occur after birth and may be of a genetic, epigenetic or immune nature (i.e., delayed infection-mediated immune deregulation). Here, we review the available experimental and epidemiological evidence linking pesticide exposure to infant and childhood leukemia and provide a mechanistic basis to support the association, focusing on early initiating molecular events.

  2. Pneumomediastinum after acute lymphoblastic leukemia and chemotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Portelles, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema are frequently benign and most commonly result from air escaping from the upper respiratory tract, intrathoracic airways, or gastrointestinal tract. Gas can also be generated by certain infections or reach the mediastinal space from outside air after trauma or surgery. In the article presented by Showkat et al a 14-year-old male patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) under chemotherapy developed pneumomediastinum, pneumorachis and subcutaneous emphysema. In the author’s opinion, these complications were caused by ALL or chemotherapy that progressed to severe respiratory failure until the patient finally died in the intensive care unit. I would like to underline some important points, which have been raised following a paper published in the October issue of World Journal of Clinical Cases. PMID:24868520

  3. Dendritic cell vaccination in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Anguille, Sébastien; Willemen, Yannick; Lion, Eva; Smits, Evelien L; Berneman, Zwi N

    2012-07-01

    The prognosis of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains dismal, with a 5-year overall survival rate of only 5.2% for the continuously growing subgroup of AML patients older than 65 years. These patients are generally not considered eligible for intensive chemotherapy and/or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation because of high treatment-related morbidity and mortality, emphasizing the need for novel, less toxic, treatment alternatives. It is within this context that immunotherapy has gained attention in recent years. In this review, we focus on the use of dendritic cell (DC) vaccines for immunotherapy of AML. DC are central orchestrators of the immune system, bridging innate and adaptive immunity and critical to the induction of anti-leukemic immunity. We discuss the rationale and basic principles of DC-based therapy for AML and review the clinical experience that has been obtained so far with this form of immunotherapy for patients with AML.

  4. Precision Medicine for Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E.; Hourigan, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints. PMID:26514194

  5. Precision medicine for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lai, Catherine; Karp, Judith E; Hourigan, Christopher S

    2016-01-01

    The goal of precision medicine is to personalize therapy based on individual patient variation, to correctly select the right treatment, for the right patient, at the right time. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogeneous collection of myeloid malignancies with diverse genetic etiology and the potential for intra-patient clonal evolution over time. We discuss here how the precision medicine paradigm might be applied to the care of AML patients by focusing on the potential roles of targeting therapy by patient-specific somatic mutations and aberrant pathways, ex-vivo drug sensitivity and resistance testing, high sensitivity measurements of residual disease burden and biology along with potential clinical trial and regulatory constraints.

  6. Histiocytic differentiation in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ru, Yong-xin; Dong, Shu-xu; Zhao, Shi-xuan; Liang, Hao-yue; Wang, Hui-jun; Hu, Xiao; Mi, Ying-chang; Wang, Jian-xiang

    2016-01-01

    Myeloid histocytes of dendritic cells (DCs), Langerhans cells (LCs), and macrophages in varied tissues, as leukemic blasts in acute monoblastic and monocytic leukemia (AML-M5a and M5b), are derived from monocyte progenitors in bone marrow. Based on DC induction from hematopoietic stem cells, myeloid progenitors, and monocytes, and occasional expressions of histocyte-related antigens (HRAs) in M5, we presume some M5 cases share histiocytic phenotypes originally. To clarify the conception, 93 M5 cases were tested with antibodies for HRAs, CD1a, CD163, S100, fascin, and langerin by immunostaining, and their morphologic characteristics were studied by light and transmission electron microscopy. The study revealed that 23 M5 cases were positive for two or more kinds of HRAs and shared a serial of histocytic immunophenotype and morphologic features, which were closely associated with M5b subtype and expression of CD14 in M5.

