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Sample records for pediatric diffuse parenchymal

  1. Spectrum of fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    PubMed

    Morgenthau, Adam S; Padilla, Maria L

    2009-02-01

    The interstitial lung diseases are a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by inflammation and/or fibrosis of the pulmonary interstitium. In 2002, the American Thoracic Society and the European Respiratory Society revised the classification of interstitial lung diseases and introduced the term diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are a subtype of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. The idiopathic interstitial pneumonias are subdivided into usual interstitial pneumonia (with its clinical counterpart idiopathic interstitial pneumonia), nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, cryptogenic organizing pneumonia, acute interstitial pneumonia, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, respiratory bronchiolitis interstitial lung disease, and lymphocytic pneumonia. Sarcoidosis and hypersensitivity pneumonitis are the 2 most common granulomatous diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Rheumatoid arthritis, systemic sclerosis, and dermatomyositis/polymyositis (causing antisynthetase syndrome) are diffuse parenchymal lung diseases of known association because these conditions are associated with connective tissue disease. Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome is a rare genetic diffuse parenchymal lung disease characterized by the clinical triad of pulmonary disease, oculocutaneous albinism, and bleeding diathesis. This review provides an overview of the chronic fibrosing diffuse parenchymal lung diseases. Its primary objective is to illuminate the clinical challenges encountered by clinicians who manage the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases regularly and to offer potential solutions to those challenges. Treatment for the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases is limited, and for many patients with end-stage disease, lung transplantation remains the best option. Although much has been learned about the diffuse parenchymal lung diseases during the past decade, research in these diseases is urgently needed.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Shlobin, Oksana A; Brown, A Whitney; Nathan, Steven D

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can be triggered by any number of disease processes that result in increased pulmonary vascular resistance. Although historically associated with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), most patients with PH do not have the idiopathic subtype, but rather PH associated with another underlying diagnosis, such as left heart or lung disease. The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of PH helps conceptualize the different categories based on presumed etiology. WHO group 3 is PH associated with lung disease. This review focuses on PH in diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs), such as the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and other more rare forms of DPLD. Although there are clear associations of PH with DPLD, the exact pathophysiologic mechanisms and full clinical significance remain uncertain. Treatment of PH related to DPLD remains investigational, but an area of great interest given the negative prognostic implications and the growing number of available pulmonary vasoactive agents.

  3. A rarely seen diffuse parenchymal lung disease: diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis.

    PubMed

    Şen, Nazan; Canpolat, Emine Tuba; Koç, Zafer

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary meningothelial-like nodules (MLNs) are usually detected incidentally during pathologic evaluation of resected pulmonary parenchymal specimens and autopsies. These nodules are generally asymptomatic and most often single. Diffuse pulmonary involvement by MLNs is less frequently described. MLNs are benign lesions and have been associated with neoplastic and non-neoplastic pulmonary conditions and occasionally with extrapulmonary diseases. We report a case of a female patient presenting with multiple and bilateral pulmonary nodules diagnosed with "diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis" by video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Diffuse pulmonary meningotheliomatosis should be included in the differential diagnosis of diffuse bilateral lung nodules in the radiologic studies.

  4. Diffuse Parenchymal Diseases Associated With Aluminum Use and Primary Aluminum Production

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aluminum use and primary aluminum production results in the generation of various particles, fumes, gases, and airborne materials with the potential for inducing a wide range of lung pathology. Nevertheless, the presence of diffuse parenchymal or interstitial lung disease related to these processes remains controversial. The relatively uncommon occurrence of interstitial lung diseases in aluminum-exposed workers—despite the extensive industrial use of aluminum—the potential for concurrent exposure to other fibrogenic fibers, and the previous use of inhaled aluminum powder for the prevention of silicosis without apparent adverse respiratory effects are some of the reasons for this continuing controversy. Specific aluminum-induced parenchymal diseases described in the literature, including existing evidence of interstitial lung diseases, associated with primary aluminum production are reviewed. PMID:24806728

  5. Genetic Polymorphisms in Inflammasome-Dependent Innate Immunity among Pediatric Patients with Severe Renal Parenchymal Infections

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Hui; Lee, Yun-Shien; Chang, Chee-Jen; Lin, Jui-Che; Lin, Tzou-Yien

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammasome innate immune response activation has been demonstrated in various inflammatory diseases and microbial infections. However, to our knowledge, no study has examined the inflammasome-dependent pathways in patients with urinary tract infection. Defective or variant genes associated with innate immunity are believed to alter the host’s susceptibility to microbial infection. This study investigated genetic polymorphisms in genes encoding inflammasomes and the subsequent released cytokines in pediatric patients with severe renal parenchymal infections. Methodology This study included patients diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis (APN) and acute lobar nephronia (ALN) who had no underlying disease or structural anomalies other than vesicoureteral reflux (VUR). Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping was performed in the genes associated with inflammasome formation and activation (NLRP3, CARD8) and subsequent IL–1β cytokine generation (IL–1β). Principal Findings A total of 40 SNPs were selected for initial genotyping. Analysis of samples from 48 patients each and 96 controls revealed that only nine SNPs (five SNPs in NLRP3; three SNPs in CARD8; one SNP in IL–1β) had heterozygosity rates >0.01. Hardy–Weinberg equilibrium was satisfied for the observed genotype frequencies of these SNPs. Analysis excluding patients with VUR, a well-known risk factor for severe UTIs, revealed a lower frequency of the CC genotype in NLRP3 (rs4612666) in patients with APN and ALN than in controls. Correction for multiple-SNP testing showed that the non-VUR subgroup of the APN+ALN combined patient groups remained significantly different from the control group (P < 0.0055). Conclusions This study is the first to suggest that the inflammasome-dependent innate immunity pathway is associated with the pathogenesis of pediatric severe renal parenchymal infections. Further investigation is warranted to clarify its pathogenic mechanism. PMID:26444566

  6. Clinical-Radiologic-Pathologic Correlation of Smoking-Related Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Kligerman, Seth; Franks, Teri J; Galvin, Jeffrey R

    2016-11-01

    The direct toxicity of cigarette smoke and the body's subsequent response to this lung injury leads to a wide array of pathologic manifestations and disease states that lead to both reversible and irreversible injury to the large airways, small airways, alveolar walls, and alveolar spaces. These include emphysema, bronchitis, bronchiolitis, acute eosinophilic pneumonia, pulmonary Langerhans cell histiocytosis, respiratory bronchiolitis, desquamative interstitial pneumonia, and pulmonary fibrosis. Although these various forms of injury have different pathologic and imaging manifestations, they are all part of the spectrum of smoking-related diffuse parenchymal lung disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. An adaptive knowledge-driven medical image search engine for interactive diffuse parenchymal lung disease quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yimo; Zhou, Xiang Sean; Bi, Jinbo; Jerebkoa, Anna; Wolf, Matthias; Salganicoff, Marcos; Krishnana, Arun

    2009-02-01

    Characterization and quantification of the severity of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLDs) using Computed Tomography (CT) is an important issue in clinical research. Recently, several classification-based computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems [1-3] for DPLD have been proposed. For some of those systems, a degradation of performance [2] was reported on unseen data because of considerable inter-patient variances of parenchymal tissue patterns. We believe that a CAD system of real clinical value should be robust to inter-patient variances and be able to classify unseen cases online more effectively. In this work, we have developed a novel adaptive knowledge-driven CT image search engine that combines offline learning aspects of classification-based CAD systems with online learning aspects of content-based image retrieval (CBIR) systems. Our system can seamlessly and adaptively fuse offline accumulated knowledge with online feedback, leading to an improved online performance in detecting DPLD in both accuracy and speed aspects. Our contribution lies in: (1) newly developed 3D texture-based and morphology-based features; (2) a multi-class offline feature selection method; and, (3) a novel image search engine framework for detecting DPLD. Very promising results have been obtained on a small test set.

  8. Pulmonary hypertension in the course of diffuse parenchymal lung diseases - state of art and future considerations.

    PubMed

    Szturmowicz, Monika; Kacprzak, Aneta; Błasińska-Przerwa, Katarzyna; Kuś, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Lung diseases are one of the most frequent causes of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The development of PH influences the course of lung disease, worsening the clinical symptoms and prognosis. According to the most recent publications, PH in the course of lung diseases develops as a result of both "parenchymal" and vascular pathology, in the patients with genetic predisposition. Prolonged infection (especially viral one) may be an additional promoting factor. Right heart catheterization (RHC), which is an invasive procedure, is the only objective method of diagnosing PH. According to the latest recommendations, the management algorithm of PH and coexisting interstitial lung disease is based on RHC and the results of pulmonary function tests. Majority of the patients develop mild PH in the course of advanced lung disease. Best treatment of underlying lung pathology combined with long term oxygen treatment is recommended in this group. In case of severe PH (mean resting pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥ 35 mm Hg) the alternate cause of PH has to be sought. PAH-specific drugs use should be limited to patients with severe PH participating in clinical trials. In this review, the value of various non-invasive methods (echocardiography, radiological examination, exercise capacity and brain natriuretic peptides assessment) in the process of screening for PH is presented, and the results of recent randomized clinical trials with PAH-specific drugs in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung diseases are discussed.

  9. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease as first clinical manifestation of GATA-2 deficiency in childhood.

    PubMed

    Svobodova, Tamara; Mejstrikova, Ester; Salzer, Ulrich; Sukova, Martina; Hubacek, Petr; Matej, Radoslav; Vasakova, Martina; Hornofova, Ludmila; Dvorakova, Marcela; Fronkova, Eva; Votava, Felix; Freiberger, Tomas; Pohunek, Petr; Stary, Jan; Janda, Ales

    2015-02-10

    GATA-2 transcription factor deficiency has recently been described in patients with a propensity towards myeloid malignancy associated with other highly variable phenotypic features: chronic leukocytopenias (dendritic cell-, monocyto-, granulocyto-, lymphocytopenia), increased susceptibility to infections, lymphatic vasculature abnormalities, and sensorineural deafness. Patients often suffer from opportunistic respiratory infections; chronic pulmonary changes have been found in advanced disease. We present a case of a 17-year-old previously healthy Caucasian male who was admitted to the hospital with fever, malaise, headache, cough and dyspnea. A chest X-ray revealed bilateral interstitial infiltrates and pneumonia was diagnosed. Despite prompt clinical improvement under antibiotic therapy, interstitial changes remained stable. A high resolution computer tomography showed severe diffuse parenchymal lung disease, while the patient's pulmonary function tests were normal and he was asymptomatic. Lung tissue biopsy revealed chronic reparative and resorptive reaction with organizing vasculitis. At the time of the initial presentation to the hospital, serological signs of acute infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) were present; EBV viremia with atypical serological response persisted during two-year follow up. No other infectious agents were found. Marked monocytopenia combined with B-cell lymphopenia led to a suspicion of GATA-2 deficiency. Diagnosis was confirmed by detection of the previously published heterozygous mutation in GATA2 (c.1081 C > T, p.R361C). The patient's brother and father were both carriers of the same genetic defect. The brother had no clinically relevant ailments despite leukocyte changes similar to the index patient. The father suffered from spondylarthritis, and apart from B-cell lymphopenia, no other changes within the leukocyte pool were seen. We conclude that a diagnosis of GATA-2 deficiency should be considered in all patients with

  10. Inter-observer variation between pathologists in diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Nicholson, A; Addis, B; Bharucha, H; Clelland, C; Corrin, B; Gibbs, A; Hasleton, P; Kerr, K; Ibrahim, N; Stewart, S; Wallace, W; Wells, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: There have been few inter-observer studies of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), but the recent ATS/ERS consensus classification provides a basis for such a study. Methods: A method for categorising numerically the percentage likelihood of these differential diagnoses was developed, and the diagnostic confidence of pathologists using this classification and the reproducibility of their diagnoses were assessed. Results: The overall kappa coefficient of agreement for the first choice diagnosis was 0.38 (n = 133 biopsies), increasing to 0.43 for patients (n = 83) with multiple biopsies. Weighted kappa coefficients of agreement, quantifying the level of probability of individual diagnoses, were moderate to good (mean 0.58, range 0.40–0.75). However, in 18% of biopsy specimens the diagnosis was given with low confidence. Over 50% of inter-observer variation related to the diagnosis of non-specific interstitial pneumonia and, in particular, its distinction from usual interstitial pneumonia. Conclusion: These results show that the ATS/ERS classification can be applied reproducibly by pathologists who evaluate DPLD routinely, and support the practice of taking multiple biopsy specimens. PMID:15170033

  11. Diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a case of chronic arsenic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Somnath; Dey, Atin; Saha, Sayantan; Kar, Saurav

    2016-01-01

    A 42-year-old housewife, the resident of rural part of West Bengal, presented with gradually progressive exertional dyspnea associated with a dry cough for last 3 years clinical features were suggestive of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD). Her chest X-ray posteroanterior view and high resolution computed tomography scan of the thorax showed bilateral patchy ground glass opacities and reticulonodular pattern. Search for the etiology revealed classical skin findings of chronic arsenic exposure in the form of generalized darkening and thickening of skin and keratotic lesions over the palms and soles and classical raindrop pigmentation over leg which was present for last 7 years subsequently her bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, hair, nail, and drinking water showed significant amount of arsenic contamination. By exclusion of all known causes of DPLD, we concluded that it was a case of DPLD due to chronic arsenic exposure. To the best of our knowledge, only few case report of DPLD in chronic arsenicosis has been reported till date. PMID:27625453

  12. Transbronchial Cryobiopsy in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease: Retrospective Analysis of 74 Cases.

    PubMed

    Ussavarungsi, Kamonpun; Kern, Ryan M; Roden, Anja C; Ryu, Jay H; Edell, Eric S

    2017-02-01

    Diagnostic evaluation of patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) is best achieved by a multidisciplinary team correlating clinical, radiological, and pathologic features. Surgical lung biopsy remains the gold standard for histopathologic diagnosis of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. Emerging data suggest an increasing role for transbronchial cryobiopsy (TBC) in DPLD evaluation. We describe our experience with TBC in patients with DPLD. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of patients with radiographic features of DPLD who underwent TBC at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota from June 2013 to September 2015. Seventy-four patients (33 women [45%]) with a mean age of 63 years (SD, 13.8) were included. The mean maximal diameter of the samples was 9.2 mm (range, 2-20 mm [SD, 3.9]). The median number of samples per procedure was three (range, one to seven). Diagnostic yield was 51% (38 of 74 specimens). The most frequent histopathologic patterns were granulomatous inflammation (12 patients) and organizing pneumonia (OP) (11 patients), resulting in the final diagnoses of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (six patients), cryptogenic OP (six patients), connective tissue disease-associated OP (three patients), drug toxicity (three patients), infection-related OP (two patients), sarcoidosis (two patients), and aspiration (one patient). Other histopathologic patterns included respiratory bronchiolitis (three patients), acute fibrinous and organizing pneumonia (two patients), desquamative interstitial pneumonia (1 patient), diffuse alveolar damage (one patient), pulmonary alveolar proteinosis (one patient), amyloidosis (one patient), eosinophilic pneumonia (one patient), necrotizing vasculitis (one patient), bronchiolitis with food particles (one patient), and malignancy (three patients). Pneumothorax developed in one patient (1.4%), and bleeding occurred in 16 patients (22%). Our single-center cohort demonstrated a 51% diagnostic yield from TBC; the

  13. Multicentre evaluation of multidisciplinary team meeting agreement on diagnosis in diffuse parenchymal lung disease: a case-cohort study.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Simon L F; Wells, Athol U; Desai, Sujal R; Poletti, Venerino; Piciucchi, Sara; Dubini, Alessandra; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique; Brillet, Pierre Y; Kambouchner, Marianne; Morais, António; Pereira, José M; Moura, Conceição Souto; Grutters, Jan C; van den Heuvel, Daniel A; van Es, Hendrik W; van Oosterhout, Matthijs F; Seldenrijk, Cornelis A; Bendstrup, Elisabeth; Rasmussen, Finn; Madsen, Line B; Gooptu, Bibek; Pomplun, Sabine; Taniguchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuoka, Junya; Johkoh, Takeshi; Nicholson, Andrew G; Sayer, Charlie; Edmunds, Lilian; Jacob, Joseph; Kokosi, Maria A; Myers, Jeffrey L; Flaherty, Kevin R; Hansell, David M

    2016-07-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung disease represents a diverse and challenging group of pulmonary disorders. A consistent diagnostic approach to diffuse parenchymal lung disease is crucial if clinical trial data are to be applied to individual patients. We aimed to evaluate inter-multidisciplinary team agreement for the diagnosis of diffuse parenchymal lung disease. We did a multicentre evaluation of clinical data of patients who presented to the interstitial lung disease unit of the Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK; host institution) and required multidisciplinary team meeting (MDTM) characterisation between March 1, 2010, and Aug 31, 2010. Only patients whose baseline clinical, radiological, and, if biopsy was taken, pathological data were undertaken at the host institution were included. Seven MDTMs, consisting of at least one clinician, radiologist, and pathologist, from seven countries (Denmark, France, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Portugal, and the UK) evaluated cases of diffuse parenchymal lung disease in a two-stage process between Jan 1, and Oct 15, 2015. First, the clinician, radiologist, and pathologist (if lung biopsy was completed) independently evaluated each case, selected up to five differential diagnoses from a choice of diffuse lung diseases, and chose likelihoods (censored at 5% and summing to 100% in each case) for each of their differential diagnoses, without inter-disciplinary consultation. Second, these specialists convened at an MDTM and reviewed all data, selected up to five differential diagnoses, and chose diagnosis likelihoods. We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreements on patient first-choice diagnoses using Cohen's kappa coefficient (κ). We then estimated inter-observer and inter-MDTM agreement on the probability of diagnosis using weighted kappa coefficient (κw). We compared inter-observer and inter-MDTM confidence of patient first-choice diagnosis. Finally, we evaluated the prognostic significance of a

  14. Quantitative consensus of supervised learners for diffuse lung parenchymal HRCT patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2013-03-01

    Automated lung parenchymal classification usually relies on supervised learning of expert chosen regions representative of the visually differentiable HRCT patterns specific to different pathologies (eg. emphysema, ground glass, honey combing, reticular and normal). Considering the elusiveness of a single most discriminating similarity measure, a plurality of weak learners can be combined to improve the machine learnability. Though a number of quantitative combination strategies exist, their efficacy is data and domain dependent. In this paper, we investigate multiple (N=12) quantitative consensus approaches to combine the clusters obtained with multiple (n=33) probability density-based similarity measures. Our study shows that hypergraph based meta-clustering and probabilistic clustering provides optimal expert-metric agreement.

  15. MR microscopy of human amyloid-β deposits: characterization of parenchymal amyloid, diffuse plaques, and vascular amyloid.

    PubMed

    Nabuurs, Rob J A; Natté, Remco; de Ronde, Fenna M; Hegeman-Kleinn, Ingrid; Dijkstra, Jouke; van Duinen, Sjoerd G; Webb, Andrew G; Rozemuller, Annemieke J; van Buchem, Mark A; van der Weerd, Louise

    2013-01-01

    Cerebral deposits of amyloid-β peptides (Aβ) form the neuropathological hallmarks of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA). In the brain, Aβ can aggregate as insoluble fibrils present in amyloid plaques and vascular amyloid, or as diffuse plaques consisting of mainly non-fibrillar Aβ. Previously, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been shown to be capable of detecting individual amyloid plaques, not only via the associated iron, but also Aβ itself has been suggested to be responsible for a decrease in the image intensity. In this current study we aim to investigate the MRI properties of the different cerebral Aβ deposits including diffuse plaques and vascular amyloid. Postmortem 60-μm-thick brain sections of AD, CAA, and Down's syndrome patients, known to contain Aβ, were studied. High resolution T2*- and T2-weighted MRI scans and quantitative relaxation maps were acquired using a microcoil on a Bruker 9.4T MRI system. Specific MRI characteristics of each type of Aβ deposit were examined by co-registration of the MRI with Congo Red and Aβ-immunostainings of the same sections. Our results show that only fibrillar Aβ, present in both vascular and parenchymal amyloid, induced a significant change in T2* and T2 values. However, signal changes were not as consistent for all of the vessels affected by CAA, irrespective of possible dyshoric changes. In contrast, the non-fibrillar diffuse plaques did not create any detectable MRI signal changes. These findings are relevant for the interpretation and further development of (quantitative) MRI methods for the detection and follow-up of AD and CAA.

  16. Clues for the differential diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis as an expectant variant of diffuse parenchymal lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Kupeli, E; Karnak, D; Kayacan, O; Beder, S

    2004-01-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis, also called extrinsic allergic alveolitis, a type of diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD), is an immunologically mediated pulmonary disease induced by inhalation of various antigens. As data on the frequency of hypersensitivity pneumonitis are lacking in Turkey, a retrospective analyses was performed in 43 patients with DPLD, followed up over seven years. The objective was to discover cases fulfilling the diagnostic criteria for hypersensitivity pneumonitis, to determine the frequency and/or the new characteristics of the disease, and to pick up clues for differentiating it from other DPLDs. The four subjects with hypersensitivity pneumonitis (9%) who lived in an urban area were studied in detail. The most common symptoms were dry cough and dyspnoea. According to the symptom duration, clinical features, radiological and pathological findings, three were diagnosed with chronic and one with subacute hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Patients with hypersensitivity pneumonitis and those with DPLD were compared by means of age, sex, smoking status, symptom duration, haematology, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, peripheral cell count, spirometric parameters, blood gases, and diffusion capacity. No statistically significant difference was detected in these parameters except for forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and forced vital capacity (FVC). In conclusion, patients with a history of antigen exposure, with mild symptoms such as dry cough and dyspnoea, and who have diffuse interstitial lung involvement on radiology should be carefully evaluated for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Moreover, among other DPLDs, stable FEV1 or FVC values may be the clues for establishing the diagnosis of hypersensitivity pneumonitis. However, further studies are needed in larger series of patients. PMID:15192166

  17. Diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T; Siddiqui, Adeel; Klimo, Paul; Boop, Frederick A

    2015-01-01

    Background Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been shown to be helpful in characterizing tumor cellularity, and predicting histology. Several works have evaluated this technique for pineal tumors; however studies to date have not focused on pediatric pineal tumors. Objective We evaluated the diffusion characteristics of pediatric pineal tumors to confirm if patterns seen in studies using mixed pediatric and adult populations remain valid. Materials and methods This retrospective study was performed after Institutional Review Board approval. We retrospectively evaluated all patients 18 years of age and younger with pineal tumors from a single institution where preoperative diffusion weighted imaging as well as histologic characterization was available. Results Twenty patients (13 male, 7 female) with pineal tumors were identified: seven with pineoblastoma, four with Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET), two with other pineal tumors, and seven with germ cell tumors including two germinomas, three teratomas, and one mixed germinoma-teratoma. The mean apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values in pineoblastoma (544 ± 65 × 10–6 mm2/s) and pineoblastoma/PNET (595 ± 144 × 10–6 mm2/s) was lower than that of the germ cell tumors (1284 ± 334 × 10–6 mm2/s; p < 0.0001 vs pineoblastoma). One highly cellular germinoma had an ADC value of 694 × 10–6 mm2/s. Conclusion ADC values can aid in differentiation of pineoblastoma/PNET from germ cell tumors in a population of children with pineal masses. PMID:25963154

  18. Novel algorithm to identify and differentiate specific digital signature of breath sound in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Parthasarathi; Mondal, Ashok; Dey, Rana; Saha, Dipanjan; Saha, Goutam

    2015-05-01

    Auscultation is an important part of the clinical examination of different lung diseases. Objective analysis of lung sounds based on underlying characteristics and its subsequent automatic interpretations may help a clinical practice. We collected the breath sounds from 8 normal subjects and 20 diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD) patients using a newly developed instrument and then filtered off the heart sounds using a novel technology. The collected sounds were thereafter analysed digitally on several characteristics as dynamical complexity, texture information and regularity index to find and define their unique digital signatures for differentiating normality and abnormality. For convenience of testing, these characteristic signatures of normal and DPLD lung sounds were transformed into coloured visual representations. The predictive power of these images has been validated by six independent observers that include three physicians. The proposed method gives a classification accuracy of 100% for composite features for both the normal as well as lung sound signals from DPLD patients. When tested by independent observers on the visually transformed images, the positive predictive value to diagnose the normality and DPLD remained 100%. The lung sounds from the normal and DPLD subjects could be differentiated and expressed according to their digital signatures. On visual transformation to coloured images, they retain 100% predictive power. This technique may assist physicians to diagnose DPLD from visual images bearing the digital signature of the condition. © 2015 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  19. Automated Lung Segmentation from HRCT Scans with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Pulagam, Ammi Reddy; Kande, Giri Babu; Ede, Venkata Krishna Rao; Inampudi, Ramesh Babu

    2016-08-01

    Performing accurate and fully automated lung segmentation of high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) images affected by dense abnormalities is a challenging problem. This paper presents a novel algorithm for automated segmentation of lungs based on modified convex hull algorithm and mathematical morphology techniques. Sixty randomly selected lung HRCT scans with different abnormalities are used to test the proposed algorithm, and experimental results show that the proposed approach can accurately segment the lungs even in the presence of disease patterns, with some limitations in the apices and bases of lungs. The algorithm demonstrates a high segmentation accuracy (dice similarity coefficient = 98.62 and shape differentiation metrics dmean = 1.39 mm, and drms = 2.76 mm). Therefore, the developed automated lung segmentation algorithm is a good candidate for the first stage of a computer-aided diagnosis system for diffuse lung diseases.

  20. Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Diseases with Clinicoradiological Discordance: Role of Transbronchial Lung Biopsy as a Diagnostic Tool - An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Narayan, Kiran Vishnu; Edakalavan, Jyothi; Kumar, Neethu Kesava

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The diagnosis of Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease (DPLD) requires a multidisciplinary approach with reconciliation of clinicoradiological and histopathological data. But when the preliminary clinicoradiological profile fails to suggest a diagnosis, an adequate lung biopsy specimen with meticulous histological examination and a multidisciplinary approach usually yields results. There is also a high chance of sampling error due to patchy and heterogeneous involvement of the disease process and due to the small volume of tissue taken. As seen in our study, Trans-Bronchial Lung Biopsy (TBLB) if performed by an experienced bronchoscopist can be done as an outpatient procedure yielding adequate specimens for diagnosis and guide effective treatment in these patients. Aim To study the utility and diagnostic yield of TBLB in DPLD patients when there is clinicoradiological discordance. Materials and Methods The current retrospective observational study was undertaken in the Institute of Chest Diseases, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, Kerala, India, from January 2012 to December 2014. Out of 169 DPLD patients who attended the tertiary care centre, 66 patients without a definite diagnosis by clinicoradiological assessment were included in the study. They underwent TBLB using a fibre-optic video bronchoscope. An open lung biopsy was advised if the TBLB did not yield a definite diagnosis. Results Among the 66 patients, histopathological confirmation was obtained in 51 patients, 39 of which were by TBLB (59%). Few diagnoses like invasive adenocarcinoma, Pneumocystis jirovecii pneumonia and Aspergillus infection were least expected. Conclusion TBLB if performed correctly can be an effective intervening modality in establishing the diagnosis of DPLD before going for an invasive surgical biopsy. PMID:28050417

  1. Quantitative and qualitative comparison of 3.0T and 1.5T MR imaging of the liver in patients with diffuse parenchymal liver disease.

    PubMed

    Tsurusaki, Masakatsu; Semelka, Richard C; Zapparoli, Mauricio; Elias, Jorge; Altun, Ersan; Pamuklar, Ertan; Sugimura, Kazuro

    2009-11-01

    The purpose of our study was to compare signal characteristics and image qualities of MR imaging at 3.0T and 1.5T in patients with diffuse parenchymal liver disease. 25 consecutive patients with diffuse parenchymal liver disease underwent abdominal MR imaging at both 3.0T and 1.5T within a 6-month interval. A retrospective study was conducted to obtain quantitative and qualitative data from both 3.0T and 1.5T MRI. Quantitative image analysis was performed by measuring the signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and the contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) by the Students t-test. Qualitative image analysis was assessed by grading each sequence on a 3- and 4-point scale, regarding the presence of artifacts and image quality, respectively. Statistical analysis consisted of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. the mean SNRs and CNRs of the liver parenchyma and the portal vein were significantly higher at 3.0T than at 1.5T on portal and equilibrium phases of volumetric interpolated breath-hold examination (VIBE) images (P<0.05). The mean SNRs were significantly higher at 3.0T than at 1.5T on T1-weighted spoiled gradient echo (SGE) images (P<0.05). However, there were no significantly differences on T2-weighted short-inversion-time inversion recovery (STIR) images. Overall image qualities of the 1.5T non-contrast T1- and T2-weighted sequences were significantly better than 3.0T (P<0.01). In contrast, overall image quality of the 3.0T post-gadolinium VIBE sequence was significantly better than 1.5T (P<0.01). MR imaging of post-gadolinium VIBE sequence at 3.0T has quantitative and qualitative advantages of evaluating for diffuse parenchymal liver disease.

  2. Assessment of pathologically diagnosed patients with Castleman's disease associated with diffuse parenchymal lung involvement using the diagnostic criteria for IgG4-related disease.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Takaaki; Kido, Takashi; Yatera, Kazuhiro; Oda, Keishi; Kawanami, Toshinori; Ishimoto, Hiroshi; Sakamoto, Noriho; Sano, Arisa; Yoshii, Chiharu; Shimajiri, Shohei; Mukae, Hiroshi

    2013-12-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4RD) is a recently recognized disease entity. Differentiating IgG4RD from plasma cell type Castleman's disease (PCD) is important but also difficult using only pathological findings. In addition, little is known about the association between these two diseases with diffuse parenchymal lung involvement. We analyzed the serum IgG4 levels and the ratio of IgG4/IgG-positive plasmacytes in the lung and lymph node specimens of eight patients previously pathologically diagnosed of PCD with diffuse parenchymal lung involvement (DL-PCD). We also compared the clinical and laboratory findings observed in these patients. Six of the eight patients exhibited abundant IgG4-positive plasmacytes in the lung and lymph node tissues and elevated serum IgG4 levels, thereby fulfilling the diagnostic criteria of IgG4RD with DL (DL-IgG4RD) in addition to having obstructive phlebitis and massive lymphoplasmacytic infiltration with fibrosis. However, three of these six patients exhibited higher levels of serum interleukin-6 and were still diagnosed with DL-PCD. Accordingly, three of these eight patients were considered as IgG4RD with DL (DL-IgG4RD), and the other five patients were ultimately given a diagnosis of DL-PCD. These two diseases have different characteristics in terms of age, symptoms, serum levels of C-reactive protein, and IgA, complicating allergic disorders, response to corticosteroids, and prognosis. This is the first report to show a high prevalence of DL-IgG4RD in DL-PCD patients, although additional large investigations are necessary. Clinical and laboratory findings are important for distinguishing between these two diseases in other organs, as previously described.

  3. Transbronchial lung biopsy in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease without 'idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis pattern' on HRCT scan - Experience from a tertiary care center of North India.

    PubMed

    Sindhwani, Girish; Shirazi, Nadia; Sodhi, Rakhee; Raghuvanshi, Shailendra; Rawat, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse parenchymal lung diseases (DPLD) are a group of disorders characterized by chest radiological findings of bilateral diffuse shadowing. Lung biopsy is generally required to make an etiological diagnosis of DPLD's. Transbronchial lung biopsy (TBLB) is a minimally invasive method to achieve a lung sample which has been found to be a useful diagnostic tool in patients with DPLD. As per American Thoracic Society guidelines for management of idiopathic interstitial pneumonias, TBLB is not required in patients who have findings consistent with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) on HRCT scan thorax. Some Indian researchers have evaluated, on a small number of subjects, the role of TBLB in patients with DPLD, but they had not excluded patients with 'IPF pattern'. This study was planned to assess TBLB in patients with DPLD after excluding patients with 'IPF pattern'. A prospective non-randomized study on 49 patients with DPLD without a characteristic 'IPF pattern' were subjected to TBLB. The overall diagnostic yield of TBLB was 85.7%. Non-specific interstitial pneumonitis, tuberculosis and sarcoidosis were the most common histology patterns found (22.4, 18.4 and 16.3%, respectively). Procedure-related mortality was nil. Iatrogenic pneumothorax occurred in five patients (10.2%). Minor complications included hemorrhage and transient hypoxia. TBLB is a safe and effective tool in the diagnosis of DPLD.

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension in Parenchymal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tsangaris, Iraklis; Tsaknis, Georgios; Anthi, Anastasia; Orfanos, Stylianos E.

    2012-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) has been extensively investigated, although it represents a less common form of the pulmonary hypertension (PH) family, as shown by international registries. Interestingly, in types of PH that are encountered in parenchymal lung diseases such as interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and many other diffuse parenchymal lung diseases, some of which are very common, the available data is limited. In this paper, we try to browse in the latest available data regarding the occurrence, pathogenesis, and treatment of PH in chronic parenchymal lung diseases. PMID:23094153

  5. Intraventricular temperature measured by diffusion-weighted imaging compared with brain parenchymal temperature measured by MRS in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sumida, Kaoru; Sato, Noriko; Ota, Miho; Sakai, Koji; Sone, Daichi; Yokoyama, Kota; Kimura, Yukio; Maikusa, Norihide; Imabayashi, Etsuko; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Kunimatsu, Akira; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2016-07-01

    We examined and compared the temperatures of the intraventricular cerebrospinal fluid (Tv ) and the brain parenchyma (Tp ) using MRI, with reference to the tympanic membrane temperature (Tt ) in healthy subjects. We estimated Tv and Tp values from data gathered simultaneously by MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and MRS, respectively, in 35 healthy volunteers (17 males, 18 females; age 25-78 years). We also obtained Tt values just before each MR examination to evaluate the relationships among the three temperatures. There were significant positive correlations between Tv and Tp (R = 0.611, p < 0.001). The correlation was also significant after correction for Tt (R = 0.642, p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between Tv and Tt or between Tp and Tt in the men or the women. Negative correlations were found between Tv and age and between Tp and age in the males but not females. DWI thermometry seems to reflect the intracranial environment as accurately as MRS thermometry. An age-dependent decline in temperature was evident in our male subjects by both DWI and MRS thermometry, probably due to the decrease in cerebral metabolism with age. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging suggests extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Matthias W.; Bell, W. Robert; Kern, Jason; Bosemani, Thangamadhan; Mhlanga, Joyce; Carson, Kathryn A.; Cohen, Kenneth J.; Raabe, Eric H.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Huisman, Thierry A.G.M.; Poretti, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To apply DTI to detect early extrapontine extension of pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma along the corticospinal tracts. Methods In children with diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, low-grade brainstem glioma, and age-matched controls, DTI metrics were measured in the posterior limb of the internal capsule and posterior centrum semiovale. Histological examination was available in one patient. Results 6 diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, 8 low-grade brainstem glioma, and two groups of 25 controls were included. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to controls, fractional anisotropy was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior centrum semiovale and posterior limb of the internal capsule, while radial diffusivity was higher in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. No significant differences were found between low-grade brainstem glioma and controls. In diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma compared to low-grade brainstem glioma, axial diffusivity was lower in the bilateral posterior limb of the internal capsule. Histological examination in one child showed tumor cells in the posterior limb of the internal capsule. Conclusion Reduction in fractional anisotropy and axial diffusivity and increase in radial diffusivity in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma may reflect tumor extension along the corticospinal tracts as shown by histology. DTI may detect early extrapontine tumor extension in diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma before it becomes apparent on conventional MRI sequences. PMID:26971411

  7. Can a Six-Minute Walk Distance Predict Right Ventricular Dysfunction in Patients with Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension?

    PubMed

    Ussavarungsi, Kamonpun; Lee, Augustine S; Burger, Charles D

    2016-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is commonly observed in patients with diffuse parenchymal lung disease (DPLD). The purpose of this study was to explore the influence of the 6-minute walk test (6MWT) as a simple, non-invasive tool to assess right ventricular (RV) function in patients with DPLD and to identify the need for an echocardiogram (ECHO) to screen for PH. We retrospectively reviewed 48 patients with PH secondary to DPLD, who were evaluated in the PH clinic at the Mayo Clinic in Jacksonville, Florida, from January 1999 to December 2014. Fifty-two percent of patients had RV dysfunction. They had a significantly greater right heart pressure by ECHO and mean pulmonary arterial pressure (MPAP) from right heart catheterization (RHC) than those with normal RV function. A reduced 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) did not predict RV dysfunction (OR 0.995; 95% CI 0.980-1.001, p = 0.138). In addition, worsening restrictive physiology, heart rate at one-minute recovery and desaturation were not different between patients with and without RV dysfunction. However, there were inverse correlations between 6MWD and MPAP from RHC (r = -0.41, 
p = 0.010), 6MWD and RV systolic pressure (r = -0.51, p < 0.001), and 6MWD and MPAP measured by ECHO (r = -0.46, p =0.013). We also found no significant correlation between 6MWD and pulmonary function test parameters. Our single-center cohort of patients with PH secondary to DPLD, PH was found to have an impact on 6MWD. In contrast to our expectations, 6MWD was not useful to predict RV dysfunction. Interestingly, a severe reduction in the 6MWD was related to PH and not to pulmonary function; therefore, it may be used to justify an ECHO to identify patients with a worse prognosis.

  8. CST recovery in pediatric hemiplegic patients: Diffusion tensor tractography study.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Ok; Jang, Sung Ho; Lee, Eusil; Kim, Saeyoon; Hah, Jeong Ok; Park, Yong Hoon; Lee, Jae Min; Son, Su Min

    2013-12-17

    Many diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies have reported an association between corticospinal tract (CST) injury and motor dysfunction. In this study, we investigated CST recovery in 29 pediatric patients with clinical hemiplegia using DTI. We measured the fractional anisotropy (FA), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and asymmetric anisotropy (AA) of both CSTs. The patients were classified into three groups according to severity of CST disruption of the more affected hemisphere. DTI was followed up for 9.34 ± 2.07 months after initial evaluation. The FA value of the more affected CST showed a significant decrease compared to the opposite side at initial and follow up evaluation, respectively (p<0.05). The FA value of both CSTs showed a significant increase at follow up compared to the initial evaluation, while more changes were observed on the more affected side, compared with the less affected side (p<0.05). AA showed a significant decrease at follow up, and showed significant correlation with interval change of FA value of the more affected side, not with that of the less affected side (r=0.543, p<0.05). 19 patients showed change of CST integrity. In the current study, the results of DTI showed recovery of the CST and provided radiologic evidence for a scientific basis of brain plasticity in pediatric patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Challenges for the functional diffusion map in pediatric brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Saunders, Dawn E.; Phipps, Kim P.; Kaur, Ramneek; Paine, Simon M.L.; Jacques, Thomas S.; Clayden, Jonathan D.; Clark, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The functional diffusion map (fDM) has been suggested as a tool for early detection of tumor treatment efficacy. We aim to study 3 factors that could act as potential confounders in the fDM: areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size. Methods Thirty-four pediatric patients with brain tumors were enrolled in a retrospective study, approved by the local ethics committee, to examine the fDM. Tumors were selected to encompass a range of types and grades. A qualitative analysis was carried out to compare how fDM findings may be affected by each of the 3 confounders by comparing fDM findings to clinical image reports. Results Results show that the fDM in areas of necrosis do not discriminate between treatment response and tumor progression. Furthermore, tumor grade alters the behavior of the fDM: a decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a sign of tumor progression in high-grade tumors and treatment response in low-grade tumors. Our results also suggest using only tumor area overlap between the 2 time points analyzed for the fDM in tumors of varying size. Conclusions Interpretation of fDM results needs to take into account the underlying biology of both tumor and healthy tissue. Careful interpretation of the results is required with due consideration to areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size. PMID:24305721

  10. Challenges for the functional diffusion map in pediatric brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Grech-Sollars, Matthew; Saunders, Dawn E; Phipps, Kim P; Kaur, Ramneek; Paine, Simon M L; Jacques, Thomas S; Clayden, Jonathan D; Clark, Chris A

    2014-03-01

    The functional diffusion map (fDM) has been suggested as a tool for early detection of tumor treatment efficacy. We aim to study 3 factors that could act as potential confounders in the fDM: areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size. Thirty-four pediatric patients with brain tumors were enrolled in a retrospective study, approved by the local ethics committee, to examine the fDM. Tumors were selected to encompass a range of types and grades. A qualitative analysis was carried out to compare how fDM findings may be affected by each of the 3 confounders by comparing fDM findings to clinical image reports. Results show that the fDM in areas of necrosis do not discriminate between treatment response and tumor progression. Furthermore, tumor grade alters the behavior of the fDM: a decrease in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) is a sign of tumor progression in high-grade tumors and treatment response in low-grade tumors. Our results also suggest using only tumor area overlap between the 2 time points analyzed for the fDM in tumors of varying size. Interpretation of fDM results needs to take into account the underlying biology of both tumor and healthy tissue. Careful interpretation of the results is required with due consideration to areas of necrosis, tumor grade, and change in tumor size.

  11. Pediatric abdominal masses: diagnostic accuracy of diffusion weighted MRI.

    PubMed

    Kocaoglu, Murat; Bulakbasi, Nail; Sanal, Hatice T; Kismet, Erol; Caliskan, Bahadir; Akgun, Veysel; Tayfun, Cem

    2010-06-01

    To retrospectively identify apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values of pediatric abdominal mass lesions, to determine whether measured ADC of the lesions and signal intensity on diffusion-weighted (DW) images allow discrimination between benign and malignant mass lesions. Approval for this retrospective study was obtained from the institutional review board. Children with abdominal mass lesions, who were examined by DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were included in this study. DW MR images were obtained in the axial plane by using a non breath-hold single-shot spin-echo sequence on a 1.5-T MR scanner. ADCs were calculated for each lesion. ADC values were compared with Mann-Whitney U test. Receiver operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine cut-off values for ADC. The results of visual assessment on b800 images and ADC map images were compared with chi-square test. Thirty-one abdominal mass lesions (16 benign, 15 malignant) in 26 patients (15 girls, 11 boys, ranging from 2 days to 17 years with 6.9 years mean) underwent MRI. Benign lesions had significantly higher ADC values than malignant ones (P < .001). The mean ADCs of malignant lesions were 0.84 +/- 1.7x10(-3) mm2/s, while the mean ADCs of the benign ones were 2.28 +/- 1.00x10(-3) mm2/s. With respect to cutoff values of ADC: 1.11x10(-3) mm2/s, sensitivity and negative predictive values were 100%, specificity was 78.6% and positive predictive value was 83.3%. For b800 and ADC map images, there were statistically significant differences on visual assessment. All malignant lesions had variable degrees of high signal intensity whereas eight of the 16 benign ones had low signal intensities on b800 images (P < .001). On ADC map images, all malignant lesions were hypointense and most of the benign ones (n=11, 68.7%) were hyperintense (P < .001). DW imaging can be used for reliable discrimination of benign and malignant pediatric abdominal mass lesions based on considerable differences in

  12. Diffusion tensor tractography imaging in pediatric epilepsy - A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Szmuda, Marta; Szmuda, Tomasz; Springer, Janusz; Rogowska, Marianna; Sabisz, Agnieszka; Dubaniewicz, Mirosława; Mazurkiewicz-Bełdzińska, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Recent years brought several experimental and clinical reports applying diffusion tensor tractography imaging (DTI) of the brain in epilepsy. This study was aimed to evaluate current evidence for adding the DTI sequence to the standard diagnostic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) protocol in pediatric epilepsy. Rapid and qualitative systematic review (RAE, Rapid Evidence Assessment), aggregating relevant studies from the recent 7 years. The PubMed database was hand searched for records containing terms "tractography AND epilepsy." Only studies referring to children were included; studies were rated using "final quality of evidence." Out of 144 screened records, relevant 101 were aggregated and reviewed. The synthesis was based on 73 studies. Case-control clinical studies were the majority of the material and comprised 43.8% of the material. Low 'confirmability' and low 'applicability' referred to 18 and 17 articles (29.5% and 27.9%), respectively. The sufficient quality of evidence supported performing DTI in temporal lobe epilepsy, malformations of cortical development and prior to a neurosurgery of epilepsy. The qualitative RAE provides an interim estimate of the clinical relevance of quickly developing diagnostic methods. Based on the critical appraisal of current knowledge, adding the DTI sequence to the standard MRI protocol may be clinically beneficial in selected patient groups with childhood temporal lobe epilepsy or as a part of planning for an epilepsy surgery. Copyright © 2015 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  13. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage in pediatric hematopoietic cell transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Heggen, Judith; West, Carla; Olson, Ellen; Olson, Thomas; Teague, Gerald; Fortenberry, James; Yeager, Andrew M

    2002-05-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is defined as a syndrome of hypoxia, dyspnea, infiltrates on chest radiograph, and bloody fluid on successive bronchoalveolar lavages without apparent infection. Minimal experience has been reported with DAH after hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) in children. We reviewed the incidence, management and outcome of DAH in a pediatric HCT population. Retrospective review of 138 patients undergoing allogeneic (n = 89) or autologous (n = 49) HCT at a referral children's medical center between January 1996 and April 2000. Seven (5.1%) of 138 patients met criteria for DAH; all were allogeneic recipients. Mean age of DAH patients was 11 years (range: 1.4-15.2). Median onset of DAH following HCT was day 24 (range: 10-50), median day of engraftment day 20 and white blood cell count 0.54 x 10(9)/L (range: < 0.1-7.03), with no difference between survivors and nonsurvivors. All patients developed clinical respiratory failure and 6 required intubation, with PaO(2)/fraction of inspired oxygen <200. Patients were intubated a median of 12 days (range: 1-75). All patients experienced >1 episode of bleeding and 3 patients required reintubation after successful extubation resulting from recurrent DAH. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid cultures were negative for viruses, bacteria and fungi. All DAH patients received steroids. Three patients died with progressive pulmonary failure and other organ system involvement. Four of 7 DAH patients (57%) survived to discharge, but 3 died from disease relapse at days 116, 138, and 273 post-HCT. DAH occurred more frequently in allogeneic HCT recipients compared with autologous recipients. Onset of DAH coincided closely with white blood cell engraftment. Although associated with significant respiratory failure and need for mechanical ventilation, HCT patients can survive DAH.

  14. Lung Parenchymal Mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Suki, Béla; Stamenovic, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This article focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed. PMID:23733644

  15. Lung parenchymal mechanics.

    PubMed

    Suki, Béla; Stamenović, Dimitrije; Hubmayr, Rolf

    2011-07-01

    The lung parenchyma comprises a large number of thin-walled alveoli, forming an enormous surface area, which serves to maintain proper gas exchange. The alveoli are held open by the transpulmonary pressure, or prestress, which is balanced by tissues forces and alveolar surface film forces. Gas exchange efficiency is thus inextricably linked to three fundamental features of the lung: parenchymal architecture, prestress, and the mechanical properties of the parenchyma. The prestress is a key determinant of lung deformability that influences many phenomena including local ventilation, regional blood flow, tissue stiffness, smooth muscle contractility, and alveolar stability. The main pathway for stress transmission is through the extracellular matrix. Thus, the mechanical properties of the matrix play a key role both in lung function and biology. These mechanical properties in turn are determined by the constituents of the tissue, including elastin, collagen, and proteoglycans. In addition, the macroscopic mechanical properties are also influenced by the surface tension and, to some extent, the contractile state of the adherent cells. This chapter focuses on the biomechanical properties of the main constituents of the parenchyma in the presence of prestress and how these properties define normal function or change in disease. An integrated view of lung mechanics is presented and the utility of parenchymal mechanics at the bedside as well as its possible future role in lung physiology and medicine are discussed.

  16. Influence of Parenchymal Heterogeneity on Airway-Parenchymal Interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Baoshun; Breen, Barbara; Bates, Jason H.T.

    2013-01-01

    To estimate the influence of parenchymal heterogeneities on airway-parenchymal interdependence, we considered a circular airway embedded within elastic parenchyma modeled as 1) a hexagonal spring network, 2) a triangular spring network, or 3) a continuum. The deformation in the parenchyma due to active airway contraction was simulated using the finite element method. Random perturbations of elastic moduli in the parenchyma did not significantly affect the overall pattern of force transmission. By contrast, when elastic moduli were increased along a path projecting radially outward from the airway, the hexagonal spring network model predicted significantly increased force along this line as the airway contracted, but this was not observed in other two models. These results indicate that tissue heterogeneities generally have minimal effect on the global nature of airway-parenchymal interdependence. However, in the exceptional circumstance of scar tissue aligned radially from the airway wall, parenchymal distortion forces may propagate much farther from the airway wall than was previously thought. PMID:23770309

  17. Pulmonary Parenchymal Lymphoma Diagnosed by Bronchoscopic Cryoprobe Lung Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Schiavo, Dante; Batzlaff, Cassandra; Maldonado, Fabien

    2016-04-01

    A 51-year-old man presented with progressively worsening lung infiltrates and respiratory failure. Extensive investigations including bronchoscopy with bronchoalveolar lavage and conventional transbronchial forceps biopsies failed to establish the diagnosis. After transfer to our institution, he underwent repeat bronchoscopy with transbronchial cryobiopsy, which provided large, high-quality biopsy specimens establishing the diagnosis of parenchymal diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

  18. Diffusion Tensor Imaging: A Review for Pediatric Researchers and Clinicians

    PubMed Central

    Feldman, Heidi M.; Yeatman, Jason D.; Lee, Eliana S.; Barde, Laura H. F.; Gaman-Bean, Shayna

    2014-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is a magnetic resonance imaging technique that allows for the visualization and characterization of the white matter tracts of the brain in vivo. DTI does not assess white matter directly. Rather, it capitalizes on the fact that diffusion is isotropic (equal in all directions) in cerebral spinal fluid and cell bodies but anisotropic (greater in one direction than the other directions) in axons that comprise white matter. It provides quantitative information about the degree and direction of water diffusion within individual units of volume within the magnetic resonance image, and by inference, about the integrity of white matter. Measures from DTI can be applied throughout the brain or to regions of interest. Fiber tract reconstruction, or tractography, creates continuous 3-dimensional tracts by sequentially piecing together estimates of fiber orientation from the direction of diffusion within individual volume units. DTI has increased our understanding of white matter structure and function. DTI shows nonlinear growth of white matter tracts from childhood to adulthood. Delayed maturation of the white matter in the frontal lobes may explain the continued growth of cognitive control into adulthood. Relative to good readers, adults and children who are poor readers have evidence of white matter differences in a specific region of the temporo-parietal lobe, implicating differences in connections among brain regions as a factor in reading disorder. Measures from DTI changed in poor readers who improved their reading skills after intense remediation. DTI documents injury to white matter tracts after prematurity. Measures indicative of white matter injury are associated with motor and cognitive impairment in children born prematurely. Further research on DTI is necessary before it can become a routine clinical procedure. PMID:20453582

  19. Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and recombinant factor VIIa treatment in pediatric patients

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Diffuse alveolar hemorrhage (DAH) is a life-threatening pulmonary complication in patients with hematologic malignancies or autoimmune disorders. The current treatment options, which include corticosteroids, transfusions, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), and immunosuppressants, have been limited and largely unsuccessful. Recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) has been successfully administered, either systemically or bronchoscopically, to adults for the treatment of DAH, but there are few data on its use in pediatric patients. The current literature in the PubMed database was reviewed to evaluate the efficacy and risk of rFVIIa treatment for DAH in pediatric patients. This review discusses the diagnosis and treatment of DAH, as well as a new treatment paradigm that includes rFVIIa. Additionally, the risks and benefits of off-label use of rFVIIa in pediatric patients are discussed. PMID:27186216

  20. Influence of parenchymal heterogeneity on airway-parenchymal interdependence.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoshun; Breen, Barbara; Bates, Jason H T

    2013-08-15

    To estimate the influence of parenchymal heterogeneities on airway-parenchymal interdependence, we considered a circular airway embedded within elastic parenchyma modeled as (1) a hexagonal spring network, (2) a triangular spring network, or (3) a continuum. The deformation in the parenchyma due to active airway contraction was simulated using the finite element method. Random perturbations of elastic moduli in the parenchyma did not significantly affect the overall pattern of force transmission. By contrast, when elastic moduli were increased along a path projecting radially outward from the airway, the hexagonal spring network model predicted significantly increased force along this line as the airway contracted, but this was not observed in other two models. These results indicate that tissue heterogeneities generally have minimal effect on the global nature of airway-parenchymal interdependence. However, in the exceptional circumstance of scar tissue aligned radially from the airway wall, parenchymal distortion forces may propagate much farther from the airway wall than was previously thought. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Update in Diffuse Parenchymal Lung Disease 2013

    PubMed Central

    Kaminski, Naftali

    2015-01-01

    The period covered by this update can be considered as the most exciting period in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) research. It started with the identification of genetic variants that are associated with IPF in the majority of patients and continued with discovery of molecular and genetic biomarkers that predict distinct clinical presentations of patients with IPF and potential new biological mechanisms. More importantly, the period ends with the publication of two groundbreaking studies that confirmed that two drugs, pirfenidone and nintedanib, slowed disease progression, leading to a historic approval by the FDA. In this update, we describe these key advances, their scientific and significant clinical implications, and future directions. PMID:25635490

  2. Diffusion-weighted imaging improves outcome prediction in pediatric traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Nicholas R; Tong, Karen A; Ashwal, Stephen; Oyoyo, Udochukwu; Obenaus, André

    2008-10-01

    Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) and consequent apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps have been used for lesion detection and as a predictor of outcome in adults with traumatic brain injury (TBI), but few studies have been reported in children. We evaluated the role of DWI and ADC for outcome prediction after pediatric TBI (n=37 TBI; n=10 controls). Fifteen regions of interest (ROIs) were manually drawn on ADC maps that were grouped for analysis into peripheral gray matter, peripheral white matter, deep gray and white matter, and posterior fossa. All ROIs excluded areas that appeared abnormal on T2-weighted images (T2WI). Acute injury severity was measured using the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, and 6-12-month outcomes were assessed using the Pediatric Cerebral Performance Category Scale (PCPCS) score. Patients were categorized into five groups: (1) controls; (2) all TBI patients; (3) mild/moderate TBI with good outcomes; (4) severe TBI with good outcomes; and (5) severe TBI with poor outcomes. ADC values in the peripheral white matter were significantly reduced in children with severe TBI with poor outcomes (72.8+/-14.4x10(-3) mm2/sec) compared to those with severe TBI and good outcomes (82.5+/-3.8x10(-3) mm2/sec; p<0.05). We also found that the average total brain ADC value alone had the greatest ability to predict outcome and could correctly predict outcome in 84% of cases. Assessment of DWI and ADC values in pediatric TBI is useful in evaluating injury, particularly in brain regions that appear normal on conventional imaging. Early identification of children at high risk for poor outcome may assist in aggressive clinical management of pediatric TBI patients.

  3. Common pediatric cerebellar tumors: correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient metrics.

    PubMed

    Koral, Korgün; Mathis, Derek; Gimi, Barjor; Gargan, Lynn; Weprin, Bradley; Bowers, Daniel C; Margraf, Linda

    2013-08-01

    To test whether there is correlation between cell densities and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. This study was reviewed for issues of patient safety and confidentiality and was approved by the Institutional Review Board of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center and was compliant with HIPAA. The need for informed consent was waived. Ninety-five patients who had preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and surgical pathologic findings available between January 2003 and June 2011 were included. There were 37 pilocytic astrocytomas, 34 medulloblastomas (23 classic, eight desmoplastic-nodular, two large cell, one anaplastic), 17 ependymomas (13 World Health Organization [WHO] grade II, four WHO grade III), and seven atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors. ADCs of solid tumor components and normal cerebellum were measured. Tumor-to-normal brain ADC ratios (hereafter, ADC ratio) were calculated. The medulloblastomas and ependymomas were subcategorized according to the latest WHO classification, and tumor cellularity was calculated. Correlation was sought between cell densities and mean tumor ADCs, minimum tumor ADCs, and ADC ratio. When all tumors were considered together, negative correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADCs (ρ = -0.737, P < .05) and minimum tumor ADCs (ρ = -0.736, P < .05) of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. There was no correlation between cellularity and ADC ratio. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and minimum tumor ADC in atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ρ = -0.786, P < .05). In atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors, no correlation was found between cellularity and mean tumor ADC and ADC ratio. There was no correlation between the ADC metrics and cellularity of the pilocytic astrocytomas, medulloblastomas, and ependymomas. Negative correlation was found between cellularity and ADC metrics of common pediatric cerebellar tumors. Although ADC metrics are

  4. Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) findings following pediatric non-penetrating TBI: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, R M; Mathias, J L; Rose, S E

    2014-01-01

    This study meta-analyzed research examining Diffusion Tensor Imaging following pediatric non-penetrating traumatic brain injury to identify the location and extent of white matter changes. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) data from 20 studies were analyzed. FA increased and ADC decreased in most white matter tracts in the short-term (moderate-to-large effects), and FA decreased and ADC increased in the medium- to long-term (moderate-to-very-large effects). Whole brain (short-term), cerebellum and corpus callosum (medium- to long-term) FA values have diagnostic potential, but the impact of age/developmental stage and injury severity on FA/ADC, and the predictive value, is unclear.

  5. Motion Artifact Reduction in Pediatric Diffusion Tensor Imaging Using Fast Prospective Correction

    PubMed Central

    Alhamud, A.; Taylor, Paul A.; Laughton, Barbara; van der Kouwe, André J.W.; Meintjes, Ernesta M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the patterns of head motion in scans of young children and to examine the influence of corrective techniques, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We investigate changes that both retrospective (with and without diffusion table reorientation) and prospective (implemented with a short navigator sequence) motion correction induce in the resulting diffusion tensor measures. Materials and Methods Eighteen pediatric subjects (aged 5–6 years) were scanned using 1) a twice-refocused, 2D diffusion pulse sequence, 2) a prospectively motion-corrected, navigated diffusion sequence with reacquisition of a maximum of five corrupted diffusion volumes, and 3) a T1-weighted structural image. Mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values in white and gray matter regions, as well as tractography in the brainstem and projection fibers, were evaluated to assess differences arising from retrospective (via FLIRT in FSL) and prospective motion correction. In addition to human scans, a stationary phantom was also used for further evaluation. Results In several white and gray matter regions retrospective correction led to significantly (P < 0.05) reduced FA means and altered distributions compared to the navigated sequence. Spurious tractographic changes in the retrospectively corrected data were also observed in subject data, as well as in phantom and simulated data. Conclusion Due to the heterogeneity of brain structures and the comparatively low resolution (~2 mm) of diffusion data using 2D single shot sequencing, retrospective motion correction is susceptible to distortion from partial voluming. These changes often negatively bias diffusion tensor imaging parameters. Prospective motion correction was shown to produce smaller changes. PMID:24935904

  6. Time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy for in vivo characterization of pediatric epileptogenic brain lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sanghoon; Ragheb, John; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Sandberg, David; Johnson, Mahlon; Fernald, Bradley; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2008-02-01

    Optical spectroscopy for in vivo tissue diagnosis is performed traditionally in a static manner; a snap shot of the tissue biochemical and morphological characteristics is captured through the interaction between light and the tissue. This approach does not capture the dynamic nature of a living organ, which is critical to the studies of brain disorders such as epilepsy. Therefore, a time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system with a fiber-optic probe was designed and developed. The system was designed to acquire broadband diffuse reflectance spectra (240 ~ 932 nm) at an acquisition rate of 33 Hz. The broadband spectral acquisition feature allows simultaneous monitoring of various physiological characteristics of tissues. The utility of such a system in guiding pediatric epilepsy surgery was tested in a pilot clinical study including 13 epilepsy patients and seven brain tumor patients. The control patients were children undergoing suregery for brain tumors in which measurements were taken from normal brain exposed during the surgery. Diffuse reflectance spectra were acquired for 12 seconds from various parts of the brain of the patients during surgery. Recorded spectra were processed and analyzed in both spectral and time domains to gain insights into the dynamic changes in, for example, hemodynamics of the investigated brain tissue. One finding from this pilot study is that unsynchronized alterations in local blood oxygenation and local blood volume were observed in epileptogenic cortex. These study results suggest the advantage of using a time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system to study epileptogenic brain in vivo.

  7. Human parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cell isolation, culture and characterization.

    PubMed

    Damm, Georg; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Burkhardt, Britta; Vermehren, Jan; Nüssler, Andreas K; Weiss, Thomas S

    2013-10-01

    Many reports describing parenchymal liver cell isolation have been published so far. However, recent evidence has clearly demonstrated that non-parenchymal liver cells play an important role in many pathophysiologies of the liver, such as drug-induced liver diseases, inflammation, and the development of liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. In this study, we present an overview of the current methods for isolating and characterizing parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells.

  8. Role of diffusion-weighted imaging in differentiating benign and malignant pediatric abdominal tumors.

    PubMed

    Gawande, Rakhee S; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Messing, Solomon; Khurana, Aman; Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2013-07-01

    Solid malignant tumors are more highly cellular than benign lesions and hence have a restricted diffusion of water molecules. To evaluate whether diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) can differentiate between benign and malignant pediatric abdominal tumors. We retrospectively analyzed DWI scans of 68 consecutive children with 39 benign and 34 malignant abdominal masses. To calculate the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps and ADC values, we used 1.5-T sequences at TR/TE/b-value of 5,250-7,500/54-64/b = 0, 500 and 3-T sequences at 3,500-4,000/66-73/b = 0, 500, 800. ADC values were compared between benign and malignant and between data derived at 1.5 tesla (T) and at 3 tesla magnetic field strength, using the Mann-Whitney-Wilcoxon test, ANOVA and a receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis. There was no significant difference in ADC values obtained at 1.5 T and 3 T (P = 0.962). Mean ADC values (× 10(-3) mm(2)/s) were 1.07 for solid malignant tumors, 1.6 for solid benign tumors, 2.9 for necrotic portions of malignant tumors and 3.1 for cystic benign lesions. The differences between malignant and benign solid tumors were statistically significant (P = 0.000025). ROC analysis revealed an optimal cut-off ADC value for differentiating malignant and benign solid tumors as 1.29 with excellent inter-observer reliability (alpha score 0.88). DWI scans and ADC values can contribute to distinguishing between benign and malignant pediatric abdominal tumors.

  9. Analysis of Multiple B-Value Diffusion-Weighted Imaging in Pediatric Acute Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tachibana, Yasuhiko; Aida, Noriko; Niwa, Tetsu; Nozawa, Kumiko; Kusagiri, Kouki; Mori, Kana; Endo, Kazuo; Obata, Takayuki; Inoue, Tomio

    2013-01-01

    Acute encephalopathy is a disease group more commonly seen in children. It is often severe and has neurological sequelae. Imaging is important for early diagnosis and prompt treatment to ameliorate an unfavorable outcome, but insufficient sensitivity/specificity is a problem. To overcome this, a new value (fraction of high b-pair (FH)) that could be processed from clinically acceptable MR diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with three different b-values was designed on the basis of a two-compartment model of water diffusion signal attenuation. The purpose of this study is to compare FH with the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) regarding the detectability of pediatric acute encephalopathy. We retrospectively compared the clinical DWI of 15 children (1–10 years old, mean 2.34, 8 boys, 7 girls) of acute encephalopathy with another 16 children (1–11 years old, mean 4.89, 9 boys, 7 girls) as control. A comparison was first made visually by mapping FH on the brain images, and then a second comparison was made on the basis of 10 regions of interest (ROIs) set on cortical and subcortical areas of each child. FH map visually revealed diffusely elevated FH in cortical and subcortical areas of the patients with acute encephalopathy; the changes seemed more diffuse in FH compared to DWI. The comparison based on ROI revealed elevated mean FH in the cortical and subcortical areas of the acute encephalopathy patients compared to control with significant difference (P<0.05). Similar findings were observed even in regions where the findings of DWI were slight. The reduction of mean ADC was significant in regions with severe findings in DWI, but it was not constant in the areas with slighter DWI findings. The detectability of slight changes of cortical and subcortical lesions in acute encephalopathy may be superior in FH compared to ADC. PMID:23755112

  10. Pilot Study of Renal Diffusion Tensor Imaging as a Correlate to Histopathology in Pediatric Renal Allografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Lee, Marsha M; Worters, Pauline W; MacKenzie, John D; Laszik, Zoltan; Courtier, Jesse L

    2017-06-01

    Fractional anisotropy (FA) is a measure of molecular motion obtained from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The objective of this study was to assess the use of FA as a noninvasive correlate of renal allograft histopathology. Sixteen pediatric renal allograft recipients were imaged using DTI in a prospective study, between October 2014 and January 2016, before a same-day renal allograft biopsy. The Kendall tau correlation coefficient was used to assess the relationship between cortical and medullary FA values and several clinically important Banff renal allograft histopathology scores. The Mann-Whitney U test was also used to compare cortical and medullary FA values in the region of biopsy in patients whose biopsy results did and in those whose biopsy results did not change clinical management. Medullary FA values had direct inverse correlation with several histopathology scores: tubulitis (designated "t" score in Banff pathologic classification, p < 0.04), interstitial inflammation (i score, p < 0.005), tubular atrophy (ct score, p < 0.002), and interstitial fibrosis (ci score, p < 0.007). Cortical FA values inversely correlated with peritubular capillaritis (ptc score, p < 0.02). Neither medullary nor cortical FA values correlated with glomerulitis (g score). At a b value of 800 s/mm(2), medullary FA values of pediatric renal allograft recipients whose renal biopsies prompted a change in clinical management (mean ± SD at a b value of 800 s/mm(2) = 0.262 ± 0.07; n = 9) were statistically different compared with the group whose biopsy results did not change clinical management (mean ± SD at a b value of 800 s/mm(2) = 0.333 ± 0.06; n = 7) (p < 0.006). FA is a noninvasive correlate of several important renal allograft histopathology scores and a potential noninvasive method of assessing renal allograft health in pediatric allograft recipients.

  11. Pineal parenchymal tumours and pineal cysts.

    PubMed

    Jouvet, A; Vasiljevic, A; Champier, J; Fèvre Montange, M

    2015-01-01

    Pineal parenchymal tumours (PPTs) and pineal cysts represent one third of the pineal region lesions. PPTs are subdivided into pineocytoma (PC), pineoblastoma (PB) and PPT with intermediate differentiation (PPTID). We report morphological and immunochemical features which permit to grade these tumours. The description of histopathological features and grading is based on a large cooperative series and on the WHO 2007 classification. PCs occur in adults between the third and the sixth decade of life. PBs typically occur in children. PPTIDs have a peak incidence in young adults between 20 and 40 years of age. There is no sex preference. PC is characterized by a uniform cell proliferation with large fibrillary pineocytomatous rosettes. PB is a high-density tumour composed of small blue cells with hyper-chromatic, round or carrot shaped nuclei. PPTIDs have lobulated or diffuse patterns. Grading is based on morphological features, count of mitoses and neurofilament protein (NFP) expression. PCs (grade I) have no mitosis and NFP is highly expressed in pineocytomatous rosettes. PBs (grade IV) are high mitotic tumours and present low or no expression of NFPs. PPTIDs are grade II when mitoses are fewer than 6 for 10 high-power fields and NFPs are expressed, and are grade III when mitoses are greater or equal to 6 or are fewer than 6 with NFPs lowly expressed. Pineal cysts may be differentiated from PPTs by the high expression of NFPs and no expression of Ki-67. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with brain parenchymal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kazato, Yuko; Fujii, Katsunori; Oba, Hiroshi; Hino, Moeko; Ochiai, Hidemasa; Uchikawa, Hideki; Kohno, Yoichi

    2012-09-01

    We described a 7-year-old girl with reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with brain parenchymal hemorrhage. She initially presented with high fever and pancytopenia, leading to a diagnosis of most severe type aplastic anemia. We treated her with cyclosporine, methylprednisolone and anti-thymocyte globulin. Thereafter she recurrently complained of a very severe headache called as thunderclap, and finally exhibited loss of consciousness. Brain imaging revealed massive parenchymal hemorrhage between the left occipital and parietal lobes on computed tomography, and diffuse cerebral vasoconstriction on magnetic resonance angiography. The cerebral vasoconstriction resolved within two months, and thus we diagnosed her as having reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome associated with brain parenchymal hemorrhage. This syndrome has been frequently reported in adult females, but rarely in children. However, even in children, a so called thunderclap headache may become a clue for the diagnosis of reversible cerebral vasoconstriction syndrome, especially in cases taking immunosuppressive agents. Immediate magnetic resonance angiography is essential to diagnose this syndrome, and a prompt application of calcium channel inhibitors should be considered to resolve constriction of the vessels and to prevent subsequent brain damage. Copyright © 2011 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Serial MR diffusion to predict treatment response in high-grade pediatric brain tumors: a comparison of regional and voxel-based diffusion change metrics

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Gutierrez, Daniel; Manita, Muftah; Jaspan, Tim; Dineen, Robert A.; Grundy, Richard G.; Auer, Dorothee P.

    2013-01-01

    Background Assessment of treatment response by measuring tumor size is known to be a late and potentially confounded response index. Serial diffusion MRI has shown potential for allowing earlier and possibly more reliable response assessment in adult patients, with limited experience in clinical settings and in pediatric brain cancer. We present a retrospective study of clinical MRI data in children with high-grade brain tumors to assess and compare the values of several diffusion change metrics to predict treatment response. Methods Eighteen patients (age range, 1.9–20.6 years) with high-grade brain tumors and serial diffusion MRI (pre- and posttreatment interval range, 1–16 weeks posttreatment) were identified after obtaining parental consent. The following diffusion change metrics were compared with the clinical response status assessed at 6 months: (1) regional change in absolute and normalized apparent diffusivity coefficient (ADC), (2) voxel-based fractional volume of increased (fiADC) and decreased ADC (fdADC), and (3) a new metric based on the slope of the first principal component of functional diffusion maps (fDM). Results Responders (n = 12) differed significantly from nonresponders (n = 6) in all 3 diffusional change metrics demonstrating higher regional ADC increase, larger fiADC, and steeper slopes (P < .05). The slope method allowed the best response prediction (P < .01, η2 = 0.78) with a classification accuracy of 83% for a slope of 58° using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Conclusions We demonstrate that diffusion change metrics are suitable response predictors for high-grade pediatric tumors, even in the presence of variable clinical diffusion imaging protocols. PMID:23585630

  14. Pediatrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spackman, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    The utilization of the Lixiscope in pediatrics was investigated. The types of images that can presently be obtained are discussed along with the problems encountered. Speculative applications for the Lixiscope are also presented.

  15. Degenerative changes of the corticospinal tract in pediatric patients showing deteriorated motor function: A diffusion tensor tractography study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Min Cheol; Jang, Sung Ho; Seo, Jeong Pyo; Lee, Eusil; Kim, Saeyoon; Won, Yu Hui; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to demonstrate the corresponding degenerative changes of the affected corticospinal tract (CST) in pediatric patients with deteriorated motor function using diffusion tensor tractography (DTT). We recruited three pediatric patients (corrected age: 2, 6 and 47 months, respectively) who showed impaired motor function. DTT in each patient showed interruption of the CSTs of the hemisphere contralateral to the side of motor impairment. Despite motor impairment and abnormal DTT findings, none of the three patients received rehabilitative therapy. The patients (corrected age: 9, 53 and 59 months, respectively) and their parents visited our clinic again due to deterioration of motor functions. Follow-up DTT of all evaluated patients showed significant degenerative changes in the affected CSTs in accordance with the aggravation of motor impairment. We presented degenerative changes of the affected CSTs in pediatric patients according to the deterioration of motor function.

  16. Shrinking lung syndrome complicating pediatric systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Burns, Natalie S; Stevens, Anne M; Iyer, Ramesh S

    2014-10-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosis (SLE) can affect the lungs and pleura, usually manifesting with pleural effusions or diffuse parenchymal disease. A rare manifestation of SLE is shrinking lung syndrome, a severe restrictive respiratory disorder. While pleuropulmonary complications of pediatric SLE are common, shrinking lung syndrome is exceedingly rare in children. We present a case of a 13-year-old girl previously diagnosed with lupus, who developed severe dyspnea on exertion and restrictive pulmonary physiology. Her chest radiographs on presentation demonstrated low lung volumes, and CT showed neither pleural nor parenchymal disease. Fluoroscopy demonstrated poor diaphragmatic excursion. While shrinking lung syndrome is described and studied in adults, there is only sparse reference to shrinking lung syndrome in children.

  17. Investigation of Vibration Induced Artifact in Clinical Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of Pediatric Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Berl, Madison M.; Walker, Lindsay; Modi, Pooja; Irfanoglu, M. Okan; Sarlls, Joelle; Nayak, Amritha; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    It has been reported that mechanical vibrations of the MRI scanner could produce spurious signal dropouts in diffusion-weighted images resulting in artifactual anisotropy in certain regions of the brain with red appearance in the Directionally Encoded Color maps. We performed a review of the frequency of this artifact across pediatric studies, noting differences by scanner manufacturer, acquisition protocol, as well as weight and position of the subject. We also evaluated the ability of automated and quantitative methods to detect this artifact. We found that the artifact may be present in over 50% of data in certain protocols and is not limited to one scanner manufacturer. While a specific scanner had the highest incidence, low body weight and positioning were also associated with appearance of the artifact for both scanner types evaluated, making children potentially more susceptible than adults. Visual inspection remains the best method for artifact identification. Software for automated detection showed very low sensitivity (10%). The artifact may present inconsistently in longitudinal studies. We discuss a published case report that has been widely cited and used as evidence to set policy about diagnostic criteria for determining vegetative state. That report attributed longitudinal changes in anisotropy to white matter plasticity without considering the possibility that the changes were caused by this artifact. Our study underscores the need to check for the presence of this artifact in clinical studies, analyzes circumstances for when it may be more likely to occur, and suggests simple strategies to identify and potentially avoid its effects. PMID:26350492

  18. Inter- and intra-rater reliability of diffusion tensor imaging parameters in the normal pediatric spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Barakat, Nadia; Shah, Pallav; Faro, Scott H; Gaughan, John P; Middleton, Devon; Mulcahey, MJ; Mohamed, Feroze B

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To assess inter- and intra-rater reliability (agreement) between two region of interest (ROI) methods in pediatric spinal cord diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). METHODS: Inner-Field-of-View DTI data previously acquired from ten pediatric healthy subjects (mean age = 12.10 years) was used to assess for reliability. ROIs were drawn by two neuroradiologists on each subject data twice within a 3-mo interval. ROIs were placed on axial B0 maps along the cervical spine using free-hand and fixed-size ROIs. Agreement analyses for fractional anisotropy (FA), axial diffusivity, radial diffusivity and mean diffusivity were performed using intra-class-correlation (ICC) and Cronbach’s alpha statistical methods. RESULTS: Inter- and intra-rater agreement between the two ROI methods showed moderate (ICC = 0.5) to strong (ICC = 0.84). There were significant differences between raters in the number of pixels selected using free-hand ROIs (P < 0.05). However, no significant differences were observed in DTI parameter values. FA showed highest variability in ICC values (0.10-0.87). Cronbach’s alpha showed moderate-high values for raters and ROI methods. CONCLUSION: The study showed that high reproducibility in spinal cord DTI can be achieved, and demonstrated the importance of setting detailed methodology for post-processing DTI data, specifically the placement of ROIs. PMID:26435778

  19. Relationship Between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings and Cognition Following Pediatric TBI: A Meta-Analytic Review

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Rachel M.; Mathias, Jane L.; Rose, Stephen E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study meta-analyzed research examining relationships between diffusion tensor imaging and cognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from 14 studies that correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) or apparent diffusion coefficient/mean diffusivity with cognition were analyzed. Short-term (<4 weeks post-TBI) findings were inconsistent, but, in the medium to long term, FA values for numerous large white matter tracts and the whole brain were related to cognition. However, the analyses were limited by the diversity of brain regions and cognitive outcomes that have been examined; all in relatively small samples. Moreover, additional data are needed to investigate the impact of age and injury severity on these findings. PMID:27232263

  20. Relationship Between Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) Findings and Cognition Following Pediatric TBI: A Meta-Analytic Review.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Rachel M; Mathias, Jane L; Rose, Stephen E

    2016-04-01

    This study meta-analyzed research examining relationships between diffusion tensor imaging and cognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI). Data from 14 studies that correlated fractional anisotropy (FA) or apparent diffusion coefficient/mean diffusivity with cognition were analyzed. Short-term (<4 weeks post-TBI) findings were inconsistent, but, in the medium to long term, FA values for numerous large white matter tracts and the whole brain were related to cognition. However, the analyses were limited by the diversity of brain regions and cognitive outcomes that have been examined; all in relatively small samples. Moreover, additional data are needed to investigate the impact of age and injury severity on these findings.

  1. Single- and Multivoxel Proton Spectroscopy in Pediatric Patients With Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Steffen-Smith, Emilie A.; Venzon, David J.; Bent, Robyn S.; Hipp, Sean J.; Warren, Katherine E.

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of two magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) techniques for treating pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) and to evaluate the relationship of metabolic profiles determined by each technique. Utility of each technique for improving patient management is also discussed. Methods and Materials: Children with DIPG (n = 36) were evaluated using single-voxel spectroscopy (SVS) and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) during the same imaging session. Patients were followed longitudinally (n = 150 total studies). Technical feasibility was defined by sufficient water and lipid suppression for detection of metabolites. Correlation of metabolic data obtained by SVS and MRSI was determined using the Spearman rank method. Metabolite ratios, including choline:N-acetyl-aspartate (Cho:NAA) and Cho:creatine (Cho:Cr), were obtained from SVS and MRSI. Results: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible in >90% of studies. Maximum Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr from MRSI analysis were strongly associated with Cho:NAA and Cho:Cr obtained by SVS (r = 0.67 and 0.76, respectively). MRSI Cho:NAA values were more heterogeneous than Cho:Cr values within the same lesion, and a strong linear relationship between the range and maximum Cho:NAA values was observed. Conclusions: SVS and MRSI acquisitions were feasible, with a strong correlation in metabolic data. Both techniques may improve diagnostic evaluation and management of DIPG. SVS is recommended for global assessment of tumor metabolism before and after therapy. MRSI showed heterogeneous patterns of metabolic activity within these tumors and is recommended for planning and monitoring targeted therapies and evaluating nearby tissue for tumor invasion.

  2. Biopsy in a series of 130 pediatric diffuse intrinsic Pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Puget, Stephanie; Beccaria, Kevin; Blauwblomme, Thomas; Roujeau, Thomas; James, Syril; Grill, Jacques; Zerah, Michel; Varlet, Pascale; Sainte-Rose, Christian

    2015-10-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is the most severe pediatric solid tumor, with no significant improvement in the past 50 years. Possible reasons for failure to make therapeutic progress include poor understanding of the underlying molecular biology due to lack of tumor material. We performed a prospective analysis of children with typical appearance of DIPG who had a stereotactic biopsy in our unit since 2002. Technical approach, complications, histopathological results, and samples processing are exposed. The literature on this subject is discussed. Reviewing our own 130 cases of DIPG biopsies and previous published data, these procedures appear to have a diagnostic yield and morbidity rates similar to those reported for other brain locations (3.9 % of transient morbidity in our series). In addition, the quality and the quantity of the material obtained allow to (1) confirm the diagnosis, (2) reveal that WHO grading was useless to predict outcome, and (3) perform an extended molecular screen, including biomarkers study and the development of preclinical models. Recent studies reveal that DIPG may comprise more than one biological entity and a unique oncogenesis involving mutations never described in other types of cancers, i.e., histones H3 K27M and activin receptor ACVR1. Stereotactic biopsies of DIPG can be considered as a safe procedure in well-trained neurosurgical teams and could be incorporated in protocols. It is a unique opportunity to integrate DIPG biopsies in clinical practice and use the biology at diagnosis to drive the introduction of innovative targeted therapies, in combination with radiotherapy.

  3. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Chad Parker; Juranek, Jenifer; Swank, Paul R.; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S.; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI. PMID:26740920

  4. White matter and reading deficits after pediatric traumatic brain injury: A diffusion tensor imaging study.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Chad Parker; Juranek, Jenifer; Swank, Paul R; Kramer, Larry; Cox, Charles S; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric traumatic brain injury often results in significant long-term deficits in mastery of reading ability. This study aimed to identify white matter pathways that, when damaged, predicted reading deficits in children. Based on the dual-route model of word reading, we predicted that integrity of the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus would be related to performance in sight word identification while integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus would be related to performance in phonemic decoding. Reading fluency and comprehension were hypothesized to relate to the superior longitudinal fasciculus, inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus, and cingulum bundle. The connectivity of white matter pathways was used to predict reading deficits in children aged 6 to 16 years with traumatic brain injury (n = 29) and those with orthopedic injury (n = 27) using tract-based spatial statistics. Results showed that children with traumatic brain injury and reduced microstructural integrity of the superior longitudinal fasciculus demonstrated reduced word-reading ability on sight word and phonemic decoding tasks. Additionally, children with traumatic brain injury and microstructural changes involving the cingulum bundle demonstrated reduced reading fluency. Results support the association of a dorsal pathway via the superior longitudinal fasciculus with both sight word reading and phonemic decoding. No association was identified between the inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus and sight word reading or phonemic decoding. Reading fluency was associated with the integrity of the cingulum bundle. These findings support dissociable pathways predicting word reading and fluency using Diffusion Tensor Imaging and provide additional information for developing models of acquired reading deficits by specifying areas of brain damage which may predict reading deficits following recovery from the acute phase of TBI.

  5. Investigation of vibration-induced artifact in clinical diffusion-weighted imaging of pediatric subjects.

    PubMed

    Berl, Madison M; Walker, Lindsay; Modi, Pooja; Irfanoglu, M Okan; Sarlls, Joelle E; Nayak, Amritha; Pierpaoli, Carlo

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that mechanical vibrations of the magnetic resonance imaging scanner could produce spurious signal dropouts in diffusion-weighted images resulting in artifactual anisotropy in certain regions of the brain with red appearance in the Directionally Encoded Color maps. We performed a review of the frequency of this artifact across pediatric studies, noting differences by scanner manufacturer, acquisition protocol, as well as weight and position of the subject. We also evaluated the ability of automated and quantitative methods to detect this artifact. We found that the artifact may be present in over 50% of data in certain protocols and is not limited to one scanner manufacturer. While a specific scanner had the highest incidence, low body weight and positioning were also associated with appearance of the artifact for both scanner types evaluated, making children potentially more susceptible than adults. Visual inspection remains the best method for artifact identification. Software for automated detection showed very low sensitivity (10%). The artifact may present inconsistently in longitudinal studies. We discuss a published case report that has been widely cited and used as evidence to set policy about diagnostic criteria for determining vegetative state. That report attributed longitudinal changes in anisotropy to white matter plasticity without considering the possibility that the changes were caused by this artifact. Our study underscores the need to check for the presence of this artifact in clinical studies, analyzes circumstances for when it may be more likely to occur, and suggests simple strategies to identify and potentially avoid its effects. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging study of pediatric patients with congenital hydrocephalus: 1-year postsurgical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Mangano, Francesco T; Altaye, Mekibib; McKinstry, Robert C; Shimony, Joshua S; Powell, Stephanie K; Phillips, Jannel M; Barnard, Holly; Limbrick, David D; Holland, Scott K; Jones, Blaise V; Dodd, Jonathan; Simpson, Sarah; Mercer, Deanna; Rajagopal, Akila; Bidwell, Sarah; Yuan, Weihong

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to investigate white matter (WM) structural abnormalities using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in children with hydrocephalus before CSF diversionary surgery (including ventriculoperitoneal shunt insertion and endoscopic third ventriculostomy) and during the course of recovery after surgery in association with neuropsychological and behavioral outcome. METHODS This prospective study included 54 pediatric patients with congenital hydrocephalus (21 female, 33 male; age range 0.03-194.5 months) who underwent surgery and 64 normal controls (30 female, 34 male; age range 0.30-197.75 months). DTI and neurodevelopmental outcome data were collected once in the control group and 3 times (preoperatively and at 3 and 12 months postoperatively) in the patients with hydrocephalus. DTI measures, including fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) values were extracted from the genu of the corpus callosum (gCC) and the posterior limb of internal capsule (PLIC). Group analysis was performed first cross-sectionally to quantify DTI abnormalities at 3 time points by comparing the data obtained in the hydrocephalus group for each of the 3 time points to data obtained in the controls. Longitudinal comparisons were conducted pairwise between different time points in patients whose data were acquired at multiple time points. Neurodevelopmental data were collected and analyzed using the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition, and the Bayley Scales of Infant Development, Third Edition. Correlation analyses were performed between DTI and behavioral measures. RESULTS Significant DTI abnormalities were found in the hydrocephalus patients in both the gCC (lower FA and higher MD, AD, and RD) and the PLIC (higher FA, lower AD and RD) before surgery. The DTI measures in the gCC remained mostly abnormal at 3 and 12 months after surgery. The DTI abnormalities in the PLIC were

  7. Genomic analysis of diffuse pediatric low-grade gliomas identifies recurrent oncogenic truncating rearrangements in the transcription factor MYBL1.

    PubMed

    Ramkissoon, Lori A; Horowitz, Peleg M; Craig, Justin M; Ramkissoon, Shakti H; Rich, Benjamin E; Schumacher, Steven E; McKenna, Aaron; Lawrence, Michael S; Bergthold, Guillaume; Brastianos, Priscilla K; Tabak, Barbara; Ducar, Matthew D; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E; Pouissant-Young, Tina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Bowers, Daniel C; Margraf, Linda; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Packer, Roger J; Hill, D Ashley; Pomeroy, Scott L; Eberhart, Charles G; Dunn, Ian F; Goumnerova, Liliana; Getz, Gad; Chan, Jennifer A; Santagata, Sandro; Hahn, William C; Stiles, Charles D; Ligon, Azra H; Kieran, Mark W; Beroukhim, Rameen; Ligon, Keith L

    2013-05-14

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) are among the most common solid tumors in children but, apart from BRAF kinase mutations or duplications in specific subclasses, few genetic driver events are known. Diffuse PLGGs comprise a set of uncommon subtypes that exhibit invasive growth and are therefore especially challenging clinically. We performed high-resolution copy-number analysis on 44 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded diffuse PLGGs to identify recurrent alterations. Diffuse PLGGs exhibited fewer such alterations than adult low-grade gliomas, but we identified several significantly recurrent events. The most significant event, 8q13.1 gain, was observed in 28% of diffuse astrocytoma grade IIs and resulted in partial duplication of the transcription factor MYBL1 with truncation of its C-terminal negative-regulatory domain. A similar recurrent deletion-truncation breakpoint was identified in two angiocentric gliomas in the related gene v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) on 6q23.3. Whole-genome sequencing of a MYBL1-rearranged diffuse astrocytoma grade II demonstrated MYBL1 tandem duplication and few other events. Truncated MYBL1 transcripts identified in this tumor induced anchorage-independent growth in 3T3 cells and tumor formation in nude mice. Truncated transcripts were also expressed in two additional tumors with MYBL1 partial duplication. Our results define clinically relevant molecular subclasses of diffuse PLGGs and highlight a potential role for the MYB family in the biology of low-grade gliomas.

  8. Genomic analysis of diffuse pediatric low-grade gliomas identifies recurrent oncogenic truncating rearrangements in the transcription factor MYBL1

    PubMed Central

    Ramkissoon, Lori A.; Horowitz, Peleg M.; Craig, Justin M.; Ramkissoon, Shakti H.; Rich, Benjamin E.; Schumacher, Steven E.; McKenna, Aaron; Lawrence, Michael S.; Bergthold, Guillaume; Brastianos, Priscilla K.; Tabak, Barbara; Ducar, Matthew D.; Van Hummelen, Paul; MacConaill, Laura E.; Pouissant-Young, Tina; Cho, Yoon-Jae; Taha, Hala; Mahmoud, Madeha; Bowers, Daniel C.; Margraf, Linda; Tabori, Uri; Hawkins, Cynthia; Packer, Roger J.; Hill, D. Ashley; Pomeroy, Scott L.; Eberhart, Charles G.; Dunn, Ian F.; Goumnerova, Liliana; Getz, Gad; Chan, Jennifer A.; Santagata, Sandro; Hahn, William C.; Stiles, Charles D.; Ligon, Azra H.; Kieran, Mark W.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Ligon, Keith L.

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric low-grade gliomas (PLGGs) are among the most common solid tumors in children but, apart from BRAF kinase mutations or duplications in specific subclasses, few genetic driver events are known. Diffuse PLGGs comprise a set of uncommon subtypes that exhibit invasive growth and are therefore especially challenging clinically. We performed high-resolution copy-number analysis on 44 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded diffuse PLGGs to identify recurrent alterations. Diffuse PLGGs exhibited fewer such alterations than adult low-grade gliomas, but we identified several significantly recurrent events. The most significant event, 8q13.1 gain, was observed in 28% of diffuse astrocytoma grade IIs and resulted in partial duplication of the transcription factor MYBL1 with truncation of its C-terminal negative-regulatory domain. A similar recurrent deletion-truncation breakpoint was identified in two angiocentric gliomas in the related gene v-myb avian myeloblastosis viral oncogene homolog (MYB) on 6q23.3. Whole-genome sequencing of a MYBL1-rearranged diffuse astrocytoma grade II demonstrated MYBL1 tandem duplication and few other events. Truncated MYBL1 transcripts identified in this tumor induced anchorage-independent growth in 3T3 cells and tumor formation in nude mice. Truncated transcripts were also expressed in two additional tumors with MYBL1 partial duplication. Our results define clinically relevant molecular subclasses of diffuse PLGGs and highlight a potential role for the MYB family in the biology of low-grade gliomas. PMID:23633565

  9. Motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment: a diffusion tensor imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Kwon, Yong Min; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    Previous diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) studies regarding pediatric patients with motor dysfunction have confirmed the correlation between DTI parameters of the injured corticospinal tract and the severity of motor dysfunction. There is also evidence that DTI parameters can help predict the prognosis of motor function of patients with cerebral palsy. But few studies are reported on the DTI parameters that can reflect the motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment. In the present study, 36 pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy were included. Before and after rehabilitation treatment, DTI was used to measure the fiber number (FN), fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of bilateral corticospinal tracts. Functional Level of Hemiplegia scale (FxL) was used to assess the therapeutic effect of rehabilitative therapy on clinical hemiplegia. Correlation analysis was performed to assess the statistical interrelationship between the change amount of DTI parameters and FxL. DTI findings obtained at the initial and follow-up evaluations demonstrated that more affected corticospinal tract yielded significantly decreased FN and FA values and significantly increased ADC value compared to the less affected corticospinal tract. Correlation analysis results showed that the change amount of FxL was positively correlated to FN and FA values, and the correlation to FN was stronger than the correlation to FA. The results suggest that FN and FA values can be used to evaluate the motor function outcomes of pediatric patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy after rehabilitation treatment and FN is of more significance for evaluation. PMID:26170825

  10. Histopathologic features of the liver in pediatric acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jonas, M M; Roldan, E O; Lyons, H J; Fojaco, R M; Reddy, R K

    1989-07-01

    Autopsy and liver biopsy specimens from 30 pediatric patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) or AIDS-related complex (ARC) were retrospectively reviewed. Of 28 cases with histologic abnormalities, the following findings were noted singly or in combination: giant-cell transformation, cytomegalovirus inclusions, Kaposi's sarcoma, diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate, granulomatous hepatitis, mild portal inflammation, necrosis around central veins, steatosis, and cholestasis. For the most part, abnormalities in the liver were not predictive of those in other organs, but the two children with the diffuse parenchymal lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate also had lymphoid interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Liver histopathology in pediatric patients with AIDS shares some features with that in adults, but appreciable differences are noted. In particular, these differences include the higher frequency of giant-cell transformation and the lower frequency of granulomas in children and the observation of diffuse lymphoplasmocytic infiltrate associated with LIP.

  11. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-01-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients. PMID:26889198

  12. Activation of less affected corticospinal tract and poor motor outcome in hemiplegic pediatric patients: a diffusion tensor tractography imaging study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin Hyun; Son, Su Min

    2015-12-01

    The less affected hemisphere is important in motor recovery in mature brains. However, in terms of motor outcome in immature brains, no study has been reported on the less affected corticospinal tract in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Therefore, we examined the relationship between the condition of the less affected corticospinal tract and motor function in hemiplegic pediatric patients. Forty patients with hemiplegia due to perinatal or prenatal injury (13.7 ± 3.0 months) and 40 age-matched typically developing controls were recruited. These patients were divided into two age-matched groups, the high functioning group (20 patients) and the low functioning group (20 patients) using functional level of hemiplegia scale. Diffusion tensor tractography images showed that compared with the control group, the patient group of the less affected corticospinal tract showed significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value. Significantly increased fiber number and significantly decreased fractional anisotropy value in the low functioning group were observed than in the high functioning group. These findings suggest that activation of the less affected hemisphere presenting as increased fiber number and decreased fractional anisotropy value is related to poor motor function in pediatric hemiplegic patients.

  13. Pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Patil, Meena; Karandikar, Manjiri

    2015-01-01

    The 2007 World Health Organization classification of tumors of the central nervous system identified "pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation" (PPTID) as a new pineal parenchymal neoplasm, located between pineocytoma and pineoblastoma as grade II or III. Because of the small number of reported cases, the classification of PPT is still a matter of controversy. We report a case of PPTID. A 25-year-old female patient was admitted to hospital with complaints of a headache, nausea, vomiting since 1-year. Computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed well-defined, mildly enhancing lesion in the region of the pineal gland with areas of calcification. The tumor was excised. After 3 years, she presented with metastasis in thoracic and lumbosacral spinal region. This is a rare event.

  14. Parenchymal abnormalities associated with developmental venous anomalies.

    PubMed

    San Millán Ruíz, Diego; Delavelle, Jacqueline; Yilmaz, Hasan; Gailloud, Philippe; Piovan, Enrico; Bertramello, Alberto; Pizzini, Francesca; Rüfenacht, Daniel A

    2007-12-01

    To report a retrospective series of 84 cerebral developmental venous anomalies (DVAs), focusing on associated parenchymal abnormalities within the drainage territory of the DVA. DVAs were identified during routine diagnostic radiological work-up based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (60 cases), computed tomography (CT) (62 cases) or both (36 cases). Regional parenchymal modifications within the drainage territory of the DVA, such as cortical or subcortical atrophy, white matter density or signal alterations, dystrophic calcifications, presence of haemorrhage or a cavernous-like vascular malformation (CVM), were noted. A stenosis of the collecting vein of the DVA was also sought for. Brain abnormalities within the drainage territory of a DVA were encountered in 65.4% of the cases. Locoregional brain atrophy occurred in 29.7% of the cases, followed by white matter lesions in 28.3% of MRI investigations and 19.3% of CT investigations, CVMs in 13.3% of MRI investigations and dystrophic calcification in 9.6% of CT investigations. An intracranial haemorrhage possibly related to a DVA occurred in 2.4% cases, and a stenosis on the collecting vein was documented in 13.1% of cases. Parenchymal abnormalities were identified for all DVA sizes. Brain parenchymal abnormalities were associated with DVAs in close to two thirds of the cases evaluated. These abnormalities are thought to occur secondarily, likely during post-natal life, as a result of chronic venous hypertension. Outflow obstruction, progressive thickening of the walls of the DVA and their morphological organization into a venous convergence zone are thought to contribute to the development of venous hypertension in DVA.

  15. Power spectral analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.

    2006-03-01

    Mammographic density and parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer. Two groups of women: gene-mutation carriers and low-risk women were included in this study. Power spectral analysis was performed within parenchymal regions of 172 digitized craniocaudal normal mammograms of the BRCA1/BRCA2 gene-mutation carriers and those of women at low-risk of developing breast cancer. The power law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β was evaluated for the mammographic patterns. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of exponent β as a decision variable in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. Power spectral analysis of mammograms demonstrated that mammographic parenchymal patterns have a power-law spectrum of the form, P(f)=B/f β where f is radial spatial frequency, with the average β values of 2.92 and 2.47 for the gene-mutation carriers and for the low-risk women, respectively. A z values of 0.90 and 0.89 were achieved in distinguishing between the gene-mutation carriers and the low-risk women with the individual image β value as the decision variable in the entire database and the age-matched group, respectively.

  16. Intensity-Corrected Dual-Echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) for Improved Pediatric Brain Diffusion Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Straka, Matus; Iv, Michael; Moseley, Michael E.; Barnes, Patrick D.; Skare, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Here we investigate the utility of a dual-echo Echo-Planar Imaging (DE-EPI) Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) approach to improve lesion conspicuity in pediatric imaging. This method delivers two ‘echo images’ for one diffusion-preparation period. We also demonstrate how the echoes can be utilized to remove transmit/receive coil-induced and static magnetic field intensity modulations on both echo images, which often mimic pathology and thereby pose diagnostic challenges. DE-EPI DWI data were acquired in 18 pediatric patients with abnormal diffusion lesions, and 46 pediatric patient controls at 3T. Echo1 [TE = 45ms] and Echo2 [TE = 86ms] were corrected for signal intensity variation across the images by exploiting the images equivalent coil-sensitivity and susceptibility-induced modulations. Two neuroradiologists independently reviewed Echo1 and Echo2 and their intensity-corrected variants (cEcho1 and cEcho2) on a 7-point Likert scale, with grading on lesion conspicuity diagnostic confidence. The apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) map from Echo1 was used to validate presence of true pathology. Echo2 was unanimously favored over Echo1 for its sensitivity for detecting acute brain injury, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.7/4.4 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.1/4.3 (p = 0.025). cEcho2 was rated higher than cEcho1, with a mean respective lesion conspicuity of 5.5/4.3 (p < 0.005) and diagnostic confidence of 5.4/4.4 (p < 0.005). cEcho2 was favored over all echoes for its diagnostic reliability, particularly in regions close to the head coil. This work concludes that DE-EPI DWI is a useful alternative to conventional single-echo EPI DWI, whereby Echo2 and cEcho2 allows for improved lesion detection and overall higher diagnostic confidence. PMID:26069959

  17. The clinical significance of preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging in pediatric cochlear implant recipients.

    PubMed

    Moon, Il Joon; Kim, Eun Yeon; Park, Ga-Young; Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Ji Hye; Lee, Jeehun; Chung, Won-Ho; Cho, Yang-Sun; Hong, Sung Hwa

    2012-01-01

    Although central nervous system abnormalities are incidentally detected in preoperative brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies in pediatric cochlear implant (CI) candidates, the clinical significance of the abnormalities remains unclear. We aimed to assess post-implantation auditory and speech performance in patients with brain lesions seen on MRI. Pediatric CI recipients (n = 177) who underwent preoperative MRI scans of the brain between January 2002 and June 2009 were included in this study. Patients with brain lesions on MRI were reviewed and categorized into the following groups: brain parenchymal lesions (focal vs. diffuse), ventriculomegaly, and extra-axial lesion. The main communication mode as well as progress in auditory perception and speech production were evaluated preoperatively and at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Performance in patients with brain lesions was compared with the age- and sex-matched control group. Various brain lesions were found in 27 out of 177 patients. Children with brain lesions who received CIs showed gradual progress in auditory and speech outcomes for 2 years, though performance was reduced compared with the control group. In addition, there was a significant difference in the main communication mode between the two groups at 2 years following cochlear implantation. This difference was especially significant in patients with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions after further stratification of the brain lesion group. Preoperative brain MRI may have a role in improving the prediction of adverse outcomes in pediatric CI recipients. In particular, children with diffuse brain parenchymal lesions should be counseled regarding the poor prognosis preoperatively, and followed up with special attention.

  18. Working memory and corpus callosum microstructural integrity after pediatric traumatic brain injury: a diffusion tensor tractography study.

    PubMed

    Treble, Amery; Hasan, Khader M; Iftikhar, Amal; Stuebing, Karla K; Kramer, Larry A; Cox, Charles S; Swank, Paul R; Ewing-Cobbs, Linda

    2013-10-01

    Deficits in working memory (WM) are a common consequence of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are believed to contribute to difficulties in a range of cognitive and academic domains. Reduced integrity of the corpus callosum (CC) after TBI may disrupt the connectivity between bilateral frontoparietal neural networks underlying WM. In the present investigation, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of eight callosal subregions (CC1-CC8) was examined in relation to measures of verbal and visuospatial WM in 74 children sustaining TBI and 49 typically developing comparison children. Relative to the comparison group, children with TBI demonstrated poorer visuospatial WM, but comparable verbal WM. Microstructure of the CC was significantly compromised in brain-injured children, with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher axial and radial diffusivity metrics in all callosal subregions. In both groups of children, lower FA and/or higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal cortical regions predicted poorer verbal WM, whereas higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal, as well as temporal, cortical regions predicted poorer visuospatial WM. DTI metrics, especially radial diffusivity, in predictive callosal subregions accounted for significant variance in WM over and above remaining callosal subregions. Reduced microstructural integrity of the CC, particularly in subregions connecting parietal and temporal cortices, may act as a neuropathological mechanism contributing to long-term WM deficits. The future clinical use of neuroanatomical biomarkers may allow for the early identification of children at highest risk for WM deficits and earlier provision of interventions for these children.

  19. Working Memory and Corpus Callosum Microstructural Integrity after Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injury: A Diffusion Tensor Tractography Study

    PubMed Central

    Treble, Amery; Hasan, Khader M.; Iftikhar, Amal; Stuebing, Karla K.; Kramer, Larry A.; Cox, Charles S.; Swank, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Deficits in working memory (WM) are a common consequence of pediatric traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are believed to contribute to difficulties in a range of cognitive and academic domains. Reduced integrity of the corpus callosum (CC) after TBI may disrupt the connectivity between bilateral frontoparietal neural networks underlying WM. In the present investigation, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography of eight callosal subregions (CC1–CC8) was examined in relation to measures of verbal and visuospatial WM in 74 children sustaining TBI and 49 typically developing comparison children. Relative to the comparison group, children with TBI demonstrated poorer visuospatial WM, but comparable verbal WM. Microstructure of the CC was significantly compromised in brain-injured children, with lower fractional anisotropy (FA) and higher axial and radial diffusivity metrics in all callosal subregions. In both groups of children, lower FA and/or higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal cortical regions predicted poorer verbal WM, whereas higher radial diffusivity in callosal subregions connecting anterior and posterior parietal, as well as temporal, cortical regions predicted poorer visuospatial WM. DTI metrics, especially radial diffusivity, in predictive callosal subregions accounted for significant variance in WM over and above remaining callosal subregions. Reduced microstructural integrity of the CC, particularly in subregions connecting parietal and temporal cortices, may act as a neuropathological mechanism contributing to long-term WM deficits. The future clinical use of neuroanatomical biomarkers may allow for the early identification of children at highest risk for WM deficits and earlier provision of interventions for these children. PMID:23627735

  20. Effect of number of acquisitions in diffusion tensor imaging of the pediatric brain: optimizing scan time and diagnostic experience.

    PubMed

    Soman, Salil; Holdsworth, Samantha J; Skare, Stefan; Andre, Jalal B; Van, Anh T; Aksoy, Murat; Bammer, Roland; Rosenberg, Jarrett; Barnes, Patrick D; Yeom, Kristen W

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) is useful for multiple clinical applications, but its routine implementation for children may be difficult due to long scan times. This study evaluates the impact of decreasing the number of DTI acquisitions (NEX) on interpretability of pediatric brain DTI. 15 children with MRI-visible neuropathologies were imaged at 3T using our motion-corrected, parallel imaging- accelerated DT-EPI technique with 3 NEX (scan time 8.25 min). Using these acquisitions, NEX = 1 (scan time 2.75 min) and NEX = 2 (scan time 5.5 min) images were simulated. Two neuroradiologists scored diffusion-weighted images (DWI), apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), and first eigenvector color-encoded (EV) images from each NEX for perceived SNR, lesion conspicuity and clinical confidence. ROI FA/ADC and image SNR values were also compared across NEX. NEX = 2 perceived SNR, lesion conspicuity, and clinical confidence were not inferior to NEX = 3 images. NEX = 1 images showed comparable lesion conspicuity and clinical confidence as NEX = 3, but inferior perceived SNR. FA and ADC ROI measurements demonstrated no significant difference across NEX. The greatest SNR increase was seen between NEX = 1 and NEX = 2. Reducing NEX to shorten imaging time may impact clinical utility in a manner that does not directly correspond with SNR changes. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Neuroimaging.

  1. Tract-based spatial statistics analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging data in pediatric- and adult-onset multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Aliotta, Rachel; Cox, Jennifer L; Donohue, Katelyn; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Yeh, E Ann; Polak, Paul; Dwyer, Michael G; Zivadinov, Robert

    2014-01-01

    White matter (WM) microstructure may vary significantly in pediatric-onset (PO) and adult-onset (AO) patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), a difference that could be explained by the effects of an inherent plasticity in the affected pediatric brains early in the disease, and a phenomenon that does not occur later in life. This hypothesis would support the observation that disease progression is much slower in POMS compared to AOMS patients. To examine WM microstructure in the brain of adults with POMS and AOMS, using tract based spatial statistics (TBSS) analysis of diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Adults with relapsing-remitting (RR) POMS, who were diagnosed before age of 18 years (n = 16), were compared with age-matched (AOA, n = 23) and disease duration-matched (AOD, n = 22) RR patients who developed MS after the age of 18 years. Scans were analyzed using the FSL software package (Oxford, UK) and statistics were performed using TBSS to evaluate WM microstructure between groups based on the mean fractional anisotropy (FA) values obtained from the DTI. Widespread cortical and deep WM area differences characterized by increased FA values were seen in the AOAMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Significantly increased FA values of posterior WM areas were detected in the AODMS compared with POMS group (P < 0.05, TFCE corrected). Increased FA values in WM areas of the AOMS compared with the POMS patients suggest that diffuse WM microstructure changes are more attributable to age of onset than a simple function of disease duration and age. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Hydroxychloroquine in children with interstitial (diffuse parenchymal) lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Braun, Sarah; Ferner, Marion; Kronfeld, Kai; Griese, Matthias

    2015-04-01

    Hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) is one of the drugs frequently used for the treatment of interstitial lung disease (ILD) in children (chILD). This use is off-label and studies to analyze the effect and safety of HCQ in chILD are lacking. Therefore, a literature research on the usage of chloroquine (CQ) and HCQ in these conditions was done. Eighty-five case reports and small series in the period from 1984 to 2013 were identified in which children with different diagnoses of ILD were treated with CQ or HCQ, sometimes in combination with other medication including steroids. A favorable response to HCQ or CQ was reported in 35 cases, whereas in the other cases the effect was negative or not clear. The dose of HCQ used was between 5 and 10 mg/kg body weight/day (bw/d). No pharmacokinetic studies have been done. The side effect profile in children seemed to be similar to that in adults. Most often gastrointestinal symptoms were reported. Three patients were found developing retinal changes during the treatment with CQ, whereas in none of the patients treated with HCQ retinal changes were reported. Based on retrospective case reports and small series likely to be reported with bias, the use of HCQ in chILD might be classified as safe. As no prospective data on efficacy and safety of HCQ in chILD are available, systematic collection is necessary. This may be achieved by web-based registers like the European Management Platform for Childhood Interstitial Lung Diseases. Prospective and controlled investigations of HCQ in patients with chILD are mandatory.

  3. Diffuse damage in pediatric traumatic brain injury: a comparison of automated versus operator-controlled quantification methods.

    PubMed

    Bigler, Erin D; Abildskov, Tracy J; Wilde, Elisabeth A; McCauley, Stephen R; Li, Xiaoqi; Merkley, Tricia L; Fearing, Michael A; Newsome, Mary R; Scheibel, Randall S; Hunter, Jill V; Chu, Zili; Levin, Harvey S

    2010-04-15

    This investigation had two main objectives: 1) to assess the comparability of volumes determined by operator-controlled image quantification with automated image analysis in evaluating atrophic brain changes related to traumatic brain injury (TBI) in children, and 2) to assess the extent of diffuse structural changes throughout the brain as determined by reduced volume of a brain structure or region of interest (ROI). Operator-controlled methods used ANALYZE software for segmentation and tracing routines of pre-defined brain structures and ROIs. For automated image analyses, the open-access FreeSurfer program was used. Sixteen children with moderate-to-severe TBI were compared to individually matched, typically developing control children and the volumes of 18 brain structures and/or ROIs were compared between the two methods. Both methods detected atrophic changes but differed in the magnitude of the atrophic effect with the best agreement in subcortical structures. The volumes of all brain structures/ROIs were smaller in the TBI group regardless of method used; overall effect size differences were minimal for caudate and putamen but moderate to large for all other measures. This is reflective of the diffuse nature of TBI and its widespread impact on structural brain integrity, indicating that both FreeSurfer and operator-controlled methods can reliably assess cross-sectional volumetric changes in pediatric TBI. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Nucleoside uptake in rat liver parenchymal cells.

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, J; Gomez-Angelats, M; del Santo, B; Casado, F J; Felipe, A; Pastor-Anglada, M

    1996-01-01

    Rat liver parenchymal cells express Na(+)-dependent and Na(+)- independent nucleoside transport activity. The Na(+)-dependent component shows kinetic properties and substrate specificity similar to those reported for plasma membrane vesicles [Ruiz-Montasell, Casado, Felipe and Pastor-Anglada (1992) J. Membr. Biol. 128, 227-233]. This transport activity shows apparent K(m) values for uridine in the range 8-13 microM and a Vmax of 246 pmol of uridine per 3 min per 10(5) cells. Most nucleosides, including the analogue formycin B, cis-inhibit Na(+)-dependent uridine transport, although thymidine and cytidine are poor inhibitors. Inosine and adenosine inhibit Na(+)-dependent uridine uptake in a dose-dependent manner, reaching total inhibition. Guanosine also inhibits Na(+)-dependent uridine uptake, although there is some residual transport activity (35% of the control values) that is resistant to high concentrations of guanosine but may be inhibited by low concentrations of adenosine. The transport activity that is inhibited by high concentrations of thymidine is similar to the guanosine-resistant fraction. These observations are consistent with the presence of at least two Na(+)-dependent transport systems. Na(+)-dependent uridine uptake is sensitive to N-ethylmaleimide treatment, but Na(+)-independent transport is not. Nitrobenzylthioinosine (NBTI) stimulates Na(+)-dependent uridine uptake. The NBTI effect involves a change in Vmax, it is rapid, dose-dependent, does not need preincubation and can be abolished by depleting the Na+ transmembrane electrochemical gradient. Na(+)-independent uridine transport seems to be insensitive to NBTI. Under the same experimental conditions, NBTI effectively blocks most of the Na(+)-independent uridine uptake in hepatoma cells. Thus the stimulatory effect of NBTI on the concentrative nucleoside transporter of liver parenchymal cells cannot be explained by inhibition of nucleoside efflux. PMID:8760370

  5. Newly Recognized Occupational and Environmental Causes of Chronic Terminal Airways and Parenchymal Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sauler, Maor; Gulati, Mridu

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis With the introduction of new materials and changes in manufacturing practices, occupational health investigators continue to uncover associations between novel exposures and chronic forms of diffuse parenchymal lung disease and terminal airways disease. In order to discern exposure disease relationships, clinicians must maintain a high index of suspicion for the potential toxicity of occupational and environmental exposures. This article details several newly recognized chronic parenchymal and terminal airways. Diseases related to exposure to Indium, Nylon Flock, Diacetyl used in the flavorings industry, nanoparticles, and the World Trade Center disaster are reviewed. Additionally, this article will review methods in worker surveillance as well as the potential use of biomarkers in the evaluation of exposure disease relationships. PMID:23153608

  6. Anatomical and diffusion MRI of deep gray matter in pediatric spina bifida

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Ashley L.; Juranek, Jenifer; Williams, Victoria J.; Cirino, Paul T.; Dennis, Maureen; Fletcher, Jack M.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with spina bifida myelomeningocele (SBM) exhibit brain abnormalities in cortical thickness, white matter integrity, and cerebellar structure. Little is known about deep gray matter macro- and microstructure in this population. The current study utilized volumetric and diffusion-weighted MRI techniques to examine gray matter volume and microstructure in several subcortical structures: basal ganglia nuclei, thalamus, hippocampus, and amygdala. Sixty-six children and adolescents (ages 8–18; M = 12.0, SD = 2.73) with SBM and typically developing (TD) controls underwent T1- and diffusion-weighted neuroimaging. Microstructural results indicated that hippocampal volume was disproportionately reduced, whereas the putamen volume was enlarged in the group with SBM. Microstructural analyses indicated increased mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) in the gray matter of most examined structures (i.e., thalamus, caudate, hippocampus), with the putamen exhibiting a unique pattern of decreased MD and increased FA. These results provide further support that SBM differentially disrupts brain regions whereby some structures are volumetrically normal whereas others are reduced or enlarged. In the hippocampus, volumetric reduction coupled with increased MD may imply reduced cellular density and aberrant organization. Alternatively, the enlarged volume and significantly reduced MD in the putamen suggest increased density. PMID:25057465

  7. Diffuse and uncontrolled vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in rapidly progressing pediatric moyamoya disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, Amy J; Bhattacharjee, Meenakshi B; Regalado, Ellen S; Milewicz, Allen L; El-Hakam, Lisa M; Dauser, Robert C; Milewicz, Dianna M

    2010-09-01

    Moyamoya disease is a rare stroke syndrome of unknown etiology resulting from stenosis or occlusion of the supraclinoid internal carotid artery (ICA) in association with an abnormal vascular network in the basal ganglia. Although the highest incidence of moyamoya disease is in pediatric patients, pathology reports have been primarily limited to adult samples and describe occlusive fibrocellular lesions in the intimae of affected arteries. We describe the case of a young girl with primary moyamoya disease who presented at 18 months of age with right hemiparesis following an ischemic stroke. Angiography showed stenosis of the distal left ICA, left middle cerebral artery, and right ICA. An emergent left-sided dural inversion was performed. Recurrent strokes and alternating hemiplegia necessitated a right dural inversion 6 months later. Nonetheless, her aggressive disease proved uniquely refractory to surgical revascularization, and she succumbed to recurrent strokes and neurological deterioration at 2.5 years of age. Pathological specimens revealed a striking bilateral occlusion of the anterior carotid circulation resulting from intimal proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Most strikingly, the ascending aorta and the superior mesenteric artery demonstrated similar intimal proliferation, along with SMC proliferation in the media. The systemic pathology involving multiple arteries in this extremely young child, the first case of its kind available for autopsy, suggests that globally uncontrolled SMC proliferation, in the absence of environmental risk factors and likely resulting from an underlying genetic alteration, may be a primary etiologic event leading to moyamoya disease.

  8. Pediatric brain tumor consortium multisite assessment of apparent diffusion coefficient z-axis variation assessed with an ice-water phantom.

    PubMed

    Mulkern, Robert V; Ricci, Kelsey I; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Chenevert, Thomas L; Malyarenko, Dariya I; Kocak, Mehmet; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2015-03-01

    Magnetic resonance diffusion imaging can characterize physiologic characteristics of pediatric brain tumors used to assess therapy response. The purpose of this study was to assess the variability of the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) along z-axis of scanners in the multicenter Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium (PBTC). Ice-water diffusion phantoms for each PBTC site were distributed with a specific diffusion imaging protocol. The phantom was scanned four successive times to 1) confirm water in the tube reached thermal equilibrium and 2) allow for assessment of intra-examination ADC repeatability. ADC profiles across slice positions for each vendor and institution combination were characterized using linear regression modeling with a quadratic fit. Eleven sites collected data with a high degree of compliance to the diffusion protocol for each scanner. The mean ADC value at slice position zero for vendor A was 1.123 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, vendor B was 1.0964 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s, and vendor C was 1.110 × 10(-3) mm(2)/s. The percentage coefficient of variation across all sites was 0.309% (standard deviation = 0.322). The ADC values conformed well to a second-order polynomial along the z-axis, (ie, following a linear model pattern with quadratic fit) for vendor-institution combinations and across vendor-institution combinations as shown in the longitudinal model. Assessment of the variability of diffusion metrics is essential for establishing the validity of using these quantitative metrics in multicenter trials. The low variability in ADC values across vendors and institutions and validates the use of ADC as a quantitative tumor marker in pediatric multicenter trials. Copyright © 2015 AUR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrated Molecular Meta-Analysis of 1,000 Pediatric High-Grade and Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma.

    PubMed

    Mackay, Alan; Burford, Anna; Carvalho, Diana; Izquierdo, Elisa; Fazal-Salom, Janat; Taylor, Kathryn R; Bjerke, Lynn; Clarke, Matthew; Vinci, Mara; Nandhabalan, Meera; Temelso, Sara; Popov, Sergey; Molinari, Valeria; Raman, Pichai; Waanders, Angela J; Han, Harry J; Gupta, Saumya; Marshall, Lynley; Zacharoulis, Stergios; Vaidya, Sucheta; Mandeville, Henry C; Bridges, Leslie R; Martin, Andrew J; Al-Sarraj, Safa; Chandler, Christopher; Ng, Ho-Keung; Li, Xingang; Mu, Kun; Trabelsi, Saoussen; Brahim, Dorra H'mida-Ben; Kisljakov, Alexei N; Konovalov, Dmitry M; Moore, Andrew S; Carcaboso, Angel Montero; Sunol, Mariona; de Torres, Carmen; Cruz, Ofelia; Mora, Jaume; Shats, Ludmila I; Stavale, João N; Bidinotto, Lucas T; Reis, Rui M; Entz-Werle, Natacha; Farrell, Michael; Cryan, Jane; Crimmins, Darach; Caird, John; Pears, Jane; Monje, Michelle; Debily, Marie-Anne; Castel, David; Grill, Jacques; Hawkins, Cynthia; Nikbakht, Hamid; Jabado, Nada; Baker, Suzanne J; Pfister, Stefan M; Jones, David T W; Fouladi, Maryam; von Bueren, André O; Baudis, Michael; Resnick, Adam; Jones, Chris

    2017-09-26

    We collated data from 157 unpublished cases of pediatric high-grade glioma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and 20 publicly available datasets in an integrated analysis of >1,000 cases. We identified co-segregating mutations in histone-mutant subgroups including loss of FBXW7 in H3.3G34R/V, TOP3A rearrangements in H3.3K27M, and BCOR mutations in H3.1K27M. Histone wild-type subgroups are refined by the presence of key oncogenic events or methylation profiles more closely resembling lower-grade tumors. Genomic aberrations increase with age, highlighting the infant population as biologically and clinically distinct. Uncommon pathway dysregulation is seen in small subsets of tumors, further defining the molecular diversity of the disease, opening up avenues for biological study and providing a basis for functionally defined future treatment stratification. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Impact of Subarachnoid Hemorrhage on Parenchymal Arteriolar Function

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, George C.; Koide, Masayo

    2013-01-01

    Summary Intracerebral or parenchymal arterioles play an important role in the regulation of both global and regional blood flow within the brain. Brain cortex lacks significant collateral sources of blood and are thus at risk if blood flow through parenchymal arterioles is restricted. Increasingly, evidence is accumulating that abnormal parenchymal arteriolar constriction contributes to the development of neurological deficits caused by subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). For example, parenchymal arterioles isolated from SAH model rats exhibit enhanced constriction in response to increased intravascular pressure. This increased pressure-dependent constriction or myogenic tone would result in a shift in the cerebral autoregulatory response and decreased cerebral perfusion. Here, we summarize our current knowledge regarding cellular mechanisms contributing to enhanced contractility of parenchymal arteriolar myocytes following SAH. Our studies demonstrate SAH-induced membrane potential depolarization involving altered K+ homeostasis leads to enhanced voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel activity, increased smooth muscle cytosolic Ca2+ and parenchymal arteriolar constriction. In summary, emerging evidence demonstrates that SAH can profoundly affect parenchymal arteriolar tone promoting decreased cortical blood flow and compromised neuronal viability. PMID:22890665

  11. Spatially selective 2D RF inner field of view (iFOV) diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) of the pediatric spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Conklin, Chris J.; Middleton, Devon M.; Alizadeh, Mahdi; Finsterbusch, Jürgen; Raunig, David L.; Faro, Scott H.; Shah, Pallav; Krisa, Laura; Sinko, Rebecca; Delalic, Joan Z.; Mulcahey, M.J.; Mohamed, Feroze B.

    2016-01-01

    Magnetic resonance based diffusion imaging has been gaining more utility and clinical relevance over the past decade. Using conventional echo planar techniques, it is possible to acquire and characterize water diffusion within the central nervous system (CNS); namely in the form of Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI). While each modality provides valuable clinical information in terms of the presence of diffusion and its directionality, both techniques are limited to assuming an ideal Gaussian distribution for water displacement with no intermolecular interactions. This assumption neglects pathological processes that are not Gaussian therefore reducing the amount of potentially clinically relevant information. Additions to the Gaussian distribution measured by the excess kurtosis, or peakedness, of the probabilistic model provide a better understanding of the underlying cellular structure. The objective of this work is to provide mathematical and experimental evidence that Diffusion Kurtosis Imaging (DKI) can offer additional information about the micromolecular environment of the pediatric spinal cord. This is accomplished by a more thorough characterization of the nature of random water displacement within the cord. A novel DKI imaging sequence based on a tilted 2D spatially selective radio frequency pulse providing reduced field of view (FOV) imaging was developed, implemented, and optimized on a 3 Tesla MRI scanner, and tested on pediatric subjects (healthy subjects: 15; patients with spinal cord injury (SCI):5). Software was developed and validated for post processing of the DKI images and estimation of the tensor parameters. The results show statistically significant differences in mean kurtosis (p < 0.01) and radial kurtosis (p < 0.01) between healthy subjects and subjects with SCI. DKI provides incremental and novel information over conventional diffusion acquisitions when coupled with higher order estimation algorithms

  12. The emerging role of NG2 in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    PubMed Central

    Yadavilli, Sridevi; Scafidi, Joseph; Becher, Oren J.; Saratsis, Amanda M.; Hiner, Rebecca L.; Kambhampati, Madhuri; Mariarita, Santi; MacDonald, Tobey J.; Codispoti, Kari-Elise; Magge, Suresh N.; Jaiswal, Jyoti K.; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) have a dismal prognosis and are poorly understood brain cancers. Receptor tyrosine kinases stabilized by neuron-glial antigen 2 (NG2) protein are known to induce gliomagenesis. Here, we investigated NG2 expression in a cohort of DIPG specimens (n= 50). We demonstrate NG2 expression in the majority of DIPG specimens tested and determine that tumors harboring histone 3.3 mutation express the highest NG2 levels. We further demonstrate that microRNA 129-2 (miR129-2) is downregulated and hypermethylated in human DIPGs, resulting in the increased expression of NG2. Treatment with 5-Azacytidine, a methyltransferase inhibitor, results in NG2 downregulation in DIPG primary tumor cells in vitro. NG2 expression is altered (symmetric segregation) in mitotic human DIPG and mouse tumor cells. These mitotic cells co-express oligodendrocyte (Olig2) and astrocyte (glial fibrillary acidic protein, GFAP) markers, indicating lack of terminal differentiation. NG2 knockdown retards cellular migration in vitro, while NG2 expressing neurospheres are highly tumorigenic in vivo, resulting in rapid growth of pontine tumors. NG2 expression is targetable in vivo using miR129-2 indicating a potential avenue for therapeutic interventions. This data implicates NG2 as a molecule of interest in DIPGs especially those with H3.3 mutation. PMID:25987129

  13. Scintigraphic evaluation of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Melloul, M.M.; Shmueli, D.; Mechlis-Frish, S.; Shapira, Z.; Baniel, J.; Rousso, I.; Cohen, M.; Lubin, E.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic evaluation of a rare case of parenchymal malakoplakia in a transplanted kidney is presented. Uptake of Tc-99m DMSA in the involved area was reduced and the Ga-67 uptake was increased.

  14. Insights into pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma through proteomic analysis of cerebrospinal fluid

    PubMed Central

    M. Saratsis, Amanda; Yadavilli, Sridevi; Magge, Suresh; Rood, Brian R.; Perez, Jennifer; Hill, D. Ashley; Hwang, Eugene; Kilburn, Lindsay; Packer, Roger J.; Nazarian, Javad

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is a leading cause of brain tumor–related death in children. DIPG is not surgically resectable, resulting in a paucity of tissue available for molecular studies. As such, tumor biology is poorly understood, and, currently, there are no effective treatments. In the absence of frozen tumor specimens, body fluids—such as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), serum, and urine—can serve as more readily accessible vehicles for detecting tumor-secreted proteins. We analyzed a total of 76 specimens, including CSF, serum, urine, and normal and tumor brainstem tissue. Protein profiling of CSF from patients with DIPG was generated by mass spectrometry using an LTQ-Orbitrap-XL and database search using the Sequest algorithm. Quantitative and statistical analyses were performed with ProteoIQ and Partek Genomics Suite. A total of 528 unique proteins were identified, 71% of which are known secreted proteins. CSF proteomic analysis revealed selective upregulation of Cyclophillin A (CypA) and dimethylarginase 1 (DDAH1) in DIPG (n = 10), compared with controls (n = 4). Protein expression was further validated with Western blot analysis and immunohistochemical assays using CSF, brain tissue, serum, and urine from DIPG and control specimens. Immunohistochemical staining showed selective upregulation of secreted but not cytosolic CypA and DDAH1 in patients with DIPG. In this study, we present the first comprehensive protein profile of CSF specimens from patients with DIPG to demonstrate selective expression of tumor proteins potentially involved in brainstem gliomagenesis. Detection of secreted CypA and DDAH1 in serum and urine has potential clinical application, with implications for assessing treatment response and detecting tumor recurrence in patients with DIPG. PMID:22492959

  15. Diagnostic Value of Diffusion-Weighted MRI for Tumor Characterization, Differentiation and Monitoring in Pediatric Patients with Neuroblastic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Neubauer, Henning; Li, Mengxia; Müller, Verena Rabea; Pabst, Thomas; Beer, Meinrad

    2017-07-01

    Purpose We explored the diagnostic value of diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) for tumor characterization, differentiation and therapy monitoring in pediatric patients with extracranial neuroblastic tumors. Materials and Methods All 29 patients (14 girls, median age: 3 years) with neuroblastoma (NB, n = 19), ganglioneuroblastoma (GNB, n = 4) and ganglioneuroma (GN, n = 6) who had had at least one in-house DWI examination since 2005 were identified and retrospectively analyzed. Two independent blinded readers measured ADC values (unit: 10-3 mm(2)/s) and signal intensity ratios (SIRs) of the primary tumor and, if applicable, of the tumor after chemotherapy, metastases and tumor relapse. Results The pre-treatment ADC was 0.90 ± 0.23 in NB/GNB and 1.70 ± 0.36 in GN without overlap between the two entities for both readers, 0.67 ± 0.14 in metastases and 0.72 ± 0.18 in tumor relapse. With chemotherapy, mean ADC increased to 1.54 ± 0.33 in NB/GNB and to 1.23 ± 0.27 in metastases (p < 0.05). The median SIRs of various tumor lesions vs. liver, vs. muscle tissue and vs. adjacent tissue were significantly higher on DWI (range: 2.4 - 9.9) than on ce-T1w (range: 1.0 - 1.8, all p < 0.05). The coefficient of variation (CV) was ≤ 8.0 % for ADC and ≤ 16.4 % for signal intensity data. Conclusion Based on mean ADC, DWI distinguishes between NB/GNB and GN with high certainty and provides plausible quantitative data on tumor response to therapy. Lesion conspicuity, as measured by SIR, is superior on DWI, compared to ce-T1w. DWI as a noninvasive, radiation-free and widely available imaging technique should be an integral part of MR imaging for neuroblastic tumors and should undergo prospective evaluation in multicenter studies. Key Points  · DWI reliably distinguishes neuroblastoma/ganglioneuroblastoma from ganglioneuroma, based on the mean ADC.. · DWI provides plausible quantitative data on tumor

  16. Imaging parenchymal lung diseases with confocal endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Newton, Richard C; Kemp, Samuel V; Yang, Guang-Zhong; Elson, Daniel S; Darzi, Ara; Shah, Pallav L

    2012-01-01

    "Optical biopsy" using bronchoscopic probe-based confocal endomicrosocopy (pCLE) provides real time images of the autofluorescent elastin scaffold of the healthy acinus. To establish how different parenchymal lung diseases (PLDs) alter the pCLE image, if intravenous fluorescein provides additional diagnostic information, and to assess pCLE's safety for investigating PLDs (UK REC: 09/H0708/18). 116 bronchopulmonary segments were examined in 38 patients and 4 healthy non-smoker volunteers. pCLE images were correlated with consensus multidisciplinary diagnosis from HRCT, bronchoalveolar lavage, and transbronchial/CT guided biopsies. Severe emphysema is evident on pCLE imaging, with increased spacing between septal walls, sudden loss of fluorescence from bullae and a subsequent reticular pleural image. Other PLDs demonstrated marked loss of lobular autofluorescence and distinctiveness. In all diseases imaged, differentiation between septal wall and microvessel elastin is more difficult in diseased versus healthy acini. Smokers displayed a hyperfluorescent 15-30 micron cellular alveolar infiltrate - alveolar macrophages on in vitro BAL analysis. Varied intravenous fluorescein doses only create a hyperfluorescent foreground with bubbles. pCLE can cause pleuritic discomfort but there were no pneumothoraces. 3 patients had transient bleeding, and in vivo tearing of septal walls and microvessels abutting the probe was observed. Marked emphysema is demonstrable from loss of elastic walls. The detail of high-resolution pCLE images is attenuated in other PLDs without further clarity from intravenous fluorescein. Nevertheless, pCLE is safe for PLD investigation. These findings form a basis for future work to harness pCLE's potential utility as part of a multiassessment modality for PLD diagnosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Differentiation of Low- and High-Grade Pediatric Brain Tumors with High b-Value Diffusion-weighted MR Imaging and a Fractional Order Calculus Model

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yi; Wang, He; Liu, Guanzhong; Damen, Frederick W.; Wanamaker, Christian; Li, Yuhua

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate that a new set of parameters (D, β, and μ) from a fractional order calculus (FROC) diffusion model can be used to improve the accuracy of MR imaging for differentiating among low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumors. Materials and Methods The institutional review board of the performing hospital approved this study, and written informed consent was obtained from the legal guardians of pediatric patients. Multi-b-value diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging was performed in 67 pediatric patients with brain tumors. Diffusion coefficient D, fractional order parameter β (which correlates with tissue heterogeneity), and a microstructural quantity μ were calculated by fitting the multi-b-value diffusion-weighted images to an FROC model. D, β, and μ values were measured in solid tumor regions, as well as in normal-appearing gray matter as a control. These values were compared between the low- and high-grade tumor groups by using the Mann-Whitney U test. The performance of FROC parameters for differentiating among patient groups was evaluated with receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Results None of the FROC parameters exhibited significant differences in normal-appearing gray matter (P ≥ .24), but all showed a significant difference (P < .002) between low- (D, 1.53 μm2/msec ± 0.47; β, 0.87 ± 0.06; μ, 8.67 μm ± 0.95) and high-grade (D, 0.86 μm2/msec ± 0.23; β, 0.73 ± 0.06; μ, 7.8 μm ± 0.70) brain tumor groups. The combination of D and β produced the largest area under the ROC curve (0.962) in the ROC analysis compared with individual parameters (β, 0.943; D,0.910; and μ, 0.763), indicating an improved performance for tumor differentiation. Conclusion The FROC parameters can be used to differentiate between low- and high-grade pediatric brain tumor groups. The combination of FROC parameters or individual parameters may serve as in vivo, noninvasive, and quantitative imaging markers for classifying

  18. Mesenchymal transition and PDGFRA amplification/mutation are key distinct oncogenic events in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas.

    PubMed

    Puget, Stephanie; Philippe, Cathy; Bax, Dorine A; Job, Bastien; Varlet, Pascale; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Carvalho, Dina; Reis, Ricardo; Guerrini-Rousseau, Lea; Roujeau, Thomas; Dessen, Philippe; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Le Teuff, Gwenael; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Geoerger, Birgit; Vassal, Gilles; Jones, Chris; Grill, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor and its prognosis is universaly fatal. No significant improvement has been made in last thirty years over the standard treatment with radiotherapy. To address the paucity of understanding of DIPGs, we have carried out integrated molecular profiling of a large series of samples obtained with stereotactic biopsy at diagnosis. While chromosomal imbalances did not distinguish DIPG and supratentorial tumors on CGHarrays, gene expression profiling revealed clear differences between them, with brainstem gliomas resembling midline/thalamic tumours, indicating a closely-related origin. Two distinct subgroups of DIPG were identified. The first subgroup displayed mesenchymal and pro-angiogenic characteristics, with stem cell markers enrichment consistent with the possibility to grow tumor stem cells from these biopsies. The other subgroup displayed oligodendroglial features, and appeared largely driven by PDGFRA, in particular through amplification and/or novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain. Patients in this later group had a significantly worse outcome with an hazard ratio for early deaths, ie before 10 months, 8 fold greater that the ones in the other subgroup (p = 0.041, Cox regression model). The worse outcome of patients with the oligodendroglial type of tumors was confirmed on a series of 55 paraffin-embedded biopsy samples at diagnosis (median OS of 7.73 versus 12.37 months, p = 0.045, log-rank test). Two distinct transcriptional subclasses of DIPG with specific genomic alterations can be defined at diagnosis by oligodendroglial differentiation or mesenchymal transition, respectively. Classifying these tumors by signal transduction pathway activation and by mutation in pathway member genes may be particularily valuable for the development of targeted therapies.

  19. Mesenchymal Transition and PDGFRA Amplification/Mutation Are Key Distinct Oncogenic Events in Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Bax, Dorine A.; Job, Bastien; Varlet, Pascale; Junier, Marie-Pierre; Andreiuolo, Felipe; Carvalho, Dina; Reis, Ricardo; Guerrini-Rousseau, Lea; Roujeau, Thomas; Dessen, Philippe; Richon, Catherine; Lazar, Vladimir; Le Teuff, Gwenael; Sainte-Rose, Christian; Geoerger, Birgit; Vassal, Gilles; Jones, Chris; Grill, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) is one of the most frequent malignant pediatric brain tumor and its prognosis is universaly fatal. No significant improvement has been made in last thirty years over the standard treatment with radiotherapy. To address the paucity of understanding of DIPGs, we have carried out integrated molecular profiling of a large series of samples obtained with stereotactic biopsy at diagnosis. While chromosomal imbalances did not distinguish DIPG and supratentorial tumors on CGHarrays, gene expression profiling revealed clear differences between them, with brainstem gliomas resembling midline/thalamic tumours, indicating a closely-related origin. Two distinct subgroups of DIPG were identified. The first subgroup displayed mesenchymal and pro-angiogenic characteristics, with stem cell markers enrichment consistent with the possibility to grow tumor stem cells from these biopsies. The other subgroup displayed oligodendroglial features, and appeared largely driven by PDGFRA, in particular through amplification and/or novel missense mutations in the extracellular domain. Patients in this later group had a significantly worse outcome with an hazard ratio for early deaths, ie before 10 months, 8 fold greater that the ones in the other subgroup (p = 0.041, Cox regression model). The worse outcome of patients with the oligodendroglial type of tumors was confirmed on a series of 55 paraffin-embedded biopsy samples at diagnosis (median OS of 7.73 versus 12.37 months, p = 0.045, log-rank test). Two distinct transcriptional subclasses of DIPG with specific genomic alterations can be defined at diagnosis by oligodendroglial differentiation or mesenchymal transition, respectively. Classifying these tumors by signal transduction pathway activation and by mutation in pathway member genes may be particularily valuable for the development of targeted therapies. PMID:22389665

  20. Acute respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to parenchymal infiltration by metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Malignant melanoma is the most aggressive form of skin cancer and carries a predisposition for metastasis to many different organs. Pulmonary dissemination is common, most often presenting as multiple discrete pulmonary nodules. While a variety of other intrathoracic patterns can occur, diffuse parenchymal infiltration causing acute respiratory failure is an extremely rare manifestation of metastatic disease. We present a case of an otherwise healthy man who developed rapidly progressive respiratory failure mimicking acute respiratory distress syndrome due to melanomatous infiltration of the lung parenchyma and airways. PMID:25006412

  1. Differentiating pediatric epileptic brain tissue from normal brain tissue by using time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy in vivo: comprehensive data analysis method in the time domain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Sanghoon; Fernald, Bradley; Bhatia, Sanjiv; Ragheb, John; Sandberg, David; Johnson, Mahlon; Lin, Wei-Chiang

    2009-05-01

    This research investigated the feasibility of using time-dependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy to differentiate pediatric epileptic brain tissue from normal brain tissue. The optical spectroscopic technique monitored the dynamic optical properties of the cerebral cortex that are associated with its physiological, morphological, and compositional characteristics. Due to the transient irregular epileptic discharge activity within the epileptic brain tissue it was hypothesized that the lesion would express abnormal dynamic optical behavior that would alter normal dynamic behavior. Thirteen pediatric epilepsy patients and seven pediatric brain tumor patients (normal controls) were recruited for this clinical study. Dynamic optical properties were obtained from the cortical surface intraoperatively using a timedependent diffuse reflectance spectroscopy system. This system consisted of a fiber-optic probe, a tungsten-halogen light source, and a spectrophotometer. It acquired diffuse reflectance spectra with a spectral range of 204 nm to 932 nm at a rate of 33 spectra per second for approximately 12 seconds. Biopsy samples were taken from electrophysiologically abnormal cortex and evaluated by a neuropathologist, which served as a gold standard for lesion classification. For data analysis, spectral intensity changes of diffuse reflectance in the time domain at two different wavelengths from each investigated site were compared. Negative correlation segment, defined by the periods where the intensity changes at the two wavelengths were opposite in their slope polarity, were extracted. The total duration of negative correlation, referred to as the "negative correlation time index", was calculated by integrating the negative correlation segments. The negative correlation time indices from all investigated sites were sub-grouped according to the corresponding histological classifications. The difference between the mean indices of two subgroups was evaluated by standard

  2. MRI diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in pediatric small bowel Crohn disease: correlation with MRI findings of active bowel wall inflammation.

    PubMed

    Ream, Justin M; Dillman, Jonathan R; Adler, Jeremy; Khalatbari, Shokoufeh; McHugh, Jonathan B; Strouse, Peter J; Dhanani, Muhammad; Shpeen, Benjamin; Al-Hawary, Mahmoud M

    2013-09-01

    Restricted diffusion on diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) sequences during magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) has been shown in segments of bowel affected by Crohn disease. However, the exact meaning of this finding, particularly within the pediatric Crohn disease population, is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to determine the significance of bowel wall restricted diffusion in children with small bowel Crohn disease by correlating apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) values with other MRI markers of disease activity. A retrospective review of pediatric patients (≤ 18 years of age) with Crohn disease terminal ileitis who underwent MRE with DWI at our institution between May 1, 2009 and May 31, 2011 was undertaken. All of the children had either biopsy-proven Crohn disease terminal ileitis or clinically diagnosed Crohn disease, including terminal ileal involvement by imaging. The mean minimum ADC value within the wall of the terminal ileum was determined for each examination. ADC values were tested for correlation/association with other MRI findings to determine whether a relationship exists between bowel wall restricted diffusion and disease activity. Forty-six MRE examinations with DWI in children with terminal ileitis were identified (23 girls and 23 boys; mean age, 14.3 years). There was significant negative correlation or association between bowel wall minimum ADC value and established MRI markers of disease activity, including degree of bowel wall thickening (R = (-)0.43; P = 0.003), striated pattern of arterial enhancement (P = 0.01), degree of arterial enhancement (P = 0.01), degree of delayed enhancement (P = 0.045), amount of mesenteric inflammatory changes (P < 0.0001) and presence of a stricture (P = 0.02). ADC values were not significantly associated with bowel wall T2-weighted signal intensity, length of disease involvement or mesenteric fibrofatty proliferation. Increasing bowel wall restricted diffusion

  3. Expression patterns of nuclear receptors in parenchymal and non-parenchymal mouse liver cells and their modulation in cholestasis.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Sanchez, Ester; Firrincieli, Delphine; Housset, Chantal; Chignard, Nicolas

    2017-04-05

    Nuclear receptors (NR), the largest family of transcription factors, control many physiological and pathological processes. To gain insight into hepatic NR and their potential as therapeutic targets in cholestatis, we determined their expression in individual cell types of the mouse liver in normal and cholestatic conditions. Hepatocytes, cholangiocytes, hepatic stellate cells (HSC), sinusoidal endothelial cells (SEC) and Kupffer cells (KC) were isolated from the liver of mice with acute or chronic cholestasis (i.e. bile duct-ligated or Abcb4(-/-) mice, respectively) and healthy controls. The expression of 43 out of the 49 NR was evidenced by RT-qPCR in one or several liver cell types. Expression of four NR was restricted to non-parenchymal liver cells. In normal conditions, NR were expressed at higher levels in individual cell types when compared to total liver. Half of the NR expressed in the liver had maximal expression in non-parenchymal cells. After bile duct ligation, NR mRNA changes occurred mostly in non-parenchymal cells and mainly consisted in down-regulations. In Abcb4(-/-) mice, NR mRNA changes were equally frequent in hepatocytes and non-parenchymal cells. Essentially down-regulations were found in hepatocytes, HSC and cholangiocytes, as opposed to up-regulations in SEC and KC. While undetectable in total liver, Vdr expression was up-regulated in all non-parenchymal cells in Abcb4(-/-) mice. In conclusion, non-parenchymal liver cells are a major site of NR expression. During cholestasis, NR expression is markedly altered mainly by down-regulations, suggesting major changes in metabolic activity. Thus, non-parenchymal cells are important new targets to consider in NR-directed therapies.