  7. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia and developmental biology

    PubMed Central

    Campos-Sanchez, Elena; Toboso-Navasa, Amparo; Romero-Camarero, Isabel; Barajas-Diego, Marcos

    2011-01-01

    The latest scientific findings in the field of cancer research are redefining our understanding of the molecular and cellular basis of the disease, moving the emphasis toward the study of the mechanisms underlying the alteration of the normal processes of cellular differentiation. The concepts best exemplifying this new vision are those of cancer stem cells and tumoral reprogramming. The study of the biology of acute lymphoblastic leukemias (ALLs) has provided seminal experimental evidence supporting these new points of view. Furthermore, in the case of B cells, it has been shown that all the stages of their normal development show a tremendous degree of plasticity, allowing them to be reprogrammed to other cellular types, either normal or leukemic. Here we revise the most recent discoveries in the fields of B-cell developmental plasticity and B-ALL research and discuss their interrelationships and their implications for our understanding of the biology of the disease. PMID:22031225

  8. Perinatal risk factors for acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Crump, Casey; Sundquist, Jan; Sieh, Weiva; Winkleby, Marilyn A; Sundquist, Kristina

    2015-12-01

    Infectious etiologies have been hypothesized for acute leukemias because of their high incidence in early childhood, but have seldom been examined for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). We conducted the first large cohort study to examine perinatal factors including season of birth, a proxy for perinatal infectious exposures, and risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood. A national cohort of 3,569,333 persons without Down syndrome who were born in Sweden in 1973-2008 were followed up for AML incidence through 2010 (maximum age 38 years). There were 315 AML cases in 69.7 million person-years of follow-up. We found a sinusoidal pattern in AML risk by season of birth (P < 0.001), with peak risk among persons born in winter. Relative to persons born in summer (June-August), incidence rate ratios for AML were 1.72 (95 % CI 1.25-2.38; P = 0.001) for winter (December-February), 1.37 (95 % CI 0.99-1.90; P = 0.06) for spring (March-May), and 1.27 (95 % CI 0.90-1.80; P = 0.17) for fall (September-November). Other risk factors for AML included high fetal growth, high gestational age at birth, and low maternal education level. These findings did not vary by sex or age at diagnosis. Sex, birth order, parental age, and parental country of birth were not associated with AML. In this large cohort study, birth in winter was associated with increased risk of AML in childhood through young adulthood, possibly related to immunologic effects of early infectious exposures compared with summer birth. These findings warrant further investigation of the role of seasonally varying perinatal exposures in the etiology of AML.

  9. Serological identification of immunogenic antigens in acute monocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Zhang, Wanggang; Cao, Xingmei; Li, Fuyang; Liu, Xinping; Yao, Libo

    2005-05-01

    In order to improve disease-free survival and potentially a cure, it is necessary to identify more potent leukemia antigen. Here, we defined the acute monocytic leukemia-associated antigen (LAA) recognized by the humoral immune system for the first time. We have applied the method of serologic analysis of recombinant cDNA expression library (SEREX) on acute monocytic leukemia (FAB M5), followed by DNA sequencing and analyzing of positive clones. Then, the reactivity of normal and other leukemia sera with positive clones were performed. Thirty-five distinct novel antigens reactive with autologous IgG were identified by SEREX analysis on an acute monocytic leukemia patient and were characterized according to cDNA sequence and the reactivity with allogeneic sera. Twenty of the 35 antigens identified in this study were recognized by IgG antibodies in normal sera, and the remaining 15 were recognized exclusively by sera from allogeneic leukemia patients but not by normal donor sera, suggested that the immune response to these 15 antigens are leukemia related. The 15 immunogenic antigens detected by immune responses in the autologous host facilitate the identification of epitopes recognized by antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and are potential candidates for diagnosis and immunotherapy in acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

  10. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa Endocarditis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    J, Barshay; A, Nemets; A, Ducach; G, Lugassy

    2008-01-01

    Infectious endocarditis is a rarely encountered complication among leukemia patient during induction therapy. We describe a young patient who developed prolonged high fever after aggressive chemotherapy for Acute Myeloid Leukemia. Pseudomonas Aeruginosa endocarditis was found to be the etiology for the febrile state. Our purpose is to emphasize the need for an early diagnosis of this rare, albeit treatable complication. PMID:23675106

  11. Acute erythroid leukemia with multilineage dysplasia in a cat.

    PubMed

    Shirani, Dariush; Nassiri, Seyed Mahdi; Aldavood, Seyed Javid; Seddigh, Hamideh Salari; Fathi, Ezzatollah

    2011-04-01

    Dysplastic features of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages were observed in a cat with acute erythroid leukemia. We demonstrated that flow cytometry analysis of the expression of glycophorin A and CD71 by neoplastic cells can be helpful in the diagnosis of this type of feline leukemia.