  4. Excised Parenchymal Mass During Partial Nephrectomy: Functional Implications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Wen; Zhang, Zhiling; Zhao, Juping; Wu, Jitao; Suk-Ouichai, Chalairat; Aguilar Palacios, Diego; Caraballo Antonio, Elvis; Babbar, Sanam; Remer, Erick M; Li, Jianbo; Isharwal, Sudhir; Zabell, Joseph; Campbell, Steven C

    2017-05-01

    To evaluate whether excised parenchymal mass (EPM) during partial nephrectomy (PN) correlates with functional decline and can serve as a surrogate for functional outcomes. All 215 patients managed with PN for unifocal renal mass with necessary studies to determine EPM and percent glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and parenchymal mass preserved (both global and specific to the operated kidney) were analyzed. EPM was estimated from the pathologic specimen by subtracting the tumor mass from the specimen mass, with both calculated using the elliptical formula. Vascularized parenchymal mass preserved was measured from computed tomography scans obtained <2 months prior and 3-12 months after surgery. All functional analyses were required to be within the same time frames, and patients with a contralateral kidney were also required to have nuclear renal scans. The median tumor size was 3.5 cm and the median R.E.N.A.L. was 7. Warm and cold ischemia were utilized in 123 and 92 patients, respectively (median ischemia time = 23 minutes). The median global GFR preserved was 89%, the median total parenchymal mass preserved was 93%, and the median estimated EPM was 16 cm(3). Whereas percent parenchymal mass preserved correlated strongly with global and ipsilateral GFR preserved (both P < .001), EPM failed to correlate with functional outcomes on both univariable and multivariable analyses. Our data suggest that parenchymal mass preserved with standard PN by experienced surgeons associates strongly with function preserved, whereas EPM fails to correlate with functional outcomes. Further study of the functional impact of EPM in other circumstances will be required, such as enucleation or PN performed by less-experienced surgeons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computerized breast parenchymal analysis on DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Yuan, Yading; Jansen, Sanaz A.; Lan, Li; Bhooshan, Neha; Newstead, Gillian M.

    2009-02-01

    Breast density has been shown to be associated with the risk of developing breast cancer, and MRI has been recommended for high-risk women screening, however, it is still unknown how the breast parenchymal enhancement on DCE-MRI is associated with breast density and breast cancer risk. Ninety-two DCE-MRI exams of asymptomatic women with normal MR findings were included in this study. The 3D breast volume was automatically segmented using a volume-growing based algorithm. The extracted breast volume was classified into fibroglandular and fatty regions based on the discriminant analysis method. The parenchymal kinetic curves within the breast fibroglandular region were extracted and categorized by use of fuzzy c-means clustering, and various parenchymal kinetic characteristics were extracted from the most enhancing voxels. Correlation analysis between the computer-extracted percent dense measures and radiologist-noted BIRADS density ratings yielded a correlation coefficient of 0.76 (p<0.0001). From kinetic analyses, 70% (64/92) of most enhancing curves showed persistent curve type and reached peak parenchymal intensity at the last postcontrast time point; with 89% (82/92) of most enhancing curves reaching peak intensity at either 4th or 5th post-contrast time points. Women with dense breast (BIRADS 3 and 4) were found to have more parenchymal enhancement at their peak time point (Ep) with an average Ep of 116.5% while those women with fatty breasts (BIRADS 1 and 2) demonstrated an average Ep of 62.0%. In conclusion, breast parenchymal enhancement may be associated with breast density and may be potential useful as an additional characteristic for assessing breast cancer risk.

  6. Germinal-center type B-cell classification and clinical characteristics of Chinese pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a report of 76 cases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Zhen, Zi-Jun; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Jia; Lu, Su-Ying; Sun, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Peng-Fei; Cai, Rui-Qing

    2013-10-01

    Pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a highly aggressive disease with unique clinical characteristics. This study analyzed the germinal-center type B-cell (GCB) classification and clinical characteristics of Chinese pediatric DLBCL. A total of 76 patients with DLBCL newly diagnosed in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between February 2000 and May 2011, with an age younger than 18 years, were included in the analysis. The male/female ratio was 3.47:1. The median age was 12 years (range, 2 to 18 years), and 47 (61.8%) patients were at least 10 years old. Of the 76 patients, 48 (63.2%) had stage III/IV disease, 9 (11.8%) had bone marrow involvement, 1 (1.3%) had central nervous system (CNS) involvement, and 5 (6.6%) had bone involvement. The GCB classification was assessed in 45 patients: 26 (57.8%) were classified as GCB subtype, and 19 (42.2%) were classified as non-GCB subtype. The modified B-NHL-BFM-90/95 regimen was administered to 50 patients, and the 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 85.8%. Among these 50 patients, 31 were assessed for the GCB classification: 17 (54.8%) were classified as GCB subtype, with a 4-year EFS rate of 88.2%; 14 (45.2%) were classified as non-GCB subtype, with a 4-year EFS rate of 92.9%. Our data indicate that bone marrow involvement and stage III/IV disease are common in Chinese pediatric DLBCL patients, whereas the percentage of patients with the GCB subtype is similar to that of patients with the non-GCB subtype. The modified B-NHL-BFM-90/95 protocol is an active and effective treatment protocol for Chinese pediatric patients with DLBCL.

  7. Germinal-center type B-cell classification and clinical characteristics of Chinese pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: a report of 76 cases

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Sun, Xiao-Fei; Zhen, Zi-Jun; Wang, Juan; Zhu, Jia; Lu, Su-Ying; Sun, Fei-Fei; Zhang, Fei; Li, Peng-Fei; Cai, Rui-Qing

    2013-01-01

    Pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is a highly aggressive disease with unique clinical characteristics. This study analyzed the germinal-center type B-cell (GCB) classification and clinical characteristics of Chinese pediatric DLBCL. A total of 76 patients with DLBCL newly diagnosed in Sun Yat-sen University Cancer Center between February 2000 and May 2011, with an age younger than 18 years, were included in the analysis. The male/female ratio was 3.47:1. The median age was 12 years (range, 2 to 18 years), and 47 (61.8%) patients were at least 10 years old. Of the 76 patients, 48 (63.2%) had stage III/IV disease, 9 (11.8%) had bone marrow involvement, 1 (1.3%) had central nervous system (CNS) involvement, and 5 (6.6%) had bone involvement. The GCB classification was assessed in 45 patients: 26 (57.8%) were classified as GCB subtype, and 19 (42.2%) were classified as non-GCB subtype. The modified B-NHL-BFM-90/95 regimen was administered to 50 patients, and the 4-year event-free survival (EFS) rate was 85.8%. Among these 50 patients, 31 were assessed for the GCB classification: 17 (54.8%) were classified as GCB subtype, with a 4-year EFS rate of 88.2%; 14 (45.2%) were classified as non-GCB subtype, with a 4-year EFS rate of 92.9%. Our data indicate that bone marrow involvement and stage III/IV disease are common in Chinese pediatric DLBCL patients, whereas the percentage of patients with the GCB subtype is similar to that of patients with the non-GCB subtype. The modified B-NHL-BFM-90/95 protocol is an active and effective treatment protocol for Chinese pediatric patients with DLBCL. PMID:23544447

  8. Diagnostic Yield and Safety of Cerebellar and Brainstem Parenchymal Biopsy.

    PubMed

    Tobin, W Oliver; Meyer, Fredric B; Keegan, B Mark

    2015-12-01

    We aimed to determine the diagnostic yield and safety of posterior fossa parenchymal biopsy. One-hundred-thirty-six patients who underwent 137 posterior fossa (brainstem or cerebellar) parenchymal biopsies at Mayo Clinic (Rochester, Minnesota, USA) between 1996 and 2009 were identified by chart review. Case histories; radiologic, surgical, and pathologic reports; and safety outcomes were assessed. Posterior fossa parenchymal biopsies were performed on 78 male and 58 female patients of median age 47 years (interquartile range 28-61). Preoperative clinical diagnosis in the majority of cases was of a malignant neoplasm. Glial neoplasm (51%) was the most common finding followed by lymphoma (7%) and neurosarcoidosis (7%). Normal tissue or nonspecific changes were observed in 28 cases (20%). Three deaths occurred: 2 at the time of biopsy (1%) and 1 due to underlying disease. All deaths occurred in patients who had a cerebellar biopsy. Transient neurologic deficits occurred in 15 patients (11%): worsening of presenting symptoms (4), cardiac arrhythmia (3), vertigo (2), diplopia (2), ataxia (3), seizure (1), decreased consciousness (1), and limb numbness (3). Sustained neurologic deficits occurred in 3 patients: fourth nerve palsy (1), hemiparesis (1), and facial numbness (1). The diagnostic yield of posterior fossa parenchymal biopsy in Mayo Clinic patients with diverse pathologies was 80%. The complication rate was 11% with the majority being transient, but 2 deaths were attributed to biopsy. Evaluation of the diagnostic yield and complication rate at individual neurosurgical centers is needed to determine generalizability of these results. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Robotic partial nephrectomy with selective parenchymal compression (Simon clamp).

    PubMed

    Castillo, O A; Rodriguez-Carlin, A; Lopez-Fontana, G; Aleman, E

    2013-01-01

    To present our initial experience using selective renal parenchymal ischemia, without hilar clamping, in robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy. In four patients with T1a renal tumor we performed robotic-assisted partial nephrectomy, using the Simon's clamp (Aesculap). It provides selective parenchymal compression without the need of vascular clamping. All patients had exofitic renal tumors in polar location. Renal parenchymal reconstruction was done as the standard technique. The median age was 49.6 years (42-59), 3 male and 1 female patient. Median operative time was 71,6 minutes (40-120). Mean stimated bleeding was 250 ml (50-400). Average tumor size was 3,25 cm (1,5-5,3). There were no complications and the average hospital stay was 3,5 days (1-7). The pathology was informed as renal cell carcinoma in three patients and one hemorrhagic cyst. The surgical margins were negative. Our preliminary results shows that selective renal parenchymal compression, with the Simon's clamp, provides an alternative to vascular control in selected patients with polar renal tumors. Copyright © 2012 AEU. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Characterization of renal parenchymal perfusion during experimental infrarenal aortic clamping and declamping with enhanced thermodiffusion electrodes.

    PubMed

    Kraus, T; Mehrabi, A; Angelescu, M; Golling, M; Allenberg, J R; Klar, E

    2001-07-01

    Despite multiple previous experimental and clinical investigations, it has not been fully clarified until now whether infrarenal aortic cross-clamping (IRAC) induces a significant disturbance of renal parenchymal perfusion. Most renal cortical flow data collected thus far have been heterogenous because of inherent limitations of available measurement technology. The enhanced thermal diffusion (TD) electrode is a newly developed and previously validated prototype device that allows continuous quantification of parenchymal kidney perfusion after local probe implantation. We monitored renal perfusion during experimental IRAC with TD for the first time, thereby also evaluating the potential applicability of the method in clinical aortic surgery. IRAC (20 min) followed by sudden declamping was performed in pigs under general anesthesia (n = 14). Renal cortical blood flow (RCBF) was continuously quantified by TD, total aortic flow (TABF) and renal artery flow (RABF) were measured by ultrasonic flow probes, and parameters of systemic circulation were determined by Swan-Ganz catheter. Our results showed that kidney perfusion can be continuously quantified using TD electrodes during experimental aortic surgery in a porcine model. IRAC does not lead to a significant impairment of RCBF in young pigs as measured by TD. Renal perfusion appears to be predominantly pressure driven. Consequently, abrubt aortic declamping can bring about prolonged renal ischemia. Transfer of the TD method to RCBF monitoring during clinical aortic surgery appears to be feasible and should be investigated in selected cases.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus presence in pediatric diffuse large B-cell lymphoma reveals a particular association and latency patterns: analysis of viral role in tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Melina; De Matteo, Elena; Narbaitz, Marina; Carreño, Fernanda Agost; Preciado, Maria V; Chabay, Paola A

    2013-04-01

    Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma represents 6-10% of pediatric malignancies, and diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is one of the three major subtypes. The 2008 WHO classification included a new entity, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-positive DLBCL of the elderly, affecting patients >50 years. It has been demonstrated that EBV may play a role in tumor microenvironment composition, disturbing antitumor immune response and disease progression. As most studies were performed in adults, our aim was to assess EBV presence and latency pattern, as well as T-cell microenvironment in a pediatric DLBCL series of Argentina. The study was conducted on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded biopsies from 25 DLBCL patients. EBV-encoded small nuclear early regions (EBERs) expression was performed by in situ hybridization, whereas EBV gene expression was analyzed using real-time PCR. Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane proteins (LMP)1, LMP2A, CD3, CD4, CD8 and Foxp3 expression were assessed by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Forty percent of cases showed EBV expression, with a significantly higher incidence among patients <10 years (p = 0.018), and with immunosuppressed (p = 0.023). T-cell subsets were not altered by EBV presence. Full EBV latency antigen expression (latency type III) was the most frequently pattern observed, together with BZLF1 lytic gene expression. One patient showed II-like pattern (LMP1 without LMP2A expression). Based exclusively on IHC, some patients showed latency II/III (EBERs and LMP1 expression) or I (EBERs only). These findings suggest that EBV association in our series was higher than the previously demonstrated for elderly DLBCL and that EBV latency pattern could be more complex from those previously observed. Therefore, EBV could be an important cofactor in pediatric DLBCL lymphomagenesis. Copyright © 2012 UICC.

  12. Differences in supratentorial damage of white matter in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors with and without adjuvant treatment as detected by magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernáiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Lüdemann, Lutz; Henze, Günter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Differences in Supratentorial Damage of White Matter in Pediatric Survivors of Posterior Fossa Tumors With and Without Adjuvant Treatment as Detected by Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Rueckriegel, Stefan Mark; Driever, Pablo Hernaiz; Blankenburg, Friederike; Luedemann, Lutz; Henze, Guenter; Bruhn, Harald

    2010-03-01

    Purpose: To elucidate morphologic correlates of brain dysfunction in pediatric survivors of posterior fossa tumors by using magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine neuroaxonal integrity in white matter. Patients and Methods: Seventeen medulloblastoma (MB) patients who had received surgery and adjuvant treatment, 13 pilocytic astrocytoma (PA) patients who had been treated only with surgery, and age-matched healthy control subjects underwent magnetic resonance imaging on a 3-Tesla system. High-resolution conventional T1- and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and DTI data sets were obtained. Fractional anisotropy (FA) maps were analyzed using tract-based spatial statistics, a part of the Functional MRI of the Brain Software Library. Results: Compared with control subjects, FA values of MB patients were significantly decreased in the cerebellar midline structures, in the frontal lobes, and in the callosal body. Fractional anisotropy values of the PA patients were not only decreased in cerebellar hemispheric structures as expected, but also in supratentorial parts of the brain, with a distribution similar to that in MB patients. However, the amount of significantly decreased FA was greater in MB than in PA patients, underscoring the aggravating neurotoxic effect of the adjuvant treatment. Conclusions: Neurotoxic mechanisms that are present in PA patients (e.g., internal hydrocephalus and damaged cerebellar structures affecting neuronal circuits) contribute significantly to the alteration of supratentorial white matter in pediatric posterior fossa tumor patients.

  14. Computerized analysis of mammographic parenchymal patterns using fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Giger, Maryellen L.; Huo, Zhimin; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I.; Chinander, Michael R.; Lan, Li; Bonta, Ioana R.

    2003-05-01

    Mammographic parenchymal patterns have been shown to be associated with breast cancer risk. Fractal-based texture analyses, including box-counting methods and Minkowski dimension, were performed within parenchymal regions of normal mammograms of BRCA1/BRCA2 gene mutation carriers and within those of women at low risk for developing breast cancer. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the performance of the computerized radiographic markers in the task of distinguishing between high and low-risk subjects. A multifractal phenomenon was observed with the fractal analyses. The high frequency component of fractal dimension from the conventional box-counting technique yielded an Az value of 0.84 in differentiating between two groups, while using the LDA to estimate the fractal dimension yielded an Az value of 0.91 for the high frequency component. An Az value of 0.82 was obtained with fractal dimensions extracted using the Minkowski algorithm.

  15. Spontaneous Intra-Parenchymal Rupture of Craniopharyngioma - A Rare Phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Rajan, Vivakaran Thanga Tirupathi; Janani, Asogan Vaishnavi; Kumar, Aiyappan Senthil; Sundar, Ilangovan Vijay

    2017-07-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a relatively benign intracranial tumour that involves sellar and supra-sellar regions. Spontaneous rupture of craniopharyngioma into the sub-arachnoid space or into the ventricles is a rare phenomenon and few cases are reported in literature. We hereby report a case of sellar-suprasellar craniopharyngioma with focal intra-parenchymal rupture into brain causing aggravation of headache in a 12-year-old female child. This complication is a relatively rare phenomenon, which requires attention for early intervention. This was managed by trans-nasal endoscopic trans-sphenoidal surgery. Usually rupture of craniopharyngioma causes chemical meningitis or it can be asymptomatic. Sometimes rupture can cause complete resolution of cyst and symptoms. In the present case, there was only focal rupture and it was into brain parenchyma causing brain oedema with aggravation of headache. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in intra-parenchymal rupture of craniopharyngioma has been emphasized in this case report.

  16. Parametric Response Mapping of Apparent Diffusion Coefficient (ADC) as an Imaging Biomarker to Distinguish Pseudoprogression from True Tumor Progression In Peptide-Based Vaccine Therapy for Pediatric Diffuse Instrinsic Pontine Glioma

    PubMed Central

    Ceschin, Rafael; Kurland, Brenda F.; Abberbock, Shira R.; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Okada, Hideho; Jakacki, Regina I.; Pollack, Ian F.; Panigrahy, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Immune response to cancer therapy may result in pseudoprogression, which can only be identified retrospectively and which may disrupt an effective therapy. This study assesses whether serial parametric response mapping (PRM, a voxel-by-voxel method of image analysis also known as functional diffusion mapping) analysis of ADC measurements following peptide-based vaccination may help prospectively distinguish progression from pseudoprogression in pediatric patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas. Materials and Methods From 2009–2012, 21 children age 4–18 with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas were enrolled in a serial peptide-based vaccination protocol following radiotherapy. DWI was acquired before immunotherapy and at six week intervals during vaccine treatment. Pseudoprogression was identified retrospectively based on clinical and radiographic findings, excluding DWI. Parametric response mapping was used to analyze 96 scans, comparing ADC measures at multiple time points (from first vaccine to up to 12 weeks after the vaccine was halted) to pre-vaccine baseline values. Log-transformed fractional increased ADC (fiADC), fractional decreased ADC (fdADC), and parametric response mapping ratio (fiADC/fdADC) were compared between patients with and without pseudoprogression, using generalized estimating equations with inverse weighting by cluster size. Results Median survival was 13.1 months from diagnosis (range 6.4–24.9 months). Four of 21 children (19%) were assessed as experiencing pseudoprogression. Patients with pseudoprogression had higher fitted average log-transformed parametric response mapping ratios (p=0.01) and fiADCs (p=0.0004), compared to patients without pseudoprogression. Conclusion Serial parametric response mapping of ADC, performed at multiple time points of therapy, may distinguish pseudoprogression from true progression in patients with diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas treated with peptide-based vaccination

  17. CO2 relaxation of the rat lung parenchymal strip.

    PubMed

    Emery, Michael J; Eveland, Randy L; Min, Jin-Hye; Hildebrandt, Jacob; Swenson, Erik R

    2013-03-01

    Evidence from liquid-filled rat lungs supported the presence of CO2-dependent, active relaxation of parenchyma under normoxia by unknown mechanisms (Emery et al., 2007). This response may improve matching of alveolar ventilation (V˙A) to perfusion (Q˙) by increasing compliance and V˙A in overperfused (high CO2) regions, and decrease V˙A in underperfused regions. Here, we have more directly studied CO2-dependent parenchymal relaxation and tested a hypothesized role for actin-myosin interaction in this effect. Lung parenchymal strips (∼1.5mm×1.5mm×15mm) from 16 rats were alternately exposed to normoxic hypocapnia ( [Formula: see text] ) or hypercapnia ( [Formula: see text] ). Seven specimens were used to construct length-tension curves, and nine were tested with and without the myosin blocker 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM). The results demonstrate substantial, reversible CO2-dependent changes in parenchyma strip recoil (up to 23%) and BDM eliminates this effect, supporting a potentially important role for parenchymal myosin in V˙A/Q˙ matching. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Diffuse myocardial fibrosis among healthy pediatric heart transplant recipients: Correlation of histology, cardiovascular magnetic resonance, and clinical phenotype.

    PubMed

    Feingold, Brian; Salgado, Cláudia M; Reyes-Múgica, Miguel; Drant, Stacey E; Miller, Susan A; Kennedy, Mark; Kellman, Peter; Schelbert, Erik B; Wong, Timothy C

    2017-08-01

    Fibrosis is commonly described in heart allografts lost late after transplantation. CMR-derived ECV is a validated measure of DMF in native adult hearts that may predict heart failure and mortality. We explored associations of ECV with histologic myocardial fibrosis and clinical features after pediatric heart transplantation. Twenty-five recipients (7.0±6.3 years at transplant and 10.7±6.5 years post-transplant) were prospectively recruited for CMR and BNP measurement at the time of surveillance biopsy. All had normal ejection fractions and lacked heart failure symptoms. Fibrosis was quantified on biopsy after picrosirius red staining as CVF. ECV was quantified using contemporaneous hematocrit on basal and mid-short-axis slices. ECV was moderately correlated with CVF (r=.47; P=.019). We found no associations of ECV with hemodynamics, ischemic time, time since transplantation, or number of prior biopsies or acute rejections. Compared to healthy non-transplant controls, there was no significant difference in ECV (25.1±3.0 vs 23.7±2.0%, P=.09). Log-transformed BNP was correlated with ECV (recipients: r=.46, P=.02; recipients and controls: r=.45, P=.006). These findings suggest ECV quantifies DMF and relates to biological indicators of cardiac function after pediatric heart transplantation. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. DWI in Pediatric Small-Bowel Crohn Disease: Are Apparent Diffusion Coefficients Surrogates for Disease Activity in Patients Receiving Infliximab Therapy?

    PubMed

    Dillman, Jonathan R; Smith, Ethan A; Sanchez, Ramon; Adler, Jeremy; Fazeli, Soudabeh; Zhang, Bin; Davenport, Matthew S

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine prospectively whether bowel wall apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements can be used to monitor treatment response to infliximab therapy in the setting of pediatric small-bowel Crohn disease. Twenty-eight pediatric subjects with newly diagnosed biopsy-proven Crohn disease of the distal or terminal ileum treated with infliximab were enrolled. Subjects underwent MR enterography at baseline, 1 month after therapy, and 6 months after therapy. Imaging features were documented, including bowel wall ADC and arterial or enteric phase contrast-enhanced signal intensity normalized to that of unenhanced imaging. A linear mixed model assessed the relationship between ADC and time; patient age and sex and azathioprine combination therapy were covariates. The diagnostic performance (with 95% CIs) of an increase in bowel wall ADC of 20% or more for identifying response to infliximab was calculated using a decrease in normalized contrast-enhanced bowel wall signal intensity of 20% or more as the reference standard. Bowel wall ADC increased over time (mean [± SD], 1180 ± 200 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s at baseline, 1420 ± 420 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s at 1 month, and 1450 ± 450 × 10(-6) mm(2)/s at 6 months; p = 0.0003); azathioprine therapy modulated this rate of change (p = 0.003). There was a statistically significant negative correlation between change in ADC and change in normalized contrast-enhanced signal intensity over time (ρ = -0.36; p < 0.001). The diagnostic performance of change in ADC for identifying response to infliximab therapy was sensitivity of 0.58 (95% CI, 0.34-0.80), specificity of 0.52 (95% CI, 0.31-0.72), positive predictive value of 0.48 (95% CI, 0.27-0.69), and negative predictive value of 0.62 (95% CI, 0.38-0.82). Bowel wall ADC increases over time in pediatric subjects receiving infliximab, but the diagnostic performance of ADC is likely insufficient for reliable treatment monitoring.

  20. Atypical choroid plexus papilloma: spontaneous resolution of diffuse leptomeningeal contrast enhancement after primary tumor removal in 2 pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Scala, Marcello; Morana, Giovanni; Milanaccio, Claudia; Pavanello, Marco; Nozza, Paolo; Garrè, Maria Luisa

    2017-09-01

    Atypical choroid plexus papillomas can metastasize in the form of leptomeningeal seeding. Postoperative chemotherapy is the recommended first-line treatment when gross-total removal is not achieved or in cases of disseminated disease. Here the authors report on 2 children with atypical choroid plexus papillomas and MRI findings of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at diagnosis, later presenting with spontaneous resolution of the leptomeningeal involvement after removal of the primary lesions. Observations in this report expand our knowledge about the natural history and biological behavior of these tumors and highlight the role of close neuroimaging surveillance in the management of atypical choroid plexus papillomas in cases with MRI evidence of diffuse leptomeningeal enhancement at presentation.

  1. Inorganic dust pneumonias: the metal-related parenchymal disorders.

    PubMed Central

    Kelleher, P; Pacheco, K; Newman, L S

    2000-01-01

    In recent years the greatest progress in our understanding of pneumoconioses, other than those produced by asbestos, silica, and coal, has been in the arena of metal-induced parenchymal lung disorders. Inhalation of metal dusts and fumes can induce a wide range of lung pathology, including airways disorders, cancer, and parenchymal diseases. The emphasis of this update is on parenchymal diseases caused by metal inhalation, including granulomatous disease, giant cell interstitial pneumonitis, chemical pneumonitis, and interstitial fibrosis, among others. The clinical characteristics, epidemiology, and pathogenesis of disorders arising from exposure to aluminum, beryllium, cadmium, cobalt, copper, iron, mercury, and nickel are presented in detail. Metal fume fever, an inhalation fever syndrome attributed to exposure to a number of metals, is also discussed. Advances in our knowledge of antigen-specific immunologic reactions in the lung are particularly evident in disorders secondary to beryllium and nickel exposure, where immunologic mechanisms have been well characterized. For example, current evidence suggests that beryllium acts as an antigen, or hapten, and is presented by antigen-presenting cells to CD4+ T cells, which possess specific surface antigen receptors. Other metals such as cadmium and mercury induce nonspecific damage, probably by initiating production of reactive oxygen species. Additionally, genetic susceptibility markers associated with increased risk have been identified in some metal-related diseases such as chronic beryllium disease and hard metal disease. Future research needs include development of biologic markers of metal-induced immunologic disease, detailed characterization of human exposure, examination of gene alleles that might confer risk, and association of exposure data with that of genetic susceptibility. PMID:10931787

  2. Early prediction of renal parenchymal injury with serum procalcitonin

    PubMed Central

    Barati, Leila; Safaeian, Baranak; Mehrjerdian, Mahshid; Vakili, Mohammad-Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common bacterial infections in children that can be associated with renal parenchymal injuries and late scars. Dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) renal scan is known as golden standard for detecting acute pyelonephritis (APN) that has a lot of difficulties and limitations. Objectives: we designed this study the accuracy of one inflammatory marker, serum procalcitonin (PCT) to identify as an early predictor of renal injuries. Patients and Methods: A prospective study was carried out in 95 patients who admitted in the hospital with the first febrile UTI. Serum PCT of all patients was measured; sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive value (PPV and NPV) of this marker was analyzed compared to DMSA scan. P value <0.05 was taken as significant. Results: In total, 79 females and 16 males were investigated. There are 42 cases in group 1 with normal DMSA scan and 53 patients in group two with renal parenchymal injuries in their scans. Mann-Whitney test showed a meaningful relation between the two groups regarding PCT level (P<0.0001). Sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of PCT reported in optimum cut off were 70%, 88.1%, 88.1% and 70%, respectively. The positive likelihood ratio (PLR) of PCT test was 5.8. Conclusion: In the current survey, PCT was the eligible inflammatory marker to predict renal parenchymal injuries in children with proper sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV that play also a pivotal role in the children aged less than 24 months, although, more studies should be undertaken to confirm. PMID:27689104

  3. Pathophysiology of Pulmonary Hypertension in Chronic Parenchymal Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Singh, Inderjit; Ma, Kevin Cong; Berlin, David Adam

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary hypertension commonly complicates chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and interstitial lung disease. The association of chronic lung disease and pulmonary hypertension portends a worse prognosis. The pathophysiology of pulmonary hypertension differs in the presence or absence of lung disease. We describe the physiological determinants of the normal pulmonary circulation to better understand the pathophysiological factors implicated in chronic parenchymal lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension. This review will focus on the pathophysiology of 3 forms of chronic lung disease-associated pulmonary hypertension: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and sarcoidosis.

  4. Parenchymal Signal Intensity in 3-T Body MRI of Dogs with Hematopoietic Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Feeney, Daniel A; Sharkey, Leslie C; Steward, Susan M; Bahr, Katherine L; Henson, Michael S; Ito, Daisuke; O'Brien, Timothy D; Jessen, Carl R; Husbands, Brian D; Borgatti, Antonella; Modiano, Jaime F

    2013-01-01

    We performed a preliminary study involving 10 dogs to assess the applicability of body MRI for staging of canine diffuse hematopoietic neoplasia. T1-weighted (before and after intravenous gadolinium), T2-weighted, in-phase, out-of-phase, and short tau inversion recovery pulse sequences were used. By using digital region of interest (ROI) and visual comparison techniques, relative parenchymal organ (medial iliac lymph nodes, liver, spleen, kidney cortex, and kidney medulla) signal intensity was quantified as less than, equal to, or greater than that of skeletal muscle in 2 clinically normal young adult dogs and 10 dogs affected with either B-cell lymphoma (n = 7) or myelodysplastic syndrome (n = 3). Falciform fat and urinary bladder were evaluated to provide additional perspective regarding signal intensity from the pulse sequences. Dogs with nonfocal disease could be distinguished from normal dogs according to both the visual and ROI signal-intensity relationships. In normal dogs, liver signal intensity on the T2-weighted sequence was greater than that of skeletal muscle by using either the visual or ROI approach. However in affected dogs, T2-weighted liver signal intensity was less than that of skeletal muscle by using either the ROI approach (10 of 10 dogs) or the visual approach (9 of 10 dogs). These findings suggest that the comparison of relative signal intensity among organs may have merit as a research model for infiltrative parenchymal disease (ROI approach) or metabolic effects of disease; this comparison may have practical clinical applicability (visual comparison approach) as well. PMID:23582424

  5. Nitrofurantoin: evidence for the oxidant injury of lung parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Martin, W J

    1983-04-01

    Nitrofurantoin, a commonly used urinary antiseptic, is associated with significant pulmonary toxicity. This study used a 51Cr rat lung explant cytotoxicity assay to demonstrate that nitrofurantoin (10(-3) M), when incubated with lung parenchymal cells for 12 h at 37 degrees C, resulted in significant lung cell injury (cytotoxic index of 43 +/- 2). This injury could be reduced (p less than 0.05) by several antioxidants, including superoxide dismutase, 300 U/ml (37 +/- 2); catalase, 1,100 U/ml (27 +/- 2); alpha tocopherol, 10 micrograms/ml (30 +/- 2); ascorbic acid 50 micrograms/ml (37 +/- 2); ethanol, 0.1% (35 +/- 2); dimethyl sulfoxide, 1.0% (37 +/- 2). Additionally, the nitrofurantoin-induced injury could be accelerated in the presence of hyperoxia (95% O2) from 45 +/- 2 to 62 +/- 1, p less than 0.01. These data suggest that nitrofurantoin can directly injure lung parenchymal cells, probably through oxidant mechanisms, and this might suggest alternative approaches in the evaluation and therapy of patients with this disorder.

  6. Upfront Stereotactic Radiosurgery for Pineal Parenchymal Tumors in Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Hoon; Kim, Jeong Hoon; Kwon, Do Hoon; Kim, Chang Jin; Khang, Shin Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Objective Pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) in adults are rare, and knowledge regarding their optimal management and treatment outcome is limited. Herein, we present the clinical results of our series of PPTs other than pineoblastomas managed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) at upfront setting. Methods Between 1997 and 2014, nine consecutive adult patients with the diagnosis of PPTs, either pineocytoma or pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, were treated with SRS. There were 6 men and 3 women. The median age was 39 years (range, 31-53 years). All of the patients presented with symptoms of hydrocephalus. Endoscopic third ventriculostomy and biopsy was done for initial management. After histologic diagnosis, patients were treated with Gamma Knife with the mean dose of 13.3 Gy (n=3) or fractionated Cyberknife with 32 Gy (n=6). Results After a mean follow-up of 78.6 months (range, 14-223 months), all patients were alive and all of their tumors were locally controlled except for one instance of cerebrospinal fluid seeding metastasis. On magnetic resonance images, tumor size decreased in all patients, resulting in complete response in 3 patients and partial response in 6. One patient had experienced temporary memory impairment after SRS, which improved spontaneously. Conclusion SRS is effective and safe for PPTs in adults and can be considered as a useful alternative to surgical resection at upfront setting. PMID:26587186

  7. Very low cerebral blood volume predicts parenchymal hematoma in acute ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Hermitte, Laure; Cho, Tae-Hee; Ozenne, Brice; Nighoghossian, Norbert; Mikkelsen, Irene Klærke; Ribe, Lars; Baron, Jean-Claude; Østergaard, Leif; Derex, Laurent; Hjort, Niels; Fiehler, Jens; Pedraza, Salvador; Hermier, Marc; Maucort-Boulch, Delphine; Berthezène, Yves

    2013-08-01

    Parenchymal hematoma (PH) may worsen the outcome of patients with stroke. The aim of our study was to confirm the relationship between the volume of very low cerebral blood volume (CBV) and PH using a European multicenter database (I-KNOW). A secondary objective was to explore the impact of early reperfusion and recanalization. The volume of cerebral tissue with CBV≤2.5th percentile of the normal hemisphere was calculated within the acute diffusion-weighted imaging lesion. Hemorrhagic transformation was assessed on day 2 MRI according to the European Cooperative Acute Stroke Study II criteria. Recanalization and reperfusion were assessed on 3-hour follow-up MRI. Of the 110 patients, hemorrhagic transformation occurred in 59 patients, including 7 PH. In univariate analysis, the acute National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale score (P=0.002), acute diffusion-weighted imaging lesion volume (P=0.02), and thrombolysis (P=0.03), but not very low CBV (P=0.52), were associated with hemorrhagic transformation. The volume of very low CBV was the only predictor of PH (P=0.007). Early reperfusion and recanalization had no influence on either hemorrhagic transformation or PH. Very low CBV was the only independent predictor of PH in patients with acute stroke.

  8. Correlation of (18)F-FDG PET and MRI Apparent Diffusion Coefficient Histogram Metrics with Survival in Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma: A Report from the Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zukotynski, Katherine A; Vajapeyam, Sridhar; Fahey, Frederic H; Kocak, Mehmet; Brown, Douglas; Ricci, Kelsey I; Onar-Thomas, Arzu; Fouladi, Maryam; Poussaint, Tina Young

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe baseline (18)F-FDG PET voxel characteristics in pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) and to correlate these metrics with baseline MRI apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) histogram metrics, progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival. Methods: Baseline brain (18)F-FDG PET and MRI scans were obtained in 33 children from Pediatric Brain Tumor Consortium clinical DIPG trials. (18)F-FDG PET images, postgadolinium MR images, and ADC MR images were registered to baseline fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images. Three-dimensional regions of interest on fluid attenuation inversion recovery MR images and postgadolinium MR images and (18)F-FDG PET and MR ADC histograms were generated. Metrics evaluated included peak number, skewness, and kurtosis. Correlation between PET and MR ADC histogram metrics was evaluated. PET pixel values within the region of interest for each tumor were plotted against MR ADC values. The association of these imaging markers with survival was described. Results: PET histograms were almost always unimodal (94%, vs. 6% bimodal). None of the PET histogram parameters (skewness or kurtosis) had a significant association with PFS, although a higher PET postgadolinium skewness tended toward a less favorable PFS (hazard ratio, 3.48; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.75-16.28 [P = 0.11]). There was a significant association between higher MR ADC postgadolinium skewness and shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 2.56; 95% CI, 1.11-5.91 [P = 0.028]), and there was the suggestion that this also led to shorter overall survival (hazard ratio, 2.18; 95% CI, 0.95-5.04 [P = 0.067]). Higher MR ADC postgadolinium kurtosis tended toward shorter PFS (hazard ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 0.98-1.74 [P = 0.073]). PET and MR ADC pixel values were negatively correlated using the Pearson correlation coefficient. Further, the level of PET and MR ADC correlation was significantly positively associated with PFS; tumors with higher

  9. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy

    PubMed Central

    R. Knitter, James; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C.; Schwamm, Lee H.; Yoo, Albert J.; Marshall, Randolph S.; Meyers, Philip M.; Yavagal, Dileep R.; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S.; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L.; Kidwell, Chelsea S.

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Methods— Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. Results— In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Conclusions— Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. Clinical Trial Registration— URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. PMID

  10. Multiparametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Prediction of Parenchymal Hemorrhage in Acute Ischemic Stroke After Reperfusion Therapy.

    PubMed

    Nael, Kambiz; Knitter, James R; Jahan, Reza; Gornbein, Jeffery; Ajani, Zahra; Feng, Lei; Meyer, Brett C; Schwamm, Lee H; Yoo, Albert J; Marshall, Randolph S; Meyers, Philip M; Yavagal, Dileep R; Wintermark, Max; Liebeskind, David S; Guzy, Judy; Starkman, Sidney; Saver, Jeffrey L; Kidwell, Chelsea S

    2017-03-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke are at increased risk of developing parenchymal hemorrhage (PH), particularly in the setting of reperfusion therapies. We have developed a predictive model to examine the risk of PH using combined magnetic resonance perfusion and diffusion parameters, including cerebral blood volume (CBV), apparent diffusion coefficient, and microvascular permeability (K2). Voxel-based values of CBV, K2, and apparent diffusion coefficient from the ischemic core were obtained using pretreatment magnetic resonance imaging data from patients enrolled in the MR RESCUE clinical trial (Mechanical Retrieval and Recanalization of Stroke Clots Using Embolectomy). The associations between PH and extreme values of imaging parameters were assessed in univariate and multivariate analyses. Receiver-operating characteristic curve analysis was performed to determine the optimal parameter(s) and threshold for predicting PH. In 83 patients included in this analysis, 20 developed PH. Univariate analysis showed significantly lower 10th percentile CBV and 10th percentile apparent diffusion coefficient values and significantly higher 90th percentile K2 values within the infarction core of patients with PH. Using classification tree analysis, the 10th percentile CBV at threshold of 0.47 and 90th percentile K2 at threshold of 0.28 resulted in overall predictive accuracy of 88.7%, sensitivity of 90.0%, and specificity of 87.3%, which was superior to any individual or combination of other classifiers. Our results suggest that combined 10th percentile CBV and 90th percentile K2 is an independent predictor of PH in patients with acute ischemic stroke with diagnostic accuracy superior to individual classifiers alone. This approach may allow risk stratification for patients undergoing reperfusion therapies. URL: https://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00389467. © 2017 The Authors.

  11. Preradiation chemotherapy may improve survival in pediatric diffuse intrinsic brainstem gliomas: Final results of BSG 98 prospective trial

    PubMed Central

    Frappaz, Didier; Schell, Matthias; Thiesse, Philippe; Marec-Bérard, Perrine; Mottolese, Carmine; Perol, David; Bergeron, Christophe; Philip, Thierry; Ricci, Anne Claire; Galand-Desme, Sophie; Szathmari, Alexandru; Carrie, Christian

    2008-01-01

    Radiation therapy remains the only treatment that provides clinical benefit to children with diffuse brainstem tumors. Their median survival, however, rarely exceeds 9 months. The authors report a prospective trial of front-line chemotherapy aimed at delaying radiation until time of clinical progression. The aim was to investigate the possibility that radiotherapy would maintain its activity in children whose disease progressed after chemotherapy. Twenty-three patients took part in this protocol, the BSG 98 protocol, which consisted of frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules. Each cycle included three courses delivered monthly; the first course was 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea– cisplatin, and the second and third were high-dose methotrexate. Three patients underwent one cycle; 5 patients each, two and three cycles; and 10 patients, four cycles. Twenty of the 23 patients eventually received local radiation therapy. A historical cohort of 14 patients who received at least local radiation therapy served as controls. Four patients experienced severe iatrogenic infections, and 11 patients required platelet transfusions. Median survival increased significantly in patients participating in the protocol compared to that in the historical controls (17 months, 95% confidence interval [CI], 10–23 months, vs. 9 months, 95% CI, 8–10 months; p = 0.022), though hospitalization was prolonged (57 vs. 25 days, p = 0.001). Although frontline chemotherapy alternating hematotoxic and nonhematotoxic schedules significantly increases overall median survival, its cost from infection and hospitalization deserves honest discussion with the children and their parents. PMID:18577561

  12. Brain parenchymal, subarachnoid racemose, and intraventricular cysticercosis in an Indian man

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, D; Dubey, T; Prabhakar, S

    1999-01-01

    The coexistence of brain parenchymal cysts at various stages of evolution, both intraventricular and subarachnoid racemose, is reported in a patient with neurocysticercosis. The condition has a variety of presentations, depending on the location of the cyst. This case is of particular interest because of the rarity of this condition in India.


Keywords: brain parenchymal cyst; cysticercosis; albendazole PMID:10448497

  13. Water-jet dissection for parenchymal division during hepatectomy1

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, Elijah; Sahajpal, Ajay; Cattral, Mark S.; Grant, David R.; Gallinger, Steven; Taylor, Bryce R.; Greig, Paul D.

    2006-01-01

    Background. High-pressure water-jet dissection was originally developed for industry where ultra-precise cutting and engraving were desirable. This technology has been adapted for medical applications with favorable results, but little is understood about its performance in hepatic resections. Blood loss may be limited by the thin laminar liquid-jet effect that provides precise, controllable, tissue-selective dissection with excellent visualization and minimal trauma to surrounding fibrous structures. Patients and methods. The efficacy of the Water-jet system for hepatic parenchymal dissection was examined in a consecutive case series of 101 hepatic resections (including 22 living donor transplantation resections) performed over 11 months. Perioperative outcomes, including blood loss, transfusion requirements, complications, and length of stay (LOS), were assessed. Results. Three-quarters of the cases were major hepatectomies and 22% were cirrhotic. Malignancy was the most common indication (77%). Median operative time was 289 min. Median estimated blood loss (EBL) was 900 ml for all cases, and only 14% of patients had >2000 ml EBL. Furthermore, EBL was 1000 ml for major resections, 775 ml for living donor resections, 600 ml in cirrhotic patients, and 1950 ml for steatotic livers. In all, 14% of patients received heterologous packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions for an average of 0.59 units per case. Median LOS was 7 days. EBL, transfusion requirements, and LOS were slightly increased in the major resection cohort. There was one mortality (1%) overall. These results are equivalent to, or better than, those from our contemporary series of resections performed with ultrasonic dissection. Conclusion. Water-jet dissection minimizes large blood volume loss, requirements for transfusion, and complications. This initial experience suggests that this precision tool is safe and effective for hepatic division, and compares favorably to other established methods for

  14. Water-jet dissection for parenchymal division during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Vollmer, Charles M; Dixon, Elijah; Sahajpal, Ajay; Cattral, Mark S; Grant, David R; Gallinger, Steven; Taylor, Bryce R; Greig, Paul D

    2006-01-01

    High-pressure water-jet dissection was originally developed for industry where ultra-precise cutting and engraving were desirable. This technology has been adapted for medical applications with favorable results, but little is understood about its performance in hepatic resections. Blood loss may be limited by the thin laminar liquid-jet effect that provides precise, controllable, tissue-selective dissection with excellent visualization and minimal trauma to surrounding fibrous structures. The efficacy of the Water-jet system for hepatic parenchymal dissection was examined in a consecutive case series of 101 hepatic resections (including 22 living donor transplantation resections) performed over 11 months. Perioperative outcomes, including blood loss, transfusion requirements, complications, and length of stay (LOS), were assessed. Three-quarters of the cases were major hepatectomies and 22% were cirrhotic. Malignancy was the most common indication (77%). Median operative time was 289 min. Median estimated blood loss (EBL) was 900 ml for all cases, and only 14% of patients had >2000 ml EBL. Furthermore, EBL was 1000 ml for major resections, 775 ml for living donor resections, 600 ml in cirrhotic patients, and 1950 ml for steatotic livers. In all, 14% of patients received heterologous packed red blood cell (PRBC) transfusions for an average of 0.59 units per case. Median LOS was 7 days. EBL, transfusion requirements, and LOS were slightly increased in the major resection cohort. There was one mortality (1%) overall. These results are equivalent to, or better than, those from our contemporary series of resections performed with ultrasonic dissection. Water-jet dissection minimizes large blood volume loss, requirements for transfusion, and complications. This initial experience suggests that this precision tool is safe and effective for hepatic division, and compares favorably to other established methods for hepatic parenchymal transection.

  15. Phase 2 study of safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in pediatric patients with progressive diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Ute; Wolff, Johannes; Gore, Lia; Dunkel, Ira; Gilheeney, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey; Goldman, Stewart; Yalon, Michal; Packer, Roger J.; Korones, David N.; Smith, Amy; Cohen, Kenneth; Kuttesch, John; Strother, Douglas; Baruchel, Sylvain; Gammon, Janet; Kowalski, Mark; Bouffet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Background The prognosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains poor, with no drug proven to be effective. Methods Patients with clinically and radiologically confirmed, centrally reviewed DIPG, who had failed standard first-line therapy were eligible for this multicenter phase II trial. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, nimotuzumab (150 mg/m2), was administered intravenously once weekly from weeks 1 to 7 and once every 2 weeks from weeks 8 to 18. Response evaluation was based on clinical and MRI assessments. Patients with partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) were allowed to continue nimotuzumab. Results Forty-four patients received at least one dose of nimotuzumab (male/female, 20/24; median age, 6.0 years; range, 3.0–17.0 years). All had received prior radiotherapy. Treatment was well tolerated. Eighteen children experienced serious adverse events (SAEs). The majority of SAEs were associated with disease progression. Nineteen patients completed 8 weeks (W8) of treatment: There were 2 PRs, 6 SDs, and 11 progressions. Five patients completed 18 weeks (W18) of treatment: 1 of 2 patients with PR at W8 remained in PR at W18, and 3 of 6 children with SD at W8 maintained SD at W18. Time to progression following initiation of nimotuzumab for the 4 patients with SD or better at W18 was 119, 157, 182 and 335 days, respectively. Median survival time was 3.2 months. Two patients lived 663 and 481 days from the start of nimotuzumab. Conclusions Modest activity of nimotuzumab in DIPG, which has been shown previously, was confirmed: A small subset of DIPG patients appeared to benefit from anti-EGFR antibody treatment. PMID:24847085

  16. Phase 2 study of safety and efficacy of nimotuzumab in pediatric patients with progressive diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma.

    PubMed

    Bartels, Ute; Wolff, Johannes; Gore, Lia; Dunkel, Ira; Gilheeney, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey; Goldman, Stewart; Yalon, Michal; Packer, Roger J; Korones, David N; Smith, Amy; Cohen, Kenneth; Kuttesch, John; Strother, Douglas; Baruchel, Sylvain; Gammon, Janet; Kowalski, Mark; Bouffet, Eric

    2014-11-01

    The prognosis of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) remains poor, with no drug proven to be effective. Patients with clinically and radiologically confirmed, centrally reviewed DIPG, who had failed standard first-line therapy were eligible for this multicenter phase II trial. The anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibody, nimotuzumab (150 mg/m(2)), was administered intravenously once weekly from weeks 1 to 7 and once every 2 weeks from weeks 8 to 18. Response evaluation was based on clinical and MRI assessments. Patients with partial response (PR) or stable disease (SD) were allowed to continue nimotuzumab. Forty-four patients received at least one dose of nimotuzumab (male/female, 20/24; median age, 6.0 years; range, 3.0-17.0 years). All had received prior radiotherapy. Treatment was well tolerated. Eighteen children experienced serious adverse events (SAEs). The majority of SAEs were associated with disease progression. Nineteen patients completed 8 weeks (W8) of treatment: There were 2 PRs, 6 SDs, and 11 progressions. Five patients completed 18 weeks (W18) of treatment: 1 of 2 patients with PR at W8 remained in PR at W18, and 3 of 6 children with SD at W8 maintained SD at W18. Time to progression following initiation of nimotuzumab for the 4 patients with SD or better at W18 was 119, 157, 182 and 335 days, respectively. Median survival time was 3.2 months. Two patients lived 663 and 481 days from the start of nimotuzumab. Modest activity of nimotuzumab in DIPG, which has been shown previously, was confirmed: A small subset of DIPG patients appeared to benefit from anti-EGFR antibody treatment. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Brain Parenchymal Fraction: A Relatively Simple MRI Measure to Clinically Distinguish ALS Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Rajagopalan, Venkateswaran; Pioro, Erik P.

    2015-01-01

    Even though neuroimaging and clinical studies indicate that amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) manifests with distinct clinical phenotypes, no objective test exists to assess upper motor degeneration in ALS. There is great interest in identifying biomarkers of ALS to allow earlier diagnosis and to recognize disease subtypes. Current quantitative neuroimaging techniques such as T2 relaxometry and diffusion tensor imaging are time-consuming to use in clinical settings due to extensive postprocessing requirements. Therefore, we aimed to study the potential role of brain parenchymal fraction (BPF) as a relatively simple quantitative measure for distinguishing ALS phenotypes. T1-weighted MR images of brain were obtained in 15 neurological controls and 88 ALS patients categorized into 4 distinct clinical phenotypes, upper motor neuron- (UMN-) predominant ALS patients with/without corticospinal tract (CST) hyperintensity on T2/PD-weighted images, classic ALS, and ALS with frontotemporal dementia (ALS-FTD). BPF was calculated using intracranial grey matter, white matter, and cerebrospinal fluid volumes obtained in control and ALS subgroups using SPM8 software. Only ALS-FTD patients had significant reduction in BPF when compared to controls and nondemented ALS patients. Correlation of clinical measures such as disease duration with BPF further supports the view that the BPF could be a potential biomarker for clinical diagnosis of ALS-FTD patients. PMID:26783524

  18. Clinicopathologic study of pineal parenchymal tumors of intermediate differentiation.

    PubMed

    Ito, Tamio; Kanno, Hiromi; Sato, Ken-ichi; Oikawa, Mitsuteru; Ozaki, Yoshimaru; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Terasaka, Shunsuke; Kobayashi, Hiroyuki; Houkin, Kiyohiro; Hatanaka, Kanako; Murata, Jyun-ichi; Tanaka, Shinya

    2014-01-01

    Pineal parenchymal tumors of intermediate differentiation (PPTID) are extremely rare tumor entities, and only limited data are available regarding their pathologic features and biologic behaviors. Because grading criteria of pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) have yet to be established, the treatment strategy and prognosis of PPTIDs remain controversial. We describe the clinicopathologic study of six patients with PPTID and compare responses for the treatment and prognosis with cases of pineocytoma (PC) and pineoblastoma (PB). From this analysis, we attempt to clarify the treatment strategy for PPTIDs. This study included 15 patients with PPTs, consisting of 6 PCs, 6 PPTIDs, and 3 PBs. We focused on the 6 patients with PPTIDs. All PPTID cases were treated surgically, and radiotherapy and chemotherapy were administered as adjuvant therapies in some cases. We have earlier reported the histopathologic study (Neuropathology 32:647-653, 2012). Briefly, we examined mitotic figures and necrosis by hematoxylin-eosin staining and immunohistochemical markers such as neuronal markers (synaptophysin, neurofilament (NF), and neuronal nuclear antigen), and an MIB-1 labeling index was determined. In the PPTID cases, the extent of resection was variable and the recurrence rates among patients varied according to stage and treatment. All PC patients underwent total resection with no recurrence. All PB patients underwent resection and adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy and chemotherapy. There were no recurrences in patients with PC or PB. The results of histopathologic findings have been already reported as mentioned above. Briefly, the results indicated no mitotic figure or necrosis in any of the six cases of PPTID, but those features were observed in PB cases. All cases even including PC and PB were immunopositive for neuronal markers. The MIB-1 labeling index of PPTID was 3.5%, whereas it was 0% in PC and 10.5% in PB. Good radiosensitivity of PPTIDs was observed in our series

  19. Sonographic Renal Parenchymal Measurements for the Evaluation and Management of Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Children.

    PubMed

    Kelley, Jeremy C; White, Jeffrey T; Goetz, Jessica T; Romero, Elena; Leslie, Jeffrey A; Prieto, Juan C

    2016-01-01

    To correlate sonographic renal parenchymal measurements among patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) labeled society of fetal urology (SFU) hydronephrosis grades 1-4 and to examine whether sonographic renal parenchymal measurements could be used to differentiate conservative vs. surgical management. Retrospective chart review and sonographic renal parenchymal measurements (renal length, medullary pyramid thickness, and renal parenchymal thickness) were performed in patients with SFU grades 1-4 hydronephrosis secondary to UPJO managed between 2009 and 2014. Exclusion criteria included other concomitant genitourinary pathology or incomplete follow-up. Anterior-posterior renal pelvic diameter (APRPD) and radionuclide renography were also evaluated when available. One hundred four patients with UPJO underwent 244 renal and bladder ultrasound (1,464 sonographic renal parenchymal measurements in 488 kidneys). Medullary pyramid thickness and renal parenchymal thickness progressively decreased from SFU grades 1-4 (p < 0.05). A similar trend was appreciated when comparing SFU grades 1 and 2 vs. 3 and 4, as well as SFU grades 3 vs. 4 (p < 0.05). SFU grade 3 and 4 patients who underwent pyeloplasty had longer renal length in comparison to those who were managed conservatively (p < 0.02). This is the first study that evaluates these objective, quantifiable sonographic renal parenchymal measurements in children with unilateral UPJO. These sonographic renal parenchymal measurements correlate closely with worsening of hydronephrosis graded by the SFU and APRPD classification systems. Prospective studies are needed to elucidate the role of sonographic renal parenchymal measurements in the management of children with UPJO.

  20. A Review on Automatic Mammographic Density and Parenchymal Segmentation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wenda; Juette, Arne; Denton, Erika R. E.; Oliver, Arnau

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in women. However, the exact cause(s) of breast cancer still remains unknown. Early detection, precise identification of women at risk, and application of appropriate disease prevention measures are by far the most effective way to tackle breast cancer. There are more than 70 common genetic susceptibility factors included in the current non-image-based risk prediction models (e.g., the Gail and the Tyrer-Cuzick models). Image-based risk factors, such as mammographic densities and parenchymal patterns, have been established as biomarkers but have not been fully incorporated in the risk prediction models used for risk stratification in screening and/or measuring responsiveness to preventive approaches. Within computer aided mammography, automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methods have been developed for estimation of breast tissue composition to facilitate mammographic risk assessment. This paper presents a comprehensive review of automatic mammographic tissue segmentation methodologies developed over the past two decades and the evidence for risk assessment/density classification using segmentation. The aim of this review is to analyse how engineering advances have progressed and the impact automatic mammographic tissue segmentation has in a clinical environment, as well as to understand the current research gaps with respect to the incorporation of image-based risk factors in non-image-based risk prediction models. PMID:26171249

  1. Sensitivity of ultrasonography in detecting renal parenchymal defects in children.

    PubMed

    Levart, Tanja Kersnik; Kenig, Anton; Fettich, Jure J; Kljucevsek, Damjana; Novljan, Gregor; Kenda, Rajko B

    2002-12-01

    Renal parenchymal defects (RPD) -- scars, hypoplasia/dysplasia -- in children are a major risk factor for chronic renal failure. Most authors would agree that RPD should be detected and followed by a 99mTc-dimercaptosuccinic acid renal scan (DMSA), as ultrasonography (US) does not seem to be sensitive enough for this purpose. However, it might well be that DMSA is too sensitive and detects RPD that are too small to be clinically significant. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity of US in identifying patients with clinically significant RPD and in detecting RPD of various grades as seen by DMSA. In 89 children with abnormal DMSA, a second DMSA, US, and other tests for evaluating renal function were performed at least 1 year after the first DMSA. The extent of RPD detected by DMSA and US was correlated with renal function parameters. In all 5 patients with diminished renal function, RPD were detected by both DMSA scan and US. In addition, US detected clinically insignificant RPD in 48 of 67 cases (71.6%). The present study has shown that, compared with DMSA, US is sensitive enough to detect clinically significant RPD in children. The substitution of DMSA with US would be beneficial, as this would eliminate radiation exposure, reduce costs, and increase availability.

  2. Renal parenchymal oxygenation and hypoxia adaptation in acute kidney injury.

    PubMed

    Rosenberger, Christian; Rosen, Seymour; Heyman, Samuel N

    2006-10-01

    The pathogenesis of acute kidney injury (AKI), formally termed acute tubular necrosis, is complex and, phenotypically, may range from functional dysregulation without overt morphological features to literal tubular destruction. Hypoxia results from imbalanced oxygen supply and consumption. Increasing evidence supports the view that regional renal hypoxia occurs in AKI irrespective of the underlying condition, even under circumstances basically believed to reflect 'direct' tubulotoxicity. However, at present, it is remains unclear whether hypoxia per se or, rather, re-oxygenation (possibly through reactive oxygen species) causes AKI. Data regarding renal hypoxia in the clinical situation of AKI are lacking and our current concepts regarding renal oxygenation during acute renal failure are presumptive and largely derived from experimental studies. There is robust experimental evidence that AKI is often associated with altered intrarenal microcirculation and oxygenation. Furthermore, renal parenchymal oxygen deprivation seems to participate in the pathogenesis of experimental AKI, induced by exogenous nephrotoxins (such as contrast media, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs or amphotericin), sepsis, pigment and obstructive nephropathies. Sub-lethal cellular hypoxia engenders adaptational responses through hypoxia-inducible factors (HIF). Forthcoming technologies to modulate the HIF system form a novel potential therapeutic approach for AKI.

  3. Preclinical evaluation of convection-enhanced delivery of liposomal doxorubicin to treat pediatric diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma and thalamic high-grade glioma.

    PubMed

    Sewing, A Charlotte P; Lagerweij, Tonny; van Vuurden, Dannis G; Meel, Michaël H; Veringa, Susanna J E; Carcaboso, Angel M; Gaillard, Pieter J; Peter Vandertop, W; Wesseling, Pieter; Noske, David; Kaspers, Gertjan J L; Hulleman, Esther

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Pediatric high-grade gliomas (pHGGs) including diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) are primary brain tumors with high mortality and morbidity. Because of their poor brain penetrance, systemic chemotherapy regimens have failed to deliver satisfactory results; however, convection-enhanced delivery (CED) may be an alternative mode of drug delivery. Anthracyclines are potent chemotherapeutics that have been successfully delivered via CED in preclinical supratentorial glioma models. This study aims to assess the potency of anthracyclines against DIPG and pHGG cell lines in vitro and to evaluate the efficacy of CED with anthracyclines in orthotopic pontine and thalamic tumor models. METHODS The sensitivity of primary pHGG cell lines to a range of anthracyclines was tested in vitro. Preclinical CED of free doxorubicin and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) to the brainstem and thalamus of naïve nude mice was performed. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) was determined based on the observation of clinical symptoms, and brains were analyzed after H & E staining. Efficacy of the MTD was tested in adult glioma E98-FM-DIPG and E98-FM-thalamus models and in the HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc primary DIPG model. RESULTS Both pHGG and DIPG cells were sensitive to anthracyclines in vitro. Doxorubicin was selected for further preclinical evaluation. Convection-enhanced delivery of the MTD of free doxorubicin and PLD in the pons was 0.02 mg/ml, and the dose tolerated in the thalamus was 10 times higher (0.2 mg/ml). Free doxorubicin or PLD via CED was ineffective against E98-FM-DIPG or HSJD-DIPG-007-Fluc in the brainstem; however, when applied in the thalamus, 0.2 mg/ml of PLD slowed down tumor growth and increased survival in a subset of animals with small tumors. CONCLUSIONS Local delivery of doxorubicin to the brainstem causes severe toxicity, even at doxorubicin concentrations that are safe in the thalamus. As a consequence, the authors could not establish a therapeutic

  4. Solitary parenchymal splenic recurrence of ovarian adenocarcinoma: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tserkezoglou, Aliki; Kontou, Sofia; Hatjieleftheriou, George; Nikolaidou, Maria-Evangellia; Plataniotis, George; Apostolikas, Nikiforos; Magiakos, George

    2005-01-01

    We report a rare case of solitary parenchymal splenic recurrence of epithelial ovarian cancer which developed 27 months after the initial treatment. The patient, a 53-year-old woman, with a history of breast cancer, underwent total abdominal hysterectomy bilateral salpingo-ophorectomy (TAH & BSO), omentectomy and pelvic lymph node sampling for a serous carcinoma of the ovaries (stage IIIB). She subsequently received 6 cycles of cisplatinum chemotherapy. During follow-up, rising CA 125 serum levels heralded the 6 x 6 cm parenchymal splenic lesion which was documented by CT scan. She underwent splenectomy after pneumococcal vaccination, sandostatin and chemoprophylaxis. Histopathological evaluation revealed metastatic parenchymal disease consistent with recurrent ovarian cancer. She remains alive and disease-free for 20 months since the last operation. Isolated parenchymal splenic lesions are very rare and may occur as a late recurrence in epithelial ovarian cancer. Splenectomy can be performed with acceptable morbidity and confers a substantial survival benefit to patients.

  5. Estimation of parenchymal cell content of human parathyroid glands using the image analyzing computer technique.

    PubMed Central

    Grimelius, L.; Akerström, G.; Johansson, H.; Lundqvist, H.

    1978-01-01

    By means of the image analyzing computer technique, a complete determination of the parenchymal tissue distribution in serially sectioned parathyroid glands were accomplished. The technique had good reproducibility. Taking into account the shrinkage of the different tissue components during histotechnical procedures and the tissue densities, it was possible to calculate the parenchymal cell mass of unfixed glands. The cell distribution varied considerably, and in most glands as many as 10 sections at different levels had to be examined to get a reliable ratio between the parenchymal and fat cell tissue. The results seriously question the validity of histopathologic examination of one or a few sections of parathyroid glands in evaluation of the parenchymal cell mass, as well as diagnoses based on examination of partial glandular biopsy specimens. PMID:717545

  6. Isolation and co-culture of rat parenchymal and non-parenchymal liver cells to evaluate cellular interactions and response

    PubMed Central

    Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Geerts, Sharon; Jindal, Rohit; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2016-01-01

    The liver is a central organ in the human body, and first line of defense between host and external environment. Liver response to any external perturbation is a collective reaction of resident liver cells. Most of the current in vitro liver models focus on hepatocytes, the primary metabolic component, omitting interactions and cues from surrounding environment and non-parenchymal cells (NPCs). Recent studies suggest that contributions of NPCs are vital, particularly in disease conditions, and outcomes of drugs and their metabolites. Along with hepatocytes, NPCs–Kupffer (KC), sinusoidal endothelial (LSEC) and stellate cells (SC) are major cellular components of the liver. Incorporation of primary cells in in vitro liver platforms is essential to emulate the functions of the liver, and its overall response. Herein, we isolate individual NPC cell fractions from rat livers and co-culture them in a transwell format incorporating primary rat hepatocytes with LSECs, SCs, and KCs. Our results indicate that the presence and contributions of multiple cells within the co-culture capture the interactions between hepatocytes and NPC, and modulates the responses to inflammatory stimulus such as LPS. The isolation and co-culture methods could provide a stable platform for creating in vitro liver models that provide defined functionality beyond hepatocytes alone. PMID:27142224

  7. An unusual case of renal failure due to solitary plasmacytoma: parenchymal invasion of the kidney.

    PubMed

    Ozkok, Abdullah; Elcioglu, Omer Celal; Bakan, Ali; Sasak, Gulsah; Atilgan, Kadir Gokhan; Alisir, Sabahat; Odabas, Ali Riza

    2012-01-01

    Solitary extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP) is a rare plasma cell disorder mostly involving the upper airway; however, retroperitoneal infiltration is very rare. Kidney injury associated with EMP is exceptionally rare with only anecdotal reports. Herein we report a case of retroperitoneal EMP causing renal failure by the way of direct renal parenchymal infiltration. Renal parenchymal invasion should be considered in aggressive and refractory plasma cell dyscrasias with unexplained renal failure.

  8. Bronchial Artery Embolization in the Management of Pulmonary Parenchymal Endometriosis with Hemoptysis

    SciTech Connect

    Kervancioglu, Selim Andic, Cagatay; Bayram, Nazan; Telli, Cumali; Sarica, Akif; Sirikci, Akif

    2008-07-15

    Pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis is extremely rare and usually manifests itself with a recurrent hemoptysis associated with the menstrual cycle. The therapies proposed for women with endometriosis consist of medical treatments and surgery. Bronchial artery embolization has become a well-established and minimally invasive treatment modality for hemoptysis, and to the best of our knowledge, it has not been reported in pulmonary endometriosis. We report a case of pulmonary parenchymal endometriosis treated with embolotheraphy for hemoptysis.

  9. Effect of denoising on supervised lung parenchymal clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jayamani, Padmapriya; Raghunath, Sushravya; Rajagopalan, Srinivasan; Karwoski, Ronald A.; Bartholmai, Brian J.; Robb, Richard A.

    2012-03-01

    Denoising is a critical preconditioning step for quantitative analysis of medical images. Despite promises for more consistent diagnosis, denoising techniques are seldom explored in clinical settings. While this may be attributed to the esoteric nature of the parameter sensitve algorithms, lack of quantitative measures on their ecacy to enhance the clinical decision making is a primary cause of physician apathy. This paper addresses this issue by exploring the eect of denoising on the integrity of supervised lung parenchymal clusters. Multiple Volumes of Interests (VOIs) were selected across multiple high resolution CT scans to represent samples of dierent patterns (normal, emphysema, ground glass, honey combing and reticular). The VOIs were labeled through consensus of four radiologists. The original datasets were ltered by multiple denoising techniques (median ltering, anisotropic diusion, bilateral ltering and non-local means) and the corresponding ltered VOIs were extracted. Plurality of cluster indices based on multiple histogram-based pair-wise similarity measures were used to assess the quality of supervised clusters in the original and ltered space. The resultant rank orders were analyzed using the Borda criteria to nd the denoising-similarity measure combination that has the best cluster quality. Our exhaustive analyis reveals (a) for a number of similarity measures, the cluster quality is inferior in the ltered space; and (b) for measures that benet from denoising, a simple median ltering outperforms non-local means and bilateral ltering. Our study suggests the need to judiciously choose, if required, a denoising technique that does not deteriorate the integrity of supervised clusters.

  10. Parenchymal lung involvement in adult-onset Still disease

    PubMed Central

    Gerfaud-Valentin, Mathieu; Cottin, Vincent; Jamilloux, Yvan; Hot, Arnaud; Gaillard-Coadon, Agathe; Durieu, Isabelle; Broussolle, Christiane; Iwaz, Jean; Sève, Pascal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Parenchymal lung involvement (PLI) in adult-onset Still's disease (AOSD) has seldom, if ever, been studied. We examine here retrospective cohort AOSD cases and present a review of the literature (1971–2014) on AOSD-related PLI cases. Patients with PLI were identified in 57 AOSD cases. For inclusion, the patients had to fulfill Yamaguchi or Fautrel classification criteria, show respiratory symptoms, and have imaging evidence of pulmonary involvement, and data allowing exclusion of infectious, cardiogenic, toxic, or iatrogenic cause of PLI should be available. This AOSD + PLI group was compared with a control group (non–PLI-complicated AOSD cases from the same cohort). AOSD + PLI was found in 3 out of the 57 patients with AOSD (5.3%) and the literature mentioned 27 patients. Among these 30 AOSD + PLI cases, 12 presented an acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the remaining 18 another PLI. In the latter, a nonspecific interstitial pneumonia computed tomography pattern prevailed in the lower lobes, pulmonary function tests showed a restrictive lung function, the alveolar differential cell count was neutrophilic in half of the cases, and the histological findings were consistent with bronchiolitis and nonspecific interstitial pneumonia. Corticosteroids were fully efficient in all but 3 patients. Ten out of 12 ARDS cases occurred during the first year of the disease course. All ARDS-complicated AOSD cases received corticosteroids with favorable outcomes in 10 (2 deceased). Most PLIs occurred during the systemic onset of AOSD. PLI may occur in 5% of AOSDs, of which ARDS is the most severe. Very often, corticosteroids are efficient in controlling this complication. PMID:27472698

  11. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients. 540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0-5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis)) and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates. Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001) and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001). FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001). Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046) and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001) and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001). Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting.

  12. MRI Background Parenchymal Enhancement Is Not Associated with Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bennani-Baiti, Barbara; Dietzel, Matthias; Baltzer, Pascal Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background Previously, a strong positive association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and breast cancer was reported in high-risk populations. We sought to determine, whether this was also true for non-high-risk patients. Methods 540 consecutive patients underwent breast MRI for assessment of breast findings (BI-RADS 0–5, non-high-risk screening (no familial history of breast cancer, no known genetic mutation, no prior chest irradiation, or previous breast cancer diagnosis)) and subsequent histological work-up. For this IRB-approved study, BPE and fibroglandular tissue FGT were retrospectively assessed by two experienced radiologists according to the BI-RADS lexicon. Pearson correlation coefficients were calculated to explore associations between BPE, FGT, age and final diagnosis of breast cancer. Subsequently, multivariate logistic regression analysis, considering covariate colinearities, was performed, using final diagnosis as the target variable and BPE, FGT and age as covariates. Results Age showed a moderate negative correlation with FGT (r = -0.43, p<0.001) and a weak negative correlation with BPE (r = -0.28, p<0.001). FGT and BPE correlated moderately (r = 0.35, p<0.001). Final diagnosis of breast cancer displayed very weak negative correlations with FGT (r = -0.09, p = 0.046) and BPE (r = -0.156, p<0.001) and weak positive correlation with age (r = 0.353, p<0.001). On multivariate logistic regression analysis, the only independent covariate for prediction of breast cancer was age (OR 1.032, p<0.001). Conclusions Based on our data, neither BPE nor FGT independently correlate with breast cancer risk in non-high-risk patients at MRI. Our model retained only age as an independent risk factor for breast cancer in this setting. PMID:27379395

  13. Pediatric Specialists

    MedlinePlus

    ... Healthy Living Healthy Living Healthy Living Nutrition Fitness Sports Oral Health Emotional Wellness Growing Healthy Sleep Safety & Prevention Safety & ... is a Pediatric Rheumatologist? What is a Pediatric Sports Medicine Specialist? What is a Pediatric Surgeon? What is a Pediatric Transport ... Find Us Donate Contact ...

  14. Quantitative imaging values of CT, MR, and FDG-PET to differentiate pineal parenchymal tumors and germinomas: are they useful?

    PubMed

    Kakigi, Takahide; Okada, Tomohisa; Kanagaki, Mitsunori; Yamamoto, Akira; Fushimi, Yasutaka; Sakamoto, Ryo; Arakawa, Yoshiki; Mikami, Yoshiki; Shimono, Taro; Takahashi, Jun C; Togashi, Kaori

    2014-04-01

    Quantitative values of CT attenuation, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), and standardized uptake value (SUV) were investigated for differentiation between pineal parenchymal tumors (PPTs) and germinomas. Differences in age, sex, and calcification pattern were also evaluated. Twenty-three patients with PPTs and germinomas in 20 years were retrospectively enrolled under the approval of the institutional review board. CT attenuation, ADC, and SUV (20, 13, and 10 patients, respectively) were statistically compared between the two tumors. Differences in sex and patterns of calcification ("exploded" or "engulfed") were also examined. Mean patient ages were compared among three groups of pineoblastoma, pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, (PPTID) and pineocytoma and germinoma. None of the quantitative values of CT attenuation, ADC, and SUV showed significant differences between PPTs and germinomas (p > .05). However, there was a significant difference in age (p < .05) among the three groups of pineoblastoma (mean age ± standard deviation 7.0 ± 8.7 years), PPTID, and pineocytoma (53.7 ± 11.4 years) and germinoma (19.1 ± 8.1 years). Sex also showed significant differences between PPTs and germinomas (p = .039). Exploded pattern of calcification was found in 9 of 11 PPT patients and engulfed pattern in 7 of 9 patients with germinomas. No reverse pattern was observed, and the patterns of calcification were considered highly specific of tumor types. None of the quantitative imaging values could differentiate PPTs from germinomas. Age, sex, and calcification patterns were confirmed useful in differentiating these tumors to some degree.

  15. Pediatric sedation.

    PubMed

    Daud, Yasmeen N; Carlson, Douglas W

    2014-08-01

    Pediatric sedation is an evolving field performed by an extensive list of specialties. Well-defined sedation systems within pediatric facilities are paramount to providing consistent, safe sedation. Pediatric sedation providers should be trained in the principles and practice of sedation, which include patient selection, pre-sedation assessment to determine risks during sedation, selection of optimal sedation medication, monitoring requirements, and post-sedation care. Training, credentialing, and continuing sedation education must be incorporated into sedation systems to verify and monitor the practice of safe sedation. Pediatric hospitalists represent a group of providers with extensive pediatric knowledge and skills who can safely provide pediatric sedation.

  16. Renal Parenchymal Area and Risk of ESRD in Boys with Posterior Urethral Valves

    PubMed Central

    Pulido, Jose E.; Furth, Susan L.; Zderic, Stephen A.; Canning, Douglas A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Approximately 20% of boys with posterior urethral valves develop ESRD; however, few factors associated with the risk of ESRD have been identified. The objective of this study was to determine if renal parenchymal area, defined as the area of the kidney minus the area of the pelvicaliceal system on first postnatal ultrasound, is associated with the risk of ESRD in infants with posterior urethral valves. Design, setting, participants, & measurements A retrospective cohort of boys who were diagnosed with posterior urethral valves at less than 6 months of age between 1988 and 2011 and followed for at least 1 year at a free-standing children’s hospital was assembled. Cox proportional hazard regression and Kaplan–Meier analysis were used to estimate the association between renal parenchymal area and time to ESRD. Cox models were adjusted for age at presentation, minimum creatinine 1 month after bladder decompression, and vesicoureteral reflux. Results Sixty patients were followed for 393 person-years. Eight patients developed ESRD. Median renal parenchymal area was 15.9 cm2 (interquartile range=13.0–21.6 cm2). Each 1-cm2 increase in renal parenchymal area was associated with a lower risk of ESRD (hazard ratio, 0.64; 95% confidence interval, 0.42 to 0.98). The rate of time to ESRD was 10 times higher in boys with renal parenchymal area<12.4 cm2 than boys with renal parenchymal area≥12.4 cm2 (P<0.001). Renal parenchymal area could best discriminate children at risk for ESRD when the minimum creatinine in the first 1 month after bladder decompression was between 0.8 and 1.1 mg/dl. Conclusion In boys with posterior urethral valves presenting during the first 6 months of life, lower renal parenchymal area is associated with an increased risk of ESRD during childhood. The predictive ability of renal parenchymal area, which is available at time of diagnosis, should be validated in a larger, prospectively-enrolled cohort. PMID:24311709

  17. Pediatric Extranodal Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ellen M; Pavio, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Lymphoma is the third most common pediatric neoplasm. Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) accounts for nearly half of cases and commonly involves extranodal sites. Compared with adults, this histologic spectrum of pediatric NHL is very narrow and consists of aggressive tumors. Patients typically present with widespread disease. Generally, NHL occurring in children includes Burkitt lymphoma, lymphoblastic lymphoma, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and anaplastic large cell lymphoma. Staging and assessment of therapeutic response are usually based on FDG-PET/CT. Due to the increased susceptibility of young patients to the effects of ionizing radiation, alternative methods of imaging are being explored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. The Relationship between Localized Subarachnoid Inflammation and Parenchymal Pathophysiology after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, James W.; Afshar, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Subarachnoid inflammation following spinal cord injury (SCI) can lead to the formation of localized subarachnoid scarring and the development of post-traumatic syringomyelia (PTS). While PTS is a devastating complication of SCI, its relative rarity (occurring symptomatically in about 5% of clinical cases), and lack of fundamental physiological insights, have led us to examine an animal model of traumatic SCI with induced arachnoiditis. We hypothesized that arachnoiditis associated with SCI would potentiate early parenchymal pathophysiology. To test this theory, we examined early spatial pathophysiology in four groups: (1) sham (non-injured controls), (2) arachnoiditis (intrathecal injection of kaolin), (3) SCI (35-g clip contusion/compression injury), and (4) PTS (intrathecal kaolin+SCI). Overall, there was greater parenchymal inflammation and scarring in the PTS group relative to the SCI group. This was demonstrated by significant increases in cytokine (IL-1α and IL-1β) and chemokine (MCP-1, GRO/KC, and MIP-1α) production, MPO activity, blood–spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability, and MMP-9 activity. However, parenchymal inflammatory mediator production (acute IL-1α and IL-1β, subacute chemokines), BSCB permeability, and fibrous scarring in the PTS group were larger than the sum of the SCI group and arachnoiditis group combined, suggesting that arachnoiditis does indeed potentiate parenchymal pathophysiology. Accordingly, these findings suggest that the development of arachnoiditis associated with SCI can lead to an exacerbation of the parenchymal injury, potentially impacting the outcome of this devastating condition. PMID:22655536

  19. Ryanodine receptors, calcium signaling and regulation of vascular tone in the cerebral parenchymal microcirculation

    PubMed Central

    Dabertrand, Fabrice; Nelson, Mark T.; Brayden, Joseph E.

    2012-01-01

    The cerebral blood supply is delivered by a surface network of pial arteries and arterioles from which arise (parenchymal) arterioles that penetrate into the cortex and terminate in a rich capillary bed. The critical regulation of cerebral blood flow, locally and globally, requires precise vasomotor regulation of the intracerebral microvasculature. This vascular region is anatomically unique as illustrated by the presence of astrocytic processes that envelope almost the entire basolateral surface of parenchymal arterioles. There are, moreover, notable functional differences between pial arteries and parenchymal arterioles. For example, in pial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), local calcium release events (“calcium sparks”) through ryanodine receptor (RyR) channels in sarcoplasmic reticulum membrane activate large conductance, calcium-sensitive potassium (BK) channels to modulate vascular diameter. In contrast, VSMCs in parenchymal arterioles express functional RyR and BK channels, but under physiological conditions these channels do not oppose pressure-induced vasoconstriction. Here we summarize the roles of ryanodine receptors in the parenchymal microvasculature under physiologic and pathologic conditions, and discuss their importance in the control of cerebral blood flow. PMID:23216877

  20. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... is diagnosed with MS. Learn More Learn More Network of Pediatric MS Centers The National MS Society ... MS Study Group (2004) and established a nationwide network of six Pediatric MS Centers of Excellence (2006) ...

  1. Pediatric Asthma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research & Science Education & Training Home Conditions Asthma (Pediatric) Asthma (Pediatric) Make an Appointment Refer a Patient Ask ... Ask a Question The first symptoms of childhood asthma – heavy wheezing, tight chest and shortness of breath – ...

  2. Myocarditis - pediatric

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007307.htm Myocarditis - pediatric To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pediatric myocarditis is inflammation of the heart muscle in ...

  3. Pediatric Injury

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control and Prevention’s Safe Child website . What is pediatric critical care? Children who have severe or life-threatening injuries ... are staffed by physicians with specialized training in pediatric critical care medicine ("pediatric intensivists"). Because children can experience a ...

  4. A clinical study of new cases of parenchymal neurosyphilis: has tabes dorsalis disappeared or been missed?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong-Qing; Huang, Ming; Jia, Xiao-Yan; Zou, Ya-Fen; Chen, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Tabes dorsalis (TD) was documented as the most common parenchymal neurosyphilis, but its incidence dramatically declined in the antibiotic era. Syphilis has resurged on the China mainland since the 1980s. In recent years, physicians have been reporting parenchymal neurosyphilis, and the overwhelming majority was general paresis, but this was not the case in the authors' hospital. To make clear the real situation of parenchymal neurosyphilis in the authors' hospital, a retrospective review was carried out of the records of patients during 2009-2012. Overrepresented clinical new cases of tabetic and paretic parenchymal neurosyphilis were collected. Clinical characteristics, neuroimaging, laboratory data, and responses to penicillin were analyzed in two groups. The efficiency of two current criteria based on CSF antibodies tests was inspected. In the 43 cases with positive serum rapid plasma reagin (RPR) and TPPA tests, 18 patients met the criteria of this study: 11 presented with symptoms of general paresis, and seven had typical presentations of TD. There were statistical differences in serum RPR titers, CSF RPR, white blood cell count, and TP between the paretic and tabetic groups. The response to penicillin was relatively poor in TD. The efficiency of two current criteria was lower in the diagnosis of TD. TD was not uncommon in our area. Its clinical features remained typical, but underdiagnosis with CSF-based criteria and a decreased response to penicillin were prominent issues.

  5. Parenchymal opacification in chronic infiltrative lung diseases: CT-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Leung, A N; Miller, R R; Müller, N L

    1993-07-01

    To correlate areas of parenchymal opacification on thin-section computed tomographic (CT) scans with histologic findings in patients with chronic infiltrative lung disease, the CT and histologic findings were evaluated in 29 patients with 11 such diseases. Open-lung biopsy was performed after CT. The area of predominant involvement was classified as air space, interstitium, or a mixture of both. A pathologic score of disease activity was assigned, and the extent of fibrosis was assessed whenever fibrosis was present. Parenchymal opacification on CT scans corresponded to abnormalities that affected mainly the air spaces in three patients (10%), the interstitium in 13 patients (45%), or both to a similar degree in 13 patients (45%). In 25 of 29 patients (86%), parenchymal opacification was associated with potentially treatable or reversible disease. Abnormalities considered irreversible were seen in three patients with end-stage fibrosis and one patient with talcosis. Parenchymal opacification on thin-section CT scans is a nonspecific finding in diseases that affect the air spaces, interstitium, or both but usually indicates potentially treatable or reversible disease.

  6. Parenchymal texture measures weighted by breast anatomy: preliminary optimization in a case-control study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gastounioti, Aimilia; Keller, Brad M.; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2016-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that quantitative descriptors of the parenchymal texture patterns hold a valuable role in assessing an individual woman's risk for breast cancer. In this work, we assess the hypothesis that breast cancer risk factors are not uniformly expressed in the breast parenchymal tissue and, therefore, breast-anatomy-weighted parenchymal texture descriptors, where different breasts ROIs have non uniform contributions, may enhance breast cancer risk assessment. To this end, we introduce an automated breast-anatomy-driven methodology which generates a breast atlas, which is then used to produce a weight map that reinforces the contributions of the central and upper-outer breast areas. We incorporate this methodology to our previously validated lattice-based strategy for parenchymal texture analysis. In the framework of a pilot case-control study, including digital mammograms from 424 women, our proposed breast-anatomy-weighted texture descriptors are optimized and evaluated against non weighted texture features, using regression analysis with leave-one-out cross validation. The classification performance is assessed in terms of the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic. The collective discriminatory capacity of the weighted texture features was maximized (AUC=0.87) when the central breast area was considered more important than the upperouter area, with significant performance improvement (DeLong's test, p-value<0.05) against the non-weighted texture features (AUC=0.82). Our results suggest that breast-anatomy-driven methodologies have the potential to further upgrade the promising role of parenchymal texture analysis in breast cancer risk assessment and may serve as a reference in the design of future studies towards image-driven personalized recommendations regarding women's cancer risk evaluation.

  7. Background parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging: normal patterns, diagnostic challenges, and potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretation.

    PubMed

    Giess, Catherine S; Yeh, Eren D; Raza, Sughra; Birdwell, Robyn L

    2014-01-01

    At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, both normal and abnormal breast tissue enhances after contrast material administration. The morphology and temporal degree of enhancement of pathologic breast tissue relative to normal breast tissue form the basis of MR imaging's diagnostic accuracy in the detection and diagnosis of breast disease. Normal parenchymal enhancement at breast MR imaging is termed background parenchymal enhancement (BPE). BPE may vary in degree and distribution in different patients as well as in the same patient over time. Typically BPE is minimal or mild in overall degree, with a bilateral, symmetric, diffuse distribution and slow early and persistent delayed kinetic features. However, BPE may sometimes be moderate or marked in degree, with an asymmetric or nondiffuse distribution and rapid early and plateau or washout delayed kinetic features. These patterns cause diagnostic difficulty because these features can be seen with malignancy. This article reviews typical and atypical patterns of BPE seen at breast MR imaging. The anatomic and physiologic influences on BPE in women undergoing diagnostic and screening breast MR imaging are reviewed. The potential for false-positive and false-negative interpretations due to BPE are discussed. Radiologists can improve their interpretive accuracy by increasing their understanding of various BPE patterns, influences on BPE, and the potential effects of BPE on MR imaging interpretation.

  8. Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Prusakowski, Melanie K; Chen, Audrey P

    2017-02-01

    Pediatric sepsis is distinct from adult sepsis in its definitions, clinical presentations, and management. Recognition of pediatric sepsis is complicated by the various pediatric-specific comorbidities that contribute to its mortality and the age- and development-specific vital sign and clinical parameters that obscure its recognition. This article outlines the clinical presentation and management of sepsis in neonates, infants, and children, and highlights some key populations who require specialized care.

  9. The effects of hemorrhagic parenchymal infarction on the establishment of sensori-motor structural and functional connectivity in early infancy.

    PubMed

    Arichi, T; Counsell, S J; Allievi, A G; Chew, A T; Martinez-Biarge, M; Mondi, V; Tusor, N; Merchant, N; Burdet, E; Cowan, F M; Edwards, A D

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize alterations of structural and functional connectivity within the developing sensori-motor system in infants with focal perinatal brain injury and at high risk of cerebral palsy. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) data were used to study the developing functional and structural connectivity framework in six infants born prematurely at term equivalent age. This was first characterised in three infants without focal pathology, which was then compared to that derived from three infants with unilateral haemorrhagic parenchymal infarction and a subsequent focal periventricular white matter lesion who developed later haemiparesis. Functional responses to passive hand movement were in the contralateral perirolandic cortex, regardless of focal pathology. In infants with unilateral periventricular injury, afferent thalamo-cortical tracts appeared to have developed compensatory trajectories which circumvented areas of damage. In contrast, efferent corticospinal tracts showed marked asymmetry at term equivalent age following focal brain injury. Sensori-motor network analysis suggested that inter-hemispheric functional connectivity is largely preserved despite pathology and that impairment may be associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcome. Following focal perinatal brain injury, altered structural and functional connectivity is already present and can be characterized with MRI at term equivalent age. The results of this small case series suggest that these techniques may provide valuable new information about prognosis and the pathophysiology underlying cerebral palsy.

  10. Does active dissemination of evidence result in faster knowledge transfer than passive diffusion?: An analysis of trends of the management of pediatric asthma and croup in US emergency departments from 1995 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Jane F; Simon, Stephen D; Sharma, Vidya

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to compare knowledge transfer (KT) in the emergency department (ED) management of pediatric asthma and croup by measuring trends in corticosteroid use for both conditions in EDs. A retrospective, cross-sectional study of the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey data between 1995 and 2009 of corticosteroid use at ED visits for asthma or croup was conducted. Odds ratios (OR) were calculated using logistic regression. Trends over time were compared using an interaction term between disease and year and were adjusted for all other covariates in the model. We included children aged 2 to 18 years with asthma who received albuterol and were triaged emergent/urgent. Children aged between 3 months to 6 years with croup were included. The main outcome measure was the administration of corticosteroids in the ED or as a prescription at the ED visit. The corticosteroid use in asthma visits increased from 44% to 67% and from 32% to 56% for croup. After adjusting for patient and hospital factors, this trend was significant both for asthma (OR, 1.07; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.10) and croup (OR, 1.07; 95% CI, 1.03-1.12). There was no statistical difference between the 2 trends (P = 0.69). Hospital location in a metropolitan statistical area was associated with increased corticosteroid use in asthma (OR, 1.76; 95% CI, 1.10-2.82). Factors including sex, ethnicity, insurance, or region of the country were not significantly associated with corticosteroid use. During a 15-year period, knowledge transfer by passive diffusion or active guideline dissemination resulted in similar trends of corticosteroid use for the management of pediatric asthma and croup.

  11. Pediatric MS

    MedlinePlus

    ... video) Watch Video Students with MS and the Academic Setting: A Handbook for School Personnel (.pdf) Download Brochure Managing School-Related Issues: A Guide for Parents with a Child or Teen Living with MS (.pdf) Download Brochure Network of Pediatric MS Centers Learn More Pediatric MS ...

  12. Virtual Pediatric Hospital

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thoracopaedia - An Imaging Encyclopedia of Pediatric Thoracic Disease Virtual Pediatric Hospital is the Apprentice's Assistant™ Last revised ... pediatric resources: GeneralPediatrics.com | PediatricEducation.org | SearchingPediatrics.com Virtual Pediatric Hospital is curated by Donna M. D' ...

  13. Transcranial parenchymal sonography in patients with Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Association with neuroimaging data, and beyond.

    PubMed

    Chillura, Antonino; Naro, Antonino; Cacciola, Alberto; Bramanti, Alessia; Bramanti, Placido; Calabrò, Rocco Salvatore

    2017-07-01

    Differential diagnosis of patients with Chronic Disorders of Consciousness (DoC) is rather challenging, owing to the lack of objective approaches highlighting residual awareness. Sophisticated functional neuroimaging have provided high diagnostic value, but their application in the clinical setting is limited due to their relative complexity, cost, availability and poor collaboration of persons with DoC. By using a specific ultrasound-based methodology, namely Transcranial B-mode Parenchymal Sonography (TCS), it is possible to obtain images of the main parenchymal brain structures. We assessed the TCS abnormalities in three patients with DoC, demonstrating widespread alterations of brain parenchyma morphology that matched to MRI findings and were associated with the degree of consciousness disorders. Thus, TCS might represent a valuable tool for routine assessment and follow-up of brain structures functioning of patients with DoC, potentially helping in differential diagnosis and prognosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Spontaneous Intra-Parenchymal Rupture of Craniopharyngioma – A Rare Phenomenon

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vivakaran Thanga Tirupathi; Kumar, Aiyappan Senthil; Sundar, Ilangovan Vijay

    2017-01-01

    Craniopharyngioma is a relatively benign intracranial tumour that involves sellar and supra-sellar regions. Spontaneous rupture of craniopharyngioma into the sub-arachnoid space or into the ventricles is a rare phenomenon and few cases are reported in literature. We hereby report a case of sellar-suprasellar craniopharyngioma with focal intra-parenchymal rupture into brain causing aggravation of headache in a 12-year-old female child. This complication is a relatively rare phenomenon, which requires attention for early intervention. This was managed by trans-nasal endoscopic trans-sphenoidal surgery. Usually rupture of craniopharyngioma causes chemical meningitis or it can be asymptomatic. Sometimes rupture can cause complete resolution of cyst and symptoms. In the present case, there was only focal rupture and it was into brain parenchyma causing brain oedema with aggravation of headache. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) in intra-parenchymal rupture of craniopharyngioma has been emphasized in this case report.

  15. The Role of the Corpus Callosum in Pediatric Dysphagia: Preliminary Findings from a Diffusion Tensor Imaging Study in Children with Unilateral Spastic Cerebral Palsy.

    PubMed

    Mourão, Lucia Figueiredo; Friel, Kathleen M; Sheppard, Justine Joan; Kuo, Hsing-Ching; Luchesi, Karen Fontes; Gordon, Andrew M; Malandraki, Georgia A

    2017-06-08

    The purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between the structural integrity of the corpus callosum (CC) and clinical feeding/swallowing performance in children with unilateral spastic cerebral palsy (USCP). Twenty children with USCP, (11 males, 5.11-17.6 yoa) were assessed via the Dysphagia Disorder Survey (DDS) and diffusion tensor imaging. Children were grouped into left hemisphere lesion (LHL; n = 13) and right hemisphere lesion (RHL; n = 7) groups. DTI variables analyzed for three CC regions (anterior, middle, posterior) were: fractional anisotropy (FA), radial diffusivity (RD), mean diffusivity (MD), and fibers count. Children with RHL presented with higher clinical dysphagia severity (p = 0.03). Six of seven children with RHL had lesions affecting periventricular/subcortical areas, and 8/13 children with LHL had lesions affecting the sensorimotor cortex. In the LHL group, as FA and fiber count of the anterior CC decreased and RD increased (all indicating reduced CC structural integrity), signs of dysphagia increased (r = -0.667, p = 0.013; r = -0.829, p ≤ 0.001; r = 0.594, p = 0.032, respectively). Reduced fiber count in the middle and posterior CC was also significantly associated with increased DDS scores (r = -0.762, p = 0.002; r = -0.739, p = 0.004, respectively). For the RHL group no significant correlations were observed. We provide preliminary evidence that corpus callosum integrity correlates with feeding/swallowing performance in children with USCP, especially when cortical sensorimotor areas of the left hemisphere are impacted. In this sample, CC integrity appeared to enable interhemispheric cortical plasticity for swallowing, but was not as critical when intrahemispheric connections were disrupted, as seen in the RHL group.

  16. Diffuse Elevated Abdominal Activity on 99mTc-Labeled Red Blood Cell Imaging in a Pediatric Patient With Klippel Trenaunay Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, Summer L; Zhuang, Hongming

    2016-11-01

    Klippel Trenaunay syndrome commonly manifests as lower limb hypertrophy where vascular malformation occurs. However, up to 20% of patients with Klippel Trenaunay syndrome can have gastrointestinal involvement. An 18-year-old man with known Klippel Trenaunay syndrome in the left lower extremity underwent Tc-labeled red blood cell imaging to determine the site of gastrointestinal bleeding. The images did not reveal the site of active bleeding. However, diffuse non-moving activity in the left abdomen and pelvis was noted, which corresponded to hypertrophied colon and related blood vessels, consistent with intestinal involvement of Klippel Trenaunay syndrome.

  17. Differential effects of fluticasone on extracellular matrix production by airway and parenchymal fibroblasts in severe COPD.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Timens, Wim; Jonker, Marnix R; Rutgers, Bea; Noordhoek, Jacobien A; Postma, Dirkje S

    2013-10-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by abnormal repair in the lung resulting in airway obstruction associated with emphysema and peripheral airway fibrosis. Because the presence and degree of airways disease and emphysema varies between COPD patients, this may explain the heterogeneity in the response to treatment. It is currently unknown whether and to what extent inhaled steroids can affect the abnormal repair process in the airways and lung parenchyma in COPD. We investigated the effects of fluticasone on transforming growth factor (TGF)-β- and cigarette smoke-induced changes in mothers against decapentaplegic homolog (Smad) signaling and extracellular matrix (ECM) production in airway and parenchymal lung fibroblasts from patients with severe COPD. We showed that TGF-β-induced ECM production by pulmonary fibroblasts, but not activation of the Smad pathway, was sensitive to the effects of fluticasone. Fluticasone induced decorin production by airway fibroblasts and partly reversed the negative effects of TGF-β treatment. Fluticasone inhibited biglycan production in both airway and parenchymal fibroblasts and procollagen 1 production only in parenchymal fibroblasts, thereby restoring the basal difference in procollagen 1 production between airway and parenchymal fibroblasts. Our findings suggest that the effects of steroids on the airway compartment may be beneficial for patients with severe COPD, i.e., restoration of decorin loss around the airways, whereas the effects of steroids on the parenchyma may be detrimental, since the tissue repair response, i.e., biglycan and procollagen production, is inhibited. More research is needed to further disentangle these differential effects of steroid treatment on the different lung compartments and its impact on tissue repair and remodeling in COPD.

  18. Alveolar septal patterning during compensatory lung growth: Part II the effect of parenchymal pressure gradients.

    PubMed

    Haber, Shimon; Weisbord, Michal; Mentzer, Steven J; Tsuda, Akira

    2017-05-21

    In most mammals, compensatory lung growth occurs after the removal of one lung (pneumonectomy). Although the mechanism of alveolar growth is unknown, the patterning of complex alveolar geometry over organ-sized length scales is a central question in regenerative lung biology. Because shear forces appear capable of signaling the differentiation of important cells involved in neoalveolarization (fibroblasts and myofibroblasts), interstitial fluid mechanics provide a potential mechanism for the patterning of alveolar growth. The movement of interstitial fluid is created by two basic mechanisms: 1) the non-uniform motion of the boundary walls, and 2) parenchymal pressure gradients external to the interstitial fluid. In a previous study (Haber et al., Journal of Theoretical Biology 400: 118-128, 2016), we investigated the effects of non-uniform stretching of the primary septum (associated with its heterogeneous mechanical properties) during breathing on generating non-uniform Stokes flow in the interstitial space. In the present study, we analyzed the effect of parenchymal pressure gradients on interstitial flow. Dependent upon lung microarchitecture and physiologic conditions, parenchymal pressure gradients had a significant effect on the shear stress distribution in the interstitial space of primary septa. A dimensionless parameter δ described the ratio between the effects of a pressure gradient and the influence of non-uniform primary septal wall motion. Assuming that secondary septa are formed where shear stresses were the largest, it is shown that the geometry of the newly generated secondary septa was governed by the value of δ. For δ smaller than 0.26, the alveolus size was halved while for higher values its original size was unaltered. We conclude that the movement of interstitial fluid, governed by parenchymal pressure gradients and non-uniform primary septa wall motion, provides a plausible mechanism for the patterning of alveolar growth. Copyright © 2017

  19. Sarcoidosis: correlation of pulmonary parenchymal pattern at CT with results of pulmonary function tests

    SciTech Connect

    Bergin, C.J.; Bell, D.Y.; Coblentz, C.L.; Chiles, C.; Gamsu, G.; MacIntyre, N.R.; Coleman, R.E.; Putman, C.E.

    1989-06-01

    The appearances of the lungs on radiographs and computed tomographic (CT) scans were correlated with degree of uptake on gallium scans and results of pulmonary function tests (PFTs) in 27 patients with sarcoidosis. CT scans were evaluated both qualitatively and quantitatively. Patients were divided into five categories on the basis of the pattern of abnormality at CT: 1 = normal (n = 4); 2 = segmental air-space disease (n = 4); 3 = spherical (alveolar) masslike opacities (n = 4); 4 = multiple, discrete, small nodules (n = 6); and 5 = distortion of parenchymal structures (fibrotic end-stage sarcoidosis) (n = 9). The percentage of the volume judged to be abnormal (CT grade) was correlated with PFT results for each CT and radiographic category. CT grades were also correlated with gallium scanning results and percentage of lymphocytes recovered from bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Patients in CT categories 1 and 2 had normal lung function, those in category 3 had mild functional impairment, and those in categories 4 and 5 showed moderate to severe dysfunction. The overall CT grade correlated well with PFT results expressed as a percentage of the predicted value. In five patients, CT scans showed extensive parenchymal disease not seen on radiographs. CT grades did not correlate with the results of gallium scanning or BAL lymphocytes. The authors conclude that patterns of parenchymal sarcoidosis seen at CT correlate with the PFT results and can be used to indicate respiratory impairment.

  20. Copper uptake and retention in liver parenchymal cells isolated from nutritionally copper-deficient rats

    SciTech Connect

    Van den Berg, G.J.; de Goeij, J.J.; Bock, I.; Gijbels, M.J.; Brouwer, A.; Lei, K.Y.; Hendriks, H.F. )

    1991-08-01

    Copper uptake and retention were studied in primary cultures of liver parenchymal cells isolated from copper-deficient rats. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a copper-deficient diet (less than 1 mg Cu/kg) for 10 wk. Copper-deficient rats were characterized by low copper concentrations in plasma and liver, anemia, low plasma ceruloplasmin oxidase activity and increased 64Cu whole-body retention. Freshly isolated liver parenchymal cells from copper-deficient rats showed a higher 64Cu influx, which was associated with a higher apparent Vmax of 45 {plus minus} 4 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 as compared with 30 {plus minus} 3 pmol Cu.mg protein-1.min-1 for cells isolated from copper-sufficient rats. No significant difference in the apparent Km (approximately 30 mumol/L) was observed. Relative 64Cu efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats was significantly smaller than the efflux from cells from copper-sufficient rats after prelabeling as determined by 2-h efflux experiments. Analysis of the medium after efflux from cells from copper-deficient rats showed elevated protein-associated 64Cu, suggesting a higher incorporation of radioactive copper during metalloprotein synthesis. Effects of copper deficiency persist in primary cultures of parenchymal cells derived from copper-deficient rats, and short-term cultures of these cells offer a prospect for the study of cell biological aspects of the metabolic adaptation of the liver to copper deficiency.

  1. Pediatric Cardiomyopathies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Teresa M; Hsu, Daphne T; Kantor, Paul; Towbin, Jeffrey A; Ware, Stephanie M; Colan, Steven D; Chung, Wendy K; Jefferies, John L; Rossano, Joseph W; Castleberry, Chesney D; Addonizio, Linda J; Lal, Ashwin K; Lamour, Jacqueline M; Miller, Erin M; Thrush, Philip T; Czachor, Jason D; Razoky, Hiedy; Hill, Ashley; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2017-09-15

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are rare diseases with an annual incidence of 1.1 to 1.5 per 100 000. Dilated and hypertrophic cardiomyopathies are the most common; restrictive, noncompaction, and mixed cardiomyopathies occur infrequently; and arrhythmogenic right ventricular cardiomyopathy is rare. Pediatric cardiomyopathies can result from coronary artery abnormalities, tachyarrhythmias, exposure to infection or toxins, or secondary to other underlying disorders. Increasingly, the importance of genetic mutations in the pathogenesis of isolated or syndromic pediatric cardiomyopathies is becoming apparent. Pediatric cardiomyopathies often occur in the absence of comorbidities, such as atherosclerosis, hypertension, renal dysfunction, and diabetes mellitus; as a result, they offer insights into the primary pathogenesis of myocardial dysfunction. Large international registries have characterized the epidemiology, cause, and outcomes of pediatric cardiomyopathies. Although adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies have similar morphological and clinical manifestations, their outcomes differ significantly. Within 2 years of presentation, normalization of function occurs in 20% of children with dilated cardiomyopathy, and 40% die or undergo transplantation. Infants with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy have a 2-year mortality of 30%, whereas death is rare in older children. Sudden death is rare. Molecular evidence indicates that gene expression differs between adult and pediatric cardiomyopathies, suggesting that treatment response may differ as well. Clinical trials to support evidence-based treatments and the development of disease-specific therapies for pediatric cardiomyopathies are in their infancy. This compendium summarizes current knowledge of the genetic and molecular origins, clinical course, and outcomes of the most common phenotypic presentations of pediatric cardiomyopathies and highlights key areas where additional research is required. URL: http

  2. [Perfusion computed tomography for diffuse liver diseases].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, S A; Juchems, M S

    2012-08-01

    Perfusion computed tomography (CT) has its main application in the clinical routine diagnosis of neuroradiological problems. Polyphase multi-detector spiral computed tomography is primarily used in liver diagnostics. The use of perfusion CT is also possible for the diagnostics and differentiation of diffuse hepatic diseases. The differentiation between cirrhosis and cirrhosis-like parenchymal changes is possible. It also helps to detect early stages of malignant tumors. However, there are some negative aspects, particularly that of radiation exposure. This paper summarizes the technical basics and possible applications of perfusion CT in cases of diffuse liver disease and weighs up the advantages and disadvantages of the examinations.

  3. At the bottom of the differential diagnosis list: unusual causes of pediatric hypertension.

    PubMed

    Grinsell, Matthew M; Norwood, Victoria F

    2009-11-01

    Hypertension affects 1-5% of children and adolescents, and the incidence has been increasing in association with obesity. However, secondary causes of hypertension such as renal parenchymal diseases, congenital abnormalities and renovascular disorders still remain the leading cause of pediatric hypertension, particularly in children under 12 years old. Other less common causes of hypertension in children and adolescents, including immobilization, burns, illicit and prescription drugs, dietary supplements, genetic disorders, and tumors will be addressed in this review.

  4. Breast Cancer Risk Estimation Using Parenchymal Texture Analysis in Digital Breast Tomosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Kontos, Despina; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2010-10-11

    Mammographic parenchymal texture has been shown to correlate with genetic markers of developing breast cancer. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) is a novel x-ray imaging technique in which tomographic images of the breast are reconstructed from multiple source projections acquired at different angles of the x-ray tube. Compared to digital mammography (DM), DBT eliminates breast tissue overlap, offering superior parenchymal tissue visualization. We hypothesize that texture analysis in DBT could potentially provide a better assessment of parenchymal texture and ultimately result in more accurate assessment of breast cancer risk. As a first step towards validating this hypothesis, we investigated the association between DBT parenchymal texture and breast percent density (PD), a known breast cancer risk factor, and compared it to DM. Bilateral DBT and DM images from 71 women participating in a breast cancer screening trial were analyzed. Filtered-backprojection was used to reconstruct DBT tomographic planes in 1 mm increments with 0.22 mm in-plane resolution. Corresponding DM images were acquired at 0.1 mm pixel resolution. Retroareolar regions of interest (ROIs) equivalent to 2.5 cm{sup 3} were segmented from the DBT images and corresponding 2.5 cm{sup 2} ROIs were segmented from the DM images. Breast PD was mammographically estimated using the Cumulus scale. Overall, DBT texture features demonstrated a stronger correlation than DM to PD. The Pearson correlation coefficients for DBT were r = 0.40 (p<0.001) for contrast and r = -0.52 (p<0.001) for homogeneity; the corresponding DM correlations were r = 0.26 (p = 0.002) and r = -0.33 (p<0.001). Multiple linear regression of the texture features versus breast PD also demonstrated significantly stronger associations in DBT (R{sup 2} = 0.39) compared to DM (R{sup 2} = 0.33). We attribute these observations to the superior parenchymal tissue visualization in DBT. Our study is the first to perform DBT texture analysis in a

  5. Mediastinal lymphadenopathy in pediatric tuberculosis in computed tomography scan.

    PubMed

    Mehrain, Payam; Moghaddam, Amin Momeni; Tavakol, Elham; Amini, Afshin; Moghimi, Mehrdad; Kabir, Ali; Velayati, Ali Akbar

    2016-12-01

    Pediatric tuberculosis is usually a primary infection presenting mainly as mediastinal or hilar adenopathy in computed tomography (CT) scan. In this study, we study the distribution and other CT scan characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy in childhood tuberculosis. Chest CT scans of 75 cases of pediatric tuberculosis at Masih Daneshvari Hospital in Tehran, Iran, from 2009 to 2013 were studied regarding characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Mean±standard deviation age of cases was 11.2±4.6years. Lymphadenopathy (mediastinal/hilar) was detected in 94.7% of cases. Most of the lymphadenopathies were located in the lower paratracheal (81.7%), upper paratracheal (69.1%), hilar (53.5%), and subcarinal (47.9%) stations. Perilymph node fatty stranding, lymphadenopathy conglomeration, bronchial pressure by the lymph nodes, and lymph node calcification were noted in 74.6%, 52.11%, 4.23%, and 5.6% of cases, respectively. Bilateral, right, and left lung parenchymal involvement were reported in 45%, 25%, and 8% of cases, respectively. Lung parenchymal involvement was significantly correlated with lymphadenopathies in subcarinal (p<0.001), hilar (p<0.001), subaortic (p=0.03), lower paratracheal (p=0.037), and axillary (p=0.006) stations. Right- and left-sided pleural effusions were observed in 12.7% and 7% of cases, respectively. Attention to distribution and characteristics of mediastinal lymphadenopathy can help differentiate tuberculosis from other causes of pediatric mediastinal lymphadenopathy. Copyright © 2016.

  6. Pediatric Terminology

    Cancer.gov

    The National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) is working with NCI Enterprise Vocabulary Services (EVS) to provide standardized terminology for coding pediatric clinical trials and other resea

  7. Pediatric Headaches.

    PubMed

    Slover, Robin; Kent, Sheryl

    2015-08-01

    Pediatric headaches are common, and many may never require intervention by a health care provider. However, migraines can become more difficult to treat, especially if they become chronic daily headaches. Pediatric headache is a subjective and unique experience that requires attention to both psychological and physiologic components in diagnosis and treatment. A biopsychosocial, multidisciplinary approach, including both medication management and psychological treatment, is considered essential for effective management.

  8. Pediatric Anthropometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klinich, Kathleen D.; Reed, Matthew P.

    Anthropometry is the measurement of human size, shape, and physical capabilities. Most pediatric anthropometry data are gathered to describe child growth patterns, but data on body size, mass distribution, range of motion, and posture are used to develop crash test dummies and computational models of child occupants. Pediatric anthropometry data are also used to determine child restraint dimensions, so they will accommodate the applicable population of child occupants.

  9. Pediatric melanoma.

    PubMed

    Tracy, Elisabeth T; Aldrink, Jennifer H

    2016-10-01

    Childhood melanoma is a rare pediatric malignancy, with fewer than 500 new diagnoses annually. The incidence is increasing, particularly in the adolescent population. This review highlights the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and histopathologic challenges of pediatric melanoma. Surgical resection remains the cornerstone for localized and regionally advanced disease. Adjuvant therapies, including current options and potential novel therapeutics for this unique population will be discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Pediatric headache.

    PubMed

    Winner, Paul

    2008-06-01

    Headaches occur frequently in the pediatric population and have a significant impact on both the patient and their family. Migraine, the most common headache disorder for which patients see a physician, still remains underdiagnosed and undertreated. Recent studies have revealed the increasing incidence of migraine and chronic migraine in the pediatric population. Limitations of the present diagnostic criteria for migraine are presented, and the proposed modifications to these criteria may assist you with early recognition and ultimate treatment. New acute and preventive migraine treatment data demonstrating statistically significant benefit for the primary endpoints will be reviewed in detail. The clinically relevant impact of migraine on the pediatric patient documented by the use of the Pediatric Migraine Disability Assessment and the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory will be discussed. A comprehensive management approach blending the most current acute, preventive, and biobehavioral treatments will be reviewed. Further research, with novel study designs, in pediatric headaches is needed to help reveal additional pathophysiological mechanisms, improve diagnostic criteria, and advance optimal treatment. Prospective studies are needed to fully evaluate the efficacy of preventive management in this population and to establish whether early intervention might slow this disease progression.

  11. Diffusion tensor imaging and MR spectroscopy of microstructural alterations and metabolite concentration changes in the auditory neural pathway of pediatric congenital sensorineural hearing loss patients.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chunxiao; Huang, Lexing; Tan, Hui; Wang, Yanting; Zheng, Hongyi; Kong, Lingmei; Zheng, Wenbin

    2016-05-15

    Our objective was to evaluate age-dependent changes in microstructure and metabolism in the auditory neural pathway, of children with profound sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL), and to differentiate between good and poor surgical outcome cochlear implantation (CI) patients by using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS). Ninety-two SNHL children (49 males, 43 females; mean age, 4.9 years) were studied by conventional MR imaging, DTI and MRS. Patients were divided into three groups: Group A consisted of children≤1 years old (n=20), Group B consisted of children 1-3 years old (n=31), and group C consisted of children 3-14 years old (n=41). Among the 31 patients (19 males and 12 females, 12m- 14y ) with CI, 18 patients (mean age 4.8±0.7 years) with a categories of auditory performance (CAP) score over five were classified into the good outcome group and 13 patients (mean age, 4.4±0.7 years) with a CAP score below five were classified into the poor outcome group. Two DTI parameters, fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), were measured in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) and auditory radiation. Regions of interest for metabolic change measurements were located inside the STG. DTI values were measured based on region-of-interest analysis and MRS values for correlation analysis with CAP scores. Compared with healthy individuals, 92 SNHL patients displayed decreased FA values in the auditory radiation and STG (p<0.05). Only decreased FA values in the auditory radiation was observed in Group A. Decreased FA values in the auditory radiation and STG were both observed in B and C groups. However, in Group C, the N-acetyl aspartate/creatinine ratio in the STG was also significantly decreased (p<0.05). Correlation analyses at 12 months post-operation revealed strong correlations between the FA, in the auditory radiation, and CAP scores (r=0.793, p<0.01). DTI and MRS can be used to evaluate microstructural

  12. A systematic evaluation of intraoperative white matter tract shift in pediatric epilepsy surgery using high-field MRI and probabilistic high angular resolution diffusion imaging tractography.

    PubMed

    Yang, Joseph Yuan-Mou; Beare, Richard; Seal, Marc L; Harvey, A Simon; Anderson, Vicki A; Maixner, Wirginia J

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Characterization of intraoperative white matter tract (WMT) shift has the potential to compensate for neuronavigation inaccuracies using preoperative brain imaging. This study aimed to quantify and characterize intraoperative WMT shift from the global hemispheric to the regional tract-based scale and to investigate the impact of intraoperative factors (IOFs). METHODS High angular resolution diffusion imaging (HARDI) diffusion-weighted data were acquired over 5 consecutive perioperative time points (MR1 to MR5) in 16 epilepsy patients (8 male; mean age 9.8 years, range 3.8-15.8 years) using diagnostic and intraoperative 3-T MRI scanners. MR1 was the preoperative planning scan. MR2 was the first intraoperative scan acquired with the patient's head fixed in the surgical position. MR3 was the second intraoperative scan acquired following craniotomy and durotomy, prior to lesion resection. MR4 was the last intraoperative scan acquired following lesion resection, prior to wound closure. MR5 was a postoperative scan acquired at the 3-month follow-up visit. Ten association WMT/WMT segments and 1 projection WMT were generated via a probabilistic tractography algorithm from each MRI scan. Image registration was performed through pairwise MRI alignments using the skull segmentation. The MR1 and MR2 pairing represented the first surgical stage. The MR2 and MR3 pairing represented the second surgical stage. The MR3 and MR4 (or MR5) pairing represented the third surgical stage. The WMT shift was quantified by measuring displacements between a pair of WMT centerlines. Linear mixed-effects regression analyses were carried out for 6 IOFs: head rotation, craniotomy size, durotomy size, resected lesion volume, presence of brain edema, and CSF loss via ventricular penetration. RESULTS The average WMT shift in the operative hemisphere was 2.37 mm (range 1.92-3.03 mm) during the first surgical stage, 2.19 mm (range 1.90-3.65 mm) during the second surgical stage, and 2.92 mm

  13. Parenchymal texture analysis in digital mammography: A fully automated pipeline for breast cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Keller, Brad M; Ray, Shonket; Wang, Yan; Conant, Emily F; Gee, James C; Kontos, Despina

    2015-07-01

    Mammographic percent density (PD%) is known to be a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Recent studies also suggest that parenchymal texture features, which are more granular descriptors of the parenchymal pattern, can provide additional information about breast cancer risk. To date, most studies have measured mammographic texture within selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the breast, which cannot adequately capture the complexity of the parenchymal pattern throughout the whole breast. To better characterize patterns of the parenchymal tissue, the authors have developed a fully automated software pipeline based on a novel lattice-based strategy to extract a range of parenchymal texture features from the entire breast region. Digital mammograms from 106 cases with 318 age-matched controls were retrospectively analyzed. The lattice-based approach is based on a regular grid virtually overlaid on each mammographic image. Texture features are computed from the intersection (i.e., lattice) points of the grid lines within the breast, using a local window centered at each lattice point. Using this strategy, a range of statistical (gray-level histogram, co-occurrence, and run-length) and structural (edge-enhancing, local binary pattern, and fractal dimension) features are extracted. To cover the entire breast, the size of the local window for feature extraction is set equal to the lattice grid spacing and optimized experimentally by evaluating different windows sizes. The association between their lattice-based texture features and breast cancer was evaluated using logistic regression with leave-one-out cross validation and further compared to that of breast PD% and commonly used single-ROI texture features extracted from the retroareolar or the central breast region. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). DeLong's test was used to compare the different ROCs in terms of AUC

  14. Parenchymal texture analysis in digital mammography: A fully automated pipeline for breast cancer risk assessment

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yuanjie; Keller, Brad M.; Ray, Shonket; Wang, Yan; Conant, Emily F.; Gee, James C.; Kontos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Mammographic percent density (PD%) is known to be a strong risk factor for breast cancer. Recent studies also suggest that parenchymal texture features, which are more granular descriptors of the parenchymal pattern, can provide additional information about breast cancer risk. To date, most studies have measured mammographic texture within selected regions of interest (ROIs) in the breast, which cannot adequately capture the complexity of the parenchymal pattern throughout the whole breast. To better characterize patterns of the parenchymal tissue, the authors have developed a fully automated software pipeline based on a novel lattice-based strategy to extract a range of parenchymal texture features from the entire breast region. Methods: Digital mammograms from 106 cases with 318 age-matched controls were retrospectively analyzed. The lattice-based approach is based on a regular grid virtually overlaid on each mammographic image. Texture features are computed from the intersection (i.e., lattice) points of the grid lines within the breast, using a local window centered at each lattice point. Using this strategy, a range of statistical (gray-level histogram, co-occurrence, and run-length) and structural (edge-enhancing, local binary pattern, and fractal dimension) features are extracted. To cover the entire breast, the size of the local window for feature extraction is set equal to the lattice grid spacing and optimized experimentally by evaluating different windows sizes. The association between their lattice-based texture features and breast cancer was evaluated using logistic regression with leave-one-out cross validation and further compared to that of breast PD% and commonly used single-ROI texture features extracted from the retroareolar or the central breast region. Classification performance was evaluated using the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC). DeLong’s test was used to compare the different ROCs in

  15. Effects of Parenchymal Thickness and Stone Density Values on Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Karalar, Mustafa; Tuzel, Emre; Keles, Ibrahim; Okur, Nazan; Sarici, Hasmet; Ates, Mutlu

    2016-01-01

    Background It is unclear whether parenchymal thickness (PT), in combination with stone density measured by Hounsfield Units (HU), affects stone-free rates after PCNL. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between PT in combination with stone density values and the outcomes of PCNL. Material/Methods From 2009 to 2014, data from 216 PCNL patients were prospectively analyzed. In total, 120 patients were included in the study. Using NCCT images, stone burden, stone localization, stone density as HU values, PT, and operative-postoperative parameters were recorded. Results Stone localization, stone type, stone burden, and presence of hydronephrosis were statistically significant factors affecting stone-free status (p<0.001, p<0.001, p<0.01, and p<0.01, respectively). The stone-free rate in patients with thicker renal parenchyma was higher than in patients with lower parenchymal thickness (p<0.01). No correlation was detected between stone density and success rate (p>0.05). Drop in Hb (%) was only correlated with parenchymal thickness (p<0.01). In univariate analyses, factors that affected blood transfusion requirement were PT, BMI, and operative times (p<0.01, p<0.05, and p<0.05, respectively). Conclusions Stone location, stone burden, and presence of hydronephrosis detected with NCCT were factors affecting PCNL outcome. Stone density values did not correlate with the rate of bleeding or success of PCNL. PT measured by NCCT may predict bleeding and may guide surgeons in determining preoperative blood requirements. The outcome of PCNL appeared to be better in patients with thicker renal parenchyma and should be taken into consideration in the clinical evaluation of patients undergoing PCNL. PMID:27842051

  16. Nuclear receptor atlas of female mouse liver parenchymal, endothelial, and Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhaosha; Kruijt, J Kar; van der Sluis, Ronald J; Van Berkel, Theo J C; Hoekstra, Menno

    2013-04-01

    The liver consists of different cell types that together synchronize crucial roles in liver homeostasis. Since nuclear receptors constitute an important class of drug targets that are involved in a wide variety of physiological processes, we have composed the hepatic cell type-specific expression profile of nuclear receptors to uncover the pharmacological potential of liver-enriched nuclear receptors. Parenchymal liver cells (hepatocytes) and liver endothelial and Kupffer cells were isolated from virgin female C57BL/6 wild-type mice using collagenase perfusion and counterflow centrifugal elutriation. The hepatic expression pattern of 49 nuclear receptors was generated by real-time quantitative PCR using the NUclear Receptor Signaling Atlas (NURSA) program resources. Thirty-six nuclear receptors were expressed in total liver. FXR-α, EAR2, LXR-α, HNF4-α, and CAR were the most abundantly expressed nuclear receptors in liver parenchymal cells. In contrast, NUR77, COUP-TFII, LXR-α/β, FXR-α, and EAR2 were the most highly expressed nuclear receptors in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Interestingly, members of orphan receptor COUP-TF family showed a distinct expression pattern. EAR2 was highly and exclusively expressed in parenchymal cells, while COUP-TFII was moderately and exclusively expressed in endothelial and Kupffer cells. Of interest, the orphan receptor TR4 showed a similar expression pattern as the established lipid sensor PPAR-γ. In conclusion, our study provides the most complete quantitative assessment of the nuclear receptor distribution in liver reported to date. Our gene expression catalog suggests that orphan nuclear receptors such as COUP-TFII, EAR2, and TR4 may be of significant importance as novel targets for pharmaceutical interventions in liver.

  17. [The clinicopathological analysis of pulmonary parenchymal involvement of multicentric giant lymph node hyperplasia (Castleman's disease)].

    PubMed

    Tian, Xinlun; Ge, Li; Feng, Rui'e; Liu, Tao; Huang, Hui; Xu, Zuojun; Xu, Wenbing; Liu, Hongrui

    2014-05-01

    To observe the clinicopathological features of pulmonary parenchymal involvement of multicentric Castleman's disease(MCD). Retrospective analysis was carried out for 6 patients of MCD with pulmonary parenchymal involvement who had been admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital from July 2008 to March 2013. Relevant literatures were reviewed. The diagnosis was established by surgical lung biopsy and all specimens were fixed in neutral formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections were cut for HE and immunohistochemical stain. B cell and T cell gene rearrangement were tested in 3 cases. These 6 patients (all females) aged 31-68 years, with a median of 49.5 years. The presenting symptoms were fever (4/6), cough (3/6), and lymphadenopathy (6/6). Laboratory study showed elevated ESR (5/6) and CRP (4/6), and hypergammaglobulinaemia (2/6). Chest CT showed multiple nodules with perilymphatic distribution and ground-glass opacity (GGO). Pathologically, there were 5 cases of plasma cell type and 1 case of hyaline vascular type. The plasma cell variant showed dense mature plasma cell infiltration in pulmonary interstitium. The hyaline vascular variant was characterized by the presence of regressed germinal centers and broad concentric mantle zones. The gene arrangement tests were all negative. During the follow-up period (range: 2-60 months; mean: 31 months), 2 cases with plasma cell type received CHOP chemotherapy and then remained stable. One case with hyaline vascular type received CHOP chemotherapy but died due to deterioration of the disease. In the thorax, Castleman's disease usually manifests as hilar and mediastinal lymph node enlargement. Pulmonary parenchymal involvement by MCD is very rare. It is mostly seen in the elderly female, and can manifest with systemic symptoms. Chest CT usually reveals multiple nodules and GGO. It shows similar morphological characteristics to those found in lymph nodes. Immunohistochemistry and gene rearrangement test can help to

  18. The role of hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury and liver parenchymal quality on cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Orci, Lorenzo A; Lacotte, Stéphanie; Oldani, Graziano; Morel, Philippe; Mentha, Gilles; Toso, Christian

    2014-09-01

    Hepatic ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury is a common clinical challenge. Despite accumulating evidence regarding its mechanisms and potential therapeutic approaches, hepatic I/R is still a leading cause of organ dysfunction, morbidity, and resource utilization, especially in those patients with underlying parenchymal abnormalities. In the oncological setting, there are growing concerns regarding the deleterious impact of I/R injury on the risk of post-surgical tumor recurrence. This review aims at giving the last updates regarding the role of hepatic I/R and liver parenchymal quality injury in the setting of oncological liver surgery, using a "bench-to-bedside" approach. Relevant medical literature was identified by searching PubMed and hand scanning of the reference lists of articles considered for inclusion. Numerous preclinical models have depicted the impact of I/R injury and hepatic parenchymal quality (steatosis, age) on increased cancer growth in the injured liver. Putative pathophysiological mechanisms linking I/R injury and liver cancer recurrence include an increased implantation of circulating cancer cells in the ischemic liver and the upregulation of proliferation and angiogenic factors following the ischemic insult. Although limited, there is growing clinical evidence that I/R injury and liver quality are associated with the risk of post-surgical cancer recurrence. In conclusion, on top of its harmful early impact on organ function, I/R injury is linked to increased tumor growth. Therapeutic strategies tackling I/R injury could not only improve post-surgical organ function, but also allow a reduction in the risk of cancer recurrence.

  19. Seizure recurrence in patients with solitary cystic granuloma or single parenchymal cerebral calcification: a comparative evaluation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Laxmi Narayan; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Verma, Rajesh; Singh, Maneesh Kumar; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh

    2013-12-01

    Solitary cysticercus granuloma and single parenchymal calcified lesion are two common neuroimaging abnormalities in Indian patients with epilepsy. In this study, we evaluated the frequency and predictors of seizure recurrence in patients presenting with new onset epilepsy or single epileptic seizures and these two different imaging findings. We enrolled 115 patients with newly diagnosed epilepsy. All patients were clinically evaluated and were treated with oxcarbazepine. No anti-helminthic treatment was prescribed. The patients were followed up for 6 months. In the solitary cystic granuloma group, repeat computed tomography was done after 6 months. The study included 80 patients with solitary cysticercus granuloma and 35 patients with a single calcified lesion. Twenty (25%) patients with solitary cysticercus granuloma and 12 (34.3%) patients with parenchymal calcified lesion had a seizure recurrence during the study period (p = 0.307). After 6 months, 57 (71.3%) patients in the solitary cysticercus granuloma group demonstrated complete resolution of the granuloma and in 21 (26.2%) patients the granuloma transformed into a calcified lesion. In the solitary cysticercus granuloma group, a family history of seizure, serial seizures and calcification on follow-up neuroimaging (p < 0.05) were significantly associated with recurrence of seizures. In patients with a single parenchymal calcified lesions, electroencephalographic abnormalities and serial seizures (p = < 0.05) were significant predictors of recurrence. Kaplan-Meier statistics revealed that the seizure recurrence rate was insignificantly higher in patients with calcified lesions than in patients with solitary cysticercosis granulomas. In conclusion, in patients with solitary cysticercus granuloma, a family history of seizures, serial seizures and calcification of the granuloma, and in patients with a calcified brain lesion, electroencephalographic abnormalities, family history of epilepsy and serial seizures

  20. Evaluation of intense renal parenchymal activity (hot kidneys) on bone scintigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, M.S.; Hayward, M.; Hayward, C.; Mundy, L. )

    1990-04-01

    The bone scintigrams of 600 patients performed over a 12-month period were reviewed. Thirty-six demonstrated abnormalities of the urinary tract of which six cases of intense renal parenchymal activity (hot kidneys) were found. Two cases were related to treatment with the new antineoplastic agent mitoxantrone. In one patient it was related to treatment with calcitonin. Neither of these associations has been previously reported. Recognized causes of hypercalcemia and recent radiotherapy were present in two patients. No cause could be found in the final patient.

  1. Pediatric dermatology.

    PubMed

    Baruch, K

    1986-07-01

    Dr. Baruch presents some of the most common pediatric lower extremity skin conditions seen in clinical practice. The conditions that he discusses appear to be relatively easy to diagnose in the early stages; however, some of them, such as contact dermatitis and atopic dermatitis, may be hard to distinguish from one another. I have to admit that I have never seen lichen planus in the pediatric age group; I will need to keep looking. I agree with Dr. Baruch that classification of lesions into either the primary and secondary groups will aid in diagnosis and treatment. It also seems that the ever-present verrucae is the most common pediatric condition seen in our office, and we have taken similar steps in treating this condition with blunt dissection with excellent results.

  2. Pediatric photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Grossberg, Anna L

    2012-08-01

    Photosensitivity is a rarely encountered problem in the pediatric population. It may be caused by a diverse group of primary, idiopathic photosensitivity conditions, or may reflect photoexacerbation of an existing dermatosis. In addition, there are several genodermatoses, metabolic disorders, and connective tissue disorders that can present with photosensitivity, usually in addition to other extracutaneous clinical and laboratory findings. It is important that both dermatologic and pediatric practitioners be able to recognize the various causes of photosensitivity, as well as be familiar with the associated stigmata and necessary workup, if needed, of each particular disorder. This review offers an approach to the pediatric patient who presents with photosensitivity, with emphasis on arriving at the proper diagnosis, necessary evaluations, and management strategies. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Pediatric Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Williams, Regan F; Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Gosain, Ankush

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of tumors accounting for approximately 10% of childhood solid tumors. Treatment is focused on multimodality therapy, which has improved the prognosis over the past two decades. Current regimens focus on decreasing treatment for low-risk patients to decrease the long-term side effects while maximizing therapy for patients with metastatic disease to improve survival. Pediatric sarcomas can be divided into soft tissue sarcomas and osseous tumors. Soft tissue sarcomas are further delineated into rhabdomyosarcomas, which affect young children and nonrhabdomyosarcomas, which are most common in adolescents. The most common bone sarcomas are osteosarcomas and Ewing's sarcoma.

  4. Pediatric rosacea.

    PubMed

    Kellen, Roselyn; Silverberg, Nanette B

    2016-07-01

    Because rosacea is uncommon in the pediatric population, care must be taken to exclude other papulopustular disorders. Children can present with vascular, papulopustular, and/or ocular findings. Importantly, ocular symptoms can appear before the cutaneous symptoms of rosacea, leading to misdiagnosis. Rosacea is a clinical diagnosis, but histopathologic examination typically reveals dilated vessels, perivascular lymphohistiocytic infiltrates in the upper dermis, elastosis, and disorganization of the upper dermal connective tissue. Treatment involves avoiding known triggers and utilizing topical and/or systemic therapies. Although treatment can control flares, pediatric rosacea often persists into adulthood.

  5. Expression of hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase enzyme in the human central nervous system and in pineal parenchymal cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takahiro; Akiyama, Nobutake; Ikegami, Masahiro; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Oka, Hidehiro; Komori, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuko; Nakazato, Youichi; Akimoto, Jiro; Tanaka, Masahiko; Okada, Yoshikazu; Saito, Saburo

    2010-05-01

    Pineal parenchymal tumor (PPT) cells usually show immunoreactivity for synaptophysin, neuron-specific enolase, neurofilament protein, class III beta-tubulin, tau protein, PGP9.5, chromogranin, serotonin, retinal S-antigen, and rhodopsin, but these markers are not specific for PPTs. Melatonin is produced and secreted mainly bypineal parenchymal cells; hydroxyindole-O-methyltransferase (HIOMT) catalyzes the final reaction in melatonin biosynthesis. We hypothesized that HIOMT could serve as a tumor marker of PPTs, and we investigated HIOMT localization and HIOMT expression in samples of normal human tissue and in PPTs, primitive neuroectodermal tumors, and medulloblastomas. In normal tissue, HIOMT was expressed in retinal cells, pineal parenchymal cells, neurons of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, microglia, macrophages, thyroid follicular epithelium, principal and oxyphil cells of parathyroid gland, adrenal cortical cells, hepatic parenchymal cells, renal tubule epithelium, and enteroendocrine cells of stomach and duodenum. The HIOMT was also expressed in all 46 PPTs studied. The proportions of HIOMT-immunoreactive cells successively decreased in the following tumors: pineocytoma, pineal parenchymal tumor of intermediate differentiation, and pineoblastoma. A few HIOMT-immunoreactive cells were observed in one of 6 primitive neuroectodermal tumors and 23 of 42 medulloblastomas. These results indicate that HIOMT immunohistochemistry may be useful for the diagnosis of PPTs and be a prognostic factor in PPTs.

  6. Disparate roles of marrow- and parenchymal cell-derived TLR4 signaling in murine LPS-induced systemic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Juskewitch, Justin E.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Knudsen, Bruce E.; Knutson, Keith L.; Brunn, Gregory J.; Grande, Joseph P.

    2012-01-01

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) occurs in a range of infectious and non-infectious disease processes. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) initiate such responses. We have shown that parenchymal cell TLR4 activation drives LPS-induced systemic inflammation; SIRS does not develop in mice lacking TLR4 expression on parenchymal cells. The parenchymal cell types whose TLR4 activation directs this process have not been identified. Employing a bone marrow transplant model to compartmentalize TLR4 signaling, we characterized blood neutrophil and cytokine responses, NF-κB1 activation, and Tnf-α, Il6, and Ccl2 induction in several organs (spleen, aorta, liver, lung) near the time of LPS-induced symptom onset. Aorta, liver, and lung gene responses corresponded with both LPS-induced symptom onset patterns and plasma cytokine/chemokine levels. Parenchymal cells in aorta, liver, and lung bearing TLR4 responded to LPS with chemokine generation and were associated with increased plasma chemokine levels. We propose that parenchymal cells direct SIRS in response to LPS. PMID:23213355

  7. Quantitative Assessment of Breast Parenchymal Uptake on 18F-FDG PET/CT: Correlation with Age, Background Parenchymal Enhancement, and Amount of Fibroglandular Tissue on MRI.

    PubMed

    Leithner, Doris; Baltzer, Pascal A; Magometschnigg, Heinrich F; Wengert, Georg J; Karanikas, Georgios; Helbich, Thomas H; Weber, Michael; Wadsak, Wolfgang; Pinker, Katja

    2016-10-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and the amount of fibroglandular tissue (FGT) assessed with MRI have been implicated as sensitive imaging biomarkers for breast cancer. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively assess breast parenchymal uptake (BPU) on (18)F-FDG PET/CT as another valuable imaging biomarker and examine its correlation with BPE, FGT, and age. This study included 129 patients with suspected breast cancer and normal imaging findings in one breast (BI-RADS 1), whose cases were retrospectively analyzed. All patients underwent prone (18)F-FDG PET/CT and 3-T contrast-enhanced MRI of the breast. In all patients, interpreter 1 assessed BPU quantitatively using SUVmax Interpreters 1 and 2 assessed amount of FGT and BPE in the normal contralateral breast by subjective visual estimation, as recommended by BI-RADS. Interpreter 1 reassessed all cases and repeated the BPU measurements. Statistical tests were used to assess correlations between BPU, BPE, FGT, and age, as well as inter- and intrainterpreter agreement. BPU on (18)F-FDG PET/CT varied among patients. The mean BPU SUVmax ± SD was 1.57 ± 0.6 for patients with minimal BPE, 1.93 ± 0.6 for mild BPE, 2.42 ± 0.5 for moderate BPE, and 1.45 ± 0.3 for marked BPE. There were significant (P < 0.001) moderate to strong correlations among BPU, BPE, and FGT. BPU directly correlated with both BPE and FGT on MRI. Patient age showed a moderate to strong indirect correlation with all 3 imaging-derived tissue biomarkers. The coefficient of variation for quantitative BPU measurements with SUVmax was 5.6%, indicating a high reproducibility. Interinterpreter and intrainterpreter agreement for BPE and FGT was almost perfect, with a κ-value of 0.860 and 0.822, respectively. The results of our study demonstrate that BPU varied among patients. BPU directly correlated with both BPE and FGT on MRI, and BPU measurements were highly reproducible. Patient age showed a strong inverse correlation with all 3 imaging

  8. Pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: can magnetic resonance urography identify crossing vessels?

    PubMed

    Parikh, Kushal R; Hammer, Matthew R; Kraft, Kate H; Ivančić, Vesna; Smith, Ethan A; Dillman, Jonathan R

    2015-11-01

    MR Urography (MRU) is an increasingly used imaging modality for the evaluation of pediatric genitourinary obstruction. To determine whether pediatric MR urography (MRU) reliably detects crossing vessels in the setting of suspected ureteropelvic junction (UPJ) obstruction. The clinical significance of these vessels was also evaluated. We identified pediatric patients diagnosed with UPJ obstruction by MRU between May 2009 and June 2014. MRU studies were evaluated by two pediatric radiologists for the presence or absence of crossing vessels. Ancillary imaging findings such as laterality, parenchymal thinning/scarring, trapped fluid in the proximal ureter, and presence of renal parenchymal edema were also evaluated. Imaging findings were compared to surgical findings. We used the Mann-Whitney U test to compare continuous data and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. Twenty-four of 25 (96%) UPJ obstructions identified by MRU were surgically confirmed. MRU identified crossing vessels in 10 of these cases, with 9 cases confirmed intraoperatively (κ = 0.92 [95% CI: 0.75, 1.0]). Crossing vessels were determined to be the primary cause of UPJ obstruction in 7/9 children intraoperatively, while in two children the vessels were deemed incidental and noncontributory to the urinary tract obstruction. There was no significant difference in age or the proportions of ancillary findings when comparing children without and with obstructing vessels. MRU allows detection of crossing vessels in pediatric UPJ obstruction. Although these vessels are the primary cause of obstruction in some children, they are incidental and non-contributory in others. Our study failed to convincingly identify any significant predictors (e.g., age or presence of renal parenchymal edema) that indicate when a crossing vessel is the primary cause of obstruction.

  9. Transport systems of serine at the brain barriers and in brain parenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Yasuyuki; Tachikawa, Masanori; Hirose, Shirou; Akanuma, Shin-ichi; Hosoya, Ken-ichi

    2011-07-01

    D-Serine is a co-agonist for NMDA-type glutamate receptors. Although D-serine levels in CSF and interstitial fluid (ISF) affect CNS function, the regulatory system remains to be fully understood. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate d-serine transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and blood-CSF barrier (BCSFB) and in brain parenchymal cells. D-Serine microinjected into the cerebrum was not eliminated, suggesting a negligible contribution of D-serine efflux transport at the BBB. In contrast, D-serine was taken up from the circulating blood across the BBB via a carrier-mediated process. D-Serine elimination clearance from CSF was fourfold greater than that of d-mannitol, which is considered to reflect CSF bulk flow. The characteristics of D-serine uptake by isolated choroid plexus were consistent with those of Na(+)-independent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 1 (asc-1). Uptake of D-serine by brain slices appeared to occur predominantly via asc-1 and Na(+)-dependent alanine-serine-cysteine transporter 2. These findings suggest that the regulatory system of D-serine levels in ISF and CSF involves (i) asc-1 at the BCSFB, acting as a major pathway of D-serine elimination from the CSF, (ii) blood-to-brain and blood-to-CSF influx transport of D-serine across the BBB and BCSFB, and (iii) concentrative uptake of D-serine by brain parenchymal cells.

  10. Effects of Ankaferd Blood Stopper and calcium alginate in experimental model of hepatic parenchymal bleeding.

    PubMed

    Aydin, O; Tuncal, S; Kilicoglu, B; Onalan, A K; Gonultas, M A; Ozer, H; Durhan, A; Tasova, V; Hucumenoglu, S; Kismet, K

    2015-01-01

    This experimental study compared the hemostatic effects of calcium alginate and Anka-ferd Blood Stopper in hepatic parenchymal bleedings. The study comprised 39 male Wistar albino rats (weight 230±30 g). Laceration model was created in the left lateral lobe of the liver. Standard cotton gauze that was impregnated 0.9% NaCl solution and Calcium alginate cover was compared to ABS tampon. The amount of preoperative bleeding, preoperative and postoperative Day 1 hematocrit levels, and the difference between them were assessed and statistically analyzed. Comparing the hematocrit levels between the groups, we found that the amount of bleeding was significantly higher in the control group versus the study groups (p<0.001). Histopathological examination revealed the portal area enlargement and biliary canaliculi proliferation. In the Ca2+ Alginate group, it was observed that the fibres were still present in the incision line with massive fibrotic area around. In the Ankaferd group, examination of the preparations revealed patchy focal necrosis areas but no fibrotic area. With this study, we demonstrated that both calcium alginate and Ankaferd have hemostatic effect in preventing hepatic parenchymal bleeding and that calcium alginate causes fibrosis in the liver, where ABS causes focal necrosis areas(Tab. 2, Fig. 4, Ref. 19).

  11. Parenchymal-sparing liver surgery in patients with colorectal carcinoma liver metastases

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez, Fernando A; Sanchez Claria, Rodrigo; Oggero, Sebastian; de Santibañes, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Liver resection is the treatment of choice for patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM). However, major resections are often required to achieve R0 resection, which are associated with substantial rates of morbidity and mortality. Maximizing the amount of residual liver gained increasing significance in modern liver surgery due to the high incidence of chemotherapy-associated parenchymal injury. This fact, along with the progressive expansion of resectability criteria, has led to the development of a surgical philosophy known as “parenchymal-sparing liver surgery” (PSLS). This philosophy includes a variety of resection strategies, either performed alone or in combination with ablative therapies. A profound knowledge of liver anatomy and expert intraoperative ultrasound skills are required to perform PSLS appropriately and safely. There is a clear trend toward PSLS in hepatobiliary centers worldwide as current evidence indicates that tumor biology is the most important predictor of intrahepatic recurrence and survival, rather than the extent of a negative resection margin. Tumor removal avoiding the unnecessary sacrifice of functional parenchyma has been associated with less surgical stress, fewer postoperative complications, uncompromised cancer-related outcomes and higher feasibility of future resections. The increasing evidence supporting PSLS prompts its consideration as the gold-standard surgical approach for CLM. PMID:27358673

  12. The degree of roentgenographic parenchymal opacities attributable to smoking among asbestos-exposed subjects

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, S.; Thornquist, M.; Omenn, G.S.; Goodman, G.; Feigl, P.; Rosenstock, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Considerable controversy surrounds the question of whether cigarette smoking has the potential to increase the prevalence of small opacities on chest roentgenographs among asbestos-exposed workers. To compare the relative contribution of smoking with other predictors of the presence of roentgenographic small opacities, we examined 661 men enrolled in a double-blind, randomized trial designed to assess the efficacy of vitamin A and beta-carotene in the prevention of lung cancer among workers with heavy occupational asbestos exposure. Subjects in the study population had a mean latency of 35 yr from first asbestos exposure and a mean of 28 yr in their trade. The prevalence of roentgenographic abnormalities consistent with asbestos exposure was 26% for pleural abnormalities alone, 10% for parenchymal abnormalities alone, and 20% for pleural and parenchymal abnormalities together. We investigated occupation, age, latency from first asbestos exposure, and smoking status as predictors of roentgenographic small opacities. Smoking history, independent of latency, contributed to the prevalence and extent of small opacities, but its effect was less than that of latency. We conclude, that in the setting of heavy occupational exposure to asbestos, cigarette smoking confers added risk for the development of roentgenographic small opacities.