  12. [The pediatric surgeon and acute appendicitis].

    PubMed

    Ait Ali Slimane, M; Montupet, P

    2009-10-01

    The management of acute appendicitis in the pediatric patient has undergone radical rethinking in recent years. It has been shown that simple uncomplicated acute appendicitis can be successfully managed with antibiotic therapy and may not even require interval appendectomy. Appendicitis complicated by perforation, abscess, or inflammatory phlegmon can be successfully treated by initial antibiotic therapy (with or without percutaneous drainage) and delayed interval appendectomy. While the laparoscopic approach has proved to be well-adapted to many other pediatric surgical procedures, its utility in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis remains open to debate; compared to standard open appendectomy, it offers only minimal advantages with regard to post-operative care, length of hospital stay, and complications. Children can be managed either by general surgeons or pediatric surgeons depending on the organization of the emergency service; there may be a higher incidence of removal of a normal appendix in non-specialized services.

  13. Cyclophosphamide and Busulfan Followed by Donor Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Myelofibrosis, Acute Myeloid Leukemia, or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-03

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; de Novo Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Essential Thrombocythemia; Myelodysplastic Syndrome With Isolated Del(5q); Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Primary Myelofibrosis; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Secondary Myelofibrosis; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Other Myeloid Malignancies

  14. Symptom-Adapted Physical Activity Intervention in Minimizing Physical Function Decline in Older Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-30

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  15. The lncRNA CASC15 regulates SOX4 expression in RUNX1-rearranged acute leukemia.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Thilini R; Contreras, Jorge R; Zampini, Matteo; Rodriguez-Malave, Norma I; Alberti, Michael O; Anguiano, Jaime; Tran, Tiffany M; Palanichamy, Jayanth K; Gajeton, Jasmine; Ung, Nolan M; Aros, Cody J; Waters, Ella V; Casero, David; Basso, Giuseppe; Pigazzi, Martina; Rao, Dinesh S

    2017-07-19

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a variety of cellular roles, including regulation of transcription and translation, leading to alterations in gene expression. Some lncRNAs modulate the expression of chromosomally adjacent genes. Here, we assess the roles of the lncRNA CASC15 in regulation of a chromosomally nearby gene, SOX4, and its function in RUNX1/AML translocated leukemia. CASC15 is a conserved lncRNA that was upregulated in pediatric B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with t (12; 21) as well as pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with t (8; 21), both of which are associated with relatively better prognosis. Enforced expression of CASC15 led to a myeloid bias in development, and overall, decreased engraftment and colony formation. At the cellular level, CASC15 regulated cellular survival, proliferation, and the expression of its chromosomally adjacent gene, SOX4. Differentially regulated genes following CASC15 knockdown were enriched for predicted transcriptional targets of the Yin and Yang-1 (YY1) transcription factor. Interestingly, we found that CASC15 enhances YY1-mediated regulation of the SOX4 promoter. Our findings represent the first characterization of this CASC15 in RUNX1-translocated leukemia, and point towards a mechanistic basis for its action.

  16. Cytogenetic and Cytogenomic Microarray Characterization of Chromothripsis in Chromosome 8 Affecting MOZ/NCOA2 (TIF2), FGFR1, RUNX1T1, and RUNX1 in a Pediatric Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Koduru, Prasad R; Wilson, Kathleen; Wen, Jiadi; Garcia, Rolando; Patel, Sangeeta; Monaghan, Sara A

    2017-05-01

    Concurrent perturbations in different driver genes have been reported primarily in lymphoma. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cases with concurrent alterations in 2 driver genes are infrequently reported. In contrast to pathogenetic pathways in lymphoma with concurrently perturbed genes, the initial gene alteration in AML arrests maturation and the alteration in the second gene promote self-renewal of the blasts. Here, we report a unique case of infantile leukemia in which chromothripsis in chromosome 8 completely altered the G-band structure and resulted in concurrent changes in MOZ/NCOA2, FGFR1, RUNX1T1, and RUNX1. These multiple-hit abnormalities in AML have not been reported previously.