  13. Potent spinal parenchymal AAV9-mediated gene delivery by subpial injection in adult rats and pigs

    PubMed Central

    Miyanohara, Atsushi; Kamizato, Kota; Juhas, Stefan; Juhasova, Jana; Navarro, Michael; Marsala, Silvia; Lukacova, Nada; Hruska-Plochan, Marian; Curtis, Erik; Gabel, Brandon; Ciacci, Joseph; Ahrens, Eric T; Kaspar, Brian K; Cleveland, Don; Marsala, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Effective in vivo use of adeno-associated virus (AAV)-based vectors to achieve gene-specific silencing or upregulation in the central nervous system has been limited by the inability to provide more than limited deep parenchymal expression in adult animals using delivery routes with the most clinical relevance (intravenous or intrathecal). Here, we demonstrate that the spinal pia membrane represents the primary barrier limiting effective AAV9 penetration into the spinal parenchyma after intrathecal AAV9 delivery. We develop a novel subpial AAV9 delivery technique and AAV9-dextran formulation. We use these in adult rats and pigs to show (i) potent spinal parenchymal transgene expression in white and gray matter including neurons, glial and endothelial cells after single bolus subpial AAV9 delivery; (ii) delivery to almost all apparent descending motor axons throughout the length of the spinal cord after cervical or thoracic subpial AAV9 injection; (iii) potent retrograde transgene expression in brain motor centers (motor cortex and brain stem); and (iv) the relative safety of this approach by defining normal neurological function for up to 6 months after AAV9 delivery. Thus, subpial delivery of AAV9 enables gene-based therapies with a wide range of potential experimental and clinical utilizations in adult animals and human patients. PMID:27462649

  14. Hepatic non-parenchymal cells and extracellular matrix participate in oval cell-mediated liver regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Zhang, Wan-Guang; Zhang, Feng; Xiang, Shuai; Dong, Han-Hua; Zhang, Lei

    2009-01-01

    AIM: To elucidate the interaction between non-parenchymal cells, extracellular matrix and oval cells during the restituting process of liver injury induced by partial hepatectomy (PH). METHODS: We examined the localization of oval cells, non-parenchymal cells, and the extracellular matrix components using immunohistochemical and double immunofluorescent analysis during the proliferation and differentiation of oval cells in N-2-acetylaminofluorene (2-AAF)/PH rat model. RESULTS: By day 2 after PH, small oval cells began to proliferate around the portal area. Most of stellate cells and laminin were present along the hepatic sinusoids in the periportal area. Kupffer cells and fibronectin markedly increased in the whole hepatic lobule. From day 4 to 9, oval cells spread further into hepatic parenchyma, closely associated with stellate cells, fibronectin and laminin. Kupffer cells admixed with oval cells by day 6 and then decreased in the periportal zone. From day 12 to 15, most of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), laminin and fibronectin located around the small hepatocyte nodus, and minority of them appeared in the nodus. Kupffer cells were mainly limited in the pericentral sinusoids. After day 18, the normal liver lobule structures began to recover. CONCLUSION: Local hepatic microenvironment may participate in the oval cell-mediated liver regeneration through the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:19195056

  15. Renal transplantation parenchymal complications: what Doppler ultrasound can and cannot do.

    PubMed

    Granata, Antonio; Di Nicolò, Pierpaolo; Scarfia, Viviana R; Insalaco, Monica; Lentini, Paolo; Veroux, Massimiliano; Fatuzzo, Pasquale; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2015-06-01

    Kidney transplantation is the treatment of choice in end-stage renal disease, given the better quality of life of transplanted patients when compared with patients on maintenance dialysis. In spite of surgical improvements and new immunosuppressive regimens, parts of transplanted grafts still develop chronic dysfunction. Ultrasonography, both in B-mode and with Doppler ultrasound, is an important diagnostic tool in case of clinical conditions which might impair kidney function. Even though ultrasonography is considered fundamental in the diagnosis of vascular and surgical complications of the transplanted kidney, its role is not fully understood in case of parenchymal complications of the graft. The specificity of Doppler is low both in case of acute complications, such as acute tubular necrosis, drugs toxicity and acute rejection, and in case of chronic conditions, such as chronic allograft nephropathy. Single determinations of resistance indices present low diagnostic accuracy, which is higher in case of successive measurements performed during the follow-up of the graft. Modern techniques such as tissue pulsatility index, maximal fractional area and contrast-enhanced ultrasound increase ultrasonography diagnostic power in case of parenchymal complications of the transplanted kidney.

  16. Endobronchial Ultrasound-Guided Transbronchial Needle Aspiration for the Diagnosis of Central Lung Parenchymal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Verma, Akash; Jeon, Kyeongman; Koh, Won-Jung; Suh, Gee Young; Chung, Man Pyo; Kim, Hojoong; Kwon, O Jung

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of convex probe endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) for detecting malignancy in parenchymal pulmonary lesions located adjacent to the central airways. Materials and Methods We retrospectively reviewed the diagnostic performance of EBUS-TBNA in consecutive patients with high clinical suspicion of a centrally located primary lung cancer who had undergone EBUS-TBNA at the Samsung Medical Center between May 2009 and June 2011. Results Thirty-seven patients underwent EBUS-TBNA for intrapulmonary lesions adjacent to the central airways. Seven lesions were located adjacent to the trachea and 30 lesions were located adjacent to the bronchi. Cytologic and histologic samples obtained via EBUS-TBNA were diagnostic in 32 of 37 (86.4%) of patients. The final diagnosis was lung cancer in 30 patients (7 small cell lung cancer, 23 non-small cell lung cancer), lymphoma in one and malignant fibrous histiocytoma in one patient. The diagnostic sensitivity of EBUS-TBNA in detecting malignancy and detecting both malignancy and benignity was 91.4% and 86.5%, respectively. Two patients experienced minor complications. Conclusion EBUS-TBNA is an effective and safe method for tissue diagnosis of parenchymal lesions that lie centrally close to the airways. EBUS-TBNA should be considered the procedure of choice for patients with centrally located lesions without endobronchial involvement. PMID:23549813

  17. Pediatric Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Skin changes are common in children. Common concerns are birthmarks (e.g., hemangiomas and port wine stains), atopic and contact dermatitis, acne, and alopecia areata. The authors review advances in common and not so common skin changes in pediatric patients. PMID:28360970

  18. Pediatric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Barut, Kenan; Sahin, Sezgin; Kasapcopur, Ozgur

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to define childhood vasculitis and to highlight new causative factors and treatment modalities under the guidance of recently published studies. Childhood vasculitis is difficult to diagnose because of the wide variation in the symptoms and signs. New nomenclature and classification criteria were proposed for the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Recently, progress has been made toward understanding the genetic susceptibility to pediatric vasculitis as it was in other diseases. Various radiological techniques provide great opportunities in establishing the diagnosis of pediatric vasculitis. Mild central nervous system disease can accompany Henoch-Schonlein purpura and can go unnoticed. Antineutrophilic cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis is rare in children. Increased severity of the disease, subglottic stenosis, and renal disease are described more frequently among children. Biological therapies are used with success in children as in adults. Future studies, whose aims are to evaluate treatment responses, prognosis and to design guidelines for activity, and damage index of vasculitis for children are required. Henoch-Schonlein purpura and Kawasaki disease are the most frequent vasculitides of children. Experience from adult studies for treatment and prognosis are usually used because of low incidence of other vasculitides in children. Multicenter studies of pediatric vasculitis should be conducted to detail treatment responses and prognosis in children.

  19. Pediatric ultrasonography

    SciTech Connect

    Hayden, C.K. Jr.; Swischuk, L.E.

    1987-01-01

    Two leading experts explore the benefits and limitations of pediatric ultrasonography, explaining the latest techniques for optimal imaging of specific body regions: the head, chest, abdomen, pelvis, extremities, and soft tissues. Numerous illustrations emphasize significant points and combine with the text to show specifically what to look for when imaging children.

  20. Hepatic uptake of (TH)retinol bound to the serum retinol binding protein involves both parenchymal and perisinusoidal stellate cells

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Norum, K.R.; Berg, T.

    1985-11-05

    We have studied the hepatic uptake of retinol bound to the circulating retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. Labeled complex was obtained from the plasma of donor rats that were fed radioactive retinol. When labeled retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex was injected intravenously into control rats, about 45% of the administered dose was recovered in liver after 56 h. Parenchymal liver cells were responsible for an initial rapid uptake. Perisinusoidal stellate cells initially accumulated radioactivity more slowly than did the parenchymal cells, but after 16 h, these cells contained more radioactivity than the parenchymal cells. After 56 h, about 70% of the radioactivity recovered in liver was present in stellate cells. For the first 2 h after injection, most of the radioactivity in parenchymal cells was recovered as unesterified retinol. The radioactivity in the retinyl ester fraction increased after a lag period of about 2 h, and after 5 h more than 60% of the radioactivity was recovered as retinyl esters. In stellate cells, radioactivity was mostly present as retinyl esters at all time points examined. Uptake of retinol in both parenchymal cells and stellate cells was reduced considerably in vitamin A-deficient rats. Less than 5% of the injected dose of radioactivity was found in liver after 5-6 h (as compared to 25% in control rats), and the radioactivity recovered in liver from these animals was mostly in the unesterified retinol fraction. Studies with separated cells in vitro suggested that both parenchymal and stellate cells isolated from control rats were able to take up retinol from the retinol-retinol binding protein-transthyretin complex. This uptake was temperature dependent.

  1. Pediatric sleep apnea

    MedlinePlus

    Sleep apnea - pediatric; Apnea - pediatric sleep apnea syndrome; Sleep-disordered breathing - pediatric ... During sleep, all of the muscles in the body become more relaxed. This includes the muscles that help keep ...

  2. Pediatric tracheostomy.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Paolo; Forte, Vito

    2016-06-01

    Tracheotomy refers to a surgical incision made into a trachea. Tracheostomy, on the other hand, refers to a surgical procedure whereby the tracheal lumen is positioned in close proximity to the skin surface. Tracheostomy is an uncommon procedure in the pediatric population. When required tracheostomy is typically performed as an open surgical procedure under general anesthesia with the patient intubated. However, it may need to be performed under local anesthesia or over a rigid bronchoscope in the patient with a precarious airway. Over the past half century, the primary indication for pediatric tracheostomy has shifted from acute infectious airway compromise to the need for prolonged ventilatory support in neurologically compromised children. The surgical technique, choice of tracheostomy tube, and post-operative care requires a nuanced approach in infants and young children. This article will review these topics in a comprehensive fashion.

  3. Pediatric parasomnias.

    PubMed

    Mason, Thornton B A; Pack, Allan I

    2007-02-01

    Parasomnias in childhood are common, and often more frequent than in adults. The large number of parasomnias underscore that sleep is not simply a quiescent state, but can involve complex episodes of movement, ranging from subtle to dramatic and complex. Clinicians should be aware that many pediatric parasomnias are benign, self-limited, and may not persist into late childhood or adolescence. Importantly, parasomnias in childhood often differ in type from adults. Nevertheless, parasomnias across ages can be classified as: 1) disorders of arousal (from non-rapid eye movement, or NREM, sleep); 2) parasomnias usually associated with REM sleep; and 3) other parasomnias. We detail here issues in the clinical diagosis, evaluation, and management of multiple pediatric parasomnias. The further study of parasomnias in children may help elucidate the multi-factorial etiologies of these fascinating conditions, shedding light on the potential genetic bases as well as environmental contributions.

  4. Pediatric stridor.

    PubMed

    Ida, Jonathan B; Thompson, Dana Mara

    2014-10-01

    Pediatric stridor is an important symptom of upper airway obstruction, and must be recognized early by evaluating physicians. Proper evaluation and management, both acutely and chronically, can provide improved outcomes and better quality of life for patients. This article discusses the physiology of stridor and its intimate relation to airway anatomy, the work-up of the stridorous child, and recent advances in treatment, and provides illustrative examples of common lesions.

  5. Pediatric Virology

    PubMed Central

    Portnoy, Bernard

    1965-01-01

    Pediatric virology is not an isolàted discipline. Rather, the syndromes associated with viral infection are modified by the unique characteristics of infancy and childhood. Fortunately for the pediatrician, and certainly for children, viral infections in childhood are rarely fatal, and are almost never serious. Future efforts of the pediatrician and virologist should be directed toward increased fetal salvage as with rubella and the prevention of severe, viral lower respiratory tract disease. PMID:14298871

  6. Pediatric sialendoscopy.

    PubMed

    Bruch, Jean M; Setlur, Jennifer

    2012-01-01

    Sialendoscopy was introduced in the early 1990s as a minimally invasive alternative to standard methods for diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory and obstructive salivary gland disease. The technique was pioneered in adults; however, advances in instrumentation have allowed this to be adapted to the smaller salivary ductal anatomy found in the pediatric population. In this chapter, the technique of sialendoscopy for parotid and submandibular glands is described.

  7. Preliminary report on digitalization of renal microangiograms used in analysing renal parenchymal diseases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, M; Kaneko, M

    1983-01-01

    Glomerulography is a useful method for the angiographic diagnosis of various renal parenchymal diseases. A new system for digitalization of the glomerulogram has been developed using a high resolution television camera and a CT computer. We describe the fundamental procedures involved in the clinical application of digital glomerulography by applying this method to a renal microangiogram of a cow. This new method aids a clearer understanding of the detailed microvasculatures by providing better magnification and storage and allowing for further processing of the original analogue images. With a computer printout of any part of the glomerulogram also possible, an estimation of the glomerular counts and their distribution can now be given for any unit of cross-sectional area of the renal cortex.

  8. Hepatic vein, hepatic parenchymal, and inferior vena caval mechanoreceptors with phrenic afferents.

    PubMed

    Kostreva, D R; Pontus, S P

    1993-07-01

    Dogs were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and placed on positive-pressure ventilation. The right phrenic nerve and/or its C5 branch were prepared for afferent recording. The hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma, diaphragm, and inferior vena cava were studied for mechanoreceptors using light pressure and stroking as the stimuli. Mechanosensitive areas were found in the hepatic veins, hepatic parenchyma of the right medial lobe, and inferior vena cava. The hepatic vein and inferior vena caval receptors are located in the same 1- to 2-cm region as the sphincters that are found in these vessels. This study presents the first experimental evidence for the existence of hepatic vein receptors, hepatic parenchymal receptors, and inferior vena caval mechanoreceptors with phrenic afferents in the dog. These sensory areas of the circulation may be involved in the neural control of venous return as well as mediating changes in intrahepatic and portal venous blood pressure during normal respiration.

  9. Amiodarone-induced loculated pleural effusion without pulmonary parenchymal involvement: A case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Hawatmeh, Amer; Thawabi, Mohammad; Jmeian, Ashraf; Shaaban, Hamid; Shamoon, Fayez

    2017-01-01

    Amiodarone is an extremely effective antiarrhythmic drug that is known to cause many adverse effects such as pulmonary, thyroid, and liver toxicities. Of these, pulmonary toxicity is most serious. Pulmonary toxicity can present as interstitial pneumonitis, organizing pneumonia, pulmonary nodules and masses, and very rarely pleural effusions. We present a case of a 73-year-old male who presented with progressive exertional dyspnea, nonproductive cough, generalized fatigue, and weakness. He was found to have multiorgan toxicity secondary to long-term treatment with high doses of amiodarone. This case illustrates that amiodarone may cause toxicity involving multiple organs simultaneously in patients receiving long-term therapy and represents the first reported case of amiodarone-induced loculated pleural effusion without associated lung parenchymal involvement. PMID:28250689

  10. Epidermal growth factor counteracts the glycogenic effect of insulin in parenchymal hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, M H; Agius, L

    1987-01-01

    Rat parenchymal hepatocytes in monolayer culture were used to study the metabolic effects of epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin on ketogenesis, gluconeogenesis and glycogen metabolism. EGF, unlike insulin, did not inhibit ketogenesis from palmitate or gluconeogenesis from pyruvate in hepatocyte cultures. It also had no effect on these pathways in the presence of insulin. In contrast, EGF potently counteracted the stimulation of [14C]pyruvate incorporation into glycogen by insulin, and also glycogen deposition from both gluconeogenic precursors and glucose. The EGF concentration causing half-maximal effect was about 0.1 nM. The anti-glycogenic effect of EGF was observed after both long-term (24 h) and short-term (1 h) exposure to EGF, and was more marked in the presence of insulin than in its absence. EGF did not displace bound insulin, suggesting that it neither competes for the insulin receptor nor affects the affinity of the receptor for insulin. EGF did not alter cellular cyclic AMP; and inhibition of cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity did not prevent the anti-glycogenic effect of EGF. In liver-derived dividing epithelial cells, Hep-G2 cells and fibroblasts, which have no capacity for gluconeogenesis, EGF did not counteract the stimulatory effect of insulin on [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen, and in the epithelial cells EGF increased [14C]glucose incorporation into glycogen. The counter-effect of EGF on the glycogenic action of insulin in parenchymal hepatocytes may be due to a direct effect on glycogen metabolism or to an interaction with the post-receptor events in insulin action. PMID:2827626

  11. Pediatric lymphomas in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Gualco, Gabriela; Klumb, Claudete E; Barber, Glen N; Weiss, Lawrence M; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study provides the clinical pathological characteristics of 1301 cases of pediatric/adolescent lymphomas in patients from different geographic regions of Brazil. METHODS: A retrospective analyses of diagnosed pediatric lymphoma cases in a 10‐year period was performed. We believe that it represents the largest series of pediatric lymphomas presented from Brazil. RESULTS: Non‐Hodgkin lymphomas represented 68% of the cases, including those of precursor (36%) and mature (64%) cell origin. Mature cell lymphomas comprised 81% of the B‐cell phenotype and 19% of the T‐cell phenotype. Hodgkin lymphomas represented 32% of all cases, including 87% of the classical type and 13% of nodular lymphocyte predominant type. The geographic distribution showed 38.4% of the cases in the Southeast region, 28.7% in the Northeast, 16.1% in the South, 8.8% in the North, and 8% in the Central‐west region. The distribution by age groups was 15–18 years old, 33%; 11–14 years old, 26%; 6–10 years old, 24%; and 6 years old or younger, 17%. Among mature B‐cell lymphomas, most of the cases were Burkitt lymphomas (65%), followed by diffuse large B‐cell lymphomas (24%). In the mature T‐cell group, anaplastic large cell lymphoma, ALK‐positive was the most prevalent (57%), followed by peripheral T‐cell lymphoma, then not otherwise specified (25%). In the group of classic Hodgkin lymphomas, the main histological subtype was nodular sclerosis (76%). Nodular lymphocyte predominance occurred more frequently than in other series. CONCLUSION: Some of the results found in this study may reflect the heterogeneous socioeconomical status and environmental factors of the Brazilian population in different regions. PMID:21340214

  12. Pediatric nutrition.

    PubMed

    Greco, Deborah S

    2014-03-01

    This article discusses pediatric nutrition in puppies and kittens. Supplementation of basic nutrients such as fat, protein, minerals, vitamins, and essential fatty acids of the bitch is essential for the proper growth and development of puppies during the lactation period. Milk replacers are compared for use in puppies and kittens. Supplements such as colostrum and probiotics for promotion of a healthy immune system and prevention or treatment of stress-induced and weaning diarrhea are also discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric Appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Rentea, Rebecca M; St Peter, Shawn D

    2017-02-01

    Appendicitis is one of the most common surgical pathologies in children. It can present with right lower quadrant pain. Scoring systems in combination with selective imaging and surgical examination will diagnose most children with appendicitis. Clinical pathways should be used. Most surgical interventions for appendicitis are now almost exclusively laparoscopic, with trials demonstrating better outcomes for children who undergo index hospitalization appendectomies when perforated. Nonoperative management has a role in the treatment of both uncomplicated and complicated appendicitis. This article discusses the workup and management, modes of treatment, and continued areas of controversy in pediatric appendicitis.

  14. Pediatric urticaria.

    PubMed

    Tsakok, Teresa; Du Toit, George; Flohr, Carsten

    2014-02-01

    Although urticaria is not a life-threatening disease, its impact on quality of life in children should not be overlooked. A systematic search of online databases, including Medline, was performed to inform a review aiming to equip clinicians with an evidence-based approach to all aspects of pediatric urticaria. This review hinges on an illustrative case and includes a summary table of studies pertaining to disease management in children. The multiple issues faced by patients, their families, and treating clinicians are highlighted, and the current literature on the presentation, natural history, investigation, and management of this poorly understood condition is assessed.

  15. Pediatric vitiligo.

    PubMed

    Silverberg, Nanette B

    2014-04-01

    Vitiligo is a disease of pigment loss. Most investigators currently consider vitiligo to be a disorder that occurs as a result of autoimmune destruction of melanocytes, supported by identification of antimelanocyte antibodies in many patients, and the presence of comorbid autoimmune disease in patients with and family members of individuals with vitiligo. One-half of vitiligo cases are of childhood onset. This article presents a current overview of pediatric vitiligo including comorbidities of general health, psychological factors, therapeutic options, and long-term health considerations.

  16. Pediatric vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Pamela F

    2012-04-01

    Childhood vasculitis is a challenging and complex group of conditions that are multisystem in nature and often require integrated care from multiple subspecialties, including rheumatology, dermatology, cardiology, nephrology, neurology, and gastroenterology. Vasculitis is defined as the presence of inflammation in the blood vessel wall. The site of vessel involvement, size of the affected vessels, extent of vascular injury, and underlying pathology determine the disease phenotype and severity. This article explores the classification and general features of pediatric vasculitis, as well as the clinical presentation, diagnostic evaluation, and therapeutic options for the most common vasculitides.

  17. Pediatric Rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Badr, Dana T; Gaffin, Jonathan M; Phipatanakul, Wanda

    2016-09-01

    Rhinosinusitis, is defined as an inflammation of the paranasal and nasal sinus mucosae. Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS)is a common problem in the pediatric age group and the diagnosis and treatment are challenging due to the chronicity and similarity of symptoms with allergic rhinitis and adenoid hypertrophy. Although it is less common than acute rhinosinusitis, CRS is becoming more frequent and significantly affects the quality of life in children and can substantially impair daily function. CRS is characterized by sinus symptoms lasting more than 3 months despite medical therapy. Many factors are involved in the pathogenesis of this disease and include a primary insult with a virus followed bybacterial infection and mucosal inflammation, along with predisposition to allergies. The standard treatment of pediatricacute bacterial rhinosinusitis (ABRS) is nasal irrigation and antibiotic use. Medical treatment of pediatric CRS includes avoidance of allergens in allergic patients (environmental or food) and therapy with nasal irrigation, nasal corticosteroids sprays, nasal decongestants, and antibiotics directed at the most common sinonasalorganisms (Haemophilusinfluenzae, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Moraxella catarrhalis). Surgical therapy is rarely needed after appropriate medical therapy. Referral to an otolaryngologist and allergy specialist is recommended in case of failure of medical treatment.

  18. Humoral immune response in patients with cerebral parenchymal cysticercosis treated with praziquantel.

    PubMed Central

    Estañol, B; Juárez, H; Irigoyen, M del C; González-Barranco, D; Corona, T

    1989-01-01

    The humoral immune response to treatment with praziquantel (PZQ) was studied in eight patients with parenchymal cerebral cysticercosis (CC). In the serum and in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) before, during and after the administration of the drug, the following were quantitated (a) levels of specific anticysticercous antibodies measured in optical densities by the ELISA method; (b) levels of IgG, IgM, IgA and IgE; (c) levels of complement fraction C3, C4; (d) presence of immune complexes; (e) total number of white blood cells in the CSF. It was found that after treatment with PZQ, the level of specific anticysticercous antibodies and the level of IgG rose significantly in the CSF but not in the blood. The levels of the fractions of the complement and the immunoglobulins IgM, IgA and IgE did not change significantly either in the serum or in the CSF. The blood-brain barrier was found ruptured in three patients before therapy and in five patients after the therapy as measured by the albumin index. Nevertheless, the IgG index showed that there was local production of IgG in five patients before treatment and in seven after the end of it. The relative specific antibody index was greater than 1.0 in five patients before therapy and in seven after therapy. This data strongly supports the idea that the specific antibodies are produced intrathecally and are not derived from the serum pool through a ruptured blood-brain barrier. It was concluded that patients with parenchymal CC have an elevation of specific anticysticercous probably due to a combination of a ruptured blood-brain barrier and intrathecal synthesis. The relatively small rupture of the blood-brain barrier and the high IgG and relative specific antibody index suggest that intrathecal synthesis is the most important mechanism. The humoral immune response may be of importance not only in the elimination of the parasite but also in the genesis of the illness. PMID:2703841

  19. Parenchymal texture analysis in digital mammography: robust texture feature identification and equivalence across devices.

    PubMed

    Keller, Brad M; Oustimov, Andrew; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jinbo; Acciavatti, Raymond J; Zheng, Yuanjie; Ray, Shonket; Gee, James C; Maidment, Andrew D A; Kontos, Despina

    2015-04-01

    An analytical framework is presented for evaluating the equivalence of parenchymal texture features across different full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems using a physical breast phantom. Phantom images (FOR PROCESSING) are acquired from three FFDM systems using their automated exposure control setting. A panel of texture features, including gray-level histogram, co-occurrence, run length, and structural descriptors, are extracted. To identify features that are robust across imaging systems, a series of equivalence tests are performed on the feature distributions, in which the extent of their intersystem variation is compared to their intrasystem variation via the Hodges-Lehmann test statistic. Overall, histogram and structural features tend to be most robust across all systems, and certain features, such as edge enhancement, tend to be more robust to intergenerational differences between detectors of a single vendor than to intervendor differences. Texture features extracted from larger regions of interest (i.e., [Formula: see text]) and with a larger offset length (i.e., [Formula: see text]), when applicable, also appear to be more robust across imaging systems. This framework and observations from our experiments may benefit applications utilizing mammographic texture analysis on images acquired in multivendor settings, such as in multicenter studies of computer-aided detection and breast cancer risk assessment.

  20. Perforin-2 is essential for intracellular defense of parenchymal cells and phagocytes against pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    McCormack, Ryan M; de Armas, Lesley R; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Fiorentino, Desiree G; Olsson, Melissa L; Lichtenheld, Mathias G; Morales, Alejo; Lyapichev, Kirill; Gonzalez, Louis E; Strbo, Natasa; Sukumar, Neelima; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Gregory V; Munson, George P; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Kirsner, Robert S; Russell, David G; Podack, Eckhard R

    2015-09-24

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is a pore-forming, antibacterial protein with broad-spectrum activity. Perforin-2 is expressed constitutively in phagocytes and inducibly in parenchymal, tissue-forming cells. In vitro, Perforin-2 prevents the intracellular replication and proliferation of bacterial pathogens in these cells. Perforin-2 knockout mice are unable to control the systemic dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Salmonella typhimurium and perish shortly after epicutaneous or orogastric infection respectively. In contrast, Perforin-2-sufficient littermates clear the infection. Perforin-2 is a transmembrane protein of cytosolic vesicles -derived from multiple organelles- that translocate to and fuse with bacterium containing vesicles. Subsequently, Perforin-2 polymerizes and forms large clusters of 100 Å pores in the bacterial surface with Perforin-2 cleavage products present in bacteria. Perforin-2 is also required for the bactericidal activity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and hydrolytic enzymes. Perforin-2 constitutes a novel and apparently essential bactericidal effector molecule of the innate immune system.

  1. Perforin-2 is essential for intracellular defense of parenchymal cells and phagocytes against pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, Ryan M; de Armas, Lesley R; Shiratsuchi, Motoaki; Fiorentino, Desiree G; Olsson, Melissa L; Lichtenheld, Mathias G; Morales, Alejo; Lyapichev, Kirill; Gonzalez, Louis E; Strbo, Natasa; Sukumar, Neelima; Stojadinovic, Olivera; Plano, Gregory V; Munson, George P; Tomic-Canic, Marjana; Kirsner, Robert S; Russell, David G; Podack, Eckhard R

    2015-01-01

    Perforin-2 (MPEG1) is a pore-forming, antibacterial protein with broad-spectrum activity. Perforin-2 is expressed constitutively in phagocytes and inducibly in parenchymal, tissue-forming cells. In vitro, Perforin-2 prevents the intracellular replication and proliferation of bacterial pathogens in these cells. Perforin-2 knockout mice are unable to control the systemic dissemination of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or Salmonella typhimurium and perish shortly after epicutaneous or orogastric infection respectively. In contrast, Perforin-2-sufficient littermates clear the infection. Perforin-2 is a transmembrane protein of cytosolic vesicles -derived from multiple organelles- that translocate to and fuse with bacterium containing vesicles. Subsequently, Perforin-2 polymerizes and forms large clusters of 100 Å pores in the bacterial surface with Perforin-2 cleavage products present in bacteria. Perforin-2 is also required for the bactericidal activity of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and hydrolytic enzymes. Perforin-2 constitutes a novel and apparently essential bactericidal effector molecule of the innate immune system. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06508.001 PMID:26402460

  2. Renal parenchymal appearance on /sup 123/iodine-hippurate renoscintigrams and excretory urograms

    SciTech Connect

    Nielsen, J.B.; Taagehoj-Jensen, F.; Andresen, J.H.; Jorgensen, T.M.; Djurhuus, J.C.; Sorensen, S.S.; Charles, P.

    1985-02-01

    In 61 patients with vesicoureteral reflux renal scar formation was diagnosed by excretory urography and /sup 123/iodine-hippurate scintigrams. Scar formation on the nephrograms was detected in the upper, middle and lower zones of the kidneys on tomography exposures. Scintigraphic detection of scars was performed on the computerized uptake of the parenchymal phase. Maximal time elapse between the 2 investigations was 1 year. Excretory urography revealed 37 kidneys with a total of 74 regional scars. On scintigraphy 57 kidneys were judged to have 102 scars. There were 281 regions judged to be identical on the scintigram and the nephrogram. A true positive ratio (sensitivity) of 0.46 and a true negative ratio (specificity) of 0.90 were noted for the excretory urogram, compared to a sensitivity of 0.64 and a specificity of 0.81 for renography. The study confirms an over-representation of scars judged from scintigrams, which calls for further investigation of scar formation detection.

  3. Parotid sialosis: morphometrical analysis of the glandular parenchyme and stroma among diabetic and alcoholic patients.

    PubMed

    Merlo, Carolina; Bohl, Luciana; Carda, Carmen; Gómez de Ferraris, María Elsa; Carranza, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    Among the agents that cause parotid sialosis, diabetes mellitus type 2 and chronic alcoholism are included. In this study, the morphometrical modifications in the diabetic parotid sialosis were determined to compare them with the histopathological characteristics of alcoholic parotid sialosis. Five parotid biopsy samples obtained from patients with diabetic sialosis, 12 samples from patients with alcoholic sialosis and seven from individuals without these pathologies (control group) were analyzed. A morphometrical study of parotid parenchyme and stroma, using a digital image analyzer attached to an optical microscope, was carried out. Dimensions of serous acini and striated ducts, the area occupied by the fatty tissue, and the number of ducts were recorded. Mean values were compared using the Mann-Whitney U-test (P

  4. Ultrasound tomography imaging with waveform sound speed: parenchymal changes in women undergoing tamoxifen therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sak, Mark; Duric, Neb; Littrup, Peter; Sherman, Mark; Gierach, Gretchen

    2017-03-01

    Ultrasound tomography (UST) is an emerging modality that can offer quantitative measurements of breast density. Recent breakthroughs in UST image reconstruction involve the use of a waveform reconstruction as opposed to a raybased reconstruction. The sound speed (SS) images that are created using the waveform reconstruction have a much higher image quality. These waveform images offer improved resolution and contrasts between regions of dense and fatty tissues. As part of a study that was designed to assess breast density changes using UST sound speed imaging among women undergoing tamoxifen therapy, UST waveform sound speed images were then reconstructed for a subset of participants. These initial results show that changes to the parenchymal tissue can more clearly be visualized when using the waveform sound speed images. Additional quantitative testing of the waveform images was also started to test the hypothesis that waveform sound speed images are a more robust measure of breast density than ray-based reconstructions. Further analysis is still needed to better understand how tamoxifen affects breast tissue.

  5. Adaptive multiple feature method (AMFM) for early detecton of parenchymal pathology in a smoking population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uppaluri, Renuka; McLennan, Geoffrey; Enright, Paul; Standen, James; Boyer-Pfersdorf, Pamela; Hoffman, Eric A.

    1998-07-01

    Application of the Adaptive Multiple Feature Method (AMFM) to identify early changes in a smoking population is discussed. This method was specifically applied to determine if differences in CT images of smokers (with normal lung function) and non-smokers (with normal lung function) could be found through computerized texture analysis. Results demonstrated that these groups could be differentiated with over 80.0% accuracy. Further, differences on CT images between normal appearing lung from non-smokers (with normal lung function) and normal appearing lung from smokers (with abnormal lung function) were also investigated. These groups were differentiated with over 89.5% accuracy. In analyzing the whole lung region by region, the AMFM characterized 38.6% of a smoker lung (with normal lung function) as mild emphysema. We can conclude that the AMFM detects parenchymal patterns in the lungs of smokers which are different from normal patterns occurring in healthy non-smokers. These patterns could perhaps indicate early smoking-related changes.

  6. Pathogenesis of Nonalcoholic Steatohepatitis: Interactions between Liver Parenchymal and Nonparenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Magee, Nancy; Zou, An

    2016-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is the most common type of chronic liver disease in the Western countries, affecting up to 25% of the general population and becoming a major health concern in both adults and children. NAFLD encompasses the entire spectrum of fatty liver disease in individuals without significant alcohol consumption, ranging from nonalcoholic fatty liver (NAFL) to nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and cirrhosis. NASH is a manifestation of the metabolic syndrome and hepatic disorders with the presence of steatosis, hepatocyte injury (ballooning), inflammation, and, in some patients, progressive fibrosis leading to cirrhosis. The pathogenesis of NASH is a complex process and implicates cell interactions between liver parenchymal and nonparenchymal cells as well as crosstalk between various immune cell populations in liver. Lipotoxicity appears to be the central driver of hepatic cellular injury via oxidative stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. This review focuses on the contributions of hepatocytes and nonparenchymal cells to NASH, assessing their potential applications to the development of novel therapeutic agents. Currently, there are limited pharmacological treatments for NASH; therefore, an increased understanding of NASH pathogenesis is pertinent to improve disease interventions in the future. PMID:27822476

  7. Procalcitonin for the early prediction of renal parenchymal involvement in children with UTI: preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Kotoula, Aggeliki; Gardikis, Stefanos; Tsalkidis, Aggelos; Mantadakis, Elpis; Zissimopoulos, Athanassios; Kambouri, Katerina; Deftereos, Savvas; Tripsianis, Gregorios; Manolas, Konstantinos; Chatzimichael, Athanassios; Vaos, George

    2009-01-01

    In order to establish the most reliable marker for distinguishing urinary tract infections (UTI) with and without renal parenchymal involvement (RPI), we recorded the clinical features and admission leukocyte count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), C-reactive protein (CRP), and serum procalcitonin (PCT) in 57 children (including 43 girls) aged 2-108 months admitted with a first episode of UTI. RPI was evaluated by Tc-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scintigraphy within 7 days of admission. To establish cut-off points for ESR, CRP, and PCT, we used receiver operating characteristics curves and compared the area under the curve for ESR, CRP, and PCT. Twenty-seven children were diagnosed as having RPI based on positive renal scintigraphy. A body temperature of >38 degrees C, a history of diarrhea, and poor oral intake were more common in patients with RPI. ESR, CRP, and PCT, but not leukocyte count, were significantly higher in patients with RPI (P < 0.001). PCT was more sensitive and specific for the diagnosis of upper versus lower UTI than ESR and CRP. Using a cut-off value of 0.85 ng/ml, PCT had the best performance, with sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of 89%, 97%, 96%, and 91% respectively. Serum PCT is a better marker than ESR, CRP, and leukocyte count for the early prediction of RPI in children with a first episode of UTI.

  8. Airway and Parenchymal Strains during Bronchoconstriction in the Precision Cut Lung Slice

    PubMed Central

    Hiorns, Jonathan E.; Bidan, Cécile M.; Jensen, Oliver E.; Gosens, Reinoud; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.; Butler, Jim P.; Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Brook, Bindi S.

    2016-01-01

    The precision-cut lung slice (PCLS) is a powerful tool for studying airway reactivity, but biomechanical measurements to date have largely focused on changes in airway caliber. Here we describe an image processing tool that reveals the associated spatio-temporal changes in airway and parenchymal strains. Displacements of sub-regions within the PCLS are tracked in phase-contrast movies acquired after addition of contractile and relaxing drugs. From displacement maps, strains are determined across the entire PCLS or along user-specified directions. In a representative mouse PCLS challenged with 10−4M methacholine, as lumen area decreased, compressive circumferential strains were highest in the 50 μm closest to the airway lumen while expansive radial strains were highest in the region 50–100 μm from the lumen. However, at any given distance from the airway the strain distribution varied substantially in the vicinity of neighboring small airways and blood vessels. Upon challenge with the relaxant agonist chloroquine, although most strains disappeared, residual positive strains remained a long time after addition of chloroquine, predominantly in the radial direction. Taken together, these findings establish strain mapping as a new tool to elucidate local dynamic mechanical events within the constricting airway and its supporting parenchyma. PMID:27559314

  9. Brain Parenchymal Fraction in Healthy Adults—A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Granåsen, Gabriel; Svenningsson, Anders

    2017-01-01

    Brain atrophy is an important feature of many neurodegenerative disorders. It can be described in terms of change in the brain parenchymal fraction (BPF). In order to interpret the BPF in disease, knowledge on the BPF in healthy individuals is required. The aim of this study was to establish a normal range of values for the BPF of healthy individuals via a systematic review of the literature. The databases PubMed and Scopus were searched and 95 articles, including a total of 9269 individuals, were identified including the required data. We present values of BPF from healthy individuals stratified by age and post-processing method. The mean BPF correlated with mean age and there were significant differences in age-adjusted mean BPF between methods. This study contributes to increased knowledge about BPF in healthy individuals, which may assist in the interpretation of BPF in the setting of disease. We highlight the differences between post-processing methods and the need for a consensus gold standard. PMID:28095463

  10. Metabolism of 17alpha-ethynylestradiol by intact liver parenchymal cells isolated from mouse and rat.

    PubMed

    Helton, E D; Casciano, D A; Althaus, Z R; Plant, H D

    1977-12-01

    Liver parenchymal cells isolated by perfusion from female C3H/HeN-MTV+Nctr mice and Sprague-Dawley rats were incubated with [6,7-3H] 17alpha-ethynylestradiol (EE2). The incubates were individually fractionated into free steroid (organic phase), steroid conjugates (aqueous), and bound steroids (macromolecular pellet). The rat had significantly less total free radioactive steroid but significantly more total conjugated and irreversibly bound radioactivity than the mouse. However, when the metabolic conversion of EE2 was compared in the rat and the mouse on a cellular basis (metabolic clearance per 10(6) cells), the rat was found to be less efficient than the mouse. The two species were essentially equivalent in their covalent binding when expressed on a per 10(6) cell basis. Purification of the free radiolabeled steriods on LH-20 demonstrated the mouse to have the parent compound and on identifiable 2-OH-EE2 fraction. The rat had EE2 and an identifiable 2-methoxy-EE2 fraction. A major metabolite fraction for both species was very nonpolar and, although not identified, was found to be ethynylated as demonstrated by silver-sulfoethylcellulose chromatography. The conjugate fractions of the mouse were indicative of glucuronide conjugation, whereas the rat had additional conjugate fractions suggestive of sulfoconjugation.

  11. Parenchymal texture analysis in digital mammography: robust texture feature identification and equivalence across devices

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Brad M.; Oustimov, Andrew; Wang, Yan; Chen, Jinbo; Acciavatti, Raymond J.; Zheng, Yuanjie; Ray, Shonket; Gee, James C.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. An analytical framework is presented for evaluating the equivalence of parenchymal texture features across different full-field digital mammography (FFDM) systems using a physical breast phantom. Phantom images (FOR PROCESSING) are acquired from three FFDM systems using their automated exposure control setting. A panel of texture features, including gray-level histogram, co-occurrence, run length, and structural descriptors, are extracted. To identify features that are robust across imaging systems, a series of equivalence tests are performed on the feature distributions, in which the extent of their intersystem variation is compared to their intrasystem variation via the Hodges–Lehmann test statistic. Overall, histogram and structural features tend to be most robust across all systems, and certain features, such as edge enhancement, tend to be more robust to intergenerational differences between detectors of a single vendor than to intervendor differences. Texture features extracted from larger regions of interest (i.e., >63  pixels2) and with a larger offset length (i.e., >7  pixels), when applicable, also appear to be more robust across imaging systems. This framework and observations from our experiments may benefit applications utilizing mammographic texture analysis on images acquired in multivendor settings, such as in multicenter studies of computer-aided detection and breast cancer risk assessment. PMID:26158105

  12. Effect of background parenchymal enhancement on breast cancer detection with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Telegrafo, M; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) may influence the sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging in breast cancer detection. A total of 180 consecutive women with 194 breast cancers underwent MR imaging examination. Women were assigned to two different groups depending on the degree of BPE. Group 1 consisted of women with minimal or mild BPE and group 2 of women with moderate or marked BPE. The distributions of histotypes of tumors within the two groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Difference in sensitivities of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between the two groups was searched for using the Student t-test. No differences in terms of distributions of histotypes of tumors between the two groups of women were found (P=0.5). The 11% difference in sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between group 1 (91/92; 99%; 95% CI: 94-100%) and group 2 (90/102; 88%; 95% CI: 80-94%) was statistically significant (P=0.0058). The sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging is significantly lower in women with moderate and marked BPE as compared with women with minimal and mild BPE regardless of cancer histotype. BPE could represent a limitation for breast MR imaging interpretation and should be indicated in MR imaging reports. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric tracheomalacia.

    PubMed

    Fraga, Jose Carlos; Jennings, Russell W; Kim, Peter C W

    2016-06-01

    Tracheomalacia (TM) is defined as an increased collapsibility of the trachea due to structural anomalies of the tracheal cartilage and/or posterior membrane. Tracheomalacia has a wide range of etiologies but is most commonly present in children born with esophageal atresia and tracheal esophageal fistula. Clinical symptoms can range from minor expiratory stridor with typical barking cough to severe respiratory distress episodes to acute life-threatening events (ALTE). Although the majority of children have mild-to-moderate symptoms and will not need surgical intervention, some will need life-changing surgical treatment. This article examines the published pediatric literature on TM, discusses the details of clinical presentation, evaluation, diagnosis, and a variety of treatments.

  14. Early effects of fluoro-edenite: correlation between IL-18 serum levels and pleural and parenchymal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Ledda, Caterina; Loreto, Carla; Matera, Serena; Massimino, Nicoletta; Cannizzaro, Emanuele; Musumeci, Andrea; Migliore, Marcello; Fenga, Concettina; Pomara, Cristoforo; Rapisarda, Venerando

    2016-12-01

    Fluoro-edenite (FE) is a natural mineral asbestos-like fibrous species first isolated in Biancavilla, Sicily. In order to clarify potential involvement of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of FE-induced chest abnormalities, we analyzed IL-18 serum levels in FE-exposed workers (FEEW) and correlated them with pleural and parenchymal abnormalities. A total of 21 FEEWs, residing in Biancavilla for >30 years, with a working seniority of 17 ± 6.1 years were examined. High-resolution computed tomography scans revealed low grade of fibrosis in 8 (38%) FEEWs, and pleural plaques (PPs) in 13 (62%) FEEWs. The mean IL-18 level was 203.13 ± 90.43 pg/ml. Pearson correlation showed a significant association (p < 0.0001) between IL-18 and PPs and parenchymal abnormality scores. Data suggest a potential role of IL-18 in the pathogenesis of these diseases.

  15. Mammographic parenchymal texture as an imaging marker of hormonal activity: a comparative study between pre- and post-menopausal women

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daye, Dania; Bobo, Ezra; Baumann, Bethany; Ioannou, Antonios; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.; Kontos, Despina

    2011-03-01

    Mammographic parenchymal texture patterns have been shown to be related to breast cancer risk. Yet, little is known about the biological basis underlying this association. Here, we investigate the potential of mammographic parenchymal texture patterns as an inherent phenotypic imaging marker of endogenous hormonal exposure of the breast tissue. Digital mammographic (DM) images in the cranio-caudal (CC) view of the unaffected breast from 138 women diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Menopause status was used as a surrogate marker of endogenous hormonal activity. Retroareolar 2.5cm2 ROIs were segmented from the post-processed DM images using an automated algorithm. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, grey-level spatial correlation, and fractal dimension were computed. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was performed to evaluate feature classification performance in distinguishing between 72 pre- and 66 post-menopausal women. Logistic regression was performed to assess the independent effect of each texture feature in predicting menopause status. ROC analysis showed that texture features have inherent capacity to distinguish between pre- and post-menopausal statuses (AUC>0.5, p<0.05). Logistic regression including all texture features yielded an ROC curve with an AUC of 0.76. Addition of age at menarche, ethnicity, contraception use and hormonal replacement therapy (HRT) use lead to a modest model improvement (AUC=0.78) while texture features maintained significant contribution (p<0.05). The observed differences in parenchymal texture features between pre- and post- menopausal women suggest that mammographic texture can potentially serve as a surrogate imaging marker of endogenous hormonal activity.

  16. Impact of ventilation frequency and parenchymal stiffness on flow and pressure distribution in a canine lung model.

    PubMed

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W

    2013-12-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cm H2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized.

  17. IMPACT OF VENTILATION FREQUENCY AND PARENCHYMAL STIFFNESS ON FLOW AND PRESSURE DISTRIBUTION IN A CANINE LUNG MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Amini, Reza; Kaczka, David W.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the impact of ventilation frequency, lung volume, and parenchymal stiffness on ventilation distribution, we developed an anatomically-based computational model of the canine lung. Each lobe of the model consists of an asymmetric branching airway network subtended by terminal, viscoelastic acinar units. The model allows for empiric dependencies of airway segment dimensions and parenchymal stiffness on transpulmonary pressure. We simulated the effects of lung volume and parenchymal recoil on global lung impedance and ventilation distribution from 0.1 to 100 Hz, with mean transpulmonary pressures from 5 to 25 cmH2O. With increasing lung volume, the distribution of acinar flows narrowed and became more synchronous for frequencies below resonance. At higher frequencies, large variations in acinar flow were observed. Maximum acinar flow occurred at first antiresonance frequency, where lung impedance achieved a local maximum. The distribution of acinar pressures became very heterogeneous and amplified relative to tracheal pressure at the resonant frequency. These data demonstrate the important interaction between frequency and lung tissue stiffness on the distribution of acinar flows and pressures. These simulations provide useful information for the optimization of frequency, lung volume, and mean airway pressure during conventional ventilation or high frequency oscillation (HFOV). Moreover our model indicates that an optimal HFOV bandwidth exists between the resonant and antiresonant frequencies, for which interregional gas mixing is maximized. PMID:23872936

  18. Liver transplantation in man: morphometric analysis of the parenchymal alterations following cold ischaemia and warm ischaemia/reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    VIZZOTTO, LAURA; VERTEMATI, MAURIZIO; DEGNA, CARLO TOMMASINI; ASENI, PAOLO

    2001-01-01

    Ischaemia and reperfusion phases represent critical events during liver transplantation. The purpose of this study was to describe morphological alterations of both vascular and parenchymal compartments after ischaemia and reperfusion and to evaluate the possible relationship between morphometric parameters and biochemical/clinical data. Three needle biopsies were drawn from 20 patients who underwent orthotopic liver transplantation. The first biopsy was taken before flushing with preservation solution, and the second and the third to evaluate respectively the effects of cold ischaemia and of warm ischaemia/reperfusion. Biopsies were examined by an image analyser and morphometric parameters related to the liver parenchyma were evaluated. At the second biopsy we observed a decrease of the endothelium volume fraction while the same parameter referred to the sinusoidal lumen achieved a peak value. The hepatocytes showed a lower surface parenchymal/vascular sides ratio. This parameter was reversed at the end of the reperfusion phase; furthermore the third biopsy revealed endothelial swelling and a decreased volume fraction of the sinusoidal lumen. The results quantify the damage to the sinusoidal bed which, as already known, is one of the main targets of cold ischaemia; warm ischaemia and reperfusion accentuate endothelial damage. The end of transplantation is characterised by damage chiefly to parenchymal cells. Hepatocytes show a rearrangement of their surface sides, probably related to the alterations of the sinusoidal bed. In addition, the fluctuations of morphometric parameters during ischaemia/reperfusion correlate positively with biochemical data and clinical course of the patients. PMID:11430699

  19. Acute Kidney Injury after Partial Nephrectomy: Role of Parenchymal Mass Reduction and Ischemia and Impact on Subsequent Functional Recovery.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhiling; Zhao, Juping; Dong, Wen; Remer, Eric; Li, Jianbo; Demirjian, Sevag; Zabell, Joseph; Campbell, Steven C

    2016-04-01

    Acute increase of serum creatinine (SCr) after partial nephrectomy (PN) is primarily due to parenchymal mass reduction or ischemia; however, only ischemia can impact subsequent functional recovery. We evaluate etiologies of acute kidney injury (AKI) after PN and their prognostic significance. From 2007-2014, 83 solitary kidneys managed with PN had necessary studies for detailed analysis of function and parenchymal mass before/after surgery. AKI was classified by Risk/Injury/Failure/Loss/Endstage classification and defined by either standard criteria (comparison to preoperative SCr) or proposed criteria (comparison to projected postoperative SCr based on parenchymal mass reduction). Subsequent recovery was defined as percent function preserved/percent mass saved. PN. Predictive factors for AKI were evaluated by logistic regression. Relationship between AKI grade and subsequent functional recovery was assessed by linear regression. Median duration warm ischemia (n=39) was 20 min and hypothermia (n=44) was 29 min. Median parenchymal mass reduction was 11%. AKI occurred in 45 patients based on standard criteria and 38 based on proposed criteria, and reflected injury/failure (grade = 2/3) in 23 and 16 patients, respectively. On multivariable analysis, only ischemia time associated with AKI occurrence (p=0.016). Based on the proposed criteria, median recovery from ischemia was 99% in patients without AKI and 95%/90%/88% for patients with grades 1/2/3 AKI, respectively. The coefficient for association between AKI grade based on proposed criteria and subsequent functional recovery was -4.168 (p=0.018). Main limitation is limited patient cohort. Parenchymal mass reduction and ischemia both contribute to acute changes in SCr after PN. Classification of AKI by proposed criteria significantly associates with subsequent functional recovery. However, more robust numbers will be needed to further assess the merits of the proposed criteria. While AKI is associated with suboptimal

  20. A Comparative Study of Peripheral Immune Responses to Taenia solium in Individuals with Parenchymal and Subarachnoid Neurocysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Tuero, Iskra; Palma, Sandra; Cabeza, Franco; Saleemi, Sarah; Rodriguez, Silvia; Gonzales, Isidro; Mayta, Holger; Mahanty, Siddhartha; Garcia, Hector H.; Gilman, Robert H.

    2015-01-01

    Background The ability of Taenia solium to modulate the immune system likely contributes to their longevity in the human host. We tested the hypothesis that the nature of the immune response is related to the location of parasite and clinical manifestations of infection. Methodology Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were obtained from untreated patients with neurocysticercosis (NCC), categorized as having parenchymal or subarachnoid infection by the presence of cysts exclusively within the parenchyma or in subarachnoid spaces of the brain, and from uninfected (control) individuals matched by age and gender to each patient. Using multiplex detection technology, sera from NCC patients and controls and cytokine production by PBMC after T. solium antigen (TsAg) stimulation were assayed for levels of inflammatory and regulatory cytokines. PBMC were phenotyped by flow cytometry ex vivo and following in vitro stimulation with TsAg. Principal Findings Sera from patients with parenchymal NCC demonstrated significantly higher Th1 (IFN-γ/IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4/IL-13) cytokine responses and trends towards higher levels of IL-1β/IL-8/IL-5 than those obtained from patients with subarachnoid NCC. Also higher in vitro antigen-driven TNF-β secretion was detected in PBMC supernatants from parenchymal than in subarachnoid NCC. In contrast, there was a significantly higher IL-10 response to TsAg stimulation in patients with subarachnoid NCC compared to parenchymal NCC. Although no differences in regulatory T cells (Tregs) frequencies were found ex vivo, there was a trend towards greater expansion of Tregs upon TsAg stimulation in subarachnoid than in parenchymal NCC when data were normalized for the corresponding controls. Conclusions/Significance T. solium infection of the subarachnoid space is associated with an enhanced regulatory immune response compared to infection in the parenchyma. The resulting anti-inflammatory milieu may represent a parasite strategy to maintain a

  1. A Clinicopathologic Correlation of Mammographic Parenchymal Patterns and Associated Risk Factors for Human Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bland, Kirby I.; Kuhns, James G.; Buchanan, Jerry B.; Dwyer, Patricia A.; Heuser, Louis F.; O'Connor, Carol A.; Gray, Laman A.; Polk, Hiram C.

    1982-01-01

    The five-year screening experience for 10,131 asymptomatic women evaluated at the Louisville Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (LBCDDP) disclosed 144 breast carcinomas in 1,209 patients (12%) aged 35 to 74 years in whom 904 biopsies and 305 aspirations were performed. This study included 44,711 high-quality xeromammograms (XM) prospectively classified by the modified Wolfe mammographic parenchymal patterns into low-risk (N1, P1) versus high-risk (P2, DY) groups, with expansion of the P2 cohort into three additional categories. Using BMDP computer-program analysis, each XM pattern was collated with 21 nonneoplastic and 18 malignant pathologic variables and commonly associated risk factors. A separate analysis of epithelial proliferative and nonproliferative fibrocystic disease of the breast (FCDB) was performed. The histopathology for each biopsy, with distinction of FCDB and neoplasms, was analyzed with regard to the statistical probability of influencing the XM pattern. An average of 1.05 biopsies per patient were performed in women with findings suggestive of carcinoma at clinical and/or XM examinations. An equal distribution of the N1, P1, and P2 DYXM patterns was observed in the 10,131 screenees. Of 8.5% of the screened population having biopsies, 623 were observed to have nonproliferative FCDB and 137, proliferative FCDB. For women 50 years of age or younger, these pathologic variables were seen more frequently in the P2 DY patterns (p < 0.001), whereas no difference in XM pattern distribution was observed for the screenee 50 years of age or older for proliferative FCDB (p = 0.65). Sixteen percent of the biopsied/aspirated lesions were carcinomas, yielding a biopsy/cancer ratio of 6.25:1. These in situ and invasive neoplasms were more commonly (p < 0.04) observed in 55% of the P2 (P2f, P2n, P2c) categories, while 64% of all cancers appeared more frequently in the P2 DY subgroup (p <0.001), compared with this pattern in the screened population. An

  2. Reproductive and menstrual factors in relation to mammographic parenchymal patterns among perimenopausal women.

    PubMed Central

    Gram, I. T.; Funkhouser, E.; Tabar, L.

    1995-01-01

    The relationship between mammographic patterns and reproductive and menstrual factors was examined in 3640 Norwegian women, aged 40-56 years, participating in the Third Tromsö study conducted in 1986-87. Epidemiological data were obtained from questionnaires. The mammograms were categorised into five groups. This categorisation is based on anatomic-mammographic correlations, following three-dimensional (thick slice technique) histopathologic-mammographic comparisons, rather than simple pattern reading. Patterns 1-3 were combined into a low-risk group and patterns 4 and 5 into a high-risk group for analysis. Women who had more than four children were 90% less likely to have a high-risk pattern than nulliparous women (OR = 0.09, 95% CI 0.04-0.16) controlling for age, weight, height and menopausal status. Furthermore, those who first gave birth over 34 years of age were more than twice as likely to have a high-risk pattern than those giving birth in their teens (OR = 2.37, 95% CI 1.23-4.56) adjusting for parity. Among post-menopausal women, age at menarche was negatively (P for trend = 0.015) and late age at menopause positively (P for trend = 0.072) related to high-risk patterns. Among premenopausal women, age at menarche was positively related to high-risk patterns (P for trend = 0.001). Also, menopausal status rather than age was associated with high-risk patterns. These findings support the opinion that reproductive and menstrual factors are involved in determining the mammographic parenchymal pattern among perimenopausal women. PMID:7880753

  3. Background parenchymal enhancement in breast MRI before and after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: correlation with tumour response.

    PubMed

    Preibsch, H; Wanner, L; Bahrs, S D; Wietek, B M; Siegmann-Luz, K C; Oberlecher, E; Hahn, M; Staebler, A; Nikolaou, K; Wiesinger, B

    2016-06-01

    To correlate the decrease in background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and tumour response measured with MRI in breast cancer patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). One hundred and forty-six MRI examinations of 73 patients with 80 biopsy-proven breast cancers who underwent breast MRI before and after NAC were retrospectively analysed. All images were reviewed by two blinded readers, who classified BPE into categories (BEC; 1 = minimal, 2 = mild, 3 = moderate, 4 = marked) before and after NAC. Histopathological and morphological tumour responses were analysed and compared. The distribution of BEC 1/2/3/4 was 25/46/18/11 % before and 78/20/2/0 % after NAC. On average, BPE decreased by 0.87 BEC. Cohen's kappa showed substantial agreement (k = 0.73-0.77) before and moderate agreement (k = 0.43-0.60) after NAC and moderate agreement (k = 0.62-0.60) concerning the change in BEC. Correlating the change in BPE with tumour response, the average decrease in BEC was 1.3 in cases of complete remission, 0.83 in cases with partial response, 0.85 in cases with stable disease and 0.40 in cases with progressive disease. Correlation analysis showed a significant correlation between the decrease in BEC and tumour response (r = -0.24, p = 0.03). BPE decreased by, on average, 0.87 BEC following NAC for breast cancer. The degree of BPE reduction seemed to correlate with tumour response. • BPE decreases by an average of 0.87 categories under neoadjuvant chemotherapy. • The reduction of BPE following neoadjuvant chemotherapy correlates with the tumour response. • The classification of the BPE shows good agreement among trained readers.

  4. A fully automated system for quantification of background parenchymal enhancement in breast DCE-MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ufuk Dalmiş, Mehmet; Gubern-Mérida, Albert; Borelli, Cristina; Vreemann, Suzan; Mann, Ritse M.; Karssemeijer, Nico

    2016-03-01

    Background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) observed in breast dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) has been identified as an important biomarker associated with risk for developing breast cancer. In this study, we present a fully automated framework for quantification of BPE. We initially segmented fibroglandular tissue (FGT) of the breasts using an improved version of an existing method. Subsequently, we computed BPEabs (volume of the enhancing tissue), BPErf (BPEabs divided by FGT volume) and BPErb (BPEabs divided by breast volume), using different relative enhancement threshold values between 1% and 100%. To evaluate and compare the previous and improved FGT segmentation methods, we used 20 breast DCE-MRI scans and we computed Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) values with respect to manual segmentations. For evaluation of the BPE quantification, we used a dataset of 95 breast DCE-MRI scans. Two radiologists, in individual reading sessions, visually analyzed the dataset and categorized each breast into minimal, mild, moderate and marked BPE. To measure the correlation between automated BPE values to the radiologists' assessments, we converted these values into ordinal categories and we used Spearman's rho as a measure of correlation. According to our results, the new segmentation method obtained an average DSC of 0.81 0.09, which was significantly higher (p<0.001) compared to the previous method (0.76 0.10). The highest correlation values between automated BPE categories and radiologists' assessments were obtained with the BPErf measurement (r=0.55, r=0.49, p<0.001 for both), while the correlation between the scores given by the two radiologists was 0.82 (p<0.001). The presented framework can be used to systematically investigate the correlation between BPE and risk in large screening cohorts.

  5. Brain parenchymal damage in neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder - A multimodal MRI study.

    PubMed

    Pache, F; Zimmermann, H; Finke, C; Lacheta, A; Papazoglou, S; Kuchling, J; Wuerfel, J; Hamm, B; Ruprecht, K; Paul, F; Brandt, A U; Scheel, M

    2016-12-01

    To investigate different brain regions for grey (GM) and white matter (WM) damage in a well-defined cohort of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) patients and compare advanced MRI techniques (VBM, Subcortical and cortical analyses (Freesurfer), and DTI) for their ability to detect damage in NMOSD. We analyzed 21 NMOSD patients and 21 age and gender matched control subjects. VBM (GW/WM) and DTI whole brain (TBSS) analyses were performed at different statistical thresholds to reflect different statistical approaches in previous studies. In an automated atlas-based approach, Freesurfer and DTI results were compared between NMOSD and controls. DTI TBSS and DTI atlas based analysis demonstrated microstructural impairment only within the optic radiation or in regions associated with the optic radiation (posterior thalamic radiation p < 0.001, 6.9 % reduction of fractional anisotropy). VBM demonstrated widespread brain GM and WM reduction, but only at exploratory statistical thresholds, with no differences remaining after correction for multiple comparisons. Freesurfer analysis demonstrated no group differences. NMOSD specific parenchymal brain damage is predominantly located in the optic radiation, likely due to a secondary degeneration caused by ON. In comparison, DTI appears to be the most reliable and sensitive technique for brain damage detection in NMOSD. • The hypothesis of a widespread brain damage in NMOSD is challenged. • The optic radiation (OR) is the most severely affected region. • OR-affection is likely due to secondary degeneration following optic neuritis. • DTI is currently the most sensitive technique for NMOSD-related brain-damage detection. • DTI is currently the most reliable technique for NMOSD-related brain-damage detection.

  6. Featured Article: Isolation, characterization, and cultivation of human hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Elisa; Kegel, Victoria; Zeilinger, Katrin; Hengstler, Jan G; Nüssler, Andreas K; Seehofer, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Primary human hepatocytes (PHH) are considered to be the gold standard for in vitro testing of xenobiotic metabolism and hepatotoxicity. However, PHH cultivation in 2D mono-cultures leads to dedifferentiation and a loss of function. It is well known that hepatic non-parenchymal cells (NPC), such as Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC), and hepatic stellate cells (HSC), play a central role in the maintenance of PHH functions. The aims of the present study were to establish a protocol for the simultaneous isolation of human PHH and NPC from the same tissue specimen and to test their suitability for in vitro co-culture. Human PHH and NPC were isolated from tissue obtained by partial liver resection by a two-step EDTA/collagenase perfusion technique. The obtained cell fractions were purified by Percoll density gradient centrifugation. KC, LEC, and HSC contained in the NPC fraction were separated using specific adherence properties and magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS®). Identified NPC revealed a yield of 1.9 × 106 KC, 2.7 × 105 LEC and 4.7 × 105 HSC per gram liver tissue, showing viabilities >90%. Characterization of these NPC showed that all populations went through an activation process, which influenced the cell fate. The activation of KC strongly depended on the tissue quality and donor anamnesis. KC became activated in culture in association with a loss of viability within 4–5 days. LEC lost specific features during culture, while HSC went through a transformation process into myofibroblasts. The testing of different culture conditions for HSC demonstrated that they can attenuate, but not prevent dedifferentiation in vitro. In conclusion, the method described allows the isolation and separation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from the same donor. PMID:25394621

  7. A comparison of deconvolution and the Rutland-Patlak plot in parenchymal renal uptake rate.

    PubMed

    Al-Shakhrah, Issa A

    2012-07-01

    Deconvolution and the Rutland-Patlak (R-P) plot are two of the most commonly used methods for analyzing dynamic radionuclide renography. Both methods allow estimation of absolute and relative renal uptake of radiopharmaceutical and of its rate of transit through the kidney. Seventeen patients (32 kidneys) were referred for further evaluation by renal scanning. All patients were positioned supine with their backs to the scintillation gamma camera, so that the kidneys and the heart are both in the field of view. Approximately 5-7 mCi of (99m)Tc-DTPA (diethylinetriamine penta-acetic acid) in about 0.5 ml of saline is injected intravenously and sequential 20 s frames were acquired, the study on each patient lasts for approximately 20 min. The time-activity curves of the parenchymal region of interest of each kidney, as well as the heart were obtained for analysis. The data were then analyzed with deconvolution and the R-P plot. A strong positive association (n = 32; r = 0.83; R (2) = 0.68) was found between the values that obtained by applying the two methods. Bland-Altman statistical analysis demonstrated that ninety seven percent of the values in the study (31 cases from 32 cases, 97% of the cases) were within limits of agreement (mean ± 1.96 standard deviation). We believe that R-P analysis method is expected to be more reproducible than iterative deconvolution method, because the deconvolution technique (the iterative method) relies heavily on the accuracy of the first point analyzed, as any errors are carried forward into the calculations of all the subsequent points, whereas R-P technique is based on an initial analysis of the data by means of the R-P plot, and it can be considered as an alternative technique to find and calculate the renal uptake rate.

  8. Parameter optimization of parenchymal texture analysis for prediction of false-positive recalls from screening mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ray, Shonket; Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2016-03-01

    This work details a methodology to obtain optimal parameter values for a locally-adaptive texture analysis algorithm that extracts mammographic texture features representative of breast parenchymal complexity for predicting falsepositive (FP) recalls from breast cancer screening with digital mammography. The algorithm has two components: (1) adaptive selection of localized regions of interest (ROIs) and (2) Haralick texture feature extraction via Gray- Level Co-Occurrence Matrices (GLCM). The following parameters were systematically varied: mammographic views used, upper limit of the ROI window size used for adaptive ROI selection, GLCM distance offsets, and gray levels (binning) used for feature extraction. Each iteration per parameter set had logistic regression with stepwise feature selection performed on a clinical screening cohort of 474 non-recalled women and 68 FP recalled women; FP recall prediction was evaluated using area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and associations between the extracted features and FP recall were assessed via odds ratios (OR). A default instance of mediolateral (MLO) view, upper ROI size limit of 143.36 mm (2048 pixels2), GLCM distance offset combination range of 0.07 to 0.84 mm (1 to 12 pixels) and 16 GLCM gray levels was set. The highest ROC performance value of AUC=0.77 [95% confidence intervals: 0.71-0.83] was obtained at three specific instances: the default instance, upper ROI window equal to 17.92 mm (256 pixels2), and gray levels set to 128. The texture feature of sum average was chosen as a statistically significant (p<0.05) predictor and associated with higher odds of FP recall for 12 out of 14 total instances.

  9. Renal parenchymal histopathology predicts life-threatening chronic kidney disease as a result of radical nephrectomy.

    PubMed

    Sejima, Takehiro; Honda, Masashi; Takenaka, Atsushi

    2015-01-01

    The preoperative prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency plays an important role in the decision-making process regarding renal surgery options. Furthermore, the prediction of both postoperative renal insufficiency and postoperative cardiovascular disease occurrence, which is suggested to be an adverse consequence caused by renal insufficiency, contributes to the preoperative policy decision as well as the precise informed consent for a renal cell carcinoma patient. Preoperative nomograms for the prediction of post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, calculated using patient backgrounds, are advocated. The use of these nomograms together with other types of nomograms predicting oncological outcome is beneficial. Post-radical nephrectomy attending physicians can predict renal insufficiency based on the normal renal parenchymal pathology in addition to preoperative patient characteristics. It is suggested that a high level of global glomerulosclerosis in nephrectomized normal renal parenchyma is closely associated with severe renal insufficiency. Some studies showed that post-radical nephrectomy severe renal insufficiency might have an association with increased mortality as a result of cardiovascular disease. Therefore, such pathophysiology should be recognized as life-threatening, surgically-related chronic kidney disease. On the contrary, the investigation of the prediction of mild post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency, which is not related to adverse consequences in the postoperative long-term period, is also promising because the prediction of mild renal insufficiency might be the basis for the substitution of radical nephrectomy for nephron-sparing surgery in technically difficult or compromised cases. The deterioration of quality of life caused by post-radical nephrectomy renal insufficiency should be investigated in conjunction with life-threatening matters.

  10. Cerebrospinal Fluid and Parenchymal Brain Development and Growth in the Healthy Fetus.

    PubMed

    Andescavage, Nickie N; DuPlessis, Adre; McCarter, Robert; Vezina, Gilbert; Robertson, Richard; Limperopoulos, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to apply quantitative magnetic resonance imaging to characterize absolute cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) development, as well as its relative development to fetal brain parenchyma in the healthy human fetus. We created three-dimensional high-resolution reconstructions of the developing brain for healthy fetuses between 18 and 40 weeks' gestation, segmented the parenchymal and CSF spaces, and calculated the volumes for the lateral, third, and fourth ventricles; extra-axial CSF space; and the cerebrum, cerebellum, and brainstem. From these data, we constructed normograms of the resulting volumes according to gestational age and described the relative development of CSF to fetal brain parenchyma. Each CSF space demonstrated major increases in volumetric growth during the second half of gestation: third ventricle (23-fold), extra-axial CSF (11-fold), fourth ventricle (8-fold), and lateral ventricle (2-fold). Total CSF volume was related to total brain volume (p < 0.01), as was lateral ventricle to cerebral volume (p < 0.01); however, the fourth ventricle was not related to cerebellar or brainstem volume (p = 0.18-0.19). Abnormalities of the CSF spaces are the most common anomalies of neurologic development detected on fetal screening using neurosonography. Normative values of absolute CSF volume, as well as relative growth in comparison to intracranial parenchyma, provide valuable insight into normal fetal neurodevelopment. These data may provide important biomarkers of early deviations from normal growth, better distinguish between benign variants and early disease, and serve as reference standards for postnatal growth and development in the premature infant. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Effect of menstrual cycle phase on background parenchymal uptake on molecular breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hruska, Carrie B.; Conners, Amy Lynn; Vachon, Celine M.; O’Connor, Michael K.; Shuster, Lynne T.; Bartley, Adam C.; Rhodes, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale and Objectives The level of Tc-99m sestamibi uptake within normal fibroglandular tissue on molecular breast imaging (MBI), termed background parenchymal uptake (BPU), has been anecdotally observed to fluctuate with menstrual cycle. Our objective was to assess the impact of menstrual cycle phase on BPU appearance. Materials and Methods Premenopausal volunteers who reported regular menstrual cycles and no exogenous hormone use were recruited to undergo serial MBI exams during the follicular and luteal phase. A study radiologist, blinded to cycle phase, categorized BPU as either photopenic, minimal-mild, moderate, or marked. Change in BPU with cycle phase was determined as well as correlations of BPU with mammographic density and hormone levels. Results Among 42 analyzable participants, high BPU (moderate or marked) was observed more often in luteal phase compared to follicular (p = 0.016). BPU did not change with phase in 30 of 42 (71%) and increased in the luteal phase compared to follicular in 12 (29%). High BPU was more frequent in dense breasts compared to non-dense breasts at both the luteal phase (58% [15/26] vs. 13% [2/16], p= 0.004) and follicular phase (35% [9/26] vs. 6% [1/16], p=0.061). Spearman’s correlation coefficients did not show any correlation of BPU with hormone levels measured at either cycle phase, and suggested a weak correlation between change in BPU and changes in estrone and estradiol between phases. Conclusion We observed variable effects of menstrual cycle on BPU among our cohort of premenopausal women, however, when high BPU was observed, it was most frequently seen during the luteal phase compared to follicular phase, and in women with dense breasts compared to non-dense breasts. PMID:26112057

  12. Changes of renal sinus fat and renal parenchymal fat during an 18-month randomized weight loss trial.

    PubMed

    Zelicha, Hila; Schwarzfuchs, Dan; Shelef, Ilan; Gepner, Yftach; Tsaban, Gal; Tene, Lilac; Yaskolka Meir, Anat; Bilitzky, Avital; Komy, Oded; Cohen, Noa; Bril, Nitzan; Rein, Michal; Serfaty, Dana; Kenigsbuch, Shira; Chassidim, Yoash; Sarusi, Benjamin; Thiery, Joachim; Ceglarek, Uta; Stumvoll, Michael; Blüher, Matthias; Haviv, Yosef S; Stampfer, Meir J; Rudich, Assaf; Shai, Iris

    2017-05-02

    Data regarding the role of kidney adiposity, its clinical implications, and its dynamics during weight-loss are sparse. We investigated the effect of long-term weight-loss induced intervention diets on dynamics of renal-sinus-fat, an ectopic fat depot, and %renal-parenchymal-fat, lipid accumulation within the renal parenchyma. We randomized 278 participants with abdominal obesity/dyslipidemia to low-fat or Mediterranean/low-carbohydrate diets, with or without exercise. We quantified renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat by whole body magnetic-resonance-imaging. Participants (age = 48 years; 89% men; body-mass-index = 31 kg/m(2)) had 86% retention to the trial after 18 months. Both increased renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat were directly associated with hypertension, and with higher abdominal deep-subcutaneous-adipose-tissue and visceral-adipose-tissue (p of trend < 0.05 for all) after adjustment for body weight. Higher renal-sinus-fat was associated with lower estimated-glomerular-filtration-rate and with higher microalbuminuria and %HbA1C beyond body weight. After 18 months of intervention, overall renal-sinus-fat (-9%; p < 0.05 vs. baseline) but not %renal-parenchymal-fat (-1.7%; p = 0.13 vs. baseline) significantly decreased, and similarly across the intervention groups. Renal-sinus-fat and %renal-parenchymal-fat changes were correlated with weight-loss per-se (p < 0.05). In a model adjusted for age, sex, and visceral-adipose-tissue changes, 18 months reduction in renal-sinus-fat associated with decreased pancreatic, hepatic and cardiac fats (p < 0.05 for all) and with decreased cholesterol/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) (β = 0.13; p = 0.05), triglycerides/HDL-c (β = 0.13; p = 0.05), insulin (β = 0.12; p = 0.05) and gamma glutamyl transpeptidase (β = 0.24; p = 0.001), but not with improved renal function parameters or blood pressure. Decreased intake of sodium was associated with a reduction in

  13. Pediatric MATCH Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    Infographic explaining NCI-COG Pediatric MATCH, a cancer treatment clinical trial for children and adolescents, from 1 to 21 years of age, that is testing the use of precision medicine for pediatric cancers.

  14. Pediatric Thyroid Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Marketplace Find an ENT Doctor Near You Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Pediatric Thyroid Cancer Patient Health Information News media ... and neck issues, should be consulted. Types of thyroid cancer in children: Papillary : This form of thyroid cancer ...

  15. Pediatric diagnostic imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Gyll, C.; Blake, N.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book treats the practical problems of pediatric radiography and radiological procedures. Written jointly by a radiographer and a radiologist, it covers pediatric positioning and procedures. An extended chapter covers neonatal radiography and radiology.

  16. American Pediatric Surgical Association

    MedlinePlus

    American Pediatric Surgical Association Search for: Login Resources + For Members For Professionals For Training Program Directors For Media For ... Surgical Outcomes Surveys & Results Publications Continuing Education + ExPERT Pediatric Surgery NaT Annual Meeting CME MOC Requirements Residents / ...

  17. Nuances in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Kenefake, Mary Ella; Swarm, Matthew; Walthall, Jennifer

    2013-08-01

    Pediatric trauma evaluation mimics adult stabilization in that it is best accomplished with a focused and systematic approach. Attention to developmental differences, anatomic and physiologic nuances, and patterns of injury equip emergency physicians to stabilize and manage pediatric injury.

  18. Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... you insights into your child's treatment. LEARN MORE Brain tumors and their treatment can be deadly so ... Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation Board Read more >> Pediatric Brain Tumor Foundation 302 Ridgefield Court, Asheville, NC 28806 ...

  19. Nuclear imaging in pediatrics

    SciTech Connect

    Siddiqui, A.R.

    1985-01-01

    The author's intent is to familiarize practicing radiologists with the technical aspects and interpretation of nuclear medicine procedures in children and to illustrate the indications for nuclear medicine procedures in pediatric problems. Pediatric doses, dosimetry, sedation, and injection techniques, organ systems, oncology and infection, testicular scanning and nuclear crystography, pediatric endocrine and skeletal systems, ventilation and perfusion imaging of both congenital and acquired pediatric disorders, cardiovascular problems, gastrointestinal, hepatobiliary, reticuloendothelial studies, and central nervous system are all topics which are included and discussed.

  20. Pediatric electrocardiographic imaging applications.

    PubMed

    Silva, Jennifer N A

    2015-03-01

    Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: (1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, (2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and preexcitation, (3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff–Parkinson–White syndrome, and (4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy.

  1. Neuroimaging in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Lucaya, Javier; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Sainz, Pilar; Olivé, Teresa; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Ortega, Juan J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in therapy for pediatric hematologic neoplasms have greatly improved the prognosis but have resulted in an increased incidence of associated complications and toxic effects. The main neuroimaging features in pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were retrospectively reviewed. To simplify the approach and facilitate differential diagnosis, the neuroimaging features have been classified into three main categories: central nervous system manifestations of primary disease, side effects of therapeutic procedures (radiation therapy, chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation), and complications due to immunosuppression, particularly infections. Manifestations of primary disease include cerebrovascular complications (hemorrhage, cerebral infarction) and central nervous system involvement (infiltration of the meninges, parenchyma, bone marrow, orbit, and spine). Effects of radiation therapy include white matter disease, mineralizing microangiopathy, parenchymal brain volume loss, radiation-induced cryptic vascular malformations, and second neoplasms. Effects of chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation include hemorrhage, dural venous thrombosis, white matter disease, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy. Both the underlying malignancy and antineoplastic therapy can cause immunosuppression. Fungi are the most frequent causal microorganisms in immunosuppressed patients with infection. Familiarity with the imaging findings is essential for proper diagnosis of neurologic symptoms in pediatric patients with oncohematologic disease. Copyright RSNA, 2002

  2. The Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Presenting as Innumerable Diffuse Microcalcifications in Underlying Adolescent Hashimoto's Thyroiditis

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Kwak, Jeong Ja

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common diffuse thyroid disease and is characterized by diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. However, the ultrasonographic findings of papillary thyroid carcinomas that arise from Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the pediatric and adolescent population are not well known. We report a rare ultrasonographic finding in a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma that arose from underlying Hashimoto's thyroiditis: innumerable diffuse microcalcifications instead of a typical malignant-appearing nodule. PMID:27015194

  3. Diffusion MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Hidenao

    Recent advances of magnetic resonance imaging have been described, especially stressed on the diffusion sequences. We have recently applied the diffusion sequence to functional brain imaging, and found the appropriate results. In addition to the neurosciences fields, diffusion weighted images have improved the accuracies of clinical diagnosis depending upon magnetic resonance images in stroke as well as inflammations.

  4. Pediatric Gastroenterology in Cuba: Evolution and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Castañeda-Guillot, Carlos

    2016-10-01

    INTRODUCTION The professional practice of pediatric gastroenterology arose in Cuba as an expression of the specialty's development internationally and Cuba's new strategies in public health, and in response to national needs for health care expertise in digestive diseases of infants, older children and adolescents. OBJECTIVES Describe the history of pediatric gastroenterology's development in Cuba since its inception at the National Gastroenterology Institute in the early 1970s, its contributions, and efforts to extend it to pediatric hospitals throughout Cuba. EVIDENCE ACQUISITION This is a historical review based on document analysis. Institutional sources from the National Gastroenterology Institute and Ministry of Public Health were reviewed, as well as international and national literature on the history of pediatric gastroenterology and unpublished texts since its emergence in 1972. DEVELOPMENT Although pediatric gastroenterology has not been formally recognized as a medical specialty in Cuba, there have been important achievements in establishing a network of specialized health care services for digestive diseases of children and adolescents. Gastrointestinal endoscopy and other auxiliary diagnostic modalities have been introduced for children and play a major role in clinical trials and research. This article describes the international context that promoted the specialty's development in Cuba. Reference is made to specialized training from its initial stages in 1972, its consolidation as an emerging discipline in Cuban medicine, and its diffusion in Latin American and Caribbean countries. Professional development and specialized training to meet health human resource needs in pediatric hospitals are described, as well as Cuban participation in the Latin American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. National and international milestones, publications, awards and recognitions that indicate advances despite difficulties are also

  5. Plasmapause diffusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horwitz, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    The Bohm diffusion coefficient and observed electrostatic wave scattering are used as the bases of estimates of the smoothing effect that diffusion may have on steep plasmapause density gradients. The estimate for diffusion resulting from scattering by observed electrostatic waves is found to be much lower than that of the perpendicular Bohm diffusion coefficient for characteristic plasma temperatures and magnetic fields. This diffusion rate estimate may be too small, however, if the wave amplitudes are significantly higher for steep plasmapauses. The effects are therefore negligible for most considerations of macroscopic plasmapause dynamics, but may be significant in limiting drift wave instabilities and similar phenomena driven by the steepness of the plasmapause density gradient.

  6. Non-invasive assessment of vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH using C-arm FDCT parenchymal blood volume measurement in the neuro-interventional suite: Technical feasibility

    PubMed Central

    Downer, Jonathan; Corkill, Rufus; Byrne, James V

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cerebral vasospasm is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) surviving the initial ictus. Commonly used techniques for vasospasm assessment are digital subtraction angiography and transcranial Doppler sonography. These techniques can reliably identify only the major vessel spasm and fail to estimate its haemodynamic significance. To overcome these issues and to enable comprehensive non-invasive assessment of vasospasm inside the interventional suite, a novel protocol involving measurement of parenchymal blood volume (PBV) using C-arm flat detector computed tomography (FDCT) was implemented. Materials and methods Patients from the neuro-intensive treatment unit (ITU) with suspected vasospasm following aneurysmal SAH were scanned with a biplane C-arm angiography system using an intravenous contrast injection protocol. The PBV maps were generated using prototype software. Contemporaneous clinically indicated MR scan including the diffusion- and perfusion-weighted sequences was performed. C-arm PBV maps were compared against the MR perfusion maps. Results Distribution of haemodynamic impairment on C-arm PBV maps closely matched the pattern of abnormality on MR perfusion maps. On visual comparison between the two techniques, the extent of abnormality indicated PBV to be both cerebral blood flow and cerebral blood volume weighted. Conclusion C-arm FDCT PBV measurements allow an objective assessment of the severity and localisation of cerebral hypoperfusion resulting from vasospasm. The technique has proved feasible and useful in very sick patients after aneurysmal SAH. The promise shown in this early study indicates that it deserves further evaluation both for post-SAH vasospasm and in other relevant clinical settings. PMID:26017197

  7. The sitting position during neurosurgical procedures does not influence serum biomarkers of pulmonary parenchymal injury.

    PubMed

    Duda, Izabela; Grzybowska, Konstancja; Jędrzejowska-Szypułka, Halina; Lewin-Kowalik, Joanna

    2012-12-05

    affect the concentration of plasma biomarkers of pulmonary parenchymal injury such as SP-D and CC16.

  8. Three-Dimensional Quantitative Validation of Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging Background Parenchymal Enhancement Assessments.

    PubMed

    Ha, Richard; Mema, Eralda; Guo, Xiaotao; Mango, Victoria; Desperito, Elise; Ha, Jason; Wynn, Ralph; Zhao, Binsheng

    2016-01-01

    The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and its clinical significance as a biomarker of breast cancer risk has been proposed based on qualitative studies. Previous BPE quantification studies lack appropriate correlation with BPE qualitative assessments. The purpose of this study is to validate our three-dimensional BPE quantification method with standardized BPE qualitative cases. An Institutional Review Board-approved study reviewed 500 consecutive magnetic resonance imaging cases (from January 2013-December 2014) using a strict inclusion criteria and 120 cases that best represented each of the BPE qualitative categories (minimal or mild or moderate or marked) were selected. Blinded to the qualitative data, fibroglandular tissue contours of precontrast and postcontrast images were delineated using an in-house, proprietary segmentation algorithm. Metrics of BPE were calculated including %BPE ([ratio of BPE volume to fibroglandular tissue volume] × 100) at multiple threshold levels to determine the optimal cutoff point for BPE quantification that best correlated with the reference BPE qualitative cases. The highest positive correlation was present at ×1.5 precontrast average signal intensity threshold level (r = 0.84, P < 0.001). At this level, the BPE qualitative assessment of minimal, mild, moderate, and marked correlated with the mean quantitative %BPE of 14.1% (95% CI: 10.9-17.2), 26.1% (95% CI: 22.8-29.3), 45.9% (95% CI: 40.2-51.7), and 74.0% (95% CI: 68.6-79.5), respectively. A one-way analysis of variance with post-hoc analysis showed that at ×1.5 precontrast average signal intensity level, the quantitative %BPE measurements best differentiated the four reference BPE qualitative groups (F [3,117] = 106.8, P < 0.001). Our three-dimensional BPE quantification methodology was validated using the reference BPE qualitative cases and could become an invaluable clinical tool to more accurately assess breast cancer risk and to

  9. [Pediatric neuroimaging emergencies].

    PubMed

    Adamsbaum, C; Rolland, Y; Husson, B

    2004-09-01

    The notion of emergency with regards to pediatric neuroimaging requires a strong knowledge of clinical indications. In children under 2 years of age, head trauma requires a CT scan in case of repeated or prolonged or rapidly increasing vomiting, focal signs, loss of consciousness, unusual behavior, seizures, clinical signs of skull fracture or polytrauma. The "shaken baby syndrome" is usually suspected in case of loss of consciousness or seizures before 8 months of age. The hematomas that are observed are subdural in location, diffuse and deeply located. Imaging is only mandatory for headache suggesting underlying space occupying lesion: permanent or increasing pain, nocturnal headache, headache during postural changes or efforts, associated to seizures or abnormal neurological examination. No imaging is indicated in case of first epileptic seizure associated to normal neurological examination and without any particular context. The presence of trauma, intracranial hypertension, persisting disturbances of consciousness or associated focal sign necessitates urgent neuroimaging. No imaging is indicated in case of typical febrile seizures, i.e. generalized, brief and occurring between 1 and 5 years of age. Spinal cord symptoms require immediate MRI evaluation. The most frequent tumor is neuroblastoma. In the absence of spinal tumor, brain abnormalities must be excluded (inflammatory disease). In neonates, CT scan or MRI must be readily performed in case of seizures or loss of consciousness to exclude ischemic, traumatic or infectious lesions.

  10. Use of C-Arm Cone Beam CT During Hepatic Radioembolization: Protocol Optimization for Extrahepatic Shunting and Parenchymal Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Hoven, Andor F. van den Prince, Jip F.; Keizer, Bart de; Vonken, Evert-Jan P. A.; Bruijnen, Rutger C. G.; Verkooijen, Helena M.; Lam, Marnix G. E. H.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den

    2016-01-15

    PurposeTo optimize a C-arm computed tomography (CT) protocol for radioembolization (RE), specifically for extrahepatic shunting and parenchymal enhancement.Materials and MethodsA prospective development study was performed per IDEAL recommendations. A literature-based protocol was applied in patients with unresectable and chemorefractory liver malignancies undergoing an angiography before radioembolization. Contrast and scan settings were adjusted stepwise and repeatedly reviewed in a consensus meeting. Afterwards, two independent raters analyzed all scans. A third rater evaluated the SPECT/CT scans as a reference standard for extrahepatic shunting and lack of target segment perfusion.ResultsFifty scans were obtained in 29 procedures. The first protocol, using a 6 s delay and 10 s scan, showed insufficient parenchymal enhancement. In the second protocol, the delay was determined by timing parenchymal enhancement on DSA power injection (median 8 s, range 4–10 s): enhancement improved, but breathing artifacts increased (from 0 to 27 %). Since the third protocol with a 5 s scan decremented subjective image quality, the second protocol was deemed optimal. Median CNR (range) was 1.7 (0.6–3.2), 2.2 (−1.4–4.0), and 2.1 (−0.3–3.0) for protocol 1, 2, and 3 (p = 0.80). Delineation of perfused segments was possible in 57, 73, and 44 % of scans (p = 0.13). In all C-arm CTs combined, the negative predictive value was 95 % for extrahepatic shunting and 83 % for lack of target segment perfusion.ConclusionAn optimized C-arm CT protocol was developed that can be used to detect extrahepatic shunts and non-perfusion of target segments during RE.

  11. Predictive Accuracy of Urinary neutrophil gelatinase associated lipocalin (NGAL) for renal parenchymal involvement in Children with Acute Pyelonephritis

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemi, Kambiz; Esteghamati, Maryam; Borzoo, Sara; Parvaneh, Erfan; Borzoo, Samira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most prevalent infections in children and infants. Early and accurate detection of renal parenchymal involvement in UTI is necessary for decision making and determining treatment strategies. The aim of this study was to determine the predictive accuracy of urinary neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) for renal parenchymal involvement in children with acute pyelonephritis. Methods This descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 on children who had been diagnosed with UTI. Children who were admitted to Koodakan Hospital in Bandar Abbas, Hormozgan Province, Iran, and whose ages ranged from two months to 14 years were enrolled in the study. Urine samples were taken to conduct urinary NGAL tests, urine cultures, and urinalyses. In addition, some blood samples were collected for the purpose of determining leukocyte count and C-reactive protein (CRP) and to conduct erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) tests. All patients underwent a dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA) scan. SPSS software was used to analyze the data. Results Among the participants in the study, 29 were male (32%), and 60 were female (68%). The mean age of the children who participated in the study was 2.99 ± 2.94 years. The results of the Kruskal-Wallis test showed a significant increase in the urinary NGAL level, an increase in the CRP level, and higher DMSA scan grades (p < 0.001). The cutoff point amounted to > 5 mg/l, having the negative predictive value (NPV) of 76.3%, the specificity of 97.83%, the positive predictive value (PPV) of 96.7%, and the sensitivity of 67.4%. Conclusion Urinary NGAL is not sensitive enough for the prediction of renal parenchymal involvement, but it is a specific marker. PMID:27053998

  12. Nature of the Fatty Acid Synthetase Systems in Parenchymal and Epidermal Cells of Allium porrum L. Leaves 1

    PubMed Central

    Lessire, Rene; Stumpe, Paul K.

    1983-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis was compared in cell-free extracts of epidermis and parenchyma of Allium porrum L. leaves. Parenchyma extracts had the major fatty acid synthetase (FAS) activity (70-90%) of the whole leaf; palmitic acid was also the major fatty acid synthesized when acetyl-coenzyme A (CoA) was the primer, but when acetyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) was employed, C18:0 and C16:0 were synthesized in equal proportion. With the epidermal FAS system when either acetyl-CoA or acetyl-ACP was tested in the presence of labeled malonyl-CoA, palmitic acid was the only product synthesized. Specific activities of the FAS enzyme activities were determined in both tissue extracts. The properties of malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase were examined from the two different tissues. The molecular weights estimated by Sephadex G-200 chromatography were 38,000 for the epidermal enzyme and 45,000 for parenchymal enzyme. The optimal pH was for both enzymes 7.8 to 8.0 and the maximal velocity 0.4 to 0.5 micromoles per milligram protein per minute. These enzymes had different affinities for malonyl-CoA and ACP. For the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylase of epidermis, the Km values were 5.6 and 13.7 micromolar for malonyl-CoA and ACP, respectively, and 4.2 and 21.7 micromolar for the parenchymal enzyme. These results suggest that the FAS system in both tissues are nonassociated, that the malonyl-CoA:ACP transacylases are isozymes, and that both in epidermis and in parenchyma tissue two independent FAS system occur. Evidence would suggest that β-ketoacyl-ACP synthase II is present in the parenchymal cells but missing in the epidermal cell. PMID:16663268

  13. Primary Angiitis of the Central Nervous System: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Spectrum of Parenchymal, Meningeal, and Vascular Lesions at Baseline.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Grégoire; de Boysson, Hubert; Zuber, Mathieu; Guillevin, Loïc; Meary, Eric; Costalat, Vincent; Pagnoux, Christian; Naggara, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    Primary angiitis of the central nervous system remains challenging. To report an overview and pictorial review of brain magnetic resonance imaging findings in adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system and to determine the distribution of parenchymal, meningeal, and vascular lesions in a large multicentric cohort. Adult patients from the French COVAC cohort (Cohort of Patients With Primary Vasculitis of the Central Nervous System), with biopsy or angiographically proven primary angiitis of the central nervous system and brain magnetic resonance imaging available at the time of diagnosis were included. A systematic imaging review was performed blinded to clinical data. Sixty patients met inclusion criteria. Mean age was 45 years (±12.9). Patients initially presented focal deficit(s) (83%), headaches (53%), cognitive disorder (40%), and seizures (38.3%). The most common magnetic resonance imaging finding observed in 42% of patients was multiterritorial, bilateral, distal acute stroke lesions after small to medium artery distribution, with a predominant carotid circulation distribution. Hemorrhagic infarctions and parenchymal hemorrhages were also frequently found in the cohort (55%). Acute convexity subarachnoid hemorrhage was found in 26% of patients and 42% demonstrated pre-eminent leptomeningeal enhancement, which is found to be significantly more prevalent in biopsy-proven patients (60% versus 28%; P=0.04). Seven patients had tumor-like presentations. Seventy-seven percent of magnetic resonance angiographic studies were abnormal, revealing proximal/distal stenoses in 57% and 61% of patients, respectively. Adult primary angiitis of the central nervous system is a heterogenous disease, with multiterritorial, distal, and bilateral acute stroke being the most common pattern of parenchymal lesions found on magnetic resonance imaging. Our findings suggest a higher than previously thought prevalence of hemorrhagic transformation and other hemorrhagic

  14. [Histological and cytological study of neoblasts and fixed parenchymal cells in Dendrocoelum lacteum planarians deprived of their anterior region].

    PubMed

    Stéphan-Dubois, F; Bautz, A

    1975-01-01

    On amputating either at the root of the pharynx or between the mouth and the genital pore, the posterior parts which are thereby isolated do not regenerate. However they are capable of surviving for ever a year, without feeding. The wounded region is occupied by neoblasts which degenerate within a few days after an initial secretory activity. Their degeneration is of autophagic type. The abortive blastems disappear only slowly, because the degeneration of their neoblasts is partly compensated by the continual immigration of new regeneration cells which come from the posterior region. Several months after amputation, under the effect of prolonged starvation, neoblasts and fixed parenchymal cells begin to degenerate.

  15. The application of capnography to differentiate peri-chest tube air leak from parenchymal leak following pulmonary surgery

    PubMed Central

    Walker, William S.

    2014-01-01

    Prolonged air leak is a common complication of pulmonary resection. However, while a bubbling chest drain is commonly related to parenchymal air leakage, it may also be caused by air entering the pleural cavity via an incomplete seal of the tissues at the chest tube insertion site. Examination alone is not sufficient to guide the surgeon as to which of the above complications is responsible for drain bubbling. We describe a simple method, whereby a CO2 monitoring device is attached to the chest drain to determine whether the air loss observed is in fact due to a pulmonary air leak. PMID:24790853

  16. Analysis of Parenchymal Texture with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis: Comparison with Digital Mammography and Implications for Cancer Risk Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Ikejimba, Lynda C.; Bakic, Predrag R.; Troxel, Andrea B.; Conant, Emily F.; Maidment, Andrew D. A.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To correlate the parenchymal texture features at digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography with breast percent density (PD), an established breast cancer risk factor, in a screening population of women. Materials and Methods: This HIPAA-compliant study was approved by the institutional review board. Bilateral DBT images and digital mammograms from 71 women (mean age, 54 years; age range, 34–75 years) with negative or benign findings at screening mammography were retrospectively collected from a separate institutional review board–approved DBT screening trial (performed from July 2007 to March 2008) in which all women had given written informed consent. Parenchymal texture features of skewness, coarseness, contrast, energy, homogeneity, and fractal dimension were computed from the retroareolar region. Principal component analysis (PCA) was applied to obtain orthogonal texture components. Mammographic PD was estimated with software. Correlation analysis and multiple linear regression with generalized estimating equations were performed to determine the association between texture features and breast PD. Regression was adjusted for age to determine the independent association of texture to breast PD when age was also considered as a predictor variable. Results: Texture feature correlations to breast PD were stronger with DBT than with digital mammography. Statistically significant correlations (P < .001) were observed for contrast (r = 0.48), energy (r = −0.47), and homogeneity (r = −0.56) at DBT and for contrast (r = 0.26), energy (r = −0.26), and homogeneity (r = −0.33) at digital mammography. Multiple linear regression analysis of PCA texture components as predictors of PD also demonstrated significantly stronger associations with DBT. The association was strongest when age was also considered as a predictor of PD (R2 = 0.41 for DBT and 0.28 for digital mammography; P < .001). Conclusion: Parenchymal texture features are more

  17. Vascular and parenchymal amyloid pathology in an Alzheimer disease knock-in mouse model: interplay with cerebral blood flow

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Accumulation and deposition of β-amyloid peptides (Aβ) in the brain is a central event in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Besides the parenchymal pathology, Aβ is known to undergo active transport across the blood–brain barrier and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) is a prominent feature in the majority of AD. Although impaired cerebral blood flow (CBF) has been implicated in faulty Aβ transport and clearance, and cerebral hypoperfusion can exist in the pre-clinical phase of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), it is still unclear whether it is one of the causal factors for AD pathogenesis, or an early consequence of a multi-factor condition that would lead to AD at late stage. To study the potential interaction between faulty CBF and amyloid accumulation in clinical-relevant situation, we generated a new amyloid precursor protein (APP) knock-in allele that expresses humanized Aβ and a Dutch mutation in addition to Swedish/London mutations and compared this line with an equivalent knock-in line but in the absence of the Dutch mutation, both crossed onto the PS1M146V knock-in background. Results Introduction of the Dutch mutation results in robust CAA and parenchymal Aβ pathology, age-dependent reduction of spatial learning and memory deficits, and CBF reduction as detected by fMRI. Direct manipulation of CBF by transverse aortic constriction surgery on the left common carotid artery caused differential changes in CBF in the anterior and middle region of the cortex, where it is reduced on the left side and increased on the right side. However these perturbations in CBF resulted in the same effect: both significantly exacerbate CAA and amyloid pathology. Conclusions Our study reveals a direct and positive link between vascular and parenchymal Aβ; both can be modulated by CBF. The new APP knock-in mouse model recapitulates many symptoms of AD including progressive vascular and parenchymal Aβ pathology and behavioral deficits in the absence

  18. Pediatric intensivist extenders in the pediatric ICU.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Cheryl L; Orlowski, James P; DeNicola, Lucian K

    2008-06-01

    This article explores the use of physician extenders in the pediatric ICU setting. The Libby Zion case is highlighted because of its impact on the use of manpower in the hospital setting. The history of physician extenders, including the hospitalist, physician assistant (PA), and nurse practitioner (NP), is discussed. Findings indicate a positive impact within the pediatric intensive care setting with the use of NPs and PAs. The American Academy of Pediatrics has supported the use of physician extenders in the care of hospitalized children.

  19. Breast MRI fibroglandular volume and parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy.

    PubMed

    DeLeo, Michael J; Domchek, Susan M; Kontos, Despina; Conant, Emily; Chen, Jinbo; Weinstein, Susan

    2015-03-01

    OBJECTIVE. The purpose of this article is to assess the difference in fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers on contrast-enhanced breast MRI (CE-MRI) performed before and immediately after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO). MATERIALS AND METHODS. We retrospectively compared fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in 55 female BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers before and after RRSO using standard BI-RADS categories and a paired Wilcoxon and Mann-Whitney U test. A two-sample Wilcoxon test was performed to compare fibroglandular volume and background parenchymal enhancement in women with and without subsequent breast cancer diagnosis on follow-up. RESULTS. The median time to post-RRSO CE-MRI was 8 months (range, 1-40 months). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO (p = 0.65). The mean background parenchymal enhancement was 2.5 (range, 1-4) before and 1.5 (range, 1-4) after RRSO (overall range, -2.5 to 1.5; p = 0.0001). Breast cancer was detected in nine women at a median time of 4.8 years (range, 1.8-13.3 years) after RRSO. For women who received a diagnosis of breast cancer after RRSO compared with those who did not, mean background parenchymal enhancement before RRSO was 3 (range, 2-4) versus 2.5 (range, 1-4; p = 0.001), and mean background parenchymal enhancement after RRSO was 2.5 (range, 1.5-4) versus 1.5 (range 2-4; p = 0.0018). There was no difference in fibroglandular volume before and after RRSO. CONCLUSION. In BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers, we observed a significant reduction in background parenchymal enhancement on the first CE-MRI after RRSO and no significant change in fibroglandular volume. Higher background parenchymal enhancement before and after RRSO was observed in women who subsequently received a diagnosis of breast cancer. This suggests that background parenchymal enhancement, rather than fibro-glandular volume, may be a

  20. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  1. Griffith diffusers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T.-T.; Nelson, C. D.

    1979-01-01

    Contoured wall diffusers are designed by using an inverse method. The prescribed wall velocity distribution(s) was taken from the high lift airfoil designed by A. A. Griffith in 1938; therefore, such diffusers are named Griffith diffusers. First the formulation of the inverse problem and the method of solution are outlined. Then the typical contour of a two-dimensional diffuser and velocity distributions across the flow channel at various stations are presented. For a Griffith diffuser to operate as it is designed, boundary layer suction is necessary. Discussion of the percentage of through-flow required to be removed for the purpose of boundary layer control is given. Finally, reference is made to the latest version of a computer program for a two-dimensional diffuser requiring only area ratio, nondimensional length and suction percentage as inputs.

  2. Diffuse abdominal gallium-67 citrate uptake in salmonella infections

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, I.; Koren, A.

    1987-11-01

    Two pediatric patients with salmonella infections (one with typhoid fever and the second with salmonella C2 gastroenteritis), had a diffuse abdominal uptake of Ga-67 citrate. The possible explanation for this finding is discussed. Salmonella infection should be included as a cause in the differential diagnosis of diffuse accumulation of Ga-67 citrate.

  3. Parenchymal cystatin C focal deposits and glial scar formation around brain arteries in Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy.

    PubMed

    Osk Snorradottir, Asbjorg; Isaksson, Helgi J; Kaeser, Stephan A; Skodras, Angelos A; Olafsson, Elias; Palsdottir, Astridur; Thor Bragason, Birkir

    2015-10-05

    Hereditary Cystatin C Amyloid Angiopathy (HCCAA) is an amyloid disorder in Icelandic families caused by an autosomal dominant mutation in the cystatin C gene. Mutant cystatin C forms amyloid deposits in brain arteries and arterioles which are associated with changes in the arterial wall structure, notably deposition of extracellular matrix proteins. In this post-mortem study we examined the neuroinflammatory response relative to the topographical distribution of cystatin C deposition, and associated haemorrhages, in the leptomeninges, cerebrum, cerebellum, thalamus, and midbrain of HCCAA patients. Cystatin C was deposited in all brain areas, grey and white matter alike, most prominently in arteries and arterioles; capillaries and veins were not, or minimally, affected. We also observed perivascular deposits and parenchymal focal deposits proximal to affected arteries. This study shows for the first time, that cystatin C does not exclusively form CAA and perivascular amyloid but also focal deposits in the brain parenchyma. Haemorrhages were observed in all patients and occurred in all brain areas, variable between patients. Microinfarcts were observed in 34.6% of patients. The neuroinflammatory response was limited to the close vicinity of affected arteries and perivascular as well as parenchymal focal deposits. Taken together with previously reported arterial accumulation of extracellular matrix proteins in HCCAA, our results indicate that the central nervous system pathology of HCCAA is characterised by the formation of a glial scar within and around affected arteries.

  4. Blood-brain barrier damage, but not parenchymal white blood cells, is a hallmark of seizure activity.

    PubMed

    Marchi, Nicola; Teng, Qingshan; Ghosh, Chaitali; Fan, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Minh T; Desai, Nirav K; Bawa, Harpreet; Rasmussen, Peter; Masaryk, Thomas K; Janigro, Damir

    2010-09-24

    It has long been held that chronic seizures cause blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. Recent studies have also demonstrated that BBB damage triggers seizures. We have used the BBB osmotic disruption procedure (BBBD) to examine the correlation between BBB opening, pattern of white blood cell (WBCs) entry into the brain and seizure occurrence. These findings were compared to results from resected epileptic brain tissue from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. We confirmed that a successful BBB osmotic opening (BBBD) leads to the occurrence of acute epileptiform discharges. Electroencephalography (EEG) and time-joint frequency analysis reveal EEG slowing followed by an increase in the 10-20Hz frequency range. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled WBCs (GFP-WBCs) suspended in Evans Blue we found that, at time of BBB-induced epileptiform discharges, WBCs populated the perivascular space of a leaky BBB. Similar results were obtained at time of pilocarpine seizure. No frank WBCs extravasation in the brain parenchyma was observed. In TLE brain specimens, CD45-positive leukocytes were detected only in the vascular and perivascular spaces while albumin and IgG extravasates were parenchymal. The pattern was similar to those observed in rats. Our data suggest that neither acute-induced nor chronic seizures correlate with WBC brain parenchymal migration while albumin and IgG brain leakage is a hallmark of acute and chronic seizures. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Blood-brain barrier damage, but not parenchymal white blood cells, is a hallmark of seizure activity

    PubMed Central

    Marchi, Nicola; Teng, Qingshan; Ghosh, Chaitali; Fan, Qingyuan; Nguyen, Minh T; Desai, Nirav K; Bawa, Harpreet; Rasmussen, Peter; Masaryk, Thomas K; Janigro, Damir

    2010-01-01

    It has long been held that chronic seizures cause blood-brain barrier (BBB) damage. Recent studies have also demonstrated that BBB damage triggers seizures. We have used the BBB osmotic disruption procedure (BBBD) to examine the correlation between BBB opening, pattern of white blood cells (WBCs) entry into the brain and seizure occurrence. These findings were compared to results from resected epileptic brain tissue from temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients. We confirmed that a successful BBB osmotic opening (BBBD) leads to the occurrence of acute epileptiform discharges. Electroencephalography (EEG) and time-joint frequency analysis reveal EEG slowing followed by an increase in the 10-20 Hz frequency range. Using green fluorescent protein (GFP)-labeled WBCs (GFP-WBCs) suspended in Evans Blue we found that, at time of BBB-induced epileptiform discharges, WBCs populated the perivascular space of a leaky BBB. Similar results were obtained at time of pilocarpine seizure. No frank WBCs extravasation in the brain parenchyma was observed. In TLE brain specimens, CD45-positive leukocytes were detected only in the vascular and perivascular spaces while albumin and IgG extravasates were parenchymal. The pattern was similar to those observed in rats. Our data suggest that neither acute-induced nor chronic seizures correlate with WBC brain parenchymal migration while albumin and IgG brain leakage is a hallmark of acute and chronic seizures. PMID:20599815

  6. Convolutional neural network approach for enhanced capture of breast parenchymal complexity patterns associated with breast cancer risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oustimov, Andrew; Gastounioti, Aimilia; Hsieh, Meng-Kang; Pantalone, Lauren; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2017-03-01

    We assess the feasibility of a parenchymal texture feature fusion approach, utilizing a convolutional neural network (ConvNet) architecture, to benefit breast cancer risk assessment. Hypothesizing that by capturing sparse, subtle interactions between localized motifs present in two-dimensional texture feature maps derived from mammographic images, a multitude of texture feature descriptors can be optimally reduced to five meta-features capable of serving as a basis on which a linear classifier, such as logistic regression, can efficiently assess breast cancer risk. We combine this methodology with our previously validated lattice-based strategy for parenchymal texture analysis and we evaluate the feasibility of this approach in a case-control study with 424 digital mammograms. In a randomized split-sample setting, we optimize our framework in training/validation sets (N=300) and evaluate its descriminatory performance in an independent test set (N=124). The discriminatory capacity is assessed in terms of the the area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operator characteristic (ROC). The resulting meta-features exhibited strong classification capability in the test dataset (AUC = 0.90), outperforming conventional, non-fused, texture analysis which previously resulted in an AUC=0.85 on the same case-control dataset. Our results suggest that informative interactions between localized motifs exist and can be extracted and summarized via a fairly simple ConvNet architecture.

  7. Age Limit of Pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Hardin, Amy Peykoff; Hackell, Jesse M

    2017-09-01

    Pediatrics is a multifaceted specialty that encompasses children's physical, psychosocial, developmental, and mental health. Pediatric care may begin periconceptionally and continues through gestation, infancy, childhood, adolescence, and young adulthood. Although adolescence and young adulthood are recognizable phases of life, an upper age limit is not easily demarcated and varies depending on the individual patient. The establishment of arbitrary age limits on pediatric care by health care providers should be discouraged. The decision to continue care with a pediatrician or pediatric medical or surgical subspecialist should be made solely by the patient (and family, when appropriate) and the physician and must take into account the physical and psychosocial needs of the patient and the abilities of the pediatric provider to meet these needs. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. What is Pediatric Palliative Care?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Families Take the Quiz What Is Pediatric Palliative Care? Pediatric Palliative care (pronounced pal-lee-uh-tiv) is specialized ... for both the child and the family. Pediatric palliative care is provided by a team of doctors, ...

  9. What Is a Pediatric Gastroenterologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in adults. Specialized training and experience in pediatric gastroenterology are important. Pediatric gastroenterologists treat children from the ... training Three years of additional training in pediatric gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition, including medical research and treatment ...

  10. Pediatric Endocrinology Nurses Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2018! Wednesday, May 16, 2018 ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​ Journal of Pediatric Nursing The Journal of Pediatric Nursing provides original, peer-reviewed research that is based on the philosophy that pediatric nursing incorporates a family-centered approach. PENS Executive Office • ...

  11. Laser gingivectomy for pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Kelman, Michelle M; Poiman, David J; Jacobson, Barry L

    2010-01-01

    Traditional gingivectomy procedures have been a challenge for pediatric dentists who confront issues of patient cooperation and discomfort. Treatment of pediatric patients must involve minimal operative and postoperative discomfort. Laser soft-tissue surgery has been shown to be well accepted by children. For the pediatric patient, the greatest advantage of the laser is the lack of local anesthesia injection and the associated pre- and postoperative discomfort. The following case report describes a gingivectomy procedure performed on a 14-year-old female.

  12. Increased Iron Loading Induces Bmp6 Expression in the Non-Parenchymal Cells of the Liver Independent of the BMP-Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Enns, Caroline A.; Ahmed, Riffat; Wang, Jiaohong; Ueno, Akiko; Worthen, Christal; Tsukamoto, Hidekazu; Zhang, An-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 6 (BMP6) is an essential cytokine for the expression of hepcidin, an iron regulatory hormone secreted predominantly by hepatocytes. Bmp6 expression is upregulated by increased iron-levels in the liver. Both hepatocytes and non-parenchymal liver cells have detectable Bmp6 mRNA. Here we showed that induction of hepcidin expression in hepatocytes by dietary iron is associated with an elevation of Bmp6 mRNA in the non-parenchymal cells of the liver. Consistently, incubation with iron-saturated transferrin induces Bmp6 mRNA expression in isolated hepatic stellate cells, but not in hepatocytes. These observations suggest an important role of the non-parenchymal liver cells in regulating iron-homeostasis by acting as a source of Bmp6. PMID:23565256

  13. Sedation for Pediatric Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    It is more difficult to achieve cooperation when conducting endoscopy in pediatric patients than adults. As a result, the sedation for a comfortable procedure is more important in pediatric patients. The sedation, however, often involves risks and side effects, and their prediction and prevention should be sought in advance. Physicians should familiarize themselves to the relevant guidelines in order to make appropriate decisions and actions regarding the preparation of the sedation, patient monitoring during endoscopy, patient recovery, and hospital discharge. Furthermore, they have to understand the characteristics of the pediatric patients and different types of endoscopy. The purpose of this article is to discuss the details of sedation in pediatric endoscopy. PMID:24749082

  14. Diffusion in the extracellular space in brain and tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verkman, A. S.

    2013-08-01

    Diffusion of solutes and macromolecules in the extracellular space (ECS) in brain is important for non-synaptic intercellular communication, extracellular ionic buffering, and delivery of drugs and metabolites. Diffusion in tumor ECS is important for delivery of anti-tumor drugs. The ECS in brain comprises ˜20% of brain parenchymal volume and contains cell-cell gaps down to ˜50 nm. We have developed fluorescence methods to quantify solute diffusion in the ECS, allowing measurements deep in solid tissues using microfiberoptics with micron tip size. Diffusion through the tortuous ECS in brain is generally slowed by ˜3-5-fold compared with that in water, with approximately half of the slowing due to tortuous ECS geometry and half due to the mildly viscous extracellular matrix (ECM). Mathematical modeling of slowed diffusion in an ECS with reasonable anatomical accuracy is in good agreement with experiment. In tumor tissue, diffusion of small macromolecules is only mildly slowed (<3-fold slower than in water) in superficial tumor, but is greatly slowed (>10-fold) at a depth of few millimeters as the tumor tissue becomes more compact. Slowing by ECM components such as collagen contribute to the slowed diffusion. Therefore, as found within cells, cellular crowding and highly tortuous transport can produce only minor slowing of diffusion in the ECS.

  15. Pediatric brain death: updated guidelines.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Jodi E

    2013-01-01

    Logan, a 5-year-old boy, was riding his bike with his 7-year-old brother when he was struck from behind by a car traveling at approximately 40 mph. The driver indicated that she did not see the riders until she hit Logan, who was not wearing a helmet at the time of the accident. Logan was thrown from his bike and was found at the side of the road, unresponsive and posturing. Although he was uninjured, Logan's brother witnessed the incident.Emergency medical services arrived and placed Logan on a backboard with a c-collar. Because he was not protecting his airway, he was intubated and then given sodium chloride fluids and brought to the pediatric emergency department. Upon arrival, his Glasgow Coma Scale score was 5, and his right pupil was 6 mm and not reactive.Logan's initial head computed tomographic scan showed diffuse brain edema, with early downward transtentorial brain herniation. The pediatric neurosurgeon determined that no operative management was appropriate for Logan. Besides a small laceration on his forehead, Logan had no other injuries. At this time, he was taking a few spontaneous respirations and had occasional posturing of his extremities.

  16. Pediatric Body Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Goyal, Ankur; Sharma, Raju; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a radiation-free imaging modality with excellent contrast resolution and multiplanar capabilities. Since ionizing radiation is an important concern in the pediatric population, MRI serves as a useful alternative to computed tomography (CT) and also provides additional clues to diagnosis, not discernible on other investigations. Magnetic resonance cholangiopancreatography (MRCP), urography, angiography, enterography, dynamic multiphasic imaging and diffusion-weighted imaging provide wealth of information. The main limitations include, long scan time, need for sedation/anesthesia, cost and lack of widespread availability. With the emergence of newer sequences and variety of contrast agents, MRI has become a robust modality and may serve as a one-stop shop for both anatomical and functional information.

  17. Pediatric intensive care.

    PubMed

    Macintire, D K

    1999-07-01

    To provide optimal care, a veterinarian in a pediatric intensive care situation for a puppy or kitten should be familiar with normal and abnormal vital signs, nursing care and monitoring considerations, and probable diseases. This article is a brief discussion of the pediatric intensive care commonly required to treat puppies or kittens in emergency situations and for canine parvovirus type 2 enteritis.

  18. Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Orlowski, J P

    1983-04-01

    Pediatric cardiopulmonary resuscitation refers to those measures used to restore ventilation and circulation in children. This article defines how cardiopulmonary resuscitation in infants, children, and adolescents differs from cardiopulmonary resuscitation in adults and delineates the drugs and dosages to be used in the resuscitation of pediatric patients.

  19. Pediatric endocrine surgery.

    PubMed

    Telander, R L; Zimmerman, D; Kaufman, B H; van Heerden, J A

    1985-12-01

    The pediatric surgeon is in a unique position to understand endocrine surgery and, therefore, is expected to develop considerable expertise in this area. In recent years numerous advances and changes have occurred in pediatric endocrine surgery that have led to greater understanding of the disease processes and syndromes and the development of new diagnostic techniques and surgical approaches.

  20. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  1. Economics of pediatric burns.

    PubMed

    Bass, Michael J; Phillips, Linda G

    2008-07-01

    Sustaining a burn injury sets in motion a cycle of pain, disfigurement, and a search for survival. In pediatric burns, the injury extends to the parents where fear, ignorance, and helplessness forever change their lives. Pediatric burn injuries are caused by fire, hot liquids, clothing irons, hair curlers, caustic substances like drain cleaner, the grounding of an electrical source, and exposure to radiation. Efficiency in the delivery of pediatric burn care is critical. Maximizing resource utilization means continual self-evaluation and economic analysis of therapeutic modalities. Griffiths et al found that most childhood burns are due to scalds, which can be treated for $1061 per percent burn. Paddock et al reduced the cost of treating superficial pediatric burns and reduced the length of stay in hospital using silver-impregnated gauze over traditional methods. Barrett et al found improved cosmesis of skin grafts using cultured epithelial autografts but at a substantially increased cost. Corpron et al showed that pediatric burn units that treat burns >10% total body surface area and operative treatment of pediatric burns regardless of size generate positive revenue. There is a paucity of evidentiary pediatric burn economic data. More research is needed to address areas of pediatric burn care inefficiency. Improving knowledge of cost in all health care endeavors will create competition and drive down expenditures.

  2. Teaching Prevention in Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Tina L.; Greenberg, Larrie; Loeser, Helen; Keller, David

    2000-01-01

    Reviews methods of teaching preventive medicine in pediatrics and highlights innovative programs. Methods of teaching prevention in pediatrics include patient interactions, self-directed learning, case-based learning, small-group learning, standardized patients, computer-assisted instruction, the Internet, student-centered learning, and lectures.…

  3. [Research in pediatrics].

    PubMed

    Herrera-Márquez, Julia Rocío; González-Cabello, Héctor Jaime

    2015-01-01

    In the interest of encouraging the promotion of research done by physicians of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social, in this supplement we publish articles written by residents of different specialties related to critical themes on pediatrics. These residents are guided by affiliated physicians from the Hospital de Pediatría del Centro Médico Nacional Siglo XXI.

  4. Diffusion barriers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicolet, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    The choice of the metallic film for the contact to a semiconductor device is discussed. One way to try to stabilize a contact is by interposing a thin film of a material that has low diffusivity for the atoms in question. This thin film application is known as a diffusion barrier. Three types of barriers can be distinguished. The stuffed barrier derives its low atomic diffusivity to impurities that concentrate along the extended defects of a polycrystalline layer. Sacrificial barriers exploit the fact that some (elemental) thin films react in a laterally uniform and reproducible fashion. Sacrificial barriers have the advantage that the point of their failure is predictable. Passive barriers are those most closely approximating an ideal barrier. The most-studied case is that of sputtered TiN films. Stuffed barriers may be viewed as passive barriers whose low diffusivity material extends along the defects of the polycrystalline host.

  5. Diffuse radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    A diffuse celestial radiation which is isotropic at least on a course scale were measured from the soft X-ray region to about 150 MeV, at which energy the intensity falls below that of the galactic emission for most galactic latitudes. The spectral shape, the intensity, and the established degree of isotropy of this diffuse radiation already place severe constraints on the possible explanations for this radiation. Among the extragalactic theories, the more promising explanations of the isotropic diffuse emission appear to be radiation from exceptional galaxies from matter antimatter annihilation at the boundaries of superclusters of galaxies of matter and antimatter in baryon symmetric big bang models. Other possible sources for extragalactic diffuse gamma radiation are discussed and include normal galaxies, clusters of galaxies, primordial cosmic rays interacting with intergalactic matter, primordial black holes, and cosmic ray leakage from galaxies.

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 2.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Secondary nephropathies can be associated with disreactive immunological disorders or with a non-inflammatory glomerular damage. In systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), scleroderma and rheumatoid arthritis as in other connective tissue diseases, kidney volume and cortex echogenicity are the parameters that best correlate with clinical severity of the disease, even if the morphological aspect is generally non-specific. Doppler studies in SLE document the correlation between resistance indexes (RIs) values and renal function. Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV) causes different types of renal damage. At ultrasound (US), kidneys have almost a normal volume, while during superinfection they enlarge (coronal diameter >13 cm) and become globular, loosing their normal aspect. Cortex appears highly hyperechoic, uniform or patchy. Microcalcifications of renal cortex and medulla are a US sign that can suggest HIV. In amyloidosis, kidneys appear normal or increased in volume in the early stages of disease. Renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic and pyramids can show normal size and morphology, but more often they appear poorly defined and hyperechoic. RIs are very high since the early stages of the disease. Nephromegaly with normal kidney shape is the first sign of lymphoma or multiple myeloma. In systemic vasculitis, renal cortex is diffusely hyperechoic, while pyramids appear hypoechoic and globular due to interstitial edema. When vasculitis determines advanced chronic kidney disease stages, kidneys show no specific signs. Microcirculation damage is highlighted by increased RIs values >0.70 in the chronic phase. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Advanced MRI for Pediatric Brain Tumors with Emphasis on Clinical Benefits.

    PubMed

    Goo, Hyun Woo; Ra, Young-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors.

  8. Advanced MRI for Pediatric Brain Tumors with Emphasis on Clinical Benefits

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Young-Shin

    2017-01-01

    Conventional anatomic brain MRI is often limited in evaluating pediatric brain tumors, the most common solid tumors and a leading cause of death in children. Advanced brain MRI techniques have great potential to improve diagnostic performance in children with brain tumors and overcome diagnostic pitfalls resulting from diverse tumor pathologies as well as nonspecific or overlapped imaging findings. Advanced MRI techniques used for evaluating pediatric brain tumors include diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, functional MRI, perfusion imaging, spectroscopy, susceptibility-weighted imaging, and chemical exchange saturation transfer imaging. Because pediatric brain tumors differ from adult counterparts in various aspects, MRI protocols should be designed to achieve maximal clinical benefits in pediatric brain tumors. In this study, we review advanced MRI techniques and interpretation algorithms for pediatric brain tumors. PMID:28096729

  9. Pediatric Care Online: A Pediatric Point-of-Care Tool.

    PubMed

    Vardell, Emily

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric Care Online is the American Academy of Pediatrics' point-of-care tool designed for health care providers. Pediatric Care Online builds on content from Red Book Online and Pediatric Patient Education and features Quick Reference topic pages for more than 250 pediatric health care topics. The multitude of resources available within Pediatric Care Online will be reviewed in this column, and a sample search will be used to illustrate the type of information available within this point-of-care pediatric resource.

  10. Diffuse renal parenchyma uptake with bone scintigraphy in a patient with paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and normal kidney function.

    PubMed

    Balink, Hans; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Hemmelder, Marc

    2014-03-01

    A 41-year-old woman with a Harrington spondylodesis presented with lower back pain. Bone scintigraphy showed diffusely increased parenchymal uptake in both kidneys. She reported 2 previous periods of dark, almost black, urine. Additional flow cytometric analysis confirmed the diagnosis of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria. The increased renal parenchyma uptake is very probably due to paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria-related renal hemosiderosis. Remarkably, the patient did not develop any abnormality of renal function.

  11. Micropatterned co-culture of hepatocyte spheroids layered on non-parenchymal cells to understand heterotypic cellular interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Hidenori; Sasaki, Kohei; Okimura, Saya; Nagamura, Masako; Nakasone, Yuichi

    2013-12-01

    Microfabrication and micropatterning techniques in tissue engineering offer great potential for creating and controlling cellular microenvironments including cell-matrix interactions, soluble stimuli and cell-cell interactions. Here, we present a novel approach to generate layered patterning of hepatocyte spheroids on micropatterned non-parenchymal feeder cells using microfabricated poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. Micropatterned PEG-hydrogel-treated substrates with two-dimensional arrays of gelatin circular domains (ϕ = 100 μm) were prepared by photolithographic method. Only on the critical structure of PEG hydrogel with perfect protein rejection, hepatocytes were co-cultured with non-parenchymal cells to be led to enhanced hepatocyte functions. Then, we investigated the mechanism of the functional enhancement in co-culture with respect to the contributions of soluble factors and direct cell-cell interactions. In particular, to elucidate the influence of soluble factors on hepatocyte function, hepatocyte spheroids underlaid with fibroblasts (NIH/3T3 mouse fibroblasts) or endothelial cells (BAECs: bovine aortic endothelial cells) were compared with physically separated co-culture of hepatocyte monospheroids with NIH3T3 or BAEC using trans-well culture systems. Our results suggested that direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact and soluble factors, both of these between hepatocytes and fibroblasts, significantly enhanced hepatocyte functions. In contrast, direct heterotypic cell-to-cell contact between hepatocytes and endothelial cells only contributed to enhance hepatocyte functions. This patterning technique can be a useful experimental tool for applications in basic science, drug screening and tissue engineering, as well as in the design of artificial liver devices.

  12. Debakey forceps crushing technique for hepatic parenchymal transection in liver surgery: a review of 100 cases and ergonomic advantages.

    PubMed

    Jain, Sundeep; Sharma, Bharat; Kaushik, Mitesh; Jain, Lokendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objective. Bleeding is an important complication in liver transections. To determine the safety and efficacy of Debakey forceps for liver parenchymal transection and its ergonomic advantages over clamp crushing method we analysed our data. Methods. We used Debakey crushing technique in 100 liver resections and analysed data for transection time, transfusion rate, morbidity, mortality, hospital stay, influence of different types of liver conditions, and ergonomi features of Debakey forceps. Results. Mean age, transection time and hospital stay of 100 patients were 52.38 ± 17.44 years, 63.36 ± 33.4 minutes, and 10.27 ± 5.7 days. Transection time, and hospital stay in patients with cirrhotic liver (130.4 ± 44.4 mins, 14.6 ± 5.5 days) and cholestatic liver (75.8 ± 19.7 mins, 16.5 ± 5.1 days) were significantly greater than in patients with normal liver (48.1 ± 20.1 mins, 6.7 ± 1.8 days) (P < 0.01). Transection time improved significantly with experience (first fifty versus second fifty cases-70.2 ± 31.1 mins versus 56.5 ± 34.5 mins, P < 0.04). Qualitative evaluation revealed that Debakey forceps had ergonomic advantages over Kelly clamp. Conclusions. Debakey forceps crushing technique is safe and effective for liver parenchymal transection in all kinds of liver. Transection time improves with surgeon's experience. It has ergonomic advantages over Kelly clamp and is a better choice for liver transection.

  13. Debakey Forceps Crushing Technique for Hepatic Parenchymal Transection in Liver Surgery: A Review of 100 Cases and Ergonomic Advantages

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Sundeep; Sharma, Bharat; Kaushik, Mitesh; Jain, Lokendra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction and Objective. Bleeding is an important complication in liver transections. To determine the safety and efficacy of Debakey forceps for liver parenchymal transection and its ergonomic advantages over clamp crushing method we analysed our data. Methods. We used Debakey crushing technique in 100 liver resections and analysed data for transection time, transfusion rate, morbidity, mortality, hospital stay, influence of different types of liver conditions, and ergonomi features of Debakey forceps. Results. Mean age, transection time and hospital stay of 100 patients were 52.38 ± 17.44 years, 63.36 ± 33.4 minutes, and 10.27 ± 5.7 days. Transection time, and hospital stay in patients with cirrhotic liver (130.4 ± 44.4 mins, 14.6 ± 5.5 days) and cholestatic liver (75.8 ± 19.7 mins, 16.5 ± 5.1 days) were significantly greater than in patients with normal liver (48.1 ± 20.1 mins, 6.7 ± 1.8 days) (P < 0.01). Transection time improved significantly with experience (first fifty versus second fifty cases—70.2 ± 31.1 mins versus 56.5 ± 34.5 mins, P < 0.04). Qualitative evaluation revealed that Debakey forceps had ergonomic advantages over Kelly clamp. Conclusions. Debakey forceps crushing technique is safe and effective for liver parenchymal transection in all kinds of liver. Transection time improves with surgeon's experience. It has ergonomic advantages over Kelly clamp and is a better choice for liver transection. PMID:25009367

  14. Non-invasive parenchymal, vascular and metabolic high-frequency ultrasound and photoacoustic rat deep brain imaging.

    PubMed

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-03-02

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  15. Human recombinant apolipoprotein E redirects lipopolysaccharide from Kupffer cells to liver parenchymal cells in rats In vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rensen, P C; Oosten, M; Bilt, E; Eck, M; Kuiper, J; Berkel, T J

    1997-01-01

    Chylomicrons have been shown to protect mice and rats against a lethal dose of lipopolysaccharide and may serve as a therapeutic means to protect against endotoxemia. However, the requisite of isolation from human lymph hampers pharmaceutical application. Recently, we developed recombinant chylomicrons from commercially available lipids and human recombinant apolipoprotein E. The current study explored the effectiveness of these apoE-enriched emulsions in redirecting LPS from Kupffer cells to liver parenchymal cells. Upon injection into rats, 125I-LPS rapidly and specifically associated with the liver (64.3+/-3.1% of the injected dose) and spleen (4.1+/-0.7%). The uptake of LPS by the spleen was four- to fivefold reduced upon incubation with the apoE-enriched emulsion or free apoE (P < 0.0001), but not with emulsion alone or Lipofundin. Within the liver, 125I-LPS mainly associated with Kupffer cells. The uptake by Kupffer cells was eight- to ninefold reduced by the apoE-enriched emulsion or apoE alone (P < 0.01), and a 19.6-fold increased uptake ratio by liver parenchymal cells over Kupffer cells was observed. The emulsion without apoE had no effect on the in vivo kinetics of LPS. LPS interacted selectively with the apoE moiety of the recombinant chylomicron. Emulsion-associated and free apoE bound approximately two molecules of LPS, possibly by its exposed hydrophilic domain involving arginine residues. We anticipate that the protecting effect of endogenous chylomicrons against LPS-induced endotoxemia may result from the apoE moiety and that human recombinant apoE may serve as a therapeuticum to protect against endotoxemia. PMID:9153287

  16. Lung parenchymal invasion in pulmonary carcinoid tumor: an important histologic feature suggesting the diagnosis of atypical carcinoid and poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ha, Sang Yun; Lee, Jae Jun; Cho, Junhun; Hyeon, Jiyeon; Han, Joungho; Kim, Hong Kwan

    2013-05-01

    The majority of previous studies on pulmonary carcinoid tumor have usually focused on clinical behavior or outcome, seldom considering histopathologic features. We retrospectively collected 63 cases of resected pulmonary carcinoid tumors from 1995 to 2011 at Samsung Medical Center, Seoul, Korea. The clinical and pathological features were correlated and survival analyses were performed. Forty cases (63.5%) were classified as typical carcinoid (TC) and 23 cases (36.5%) were classified as atypical carcinoid (AC) according to WHO classification criteria. AC patients showed a higher frequency of current smoking status and a higher stage of the tumor by the American Joint Committee on Cancer than TC patients. The disease was associated with death and recurrence in five and seven patients, respectively, with almost all of the associations found in AC patients. The five-year survival rate of TC and AC were 100% and 83.5%, respectively, with AC showing poorer prognosis than TC in overall survival (OS) and disease free survival (DFS) (p=0.005 and p=0.002). Lung parenchymal invasion was observed more commonly in AC than in TC (39.1% vs 12.5%, p=0.01) and was a poor prognostic factor in OS and DFS. Rosette-like arrangements were found only in six cases of AC, while abundant basophilic cytoplasm mimicking paraganglioma and ossification were found only in TC. Through the comprehensive study of pulmonary carcinoid tumor in Korea, we suggest that lung parenchymal invasion could be a useful histologic feature to suspect the diagnosis of AC in daily practice as well as to predict the prognosis of carcinoid tumor.

  17. Breast density and parenchymal texture measures as potential risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keller, Brad M.; Chen, Jinbo; Conant, Emily F.; Kontos, Despina

    2014-03-01

    Accurate assessment of a woman's risk to develop specific subtypes of breast cancer is critical for appropriate utilization of chemopreventative measures, such as with tamoxifen in preventing estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer. In this context, we investigate quantitative measures of breast density and parenchymal texture, measures of glandular tissue content and tissue structure, as risk factors for estrogen-receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer. Mediolateral oblique (MLO) view digital mammograms of the contralateral breast from 106 women with unilateral invasive breast cancer were retrospectively analyzed. Breast density and parenchymal texture were analyzed via fully-automated software. Logistic regression with feature selection and was performed to predict ER+ versus ER- cancer status. A combined model considering all imaging measures extracted was compared to baseline models consisting of density-alone and texture-alone features. Area under the curve (AUC) of the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and Delong's test were used to compare the models' discriminatory capacity for receptor status. The density-alone model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.62 AUC (p=0.05). The texture-alone model had a higher discriminatory capacity of 0.70 AUC (p=0.001), which was not significantly different compared to the density-alone model (p=0.37). In contrast the combined density-texture logistic regression model had a discriminatory capacity of 0.82 AUC (p<0.001), which was statistically significantly higher than both the density-alone (p<0.001) and texture-alone regression models (p=0.04). The combination of breast density and texture measures may have the potential to identify women specifically at risk for estrogen-receptor positive breast cancer and could be useful in triaging women into appropriate risk-reduction strategies.

  18. Protocol for Isolation of Primary Human Hepatocytes and Corresponding Major Populations of Non-parenchymal Liver Cells.

    PubMed

    Kegel, Victoria; Deharde, Daniela; Pfeiffer, Elisa; Zeilinger, Katrin; Seehofer, Daniel; Damm, Georg

    2016-03-30

    Beside parenchymal hepatocytes, the liver consists of non-parenchymal cells (NPC) namely Kupffer cells (KC), liver endothelial cells (LEC) and hepatic Stellate cells (HSC). Two-dimensional (2D) culture of primary human hepatocyte (PHH) is still considered as the "gold standard" for in vitro testing of drug metabolism and hepatotoxicity. It is well-known that the 2D monoculture of PHH suffers from dedifferentiation and loss of function. Recently it was shown that hepatic NPC play a central role in liver (patho-) physiology and the maintenance of PHH functions. Current research focuses on the reconstruction of in vivo tissue architecture by 3D- and co-culture models to overcome the limitations of 2D monocultures. Previously we published a method to isolate human liver cells and investigated the suitability of these cells for their use in cell cultures in Experimental Biology and Medicine(1). Based on the broad interest in this technique the aim of this article was to provide a more detailed protocol for the liver cell isolation process including a video, which will allow an easy reproduction of this technique. Human liver cells were isolated from human liver tissue samples of surgical interventions by a two-step EGTA/collagenase P perfusion technique. PHH were separated from the NPC by an initial centrifugation at 50 x g. Density gradient centrifugation steps were used for removal of dead cells. Individual liver cell populations were isolated from the enriched NPC fraction using specific cell properties and cell sorting procedures. Beside the PHH isolation we were able to separate KC, LEC and HSC for further cultivation. Taken together, the presented protocol allows the isolation of PHH and NPC in high quality and quantity from one donor tissue sample. The access to purified liver cell populations could allow the creation of in vivo like human liver models.

  19. Non-invasive Parenchymal, Vascular and Metabolic High-frequency Ultrasound and Photoacoustic Rat Deep Brain Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Giustetto, Pierangela; Filippi, Miriam; Castano, Mauro; Terreno, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Photoacoustics and high frequency ultrasound stands out as powerful tools for neurobiological applications enabling high-resolution imaging on the central nervous system of small animals. However, transdermal and transcranial neuroimaging is frequently affected by low sensitivity, image aberrations and loss of space resolution, requiring scalp or even skull removal before imaging. To overcome this challenge, a new protocol is presented to gain significant insights in brain hemodynamics by photoacoustic and high-frequency ultrasounds imaging with the animal skin and skull intact. The procedure relies on the passage of ultrasound (US) waves and laser directly through the fissures that are naturally present on the animal cranium. By juxtaposing the imaging transducer device exactly in correspondence to these selected areas where the skull has a reduced thickness or is totally absent, one can acquire high quality deep images and explore internal brain regions that are usually difficult to anatomically or functionally describe without an invasive approach. By applying this experimental procedure, significant data can be collected in both sonic and optoacoustic modalities, enabling to image the parenchymal and the vascular anatomy far below the head surface. Deep brain features such as parenchymal convolutions and fissures separating the lobes were clearly visible. Moreover, the configuration of large and small blood vessels was imaged at several millimeters of depth, and precise information were collected about blood fluxes, vascular stream velocities and the hemoglobin chemical state. This repertoire of data could be crucial in several research contests, ranging from brain vascular disease studies to experimental techniques involving the systemic administration of exogenous chemicals or other objects endowed with imaging contrast enhancement properties. In conclusion, thanks to the presented protocol, the US and PA techniques become an attractive noninvasive

  20. Harvey Cushing's surgical treatment of a pediatric patient with an intraventricular glioma.

    PubMed

    Pendleton, Courtney; Jiang, Bowen; Adams, Hadie; Burger, Peter; Quiñones-Hinojosa, Alfredo

    2010-01-01

    The combination of inadequate technology and incomplete nomenclature systems created challenges for early neurosurgeons, and contributed to the dismal prognosis for brain tumors, particularly within the pediatric population. Following IRB approval, and by the courtesy of the Alan Mason Chesney Archives, we reviewed the Johns Hopkins Hospital surgical files from 1896 to 1912. A single case of a pediatric patient with an intraventricular glioma was selected for further review. Here we report the case of a 10-year-old girl who presented to the Johns Hopkins Hospital in 1907, with a 7-year history of subtle symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, secondary to a tumor. Dr. Harvey Cushing operated upon her, and during surgical intervention resected a large parenchymal and intraventricular glioma. High-grade gliomas are rare occurrences in pediatric patients, with intraventricular gliomas described in only a handful of cases. Although advances in neuroimaging, hemostasis and understanding of the cerebrospinal fluid system have allowed neurosurgeons to resect intraventricular gliomas more safely, the surgical approaches in use today are still fraught with challenges. Here we describe a case of attempted resection of an intraventricular glioma in a pediatric patient, which predates the earliest published report of intraventricular gliomas by 30 years. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Social pediatrics: weaving horizontal and vertical threads through pediatric residency.

    PubMed

    van den Heuvel, Meta; Martimianakis, Maria Athina Tina; Levy, Rebecca; Atkinson, Adelle; Ford-Jones, Elizabeth; Shouldice, Michelle

    2017-01-13

    Social pediatrics teaches pediatric residents how to understand disease within their patients' social, environmental and political contexts. It's an essential component of pediatric residency training; however there is very little literature that addresses how such a broad-ranging topic can be taught effectively. The aim of this study was to determine and characterize social pediatric education in our pediatric residency training in order to identify strengths and gaps. A social pediatrics curriculum map was developed, attending to 3 different dimensions: (1) the intended curriculum as prescribed by the Objectives of Training for Pediatrics of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada (RCPSC), (2) the formal curriculum defined by rotation-specific learning objectives, and (3) the informal/hidden curriculum as reflected in resident and teacher experiences and perceptions. Forty-one social pediatric learning objectives were extracted from the RCPSC Objectives of Training for Pediatrics, most were listed in the Medical Expert (51%) and Health Advocate competencies (24%). Almost all RCPSC social pediatric learning objectives were identified in more than one rotation and/or seminar. Adolescent Medicine (29.2%), Pediatric Ambulatory Medicine (26.2%) and Developmental Pediatrics (25%) listed the highest proportion of social pediatric learning objectives. Four (10%) RCPSC social pediatric objectives were not explicitly named within learning objectives of the formal curriculum. The informal curriculum revealed that both teachers and residents viewed social pediatrics as integral to all clinical encounters. Perceived barriers to teaching and learning of social pediatrics included time constraints, particularly in a tertiary care environment, and the value of social pediatrics relative to medical expert knowledge. Despite the lack of an explicit thematic presentation of social pediatric learning objectives by the Royal College and residency training program

  2. Evaluation of renal function following treatment with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL): the use of whole-kidney, parenchymal and pelvic transit times.

    PubMed

    Ilgin, N; Iftehar, S A; Vural, G; Bozkirli, I; Gokcora, N

    1998-02-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the efficacy of using whole-kidney, mean parenchymal and pelvic transit times to evaluate renal function following treatment with extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL). Fifteen patients were evaluated 24-48 h before and after ESWL therapy using 99Tcm-DTPA renal scintigraphy. Using deconvolution analysis, whole-kidney, mean parenchymal and pelvic transit times were calculated and the pre-ESWL values were compared with the post-ESWL values. In both kidneys, there were no significant changes in the glomerular filtration rate or relative renal uptake when compared with the pre-ESWL values. The mean whole-kidney transit time of the tracer did not change significantly during the post-ESWL period. In the treated kidney, the mean post-ESWL parenchymal transit time was significantly increased (P < 0.05), while the mean pelvic transit time was significantly decreased (P < 0.05). In the untreated kidney, there were no significant changes in any of these parameters. We conclude that the dual use of parenchymal and pelvic transit times is more sensitive than the mean whole-kidney transit time and other measures, such as glomerular filtration rate and relative renal uptake, for the assessment of outcome of therapy and other related post-ESWL changes.

  3. Color Doppler dynamic tissue perfusion measurement: a novel tool in the assessment of renal parenchymal perfusion in children with vesicoureteral reflux

    PubMed Central

    Scholbach, Thomas M.; Scholbach, Jakob; Pawelec, Agata; Nachulewicz, Paweł; Wieczorek, Andrzej P.; Brodzisz, Agnieszka; Zajączkowska, Maria M.; Borzęcka, Halina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) occurs in 20–50% of children suffering from recurrent urinary tract infections (UTIs) and is associated with an increased risk of renal scarring and impaired renal function. Early detection of renal perfusion deterioration would allow for the implementation of more aggressive treatment and potentially prevent further damage to the renal parenchyma. The aim of the study was to assess renal parenchymal perfusions in children with recurrent UTIs with and without coexisting VUR, and compare the findings with the results of healthy patients. Material and methods Color Doppler sonographic dynamic renal parenchymal perfusion measurements were performed with PixelFlux (Chameleon-Software, Germany) software in 77 children with recurrent UTIs and coexisting VUR and in 30 children with UTIs without VUR. The findings were compared with the results of 53 healthy children. Results Cortical parenchymal perfusion of children suffering from UTIs and VUR was significantly reduced when compared to the control group. Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were found in all perfusion parameters (i.e. mean velocity (vmix), mean perfused area (Amix), mean perfusion intensity (Imix), tissue pulsatility index (TPI), and tissue resistance index (TRI)) between the control group and children suffering from UTIs and VUR, particularly VUR grades III and IV. There were no significant differences between the UTI group and the control group. No differences were found between the controls and VUR grade II. Conclusions Renal parenchymal perfusion decreases significantly with higher grades of VUR. PMID:27279857

  4. A diet enriched in docosahexanoic Acid exacerbates brain parenchymal extravasation of apo B lipoproteins induced by chronic ingestion of saturated fats.

    PubMed

    Pallebage-Gamarallage, Menuka M; Lam, Virginie; Takechi, Ryusuke; Galloway, Susan; Mamo, John C L

    2012-01-01

    Chronic ingestion of saturated fatty acids (SFAs) was previously shown to compromise blood-brain barrier integrity, leading to brain parenchymal extravasation of apolipoprotein B (apo B) lipoproteins enriched in amyloid beta. In contrast, diets enriched in mono- or polyunsaturated (PUFA) oils had no detrimental effect. Rather, n3 and n6 oils generally confer protection via suppression of inflammation. This study investigated in wild-type mice if a PUFA diet enriched in docosahexanoic acid (DHA) restored blood-brain barrier integrity and attenuated parenchymal apo B abundance induced by chronic ingestion of SFA. Cerebrovascular leakage of apo B was quantitated utilising immunofluorescent staining. The plasma concentration of brain-derived S100β was measured as a marker of cerebrovascular inflammation. In mice fed SFA for 3 months, provision thereafter of a DHA-enriched diet exacerbated parenchymal apo B retention, concomitant with a significant increase in plasma cholesterol. In contrast, provision of a low-fat diet following chronic SFA feeding had no effect on SFA-induced parenchymal apo B. The findings suggest that in a heightened state of cerebrovascular inflammation, the provision of unsaturated fatty acids may be detrimental, possibly as a consequence of a greater susceptibility for oxidation.