  17. Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia treated with bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Keino, Dai; Kondoh, Kensuke; Ohyama, Ryo; Morimoto, Mizuho; Mori, Tetsuya; Ito, Masafumi; Kinoshita, Akitoshi

    2017-04-01

    Hypocellular acute myeloid leukemia (AML) mainly occurs in elderly patients, and is extremely rare in childhood. There is still no established treatment for hypocellular AML. We report the case of an 11-year-old boy with hypocellular AML who was treated successfully with allogenic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT). He presented with fever, pallor and pancytopenia. Bone marrow aspiration and biopsy confirmed a diagnosis of hypocellular AML. Although low-dose cytarabine induced reduction of blasts, it did not lead to complete remission. He subsequently received myeloablative conditioning and allo-BMT. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis included short-course methotrexate and cyclosporine. Neutrophil engraftment (>5 × 10(8) /L) and platelet recovery (>10 × 10(10) /L) were achieved on days 13 and 27, respectively. He developed acute GVHD of the skin (grade 2), which responded well to treatment with prednisolone. He has remained in complete remission for 5 years since allo-BMT. We consider allo-BMT to be feasible for children with hypocellular AML. © 2017 Japan Pediatric Society.

  18. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ying; Wieman, Eric A; Guan, Xiuqin; Jakubowski, Ann A; Steinherz, Peter G; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-29

    We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML)) in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8%) displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5%) displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6%) did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  19. Novel gene targets detected by genomic profiling in a consecutive series of 126 adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Safavi, Setareh; Hansson, Markus; Karlsson, Karin; Biloglav, Andrea; Johansson, Bertil; Paulsson, Kajsa

    2015-01-01

    In contrast to acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children, adult cases of this disease are associated with a very poor prognosis. In order to ascertain whether the frequencies and patterns of submicroscopic changes, identifiable with single nucleotide polymorphism array analysis, differ between childhood and adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, we performed single nucleotide polymorphism array analyses of 126 adult cases, the largest series to date, including 18 paired diagnostic and relapse samples. Apart from identifying characteristic microdeletions of the CDKN2A, EBF1, ETV6, IKZF1, PAX5 and RB1 genes, the present study uncovered novel, focal deletions of the BCAT1, BTLA, NR3C1, PIK3AP1 and SERP2 genes in 2-6% of the adult cases. IKZF1 deletions were associated with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P=0.036), BCR-ABL1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (P<0.001), and higher white blood cell counts (P=0.005). In addition, recurrent deletions of RASSF3 and TOX were seen in relapse samples. Comparing paired diagnostic/relapse samples revealed identical changes at diagnosis and relapse in 27%, clonal evolution in 22%, and relapses evolving from ancestral clones in 50%, akin to what has previously been reported in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia and indicating that the mechanisms of relapse may be similar in adult and childhood cases. These findings provide novel insights into the leukemogenesis of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia, showing similarities to childhood disease in the pattern of deletions and the clonal relationship between diagnostic and relapse samples, but with the adult cases harboring additional aberrations that have not been described in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  20. Hematopoietic ontogeny and its relevance for pediatric leukemias.

    PubMed

    Udroiu, Ion; Sgura, Antonella

    2016-03-01

    Fetal and infant hematopoiesis display characteristics different from the adult one: our suggestion is that these features may help to explain the peculiar incidence rates of acute leukemias. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are fast-cycling (those in adults instead are largely quiescent) and studies in mice demonstrated that their relative contribution to myelo- and lymphopoiesis varies during development. We hypothesize that during development some of the "hits" needed for the onset of leukemia are usually occurring (being part of the normal development), so leukemogenesis needs less mutations than in adults to take place and therefore it's more probable. The switch between the relative incidence of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemias may be related to the changes of the percentage of lymphoid-deficient and lymphoid-proficient sub-set of HSCs during development. Further investigations may clarify this hypothesis, elucidating also the roles of the different microenvironments in determining the myeloid/lymphoid predisposition of the HSCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Imatinib Mesylate and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Philadelphia Chromosome Positive Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-06

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia With t(9;22)(q34.1;q11.2); BCR-ABL1; BCR-ABL1 Fusion Protein Expression; Minimal Residual Disease; Philadelphia Chromosome Positive; T Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Untreated Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  2. Study of Posterior Reversible Encephalopathy Syndrome in Children With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia After Induction Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ji-Hong; Tian, Jian-Mei; Sheng, Mao; Hu, Shao-Yan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Li-Ya; Gu, Qing; Wang, Qi