  5. A Comparative Study of Sonographic Grading of Renal Parenchymal Changes and Estimated Glomerular Filtration Rate (eGFR) using Modified Diet in Renal Disease Formula

    PubMed Central

    Shivalli, Siddharudha; Pai, B.H. Santhosh; Acharya, Koteshwara Devadasa; Gopalakrishnan, Ravichandra; Srikanth, Vivek; Reddy, Vishwanath; Haris, Arafat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The sonographic findings are of help in evaluating the nephrological diseases. Glomerular filtration rate is another parameter for assessing the reserved renal function and an indicator of prognosis. In clinical practice GFR estimation (eGFR) is done by using a mathematical formula. In our study, we compared the sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR calculated using Modified Diet in Renal Diseases formula based on serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity. Aim To evaluate the relevance of sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes in assessing the severity of the renal disease and comparing it to the eGFR calculated using MDRD formula based on the age, gender and serum creatinine value of the patient. Materials and Methods The adult patients with suspected kidney disease referred for sonography of abdomen were our study participants. As per our study design following strict inclusion and exclusion criteria, patients were selected as study participants and for each of the patient’s renal parenchymal status, serum creatinine, age, gender and ethnicity were documented. Results A total of 70 patients were our study participants, out of which 67.1% were males and 32.9% were females. Our study showed a linear correlation between sonographic grading of renal parenchymal changes with eGFR. Conclusion We conclude that by evaluating the kidneys with sonography and calculating eGFR using MDRD formula the renal status will be more accurately interpreted. PMID:27042555

  6. Clinical Scenarios in Chronic Kidney Disease: Parenchymal Chronic Renal Diseases - Part 1.

    PubMed

    Petrucci, Ilaria; Samoni, Sara; Meola, Mario

    2016-01-01

    In diabetes, kidneys' morphological changes are non-specific at ultrasound (US) and they vary according to disease stage. In the earlier stages, kidneys are enlarged and diffusely hypoechoic due to hyperfiltration. Kidneys size decreases only in advanced stages whereas renal cortical echogenicity progressively increases due to glomerulosclerosis. Nephromegaly, as well as discrepancy between size and renal function, are typical features of diabetic nephropathy either in early or in advanced stages of the disease. Resistive indexes progressively increase together with serum creatinine levels and macro/microcirculation damage. Chronic glomerulonephritis (CGN) is the third leading cause of chronic kidney disease and it represents the clinical evolution of a variety of primary or secondary glomerular diseases. Kidneys in CGN are gradually reduced in volume, but remain symmetric, easily recognizable in renal space until the disease's later stages. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. The Diffuse Sclerosing Variant of Papillary Thyroid Cancer Presenting as Innumerable Diffuse Microcalcifications in Underlying Adolescent Hashimoto's Thyroiditis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sun Hye; Hong, Hyun Sook; Lee, Eun Hye; Kwak, Jeong Ja

    2016-03-01

    Hashimoto's thyroiditis is the most common diffuse thyroid disease and is characterized by diffuse lymphocytic infiltration. However, the ultrasonographic findings of papillary thyroid carcinomas that arise from Hashimoto's thyroiditis in the pediatric and adolescent population are not well known.We report a rare ultrasonographic finding in a 22-year-old woman diagnosed with the diffuse sclerosing variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma that arose from underlying Hashimoto's thyroiditis: innumerable diffuse microcalcifications instead of a typical malignant-appearing nodule.

  8. Diffuser Test

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-09-13

    Tests begun at Stennis Space Center's E Complex Sept. 13 evaluated a liquid oxygen lead for engine start performance, part of the A-3 Test Facility Subscale Diffuser Risk Mitigation Project at SSC's E-3 Test Facility. Phase 1 of the subscale diffuser project, completed Sept. 24, was a series of 18 hot-fire tests using a 1,000-pound liquid oxygen and gaseous hydrogen thruster to verify maximum duration and repeatability for steam generation supporting the A-3 Test Stand project. The thruster is a stand-in for NASA's developing J-2X engine, to validate a 6 percent scale version of A-3's exhaust diffuser. Testing the J-2X at altitude conditions requires an enormous diffuser. Engineers will generate nearly 4,600 pounds per second of steam to reduce pressure inside A-3's test cell to simulate altitude conditions. A-3's exhaust diffuser has to be able to withstand regulated pressure, temperatures and the safe discharge of the steam produced during those tests. Before the real thing is built, engineers hope to work out any issues on the miniature version. Phase 2 testing is scheduled to begin this month.

  9. Pediatric ventricular assist devices

    PubMed Central

    Burki, Sarah; Zafar, Farhan; Morales, David Luis Simon

    2015-01-01

    The domain of pediatric ventricular assist device (VAD) has recently gained considerable attention. Despite the fact that, historically, the practice of pediatric mechanical circulatory support (MCS) has lagged behind that of adult patients, this gap between the two groups is narrowing. Currently, the Berlin EXCOR VAD is the only pediatric-specific durable VAD approved by the U.S Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The prospective Berlin Heart trial demonstrated a successful outcome, either bridge to transplantation (BTT), or in rare instances, bridge to recovery, in approximately 90% of children. Also noted during the trial was, however, a high incidence of adverse events such as embolic stroke, bleeding and infection. This has incentivized some pediatric centers to utilize adult implantable continuous-flow devices, for instance the HeartMate II and HeartWare HVAD, in children. As a result of this paradigm shift, the outlook of pediatric VAD support has dramatically changed: Treatment options previously unavailable to children, including outpatient management and even destination therapy, have now been becoming a reality. The sustained demand for continued device miniaturization and technological refinements is anticipated to extend the range of options available to children—HeartMate 3 and HeartWare MVAD are two examples of next generation VADs with potential pediatric application, both of which are presently undergoing clinical trials. A pediatric-specific continuous-flow device is also on the horizon: the redesigned Infant Jarvik VAD (Jarvik 2015) is undergoing pre-clinical testing, with a randomized clinical trial anticipated to follow thereafter. The era of pediatric VADs has begun. In this article, we discuss several important aspects of contemporary VAD therapy, with a particular focus on challenges unique to the pediatric population. PMID:26793341

  10. Pediatric Palliative Care

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Donna L.; Hentz, Tracy A.; Friedman, Debra L.

    2005-01-01

    Pediatric palliative care provides benefit to children living with life-threatening or terminal conditions. Palliative care should be available to all seriously ill children. Palliative care includes the treatment of symptoms such as pain, nausea, dyspnea, constipation, anorexia, and sialorrhea. This care can occur in a variety of settings, from home to hospice to hospital, and must include bereavement care and follow up after the death of a child. There are many challenges in pediatric palliative care, but continued research into this important area of pediatrics will lead to improvements in the care of children with life-threatening illnesses. PMID:23118638

  11. Pediatric uveitis: An update

    PubMed Central

    Majumder, Parthopratim Dutta; Biswas, Jyotirmay

    2013-01-01

    Because of their varied spectrum of clinical presentation and difficulty in management, pediatric uveitis remains a challenge to the ophthalmologist. Variations in clinical presentation, difficulties in eye examination, extended burden of the inflammation over quality of life, limited treatment modalities, risk of amblyopia are the main challenges in the management of pediatric uveitis. Pediatric uveitis is a cause of significant ocular morbidity and severe vision loss is found in 25-33% of such cases. This article summarizes the common causes of uveitis in children with special approach to the evaluation and diagnosis of each clinical entity. PMID:24379547

  12. Pediatric body MR angiography.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Rajesh; Muthupillai, Raja; Chung, Taylor

    2009-02-01

    Vascular pathology in children is commonplace and involves every organ system; however, the powerful, noninvasive, and rapid three-dimensional imaging capability offered by MR angiography is underutilized in children. The success of pediatric MR angiography depends on modifying the MR angiography on the basis of patient size, hemodynamic status, and clinical indications in children, and requires an adequate understanding of pediatric-specific hardware, software, and equipment requirements. This article provides an overview of general pediatric MR angiography techniques, common indications for body MR angiography in children, and the complementary role of MR angiography to other vascular imaging modalities in children, including CT angiography, Doppler ultrasound, and catheter angiography.

  13. Pediatric facial nerve rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Banks, Caroline A; Hadlock, Tessa A

    2014-11-01

    Facial paralysis is a rare but severe condition in the pediatric population. Impaired facial movement has multiple causes and varied presentations, therefore individualized treatment plans are essential for optimal results. Advances in facial reanimation over the past 4 decades have given rise to new treatments designed to restore balance and function in pediatric patients with facial paralysis. This article provides a comprehensive review of pediatric facial rehabilitation and describes a zone-based approach to assessment and treatment of impaired facial movement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Robotics in pediatric surgery].

    PubMed

    Camps, J I

    2011-10-01

    Despite the extensive use of robotics in the adult population, the use of robotics in pediatrics has not been well accepted. There is still a lack of awareness from pediatric surgeons on how to use the robotic equipment, its advantages and indications. Benefit is still controversial. Dexterity and better visualization of the surgical field are one of the strong values. Conversely, cost and a lack of small instruments prevent the use of robotics in the smaller patients. The aim of this manuscript is to present the controversies about the use of robotics in pediatric surgery.

  15. Imaging Features of Pediatric Pentastomiasis Infection: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xi Qun; Lin, Long; Gao, De Chun; Zhang, Hong Xi; Zhang, Yi Ying; Zhou, Yin Bao

    2010-01-01

    We report here a case of pentastomiasis infection in a 3-year-old girl who had high fever, abdominal pain, abdominal tension and anemia. Ultrasound scanning of the abdomen revealed disseminated hyperechoic nodules in the liver and a small amount of ascites. Abdominal MRI showed marked hepatomegaly with disseminated miliary nodules of high signal intensity throughout the hepatic parenchyma on T2-weighted images; retroperitoneal lymphadenopathy and disseminated miliary nodules on the peritoneum were also noted. Chest CT showed scattered small hyperdense nodules on both sides of the lungs. The laparoscopy demonstrated diffuse white nodules on the liver surface and the peritoneum. After the small intestinal wall and peritoneal biopsy, histological examination revealed parenchymal tubercles containing several larvae of pentastomids and a large amount of inflammatory cell infiltration around them. The pathological diagnosis was parasitic granuloma from pentastomiasis infection. PMID:20592934

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging of pediatric muscular disorders: recent advances and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Kyung; Lindquist, Diana M; Serai, Suraj D; Mariappan, Yogesh K; Wang, Lily L; Merrow, Arnold C; McGee, Kiaran P; Ehman, Richard L; Laor, Tal

    2013-07-01

    This review describes various quantitative magnetic resonance imaging techniques that can be used to objectively analyze the composition (T2 relaxation time mapping, Dixon imaging, and diffusion-weighted imaging), architecture (diffusion tensor imaging), mechanical properties (magnetic resonance elastography), and function (magnetic resonance spectroscopy) of normal and pathologic skeletal muscle in the pediatric population.

  17. Treatment of initial parenchymal central nervous system involvement in systemic aggressive B-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nijland, Marcel; Jansen, Anne; Doorduijn, Jeanette K; Enting, Roelien H; Bromberg, Jacoline E C; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C

    2017-09-01

    Central nervous system (CNS) involvement in systemic B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) at diagnosis (sysCNS) is rare. We investigated the outcome of 21 patients with sysCNS, most commonly diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, treated with high dose methotrexate (HD-MTX) and R-CHOP. The median number of cycles of HD-MTX and R-CHOP was 4 (range 1-8) and 6 (range 0-8), respectively. Consolidative whole brain radiotherapy (WBRT) was given to 33% (7/21) patients. With a median follow-up of 44 months the 3-year progression free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were 45% (95%CI 34-56%) and 49% (95%CI 38-60%), respectively. Over 90% of patients had an unfavorable international prognostic index score, reflected by treatment-related mortality of 19% (4/21) and relapse-related mortality of 28% (6/21). The outcome of these patients was, however, unexpectedly good when compared to secondary CNS relapses. Prospective studies are needed to define the optimal treatment for patients with sysCNS, but its rarity might be challenging.

  18. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-02-01

    In pediatrics ultrasound has long been viewed more favorably than imaging that exposes patients to radiation and iodinated contrast or requires sedation. It is child-friendly and diagnostic capabilities have been improved with the advent of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). The application of CEUS is indeed promising. However, no ultrasound contrast agent manufactured today is registered for pediatric use in Europe. The contrast agent SonoVue(®) has recently been approved by the FDA under the name of Lumason(®) to be used in hepatic investigations in adults and children. This article reviews the literature with respect to 2 specific applications of CEUS in children: 1) identification of parenchymal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, and 2) classification of focal liver lesions. Applications were chosen through the CEUS guidelines published by the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child for identifying parenchymal injuries and for the characterization of focal liver lesions. CEUS showed comparable performance to CT and MRI with a specificity of 98% for identifying benign lesions and a negative predictive value of 100%. For the applications reviewed here, CEUS holds promising perspectives and can help reduce radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents in pediatrics, thereby potentially reducing complications in routine imaging.

  19. Clinical Applications of Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound in the Pediatric Work-Up of Focal Liver Lesions and Blunt Abdominal Trauma: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Laugesen, Nicolaj Grønbæk; Nolsoe, Christian Pallson; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2017-01-01

    In pediatrics ultrasound has long been viewed more favorably than imaging that exposes patients to radiation and iodinated contrast or requires sedation. It is child-friendly and diagnostic capabilities have been improved with the advent of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS). The application of CEUS is indeed promising. However, no ultrasound contrast agent manufactured today is registered for pediatric use in Europe. The contrast agent SonoVue® has recently been approved by the FDA under the name of Lumason® to be used in hepatic investigations in adults and children. This article reviews the literature with respect to 2 specific applications of CEUS in children: 1) identification of parenchymal injuries following blunt abdominal trauma, and 2) classification of focal liver lesions. Applications were chosen through the CEUS guidelines published by the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology and World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Literature was obtained by searching Medline and Pubmed Central (using Pubmed), Scopus database and Embase. CEUS proved to be an effective investigation in the hemodynamically stable child for identifying parenchymal injuries and for the characterization of focal liver lesions. CEUS showed comparable performance to CT and MRI with a specificity of 98% for identifying benign lesions and a negative predictive value of 100%. For the applications reviewed here, CEUS holds promising perspectives and can help reduce radiation exposure and use of iodinated contrast agents in pediatrics, thereby potentially reducing complications in routine imaging. PMID:28255580

  20. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  1. Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Diefenbach, Karen A; Breuer, Christopher K

    2006-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is an important cause of gastrointestinal pathology in children and adolescents. The incidence of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is increasing; therefore, it is important for the clinician to be aware of the presentation of this disease in the pediatric population. Laboratory tests, radiology studies, and endoscopic procedures are helpful in diagnosing inflammatory bowel disease and differentiating between Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis. Once diagnosed, the goal of medical management is to induce remission of disease while minimizing the side effects of the medication. Specific attention needs to be paid to achieving normal growth in this susceptible population. Surgical management is usually indicated for failure of medical management, complication, or malignancy. Algorithms for diagnostic evaluation and treatment of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease are presented. The specific psychosocial issues facing these patients are also discussed in this review as are the future goals of research in the complex problem of pediatric inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:16718840

  2. Pediatric cancer genetics.

    PubMed

    Dean, Sarah J; Farmer, Meagan

    2017-10-04

    The current review will focus on the current knowledge of the contribution of both germline and somatic mutations to the development and management of cancer in pediatric patients. It has long been thought that genetic mutations in both germline and somatic cells can contribute to the development of cancer in pediatric patients. With the recent advances in genomic technologies, there are now over 500 known cancer predisposition genes. Recent studies have confirmed an 8.5-14% germline mutation rate in cancer predisposition genes in pediatric cancer patients. The discovery of both germline and somatic cells mutation(s) in pediatric cancer patients not only aids in the management of current disease, but can also have direct implications for future management as well as the medical management of family members.

  3. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  4. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  5. Defusing Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dou, Remy; Hogan, DaNel; Kossover, Mark; Spuck, Timothy; Young, Sarah

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion has often been taught in science courses as one of the primary ways by which molecules travel, particularly within organisms. For years, classroom teachers have used the same common demonstrations to illustrate this concept (e.g., placing drops of food coloring in a beaker of water). Most of the time, the main contributor to the motion…

  6. Demonstrating Diffusion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foy, Barry G.

    1977-01-01

    Two demonstrations are described. Materials and instructions for demonstrating movement of molecules into cytoplasm using agar blocks, phenolphthalein, and sodium hydroxide are given. A simple method for demonstrating that the rate of diffusion of a gas is inversely proportional to its molecular weight is also presented. (AJ)

  7. Pediatric Salivary Gland Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ord, Robert A; Carlson, Eric R

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric malignant salivary gland tumors are extremely rare. The percentage of malignant tumors is higher than that seen in adults, although the outcomes in terms of survival are better in pediatric patients. The mainstay of treatment is surgical excision with negative margins. This article reviews current concepts in demographics, etiology, management, and outcomes of malignant salivary tumors in children. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Advances in pediatric anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Burns, L S

    1997-03-01

    Advances in many aspects of pediatric anesthesia have resulted in a significant reduction in morbidity and mortality in children. Research and development have created vast improvements in pharmacology. Sophisticated monitoring and improvements in equipment evolved from advances made in scientific technology. Recognition of the psychological needs of children of all ages likely has reduced the incidence of lasting psychological effects after hospitalization. Finally, these important advances have made pediatric anesthesia a safer and more compassionate specialty.

  9. Referral to pediatric surgical specialists.

    PubMed

    Klein, Michael D

    2014-02-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics, with the collaboration of the Surgical Sections of the American Academy of Pediatrics, has created referral recommendations intended to serve as voluntary practice parameters to assist general pediatricians in determining when and to whom to refer their patients for pediatric surgical specialty care. It is recognized that these recommendations may be difficult to implement, because communities vary in terms of access to major pediatric medical centers. Limited access does not negate the value of the recommendations, however, because the child who needs specialized surgical and anesthetic care is best served by the skills of the appropriate pediatric surgical team. Major congenital anomalies, malignancies, major trauma, and chronic illnesses (including those associated with preterm birth) in infants and children should be managed by pediatric medical subspecialists and pediatric surgical specialists at pediatric referral centers that can provide expertise in many areas, including the pediatric medical subspecialties and surgical specialties of pediatric radiology, pediatric anesthesiology, pediatric pathology, and pediatric intensive care. The optimal management of the child with complex problems, chronic illness, or disabilities requires coordination, communication, and cooperation of the pediatric surgical specialist with the child's primary care pediatrician or physician.

  10. Pediatric oncology in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Kebudi, Rejin

    2012-03-01

    The survival of children with cancer has increased dramatically in the last decades, as a result of advances in diagnosis, treatment and supportive care. Each year in Turkey, 2500-3000 new childhood cancer cases are expected. According to the Turkish Pediatric Oncology Group and Turkish Pediatric Hematology Societies Registry, about 2000 new pediatric cancer cases are reported each year. The population in Turkey is relatively young. One fourth of the population is younger than 15 years of age. According to childhood mortality, cancer is the fourth cause of death (7.2%) after infections, cardiac deaths and accidents. The major cancers in children in Turkey are leukemia (31%), lymphoma (19%), central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms (13%), neuroblastomas (7%), bone tumors (6.1%), soft tissue sarcomas (6%), followed by renal tumors, germ cell tumors, retinoblastoma, carcinomas-epithelial neoplasms, hepatic tumors and others. Lymphomas rank second in frequency as in many developing countries in contrast to West Europe or USA, where CNS neoplasms rank second in frequency. The seven-year survival rate in children with malignancies in Turkey is 65.8%. The history of modern Pediatric Oncology in Turkey dates back to the 1970's. Pediatric Oncology has been accepted as a subspecialty in Turkey since 1983. Pediatric Oncologists are all well trained and dedicated. All costs for the diagnosis and treatment of children with cancer is covered by the government. Education and infrastructure for palliative care needs improvement.

  11. Pediatric enteral nutrition.

    PubMed

    Axelrod, David; Kazmerski, Kimberly; Iyer, Kishore

    2006-01-01

    Common to all pediatric patients receiving enteral nutrition is the inability to consume calories orally. This is often secondary to issues of inadequate weight gain, inadequate growth, prolonged feeding times, weight loss, a decrease in weight/age or weight/height ratios, or a persistent triceps skinfold thickness <5% for age. Enteral nutrition requires enteral access. In the neonatal period the nasoenteric route is usually used. In pediatric patients requiring long-term enteral access, surgically, endoscopically, or radiologically placed percutaneous feeding tubes are common. Jejunal feeding tubes are used in pediatric patients with gastric feeding intolerance or persistent gastroesophageal reflux. Low-profile enteral access devices are preferred by most pediatric patients because of their cosmetic appearance. For most children, a standard pediatric polypeptide enteral formula is well tolerated. There are specialized pediatric enteral formulas available for patients with decreased intestinal length, altered intestinal absorptive capacity, or altered pancreatic function. Weaning patients from tube feeding to oral nutrition is the ultimate nutrition goal. A multidisciplinary approach to patients with short bowel syndrome will maximize the use of enteral nutrition while preserving parenteral nutrition for patients with true enteral nutrition therapy failure.

  12. Incidental parenchymal magnetic resonance imaging findings in the brains of patients with neurofibromatosis type 2☆

    PubMed Central

    Vargas, Wendy S.; Heier, Linda A.; Rodriguez, Fausto; Bergner, Amanda; Yohay, Kaleb

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Whereas T2 hyperintensities known as NF-associated bright spots are well described in patients with neurofibromatosis type I (NF-1), there is a paucity of data on incidental findings in patients with neurofibromatosis type II (NF-2). We aim to characterize unexplained imaging findings in the brains of patients with NF-2. Materials and methods This study is retrospective, HIPAA-compliant and approved by the institutional review board. 34 patients with NF-2 underwent brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) between January 2000 and December 2012. T2 and T1-weighted imaging characteristics, diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) characteristics, and enhancement patterns were analyzed by visual inspection. Clinical information at time of imaging was available for all patients. Neuropathologic data was available for one patient. Results We found unexplained T2 hyperintensities present on initial imaging in 23/34 patients (67%). Of the 23 patients with unexplained MRI findings, 15 (65%) had wedge-shaped T2 hyperintensities in the subcortical white matter extending to the cortex suggestive of a cortical dysplasia. 3 additional cases (17%) had a lesion within the cerebellum suggestive of a neuronal migration anomaly. In one patient where the MRI was suggestive of focal cortical dysplasia, histopathologic analysis revealed dysplastic glial foci without other alterations of cortical architecture or other cytologic abnormalities. Conclusion Unexplained T2 hyperintensities occur frequently in patients with NF-2. While they may not be the NF-2 equivalent of NF-associated bright spots seen in NF-1, some of these T2 hyperintensities in patients with NF-2 may represent underlying disorders of neuronal migration. Further studies are needed to validate our findings. PMID:24501699

  13. Pediatric integrative medicine: pediatrics' newest subspecialty?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Integrative medicine is defined as relationship-centered care that focuses on the whole person, is informed by evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches, healthcare professionals and disciplines to achieve optimal health and healing, including evidence-based complementary and alternative medicine. Pediatric integrative medicine (PIM) develops and promotes this approach within the field of pediatrics. We conducted a survey to identify and describe PIM programs within academic children’s hospitals across North America. Key barriers and opportunities were identified for the growth and development of academic PIM initiatives in the US and Canada. Methods Academic PIM programs were identified by email and eligible for inclusion if they had each of educational, clinical, and research activities. Program directors were interviewed by telephone regarding their clinical, research, educational, and operational aspects. Results Sixteen programs were included. Most (75%) programs provided both inpatient and outpatient services. Seven programs operated with less than 1 FTE clinical personnel. Credentialing of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) providers varied substantially across the programs and between inpatient and outpatient services. Almost all (94%) programs offered educational opportunities for residents in pediatrics and/or family medicine. One fifth (20%) of the educational programs were mandatory for medical students. Research was conducted in a range of topics, but half of the programs reported lack of research funding and/or time. Thirty-one percent of the programs relied on fee-for-service income. Conclusions Pediatric integrative medicine is emerging as a new subspecialty to better help address 21st century patient concerns. PMID:22894682

  14. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  15. Sonographic parenchymal and brain perfusion imaging: preliminary results in four patients following decompressive surgery for malignant middle cerebral artery infarct.

    PubMed

    Schlachetzki, F; Hoelscher, T; Dorenbeck, U; Greiffenberg, B; Marienhagen, J; Ullrich, O W; Bogdahn, U

    2001-01-01

    To investigate new methods of diagnostic transcranial sonography for brain parenchymal, vascular and perfusion imaging, we performed 3-D native tissue harmonic transcranial sonography (3D-nthTCS), 3-D transcranial color-coded duplex sonography (3D-TCCS), and "loss-of-correlation" imaging (LOC-TCCS) in four patients following early hemicraniectomy due to space-occupying "malignant" middle cerebral artery infarction (MMCAI). Three-dimensional datasets, utilizing 3D-nthTCS and 3D-TCCS, were created and up to 10 axial 2-D B-mode image planes, similar to CCT, reconstructed in each patient. Three-dimensional reconstructions of the circle of Willis documented one persistent carotid-T occlusion and three recanalizations of the MCA. LOC-TCCS, based on stimulated acoustic emission from an ultrasound (US) contrast agent, demonstrated a perfusion deficit in 2 of 3 patients, with regard to their infarcts. Concluding, 3D-nthTCS, 3D-TCCS and LOC-TCCS are promising tools for bedside monitoring, early prognosis and treatment evaluation for MMCAI in the postoperative period. Further studies should be performed to standardize these new methods and evaluate their applications through the intact calvarina.

  16. Parenchymal and Stromal Cells Contribute to Pro-Inflammatory Myocardial Environment at Early Stages of Diabetes: Protective Role of Resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Savi, Monia; Bocchi, Leonardo; Sala, Roberto; Frati, Caterina; Lagrasta, Costanza; Madeddu, Denise; Falco, Angela; Pollino, Serena; Bresciani, Letizia; Miragoli, Michele; Zaniboni, Massimiliano; Quaini, Federico; Del Rio, Daniele; Stilli, Donatella

    2016-11-16

    Background: Little information is currently available concerning the relative contribution of cardiac parenchymal and stromal cells in the activation of the pro-inflammatory signal cascade, at the initial stages of diabetes. Similarly, the effects of early resveratrol (RSV) treatment on the negative impact of diabetes on the different myocardial cell compartments remain to be defined. Methods: In vitro challenge of neonatal cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts to high glucose and in vivo/ex vivo experiments on a rat model of Streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used to specifically address these issues. Results: In vitro data indicated that, besides cardiomyocytes, neonatal fibroblasts contribute to generating initial changes in the myocardial environment, in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings were mostly confirmed at the myocardial tissue level in diabetic rats, after three weeks of hyperglycemia. Specifically, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and Fractalkine were up-regulated and initial abnormalities in cardiomyocyte contractility occurred. At later stages of diabetes, a selective enhancement of pro-inflammatory macrophage M1 phenotype and a parallel reduction of anti-inflammatory macrophage M2 phenotype were associated with a marked disorganization of cardiomyocyte ultrastructural properties. RSV treatment inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production, leading to a recovery of cardiomyocyte contractile efficiency and a reduced inflammatory cell recruitment. Conclusion: Early RSV administration could inhibit the pro-inflammatory diabetic milieu sustained by different cardiac cell types.

  17. Parenchymal and Stromal Cells Contribute to Pro-Inflammatory Myocardial Environment at Early Stages of Diabetes: Protective Role of Resveratrol

    PubMed Central

    Savi, Monia; Bocchi, Leonardo; Sala, Roberto; Frati, Caterina; Lagrasta, Costanza; Madeddu, Denise; Falco, Angela; Pollino, Serena; Bresciani, Letizia; Miragoli, Michele; Zaniboni, Massimiliano; Quaini, Federico; Del Rio, Daniele; Stilli, Donatella

    2016-01-01

    Background: Little information is currently available concerning the relative contribution of cardiac parenchymal and stromal cells in the activation of the pro-inflammatory signal cascade, at the initial stages of diabetes. Similarly, the effects of early resveratrol (RSV) treatment on the negative impact of diabetes on the different myocardial cell compartments remain to be defined. Methods: In vitro challenge of neonatal cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts to high glucose and in vivo/ex vivo experiments on a rat model of Streptozotocin-induced diabetes were used to specifically address these issues. Results: In vitro data indicated that, besides cardiomyocytes, neonatal fibroblasts contribute to generating initial changes in the myocardial environment, in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression. These findings were mostly confirmed at the myocardial tissue level in diabetic rats, after three weeks of hyperglycemia. Specifically, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and Fractalkine were up-regulated and initial abnormalities in cardiomyocyte contractility occurred. At later stages of diabetes, a selective enhancement of pro-inflammatory macrophage M1 phenotype and a parallel reduction of anti-inflammatory macrophage M2 phenotype were associated with a marked disorganization of cardiomyocyte ultrastructural properties. RSV treatment inhibited pro-inflammatory cytokine production, leading to a recovery of cardiomyocyte contractile efficiency and a reduced inflammatory cell recruitment. Conclusion: Early RSV administration could inhibit the pro-inflammatory diabetic milieu sustained by different cardiac cell types. PMID:27854328

  18. Iron content and acid phosphatase activity in hepatic parenchymal lysosomes of patients with hemochromatosis before and after phlebotomy treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Cleton, M.I.; de Bruijn, W.C.; van Blokland, W.T.; Marx, J.J.; Roelofs, J.M.; Rademakers, L.H.

    1988-03-01

    Lysosomal structures in liver parenchymal cells of 3 patients with iron overload and of 3 subjects without iron-storage disorders were investigated. A combination of enzyme cytochemistry--with cerium as a captive ion to demonstrate lysosomal acid phosphatase activity--and electron probe X-ray microanalysis (EPMA) was used. We were able (1) to define and quantify lysosomal structures as lysosomes, siderosomes, or residual bodies, (2) to quantify the amount of iron and cerium simultaneously in these structures, and (3) to evaluate a possible relation between iron storage and enzyme activity. With histopathologically increased iron storage, the number of siderosomes had increased at the cost of lysosomes, with a corresponding increase in acid phosphatase activity in both organelles. In histopahtologically severe iron overload, however, acid phosphatase activity was low or not detectable and most of the iron was stored in residual bodies. After phlebotomy treatment, the number of siderosomes had decreased in favor of the lysosomes, approaching values obtained in control subjects, and acid phosphatase activity was present in all iron-containing structures. In this way a relationship between iron storage and enzyme activity was established. The iron content of the individual lysosomal structures per unit area had increased with histopathologically increased iron storage and had decreased after phlebotomy treatment. From this observation, it is concluded that the iron status of the patient is not only reflected by the amount of iron-containing hepatocytes but, as well, by the iron content lysosomal unit area.

  19. Radiographic parenchymal opacity, matching perfusion defect, and normal ventilation: a sign of pulmonary embolism. Work in progress

    SciTech Connect

    Strauss, E.B.; Sostman, H.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1987-05-01

    By conventional criteria, perfusion defects that correspond to radiographic parenchymal opacities of similar size have less diagnostic significance for pulmonary embolism (PE) than perfusion defects in areas that are radiographically clear, regardless of the findings on ventilation scan. It was proposed that the demonstration of normal ventilation in areas with matched radiographic opacity and perfusion defects does support the diagnosis of PE. To test this hypothesis, a retrospective review was done of selected cases from a consecutive series of 85 pulmonary angiography studies. Cases were reviewed if the following criteria were met: chest radiography, ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy, and angiography of the relevant regions had all been performed within 24 hours of one another, and there was a radiographic opacity corresponding to the perfusion defect. Sixteen cases fulfilled these criteria. Six patients had normal ventilation in the regions of the radiographic infiltrate and perfusion defect, and all had PE. No patient had an area of opacity and perfusion defect and normal ventilation without PE.

  20. There is no role for hyperfractionated radiotherapy in the management of children with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic brainstem tumors: results of a Pediatric Oncology Group phase III trial comparing conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mandell, L R; Kadota, R; Freeman, C; Douglass, E C; Fontanesi, J; Cohen, M E; Kovnar, E; Burger, P; Sanford, R A; Kepner, J; Friedman, H; Kun, L E

    1999-03-15

    In June 1992, POG began accrual to a phase III study, POG-9239, designed to compare the time to disease progression, overall survival, and toxicities observed in children with newly diagnosed brainstem tumor treated with 100 mg/m2 of infusional cisplatin and randomized to either conventional vs. hyperfractionated radiotherapy. Patients eligible for study were those between 3 and 21 years of age with previously untreated tumors arising in the pons. Histologic confirmation of diagnosis was not mandatory, provided that the clinical and MRI scan findings were typical for a diffusely infiltrating pontine lesion. Treatment consisted of a six-week course of local field radiotherapy with either once a day treatment of 180 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 5400 cGy (arm 1) or a twice a day regimen of 117 cGy per fraction to a total dose of 7020 cGy (the second of the three hyperfractionated dose escalation levels of POG-8495) (arm 2). Because of previously reported poor results with conventional radiotherapy alone, cisplatin was included as a potential radiosensitizer in an attempt to improve progression-free and ultimate survival rates. Based on results of the phase I cisplatin dose escalation trial, POG-9139, 100 mg/m2 was chosen for this trial and was delivered by continuous infusion over a 120-hour period, beginning on the first day of radiotherapy and repeated during weeks 3 and 5. One hundred thirty eligible patients were treated on protocol, 66 on arm 1 and 64 on arm 2. The results we report are from time of diagnosis through October 1997. For patients treated on arm 1, the median time to disease progression (defined as time to off study) was 6 months (range 2-15 months) and the median time to death 8.5 months (range 3-24 months); survival at 1 year was 30.9% and at 2 years, 7.1%. For patients treated on arm 2, the corresponding values were 5 months (range 1-12 months) and 8 months (range 1-23 months), with 1- and 2-year survival rates at 27.0% and 6

  1. Adolescent and Pediatric Brain Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children Pediatric Brain Tumor Diagnosis Family Impact Late Effects After Treatment Returning to School Pediatric Caregiver Resource Center About Us Our Founders Board of Directors Staff Leadership Strategic Plan Financials ...

  2. Intracellular transport of endocytosed chylomicron (TH)retinyl ester in rat liver parenchymal cells. Evidence for translocation of a (TH)retinoid from endosomes to endoplasmic reticulum

    SciTech Connect

    Blomhoff, R.; Eskild, W.; Kindberg, G.M.; Prydz, K.; Berg, T.

    1985-11-05

    The intracellular transport of chylomicron remnants labeled with (TH)retinyl ester was studied in rat liver parenchymal cells by means of subcellular fractionation in Nycodenz and sucrose density gradients. The data presented indicate that endocytosed chylomicron remnant (TH)retinyl ester initially is located in low density endosomes. Radioactivity is subsequently transferred to a denser vesicle. Equilibrium as well as rate zonal centrifugation suggest that this denser (TH) retinoid-containing vesicle may represent endoplasmic reticulum. We have compared the intracellular transport of chylomicron remnant (TH)retinyl ester and SVI-asialofetuin. The receptor-mediated endocytosis of asialoglycoproteins in rat liver parenchymal cells is a thoroughly studied system. Our results suggest that the (TH) retinoid and SVI-asialofetuin follow the same path initially to the endosomes. After transit in endosomes, the intracellular transport differs. While asialofetuin is transported to the lysosomes, the retinoid is probably transferred to the endoplasmic reticulum.

  3. Pediatric Antimicrobial Stewardship Programs

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Stoffella, Sylvia; Meyers, Rachel; Girotto, Jennifer

    2017-01-01

    The frequent use of antimicrobials in pediatric patients has led to a significant increase in multidrug-resistant bacterial infections among children. Antimicrobial stewardship programs have been created in many hospitals in an effort to curtail and optimize the use of antibiotics. Pediatric-focused programs are necessary because of the differences in antimicrobial need and use among this patient population, unique considerations and dosing, vulnerability for resistance due to a lifetime of antibiotic exposure, and the increased risk of adverse events. This paper serves as a position statement of the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) who supports the implementation of antimicrobial stewardship programs for all pediatric patients. PPAG also believes that a pediatric pharmacy specialist should be included as part of that program and that services be covered by managed care organizations and government insurance entities. PPAG also recommends that states create legislation similar to that in existence in California and Missouri and that a federal Task Force for Combating Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria be permanently established. PPAG also supports post-doctoral pharmacy training programs in antibiotic stewardship.

  4. Pediatric Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Ievers-Landis, Carolyn E.; Redline, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Over the last 30 years, the prevalence of overweight across all pediatric age groups and ethnicities has increased substantially, with the current prevalence of overweight among adolescents estimated to be approximately 30%. Current evidence suggests that overweight is modestly associated with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) among young children, but strongly associated with OSAS in older children and adolescents. The rising incidence of pediatric overweight likely will impact the prevalence, presentation, and treatment of childhood OSAS. The subgroup of children who may be especially susceptible include ethnic minorities and those from households with caregivers from low socioeconomic groups. OSAS, by exposing children to recurrent intermittent hypoxemia or oxidative stress, may amplify the adverse effects of adiposity on systemic inflammation and metabolic perturbations associated with vascular disease and diabetes. When these conditions manifest early in life, they have the potential to alter physiology at critical developmental stages, or, if persistent, provide cumulative exposures that may powerfully alter long-term health profiles. An increased prevalence of overweight also may impact the response to adenotonsillectomy as a primary treatment for childhood OSAS. The high and anticipated increased prevalence of pediatric OSAS mandates assessment of optimal approaches for preventing and treating both OSAS and overweight across the pediatric age range. In this Pulmonary Perspective, the interrelationships between pediatric OSAS and overweight are reviewed, and the implications of the overweight epidemic on childhood OSAS are discussed. PMID:17158283

  5. [History of pediatric anesthesiology].

    PubMed

    Simić, Dusica; Dragović, Simon; Budić, Ivana

    2007-01-01

    Among advances in medicine during the past 150 years, certainly the introduction of surgical anesthesia must be considered the greatest gifts of medical profession to mankind, especially to children. Pediatric anesthesia has progressed rapidly throughout the years. Since the first recorded case of pediatric anesthesia in 1842 to the latest advancement in training, technology, medicine and equipment in the last decades of this century, many historic moments have been following each other. Throughout the first decades of 20th century, most physicians treated children as miniature adults. It is believed that the development of modern pediatric anesthesia started in 1930. To offer a historic perspective, the evolution of new field through its rapid growth was divided into two chronologic categories: first (1930-1950) and second (1950-present). During the first period (1930-1950), the anesthesia techniques and equipment adjusted to different children's age were developed. In the second, together with further technique and equipment refinement, modern anesthetics and vital system surveillance (monitoring) were introduced into everyday practice. The keyto the advances in pediatric anesthesiology was difficulties leading to new inventions with consequent improvement of techniques and methods. This article reviews the origins and development of anesthesia for infants and children in the world and Serbia, emphasizing the contributions of many devoted physicians that represented the major force leading to inevitable evolution of pediatric anesthesia.

  6. Pediatric Electrocardiographic Imaging (ECGI) Applications

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Jennifer N. A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Noninvasive electrocardiographic imaging (ECGI) has been used in pediatric and congenital heart patients to better understand their electrophysiologic substrates. In this article we focus on the 4 subjects related to pediatric ECGI: 1) ECGI in patients with congenital heart disease and Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, 2) ECGI in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and pre-excitation, 3) ECGI in pediatric patients with Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome, and 4) ECGI for pediatric cardiac resynchronization therapy. PMID:25722754

  7. Failed Pediatric Drug Development Trials.

    PubMed

    Momper, J D; Mulugeta, Y; Burckart, G J

    2015-09-01

    Pediatric product development initiatives have stimulated the development of therapies for children, resulting in improved product labeling, increased identification of adverse events, and development of new pediatric formulations. However, 42% of recently completed pediatric trials have failed to establish either safety or efficacy, leading to an inability to label the product for use in children.(1) Characterizing these failed trials, including common contributing factors, is imperative to designing better pediatric trials in the future. © 2015 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. A cost effectiveness based safety and efficacy study of resterilized intra-parenchymal catheter based intracranial pressure monitoring in developing world

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak Kumar; Bisht, Ajay; Batra, Priyam; Mathur, Purva; Mahapatra, Ashok Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of traumatic brain injury (TBI) aims to maintain the normal cerebral perfusion in spite of the mass lesions that may occur (haematoma, contusion, and oedema). The monitoring of the intracranial pressure (ICP) is a step in that direction. The intra-parenchymal catheters have the lowest incidence of infection compared to intra-ventricular/subdural catheters with reliable and accurate pressure recordings. The major disadvantage of the intra-parenchymal catheters is the cost, especially in developing nations. Hypothesis: Resterilized intra-parenchymal strain gauge catheters can be used safely for ICP monitoring without any added risk of meningitis. The reusage of catheters can bring down the costs. Resterilized catheters/equipment have been approved for usage in cardiac usage, but such study on ICP catheters has not been carried out so far in any part of the world. Methodology: A total of 100 consecutive cases of severe TBI receiving ICP monitoring at a level 1 trauma center of a developing nation were prospectively studied (34 cases had fresh catheters, and 66 had resterilized [using ethylene oxide] catheters). Observations: The use of reused resterilized catheters was not associated with increased incidence of meningitis or fever (the surrogate marker for infection in this study). Also, there was concordance between the pressure recording of reused catheters and operative finding/subsequent computed tomography scans. These catheters after sterilization could be reused 2–4 times and reliably recorded the ICP (insignificant drift) with no increase in the incidence of meningitis. Conclusions: Usage of resterilized intra-parenchymal ICP catheters is feasible, safe, efficacious, and cost effective and brings down the cost of monitoring significantly. PMID:27695548

  9. Identifying Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Using Background Parenchymal Enhancement Heterogeneity on Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI: A Pilot Radiomics Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jeff; Kato, Fumi; Oyama-Manabe, Noriko; Li, Ruijiang; Cui, Yi; Tha, Khin Khin; Yamashita, Hiroko; Kudo, Kohsuke; Shirato, Hiroki

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To determine the added discriminative value of detailed quantitative characterization of background parenchymal enhancement in addition to the tumor itself on dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI at 3.0 Tesla in identifying “triple-negative" breast cancers. Materials and Methods In this Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study, DCE-MRI of 84 women presenting 88 invasive carcinomas were evaluated by a radiologist and analyzed using quantitative computer-aided techniques. Each tumor and its surrounding parenchyma were segmented semi-automatically in 3-D. A total of 85 imaging features were extracted from the two regions, including morphologic, densitometric, and statistical texture measures of enhancement. A small subset of optimal features was selected using an efficient sequential forward floating search algorithm. To distinguish triple-negative cancers from other subtypes, we built predictive models based on support vector machines. Their classification performance was assessed with the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) using cross-validation. Results Imaging features based on the tumor region achieved an AUC of 0.782 in differentiating triple-negative cancers from others, in line with the current state of the art. When background parenchymal enhancement features were included, the AUC increased significantly to 0.878 (p<0.01). Similar improvements were seen in nearly all subtype classification tasks undertaken. Notably, amongst the most discriminating features for predicting triple-negative cancers were textures of background parenchymal enhancement. Conclusions Considering the tumor as well as its surrounding parenchyma on DCE-MRI for radiomic image phenotyping provides useful information for identifying triple-negative breast cancers. Heterogeneity of background parenchymal enhancement, characterized by quantitative texture features on DCE-MRI, adds value to such differentiation models as they are strongly

  10. Classification of diffuse lung diseases: why and how.

    PubMed

    Hansell, David M

    2013-09-01

    The understanding of complex lung diseases, notably the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias and small airways diseases, owes as much to repeated attempts over the years to classify them as to any single conceptual breakthrough. One of the many benefits of a successful classification scheme is that it allows workers, within and between disciplines, to be clear that they are discussing the same disease. This may be of particular importance in the recruitment of individuals for a clinical trial that requires a standardized and homogeneous study population. Different specialties require fundamentally different things from a classification: for epidemiologic studies, a classification that requires categorization of individuals according to histopathologic pattern is not usually practicable. Conversely, a scheme that simply divides diffuse parenchymal disease into inflammatory and noninflammatory categories is unlikely to further the understanding about the pathogenesis of disease. Thus, for some disease groupings, for example, pulmonary vasculopathies, there may be several appropriate classifications, each with its merits and demerits. There has been an interesting shift in the past few years, from the accepted primacy of histopathology as the sole basis on which the classification of parenchymal lung disease has rested, to new ways of considering how these entities relate to each other. Some inventive thinking has resulted in new classifications that undoubtedly benefit patients and clinicians in their endeavor to improve management and outcome. The challenge of understanding the logic behind current classifications and their shortcomings are explored in various examples of lung diseases.

  11. Ruptured pediatric cerebellopontine angle epidermoid cyst: a case report detailing radiographic evolution and clinical course.

    PubMed

    Guan, Zhe; Hollon, Todd; Bentley, J Nicole; Garton, Hugh J L

    2015-08-21

    Epidermoid cysts (ECs) are uncommon pediatric tumors that often occur in the cerebellopontine angle. Although cyst rupture is a recognized complication, the radiographic evolution of an EC following rupture and the resultant parenchymal brainstem edema have not been reported. The authors present the case of a 13-year-old female with a newly diagnosed cerebellopontine angle EC who presented with worsening headaches, photophobia, and emesis. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated significant pericystic brainstem edema and mass effect with effacement of the fourth ventricle. Refractory symptoms prompted repeat imaging, revealing cyst enlargement and dense rim enhancement. Resection of the EC resolved both her symptoms and the brainstem edema. This case documents the radiographic evolution of EC rupture and subsequent clinical course.

  12. What Is a Pediatric Endocrinologist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... dealing with children and in treating children with endocrine disorders and hormonal problems. If your pediatrician suggests that your child see a pediatric endocrinologist, you can be assured that your child will receive the best possible care. To find a pediatrician or pediatric specialist in ... © Copyright 2017 American Academy of Pediatrics. All rights reserved.

  13. Physician Requirements-1990. For Pediatrics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudzinski, Karen; Thorner, Robert N.

    Professional requirements for physicians specializing in pediatrics were estimated to assist policymakers in developing guidelines for graduate medical education. In estimating service requirements for pediatrics, the pediatrics Delphi panel reviewed reference and incidence-prevalence and utilization data for 230 conditions that affect the…

  14. What's new in pediatric orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Sanders, James O; Otsuka, Norman Y; Martus, Jeffrey E

    2015-02-18

    This past year has seen an increase in the quality of studies in pediatric orthopaedics, and the completion of BrAIST demonstrated that high-level studies of important questions can be addressed in pediatric orthopaedics. The current commitment of improving quality of care for children promises a healthy future for pediatric orthopaedics.

  15. Integrative Pediatrics: Looking Forward

    PubMed Central

    McClafferty, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    Increase in the prevalence of disease and illness has dramatically altered the landscape of pediatrics. As a result, there is a demand for pediatricians with new skills and a sharper focus on preventative health. Patient demand and shifting pediatric illness patterns have accelerated research in the field of pediatric integrative medicine. This emerging field can be defined as healing-oriented medicine that considers the whole child, including all elements of lifestyle and family health. It is informed by evidence and carefully weighs all appropriate treatment options. This Special Issue of Children, containing a collection of articles written by expert clinicians, represents an important educational contribution to the field. The goal of the edition is to raise awareness about integrative topics with robust supporting evidence, and to identify areas where more research is needed. PMID:27417349

  16. Pediatric nuclear medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    This symposium presented the latest techniques and approaches to the proper medical application of radionuclides in pediatrics. An expert faculty, comprised of specialists in the field of pediatric nuclear medicine, discussed the major indications as well as the advantages and potential hazards of nuclear medicine procedures compared to other diagnostic modalities. In recent years, newer radiopharmaceuticals labeled with technetium-99m and other short-lived radionuclides with relatively favorable radiation characteristics have permitted a variety of diagnostic studies that are very useful clinically and carry a substantially lower radiation burden then many comparable X-ray studies. This new battery of nuclear medicine procedures is now widely available for diagnosis and management of pediatric patients. Many recent research studies in children have yielded data concerning the effacacy of these procedures, and current recommendations will be presented by those involved in conducting such studies. Individual papers are processed separately for the Energy Data Base.

  17. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-10-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that "sleeps" for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more "SB fertile" than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB.

  18. Sleeping beauties in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Završnik, Jernej; Kokol, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Sleeping beauties (SBs) in science have been known for few decades; however, it seems that only recently have they become popular. An SB is a publication that “sleeps” for a long time and then almost suddenly awakes and becomes highly cited. SBs present interesting findings in science. Pediatrics research literature has not yet been analyzed for their presence, and 5 pediatrics SBs were discovered in this research. Their prevalence was approximately 0.011%. Some environments or periods are more “SB fertile” than others: 3 of 5 SBs were published in the journal Pediatrics, 4 originated from the United States, and 4 were published in the period from 1992 to 1993. No institutions or authors published more than 1 SB. PMID:27822155

  19. Pediatric considerations in homecare.

    PubMed

    Petit de Mange, E A

    1998-09-01

    "If I had known beforehand how difficult, demanding, time consuming, and exhausting it would be--having my child home on a ventilator--I would never have agreed to bring her home" (personal communication with a parent, 1994). This mother's statement strikes at the heart of pediatric high-tech homecare. Parents assume caregiver roles that professional health providers have taken years to develop. Nurses, as strangers, intrude into intimate family relationships that have cultivated over years. Pioneering agencies attempt to fill a gap in pediatric care using guidelines that have been entrenched in the medical and economic models for years. The multiple dimensions of high-tech pediatric homecare require more than provision of technical nursing services. In homecare, nurses are challenged by cultural differences, language barriers, loss of control, family dynamics, practicing in unfamiliar environments, and new technology. To ensure quality nursing care, all professional dimensions need to be considered to be of equal importance.

  20. Pediatric Integrative Medicine.

    PubMed

    McClafferty, Hilary; Vohra, Sunita; Bailey, Michelle; Brown, Melanie; Esparham, Anna; Gerstbacher, Dana; Golianu, Brenda; Niemi, Anna-Kaisa; Sibinga, Erica; Weydert, Joy; Yeh, Ann Ming

    2017-09-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics is dedicated to optimizing the well-being of children and advancing family-centered health care. Related to this mission, the American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes the increasing use of complementary and integrative therapies for children and the subsequent need to provide reliable information and high-quality clinical resources to support pediatricians. This Clinical Report serves as an update to the original 2008 statement on complementary medicine. The range of complementary therapies is both extensive and diverse. Therefore, in-depth discussion of each therapy or product is beyond the scope of this report. Instead, our intentions are to define terms; describe epidemiology of use; outline common types of complementary therapies; review medicolegal, ethical, and research implications; review education and training for select providers of complementary therapies; provide educational resources; and suggest communication strategies for discussing complementary therapies with patients and families. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  1. DIFFUSION PUMP

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, L.

    1963-09-01

    A high-vacuum diffusion pump is described, featuring a novel housing geometry for enhancing pumping speed. An upright, cylindrical lower housing portion is surmounted by a concentric, upright, cylindrical upper housing portion of substantially larger diameter; an uppermost nozzle, disposed concentrically within the upper portion, is adapted to eject downwardly a conical sheet of liquid outwardly to impinge upon the uppermost extremity of the interior wall of the lower portion. Preferably this nozzle is mounted upon a pedestal rising coaxially from within the lower portion and projecting up into said upper portion. (AEC)

  2. Pediatric thoracoabdominal biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Kent, Richard; Salzar, Robert; Kerrigan, Jason; Parent, Daniel; Lessley, David; Sochor, Mark; Luck, Jason F; Loyd, Andre; Song, Yin; Nightingale, Roger; Bass, Cameron R; Maltese, Matthew R

    2009-11-01

    No experimental data exist quantifying the force-deformation behavior of the pediatric chest when subjected to non-impact, dynamic loading from a diagonal belt or a distributed loading surface. Kent et al. (2006) previously published juvenile abdominal response data collected using a porcine model. This paper reports on a series of experiments on a 7-year-old pediatric post-mortem human subject (PMHS) undertaken to guide the scaling of existing adult thoracic response data for application to the child and to assess the validity of the porcine abdominal model. The pediatric PMHS exhibited abdominal response similar to the swine, including the degree of rate sensitivity. The upper abdomen of the PMHS was slightly stiffer than the porcine behavior, while the lower abdomen of the PMHS fit within the porcine corridor. Scaling of adult thoracic response data using any of four published techniques did not successfully predict the pediatric behavior. All of the scaling techniques intrinsically reduce the stiffness of the adult response, when in reality the pediatric subject was as stiff as, or slightly more stiff than, published adult corridors. An assessment of age-related changes in thoracic stiffness indicated that for both a CPR patient population and dynamic diagonal belt loading on a PMHS population, the effective stiffness of the chest increases through the fourth decade of life and then decreases, resulting in stiffness values approximately the same for children and for elderly adults. Additional research is needed to elucidate the generality of this finding and to assess its significance for scaling adult data to represent pediatric responses.

  3. Pediatric bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Carbray, M Julie A; McGuinness, Teena

    2009-12-01

    Pediatric bipolar disorder differs from the adult form of the disorder, marked by longer episodes, rapid cycling, prominent irritability, and high rates of comorbid attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder and anxiety disorders. A careful assessment by families of children's symptoms, including their duration and intensity, helps with accurate diagnosis. After the diagnosis is made and careful psychopharmacological intervention is initiated, psychiatric nursing treatment of children and adolescents with pediatric bipolar disorder should involve child-and family-focused cognitive-behavioral therapies, family support, and psychoeducation.

  4. Children's rights in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Streuli, Jürg C; Michel, Margot; Vayena, Effy

    2011-01-01

    The United Nations Convention of Children's Rights (UNCRC) introduced in 1989 has generated a global movement for the protection of children's rights and has brought about a paradigm change in how children are perceived. Pediatric healthcare professionals are interacting with children and therefore with children's rights on a daily basis. However, although at least 18 of the 54 articles are relevant for pediatric practice, there is limited systematic training on how pediatricians can support children's rights in the clinical setting. This article discusses the principles and aims of the UNCRC and proposes a comprehensive checklist of rights vis-à-vis issues that arise in clinical practice.

  5. Pediatric Gastric Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela-Ramos, Marco Cesar; Mendizábal-Méndez, Ana Luisa; Ríos-Contreras, Carlos Alberto; Rodríguez-Montes, Claudia Esther

    2010-01-01

    Neoplasms from germ cell origin are a heterogeneous group of tumors rarely seen in the pediatric population, teratoma is the most frequent among them. They can occur in either gonadal or extragonadal locations. Extragonadal teratoma arising from abdominal viscera is very unusual. There are less than a hundred reported cases of gastric teratoma in the worldwide literature. Since the occurrence of this pathology in the pediatric age group is quite rare, we describe a case of a teratoma located in the lesser curvature of the stomach in an infant with an emphasis in radiologic-pathologic correlation. PMID:22470691

  6. Pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Moody, Karen; Siegel, Linda; Scharbach, Kathryn; Cunningham, Leslie; Cantor, Rabbi Mollie

    2011-06-01

    Progress in pediatric palliative care has gained momentum, but there remain significant barriers to the appropriate provision of palliative care to ill and dying children, including the lack of properly trained health care professionals, resources to finance such care, and scientific research, as well as a continued cultural denial of death in children. This article reviews the epidemiology of pediatric palliative care, special communication concerns, decision making, ethical and legal considerations, symptom assessment and management, psychosocial issues, provision of care across settings, end-of-life care, and bereavement. Educational and supportive resources for health care practitioners and families, respectively, are included.

  7. Pediatric Orbital Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Oppenheimer, Adam J.; Monson, Laura A.; Buchman, Steven R.

    2013-01-01

    It is wise to recall the dictum “children are not small adults” when managing pediatric orbital fractures. In a child, the craniofacial skeleton undergoes significant changes in size, shape, and proportion as it grows into maturity. Accordingly, the craniomaxillofacial surgeon must select an appropriate treatment strategy that considers both the nature of the injury and the child's stage of growth. The following review will discuss the management of pediatric orbital fractures, with an emphasis on clinically oriented anatomy and development. PMID:24436730

  8. Orthobiologics in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Robert F; Mooney, James F

    2017-07-01

    Orthobiologics are biologic devices or products used in orthopedic surgery to augment or enhance bone formation. The use of orthobiologics in pediatric orthopedics is less frequent than in other orthopedic subspecialties, mainly due to the naturally abundant healing potential and bone formation in children compared with adults. However, orthobiologics are used in certain situations in pediatric orthopedics, particularly in spine and foot surgery. Other uses have been reported in conjunction with specific procedures involving the tibia and pelvis. The use of bioabsorable implants to stabilize children's fractures is an emerging concept but has limited supporting data. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tracheostomy: pediatric considerations.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Ellen S

    2010-08-01

    Pediatric patients for whom tracheotomy is a consideration have different anatomy, medical conditions, and prognoses than adults; even the tracheotomy tubes are different. Indications for pediatric tracheotomy generally include bypassing airway obstruction, providing access for prolonged mechanical ventilation, and facilitating tracheobronchial toilet. Subglottic stenosis is an important indication for tracheotomy in children; its etiology, prevention, and alternative options for management are presented. Discussion includes the benefits, risks, impact on families, techniques for tracheotomy tube changes, and alternatives to tracheotomy, with illustrative photographs and diagrams.

  10. Pediatric Readiness and Facility Verification.

    PubMed

    Remick, Katherine; Kaji, Amy H; Olson, Lenora; Ely, Michael; Schmuhl, Patricia; McGrath, Nancy; Edgerton, Elizabeth; Gausche-Hill, Marianne

    2016-03-01

    We perform a needs assessment of pediatric readiness, using a novel scoring system in California emergency departments (EDs), and determine the effect of pediatric verification processes on pediatric readiness. ED nurse managers from all 335 acute care hospital EDs in California were sent a 60-question Web-based assessment. A weighted pediatric readiness score (WPRS), using a 100-point scale, and gap analysis were calculated for each participating ED. Nurse managers from 90% (300/335) of EDs completed the Web-based assessment, including 51 pediatric verified EDs, 67 designated trauma centers, and 31 EDs assessed for pediatric capabilities. Most pediatric visits (87%) occurred in nonchildren's hospitals. The overall median WPRS was 69 (interquartile ratio [IQR] 57.7, 85.9). Pediatric verified EDs had a higher WPRS (89.6; IQR 84.1, 94.1) compared with nonverified EDs (65.5; IQR 55.5, 76.3) and EDs assessed for pediatric capabilities (70.7; IQR 57.4, 88.9). When verification status and ED volume were controlled for, trauma center designation was not predictive of an increase in the WPRS. Forty-three percent of EDs reported the presence of a quality improvement plan that included pediatric elements, and 53% reported a pediatric emergency care coordinator. When coordinator and quality improvement plan were controlled for, the presence of at least 1 pediatric emergency care coordinator was associated with a higher WPRS (85; IQR 75, 93.1) versus EDs without a coordinator (58; IQR 50.1, 66.9), and the presence of a quality improvement plan was associated with a higher WPRS (88; IQR 76.7, 95) compared with that of hospitals without a plan (62; IQR 51.2, 68.7). Of pediatric verified EDs, 92% had a quality improvement plan for pediatric emergency care and 96% had a pediatric emergency care coordinator. We report on the first comprehensive statewide assessment of "pediatric readiness" in EDs according to the 2009 "Guidelines for Care of Children in the Emergency Department

  11. Elastase-Induced Parenchymal Disruption and Airway Hyper Responsiveness in Mouse Precision Cut Lung Slices: Toward an Ex vivo COPD Model

    PubMed Central

    Van Dijk, Eline M.; Culha, Sule; Menzen, Mark H.; Bidan, Cécile M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    2017-01-01

    Background: COPD is a progressive lung disease characterized by emphysema and enhanced bronchoconstriction. Current treatments focused on bronchodilation can delay disease progression to some extent, but recovery or normalization of loss of lung function is impossible. Therefore, novel therapeutic targets are needed. The importance of the parenchyma in airway narrowing is increasingly recognized. In COPD, the parenchyma and extracellular matrix are altered, possibly affecting airway mechanics and enhancing bronchoconstriction. Our aim was to set up a comprehensive ex vivo Precision Cut Lung Slice (PCLS) model with a pathophysiology resembling that of COPD and integrate multiple readouts in order to study the relationship between parenchyma, airway functionality, and lung repair processes. Methods: Lungs of C57Bl/6J mice were sliced and treated ex vivo with elastase (2.5 μg/ml) or H2O2 (200 μM) for 16 h. Following treatment, parenchymal structure, airway narrowing, and gene expression levels of alveolar Type I and II cell repair were assessed. Results: Following elastase, but not H2O2 treatment, slices showed a significant increase in mean linear intercept (Lmi), reflective of emphysema. Only elastase-treated slices showed disorganization of elastin and collagen fibers. In addition, elastase treatment lowered both alveolar Type I and II marker expression, whereas H2O2 stimulation lowered alveolar Type I marker expression only. Furthermore, elastase-treated slices showed enhanced methacholine-induced airway narrowing as reflected by increased pEC50 (5.87 at basal vs. 6.50 after elastase treatment) and Emax values (47.96 vs. 67.30%), and impaired chloroquine-induced airway opening. The increase in pEC50 correlated with an increase in mean Lmi. Conclusion: Using this model, we show that structural disruption of elastin fibers leads to impaired alveolar repair, disruption of the parenchymal compartment, and altered airway biomechanics, enhancing airway contraction

  12. Minimally invasive cone beam CT-guided evacuation of parenchymal and ventricular hemorrhage using the Apollo system: proof of concept in a cadaver model

    PubMed Central

    Fiorella, David; Arthur, Adam; Schafer, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Apollo system (Penumbra Inc, Alameda, California, USA) is a low profile irrigation–aspiration system designed for the evacuation of intracranial hemorrhage. Objective To demonstrate the feasibility of using Apollo in combination with cone beam CT guidance. Methods Parenchymal (n=1) and mixed parenchymal–intraventricular hematomas (n=1) were created in cadaver heads using a transvascular (n=1) or transcranial (n=1) approach. Hematomas were then imaged with cone beam CT (CB-CT), and the long axis of the hematoma defined. The CB-CT data were then used to guide transcranial access to the hematoma—defining the location of the burr hole and the path to the leading edge of the hematoma. An 8F vascular sheath was then placed under live fluoroscopic guidance into the hematoma. A second CB-CT was performed to confirm localization of the sheath. The hematoma was then demarcated on the CB-CT and the Apollo wand was introduced through the 8F sheath and irrigation–aspiration was performed under (periodic) live fluoroscopic guidance. The operators manipulated the wand within the visible boundaries of the hematoma. After irrigation–aspiration, a control CB-CT was performed to document reduction in hematoma volume. Results Transvascular and transcranial techniques were both successful in creating intracranial hematomas. Hematomas could be defined with conspicuity sufficient for localization and volumetric measurement using CB-CT. Live fluoroscopic guidance was effective in navigating a sheath into the leading aspect of a parenchymal hematoma and guiding irrigation–aspiration with the Apollo system. Irrigation–aspiration reduced the parenchymal hemorrhage volume from 14.8 to 1.7 cc in 189 s in the first case (parenchymal hemorrhage) and from 26.4 to 4.1 cc in 300 s in the second case (parenchymal and intraventricular hemorrhage). Conclusions The cadaver model described is a useful means of studying interventional techniques for intracranial

  13. Interferon regulatory factor 3 and Type I interferons are protective in alcoholic liver injury in mice via cross-talk of parenchymal and myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Petrasek, Jan; Dolganiuc, Angela; Csak, Timea; Nath, Bharath; Hritz, Istvan; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2010-01-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) features increased hepatic exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) recognizes LPS and activates signaling pathways depending on MyD88 or TRIF adaptors. We previously showed that MyD88 is dispensable in ALD. TLR4 induces Type-I interferons (IFN) in MyD88-independent manner that involves interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). We fed alcohol or control diets to wild-type (WT) and IRF3 knock-out (KO) mice, and to mice with selective IRF3 deficiency in liver parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells. Whole-body IRF3-KO mice were protected from alcohol-induced liver injury, steatosis and inflammation. In contrast to WT or bone-marrow specific IRF3-KO mice, deficiency of IRF3 only in parenchymal cells aggravated alcohol-induced liver injury, associated with increased pro-inflammatory cytokines, lower anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 and lower Type-I IFNs compared to WT mice. Co-culture of WT primary murine hepatocytes with liver mononuclear cells (LMNC) resulted in higher LPS-induced IL-10 and IFN-β, and lower TNF-α levels compared to LMNC alone. Type-I IFN was important since co-cultures of hepatocytes with LMNC from Type-I IFN receptor KO mice showed attenuated IL-10 levels compared to control co-cultures from WT mice. We further identified that Type-I IFNs potentiated LPS-induced IL-10 and inhibited inflammatory cytokine production in both murine macrophages and human leukocytes, indicating preserved cross-species effects. These findings suggest that liver parenchymal cells are the dominant source of Type-I IFN in TLR4/IRF3-dependent manner. Further, parenchymal cell-derived Type-I IFNs increase anti-inflammatory and suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines production by LMNC in paracrine manner. In conclusion, our results indicate that IRF3 activation in parenchymal cells and resulting type I IFNs have protective effects in ALD via modulation of inflammatory functions in macrophages. These results suggest

  14. Interferon regulatory factor 3 and type I interferons are protective in alcoholic liver injury in mice by way of crosstalk of parenchymal and myeloid cells.

    PubMed

    Petrasek, Jan; Dolganiuc, Angela; Csak, Timea; Nath, Bharath; Hritz, Istvan; Kodys, Karen; Catalano, Donna; Kurt-Jones, Evelyn; Mandrekar, Pranoti; Szabo, Gyongyi

    2011-02-01

    Alcoholic liver disease (ALD) features increased hepatic exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR4) recognizes LPS and activates signaling pathways depending on MyD88 or TRIF adaptors. We previously showed that MyD88 is dispensable in ALD. TLR4 induces Type I interferons (IFNs) in an MyD88-independent manner that involves interferon regulatory factor-3 (IRF3). We fed alcohol or control diets to wild-type (WT) and IRF3 knock-out (KO) mice, and to mice with selective IRF3 deficiency in liver parenchymal and bone marrow-derived cells. Whole-body IRF3-KO mice were protected from alcohol-induced liver injury, steatosis, and inflammation. In contrast to WT or bone marrow-specific IRF3-KO mice, deficiency of IRF3 only in parenchymal cells aggravated alcohol-induced liver injury, associated with increased proinflammatory cytokines, lower antiinflammatory cytokine interleukin 10 (IL-10), and lower Type I IFNs compared to WT mice. Coculture of WT primary murine hepatocytes with liver mononuclear cells (LMNC) resulted in higher LPS-induced IL-10 and IFN-β, and lower tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) levels compared to LMNC alone. Type I IFN was important because cocultures of hepatocytes with LMNC from Type I IFN receptor KO mice showed attenuated IL-10 levels compared to control cocultures from WT mice. We further identified that Type I IFNs potentiated LPS-induced IL-10 and inhibited inflammatory cytokine production in both murine macrophages and human leukocytes, indicating preserved cross-species effects. These findings suggest that liver parenchymal cells are the dominant source of Type I IFN in a TLR4/IRF3-dependent manner. Further, parenchymal cell-derived Type I IFNs increase antiinflammatory and suppress proinflammatory cytokines production by LMNC in paracrine manner. Our results indicate that IRF3 activation in parenchymal cells and resulting type I IFNs have protective effects in ALD by way of modulation of inflammatory

  15. Does breast MRI background parenchymal enhancement indicate metabolic activity? Qualitative and 3D quantitative computer imaging analysis.

    PubMed

    Mema, Eralda; Mango, Victoria L; Guo, Xiaotao; Karcich, Jenika; Yeh, Randy; Wynn, Ralph T; Zhao, Binsheng; Ha, Richard S

    2017-06-24

    To investigate whether the degree of breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) is associated with the amount of breast metabolic activity measured by breast parenchymal uptake (BPU) of 18F-FDG on positron emission tomography / computed tomography (PET/CT). An Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved retrospective study was performed. Of 327 patients who underwent preoperative breast MRI from 1/1/12 to 12/31/15, 73 patients had 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation performed within 1 week of breast MRI and no suspicious findings in the contralateral breast. MRI was performed on a 1.5T or 3.0T system. The imaging sequence included a triplane localizing sequence followed by sagittal fat-suppressed T2 -weighted sequence, and a bilateral sagittal T1 -weighted fat-suppressed fast spoiled gradient-echo sequence, which was performed before and three times after a rapid bolus injection (gadobenate dimeglumine, Multihance; Bracco Imaging; 0.1 mmol/kg) delivered through an IV catheter. The unaffected contralateral breast in these 73 patients underwent BPE and BPU assessments. For PET/CT BPU calculation, a 3D region of interest (ROI) was drawn around the glandular breast tissue and the maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax ) was determined. Qualitative MRI BPE assessments were performed on a 4-point scale, in accordance with BI-RADS categories. Additional 3D quantitative MRI BPE analysis was performed using a previously published in-house technique. Spearman's correlation test and linear regression analysis was performed (SPSS, v. 24). The median time interval between breast MRI and 18F-FDG PET/CT evaluation was 3 days (range, 0-6 days). BPU SUVmax mean value was 1.6 (SD, 0.53). Minimum and maximum BPU SUVmax values were 0.71 and 4.0. The BPU SUVmax values significantly correlated with both the qualitative and quantitative measurements of BPE, respectively (r(71) = 0.59, P < 0.001 and r(71) = 0.54, P < 0.001). Qualitatively assessed high

  16. EUS-guided liver biopsy for parenchymal disease: a comparison of diagnostic yield between two core biopsy needles.

    PubMed

    Sey, Michael Sai Lai; Al-Haddad, Mohammad; Imperiale, Thomas F; McGreevy, Kathleen; Lin, Jingmei; DeWitt, John M

    2016-02-01

    EUS-guided biopsy of the liver has a variable diagnostic accuracy and specimen adequacy. A new core biopsy needle has been developed that may improve performance. The objective of this study was to compare the diagnostic yield of a new core biopsy needle with the previous standard needle. In this cross-sectional study, consecutive patients who underwent EUS-guided core liver biopsy over a 7-year period for suspected parenchymal disease were prospectively evaluated. Between 2007 and 2011, all biopsies were performed with a 19-gauge Tru-cut biopsy needle (Quick-core [QC]), whereas a novel reverse bevel needle (PC) was used exclusively from 2011 to 2014. All specimens were examined by 1 of 3 experienced, blinded pathologists for the following: presence of visible core, aggregate specimen length, number of complete portal tracts, and specimen adequacy. A total of 75 patients (mean age 51 years, 51 female) underwent liver biopsy by using the QC (n = 45) or PC (n = 30) needle. The QC and PC groups had similar demographics, indications for EUS, indications for liver biopsy, and liver findings on EUS. Compared with those of the QC, biopsies with the PC required fewer passes (median 2 vs 3; P < .0001) but produced longer aggregate length (median 20 mm vs 9 mm; P < .0001) with more complete portal tracts (median 5 vs 2; P = .0003) and adequate specimens (P < .01). Two patients had abdominal pain after liver biopsy with the QC needle. Compared with the QC needle, EUS-guided core liver biopsy with the PC needle produced longer aggregate length, more complete portal tracts, and more adequate specimens despite fewer passes (Clinical trial registration number: NCT00586313.). Copyright © 2016 American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Detection of transplant renal artery stenosis in the early postoperative period with analysis of parenchymal perfusion with ultrasound contrast agent.

    PubMed

    Grzelak, Piotr; Kurnatowska, Ilona; Nowicki, Michał; Muras, Katarzyna; Podgórski, Michał; Strzelczyk, Janusz; Stefańczyk, Ludomir

    2013-04-26

    Transplant renal artery stenosis (TRAS) is a serious vascular complication due to non-specific clinical manifestations, causing serious diagnostic difficulties. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) can complement standard sonographic examination in evaluation of TRAS. Standard ultrasound B presentation, extended with color Doppler assessment of the flow spectrum and CE-US, was carried out in the early postoperative period in a group of 180 patients who underwent kidney transplantation. In CE-US analysis, the maximum contrast agent perfusion to the cortex and renal pyramids was evaluated. In 15 patients with sonographically diagnosed TRAS, magnetic resonance angiography and computer tomography angiography were performed to confirm the diagnosis. In patients with TRAS, significantly longer time of contrast agent (CE) inflow was observed in comparison to patients without perfusion disturbances (3.47 s vs. 1.5 s, p<0.000 for cortex; 6.01 vs. 2.09 s for pyramids, p<0.000). The rate of CE inflow was strongly positively correlated with severity of stenosis assessed on the basis of CTA/MRA examination (R=0.97 for cortex and 0.9 for pyramids; p<0.001). Six months after kidney transplantation, patients with a history of TRAS had significantly higher serum creatinine level than recipients with normal renal artery blood flow (1.76 mg/dL vs. 1.53 mg/dl, p<0.02). Estimated GFR was decreased to 35.9 ml/min vs. 46.5 ml/min, respectively (p<0.05). Contrast-enhanced ultrasound allows for quick and non-invasive assessment of parenchymal kidney graft perfusion. It enables confirmation of TRAS diagnosis in the early postoperative period and helps assess the degree of stenosis.

  18. Intra-Parenchymal Renal Resistive Index Variation (IRRIV) Describes Renal Functional Reserve (RFR): Pilot Study in Healthy Volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Samoni, Sara; Nalesso, Federico; Meola, Mario; Villa, Gianluca; De Cal, Massimo; De Rosa, Silvia; Petrucci, Ilaria; Brendolan, Alessandra; Rosner, Mitchell H.; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    An increase of glomerular filtration rate after protein load represents renal functional reserve (RFR) and is due to afferent arteriolar vasodilation. Lack of RFR may be a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI), but is cumbersome to measure. We sought to develop a non-invasive, bedside method that would indirectly measure RFR. Mechanical abdominal pressure, through compression of renal vessels, decreases blood flow and activates the auto-regulatory mechanism which can be measured by a fall in renal resistive index (RRI). The study aims at elucidating the relationship between intra-parenchymal renal resistive index variation (IRRIV) during abdominal pressure and RFR. In healthy volunteers, pressure was applied by a weight on the abdomen (fluid-bag 10% of subject's body weight) while RFR was measured through a protein loading test. We recorded RRI in an interlobular artery after application of pressure using ultrasound. The maximum percentage reduction of RRI from baseline was compared in the same subject to RFR. We enrolled 14 male and 16 female subjects (mean age 38 ± 14 years). Mean creatinine clearance was 106.2 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m2. RFR ranged between −1.9 and 59.7 with a mean value of 28.9 ± 13.1 ml/min/1.73 m2. Mean baseline RRI was 0.61 ± 0.05, compared to 0.49 ± 0.06 during abdominal pressure; IRRIV was 19.6 ± 6.7%, ranging between 3.1% and 29.2%. Pearson's coefficient between RFR and IRRIV was 74.16% (p < 0.001). Our data show the correlation between IRRIV and RFR. Our results can lead to the development of a “stress test” for a rapid screen of RFR to establish renal susceptibility to different exposures and the consequent risk for AKI. PMID:27458386

  19. Intra-Parenchymal Renal Resistive Index Variation (IRRIV) Describes Renal Functional Reserve (RFR): Pilot Study in Healthy Volunteers.

    PubMed

    Samoni, Sara; Nalesso, Federico; Meola, Mario; Villa, Gianluca; De Cal, Massimo; De Rosa, Silvia; Petrucci, Ilaria; Brendolan, Alessandra; Rosner, Mitchell H; Ronco, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    An increase of glomerular filtration rate after protein load represents renal functional reserve (RFR) and is due to afferent arteriolar vasodilation. Lack of RFR may be a risk factor for acute kidney injury (AKI), but is cumbersome to measure. We sought to develop a non-invasive, bedside method that would indirectly measure RFR. Mechanical abdominal pressure, through compression of renal vessels, decreases blood flow and activates the auto-regulatory mechanism which can be measured by a fall in renal resistive index (RRI). The study aims at elucidating the relationship between intra-parenchymal renal resistive index variation (IRRIV) during abdominal pressure and RFR. In healthy volunteers, pressure was applied by a weight on the abdomen (fluid-bag 10% of subject's body weight) while RFR was measured through a protein loading test. We recorded RRI in an interlobular artery after application of pressure using ultrasound. The maximum percentage reduction of RRI from baseline was compared in the same subject to RFR. We enrolled 14 male and 16 female subjects (mean age 38 ± 14 years). Mean creatinine clearance was 106.2 ± 16.4 ml/min/1.73 m(2). RFR ranged between -1.9 and 59.7 with a mean value of 28.9 ± 13.1 ml/min/1.73 m(2). Mean baseline RRI was 0.61 ± 0.05, compared to 0.49 ± 0.06 during abdominal pressure; IRRIV was 19.6 ± 6.7%, ranging between 3.1% and 29.2%. Pearson's coefficient between RFR and IRRIV was 74.16% (p < 0.001). Our data show the correlation between IRRIV and RFR. Our results can lead to the development of a "stress test" for a rapid screen of RFR to establish renal susceptibility to different exposures and the consequent risk for AKI.

  20. Increased pressure-induced tone in rat parenchymal arterioles vs. middle cerebral arteries: role of ion channels and calcium sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cipolla, Marilyn J; Sweet, Julie; Chan, Siu-Lung; Tavares, Matthew J; Gokina, Natalia; Brayden, Joseph E

    2014-07-01

    Brain parenchymal arterioles (PAs) are high-resistance vessels that branch off pial arteries and perfuse the brain parenchyma. PAs are the target of cerebral small vessel disease and have been shown to have greater pressure-induced tone at lower pressures than pial arteries. We investigated mechanisms by which brain PAs have increased myogenic tone compared with middle cerebral arteries (MCAs), focusing on differences in vascular smooth muscle (VSM) calcium and ion channel function. The amount of myogenic tone and VSM calcium was measured using Fura 2 in isolated and pressurized PAs and MCAs. Increases in intraluminal pressure caused larger increases in tone and cytosolic calcium in PAs compared with MCAs. At 50 mmHg, myogenic tone was 37 ± 5% for PAs vs. 6.5 ± 4% for MCAs (P < 0.01), and VSM calcium was 200 ± 20 nmol/l in PAs vs. 104 ± 15 nmol/l in MCAs (P < 0.01). In vessels permeabilized with Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin, PAs were not more sensitive to calcium, suggesting calcium sensitization was not at the level of the contractile apparatus. PAs were 30-fold more sensitive to the voltage-dependent calcium channel (VDCC) inhibitor nifedipine than MCAs (EC50 for PAs was 3.5 ± 0.4 vs. 82.1 ± 2.1 nmol/l for MCAs;P < 0.01); however, electrophysiological properties of the VDCC were not different in VSM. PAs had little to no response to the calcium-activated potassium channel inhibitor iberiotoxin, whereas MCAs constricted ∼15%. Thus increased myogenic tone in PAs appears related to differences in ion channel activity that promotes VSM membrane depolarization but not to a direct sensitization of the contractile apparatus to calcium.

  1. Specific renal parenchymal-derived urinary extracellular vesicles identify age-associated structural changes in living donor kidneys.

    PubMed

    Turco, Anne E; Lam, Wing; Rule, Andrew D; Denic, Aleksandar; Lieske, John C; Miller, Virginia M; Larson, Joseph J; Kremers, Walter K; Jayachandran, Muthuvel

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive tests to identify age and early disease-associated pathology within the kidney are needed. Specific populations of urinary extracellular vesicles (EVs) could potentially be used for such a diagnostic test. Random urine samples were obtained from age- and sex-stratified living kidney donors before kidney donation. A biopsy of the donor kidney was obtained at the time of transplantation to identify nephron hypertrophy (larger glomerular volume, cortex per glomerulus and mean profile tubular area) and nephrosclerosis (% fibrosis, % glomerulosclerosis and arteriosclerosis). Renal parenchymal-derived EVs in cell-free urine were quantified by digital flow cytometry. The relationship between these EV populations and structural pathology on the kidney biopsy was assessed. Clinical characteristics of the kidney donors (n=138, age range: 20-70 years, 50% women) were within the normative range. Overall, urine from women contained more EVs than that from men. The number of exosomes, juxtaglomerular cells and podocyte marker-positive EVs decreased (p<0.05) with increasing age. There were fewer total EVs as well as EVs positive for mesangial cell, parietal cell, descending limb of Henle's loop (simple squamous epithelium), collecting tubule-intercalated cell and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 markers (p<0.05) in persons with nephron hypertrophy. The number of EVs positive for intercellular adhesion molecule-1, juxtaglomerular cell, podocyte, parietal cell, proximal tubular epithelial cell, distal tubular epithelial cell and collecting duct cells were fewer (p<0.05) in persons with nephrosclerosis. EVs carrying markers of cells from the renal pelvis epithelium did not associate with any indices of nephron hypertrophy or nephrosclerosis. Therefore, specific populations of EVs derived from cells of the glomerulus and nephron associate with underlying kidney structural changes. Further validation of these findings in other cohorts is needed to determine their

  2. CTNNB1 (β-Catenin)-altered Neoplasia: A Review Focusing on Soft Tissue Neoplasms and Parenchymal Lesions of Uncertain Histogenesis.

    PubMed

    Agaimy, Abbas; Haller, Florian

    2016-01-01

    β-catenin (CTNNB1) is a key regulatory molecule of the Wnt signaling pathway, which is important for tissue homeostasis and regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and function. Abnormal stabilization and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin as a consequence of missense mutations or alternative molecular mechanisms occurs at a high frequency in a variety of epithelial cancers. In mesenchymal neoplasia, the role of β-catenin has been traditionally considered limited to desmoid-type fibromatosis. However, the spectrum of β-catenin-driven (β-catenin-altered) neoplasia of mesenchymal origin has been steadily widening to include, in addition to desmoid tumors, a variety of benign and intermediate-biology neoplasms of soft tissue (intranodal palisaded myofibroblastoma), head and neck (juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma and sinonasal hemangiopericytoma/glomangiopericytoma), and ovarian (microcystic stromal tumor) origin. In addition, several old and newly reported distinctive site-specific β-catenin-driven parenchymal neoplasms of uncertain histogenesis have been well characterized in recent studies, including solid-pseudopapillary neoplasm of the pancreas and its recently described ovarian counterpart, sclerosing hemangioma of lung and calcifying nested stromal-epithelial tumor of the liver. This review addresses the most relevant pathobiological and differential diagnostic aspects of β-catenin-altered neoplasms with emphasis on site-specific histologic and biological variations. In addition, the morphologic overlap and analogy as well as distinctness between these uncommon tumors will be presented and discussed. Furthermore, a note is made on association of some of these lesions with hereditary tumor syndromes, in particular with the familial adenomatous polyposis coli.

  3. Treatment for cerebral small vessel disease: effect of relaxin on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles during hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chan, Siu-Lung; Sweet, Julie G; Cipolla, Marilyn J

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the effect of hypertension on the function and structure of cerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), a major target of cerebral small vessel disease (SVD), and determined whether relaxin is a treatment for SVD during hypertension. PAs were isolated from 18-wk-old female normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, spontaneous hypertensive rats (SHRs), and SHRs treated with human relaxin 2 for 14 d (4 μg/h; n=8/group) and studied using a pressurized arteriograph system. Hypertension reduced PA inner diameter (58±3 vs. 49±3 μm at 60 mmHg in WKY rats, P<0.05), suggesting inward remodeling that was reversed by relaxin (56±4 μm, P<0.05). Relaxin also increased PA distensibility in SHRs (34±2 vs. 10±2% in SHRs, P<0.05). Relaxin was detected in cerebrospinal fluid (110±30 pg/ml) after systemic administration, suggesting that it crosses the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Relaxin receptors (RXFP1/2) were not detected in cerebral vasculature, but relaxin increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) expression in brain cortex. Inhibition of VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase (axitinib, 4 mg/kg/d, 14 d) had no effect on increased distensibility with relaxin, but caused outward hypertrophic remodeling of PAs from SHRs. These results suggest that relaxin crosses the BBB and activates MMP-2 in brain cortex, which may interact with PAs to increase distensibility. VEGF appears to be involved in remodeling of PAs, but not relaxin-induced increased distensibility.

  4. Background Parenchymal Enhancement of the Contralateral Normal Breast: Association with Tumor Response in Breast Cancer Patients Receiving Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jeon Hor; Yu, Hon J.; Hsu, Christine; Mehta, Rita S.; Carpenter, Philip M.; Su, Min Ying

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study investigated the association between background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) and pathologic response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC). METHODS: A total of 46 patients diagnosed with invasive breast cancer were analyzed. Each patient had three magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies, one pre-treatment and two follow-up (F/U) MRI studies. BPE was measured as the averaged enhancement of the whole fibroglandular tissues. The pre-treatment BPE and the changes in the F/U MRI were compared between patients achieving pathologic complete response (pCR) versus those not. Subgroup analyses based on age, estrogen receptor (ER), and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) status of their cancers were also performed. RESULTS: The pre-treatment BPE was higher in the pCR group than that in the non-pCR group. Compared to baseline, BPE at F/U-1 was significantly decreased in the pCR group but not in the non-pCR group. In subgroup analysis based on age, these results were seen only in the younger group (< 55 years old), not in the older group (≥ 55 years old). Older patients had a significantly lower pre-treatment BPE than younger patients. In analysis based on molecular biomarkers, a significantly decreased BPE at F/U-1 was only found in the ER-negative pCR group but not in the non-pCR, nor in the ER-positive groups. CONCLUSIONS: A higher pre-treatment BPE showing a significant decrease early after starting NAC was related to pCR in pre/peri-menopausal patients. PMID:26055178

  5. Breast Background Parenchymal Enhancement on Screening Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Women Who Received Chest Radiotherapy for Childhood Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Liang; Lo, Glen; Moshonov, Hadas; Liang, Jiachao; Hodgson, David; Crystal, Pavel

    2016-02-01

    Breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is recommended for the screening of women with a history of chest radiotherapy and consequent increased breast cancer risk. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of prior chest radiotherapy on breast tissue background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) at screening breast MRI. A departmental database was reviewed to identify asymptomatic women with either a history of chest radiotherapy for Hodgkin's lymphoma or age-matched controls who underwent screening breast MRI between 2009 and 2013. MRI studies were analyzed on an automated breast MRI viewing platform to calculate breast BPE and breast density. A total of 61 cases (mean age 41.6 ± 6.75 years) and 61 controls (mean age 40.8 ± 6.99 years) were included. The age of patients at the time of chest radiotherapy was 22.6 ± 8.17 years. Screening MRI was performed 19.0 ± 7.43 years after chest radiotherapy. BPE was significantly higher in patients who received chest radiotherapy (50% vs. 37%, P <0.01). A weak to moderate positive correlation (r > 0.3; P < 0.03) was found between BPE and number of years post radiotherapy. There was a trend toward significant difference between the two groups in the correlation of BPE and age (P = 0.05). Breast density was not significantly different between the two groups. BPE is significantly greater in women who receive chest radiotherapy for childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma, and unexpectedly, it positively correlates with the number of years passed after radiation therapy. Long-term biological effects of radiation therapy on breast parenchyma need further research. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Association of a mammographic parenchymal pattern (MPP) descriptor with breast cancer risk: a case-control study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Zhou, Chuan; Helvie, Mark A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman

    2010-03-01

    We are investigating the feasibility of improving breast cancer risk prediction by computerized mammographic parenchymal pattern (MPP) analysis. A case-control study was conducted to investigate the association of the MPP measures with breast cancer risk. The case group included 168 contralateral CC-view mammograms of breast cancer patients dated at least one year prior to cancer diagnosis, and the control group included 522 CC-view mammograms from one breast of normal subjects. We extracted and compared four types of statistical texture feature spaces that included run length statistics and region size statistics (RLS/RSS) features, spatial gray level dependence (SGLD) features, gray level difference statistics (GLDS) features, and the feature space combining these three types of texture features. A linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier with stepwise feature selection was trained and tested with leave-one-case-out resampling to evaluate whether the breast parenchyma of future cancer patients could be distinguished from those of normal subjects in each feature space. The areas under ROC curves (Az) were 0.71, 0.72, 0.71 and 0.76 for the four feature spaces, respectively. The Az obtained from the combined feature space was significantly (p<0.05) higher than those from the individual feature spaces. Odd ratios (OR) were used to assess the association between breast cancer risk and four categories of MPP measures: <0.1 (C1), 0.1-0.15 (C2), 0.15-0.2 (C3), and >0.2 (C4) while patient age was treated as a confounding factor. The adjusted ORs of breast cancer for C2, C3 and C4 were 3.23, 7.77 and 25.43, respectively. The preliminary result indicated that our proposed computerized MPP measures were strongly associated with breast cancer risk.

  7. The future of pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Boat, Thomas F

    2007-11-01

    The future of pediatric research will be enhanced by strengthening traditional biomedical approaches and embracing emerging opportunities. Biomedical discovery and translation of new knowledge, concepts, and devices into better diagnostic and therapeutic options will require more pediatric physician-scientists, rapid adoption of enabling technologies, increased funding for research and research training (including the creation of federally funded pediatric translational research centers), and a broader distribution of research activities across the academic pediatric community. Rapid improvement of child health outcomes also will be realized through robust health services research in pediatrics, including the application of rigorous quality improvement science that documents and disseminates successful interventions, leading to better access and effectiveness of care. Improving the value of pediatric care is a realistic goal. Achieving better outcomes through individually tailored (personalized) care for children should be tested experimentally. The future of pediatrics is bright, but will depend on the recognition of and response to a growing array of exciting opportunities.

  8. Pediatric renal leukemia: spectrum of CT imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Hilmes, Melissa A; Dillman, Jonathan R; Mody, Rajen J; Strouse, Peter J

    2008-04-01

    The kidneys are a site of extramedullary leukemic disease that can be readily detected by CT. To demonstrate the spectrum of CT findings in children with renal leukemic involvement. Twelve children were identified retrospectively as having renal leukemic involvement by contrast-enhanced CT of the abdomen. Contrast-enhanced CT images through the kidneys of each patient were reviewed by two pediatric radiologists. Pertinent imaging findings and renal lengths were documented. The electronic medical record was accessed to obtain relevant clinical and pathologic information. Five patients with renal leukemic involvement presented with multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses, while three patients demonstrated large areas of wedge-shaped and geographic low attenuation. Four other patients presented with unique imaging findings, including a solitary unilateral low-attenuation mass, solitary bilateral low-attenuation masses, multiple bilateral low-attenuation masses including unilateral large conglomerate masses, and bilateral areas of ill-defined parenchymal low attenuation. Two patients showed unilateral nephromegaly, while eight other patients showed bilateral nephromegaly. Two patients had normal size kidneys. Two patients had elevated serum creatinine concentrations at the time of imaging. Renal leukemic involvement in children can present with a variety of CT imaging findings. Focal renal abnormalities as well as nephromegaly are frequently observed. Most commonly, renal leukemic involvement does not appear to impair renal function.

  9. Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100165.htm Intestinal obstruction (pediatric) - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Intestinal Obstruction A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by ...

  10. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  11. Pharmacotherapy of Pediatric Insomnia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Judith A.

    2009-01-01

    General guidelines for the use of medication to treat pediatric insomnia are presented. It should be noted that medication is not the first treatment choice and should be viewed within the context of a more comprehensive treatment plan. The pharmacological and clinical properties of over the counter medications and FDA-approved insomnia drugs are…

  12. The pediatric red eye.

    PubMed

    Wong, Melissa M; Anninger, William

    2014-06-01

    There is a broad differential for the pediatric red eye, which may range from benign conditions to vision- and/or life-threatening conditions. This article presents a systematic differential, red flags for referral, and treatment options. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Pediatric Glaucoma: Pharmacotherapeutic Options.

    PubMed

    Samant, Monica; Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2016-06-01

    Childhood glaucoma is a major therapeutic challenge for pediatric ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialists worldwide. Management depends on the etiology and age at presentation. A variety of drugs are available for the control of intraocular pressure in children; however, none of these drugs have been licensed by the regulatory agencies for use in children. Furthermore, evidence gained from randomized controlled trials in the pediatric population is sparse, and little is known regarding the use of newer anti-glaucoma preparations. This evidence-based review aims to discuss the available pharmacotherapeutic options for glaucoma in children. Topical adrenoceptor blockers, topical and systemic carbonic anhydrase inhibitors, prostaglandin (PG) analogs, adrenoceptor agonists, parasympathomimetics, and combined preparations are available for use in children, but usually as an off-label indication. Therefore, it is important to recognize that serious side effects have been reported, even with topical drops, and measures to reduce systemic absorption should be taken. Most drugs have been shown to have comparable ocular hypotensive effects, with the lowest occurrence of systemic side effects with PG analogs. Whereas a newly introduced prostaglandin analog, tafluprost, and some other preservative-free preparations have shown promising results in adult glaucoma patients, no pediatric reports are available as yet. Future studies may describe their role in treating pediatric glaucoma. This review also shares some suggested treatment pathways for primary congenital glaucoma (PCG), juvenile open angle glaucoma (JOAG), developmental glaucoma, aphakic/pseudophakic glaucoma, and uveitic glaucoma.

  14. Pediatric primary gastric lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Harris, G J; Laszewski, M J

    1992-04-01

    Primary gastric lymphoma in the pediatric population is rare. We have described a case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (Burkitt's type) manifested as a gastric mass. Despite its rarity in children, this tumor should be treated aggressively, since long-term survival has been reported.

  15. Pediatric sleep pharmacology.

    PubMed

    Pelayo, Rafael; Yuen, Kin

    2012-10-01

    This article reviews common sleep disorders in children and pharmacologic options for them. Discussions of pediatric sleep pharmacology typically focus on treatment of insomnia. Although insomnia is a major concern in this population, other conditions of concern in children are presented, such as narcolepsy, parasomnias, restless legs syndrome, and sleep apnea.

  16. Pediatric functional gastrointestinal disorders

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Functional gastrointestinal disorders continue to be a prevalent set of conditions faced by the healthcare team and have a significant emotional and economic impact. In this review, the authors highlight some of the common functional disorders seen in pediatric patients (functional dyspepsia, irrita...

  17. Pediatric Urinary Tract Infection

    MedlinePlus

    SBA National Resource Center: 800-621-3141 Pediatric Urinary Tract Infections and Catheterization in Children with Neurogenic Bladder and ... To protect the kidneys from damage – By preventing urinary tract infections (UTI) – By identifying and treating vesicoureteral remux (VUR). ...

  18. Update on pediatric hyperhidrosis.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Jennifer R S; Hill, Samantha E

    2013-01-01

    Hyperhidrosis is a common and under-recognized disease in the pediatric population that has a significant impact on quality of life. Focal and generalized forms of hyperhidrosis exist, which can be idiopathic or secondary to underlying medical conditions or medications. Treatment is tailored to the specific patient needs, characteristics and goals. These include topical preparations, iontophoresis, botulinum toxin and anticholinergic medications.

  19. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  20. Pediatric Cervicofacial Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    King, Ericka; Chun, Robert; Sulman, Cecille

    2015-01-01

    Objective To present a case of a pediatric cervicofacial necrotizing fasciitis (NF), a rapidly progressive infection, and a review of a 10-year pediatric inpatient database. Design Case report and review. Setting Pediatric intensive care unit. Patients A healthy 5-year-old male who developed NF of the lower lip 36 hours following minor trauma. International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, code 728.86 (NF), was the inclusion criteria for the Kids’ Inpatient Database (KID) in 1997 and 2006. Results A pediatric case is presented with a thorough photographic record demonstrating the need for rapid diagnosis and treatment. In a review of the KID from 1997 and 2006, the relative risk of being discharged with NF in 2006 vs 1997 was 1.4 (95% CI, 9.95-2.28). Age at diagnosis of NF was older in 2006 compared with 1997 (11.5 years vs 8.05 years; P<.001). Deaths with a diagnosis of NF increased from 1997 compared with 2006: from 3.9% to 5.4%. In 2006, the odds of death were 15.1 times higher in pediatric discharges with a diagnosis of NF compared with discharges without a diagnosis of NF (P<.001; 95% CI, 9.3-23.1). Conclusions Even with the advent of new treatments and antibiotics, the incidence and death rates of NF have changed little over the past 10 years. While it is still a rare diagnosis, knowledge and awareness of necrotizing fasciitis with aggressive medical and surgical treatment are still the foundation in disease survival. PMID:22508620

  1. Airway-parenchymal interdependence

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Peter D; Mitzner, Wayne

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript we discuss the interaction of the lung parenchyma and the airways as well as the physiological and pathophysiological significance of this interaction. These two components of the respiratory organ can be thought of as two independent elastic structures but in fact the mechanical properties of one influence the behavior of the other. Traditionally the interaction has focused on the effects of the lung on the airways but there is good evidence that the opposite is also true, i.e., that the mechanical properties of the airways influence the elastic properties of the parenchyma. The interplay between components of the respiratory system including the airways, parenchyma and vasculature is often referred to as “interdependence.” This interdependence transmits the elastic recoil of the lung to create an effective pressure that dilates the airways as transpulmonary pressure and lung volume increase. By using a continuum mechanics analysis of the lung parenchyma, it is possible to predict the effective pressure between the airways and parenchyma, and these predictions can be empirically evaluated. Normal airway caliber is maintained by this pressure in the adventitial interstitium of the airway, and it counteracts airway compression during forced expiration as well as the ability of airway smooth muscle to narrow airways. Interdependence has physiological and pathophysiological significance. Weakening of the forces of interdependence contributes to airway dysfunction and gas exchange impairment in acute and chronic airway diseases including asthma and emphysema. PMID:23723029

  2. Airway-parenchymal interdependence.

    PubMed

    Paré, Peter D; Mitzner, Wayne

    2012-07-01

    In this article, we discuss the interaction of the lung parenchyma and the airways as well as the physiological and pathophysiological significance of this interaction. These two components of the respiratory organ can be thought of as two independent elastic structures but in fact the mechanical properties of one influence the behavior of the other. Traditionally, the interaction has focused on the effects of the lung on the airways but there is good evidence that the opposite is also true, that is, that the mechanical properties of the airways influence the elastic properties of the parenchyma. The interplay between components of the respiratory system including the airways, parenchyma, and vasculature is often referred to as "interdependence." This interdependence transmits the elastic recoil of the lung to create an effective pressure that dilates the airways as transpulmonary pressure and lung volume increase. By using a continuum mechanics analysis of the lung parenchyma, it is possible to predict the effective pressure between the airways and parenchyma, and these predictions can be empirically evaluated. Normal airway caliber is maintained by this pressure in the adventitial interstitium of the airway, and it attenuates the ability of airway smooth muscle to narrow airways. Interdependence has physiological and pathophysiological significance. Weakening of the forces of interdependence contributes to airway dysfunction and gas exchange impairment in acute and chronic airway diseases including asthma and emphysema. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  3. Diffusion archeology for diffusion progression history reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Sefer, Emre; Kingsford, Carl

    2016-11-01

    Diffusion through graphs can be used to model many real-world processes, such as the spread of diseases, social network memes, computer viruses, or water contaminants. Often, a real-world diffusion cannot be directly observed while it is occurring - perhaps it is not noticed until some time has passed, continuous monitoring is too costly, or privacy concerns limit data access. This leads to the need to reconstruct how the present state of the diffusion came to be from partial diffusion data. Here, we tackle the problem of reconstructing a diffusion history from one or more snapshots of the diffusion state. This ability can be invaluable to learn when certain computer nodes are infected or which people are the initial disease spreaders to control future diffusions. We formulate this problem over discrete-time SEIRS-type diffusion models in terms of maximum likelihood. We design methods that are based on submodularity and a novel prize-collecting dominating-set vertex cover (PCDSVC) relaxation that can identify likely diffusion steps with some provable performance guarantees. Our methods are the first to be able to reconstruct complete diffusion histories accurately in real and simulated situations. As a special case, they can also identify the initial spreaders better than the existing methods for that problem. Our results for both meme and contaminant diffusion show that the partial diffusion data problem can be overcome with proper modeling and methods, and that hidden temporal characteristics of diffusion can be predicted from limited data.

  4. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014.

    PubMed

    Kearns, James T; Gundeti, Mohan S

    2014-07-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide.

  5. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery-2014

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, James T.; Gundeti, Mohan S.

    2014-01-01

    We seek to provide a background of the current state of pediatric urologic surgery including a brief history, procedural outcomes, cost considerations, future directions, and the state of robotic surgery in India. Pediatric robotic urology has been shown to be safe and effective in cases ranging from pyeloplasty to bladder augmentation with continent urinary diversion. Complication rates are in line with other methods of performing the same procedures. The cost of robotic surgery continues to decrease, but setting up pediatric robotic urology programs can be costly in terms of both monetary investment and the training of robotic surgeons. The future directions of robot surgery include instrument and system refinements, augmented reality and haptics, and telesurgery. Given the large number of children in India, there is huge potential for growth of pediatric robotic urology in India. Pediatric robotic urologic surgery has been established as safe and effective, and it will be an important tool in the future of pediatric urologic surgery worldwide. PMID:25197187

  6. An update on pediatric endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Friedt, Michael; Welsch, Simon

    2013-07-25

    Advances in endoscopy and anesthesia have enabled gastrointestinal endoscopy for children since 1960. Over the past decades, the number of endoscopies has increased rapidly. As specialized teams of pediatric gastroenterologists, pediatric intensive care physicians and pediatric endoscopy nurses are available in many medical centers, safe and effective procedures have been established. Therefore, diagnostic endoscopies in children are routine clinical procedures. The most frequently performed endoscopies are esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD), colonoscopy and endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreaticography (ERCP). Therapeutic interventions include variceal bleeding ligation, foreign body retrieval and percutaneous endoscopic gastrostomy. New advances in pediatric endoscopy have led to more sensitive diagnostics of common pediatric gastrointestinal disorders, such as Crohn's disease, ulcerative colitis and celiac disease; likewise, new diseases, such as eosinophilic esophagitis, have been brought to light.Upcoming modalities, such as capsule endoscopy, double balloon enteroscopy and narrow band imaging, are being established and may contribute to diagnostics in pediatric gastroenterology in the future.

  7. What Is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Critical Care Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... PICU. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Critical Care Specialists Have? Pediatric critical care specialists are medical ...

  8. What Is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Size Email Print Share What is a Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialist? Page Content Article Body If your child ... teen years. What Kind of Training Do Pediatric Infectious Diseases Specialists Have? Pediatric infectious diseases specialists are medical ...

  9. Radiological aspects of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Cortese, G; Nicali, R; Placido, R; Gariazzo, G; Anrò, P

    2008-02-01

    This paper describes chest X-ray (CXR) and computed tomography (CT) findings of diffuse alveolar haemorrhage (DAH). We retrospectively reviewed 23 episodes of DAH in 20 patients, 17 of known aetiology and three of unknown aetiology. All cases were studied by CXR and 15 also by CT. Parenchymal consolidations and ground-glass opacities were evaluated after dividing each lung into three regions (upper, middle, lower) for a total of six zones. Consolidations or ground-glass opacities were identified on CXR in 16/20 patients, mainly in the middle fields (73%). In 4/20 patients, all with Wegener's granulomatosis, CXR was negative or demonstrated only nodular opacities; in two of these cases, CT revealed ground-glass opacities. A complete follow-up was available for ten patients: initially, they showed consolidation opacities in 36/60 zones, which persisted in 16/60 after 7 days and in 11/60 after 15 days. Conversely, ground-glass opacities increased after 7 days owing to the partial regression of consolidation opacities, and they markedly diminished after 15 days. DAH is radiologically characterised by a nonspecific alveolar-filling pattern. Diagnosis or suspicion of DAH needs to be supported by the evidence of haemoptysis and/or rapid-onset anaemia. CT is superior in detecting ground-glass opacities and is required in cases of suspected DAH with normal CXR findings.

  10. Acupuncture for Pediatric Pain

    PubMed Central

    Golianu, Brenda; Yeh, Ann Ming; Brooks, Meredith

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is a growing problem in children, with prevalence as high as 30.8%. Acupuncture has been found to be useful in many chronic pain conditions, and may be of clinical value in a multidisciplinary treatment program. The basic principles of acupuncture are reviewed, as well as studies exploring basic mechanisms of acupuncture and clinical efficacy. Conditions commonly treated in the pediatric pain clinic, including headache, abdominal pain, fibromyalgia, juvenile arthritis, complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain, as well as perioperative pain studies are reviewed and discussed. Areas in need of further research are identified, and procedural aspects of acupuncture practice and safety studies are reviewed. Acupuncture can be an effective adjuvant in the care of pediatric patients with painful conditions, both in a chronic and an acute setting. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, as well as trials of comparative effectiveness are needed. PMID:27417472

  11. Hippocrates on Pediatric Dermatology.

    PubMed

    Sgantzos, Markos; Tsoucalas, Gregory; Karamanou, Marianna; Giatsiou, Styliani; Tsoukalas, Ioannis; Androutsos, George

    2015-01-01

    Hippocrates of Kos is well known in medicine, but his contributions to pediatric dermatology have not previously been examined. A systematic study of Corpus Hippocraticum was undertaken to document references of clinical and historical importance of pediatric dermatology. In Corpus Hippocraticum, a variety of skin diseases are described, along with proposed treatments. Hippocrates rejected the theory of the punishment of the Greek gods and supported the concept that dermatologic diseases resulted from a loss of balance in the body humors. Many of the terms that Hippocrates and his pupils used are still being used today. Moreover, he probably provided one of the first descriptions of skin findings in smallpox, Henoch-Schönlein purpura (also known as anaphylactoid purpura, purpura rheumatica, allergic purpura), and meningococcal septicemia.

  12. Recurrent Pediatric Perianal Swelling.

    PubMed

    Cordova, Jonathan; Chugh, Ankur; Rivera Rivera, Edgardo D; Young, Sona

    2016-02-01

    Pediatric inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic gastrointestinal disease consisting of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC). Both disease processes can share similar clinical symptoms including abdominal pain, diarrhea, hematochezia, and weight loss; CD can also be complicated by penetrating and fistulizing disease. Perianal skin tags, perianal abscesses, recto-cutaneous fistulae, and rectal stenosis are among the phenotypic characteristics of perianal CD. Current treatment strategies are focused on the surgical drainage of abscesses and the closure of fistulous tracts as well as controlling intestinal inflammation with the use of immunomodulators (6-mercaptopurine and methotrexate) and biologics (infliximab and adalimumab). Current guidelines by the American Gastroenterology Association and the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommend a combination of surgical intervention and medical management for the treatment of perianal CD.

  13. Pediatric Stroke: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Tsze, Daniel S.; Valente, Jonathan H.

    2011-01-01

    Stroke is relatively rare in children, but can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Understanding that children with strokes present differently than adults and often present with unique risk factors will optimize outcomes in children. Despite an increased incidence of pediatric stroke, there is often a delay in diagnosis, and cases may still remain under- or misdiagnosed. Clinical presentation will vary based on the child's age, and children will have risk factors for stroke that are less common than in adults. Management strategies in children are extrapolated primarily from adult studies, but with different considerations regarding short-term anticoagulation and guarded recommendations regarding thrombolytics. Although most recommendations for management are extrapolated from adult populations, they still remain useful, in conjunction with pediatric-specific considerations. PMID:22254140

  14. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Tayyeb S; Ajaz, Tarannum; Agarwal, Mamta

    2017-01-01

    Fibroma is one of the most common soft tissue benign tumors of the oral cavity. These masses represent hyperplasias instead of true neoplasm, which develop due to irritation to the mucosal tissue resulting in proliferation of the cells. Although so common in the oral cavity, its occurrence on the palate is rare, mainly due to fewer chances of trauma. Here, we report a case of palatal fibroma in a child diagnosed on the basis of clinical, radiological, and histological features. The case represents an extremely rare occurrence as unusual trauma due to thumb sucking seemed to be the only apparent traumatic factor in the palatal region. How to cite this article Mishra R, Khan TS, Ajaz T, Agarwal M. Pediatric Palatal Fibroma. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017; 10(1):96-98. PMID:28377663

  15. Pediatric obesity. An introduction.

    PubMed

    Yanovski, Jack A

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of child and adolescent obesity in the United States increased dramatically between 1970 and 2000, and there are few indications that the rates of childhood obesity are decreasing. Obesity is associated with myriad medical, psychological, and neurocognitive abnormalities that impact children's health and quality of life. Genotypic variation is important in determining the susceptibility of individual children to undue gains in adiposity; however, the rapid increase in pediatric obesity prevalence suggests that changes to children's environments and/or to their learned behaviors may dramatically affect body weight regulation. This paper presents an overview of the epidemiology, consequences, and etiopathogenesis of pediatric obesity, serving as a general introduction to the subsequent papers in this Special Issue that address aspects of childhood obesity and cognition in detail.

  16. [Pediatric adamantinoma. Case report].

    PubMed

    Cafferata, Constanza; Galluzzo, Laura; Cacciavillano, Walter; Innocenti, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Adamantinoma is a primary tumor of long bones, which affects mainly the shaft of the tibia, and is extremely rare in pediatrics. It frequently presents during the second decade of life, with a slight predominance in males. It is a low grade tumor, with local aggressiveness and low rate of metastasis and recurrence once it is completely removed. Its diagnosis is difficult, not only because it is a rare disease in children, but also because of the difficulty in the differential diagnosis with other benign lesions. We report the case of a 15-year-old patient with a painless swelling of the distal tibia, whose diagnosis was confirmed with the piece of amputation, as imaging features and both initial biopsies were not enough to achieve diagnosis. Though most of the literature consists of case reports, and very few in pediatric patients, they all agree on the difficulty in achieving the diagnosis of adamantinoma.

  17. Online resources in pediatrics

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Ran D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Question In the past few years, parents of children seen in my clinic are frequently conducting online searches relating to medical questions. How reliable are online resources in pediatrics and what guidance can I provide parents when searching online about their children’s health? Answer The use of the Internet to gather medical information has increased dramatically over the past decade, including in the field of pediatrics. The enormous amount of information is confusing to parents and providers alike, and general search engines have not done enough to distinguish reliable from biased information. Physicians can develop websites with reliable content, advise parents on how to identify reliable sources of information, and give examples of websites to review child health–related topics. PMID:24829005

  18. Pediatric head injury.

    PubMed

    Tulipan, N

    1998-01-01

    Pediatric head injury is a public health problem that exacts a high price from patients, their families and society alike. While much of the brain damage in head-injured patients occurs at the moment of impact, secondary injuries can be prevented by aggressive medical and surgical intervention. Modern imaging devices have simplified the task of diagnosing intracranial injuries. Recent advances in monitoring technology have made it easier to assess the effectiveness of medical therapy. These include intracranial pressure monitoring devices that are accurate and safe, and jugular bulb monitoring which provides a continuous, qualitative measure of cerebral blood flow. The cornerstones of treatment remain hyperventilation and osmotherapy. Despite maximal treatment, however, the mortality and morbidity associated with pediatric head injury remains high. Reduction of this mortality and morbidity will likely depend upon prevention rather than treatment.

  19. Ethics, genetics and pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Souza, Ricardo Timm de; Goldim, José Roberto

    2008-08-01

    To reflect on the nature of ethics, from a contemporary perspective, and also on which features of the family relationship have an impact on the interface between genetics and pediatrics. The data used are the fruit of the authors' own intellectual production plus other bibliographic references. Genetics has presented ethics with new challenges. Particularly in pediatrics, where caring for patients is almost indivisible from a continuous relationship with their families, these issues are amplified even further, generating new questions that health professionals have not previously had to face. Based on the reflections outlined here, emphasis can be placed on the importance of actively recognizing the Other in its multiple dimensions and on the repercussions that this perspective has for the physician-patient-family relationship.

  20. Pediatric rhinitis risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yaofeng; Liu, Yin; Yang, Na

    2016-01-01

    Rhinitis is a common global disorder that impacts on the quality of life of the sufferer and caregivers. Treatment for pediatric rhinitis is empirical and does not include a detailed history of the allergy triggers or allergy testing. Thus, allergen avoidance advice is not tailored to the child's sensitivities, which may result in adenoid hypertrophy. However, infant onset rhinitis, especially its relationship with respiratory viruses, remains to be further clarified. Rhinitis basically involves inflammation of the upper nasal lining, presenting typically with symptoms of runny nose (rhinorrhea), nasal blockage, and/or sneezing. While not typically fatal, it does impose significant health, psychological, and monetary burden to its sufferers, and is thus considered a global health problem. Previous findings showed that immunotherapy had significant clinical efficacy in children with allergic rhinitis. The present review article aims to highlight recent perspectives pertaining to the rhinitis risk factors especially in pediatric patients. PMID:27698737

  1. Pediatric nail diseases: clinical pearls.

    PubMed

    Oberlin, Kate E

    2017-02-01

    This article highlights pearls shared during a unique and enlightening lecture by Antonella Tosti, MD, a professor at the University of Miami Health System, Florida, on the presentation and management of common pediatric nail diseases. These clinical pearls are shared to help deliver utmost care to our pediatric patients presenting with nail pathology and may help shed light on the management of pediatric nail diseases.

  2. Benign Pediatric Salivary Gland Lesions.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Eric R; Ord, Robert A

    2016-02-01

    Salivary gland lesions are rare in pediatric patients. In addition, the types of salivary gland tumors are different in their distribution in specific sites in the major and minor salivary glands in children compared with adults. This article reviews benign neoplastic and nonneoplastic salivary gland disorders in pediatric patients to help clinicians to develop an orderly differential diagnosis that will lead to expedient treatment of pediatric patients with salivary gland lesions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Managing the Pediatric Facial Fracture

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Patrick; Kaufman, Yoav; Hollier, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Facial fracture management is often complex and demanding, particularly within the pediatric population. Although facial fractures in this group are uncommon relative to their incidence in adult counterparts, a thorough understanding of issues relevant to pediatric facial fracture management is critical to optimal long-term success. Here, we discuss several issues germane to pediatric facial fractures and review significant factors in their evaluation, diagnosis, and management. PMID:22110800

  4. Pacific Pediatric Advanced Care Initiative

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    Benefits of a virtual play rehabilitation environment for children with cerebral palsy on perceptions of self-efficacy: a pilot study. Pediatr Rehabil...et al: Cerebral saturations trend with mixed venous saturations in patients undergoing extracorporeal life support. Perfusion. 2004 May;19(3):171-6...Seidel K, et al: Cerebral oxygenation in neonatal and pediatric patients during veno-arterial extracorporeal life support. Pediatr Crit Care Med

  5. MR in pediatric neuroimaging

    SciTech Connect

    Wolpert, S.M. ); Barnes, P.; Strand, R. )

    1990-01-01

    The multitude of modern imaging techniques has made pediatric neuroradiology increasingly complex. The practitioner must have a thorough understanding of each possible diagnostic study in order to achieve the best results at the least expense and with minimal risk. In this book, MRI is emphasized; correlative CT, ultrasound, angiographic, and conventional x-ray studies assist in establishing effective diagnostic protocols and reaching accurate diagnoses.

  6. Introduction to pediatric oncology

    SciTech Connect

    McWhirter, W.R.; Masel, J.P.

    1987-01-01

    This book covers the varied and complex aspects of management in pediatric oncology. Emphasis is placed on a team approach and on establishing and maintaining an individualized, humanistic relationships with the patient. Numerous illustrations show modern imaging techniques that are proving most valuable in the investigation of suspected or confirmed childhood cancer. Physical and psychological side effects of short-term and long-term treatment are also discussed.

  7. Pediatric Bipolar Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Aravind, V. K.; Krishnaram, V. D.

    2009-01-01

    Clinicians are less sensitive in considering the diagnosis of mania in children because of the variations in clinical presentation and because of the high comorbidity with other psychiatric disorders. More often than the elated and expansive mood, irritability and significant aggression may be the presenting symptoms in these cases. One such case report is discussed highlighting the clinical aspects of pediatric bipolar disorder. PMID:21938101

  8. Impact of Abdominal Follow-Up Sonography in Trauma Patients Without Abdominal Parenchymal Organ Lesion or Free Intraabdominal Fluid in Whole-Body Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Schneck, Emmanuel; Koch, Christian; Borgards, Mara; Reichert, Martin; Hecker, Andreas; Heiß, Christian; Padberg, Winfried; Alejandre-Lafont, Enrique; Röhrig, Rainer; Krombach, Gabriele Anja; Weigand, Markus; Bernhard, Michael; Roller, Fritz Christian

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Patients suffering from severe blunt abdominal trauma are challenging because of their need for accurate diagnostic imaging and fast therapeutic action. Whole-body computed tomography (WBCT) is highly sensitive and represents the gold standard in the trauma room diagnostic setting. The aim of our study was to investigate the impact and therapy relevance of abdominal follow-up sonography (AFS) as part of the tertiary trauma survey (TTS) in patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free abdominal fluid in initial WBCT. Materials and Methods All adult patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free intraabdominal fluid in the initial WBCT examination, who received AFS within 24 hours after trauma, were included in this retrospective analysis between January 2008 and December 2011. Results 316 patients were analyzed (ISS 10 ± 8, NISS 13 ± 11) according to the inclusion criteria. Overall, only small amounts of free intraabdominal fluid were detected in AFS in 3 patients (0.9 %) and remained without therapeutic consequence. None of the patients died due to intraabdominal bleeding. Conclusion AFS as part of the TTS did not show additional benefits and had no impact on further treatment in patients without abdominal parenchymal organ lesions or free intraabdominal fluid in the initial WBCT examination. We conclude that AFS is not routinely required but should be performed if indicated on a clinical or laboratory basis because of its fast and less invasive character. Key points  · Seriously injured patients are challenging for medical imaging and treatment.. · Whole-body computed tomography is known for its high accuracy in trauma patients.. · Nonetheless, missed injuries are a major challenge in trauma patients.. · Therefore, follow-up ultrasound is often performed within the tertiary trauma survey.. · Follow-up ultrasound in patients with an inconspicuous abdominal computed tomography scan did not show any

  9. Nutritional assessment in pediatrics.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, M R; Zemel, B; Stallings, V A

    1998-01-01

    Nutritional status affects every pediatric patient's response to illness. Good nutrition is important for achieving normal growth and development. Nutritional assessment therefore should be an integral part of the care for every pediatric patient. Routine screening measures for abnormalities of growth should be performed on all pediatric patients. Those patients with chronic illness and those at risk for malnutrition should have detailed nutritional assessments done. Components of a complete nutritional assessment include a medical history, nutritional history including dietary intake, physical examination, anthropometrics (weight, length or stature, head circumference, midarm circumference, and triceps skinfold thickness), pubertal staging, skeletal maturity staging, and biochemical tests of nutritional status. Alternative measures for linear growth assessment (e.g., lower leg and upper arm measures) can be performed on patients unable to stand or who have musculoskeletal deformities. Bone densitometry can be used to assess bone mineralization and the risk of fracture. Nutritionally at risk patients may benefit from determination of resting energy expenditure by indirect calorimetry. The use of age, gender, and disease-specific growth charts is essential in assessing nutritional status and monitoring nutrition interventions. The importance of accurate measurements using trained personnel and appropriate equipment cannot be overemphasized.

  10. Nutrition in Pediatric Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Tracie L.; Neri, Daniela; Extein, Jason; Somarriba, Gabriel; Strickman-Stein, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    Pediatric cardiomyopathies are heterogeneous groups of serious disorders of the heart muscle and are responsible for significant morbidity and mortality among children who have the disease. While enormous improvements have been made in the treatment and survival of children with congenital heart disease, parallel strides have not been made in the outcomes for cardiomyopathies. Thus, ancillary therapies, such as nutrition and nutritional interventions, that may not cure but may potentially improve cardiac function and quality of life, are imperative to consider in children with all types of cardiomyopathy. Growth failure is one of the most significant clinical problems of children with cardiomyopathy with nearly one-third of children with this disorder manifesting some degree of growth failure during the course of their illness. Optimal intake of macronutrients can help improve cardiac function. In addition, several specific nutrients have been shown to correct myocardial abnormalities that often occur with cardiomyopathy and heart failure. In particular, antioxidants that can protect against free radical damage that often occurs in heart failure and nutrients that augment myocardial energy production are important therapies that have been explored more in adults with cardiomyopathy than in the pediatric population. Future research directions should pay particular attention to the effect of overall nutrition and specific nutritional therapies on clinical outcomes and quality of life in children with pediatric cardiomyopathy. PMID:18159216

  11. Obesity in pediatric trauma.

    PubMed

    Witt, Cordelie E; Arbabi, Saman; Nathens, Avery B; Vavilala, Monica S; Rivara, Frederick P

    2017-04-01

    The implications of childhood obesity on pediatric trauma outcomes are not clearly established. Anthropomorphic data were recently added to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) Research Datasets, enabling a large, multicenter evaluation of the effect of obesity on pediatric trauma patients. Children ages 2 to 19years who required hospitalization for traumatic injury were identified in the 2013-2014 NTDB Research Datasets. Age and gender-specific body mass indices (BMI) were calculated. Outcomes included injury patterns, operative procedures, complications, and hospital utilization parameters. Data from 149,817 pediatric patients were analyzed; higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly more extremity injuries, and fewer injuries to the head, abdomen, thorax and spine (p values <0.001). On multivariable analysis, higher BMI percentiles were associated with significantly increased likelihood of death, deep venous thrombosis, pulmonary embolus and pneumonia; although there was no difference in risk of overall complications. Obese children also had significantly longer lengths of stay and more frequent ventilator requirement. Among children admitted after trauma, increased BMI percentile is associated with increased risk of death and potentially preventable complications. These findings suggest that obese children may require different management than nonobese counterparts to prevent complications. Level III; prognosis study. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Issues in Pediatric Craniofacial Trauma.

    PubMed

    Chandra, Srinivasa R; Zemplenyi, Karen S

    2017-11-01

    Pediatric maxillofacial fractures are rare owing to anatomic differences between juvenile and adult skulls. Children's bone is less calcified, allowing for "greenstick fractures." The overall ratio of cranial to facial volume decreases with age. In children, tooth buds comprise the majority of mandibular volume. The most common pediatric craniomaxillofacial fractures for children ages 0 to 18 years old are mandible, nasal bone, and maxilla and zygoma. Growth potential must be considered when addressing pediatric trauma and often a less-is-more approach is best when considering open versus closed treatment. Regardless of treatment, pediatric trauma cases must be followed through skeletal maturity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Moral Dilemmas in Pediatric Orthopedics.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, John J; Vigdorchik, Jonathan M; Otsuka, Norman Y

    2015-12-01

    All orthopedic surgeons face moral dilemmas on a regular basis; however, little has been written about the moral dilemmas that are encountered when providing orthopedic care to pediatric patients and their families. This article aims to provide surgeons with a better understanding of how bioethics and professionalism apply to the care of their pediatric patients. First, several foundational concepts of both bioethics and professionalism are summarized, and definitions are offered for 16 important terms within the disciplines. Next, some of the unique aspects of pediatric orthopedics as a subspecialty are reviewed before engaging in a discussion of 5 common moral dilemmas within the field. Those dilemmas include the following: (1) obtaining informed consent and assent for either surgery or research from pediatric patients and their families; (2) performing cosmetic surgery on pediatric patients; (3) caring for pediatric patients with cognitive or physical impairments; (4) caring for injured pediatric athletes; and (5) meeting the demand for pediatric orthopedic care in the United States. Pertinent considerations are reviewed for each of these 5 moral dilemmas, thereby better preparing surgeons for principled moral decision making in their own practices. Each of these dilemmas is inherently complex with few straightforward answers; however, orthopedic surgeons have an obligation to take the lead and better define these kinds of difficult issues within their field. The lives of pediatric patients and their families will be immeasurably improved as a result.

  14. NIST Diffusion Data Center

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    NIST Diffusion Data Center (Web, free access)   The NIST Diffusion Data Center is a collection of over 14,100 international papers, theses, and government reports on diffusion published before 1980.

  15. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, Hsu-Chi; Cheng, Yung-Sung

    1984-08-07

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  16. Parallel flow diffusion battery

    DOEpatents

    Yeh, H.C.; Cheng, Y.S.

    1984-01-01

    A parallel flow diffusion battery for determining the mass distribution of an aerosol has a plurality of diffusion cells mounted in parallel to an aerosol stream, each diffusion cell including a stack of mesh wire screens of different density.

  17. Laryngeal sarcoidosis: presentation and management in the pediatric population.

    PubMed

    Strychowsky, Julie E; Vargas, Sara O; Cohen, Ezra; Vielman, Rene; Son, Mary Beth; Rahbar, Reza

    2015-09-01

    Sarcoidosis is a disease characterized by systemic non-necrotizing granulomas of unknown etiology. Laryngeal sarcoidosis is extremely uncommon, especially among pediatric patients. The clinical presentation and management of this entity in the pediatric population are poorly understood. A comprehensive search in PubMed was conducted to identify all cases in the published literature. We also present a case of isolated pediatric laryngeal sarcoidosis and outline the multidisciplinary approach to evaluation and management. A previously healthy 13-year-old female presented with a five-month history of mild dysphonia, dyspnea on exertion, and diffuse supraglottic edema. Biopsy showed non-necrotizing granulomas. Treatment with methotrexate led to marked improvement. The literature search identified seven previously published cases of pediatric laryngeal sarcoidosis, four in which disease was isolated to the larynx. All patients presented with a symptomatic and diffusely edematous supraglottis. Diagnoses were based on supraglottic biopsies showing non-necrotizing granulomas; all other possible etiopathologies were excluded. Three patients responded to corticosteroid therapy alone, one patient to tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor and methotrexate, and the remainder to a combination of corticosteroid therapy and surgical debulking. Laryngeal sarcoidosis in the pediatric population is challenging to diagnose and manage. When epithelioid granulomas are encountered histologically, other causes of granulomatous inflammation must be ruled out before a diagnosis of sarcoidosis can be made. Corticosteroid therapy alone may be ineffective. Medical therapy with methotrexate alone or in combination with TNF inhibitors versus surgical debulking alone or as part of multimodality treatment should be considered. A multidisciplinary approach with involvement of an otolaryngologist, pathologist, and rheumatologist is suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights

  18. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS.

    PubMed

    Leonenko, Nikolai N; Meerschaert, Mark M; Sikorskii, Alla

    2013-07-15

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change.

  19. FRACTIONAL PEARSON DIFFUSIONS

    PubMed Central

    Leonenko, Nikolai N.; Meerschaert, Mark M.

    2013-01-01

    Pearson diffusions are governed by diffusion equations with polynomial coefficients. Fractional Pearson diffusions are governed by the corresponding time-fractional diffusion equation. They are useful for modeling sub-diffusive phenomena, caused by particle sticking and trapping. This paper provides explicit strong solutions for fractional Pearson diffusions, using spectral methods. It also presents stochastic solutions, using a non-Markovian inverse stable time change. PMID:23626377

  20. Pediatric Nurse Practitioner Program: Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Margaret A.

    A description is provided of "Theories for Extended Pediatric Nursing Practice," a required course for pediatric and family nurse practitioner students in a California state university program. The course description presents information on the curricular placement of the course, prerequisites, in-class time allotments, and the focus of the course…

  1. Pediatric nurses' attitudes toward hospice and pediatric palliative care.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Caprice A; Madden, Vanessa; Wang, Hua; Kassing, Kristin; Curtis, Charlotte; Sloyer, Phyllis; Shenkman, Elizabeth A

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have investigated nurses' attitudes toward hospice and palliative care for adults, yet little information exists about pediatrics. Assessing pediatric nurses' attitudes is especially important in Florida, where a publicly funded pediatric palliative care program operates in eight cities across the State. The aims of this study were 1) to assess the attitudes toward hospice and palliative care, and 2) to examine the associations between sociodemographic and nursing care factors and nurses' attitudes toward hospice and palliative care. A cross-sectional research design using online and mail-in survey data was used to address the study aims. Surveys were conducted with 279 pediatric nurses across Florida. Bivariate results showed there were significant differences between the attitudes of pediatric nurses employed in a city with a pediatric palliative care program versus those not employed in a program site (p = 0.05). Multivariate analyses also showed that being employed in a program site increased attitudinal scores toward hospice and pediatric palliative care by 0.6 points. Beyond being employed in an area city where a pediatric palliative care program operates, results also suggest that having prior training in palliative care could alter nurses' attitudes, which might subsequently lead to increased referrals and improved outcomes for children and families.

  2. Assessment of the Contralesional Corticospinal Tract in Early-Onset Pediatric Hemiplegia: Preliminary Findings

    PubMed Central

    Hawe, Rachel L.; Dewald, Jules P.A.

    2015-01-01

    While pediatric hemiplegia results from a unilateral lesion, the immature state of the brain at the time of injury increases the likelihood of observing changes in the non-lesioned hemisphere as well. The purpose of this preliminary study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to evaluate the contralesional corticospinal tracts in individuals with early-onset pediatric hemiplegia. Twelve individuals with pediatric hemiplegia and ten age-matched controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corticospinal projections were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography for both the lesioned and contralesional side in pediatric hemiplegia as well as the dominant and non-dominant sides in control subjects. The contralesional tract was found to have decreased white matter integrity relative to control subjects. Compared to controls, the contralesional tract also showed increased tract volume. The increase in volume suggests the presence of ipsilateral corticospinal projections from the contralesional hemisphere that are maintained during development to control the paretic extremities. Decreases in integrity may be explained by diffuse damage or incomplete maturation. The findings of this study support the notion of bilateral motor involvement in pediatric hemiplegia, and the need to address bilateral neural changes as well as motor deficits in this population. PMID:25571199

  3. Assessment of the contralesional corticospinal tract in early-onset pediatric hemiplegia: Preliminary findings.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Rachel L; Dewald, Jules P A

    2014-01-01

    While pediatric hemiplegia results from a unilateral lesion, the immature state of the brain at the time of injury increases the likelihood of observing changes in the non-lesioned hemisphere as well. The purpose of this preliminary study was to use diffusion tensor imaging to evaluate the contralesional corticospinal tracts in individuals with early-onset pediatric hemiplegia. Twelve individuals with pediatric hemiplegia and ten age-matched controls underwent diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Corticospinal projections were reconstructed using probabilistic tractography for both the lesioned and contralesional side in pediatric hemiplegia as well as the dominant and non-dominant sides in control subjects. The contralesional tract was found to have decreased white matter integrity relative to control subjects. Compared to controls, the contralesional tract also showed increased tract volume. The increase in volume suggests the presence of ipsilateral corticospinal projections from the contralesional hemisphere that are maintained during development to control the paretic extremities. Decreases in integrity may be explained by diffuse damage or incomplete maturation. The findings of this study support the notion of bilateral motor involvement in pediatric hemiplegia, and the need to address bilateral neural changes as well as motor deficits in this population.

  4. Pediatric nuclear medicine in acute care.

    PubMed

    Shammas, Amer; Vali, Reza; Charron, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Various radiopharmaceuticals are available for imaging pediatric patients in an acute care setting. This article focuses on the common applications used on a pediatric patient in acute care. To confirm the clinical diagnosis of brain death, brain scintigraphy is considered accurate and has been favorably compared with other methods of detecting the presence or absence of cerebral blood flow. Ventilation-perfusion lung scans are easy and safe to perform with less radiation exposure than computed tomography pulmonary angiography and remain an appropriate procedure to perform on children with suspected pulmonary embolism as a first imaging test in a hemodynamically stable patient with no history of lung disease and normal chest radiograph. (99m)Tc pertechnetate scintigraphy (Meckel's scan) is the best noninvasive procedure to establish the diagnosis of ectopic gastric mucosa in Meckel's diverticulum. Hepatobiliary scintigraphy is the most accurate diagnostic imaging modality for acute cholecystitis. (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy is the simplest, and the most reliable and sensitive method for the early diagnosis of focal or diffuse functional cortical damage. Bone scintigraphy is a sensitive and noninvasive technique for the diagnosis of bone disorders such as osteomyelitis and fracture. Of recent, positron emission tomography imaging using (18)F-NaF has been introduced as an alternative to bone scintigraphy. (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography has the potential to replace other imaging modalities, such as the evaluation of fever of unknown origin in pediatric patients, with better sensitivity and significantly less radiation exposure than gallium scan. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug repurposing in pediatrics and pediatric hematology oncology.

    PubMed

    Blatt, Julie; Corey, Seth J

    2013-01-01

    Drug 'repurposing', that is, using old drugs for new indications, has been proposed as a more efficient strategy for drug development than the current standard of beginning with novel agents. In this review, we explore the scope of drug repurposing in pediatric hematology oncology and in pediatrics in general. Drugs commonly used in children were identified using the Harriet Lane Handbook (HLH) and searched in PubMed for different uses. Additional drugs were identified by searching PubMed and Google.com for 'drug repurposing' or 'drug repositioning'. Almost 10% of drugs with primary uses in pediatrics have been repurposed in pediatric hematology oncology or pediatrics. The observant clinician, pharmacologist and translational bioinformatician, as well as structural targeting, will have a role in discovering new repurposing opportunities.

  6. Pediatric otolaryngology: The maturation of a pediatric surgical subspecialty.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Michael J; Lin, Aaron C

    2011-01-01

    To review the historical development of pediatric otolaryngology as a surgical subspecialty and to compare and contrast this historical development with that of pediatric surgery and pediatric urology. Literature search. A sequential comparison of these three surgical subspecialties was undertaken in terms of their early origins and founding physicians, sections and societies, standardization of training and accreditation, official recognition, and certification. Supportive materials were obtained via a literature search using the PubMed database from 1950 to the present, supplemented by archived material from the libraries of the Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary and the Countway Library of the Harvard Medical School. Pediatric surgery, urology, and otolaryngology have taken somewhat parallel but also disparate paths toward surgical subspecialty establishment. Pediatric otolaryngology, despite its many accomplishments, lags behind its surgical and urologic brethren from both an accreditation and certification standpoint. Copyright © 2010 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Taro; Suganuma, Narufumi; Hering, Kurt G; Vehmas, Tapio; Itoh, Harumi; Akira, Masanori; Takashima, Yoshihiro; Hirano, Harukazu; Kusaka, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects' occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades.

  8. Cellular and molecular characterization of multipolar Map5-expressing cells: a subset of newly generated, stage-specific parenchymal cells in the mammalian central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like cells (mMap5 cells) expressing the microtubule associated protein 5 (Map5), which is known to be present in most neurons. We characterized the morphology, phenotype, regional distribution, proliferative dynamics, and stage-specific marker expression of these cells in the rabbit and mouse CNS, also assessing their existence in other mammalian species. mMap5 cells were never found to co-express the Ng2 antigen. They appear to be a population of glial cells sharing features but also differences with Ng2+progenitor cells. We show that mMap5 cells are newly generated, postmitotic parenchymal elements of the oligodendroglial lineage, thus being a stage-specific population of polydendrocytes. Finally, we report that the number of mMap5 cells, although reduced within the brain of adult/old animals, can increase in neurodegenerative and traumatic conditions.

  9. New simple technique for hepatic parenchymal resection using a Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator and bipolar cautery equipped with a channel for water dripping.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Y; Ikai, I; Kume, M; Sakai, Y; Yamauchi, A; Shinohara, H; Morimoto, T; Shimahara, Y; Yamamoto, M; Yamaoka, Y

    1999-10-01

    We have developed a new technique to resect hepatic parenchyma without inflow occlusion by using the Cavitron Ultrasonic Surgical Aspirator (CUSA) and bipolar cautery with a saline irrigation system. The significance of this method in hepatectomy was analyzed in comparison with historical control of hepatectomy using Pringle's maneuver. An ordinary bipolar cautery was remodeled with an infusion line to bring saline droplets down the inner surface of one arm of the tweezers through an opening about 1.5 cm proximal to its tip. The optimal flow rate of saline was approximately one drop per second. The power of bipolar cautery was adjusted to 50 watts. When the tweezer blades were approximated to 1 or 2 mm, saline droplets were directed to the tip of tweezers and could be immediately evaporated. After sonicating parenchymal cells, the tissue of small branches of Glisson's tree or small tributaries of the hepatic vein were coagulated by bipolar cautery. The coagulated cords were then easily cut by scissors. The impact of this technique on ordinary liver resections was evaluated by analyzing the postoperative clinical course in relation to the hepatic functional reserve necessary for major hepatectomy, duration of hepatectomy, and intraoperative blood loss. Hepatic resection without vascular occlusion using this technique could decrease the morbidity in patients who have less hepatic functional reserve. It could also decrease intraoperative blood loss. This new technique effectively decreased the surgical load of the remnant liver during parenchymal resection by avoiding ischemic stress. Consequently it extends the safety limits of major hepatectomy.

  10. Role of Hepatic Stellate Cells in the Early Phase of Liver Regeneration in Rat: Formation of Tight Adhesion to Parenchymal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mabuchi, Ayako; Mullaney, Ian; Sheard, Philip; Hessian, Paul; Zimmermann, Arthur; Senoo, Haruki; Wheatley, Antony M

    2004-01-01

    We investigated activation mechanisms of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are known to play pivotal roles in the regeneration process after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx). Parenchymal liver cells (PLCs) and non-parenchymal cells (NPLCs) were isolated and purified from the regenerating livers at 1, 3, 7, 14 days after PHx. Each liver cell fraction was stained by immunocytochemistry using an anti-desmin antibody as a marker for HSCs, anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as a marker for activated HSCs, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for detection of proliferating cells. Tissue sections from regenerating livers were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry and compared with the results obtained for isolated cell fractions. One and 3 days after PHx, PLC-enriched fraction contained HSCs adhered to PLCs. The HSCs adhered to PLCs were double positive for BrdU and alpha-SMA, and formed clusters suggesting that these HSCs were activated. However, HSC-enriched fraction contained HSCs not adhered PLCs showed positive staining for anti-desmin antibody but negative for anti-alpha-SMA antibody. These results suggest that HSCs are activated by adhering to PLCs during the early phase of hepatic regeneration. PMID:14960181

  11. Role of Hepatic Stellate Cells in the Early Phase of Liver Regeneration in Rat: Formation of Tight Adhesion to Parenchymal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mabuchi, Ayako; Mullaney, Ian; Sheard, Philip; Hessian, Paul; Zimmermann, Arthur; Senoo, Haruki; Wheatley, Antony M

    2004-01-14

    We investigated activation mechanisms of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) that are known to play pivotal roles in the regeneration process after 70% partial hepatectomy (PHx). Parenchymal liver cells (PLCs) and non-parenchymal cells (NPLCs) were isolated and purified from the regenerating livers at 1, 3, 7, 14 days after PHx. Each liver cell fraction was stained by immunocytochemistry using an anti-desmin antibody as a marker for HSCs, anti-alpha-smooth muscle actin (alpha-SMA) as a marker for activated HSCs, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) for detection of proliferating cells. Tissue sections from regenerating livers were also analyzed by immunohistochemistry and compared with the results obtained for isolated cell fractions. One and 3 days after PHx, PLC-enriched fraction contained HSCs adhered to PLCs. The HSCs adhered to PLCs were double positive for BrdU and alpha-SMA, and formed clusters suggesting that these HSCs were activated. However, HSC-enriched fraction contained HSCs not adhered PLCs showed positive staining for anti-desmin antibody but negative for anti-alpha-SMA antibody. These results suggest that HSCs are activated by adhering to PLCs during the early phase of hepatic regeneration.

  12. Intrapancreatic Parenchymal Injection of Cells as a Useful Tool for Allowing a Small Number of Proliferative Cells to Grow In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masahiro; Saitoh, Issei; Murakami, Tomoya; Kubota, Naoko; Watanabe, Satoshi; Inada, Emi

    2017-01-01

    In vivo inoculation of cells such as tumor cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS)/embryonic stem (ES) cells into immunocompromised mice has been considered as a powerful technique to evaluate their potential to proliferate or differentiate into various cell types originating from three germ cell layers. Subcutaneous grafting and grafting under the kidney capsule have been widely used for this purpose, but there are some demerits such as the requirement of a large number of tumor cells for inoculation and frequent failure of tumorigenesis. Therefore, grafting into other sites has been explored, including intratesticular or intramuscular grafting as well as grafting into the cochleae, liver, or salivary glands. In this study, we found that intrapancreatic parenchymal injection of cells is useful for allowing a small number of cells (~15 × 103 cells or ~30 cell clumps μL−1·site−1) to proliferate and sometimes differentiate into various types of cells. It requires only surgical exposure of the pancreas over the dorsal skin and subsequent injection of cells towards the pancreatic parenchyma under dissecting microscope-based observation using a mouthpiece-controlled glass micropipette. We now name this technology “intrapancreatic parenchymal cell transplantation (IPPCT)”, which will be useful, especially when only a small number of cells or colonies are available. PMID:28767080

  13. Relationships (II) of International Classification of High-resolution Computed Tomography for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases with ventilatory functions indices for parenchymal abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    TAMURA, Taro; SUGANUMA, Narufumi; HERING, Kurt G.; VEHMAS, Tapio; ITOH, Harumi; AKIRA, Masanori; TAKASHIMA, Yoshihiro; HIRANO, Harukazu; KUSAKA, Yukinori

    2015-01-01

    The International Classification of High-Resolution Computed Tomography (HRCT) for Occupational and Environmental Respiratory Diseases (ICOERD) is used to screen and diagnose respiratory illnesses. Using univariate and multivariate analysis, we investigated the relationship between subject characteristics and parenchymal abnormalities according to ICOERD, and the results of ventilatory function tests (VFT). Thirty-five patients with and 27 controls without mineral-dust exposure underwent VFT and HRCT. We recorded all subjects’ occupational history for mineral dust exposure and smoking history. Experts independently assessed HRCT using the ICOERD parenchymal abnormalities (Items) grades for well-defined rounded opacities (RO), linear and/or irregular opacities (IR), and emphysema (EM). High-resolution computed tomography showed that 11 patients had RO; 15 patients, IR; and 19 patients, EM. According to the multiple regression model, age and height had significant associations with many indices ventilatory functions such as vital capacity, forced vital capacity, and forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1). The EM summed grades on the upper, middle, and lower zones of the right and left lungs also had significant associations with FEV1 and the maximum mid-expiratory flow rate. The results suggest the ICOERD notation is adequate based on the good and significant multiple regression modeling of ventilatory function with the EM summed grades. PMID:25810443

  14. Cellular and Molecular Characterization of Multipolar Map5-Expressing Cells: A Subset of Newly Generated, Stage-Specific Parenchymal Cells in the Mammalian Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Crociara, Paola; Parolisi, Roberta; Conte, Daniele; Fumagalli, Marta; Bonfanti, Luca

    2013-01-01

    Although extremely interesting in adult neuro-glio-genesis and promising as an endogenous source for repair, parenchymal progenitors remain largely obscure in their identity and physiology, due to a scarce availability of stage-specific markers. What appears difficult is the distinction between real cell populations and various differentiation stages of the same population. Here we focused on a subset of multipolar, polydendrocyte-like