    2016-03-01

    Increasing occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome has been reported in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. However, the etiology of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome is not clear. To study the possible pathogenetic mechanisms and treatment of this complication, we reported 11 cases of pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia who developed posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome after induction chemotherapy. After appropriate treatment, the clinical symptoms of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome in most cases disappeared even though induction chemotherapy continued. During the 1-year follow-up, no recurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was observed. Although the clinical and imaging features of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome may be diverse, posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be recognized as a possible important complication of acute lymphoblastic leukemia when neurologic symptoms appear. In line with previous reports, our study also indicated that posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome was reversible when diagnosed and treated at an early stage. Thus, the occurrence of posterior reversible encephalopathy syndrome should be considered and investigated to optimize the early induction scheme of acute lymphoblastic leukemia treatment.

  3. Genetics Home Reference: familial acute myeloid leukemia with mutated CEBPA

    MedlinePlus

    ... terminal C/EBPalpha mutation. Genes Chromosomes Cancer. 2010 Mar;49(3):237-41. doi: 10.1002/gcc. ... EBPalpha), in acute myeloid leukemia. Nat Genet. 2001 Mar;27(3):263-70. Citation on PubMed Renneville ...

  4. What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Prevention What Are the Risk Factors for Acute Lymphocytic Leukemia? A risk factor is something that affects your ... this is unknown. Having an identical twin with ALL Someone who has an identical twin who develops ...

  5. Endometrial and acute myeloid leukemia cancer genomes characterized

    Cancer.gov

    Two studies from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) program reveal details about the genomic landscapes of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and endometrial cancer. Both provide new insights into the molecular underpinnings of these cancers.

  6. Serum metabonomics of acute leukemia using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Siddiqui, Amna Jabbar; Shamsi, Tahir; Choudhary, M. Iqbal; Rahman, Atta-ur

    2016-01-01

    Acute leukemia is a critical neoplasm of white blood cells. In order to differentiate between the metabolic alterations associated with two subtypes of acute leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we investigated the serum of ALL and AML patients and compared with two controls (healthy and aplastic anemia) using 1H NMR (nuclear magnetic resonance) spectroscopy. Thirty-seven putative metabolites were identified using Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill (CPMG) sequence. The use of PLS-DA and OPLS-DA models gave results with 84.38% and 90.63% classification rate, respectively. The metabolites responsible for classification are mainly lipids, lactate and glucose. Compared with controls, ALL and AML patients showed serum metabonomic differences involving aberrant metabolism pathways including glycolysis, TCA cycle, lipoprotein changes, choline and fatty acid metabolisms. PMID:27480133

  7. Measurements of treatment response in childhood acute leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Coustan-Smith, Elaine

    2012-01-01

    Measuring response to chemotherapy is a backbone of the clinical management of patients with acute leukemia. This task has historically relied on the ability to identify leukemic cells among normal bone marrow cells by their morphology. However, more accurate ways to identify leukemic cells have been developed, which allow their detection even when they are present in small numbers that would be impossible to be recognized by microscopic inspection. The levels of such minimal residual disease (MRD) are now widely used as parameters for risk assignment in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and increasingly so in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, different MRD monitoring methods may produce discrepant results. Moreover, results of morphologic examination may be in stark contradiction to MRD measurements, thus creating confusion and complicating treatment decisions. This review focusses on the relation between results of different approaches to measure response to treatment and define relapse in childhood acute leukemia. PMID:23320002

  8. Clofarabine, Cytarabine, and Filgrastim Followed by Infusion of Non-HLA Matched Ex Vivo Expanded Cord Blood Progenitors in Treating Patients With Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-13

    Adult Acute Megakaryoblastic Leukemia (M7); Adult Acute Minimally Differentiated Myeloid Leukemia (M0); Adult Acute Monoblastic Leukemia (M5a); Adult Acute Monocytic Leukemia (M5b); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia With Maturation (M2); Adult Acute Myeloblastic Leukemia Without Maturation (M1); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Del(5q); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); Adult Acute Myelomonocytic Leukemia (M4); Adult Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia (M3); Adult Erythroleukemia (M6a); Adult Pure Erythroid Leukemia (M6b); Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  9. Neuroimaging in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Lucaya, Javier; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Sainz, Pilar; Olivé, Teresa; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Ortega, Juan J

    2002-01-01